WorldWideScience

Sample records for base tumor ameloblastoma

  1. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: I. Ameloblastoma and Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Sook

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs) are common epithelial tumors of odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are clinico-pathologically classified into solid/multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic, and peripheral types, and also divided into follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular types, etc., based on their histological features. Craniopharyngiomas, derived from the remnants of Rathke's pouch or a misplaced enamel organ, are also comparable to the odontogenic tumors. The malignant transformation of ameloblastomas results in the formation of ameloblastic carcinomas and malignant ameloblastomas depending on cytological dysplasia and metastasis, respectively. AOTs are classified into follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral types. Ameloblastomas are common, have an aggressive behavior and recurrent course, and are rarely metastatic, while AOTs are hamartomatous benign lesions derived from the complex system of the dental lamina or its remnants. With advances in the elucidation of molecular signaling mechanisms in cells, the cytodifferentiation of epithelial tumor cells in ameloblastomas and AOTs can be identified using different biomarkers. Therefore, it is suggested that comprehensive pathological observation including molecular genetic information can provide a more reliable differential diagnosis for the propagation and prognosis of ameloblastomas and AOTs. This study aimed to review the current concepts of ameloblastomas and AOTs and to discuss their clinico-pathological features relevant to tumorigenesis and prognosis. PMID:23837011

  2. Overexpression of MDM2 protein in ameloblastomas as compared to adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies on odontogenic tumors have identified various molecular alterations responsible for their development, and determination of epithelial proliferation is a useful means of investigating the differences in biologic behavior of these tumors. One such specific marker to identify proliferative activity and tumor aggressiveness by immunohistochemistry (IHC is MDM2, 90-95kDa protein. Objective: This immunohistochemical study using MDM2 expression was undertaken to understand better the diverse biological activity of two groups of odontogenic tumors namely ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT based on their cell proliferation activity. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 cases, comprising of 36 ameloblastoma samples and 14 AOT samples, were subjected to heat-induced antigen retrieval method using citrate buffer in a pressure cooker. Consequently, the sections were stained with MDM2 monoclonal antibody and visualized using an LSAB+ kit. Results: In ameloblastomas, statistically significant association was seen between plexiform ameloblastomas, follicular ameloblastomas with granular cell changes, desmoplastic and unicystic variants. The predominant nuclear staining by MDM2 revealed overexpression in ameloblastomas as compared to AOT. Conclusion: The MDM2 overexpression noticed in plexiform ameloblastoma, follicular ameloblastoma with granular cell changes and acanthomatous ameloblastoma when compared to simple unicystic and desmoplastic ameloblastoma suggest a relatively enhanced proliferative phenotype of these solid multicystic variants of ameloblastomas. On overall comparison, higher expression was noted in ameloblastomas when compared to AOT. This indicates differences in the aggressive nature between these two groups of odontogenic tumors favoring the perception of a greater aggressive nature of ameloblastomas.

  3. Mixed odontogenic tumor: Ameloblastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etit Demet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors constitute a group of heterogeneous disease derived from epithelial, mesenchymal and/or ectomesenchymal elements. Ameloblastoma is the best known and the most frequent form of odontogenic tumors. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT, known as Pindborg tumor, is locally invasive lesion which has a characteristic amiloid deposition. Here a case of a peripheral ameloblastoma associated with CEOT is presented with clinical and morphological features.

  4. Early dental epithelial transcription factors distinguish ameloblastoma from keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikinheimo, K; Kurppa, K J; Laiho, A; Peltonen, S; Berdal, A; Bouattour, A; Ruhin, B; Catón, J; Thesleff, I; Leivo, I; Morgan, P R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the molecular relationship between ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) by means of a genome-wide expression analysis. Total RNA from 27 fresh tumor samples of 15 solid/multicystic intraosseous ameloblastomas and 12 sporadic KCOTs was hybridized on Affymetrix whole genome arrays. Hierarchical clustering separated ameloblastomas and KCOTs into 2 distinct groups. The gene set enrichment analysis based on 303 dental genes showed a similar separation of ameloblastomas and KCOTs. Early dental epithelial markers PITX2, MSX2, DLX2, RUNX1, and ISL1 were differentially overexpressed in ameloblastoma, indicating its dental identity. Also, PTHLH, a hormone involved in tooth eruption and invasive growth, was one of the most differentially upregulated genes in ameloblastoma. The most differentially overexpressed genes in KCOT were squamous epithelial differentiation markers SPRR1A, KRTDAP, and KRT4, as well as DSG1, a component of desmosomal cell-cell junctions. Additonally, the epithelial stem cell marker SOX2 was significantly upregulated in KCOT when compared with ameloblastoma. Taken together, the gene expression profile of ameloblastoma reflects differentiation from dental lamina toward the cap/bell stage of tooth development, as indicated by dental epithelium-specific transcription factors. In contrast, gene expression of KCOT indicates differentiation toward keratinocytes. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2014.

  5. Molecular markers of tumor invasiveness in ameloblastoma: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Yi; Guo, Wei; Wang, Li; Chen, Xinming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present article was to review the current new knowledge on the molecular markers of tumor invasion in ameloblastoma. In this review, tumor molecular markers were identified and allocated to the following six groups according to their functions: (I) Markers involved in extracellular matrix degradation, (II) Molecular markers involved in cell adhesion lost, (III) Molecular markers involved in bone remodeling, (IV) Cytokines involved in angiogenesis, (V) Molecular markers related ...

  6. Recurrent mandibular ameloblastoma with anterior skull base invasion: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, L; Varoquaux, A; Giovanni, A; Dessi, P; Michel, J

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent ameloblastoma with skull base invasion is a rare clinical entity with poor prognosis. We report a case of a mandibular ameloblastoma recurrence involving the anterior skull base. The diagnostic and therapeutic processes are presented with emphasis on the radiologic features of ameloblastoma. Another aim of this case report is to underline the importance of close and long-term follow-up after resection. Ameloblastoma recurrences are frequent and mainly occur after incomplete surgical resection. These recurrences may be diagnosed late because of lack of symptoms in the mandibular area.

  7. Cystic Granular Cell Ameloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Thillaikarasi, Rathnavel; Balaji, Jayaram; Gupta, Bhawna; Ilayarja, Vadivel; Vani, Nandimandalam Venkata; Vidula, Balachander; Saravanan, Balasubramaniam; Ponniah, Irulandy

    2010-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a locally aggressive benign epithelial odontogenic tumor, while unicystic ameloblastoma is a relatively less aggressive variant. Although rare in unicystic or cystic ameloblastoma, granular cell change in ameloblastoma is a recognized phenomenon. The purpose of the present article is to report a case of cystic granular cell ameloblastoma in 34-year old female.

  8. Malignant ameloblastoma (metastatic ameloblastoma) in the lung: 3 cases of misdiagnosis as primary lung tumor with a unique growth pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Rui; Shen, Lei; Zhu, Xiongzeng; Xu, Xiaoli

    2015-07-25

    Malignant ameloblastoma (metastatic ameloblastoma, MA) is currently defined as a distinct pathologic entity, MA, despite its histologically benign appearance. According to the new criteria, the histological and clinical features of MA are more homogenous. Here, we report three cases of histologically confirmed pulmonary MA. Two of the three patients complained of chest pain as the primary symptom, and the other case was detected upon the evaluation of pulmonary nodules found during a health examination after a local recurrence of mandible ameloblastoma. All three patients were female with an average age of 48 years. The intervals between the primary ameloblastoma and metastasis to the lung were 14 years, 19 years and 10 years, averaging 14.3 years. Prior to metastasis to the lung, only one patient experienced local recurrences, at 5 and 19 years after the primary tumor resection, while the other two patients both remained disease-free. Computed tomography (CT) or X-ray evaluation demonstrated multiple bilateral lung nodules ranging in size from several millimeters up to 2 cm. Histologically, the pulmonary metastatic tumors showed a unique growth pattern: the tumor cells grew among the interstitial alveoli but did not appear to destructively infiltrate the surrounding tissue. Immunohistochemically, the MA cells expressed squamous differentiation markers, such as CK10/13 and p63, while the alveolar epithelial cells stained for TTF1 and PE10. In this paper, we discuss the clinical behavior, differential diagnosis and unique growth pattern of pulmonary MA.

  9. Hybrid ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: report of a case and review of hybrid variations in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Manabu; Maruyama, Satoshi; Abé, Tatsuya; Babkair, Hamzah; Fujita, Hajime; Takagi, Ritsuo; Koyama, Jun-Ichi; Hayashi, Takafumi; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Hybrid odontogenic tumors including 2 or more different histologic types have been documented, but their occurrences are not very common. We present a case of hybrid odontogenic tumor composed of ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) arising in the mandibular molar region of a 31-year-old Japanese woman who had a history of familial adenomatous polyposis. The tumor, measuring 10 mm in diameter, was surgically removed from the alveolar bone. Histopathologically, the tumor consisted of both follicular and plexiform types of ameloblastoma in which multiple and smaller foci of AOT were intermingled. There have been 3 reported cases of hybrid ameloblastoma and AOT, all of which presented unicystic types as ameloblastoma components. This, however, is the first report of a hybrid tumor containing an authentic solid-type ameloblastoma compartment and an AOT compartment in a patient with a background of familial adenomatous polyposis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acanthomatous ameloblastoma: A rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaswamy Pachigolla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is the most frequent odontogenic tumor arising from dental epithelium. It is characterized by its histological resemblance to the enamel organ of the developing tooth germ; but enamel formation is not observed. Acanthomatous ameloblastoma is considered an aggressive odontogenic tumor characterized by irregular verrucous masses adjacent to the tooth, consisting of sheets of keratinizing odontogenic epithelium. Here we are reporting a case of 35-year-old male with swelling on left body of the mandible region which was diagnosed as acanthomatous ameloblastoma based on clinical, radiographic and histopathological features.

  11. Tratamento cirúrgico de ameloblastoma mandibular

    OpenAIRE

    Jardim, Ellen Cristina Gaetti; Faverani, Leonardo Peres [UNESP; Melo, Rosana Leite de; Miyahara, Glauco Issamu [UNESP; Soubhia, Ana Maria Pires [UNESP; Mendonça, José Carlos Garcia de; Shinohara, Elio Hitoshi [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastomas are benign, invasive locally and highly recurrent. It is an odontogenic tumor, characterized by the proliferation of epithelial ameloblastic in a fibrous stroma. This paper reports a case of mandibular ameloblastoma, in patients 27 years of age without pain with developments around 4 years, with about 20 mm at its greatest extent, sessile base and surface coatings full. The treatment of choice was the surgical conservative Ameloblastomas son benignos, localmente invasivo y a...

  12. Ameloblastoma solido/multiquistico

    OpenAIRE

    Alemán Navas, Ramos Manuel; Martínez Mendoza, María Guadalupe

    2008-01-01

    El ameloblastoma es una neoplasia benigna, agresiva, de crecimiento lento que puede ser más destructivo y amenazador para la vida que algunos de los tumores malignos de la región oral y maxilofacial específicamente hablando del ameloblastoma solido/multiquistico o del ameloblastoma unquístico mural. El ameloblastoma es el tumor odontogénico benigno más frecuente en muchos países del mundo

  13. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchigami, Takao [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kibe, Toshiro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Nishizawa, Yoshiaki [Kagoshima University Faculty of Medicine, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ueda, Masahiro [Natural Science Centre for Research and Education, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Koorimoto, Kagoshima 890-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Norifumi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kiyono, Tohru [Department of Virology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuouku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Kishida, Michiko, E-mail: kmichiko@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  14. Hybrid ameloblastoma: An amalgam of rare and conventional ameloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chaitanya, B.; Chhaparwal, Yogesh; Pai, Keerthilatha M.; Kudva, Adarsh; Cariappa, K. M.; Acharya, Shruthi

    2016-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a common benign odontogenic tumor with multiple histologic types. This case report describes an unusual type of ameloblastoma called “Hybrid Ameloblastoma” with features of both follicular and desmoplastic ameloblastoma in a 50-year-old female. This is a very rare form of ameloblastoma as

  15. Radiological challenges in distinguishing keratocystic odontogenic tumor from ameloblastoma: an extraordinary occurrence in the same patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubayed, Sami P; Khorsandi, Azita; Urken, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study are to describe the radiological appearance of two common odontogenic lesions (keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma) arising in the same patient simultaneously with their radiological differences and histological correlates, and to describe challenges in radiological diagnosis. Single case report. Tertiary referral center. Forty-one year-old African-American male patient. Lesion appearance on computed tomography (CT) scan and pathological correlates. A 41year-old African-American male presented with asymptomatic right maxillary swelling. A CT scan of the maxillofacial skeleton showed and expansile and cystic lesion of the right hemimaxilla with trabecular osseous expansion, and a left cystic lesion in the left hemimaxilla expanding into the pterygopalatine fossa. Biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnoses of right ameloblastoma and left keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Although they are among the most common odontogenic tumors, the presence of concurrent ameloblastoma and KOT is an exceedingly rare occurrence in the same patient. The appearance on CT scan may help in distinguishing ameloblastoma from KOT by looking at bone expansion and high density areas, although the gold standard diagnostic test remains open biopsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cell cycle aberration in ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: As evidenced by the expression of p53 and survivin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Zulfin; Niranjan, K C

    2015-01-01

    p53 and survivin are involved in cell cycle progression and inhibition of apoptosis, respectively. Survivin is a unique protein which functions in progression of cell division and inhibits apoptosis leading to cell proliferation and cell survival. According to the literature, mutation of p53 leads to promotion of survivin function. Thus, the importance of cell cycle aberration and uncontrolled proliferation resulting from mutation of p53 and up-regulation of survivin is discussed. To assess the role of p53 and survivin in ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT). The percentages of positive tumor cells were considered for statistical evaluation. Nuclear labeling index for p53 and nuclear, cytoplasmic and combined labeling index for survivin was obtained from the stained slides. Immunohistochemical expression of p53 and survivin was done qualitatively and quantitatively in 25 cases each of ameloblastoma and AOT. Mann-Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Pearson's correlation test. Quantitatively, p53 and survivin expression was statistically significant in AOT (P = 0.003) and qualitatively, in ameloblastoma (P = 0.004). Survivin expression was significant (P = 0.002) between the study groups unlike that of p53 (P = 0.554). There was no much difference in p53 expression in ameloblastoma and AOT suggestive of cell cycle aberration in both the odontogenic tumors, but significant difference in survivin expression in ameloblastoma and AOT with higher percentage of positive cells in ameloblastoma may be indicative of an aggressive behavior of ameloblastoma.

  17. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchigami, Takao; Kibe, Toshiro; Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio; Nishizawa, Yoshiaki; Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Ueda, Masahiro; Nakamura, Norifumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Kishida, Michiko

    2014-09-05

    Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave interactively via these cytokines to create a microenvironment that leads to the extension of ameloblastomas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface vacuolar ATPase in ameloblastoma contributes to tumor invasion of the jaw bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Shohei; Morita, Hiromitsu; Matsubara, Ryota; Mitsuyasu, Takeshi; Imai, Yuko; Kajioka, Shunichi; Yoneda, Masahiro; Ito, Yushi; Hirofuji, Takao; Nakamura, Seiji; Hirata, Masato

    2016-03-01

    Ameloblastoma is the most common benign odontogenic tumor in Japan. It is believed that it expands in the jaw bone through peritumoral activation of osteoclasts by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) released from the ameloblastoma, as in bone metastases of cancer cells. However, the clinical features of ameloblastoma, including its growth rate and patterns of invasion, are quite different from those of bone metastasis of cancer cells, suggesting that different underlying mechanisms are involved. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying the invasive expansion of ameloblastoma in the jaw bone. Expression levels of RANKL assessed by western blotting were markedly lower in ameloblastoma (AM-1) cells than in highly metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma (HSC-3) cells. Experiments coculturing mouse macrophages (RAW264.7) with AM-1 demonstrated low osteoclastogenic activity, as assessed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear cell formation, probably because of low release of RANKL, whereas cocultures of RAW264.7 with HSC-3 cells exhibited very high osteoclastogenic activity. Thus, RANKL release from AM-1 appeared to be too low to generate osteoclasts. However, AM-1 cultured directly on calcium phosphate-coated plates formed resorption pits, and this was inhibited by application of bafilomycin A1. Furthermore, vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) and H+/Cl- exchange transporter 7 (CLC-7) were detected on the surface of AM-1 cells by plasma membrane biotinylation and immunofluorescence analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis of clinical samples of ameloblastoma also showed plasma membrane-localized V-ATPase and CLC-7 in the epithelium of plexiform, follicular and basal cell types. The demineralization activity of AM-1 was only 1.7% of osteoclasts demineralization activity, and the growth rate was 20% of human normal skin keratinocytes and HSC-3 cells. These results suggest that the

  19. Incidence and overall survival of malignant ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Smoll, Nicolas R; Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Malignant ameloblastoma, comprising metastasizing ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma, represents 1.6-2.2% of all odontogenic tumors. Due to its rare nature, malignant ameloblastoma has only been reported in the literature in small case series or case reports. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER) database, we have performed a population-based study to determine the incidence rate and the absolute survival of malignant ameloblastoma. Using the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O) codes 9310/3 and 9270/3, data from the SEER database were used to calculate the incidence rate and absolute survival rate of population with malignant ameloblastoma. The overall incidence rate of malignant ameloblastoma was 1.79 per 10 million person/year. The incidence rate was higher in males than females and also higher in black versus white population. The median overall survival was 17.6 years from the time of diagnosis and increasing age was associated with a statistically significant poorer survival. To our best knowledge, we report the largest population-based series of malignant ameloblastoma. The incidence rate was 1.79 per 10 million person/year and the overall survival was 17.6 years.

  20. Incidence and overall survival of malignant ameloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Rizzitelli

    Full Text Available Malignant ameloblastoma, comprising metastasizing ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma, represents 1.6-2.2% of all odontogenic tumors. Due to its rare nature, malignant ameloblastoma has only been reported in the literature in small case series or case reports. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER database, we have performed a population-based study to determine the incidence rate and the absolute survival of malignant ameloblastoma.Using the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O codes 9310/3 and 9270/3, data from the SEER database were used to calculate the incidence rate and absolute survival rate of population with malignant ameloblastoma.The overall incidence rate of malignant ameloblastoma was 1.79 per 10 million person/year. The incidence rate was higher in males than females and also higher in black versus white population. The median overall survival was 17.6 years from the time of diagnosis and increasing age was associated with a statistically significant poorer survival.To our best knowledge, we report the largest population-based series of malignant ameloblastoma. The incidence rate was 1.79 per 10 million person/year and the overall survival was 17.6 years.

  1. Marsupialization of unicystic ameloblastoma: A conservative approach for aggressive odontogenic tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogan Dolanmaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicystic ameloblastoma (UA is known as a distinct entity which has a less aggressive behavior when compared with conventional ameloblastoma. In this report, we have presented two cases of UAs, (of which one case showed a more aggressive behavior with mural invasion into the adjacent tissues and granular cell differentiation, both of which were successfully managed with enucleation following marsupialization. We aim to highlight how this method can be used for the successful management of such cases, rather than following more aggressive approaches. In both the cases, marsupialization was done for the UA lesions initially and follow-ups were maintained. When the tumor size had regressed on radiographic follow up, an enucleation procedure with ostectomy of the margins was carried out. Special importance was also given to the endodontic treatment of the teeth involved in the area of the lesion. The patients were free of the condition and did not show any signs of recurrence on radiographic follow-ups even after 30 months of the final procedure. Granular variant of UA is quite rare and had been considered to be more aggressive. Marsupialization of UA is an alternative treatment option of resection even for more aggressive variants, as long as the histological behavior of the lesion was carefully evaluated and strict radiographic follow-up is maintained.

  2. Cytologic picture of ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bokun Radojka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is a rare tumor of the jaw arising from odontogenic epithelium. There are sparse reports in the literature concerning cytologic features of this tumor. This paper presents two cases of ameloblastoma diagnosed by imprint cytology and confirmed histopathologically. The imprints were hypercellular, with single cells and the groups of basaloid and polygonal squamous cells with huge vacuoles in cytoplasm. Stellate and fusiform cells were found in the background of the preparation. These morphologic parameters were sufficient for the cytologic diagnosis of ameloblastoma.

  3. Radiotherapy for a repeatedly recurrent ameloblastoma with malignant transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Ming; Chen, Jin-Yi; Chen, Chung-Ho; Huang, Chih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy (RT) for ameloblastoma remains controversial and undetermined due to the rarity of the disease. A case of repeatedly recurrent ameloblastoma with malignant transformation is presented. The clinical course and managements are described. The 63-year-old man had a recurrent ameloblastoma in the left mandible. Five years after the first surgical resection, he underwent 8 more rounds of surgical excision of the recurrent tumors. The malignant transformation occurred and the unresectable tumor invaded the masticator space, parapharyngeal space, and skull base. He received 3-dimensional conformal RT, at the dose of 66 Gray (Gy) in 33 fractions. The ulcerative exophytic mass had regressed gradually. After follow-up of 28 months, the tumor was well controlled. RT seems to be a feasible treatment option for recurrent ameloblastoma with malignant transformation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Hemimandibulectomy with full angular mandibular plate reconstruction follicular Ameloblastoma patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanti Bulan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction :Ameloblastoma is an aggressive benign of odontogenic origin tumor; cystic shape, slowly growth; no pain; local invasive; infiltrate muscle; and bone destruction. Based on histopathology ameloblastomas are classified: Follicular, acanthomatous, granular cell, basal cell, and plexiform. Follicular and plexiformameloblastomas are the most common, with incidence rates 27.7% and 21.1%. Follicular ameloblastoma is characterized by recurrence rate (29.5%; plexiformameloblastoma (16.7%; and acanthomatousameloblastoma (4.5%. Early diagnosis with prompt and adequate management decrease recurrence and get good prognosis. Objective : to evaluate recurrence of follicular ameloblastoma after surgery; to evaluate  stomatognatic function and aesthetic problems. Case report : a 55 y.o. female patient with lump at left cheek since 1 year before admission; initially was small in size; gradually increased, no history of trauma, pain, febrile, and discharge. Based on clinical, histopathological, radiological, CT scan, it was diagnosed follicular ameloblastoma. The treatment was left hemimandibulectomy with full angular mandibular plate reconstruction. Discussion :Ameloblastoma is a locally destructive tumor with recurrence if not entirely excised. The goal of treatment ameloblastoma is wide excision and reconstruction of surgical defect. Then, it is followed up to evaluate recurrence, stomatognatic function, and aesthetic problems. Conclusion : Prognosis is good if an early diagnosis of the lesion is made with prompt and adequate surgical intervention.

  5. Maxillary unicystic ameloblastoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agani, Zana; Hamiti-Krasniqi, Vjosa; Recica, Jehona; Loxha, Mergime Prekazi; Kurshumliu, Fisnik; Rexhepi, Aida

    2016-10-18

    Ameloblastoma is a benign epithelial odontogenic tumor. It is often aggressive and destructive, with the capacity to attain great size, erode bone and invade adjacent structures. Unicystic ameloblastoma is a rare odontogenic lesion, with clinical, radiographic and gross features of jaw cysts. The lesion histologically shows typical ameloblastomatous epithelium lining part of the cyst cavity with or without and/or mural tumor growth. Unicystic ameloblastoma usually presents in posterior mandibular ramus region, while it is rare and atypical in posterior maxillary region. . We report a case of 16 year old Kosovar male, Albanian ethnicity, who presented with a swelling located in right maxillary region. Clinical examination revealed a painless swelling extending from the maxillary right central incisor to the maxillary right first molar tooth. Panoramic radiograph disclosed a well corticated unilocular radiolucent lesion approximately 5 × 5 cm in diameter which was in contact with the roots of the teeth present inferiorly and with the maxillary sinus superiorly. Maxillary right canine impaction was noted and unerupted lateral incisor tooth was present inside the radiolucency. Preoperative diagnosis of the lesion was made as dentigerous cyst based on the age of the patient, location of the swelling, clinical and radiographic findings, but the unicystic ameloblastoma was also taken into consideration. The patient was treated by surgical enucleation of the lesion and extraction of lateral incisor tooth which was present inside the lesion. The histopathological examination of the lesion revealed confirmed finding for unicystic ameloblastoma mural form. No recurrence was observed in 1 year follow-up. Maxillary region is considered a rare and atypical location for unicystic ameloblastoma. We emphasize the importance of differential diagnosis of an odontogenic lesion with common clinical and radiological features that will impact the treatment planning and follow up

  6. An infrequent histopathological subtype of ameloblastoma: Adenoid granular cell ameloblastoma with dentinoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahanshah Salehinejad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoid ameloblastoma with dentinoid is a rare odontogenic tumor. Granular cell ameloblastoma also is a less common histological subtype of ameloblastoma. In this report, the patient was a 31-year-old male. The lesion was located in the right mandible and was unicystic with well-defined borders. The tumor tissue was showing a combination of follicular, plexiform, and desmoplastic patterns of ameloblastoma with wide areas of granular cells, fibrous stroma, glandular pattern, and dentinoid calcified. Very few cases of distinct forms of ameloblastoma that show the formation of dentinoid has been reported. However, there are no cases of adenoid granular cell ameloblastoma with dentinoid reported.

  7. Expression of RECK and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in ameloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Ameloblastoma is a frequent odontogenic benign tumor characterized by local invasiveness, high risk of recurrence and occasional metastasis and malignant transformation. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) promotes tumor invasion and progression by destroying the extracellular matrix (ECM) and basement membrane. For this proteolytic activity, the endogenous inhibitor is reversion-inducing cysteine rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK). The aim of this study was to characterize the relationship between RECK and MMP-2 expression and the clinical manifestation of ameloblastoma. Methods Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were employed to detect the protein and mRNA expression of RECK and MMP-2 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma. Results RECK protein expression was significantly reduced in KCOT (87.5%), ameloblastoma (56.5%) and ameloblastic carcinoma (0%) (P ameloblastoma compared with primary ameloblastoma (P ameloblastoma. MMP-2 protein expression was significantly higher in ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma compared with KCOT (P ameloblastoma than in KCOT (P ameloblastoma than in primary ameloblastoma, and was negative in ameloblastic carcinoma. MMP-2 mRNA expression was significantly higher in ameloblastoma compared with KCOT (P ameloblastoma versus primary ameloblastoma. RECK protein expression was negatively associated with MMP-2 protein expression in ameloblastoma (r = -0.431, P ameloblastoma. RECK may participate in the invasion, recurrence and malignant transformation of ameloblastoma by regulating MMP-2 at the post-transcriptional level. PMID:19995435

  8. Granular cell ameloblastoma of mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansari, Trupti R; Samanta, Satarupa T; Trivedi, Priti P; Shah, Manoj J

    2014-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a neoplasm of odontogenic epithelium, especially of enamel organ-type tissue that has not undergone differentiation to the point of hard tissue formation. Granular cell ameloblastoma is a rare condition, accounting for 3-5% of all ameloblastoma cases. A 30-year-old female patient presented with the chief complaint of swelling at the right lower jaw region since 1 year. Orthopantomogram and computed tomography scan was suggestive of primary bone tumor. Histopathologically, diagnosis of granular cell ameloblastoma of right mandible was made.

  9. Ameloblastoma in children; Ameloblastoma u dzieci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzon, M.; Popadiuk, S.; Bohdan, Z. and others [Akademia Medyczna, Gdansk (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Two cases of ameloblastoma in 3 and 12 year old children are described. The difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of this rare tumor of the jaws (mandibula) are presented. Only a short remission following chemotherapy was achieved in both cases. (author) 19 refs, 2 figs

  10. Molecular concepts in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma: implications for therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhamb, Tania; Kramer, Jill M

    2014-12-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign odontogenic neoplasm that may exhibit aggressive biological behavior as evidenced by its rapid growth and significance recurrence rates following initial surgical resection. Currently, the only therapy for ameloblastoma is surgical, and adjunctive treatment modalities are needed to mitigate tumor growth and to reduce the need for extensive and disfiguring surgeries. Many studies have identified markers expressed by ameloblastoma and these lend insight to our understanding of tumor progression. This review provides a summary of the specific molecular pathways implicated in tumor pathogenesis, including those involved in bone remodeling, apoptosis, cell signaling, and tumor suppression. Based on these data, we identify several prognostic or therapeutic markers that have been used successfully in the treatment of other neoplastic processes that may also have diagnostic and prognostic utility for ameloblastoma. Thus, it is important to determine which markers hold the greatest promise for clinical management of this benign neoplasm in order to improve treatment options, particularly in patients with aggressive forms of ameloblastoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Basal Cell Ameloblastoma: A Rare Histological Variant of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ameloblastomas are an inscrutable group of oral tumors. Basal cell ameloblastoma is a rare variant of ameloblastoma with very few cases reported until date. The tumor is composed of more primitive cells and has less conspicuous peripheral palisading. It shows remarkable similarity to basal cell carcinoma, basal cell ...

  12. Ameloblastoma during pregnancy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Helbert Eustáquio Cardoso; Costa, Erika do Socorro Ramos; Medeiros, Antônio Carlos Quintão; Pereira, Paulo Sérgio Dos Santos

    2016-09-06

    Ameloblastomas are rarely found in pregnant women, with only two cases reported in the scientific literature. We report the first case of ameloblastoma in a pregnant woman in Brazil. A 27-year-old white woman, 12-weeks pregnant, presented with a large mass in her right posterior mandible. Panoramic radiography revealed a lesion involving her mandibular right first molar with displacement of her mandibular right third molar and impairment of the mandibular bone base. The results of an incisional biopsy led to a diagnosis of acanthomatous ameloblastoma. We fixed Erich arch bars to both dental arches and performed an en-bloc resection surgery under general anesthesia for tumor removal. She was then treated by maxillomandibular rigid fixation with the installation of a 2.7 mm non-locking reconstruction plate. So far, she has presented no motor deficits, chewing difficulties, or relevant asymmetries. The tumor showed no recurrence after the first year (pregnancy period) and post-surgery radiographic follow-up revealed a reduction in the surgical area after osseous growth in the margins of the lesion. Although she displayed no systemic comorbidities that affected pregnancy, the fetus was born with alobar holoprosencephaly. The possible influence of pregnancy hormones on the growth and development of tumors in general and ameloblastoma in particular, is still not explained in the literature. However, evidence reveals that the issue should be further studied. Although en-bloc resection surgery is considered a radical method of treatment, it is an effective alternative in ameloblastoma removal, presenting low rates of recurrence.

  13. Overwhelming hypercalcaemia in mandibular ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Tom Edward Ngo; Villafuerte, Cesar Vincent; Acampado, Laura Trajano

    2014-10-17

    Ameloblastoma is considered to be a benign odontogenic tumour of epithelial in origin that is slow growing but recurrent and invasive in nature. Some of its features have been sources of debate among experts regarding its benign or malignant character. We report a case of a 20-year-old Filipino woman with right mandibular ameloblastoma presenting with overwhelming hypercalcaemia. Work ups for hypercalcaemia eventually revealed tumoral hypercalcaemia, which was initially controlled with intravenous bisphosphanate. The patient eventually underwent tumour excision and mandibular reconstruction, which totally corrected hypercalcaemia. This case will highlight the rare association of hypercalcaemia among patients with ameloblastoma. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. The approach and treatment of a unicystic Ameloblastoma in the jaw - doi:10.5020/18061230.2006.p247

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Francisco Durighetto Júnior

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the complex group of odontogenic tumors, the ameloblastoma points out as the most important and common odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin. It consists mainly of a benign tumor, slow in progress and locally invasive, although it can present high rates of reincidence. The unicystic ameloblastoma is one of the tumor variants and deserves singular consideration for its peculiar characteristics. This study aimed at showing the peculiarities of this ameloblastoma variant through a case report on the care assistance of a young man committed by a jaw tumor, approaching the diagnostic methods used and the applied treatment. Based on present, we conclud that the prognostic for patients with unicystic ameloblastoma is very favorable, since the propaedeutic proceedings are well conducted by the professionals involved.

  15. Expression of RECK and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in ameloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Jin; Xu, Zhi-Ying; Xie, Hong-Liang

    2009-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a frequent odontogenic benign tumor characterized by local invasiveness, high risk of recurrence and occasional metastasis and malignant transformation. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) promotes tumor invasion and progression by destroying the extracellular matrix (ECM) and basement membrane. For this proteolytic activity, the endogenous inhibitor is reversion-inducing cysteine rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK). The aim of this study was to characterize the relationship between RECK and MMP-2 expression and the clinical manifestation of ameloblastoma. Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were employed to detect the protein and mRNA expression of RECK and MMP-2 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma. RECK protein expression was significantly reduced in KCOT (87.5%), ameloblastoma (56.5%) and ameloblastic carcinoma (0%) (P < 0.01), and was significantly lower in recurrent ameloblastoma compared with primary ameloblastoma (P < 0.01), but did not differ by histological type of ameloblastoma. MMP-2 protein expression was significantly higher in ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma compared with KCOT (P < 0.01). RECK mRNA expression was significantly lower in ameloblastoma than in KCOT (P < 0.01), lower in recurrent ameloblastoma than in primary ameloblastoma, and was negative in ameloblastic carcinoma. MMP-2 mRNA expression was significantly higher in ameloblastoma compared with KCOT (P < 0.01), but was no different in recurrent ameloblastoma versus primary ameloblastoma. RECK protein expression was negatively associated with MMP-2 protein expression in ameloblastoma (r = -0.431, P < 0.01). Low or no RECK expression and increased MMP-2 expression may be associated with negative clinical findings in ameloblastoma. RECK may participate in the invasion, recurrence and malignant transformation of ameloblastoma by regulating MMP-2 at the post

  16. Educational effect of a lecture on differential imaging features comparing ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the mandible presented to dental students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Mitsuko; Ariji, Yoshiko; Kise, Yoshitaka; Goto, Masakazu; Izumi, Masahiro; Naitoh, Munetaka; Ariji, Eiichiro; Katsumata, Akitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the educational effect of a lecture on differential imaging features comparing ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the mandibles presented to dental students. Panoramic and CT images of 10 ameloblastomas and 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumors were randomly presented 114 dental students. Test scores, correct answer ratios, identification index, and understanding of the imaging features contributing to a correct diagnosis were serially evaluated before and after the lecture on the differential imaging features comparing the two types of tumors. The mean and standard deviation of the scoring ratios of dental students diagnosing these lesions on panoramic and CT images were 48.8±10.8% and 52.5±12.9%, respectively. After the lecture on the differential imaging features comparing the two tumors, the scoring ratios improved significantly. After the lecture, both the numbers of patients whose images were correctly diagnosed and the identification indices increased. The lecture also increased the number of imaging features recognized as contributing to the correct diagnosis. A lecture on the differential imaging features comparing ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the mandibles contributed to the improvement of imaging diagnosis skills among dental students. (author)

  17. Ameloblastoma, Solid/Multicystic Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Angela M.

    2009-01-01

    The ameloblastoma, particularly the solid/multicystic type, is the most clinically significant odontogentic tumor. The tumor is often locally aggressive and has a significant impact and may have a patient’s morbidity and mortality. In this report, we present a case of a large ameloblastoma that presented with the typical radiographic features of variably sized radiolucent loculations. Microscopically the tumor showed a variety of histologic types, with plexiform and follicular predominating. The tumor was treated with a partial resection of the mandible. PMID:20596851

  18. Granular cell ameloblastoma: case report of a particular ameloblastoma histologically resembling oncocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Yuki; Fujita, Shuichi; Kawasaki, Goro; Hirota, Yoshinosuke; Rokutanda, Satoshi; Yamashita, Kentaro; Yanamoto, Souichi; Ikeda, Tohru; Umeda, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell ameloblastoma is classified as a histological subtype of solid/multicystic ameloblastoma. Usual granular cell ameloblastoma is histologically characterized by granular changes of stellate-like cells located in the inner portion of the epithelial follicles. Here we report a case of another type of granular cell ameloblastoma, showing predominant anastomosing double-stranded trabeculae of granular cells. This type of granular cell ameloblastoma is extremely rare, and the World Health Organization classification does not contain the entity. We tentatively termed it 'anastomosing granular cell ameloblastoma' in this report. The present case suggests the importance of differential diagnosis because the histology of 'anastomosing granular cell ameloblastoma' resembles that of salivary gland oncocytoma rather than that of usual granular cell ameloblastoma. The trabeculae observed in our case continued to the peripheral cells of a small amount of epithelial sheets of plexiform ameloblastoma, and the tumor cells were positive for CK19, which is regarded as an immunohistochemical marker of odontogenic epithelium. Similar to usual granular cell ameloblastoma, the tumor cells had CD68-positive granules. For precise diagnosis of this condition, immunohistochemistry using CK19 and CD68, as well as detailed histological observation, are recommended. © 2014 Japanese Society of Pathology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Plexiform Ameloblastoma of the Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Singh Chauhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is a common and aggressive odontogenic epithelial tumor. It has an aggressive behavior and recurrent course, and is rarely metastatic. Ameloblastoma represents 1% of all tumors and cysts that involve the maxillomandibular area and about 10% of the odontogenic tumors. It is primarily seen in adults in the third to fifth decade of life, with equal sex predilection. Radiographically, it appears as an expansile radiolucent, with thinned and perforated cortices, and is known to cause root resorption. As it shares common radiographic features with other lesions such as the giant cell tumor, aneurismal bone cyst, and renal cell carcinoma metastasis, a definitive diagnosis can only be made with histopathology. We present an extensive case of plexiform ameloblastoma of the mandible in a 42-year-old female patient.

  20. [Unicystic ameloblastoma as a clinicopathologic entity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre Urízar, J M; González Tanago, J; Fernández de Larrinoa, A; Vallejo Irastorza, G; Martínez Conde, R

    1991-02-01

    Due to its clinic and histopathologic features, the unicystic ameloblastoma is a special kind of ameloblastoma, and it has a more favourable prognosis. The more interesting clinicopathologic aspects and the importance of a correct diagnosis are discussed in this paper, where we report two new mandibular cases of this tumor in young patients.

  1. The expression profiles of acidic epithelial keratins in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Samir Kumar; Sakamoto, Kei; Aragaki, Tadanobu; Akashi, Takumi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2013-04-01

    To characterize the subtypes of ameloblastoma by differentiation markers. Expression of 9 major acidic epithelial keratins was immunohistochemically examined in 28 ameloblastomas. Keratin 15 (K15) expression patterns corresponded to histological variants: follicular, plexiform and acanthomatous. Tumor nests comprising K15-expressing basal cells mimicked oral epithelium or dental lamina, and tumor nests comprising K15-negative basal cells mimicked outer enamel epithelium. Keratin 19 (K19) was consistently expressed in solid/multicystic ameloblastoma and unicystic ameloblastoma, while peripheral ameloblastoma and desmoplastic ameloblastoma contained K19-negative cells. The 4 current subtypes had unvaried expression patterns within each group. However, they could be divided into 2 groups by K19 expression pattern: solid/multicystic and unicystic versus extraosseous/peripheral and desmoplastic. K15 expression pattern represented various types of differentiation for tumor nests mimicking tooth germ and oral epithelium. The results clarify the homogeneity and heterogeneity of ameloblastoma cell lineage and differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Plexiform Unicystic Ameloblastoma: A Rare Variant of Ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil S. Deore

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The term plexiform unicystic ameloblastoma refers to a pattern of epithelial proliferation that has been described in cystic cavity. Because of unilocular presentation, it is commonly misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. However, they may often behave clinically as biologically aggressive tumors. These tumors show high incidence of cortical perforation, tooth resorption and a high rate of recurrence after simple enucleation. This paper aims to provide an insight into this biologically distinct entity. A literature review on the topic has been added along with a case report highlighting the approach of diagnosis and management of such ameloblastomas.

  3. Maxillary plexiform ameloblastoma showing basaloid differentiation: Report of a rare case with review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghattamaneni, Sravani; Guttikonda, Venkateswara Rao; Kumari, M Geetha; Kumar, D Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign, locally aggressive tumor originating from the odontogenic epithelium. It manifests as a slow growing swelling, causing expansion of the jaw bones. Radiologically, it presents as a unilocular or multilocular radiolucency exhibiting a characteristic soap bubble or honeycomb appearance. Ameloblastoma exhibits several histologic patterns of which basal cell variant is a rare entity. The present case report is that of a maxillary ameloblastoma exhibiting a basaloid differentiation that may put one in the mind of a basaloid squamous cell carcinoma or a basal cell carcinoma. Confirmation of such rare variants should be done not only based on histopathology but with the help of supplemental immunohistochemical analysis. The present case report helps in exposing a rare variant of ameloblastoma and emphasizes the role of advanced diagnostic aids such as immunohistochemistry in establishing the diagnosis.

  4. Establishing the natural history and growth rate of ameloblastoma with implications for management: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Smoll, Nicolas R; Hunter-Smith, David J; Rozen, Warren Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is the second most common odontogenic tumor, known to be slow-growing, persistent, and locally aggressive. Recent data suggests that ameloblastoma is best treated with wide resection and adequate margins. Following primary excision, bony reconstruction is often necessary for a functional and aesthetically satisfactory outcome, making early diagnosis paramount. Despite earlier diagnosis potentially limiting the extent of resection and reconstruction, an understanding of the growth rate and natural history of ameloblastoma has been notably lacking from the literature. A systematic review of the literature was conducted by reviewing relevant articles from PubMed and Web of Science databases. Each article's level of evidence was formally appraised according to the Centre of Evidence Based Medicine (CEBM), with data from each utilized in a meta-analysis of growth rates for ameloblastoma. Literature regarding the natural history of ameloblastoma is limited since the tumor is immediately acted upon at its initial detection, unless the patient voluntarily refuses a surgical intervention. From the limited data, it is derived that the highest estimated growth rate is associated with solid, multicystic type and the lowest rate with peripheral ameloblastomas. After meta-analysis, the calculated mean specific grow rate is 87.84% per year. The growth rate of ameloblastoma has been demonstrated, offering prognostic and management information, particularly in cases where a delay in management is envisaged.

  5. Soft tissue recurrent ameloblastomas also show some malignant features: A clinicopathological study of a 15-year database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zitong; Sun, Guowen; Hu, Qingang; Chen, Fei; Wen, Shanhui

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the clinicopathological features of six cases of soft tissue recurrent ameloblastoma and explore the role of increased aggressive biological behavior in the recurrences and treatment of this type of ameloblastomas. Material and Methods In this study, we retrospectively reviewed recurrent ameloblastomas during a 15-year period; six cases were diagnosed as soft tissue recurrent ameloblastoma. The clinical, radiographic, cytological and immunohistochemical records of these six cases were investigated and analyzed. Results All the six soft tissue recurrent ameloblastomas occurred after radical bone resection, and were located in the adjacent soft tissues around the osteotomy regions. In Case 4, the patient developed pulmonary metastasis, extensive skull-base infiltration and cytological malignancy after multiple recurrences and malignant transformation was diagnosed. In the other five cases, although there were no cytological signs are sufficient to justify an ameloblastoma as malignant, some malignant features were observed. In Case 1, the tumor showed moderate atypical hyperplasia and the Ki-67 staining percentage was 40% positive, which are strongly suggestive of potential malignance. In Case 5, the patient developed a second soft tissue recurrence in the parapharyngeal region and later died of tumor-related complications. All the remaining three patients showed cytology atypia of varying degrees and high expression of PCNA or Ki-67, which confirmed active cell proliferation. Conclusions Increased aggressiveness is an important factor of soft tissue recurrence. An intraoperative rapid pathological examination and more radical treatment are suggested for these cases. Key words: Ameloblastoma, soft tissue recurrence, aggressive biological behaviour. PMID:25662548

  6. Intra-epithelially entrapped blood vessels in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siar, Chong Huat; Ishak, Ismadi; Ng, Kok Han

    2015-05-01

    The ameloblastoma is a benign but locally aggressive odontogenic neoplasm with a high recurrence rate. While significant progress has been made in our understanding regarding the role of tumoral vasculature relative to the diverse behavioral characteristics of this tumor, no attention has been paid to a distinct subset of blood vessels entrapped within its epithelial compartment. As vascular niches are known to influence tumoral growth, clarification of these vessels is important. The objectives of this study were to investigate the morphologic characteristics of intra-epithelially entrapped blood vessels (IEBVs) in ameloblastoma and to speculate on their relevance. Here, we evaluated the frequency, microvessel density (MVD), morphology, and distribution pattern of IEBVs in 77 ameloblastoma of different subtypes based on their immunoreactivity for endothelial markers (CD34, CD31, CD105), vascular tight junction protein (claudin-5), pericyte [α-smooth muscle actin (α-sma)], and vascular basement membrane (collagen IV). IEBVs were heterogeneously detected in ameloblastoma. Their mean MVD (CD34 = 15.46 ± 7.25; CD31 = 15.8 ± 5.04; CD105 = 0.82 ± 0.51) showed no significant correlation with different subtypes, and between primary and recurrent tumors (P > 0.05). These microvessels may occur as single/clusters of capillary sprouts, or formed compressed branching/non-branching slits entrapped within the epithelial compartment, and in direct apposition with polyhedral/granular neoplastic epithelial cells. They expressed proteins for endothelial tight junctions (claudin-5-positive) and pericytes (α-sma-positive) but had deficient basement membrane (collagen IV weak to absent). Aberrant expression for CD34, CD31, and CD105 in tumor epithelium was variably observed. Although rare in occurrence, identification of IEBVs in ameloblastoma could potentially represent a new paradigm for vascular assessment of this neoplasm. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John

  7. Treatment of ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vagner Raldi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is a benign odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin, with slow growth, frequently found in the mandible or maxilla. The symptoms are unnoticeable, rarely being perceived by the patient in the initial stages, and are sometimes diagnosed by chance in routine radiographic exams. Clinically, it is a hardened curvature that grows slowly, and the regional mucosa remains with the normal appearance. There is rarely a solution of continuity or infection. The ameloblastoma invades the spaces between the trabeculated bones without reabsorbing them, and expands the compact bone without invading it, however, it may propagate through the mandibular canal. It has been given this name due to its similarity to the cells of the enamel organ and it has a unique biological behavior that leads to controversy with regard to the best form of treatment. This clinical case describes the case of a unicystic ameloblastoma located in the left retromandibular region with eight years of follow-up. Clinical and radiographic diagnosis was confirmed through the histopathologic exam. Treatment proposed was enucleation without marginal dissection.

  8. Imaging diagnosis of ameloblastoma; Bildgebung bei Ameloblastomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, M.; Horger, M.; Ioanovicu, S.D.; Boesmueller, H.

    2015-10-15

    Ameloblastomas are ondontogenic tumors of the upper and lower jaw. The ameloblastomas are supposed to be benign with slow growth, but locally invasive growth is possible. Contrast agent enhanced CT seems to have the largest imaging potential to differentiate between benign and malign osteogenic processes. In general - dependent on localization, histological type and neighboring tissues - the radical resection with following plastic reconstruction seems to be the best therapeutic decision.

  9. Comparison of immunoexpression of VEGF, TGF-β and MMP-9 in ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor = Comparação da imunoexpressão de VEGF, TGF-β e MMP-9 em ameloblastoma e tumor odontogênico adenomatóide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira, Stefânia Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Estudos sobre tumores odontogênicos têm identificado várias disfunções moleculares envolvidas no seu desenvolvimento, e alguns mecanismos como a angiogênese e modulação da matriz são objetos úteis para investigar as diferenças no comportamento biológico destes tumores. Alguns marcadores importantes para identificar a agressividade do tumor por imunoistoquímica são as proteínas VEGF, TGF-ß e MMP-9. Este estudo teve como objetivo comparar a expressão imunoistoquímica de VEGF, TGF-ß e MMP-9 entre ameloblastoma e tumor odontogênico adenomatoide (TOA. Métodos: Imunoexpressão de VEGF, TGF-ß e MMP-9 foi estudada em 15 ameloblastomas sólidos e 15 TOA. Uma análise semiquantitativa das células imunomarcadas foi realizada e a análise estatística foi feita usando o teste não paramétrico de Mann-Whitney e o teste de correlação de Spearman, com nível de significância de 0,05 (P0. 05. Conclusão: Os resultados sugerem o envolvimento da angiogênese na progressão tumoral de ameloblastomas e o efeito indutor de células estromais em TOA, portanto, justificando o seu potencial de crescimento mais baixo

  10. Management of recurrent ameloblastoma of the jaws; a 40-year single institution experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertog, D.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; Leemans, C.R.; Winters, H.A.H.; van der Waal, I.

    2011-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a histologically almost always benign odontogenic tumor with a high rate of recurrence if not removed completely. Therefore, radical surgery is the treatment of choice of a primary ameloblastoma. Of 18 patients with a recurrent ameloblastoma, previously treated by enucleation,

  11. PERIPHERAL AMELOBLASTOMA - A CASE-REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NAUTA, JM; PANDERS, AK; SCHOOTS, CJF; VERMEY, A; ROODENBURG, JLN

    Peripheral ameloblastoma is a benign odontogenic tumor with the same histological characteristics as the centrally located ameloblastoma, but appearing in the gingiva and mucosa of the tooth-bearing area of the jaws. A review is presented of 53 cases: 45 being reported as peripheral ameloblastoma

  12. Desmoplastic ameloblastoma of mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Preeti P; Bhat, Guruprasad R; Neelakantan, Shiba; Chatterjee, Rhiti

    2013-09-17

    Desmoplastic ameloblastoma is one of the six histopathological subtypes of ameloblastoma. The age and gender groups affected by desmoplastic are similar to those affected by the conventional ameloblastoma. It usually presents as a painless enlargement of the jaw. Owing to its deceptive radiological appearance as a mixed radiopaque-radiolucent lesion, it is often mistaken as a fibro-osseous lesion. Histologically, desmoplastic ameloblastoma has a densely collagenised and hypocellular stroma, where the epithelium tends to proliferate in the form of cords and nests instead of cellular islands. Most desmoplastic ameloblastomas display occasional classic islands of follicular ameloblastoma among the predominant strands and cords. Studies have shown that desmoplastic ameloblastoma shows a tendency to recur. We present a rare case of a tumour occurring in the anterior mandibular region in a 60-year-old man over a period of 11/2 months.

  13. Ameloblastoma of the jaws: a critical reappraisal based on a 40-years single institution experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertog, D.; van der Waal, I.

    2010-01-01

    The 40-years of experience in a single institution with the treatment of previously untreated ameloblastoma have been reported, followed by a management protocol. Retrospectively, 25 consecutive patients treated between 1969 and 2009 have been analyzed. In 11 patients, a preoperative diagnosis of

  14. Basal Cell Ameloblastoma: A Rare Histological Variant of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of ameloblastoma.[4] The microscopic features of basal cell ameloblastoma, however, are similar to those of several malignant tumors, including basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC),[5,6] cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and solid‑type adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC).[1] The pathologist may sometimes fail to.

  15. Images of ameloblastoma: from radiography to tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Herrera-Mujica

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors are a group of lesions originated from odontogenesis course alterations. Within odontogenic tumors is ameloblastoma, its treatment probably is one of the most controversial, because its aggressive behavior, high recurrence and probably low malignancies. Radiographs play an important role in assessment from this tumor, but the limitation is they are in two dimensions exams. Cone beam computed tomography is a valuable tool because enable a comprehensive assessment of anatomical structures by multiple sections of the area. Therefore, evaluation of ameloblastoma is complete by cone beam computed tomography because bone structures do not show distortion neither magnification.

  16. [Diagnosis and treatment of ameloblastoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes Díaz, J C; Vergara Piedra, L

    1989-01-01

    In the light of current knowledge, a discussion is made on 10 patients with ameloblastoma operated on in Josina Machel General Hospital, in the People's Republic of Angola. This tumor, which has a high incidence in that country, can be operated on in spite of the shortage of a vailable resources, by means of an autogenous graft. Age, sex, location, course of the disease, and results in this group of patients are discussed.

  17. The variability and complexity of ameloblastoma: carcinoma ex ameloblastoma or primary ameloblastic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zitong; Chen, Fei; Wang, Tiemei; Hu, Qingang; Sun, Guowen

    2013-04-01

    Ameloblastoma is characterized by slow-growing, local invasiveness and high incidence of local recurrence. It usually presents with a benign histological appearance. However, ameloblastoma occasionally demonstrates a clinical course that is characteristic of malignant transformation. Here, we present a case of ameloblastoma with an aggressive clinical course, including multiple recurrences, a short disease-free interval, pulmonary metastasis and extensive skull-base infiltration. With a careful re-evaluation of the histology and cytology of the specimens of primary and recurrent ameloblastoma in 2006 and 2007, malignant transformation was observed and carcinoma ex ameloblastoma was ultimately diagnosed. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Calretinin as a Diagnostic Adjunct for Ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Anandani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Calretinin is a 29 kDa calcium-binding protein of the EF-hand family which is expressed in a variety of normal and tumorigenic tissues. Its expression in odontogenic epithelium during odontogenesis and in neoplastic odontogenic tissues has been demonstrated. Unicystic ameloblastoma poses a diagnostic challenge, as its histologic presentation can be sometimes mistaken for keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT. This study was performed to assess the usefulness of calretinin as a confirmatory marker for ameloblastic tissue. Methodology. Total of 40 cases: 16 unicystic ameloblastoma, 4 multicystic ameloblastoma, and 20 KCOT, were evaluated immunohistochemically for the presence, localization, distribution, and intensity of calretinin expression. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test to intercompare the expression between ameloblastoma and KCOT. Results. Sixteen cases of ameloblastoma (12 unicystic, 4 multicystic showed positive calretinin staining of ameloblastic epithelium and only one case of KCOT was positive for calretinin, with the positivity restricted to the stellate reticulum like epithelium. Intercomparison between two groups revealed statistically significant difference (P=0.000. Conclusion. Calretinin appears to be a specific immunohistochemical marker for neoplastic ameloblastic epithelium and may be an important diagnostic adjunct in the differential diagnosis of ameloblastoma and KCOT.

  19. Radiotherapy in the treatment of ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    There is a lack of well-documented evidence in the literature concerning the relative radioresponsiveness or radioresistance of ameloblastomas, although they are generally considered radioresistant. Most of the previous papers reffering to this subject lack acceptable histopathologic proof of the diagnosis, adequate radiotherapeutic data, and/or follow-up information; many predate the use of megavoltage irradiation. The present article reports 5 cases of ameloblastoma that were treated by radiotherapy, 3 by megavoltage irradiation. All have been confirmed histologically by an oral pathologist, all have adequate radiotherapeutic data and, with one exception, adequate follow-up information. In addition, the reasons for our present lack of knowledge of this subject are discussed; objective criteria are presented for evaluating the results of radiotherapy on ameloblastomas; the only other series of ameloblastomas treated by megavoltage irradition is analyzed. Although radiotherapy can reduce the size of an ameloblastoma, primarily that part of the tumor which has expanded the jaw or broken into the soft tissues, it does not appear to be an appropriate treatment for an operable ameloblastoma. Its main use is in inoperable cases, primarily in the posterior maxilla.

  20. Maxillary ameloblastoma in an elderly patient: Report of a surgical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Machado de Menezes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor of epithelial origin that is characterized by slow, aggressive growth and invasive features. This disease is predominant in the mandible, and in adults between 30 and 40 years of age. It rarely occurs in the maxilla; there are few reported cases in literature, with relative proportions of 1:8 and 1:14 or even 1:58 diagnosed maxilla/mandible ameloblastoma cases, according to published retrospective studies. The purpose of this study is to present and discuss a case of ameloblastoma in the maxilla of an elderly man from the state of Pará in Brazil, who presented with a lesion in the left maxilla. The clinical and surgical steps were chosen based on a set of criteria that will be discussed in this report.

  1. Ameloblastoma desmoplásico Desmoplastic ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Martínez-Lage

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos un caso de ameloblastoma desmoplásico en una mujer de 32 años que afecta a la región media del maxilar superior. Se describen las características específicas, tanto histológicas como clínicas, de esta variante de ameloblastoma, y se insiste en su imagen radiológica similar a la de una lesión fibroósea benigna. Se indica la misma conducta terapéutica que para el resto de los ameloblastomas intraóseos sólidos.We report a case of desmoplastic ameloblastoma in a 32 year-old female patient affecting the region half of the upper jaw. We describe the specific characteristics, both histological and clinical of this variant of ameloblastoma, insisting its radiological image similar to that of a benign fibroosseous lession. We indicate the same therapeutic conduct for the rest of the solid intraosseous ameloblastomas.

  2. Hemimaxillectomy for desmoplastic ameloblastoma with immediate temporalis flap reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, Jeffrey A; Tandon, Rahul; Allen, Chad N; Murray, Matthew D

    2014-08-01

    Ameloblastoma is one of the most common odontogenic tumors encountered, occurring more frequently than all other tumors combined, if one excludes the keratocystic odontogenic tumor. These tumors can cause severe expansion of the cortical bones and gross anatomic deformities. They can affect the dentition, causing tooth mobility and displacement. Fortunately, morbidity can be minimized with recognition on routine radiographic examination. The tissue may be unilocular or multilocular and has been described as having a "soap-bubble" appearance. Nevertheless, its radiographic appearance is insufficient to make a definitive diagnosis, because other tumors have similar appearance. Although the anatomic distribution and progression of ameloblastoma remain fairly consistent, alternative manifestations follow an atypical clinical course. One such variant is the desmoplastic ameloblastoma. We present a case of maxillary desmoplastic ameloblastoma treated with hemimaxillectomy and immediate reconstruction with temporalis flap that was recurrence-free at 36 months. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ameloblastic carcinoma developing in preexisting ameloblastoma with a mutation of the p53 gene: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobusawa, Aiko; Sano, Takaaki; Yokoo, Satoshi; Oyama, Tetsunari

    2014-11-01

    Ameloblastic carcinoma is a rare malignant odontogenic tumor. Here we present a case of a large ameloblastic carcinoma, which developed in a preexisting ameloblastoma in the right submandibular region. The patient was an 84-year-old woman who had received several surgical procedures for ameloblastoma, including a segmental mandibulectomy. The dimensions of the tumor were 12 × 8 × 5 cm, and both benign ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma were observed histologically. Based on histologic diagnosis, immunohistochemical staining and sequence analysis for p53 were performed. Overexpression of p53 was observed only in the ameloblastic carcinoma. Additionally, a mutation of the p53 gene (TP53) in exon 5 was found by sequence analysis in the ameloblastic carcinoma. This is the first case of ameloblastic carcinoma with a mutation of the p53 gene that has been associated with carcinomatous transformation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Manejo quirúrgico del ameloblastoma Surgical management of ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adaia Valls

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available El ameloblastoma es un tumor odontogénico de estirpe epitelial. Aunque se clasifica como una tumoración benigna, suele ser localmente agresiva presentando elevada invasión local, con gran tendencia a la recidiva y con posibilidad metastásica ocasional. Se manifiesta preferentemente durante la tercera, cuarta y quinta décadas de la vida, sin predilección por razón de sexo, aunque puede darse en cualquier grupo de edad, incluidos los niños. La mayoría de los ameloblastomas se encuentran sobre todo en mandíbula (al nivel del ángulo y rama. En el tratamiento se debe valorar su tipología clínica (sólido, multiquístico, uniquístico, mixto o periférico, su localización y el tamaño del tumor, así como la edad y las condiciones clínicas del paciente. Presentamos una revisión de los pacientes afectos de ameloblastomas tratados en nuestro Centro durante los últimos 10 años. Se aportan datos acerca de su aparición clínica, sus características histológicas, el manejo terapéutico realizado y analizamos el seguimiento y comparamos la aparición de recidivas en los pacientes presentados. Las características clínicas, incluso si se complementan con radiografías y/o muestras histológicas, no son siempre determinantes del comportamiento biológico y, por tanto tampoco lo son del pronóstico de un ameloblastoma individual.The ameloblastoma is an odontogenic tumour of epithelial origin. Although it is classified as benign, there is usually aggressive local invasion, a great tendency to recurrence, and occasional metastatic potential. It generally appears during the third, fourth and fifth decades of life, without gender predilection, although it can occur at any age, including in children. Ameloblastomas are mostly found in the mandible (angle and branch. In treatment, its clinical type (solid, unicystic, desmoplastic, mixed or peripheral, its location and size, must be assessed, as well as the age and clinical condition of the

  5. Nonexpansile Unicystic Ameloblastoma: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is the most common benign odontogenic tumor that has the potential to grow into a large size. Unicystic ameloblastoma (UA is a variant of the solid or multicystic ameloblastoma. It is a rare (relative frequency 5–22% benign, locally invasive odontogenic tumor of young age that mimics clinically and radiographically as an odontogenic cyst. Radiographically it may present as unilocualr or multilocular with cortical plate expansion. Conventional radiograph has less advantage to determine their extension into soft tissue. Hence, conventional tomography, cone-beam computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging may be used to determine expansion, root resorption and relation with adjacent structures. It has low recurrence rate after conservative therapy. Here, we present a rare case of nonexpansile UA with an unusual presentation in a young male patient.

  6. Primary Ameloblastoma of the Temporal Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košec, Andro; Ajduk, Jakov; Ries, Mihael; Trotić, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Ameloblastoma is a locally aggressive tumor derived from odontogenic epithelium. Although benign, its clinical behavior can often exhibit malignant characteristics. It is marked by slow and persistent growth with infiltration of adjacent tissues. Almost 70% occur in the mandible in patients older than 30 years. Recurrence of ameloblastoma from inadequate treatment is frequent. Because of its slow growth, recurrences can present decades after primary surgery. A primary ameloblastoma in an area outside the mandibular, maxillary, and infratemporal fossa regions has not been described in detail to date, with only 1 possible case mentioned in the literature. The authors present a case of primary temporal bone ameloblastoma in a 17-year-old boy. The tumor originated in the left mastoid, infiltrated the lateral semicircular canal, facial nerve, and cochlea, and adhered to the sigmoid sinus and posterior cranial fossa dura. Although invasion of multiple structures in the infratemporal fossa and temporal bone leads to variable disease presentation, this case is unique because the first symptom of disease was sudden and recurring unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Surgery required transection of the facial nerve. Histopathology confirmed primary temporal bone ameloblastoma. The difficulties in achieving wide surgical margins, diagnostics, and further management are addressed. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Malignant ameloblastoma metastasis to the neck: Radiological and pathohistological dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Mileta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ameloblastomas are odontogenic epithelial, locally invasive tumors of slow growth and mostly of benign behavior. Their frequency is low (they account for 1% of all head and neck tumors and about 11% of tumors of dental origin. Malignant variations of ameloblastoma are malignant ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma. They constitute less than 1% of all ameloblastomas. We presented a case of malignant ameloblastoma of the mandible with neck metastasis. Case report. A patient, aged 72, presented with the following symptoms: pain in the lower jaw, swelling in the left submandibular area and difficult mouth opening. The patient was admitted to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Center of Montenegro, two months after he had noticed the symptoms. Panoramic radiography (OPG showed that both jaws were partially toothless with terminal stage of periodontitis of the remaining teeth. Also, OPG showed sharply limited semicircular defect in the retromolar region and along the front edge of the mandible rami. Conventional histopathologic examination of the neck masses showed malignant ameloblastoma which contained central fields of squamous differentiation. Immunoreactivity of several markers was determined using immunohistochemical analyses. After these diagnostic methods a definite histopathology diagnosis was made: Ameloblastoma metastaticum in textus fibroadiposus regio colli (typus acanthomatosus. Conclusion. It is not possible to distinguish conventional, ie intraosseous, ameloblastoma from malignant ameloblastoma according to histopathologic features. It is necessary to pay special attention, especially in elderly patients, and to carry out further clinical, radiological and pathohistological diagnostic procedures, such as immunohistochemical analysis. A timely and correct diagnosis and treatment of malignant ameloblastoma require a multidisciplinary approach.

  8. Vascularized mandibular anterior ameloblastoma - an entity still unresolved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, P; Chandrashekhar, C; Radhakrishnan, R

    2013-05-01

    Vascularized ameloblastoma is a bewildering entity whose existence is questionable from its origin to nosology and its very characterization as a distinct variant of ameloblastoma. This uncertainty is largely because of a fewer number of documented cases and loss of long-term follow-up. The current paper describes two cases of ameloblastoma in the mandibular anterior region, which had features of so-called "hemangiomatous ameloblastoma" as it was originally described. Understanding its pathophysiology based on various views and clinical implications in terms of its biologic behavior are brought to light in this paper.

  9. Expression of Bcl-2 and epithelial growth factor receptor proteins in keratocystic odontogenic tumor in comparison with dentigerous cyst and ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Razavi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: According to the expression of - Bcl-2 in ameloblastoma and KCOT, and no expression of EGFR in KCOT, it can be concluded that the biological activity and growth mechanisms of KCOT are different compared with other cystic lesions. However, the aggressive potential of KCOT is not as severe as that of a neoplasm such as ameloblastoma.

  10. Desmoplastic ameloblastoma of anterior mandible: Case report of a rarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Nahar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma, one of the most common odontogenic tumors of the jaws, presents classical clinical, radiographic and histopathological diagnostic features exhibiting a benign but locally aggressive and destructive clinical course with a high rate of recurrence. A case of desmoplastic ameloblastoma of mandible is discussed in this article, which presents itself as a rare variant of ameloblastoma with unusual inconclusive clinico-radiographic features to be diagnosed as classical ameloblastoma and difficult to differentiate from other suspected multilocular benign odontogenic or reactive lesions of the jaws. It is the typical histopathological picture of the lesion exhibiting a blend of desmoplasia (collagenization and ameloblastoma that leads to its final diagnosis and determines its management.

  11. Molecular markers of cell adhesion in ameloblastomas. An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-González, Rogelio; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Damian-Matsumura, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is the most common odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin, and though it is of a benign nature, it frequently infiltrates the bone, has a high rate of recurrence and could potentially become malignant. Cellular adhesion potentially plays an important role in the manifestation of these characteristics and in the tumor biology of ameloblastomas. Losses of cell-cell and extracellular matrix adhesion and cohesion are among the first events that occur in the invasion and growth of tumors of epithelial origin. The present review includes a description of the molecules that are involved in cell adhesion as reported for various types of ameloblastomas and discusses the possible roles of these molecules in the biological behaviors of this odontogenic tumor. Knowledge of the complex mechanisms in which these molecules play a role is critical for the research and discovery of future therapeutic targets. Key words:Ameloblastoma, cellular adhesion, molecular markers, cell-cell adhesion, extracellular matrix-cell adhesion. PMID:23986011

  12. Caracterização imuno-histoquímica de lesão híbrida de ameloblastoma desmoplásico e convencional "Hybrid" lesion of desmoplastic and conventional ameloblastoma: immunohistochemical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Nunes dos Santos

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available O ameloblastoma é uma neoplasia odontogênica benigna comumente encontrada nos ossos maxilares. Histologicamente, mostra diversos padrões, incluindo a ameloblastoma plexiforme e folicular. Quando estes padrões histológicos coexistem com um ameloblastoma que exibe abundante desmoplasia, são então denominados de lesão ‘híbrida" de ameloblastoma desmoplásico e convencional. No presente trabalho, nos propomos a relatar um caso de lesão híbrida de ameloblastoma desmoplásico e convencional destacando os aspectos imuno-histoquímicos relativos a expressão das proteínas da matriz extracelular (tenascina, fibronectina e colágeno I.Ameloblastoma is a benign epithelial odontogenic tumor and is the most commonly encountered odontogenic tumor in the jaws. Histologically, ameloblastomas occur in different patterns, including plexiform pattern and follicular pattern. "Hybrid " lesion of ameloblastoma is a tumor variant in which histologically, areas of follicular or plexiform ameloblastoma coexist with characteristic areas of ameloblastoma exhibiting pronounced stromal desmoplasia (desmoplastic ameloblastoma. The purpose of this article is to present a case of "hybrid" lesion of desmoplastic ameloblastoma (AD and conventional, and investigate extracellular matrix proteins such as tenascin, fibronectin, and type I collagen.

  13. Mandible ameloblastoma with lung metastasis: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui-Na; Wang, Xin-Shuai; Ren, Jing; Xie, Yan-Fei; Zhou, Dan; Ge, Dong-Feng; Feng, Xiao-Shan; Gao, She-Gan

    2015-01-01

    The ameloblastoma is the most common odontogenic epithelial tumor, which belong to benign neoplasms that present a painless course, and usually occur in the oromaxillo-facial region. Although the histopathological manifestation of ameloblastoma is benign, it has unique biological behavior, for example local invasion and recurrence repeatedly. A few case of ameloblastoma was locally aggressive growth, and rarely metastasis to other tissue, for example the lungs, lymph nodes, and spine. A 64-year-old Chinese man, diagnosed with metastatic ameloblastoma, was treated with palliative chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and cisplatin for six cycles, and radiotherapy for 50 Gy after the last cycle chemotherapy. During the surveillance CT scan after the therapy, the tissues of the tumor were nearly complete response. The purpose of this study was to report a case of a patient with a right mandible ameloblastoma that recurred repeatedly and metastasized into bilateral lung. After the chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the tissues of the tumor were nearly complete response. This case is interesting because it investigated the diagnosis and treatment of the malignancy ameloblastoma, as this may help diagnose and treatment for clinician to the metastatic ameloblastoma.

  14. Metastasizing Ameloblastoma With Localized Interstitial Spread in the Lung: Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yueh-Hung; Jhuang, Jie-Yang; Chang, Min-Hsiang; Huang, Wen-Chih; Hsieh, Min-Shu

    2014-06-01

    Ameloblastoma is a locally aggressive, epithelial odontogenic tumor involving mandibles and maxillas. Distant metastasis is a very rare condition and is designated as metastasizing (malignant) ameloblastoma despite its benign histological appearance. Up to now, only 27 well-documented cases of metastasizing ameloblastomas are reported in the literature, and lung is the most commonly involved organ. In previous reports of pulmonary metastasizing ameloblastomas, there was little description of the histopathologic finding. Here, the authors report 2 cases of pulmonary metastasizing ameloblastomas with special emphasis on their interesting, interstitial spread along alveolar septa, resulting in a unique 2-cell pattern under microscopic examination. Pulmonary metastasizing ameloblastoma may pose difficulty in diagnosis if the pathologist is not aware of patient's clinical history of ameloblastoma. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Unusual imaging appearance of unicystic ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Kavitha Nadendla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicystic ameloblastoma (UA refers to those cystic lesions that show clinical, radiographic, or gross features of a mandibular cyst, but on histologic examination show a typical ameloblastous epithelium lining part of the cystic cavity, with or without luminal and/or mural tumor growth. It accounts for 5-15% of all intraosseous ameloblastomas. We report a case of UA in a 35-year-old female with an unusual large multilocular (tennis racket appearance on the right body of mandible and illustrate the importance and complexity of differential diagnosis with a brief review of recent literature.

  16. Massive granular cell ameloblastoma with dural extension and atypical morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Raghunath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastomas are rare histologically benign, locally aggressive tumors arising from the oral ectoderm that occasionally reach a gigantic size. Giant ameloblastomas are a rarity these days with the advent of panoramic radiography in routine dental practice. Furthermore, the granular cell variant is an uncommon histological subtype of ameloblastoma where the central stellate reticulum like cells in tumor follicles is replaced by granular cells. Although granular cell ameloblastoma (GCA is considered to be a destructive tumor with a high recurrence rate, the significance of granular cells in predicting its biologic behavior is debatable. However, we present a rare case of giant GCA of remarkable histomorphology showing extensive craniofacial involvement and dural extension that rendered a good prognosis following treatment.

  17. Ameloblastoma: A Review of Recent Molecular Pathogenetic Discoveries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah A. Brown

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic neoplasm whose molecular pathogenesis has only recently been elucidated. The discovery of recurrent activating mutations in FGFR2, BRAF , and RAS in a large majority of ameloblastomas has implicated dysregulation of MAPK pathway signaling as a critical step in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Some degree of controversy exists regarding the role of mutations affecting the sonic hedgehog (SHH pathway, specifically Smoothened (SMO, which have been postulated to serve as either an alternative pathogenetic mechanism or secondary mutations. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of ameloblastoma as well as the diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications of these discoveries.

  18. Activating FGFR2-RAS-BRAF mutations in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Noah A; Rolland, Delphine; McHugh, Jonathan B; Weigelin, Helmut C; Zhao, Lili; Lim, Megan S; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Betz, Bryan L

    2014-11-01

    Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic neoplasm whose overall mutational landscape has not been well characterized. We sought to characterize pathogenic mutations in ameloblastoma and their clinical and functional significance with an emphasis on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. A total of 84 ameloblastomas and 40 non-ameloblastoma odontogenic tumors were evaluated with a combination of BRAF V600E allele-specific PCR, VE1 immunohistochemistry, the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel, and Sanger sequencing. Efficacy of a BRAF inhibitor was evaluated in an ameloblastoma-derived cell line. Somatic, activating, and mutually exclusive RAS-BRAF and FGFR2 mutations were identified in 88% of cases. Somatic mutations in SMO, CTNNB1, PIK3CA, and SMARCB1 were also identified. BRAF V600E was the most common mutation, found in 62% of ameloblastomas and in ameloblastic fibromas/fibrodentinomas but not in other odontogenic tumors. This mutation was associated with a younger age of onset, whereas BRAF wild-type cases arose more frequently in the maxilla and showed earlier recurrences. One hundred percent concordance was observed between VE1 immunohistochemistry and molecular detection of BRAF V600E mutations. Ameloblastoma cells demonstrated constitutive MAPK pathway activation in vitro. Proliferation and MAPK activation were potently inhibited by the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. Our findings suggest that activating FGFR2-RAS-BRAF mutations play a critical role in the pathogenesis of most cases of ameloblastoma. Somatic mutations in SMO, CTNNB1, PIK3CA, and SMARCB1 may function as secondary mutations. BRAF V600E mutations have both diagnostic and prognostic implications. In vitro response of ameloblastoma to a BRAF inhibitor suggests a potential role for targeted therapy. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Acanthomatous ameloblastoma of mandible crossing the midline: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Neha; Sheikh, Soheyl; Bansal, Richa; Sabharwal, Robin; Gupta, Aanchal; Goyal, Ankit; Kainth, Nitika

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is the most common aggressive benign odontogenic tumor of the jaws. Ameloblastoma is a benign epithelial odontogenic tumor that typically arises in the mandible or maxilla or, rarely, in the immediate adjacent soft tissues. A clinical, radiographic and histopathological report is presented of a case of acanthomatous ameloblastoma in relation to molar in the left mandible of a 30-year-old healthy male. The histopathological examination of the removed specimen revealed the histopathological pattern of an acanthomatous ameloblastoma. The radiographic appearance of the lesion showed the presence of multilocular radiolucencies, which were crossing the midline, which is rarely found in ameloblastoma. Due to its rarity and lack of data, we take this opportunity to present a world first case of acanthomatous ameloblastoma which was crossing the midline.

  20. Investigation of basement membrane proteins in a case of granular cell ameloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapthanasupkul, Puangwan; Poomsawat, Sopee; Chindasombatjaroen, Jira

    2012-01-01

    Granular cell ameloblastoma is a rare, benign neoplasm of the odontogenic epithelium. A case of massive granular cell ameloblastoma in a 44-year-old Thai female is reported. Histopathological features displayed a follicular type of ameloblastoma with an accumulation of granular cells residing within the tumor follicles. After treatment by partial mandibulectomy, the patient showed a good prognosis without recurrence in a 2-year follow-up. To characterize the granular cells in ameloblastoma, we examined the expression of basement membrane (BM) proteins, including collagen type IV, laminins 1 and 5 and fibronectin using immunohistochemistry. Except for the granular cells, the tumor cells demonstrated a similar expression of BM proteins compared to follicular and plexiform ameloblastomas in our previous study, whereas the granular cells showed strong positivity to laminins 1 and 5 and fibronectin. The increased fibronectin expression in granular cells suggests a possibility of age-related transformation of granular cells in ameloblastoma. PMID:22361945

  1. Retrospective study of ameloblastoma: the possibility of conservative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Takumi; Imai, Yusuke; Takeda, Daisuke; Yasuoka, Daisuke; Ri, Shinshou; Shigeta, Takashi; Minamikawa, Tsutomu; Shibuya, Yasuyuki; Komori, Takahide

    2013-11-09

    At our institutions, most cases of the solid or multicystic type were treated as conservatively as possible in order to avoid disadvantages of radical treatment. The aim of present study was to retrospectively analyze the ameloblastoma cases diagnosed at our two institutions, to classify them according to the criteria of the 2005 WHO classification, and to evaluate the possibility of using a conservative approach for the surgical treatment of ameloblastoma. Maxillary cases, unicystic cases, peripheral cases and resection-treated cases were excluded from this study. In 23 tumors of mandibular solid or multicystic ameloblastoma, a patient's age, gender, location, clinical signs, duration, radiographic appearance, preoperative diagnosis, ameloblastoma subtypes, treatment, and recurrence were investigated. The recurrence rate (48.7%) in this study was lower than the reported recurrence rate after conservative treatment for solid or multicystic ameloblastoma and was higher than the reported recurrence rate of ameloblastoma, inclusive of other types. However, all patients who were diagnosed with recurrences have maintained their quality of life and were satisfied for at least several years after the conservative treatment. In conclusion, we demonstrated one possibility that a conservative approach might be employed in the surgical treatment of ameloblastoma (even of the solid or multicystic type).

  2. Ameloblastoma: a clinical review and trends in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClary, Andrew C; West, Robert B; McClary, Ashley C; Pollack, Jonathan R; Fischbein, Nancy J; Holsinger, Christopher F; Sunwoo, John; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Sirjani, Davud

    2016-07-01

    Ameloblastoma is a rare odontogenic neoplasm of the mandible and maxilla, with multiple histologic variants, and high recurrence rates if improperly treated. The current mainstay of treatment is wide local excision with appropriate margins and immediate reconstruction. Here we review the ameloblastoma literature, using the available evidence to highlight the change in management over the past several decades. In addition, we explore the recent molecular characterization of these tumors which may point towards new potential avenues of personalized treatment.

  3. Malignant ameloblastoma or ameloblastic carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, P.J.; Müller, H.

    1984-01-01

    The World Health Organization defines malignant ameloblastoma as a lesion exhibiting features of an ameloblastoma in primary and metastatic growths. To cases collected from the literature we have added two of our own cases in which features of an ameloblastoma were coupled with malignant behavior.

  4. Histopathology of ameloblastoma of the jaws; some critical observations based on a 40 years single institution experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertog, Doenja; Bloemena, Elisabeth; H A Aartman, Irene

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine all cases of intraosseous benign ameloblastomas treated between 1970 and 2010 in a single institution and to look for a possible correlation between the histopathological aspects and the demographical and clinical parameters, as well as the treatment outcome. The data of a total number of 44 patients were retrieved from the records. Nine patients were excluded because of doubt about the correct diagnosis (8 patients) or because of an extra-osseous presentation (1 patient). No statistically significant differences were found between the histopathological (sub)types of ameloblastomas and the demographical and clinical parameters, nor between the histopathological (sub)types and treatment outcome. Of the 28 patients treated by enucleation, in 17 patients one or more recurrences occurred, with no significant predilection for any histopathological (sub)type, including the unicystic type. There were no significant differences in the recurrence rate after enucleation in patients below and above the age of 20 years either. In six out of 17 patients with a recurrence, the recurrent lesion showed a different histopathological subtype than was encountered in the primary. In two cases a change from solid/multicystic to desmoplastic ameloblastomas was noticed. In conclusion, the current histopathological classification of benign intraosseous ameloblastoma does not seem to have clinical relevance with the possible exception of the luminal unicystic ameloblastoma that has been removed in toto, unfragmented. Since no primary desmoplastic ameloblastomas were encountered in the present study no further comments can be made on this apparently rare entity. Key words: Odontogenic tumours, ameloblastoma, histopathology. PMID:22157674

  5. Expression of RECK and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Hong-Liang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ameloblastoma is a frequent odontogenic benign tumor characterized by local invasiveness, high risk of recurrence and occasional metastasis and malignant transformation. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 promotes tumor invasion and progression by destroying the extracellular matrix (ECM and basement membrane. For this proteolytic activity, the endogenous inhibitor is reversion-inducing cysteine rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK. The aim of this study was to characterize the relationship between RECK and MMP-2 expression and the clinical manifestation of ameloblastoma. Methods Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR were employed to detect the protein and mRNA expression of RECK and MMP-2 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT, ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma. Results RECK protein expression was significantly reduced in KCOT (87.5%, ameloblastoma (56.5% and ameloblastic carcinoma (0% (P Conclusion Low or no RECK expression and increased MMP-2 expression may be associated with negative clinical findings in ameloblastoma. RECK may participate in the invasion, recurrence and malignant transformation of ameloblastoma by regulating MMP-2 at the post-transcriptional level.

  6. Maxillary ameloblastoma: Factors associated with risk of recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Liu, Zheqi; Peng, Canbang; Cao, Wei; Ji, Tong

    2017-05-01

    Maxillary ameloblastomas are rare and associated with an aggressive course because of the anatomic composition of the maxilla and adjacent structures. The risk factors associated with recurrence were analyzed in this retrospective study. Cases of maxillary ameloblastoma reported in a tertiary hospital from 2005 to 2015 were analyzed to identify clinicopathological and radiological factors associated with recurrence using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. A total of 890 patients with ameloblastomas were treated in this study, of whom only 51 (5.7%) had maxillary ameloblastomas. The median follow-up period was 56 ± 28.65 months. Of the maxillary ameloblastomas, 29 (56.8%) were primary and 22 (43.1%) were recurrent. Soft tissue or maxillary sinus invasion and primary or recurrent tumor status were risk factors significantly associated with recurrence in the univariate analyses (p = .006 vs p = .025, respectively), whereas the association between recurrence and surgical methods was borderline significant (p = .08). The multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that soft tissue or maxillary sinus involvement was significantly associated with recurrence (p = .023). Recurrent tumors and tumors with soft tissue or maxillary sinus involvement were risk factors for recurrence among patients with maxillary ameloblastoma. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 996-1000, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Interplay Between MMP-9 and TIMP-2 Regulates Ameloblastoma Behavior and Tooth Morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunia, Kalpana; Urs, Aadithya B; Kumar, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) have been implicated in the local invasiveness of ameloblastoma. This study aims to assess the role of MMP-9 and TIMP-2 in regulating tumor progression in ameloblastomas, taking tooth germs as control. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 4 tooth germs and 32 ameloblastomas were immunohistochemically examined using antibodies against MMP-9 and TIMP-2. Strong MMP-9 positivity was seen in the epithelial component in both controls and solid multicystic ameloblastoma. Statistically significant difference was observed in the mean stromal MMP-9 immunoscores between follicular, acanthomatous, and granular ameloblastoma when compared with the tooth germ (P=0.004). TIMP-2 expression in the epithelial and mesenchymal components of solid multicystic ameloblastoma and tooth germ was weak as compared with MMP-9 expression. Highest mean epithelial TIMP-2 immunoscore was observed in follicular ameloblastoma and the difference was statistically significant between follicular and granular ameloblastoma (P=0.05). The comparison of mean stromal TIMP-2 immunoscores showed statistically significant difference between follicular subtype and tooth germ (P=0.048), with tooth germ showing least expression among the groups studied. Strong stromal expression of MMP-9 in ameloblastoma compared with tooth germ mesenchyme indicated the possibility of tumor induction with release of growth factors and cytokines, resulting in invasiveness of ameloblastoma. Epithelial TIMP-2 expression was associated with the least and most aggressive behavior of follicular and granular cell ameloblastoma, respectively. Stromal TIMP-2 expression reflected its role in regulating tumor progression in ameloblastoma and in regulating developmental processes in tooth germs by their inhibitory effect on MMP-9.

  8. Ameloblastoma Phenotypes Reflected in Distinct Transcriptome Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shijia; Parker, Joel; Divaris, Kimon; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a locally invasive benign neoplasm derived from odontogenic epithelium and presents with diverse phenotypes yet to be characterized molecularly. High recurrence rates of 50–80% with conservative treatment in some sub-types warrants radical surgical resections resulting in high morbidity. The objective of the study was to characterize the transcriptome of ameloblastoma and identify relevant genes and molecular pathways using normal odontogenic tissue (human “dentome”) for comparison. Laser capture microdissection was used to obtain neoplastic epithelial tissue from 17 tumors which were examined using the Agilent 44 k whole genome microarray. Ameloblastoma separated into 2 distinct molecular clusters that were associated with pre-secretory ameloblast and odontoblast. Within the pre-secretory cluster, 9/10 of samples were of the follicular type while 6/7 of the samples in the odontoblast cluster were of the plexiform type (p ameloblastoma sub-types and have implications for the use of tailored treatment. PMID:27491308

  9. Difficulties in the diagnosis of plexiform ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Silva, Igor Iuco; Israel, Monica Simoes; Lima, Glauco Siqueira; de Queiroz Chaves Lourenço, Simone

    2012-03-01

    Plexiform ameloblastoma is a rare and benign odontogenic tumor which may reach grotesque proportions affecting over a region of lower molars. The correct diagnosis is essential to reduce this risk of local recurrences and obtain an effective treatment. A 10-year-old female patient, Caucasian, presented a complaint of painless facial asymmetry. The clinical and imaginological examinations showed an increase in volume in the left mandibular body related to radiolucent unilocular injury near the apex of the first molar, expansion of the vestibular cortical bone, and tooth root resorption ipsilaterally. The former intraosseous biopsy suggested an aneurysmal bone cyst. In reopening the previous marsupialization, a new biopsy was performed with histopathologic findings compatible with plexiform ameloblastoma associated with acute inflammation. Curettage was performed in the region associated with cryotherapy. At the last biopsy, the diagnosis of plexiform ameloblastoma was confirmed with multiple cystic formations and areas of foreign body reaction. The patient is being followed for 2 years and yet remains clinically and radiographically stable with no recurrence. This case reports the importance of selecting the correct area of biopsy of an intraosseous extended lesion to contribute to the diagnosis and treatment of plexiform ameloblastoma.

  10. Unicystic plexiform ameloblastoma: An insight for pediatric dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavagal C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastomas have been categorized broadly into three biologic variants: cystic (unicystic, solid, and peripheral. The term plexiform unicystic ameloblastoma refers to a pattern of epithelial proliferation that has been described in cystic lesions of the jaws. Although the histology suggests that cystic ameloblastomas follow a biologically low-grade course, recent evidence suggests that they may often behave clinically as biologically aggressive tumors. This is supported by the high incidence of cortical perforation, tooth resorption, lesion size, bony destruction, and a high rate of recurrence after simple enucleation. This article tries to provide an insight for pediatric dentists regarding this biologically distinct entity. A literature review on the topic has been added along with a case report highlighting the state-of-the-art approach and management of such ameloblastomas, in pediatric patients.

  11. [Ameloblastoma of the maxillary sinus treated with radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehal, Asmaa; Lobo, Rosabel; Naim, Asmaa; Azinovic, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign aggressive odontogenic tumor which requires early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. It commonly affects the mandible and radical surgery is the gold standard treatment. We report the case of a patient with ameloblastoma in extremely advanced phase affecting the maxillary sinus who was treated with intensity modulated conformal radiation therapy. Patient's evolution was marked by complete remission maintained after 24 months follow-up. Maxillary ameloblastoma is not well documented in the literature. It is usually diagnosed at the later stage when optimal surgery cannot be performed. This case study aimed to demonstrate that radiation therapy is a real therapeutic alternative in the treatment of advanced and inoperable forms of ameloblastoma.

  12. Endoscopic transnasal resection of ameloblastoma with intracranial extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodroffe, Royce W; Abel, Taylor J; Fletcher, Aaron; Grossbach, Andrew; Van Daele, Douglas J; O'Brien, Erin; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2014-05-01

    Ameloblastoma is a rare odontogenic tumor with characteristics of epithelial tissue that produces enamel for the developing tooth. This lesion is generally considered benign, but has malignant forms that invade locally and metastasize. We present a 60-year-old man with maxillary ameloblastoma that after multiple recurrences developed intracranial extension with dural involvement of the middle cranial fossa and was treated by endoscopic transnasal resection followed by radiation therapy. Our technique and intraoperative findings are described with a review of the literature on intracranial ameloblastoma. This patient represents a unique account of endoscopic transnasal resection being utilized in the treatment of intracranial extension of ameloblastoma and demonstrates potential for application in similar cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. RECK overexpression reduces invasive ability in ameloblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qi-xiang; Liang, Yan-can; Xu, Zhi-ying; Chen, Wei-liang; Xie, Hong-liang; Zhang, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Ameloblastoma is a frequent odontogenic neoplasm characterized by local invasiveness and high risk of recurrence. Reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) is a tumor suppressor that inhibits metastasis and angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of RECK overexpression on invasive potential in ameloblastoma cells. Lentiviral vectors containing human RECK gene were created and subsequently stably transfected into immortalized ameloblastoma cell line hTERT(+) -AM. Functional characteristics of hTERT(+) -AM cells with stable RECK overexpression included proliferation, migration, invasion, and regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, MMP-9 measured by zymography or commercially available assays. The stable and higher expression of RECK mRNA and protein (P 0.05). Overexpression of RECK gene significantly inhibited cell invasive ability of hTERT(+) -AM cells, suggesting RECK may be a new target for ameloblastoma treatment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Acanthomatous ameloblastoma in anterior mandibular region of a young patient: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugrappa, Sridevi; Jain, Ajay; Fuloria, Neeraj Kumar; Fuloria, Shivkanya

    2017-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is the most known of the epithelial odontogenic benign tumor. It is slow growing and locally aggressive in nature and most commonly seen in the posterior mandible. Various histopathological variants exist, among which acanthomatous type of ameloblastoma is one of the rarest types. Acanthomatous ameloblastoma is usually seen in older aged human population and most commonly reported in canine region of dogs in literature. Here, we report a rare case of acanthomatous ameloblastoma in a young male patient involving mandibular anterior region crossing the midline with recurrence over a period of 2 years of follow-up after surgical resection.

  15. Molecular and genetic aspects in the etiopathogenesis of ameloblastoma: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagi, Ravleen; Sahu, Shashikant; Rakesh, N

    2016-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is the second most common benign epithelial odontogenic tumor and though it is of a benign nature, it is locally invasive, has a high recurrence rate and could potentially become malignant. Many theories have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma. Proper understanding of the pathogenic mechanism involved in ameloblastoma and its proliferation aids in constituting proper treatment of choice at an early stage, preventing morbidity associated with extensive therapy. An attempt has been made to discuss the current concepts related to molecular and genetic changes that occur in ameloblastoma as these could affect treatment plan and prognosis. PMID:27721617

  16. Histopathology of ameloblastoma of the jaws; some critical observations based on a 40 years single institution experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertog, D.; Bloemena, E.; Aartman, I.H.A.; van der Waal, I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine all cases of intraosseous benign ameloblastomas treated between 1970 and 2010 in a single institution and to look for a possible correlation between the histopathological aspects and the demographical and clinical parameters, as well as the treatment

  17. Basal Cell Ameloblastoma of Mandible: A Rare Case Report with Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Shakya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is a slow-growing benign neoplasm that has a strong tendency to local invasion and that can grow to be quite large without metastasizing. Rare examples of distant metastasis of an ameloblastoma in lungs or regional lymph nodes do exist. It has an aggressive and recurrent course and is rarely metastatic. Radiographically it shares common features with other lesions such as the giant cell tumor, aneurysmal bone cyst, and renal cell carcinoma metastasis; a definitive diagnosis can only be made with histopathology. Basal cell ameloblastoma is believed to be the rarest histologic subtype in which the tumor is composed of more primitive cells and has even fewer features of peripheral palisading. Till date, only few cases of basal cell ameloblastoma have been reported in the literature. Considering the rarity of the lesion, we report here an interesting and unique case of basal cell ameloblastoma of the mandible occurring in a very old patient.

  18. Basal cell ameloblastoma of mandible: a rare case report with review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Hemant; Khare, Vikram; Pardhe, Nilesh; Mathur, Ena; Chouhan, Mansi

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a slow-growing benign neoplasm that has a strong tendency to local invasion and that can grow to be quite large without metastasizing. Rare examples of distant metastasis of an ameloblastoma in lungs or regional lymph nodes do exist. It has an aggressive and recurrent course and is rarely metastatic. Radiographically it shares common features with other lesions such as the giant cell tumor, aneurysmal bone cyst, and renal cell carcinoma metastasis; a definitive diagnosis can only be made with histopathology. Basal cell ameloblastoma is believed to be the rarest histologic subtype in which the tumor is composed of more primitive cells and has even fewer features of peripheral palisading. Till date, only few cases of basal cell ameloblastoma have been reported in the literature. Considering the rarity of the lesion, we report here an interesting and unique case of basal cell ameloblastoma of the mandible occurring in a very old patient.

  19. Recurrent Ameloblastoma: A Surgical Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chithra Aramanadka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is locally aggressive benign odontogenic tumour with increased risk of recurrence rate. The choice of treatment depends on the histologic subtype. Radical therapy is the recommended modality for solid ameloblastomas. The possibilities of recurrence even after enbloc resection are still high. The author presents two case reports of recurrent ameloblastomas postradical resection. First case describes the recurrence of ameloblastoma in the bone graft which was used for reconstruction, and the second case depicts recurrence in the infratemporal fossa. Intraoperative radiography of the frozen section of the soft tissue margin plays an important role in the holistic management of these lesions.

  20. Ameloblastoma: 25 Year Experience at a Single Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Tatyana; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Pan, Wei; LiVolsi, Virginia

    2016-12-01

    Ameloblastoma is a rare, locally aggressive odontogenic neoplasm, accounting for fewer than 1 % of head and neck tumors. Recent literature suggests that the initial surgical approach and histologic growth patterns are the most important prognostic determinants in ameloblastoma. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical presentation, management, and outcomes of patients with ameloblastoma with data reported in the literature; the study spanned 2 decades at a single institution. The institution's database was searched for all patients with pathologically confirmed ameloblastoma, diagnosed between 1990 and 2015. The data collected included sex, age, clinical and imaging findings, management, histologic pattern, clearance of surgical margins, length of follow-up, time to recurrence, and disease-related mortality. The potential risk factors of recurrence were evaluated using log-rank test, proportional hazard model, and Fisher exact test. Review of the database yielded 54 patients with pathologically confirmed ameloblastoma and follow-up. Recurrence was noted in 13 (24 %) patients. Surgical approach was associated with the risk of recurrence (6.1 % following radical resection vs. 52 % following limited surgery, p = 0.002). There were trends toward higher recurrence rate in the group with pathologically documented positive margins (p = 0.054) and in follicular ameloblastoma (p = 0.35). Transformation into ameloblastic carcinoma was identified in two patients. There was no disease-related mortality. Our study confirms the recent data regarding the importance of radical surgical resection in management of ameloblastoma. Surgical approach appears to be the strongest predictor of tumor clearance.

  1. A 40-year Retrospective Clinicopathological Study of Ameloblastoma in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghravanian, Nasrollah; Salehinejad, Jahanshah; Ghazi, Narges; Shirdel, Mohammad; Razi, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is the most common epithelial odontogenic tumor. It may show locally invasive behavior resulting in recurrence and malignancy. Therefore, appropriate diagnosis of this tumor is necessary. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinicopathological characteristics of ameloblastomas in an Iranian population. We present a 40-year retrospective study of patients diagnosed from 1971 to 2010 in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mashhad, Iran. Information gathered from patient records included age, gender, tumor location and histologic type. The frequency of odontogenic tumors among all lesions was 2.08% and ameloblastoma with 88 samples demonstrated the greatest prevalence (41.5%). Regarding gender, 60% of samples occurred in males. The mean age of studied patients was 33.02± 15.74 years with a peak of occurrence in the third decade of life. The most frequent location of tumor was the mandibles (93.2%). Eighty five (96.6%) tumors were recorded as benign and 3 (3.4%) as malignant. Of benign tumors, 62 (72.9%), 20 (23.5%) and 3 (3.6%) cases were of conventional, unicyctic and peripheral types, respectively. In contrast to most previous studies, the most common histologic subtype in the present study was plexiform. Knowledge of the incidence of ameloblastoma and its clinicopathologic features including most common location, gender and age distribution in different ethnogeographic backgrounds is necessary for accurate diagnosis and proper treatment.

  2. Microgenomics of Ameloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVilliers, P.; Suggs, C.; Simmons, D.; Murrah, V.; Wright, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of human ameloblastoma microdissected cells were characterized with the purpose of identifying genes and their protein products that could be targeted as diagnostic and prognostic markers as well as for potential therapeutic interventions. Five formalin-fixed, decalcified, paraffin-embedded samples of ameloblastoma were subjected to laser capture microdissection, linear mRNA amplification, and hybridization to oligonucleotide human 41,000 RNA arrays and compared with universal human reference RNA, to determine the gene expression signature. Assessment of the data by Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) and cluster analysis showed that 38 genes were highly expressed (two-fold increase) in all samples, while 41 genes were underexpressed (two-fold reduction). Elements of the sonic hedgehog pathway and Wingless type MMTV integration site family were validated by immunohistochemistry. We have identified the expression of multiple genes and protein products that could serve as potential diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic targets. PMID:21282726

  3. Hybrid Ameloblastoma of the Maxilla: A Puzzling Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintamaneni Raja Lakshmi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastomas are slow growing, locally invasive, benign odontogenic tumors of an epithelial origin, accounting for approximately 1% of all oral tumors. A 40-year-old man presented with a chief complaint of a swelling over the left side of his face of 4 years’ duration. On examination, gross facial asymmetry was detected, and a well-defined swelling was noted intraorally involving the left maxilla medially from the mid palatal raphe and obliterating the buccal vestibule laterally. The swelling was non-tender and exhibited dual consistencies: firm in the palate and cystic in the vestibular region. Computed tomography revealed a multilocular radiolucency, which involved the left maxilla, encroached into the left maxillary sinus and the nasal complex, and caused bony erosion. Early diagnosis and treatment are the key tools in managing ameloblastomas, failure of which may lead to a significant deterioration of the prognosis and an increased recurrence rate. Uncommon variants of ameloblastomas have been gaining interest recently. To date, 25 cases of hybrid ameloblastomas have been documented in the scientific literature. We present an extremely rare hybrid type of the ameloblastoma with combined follicular, cystic, acanthomatous, and desmoplastic variants, which render it the first of its kind to have ever been reported.

  4. A case report on desmoplastic ameloblastoma of anterior mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma Lamichhane, Narayan; Liu, Qilin; Sun, Hongchen; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-16

    Desmoplastic ameloblastoma (DA) is a rare variant that accounts for approximately 4-13% of ameloblastoma, displaying significant differences in anatomical site, imaging, and histologic appearance. It has been included in WHO classification of head and neck tumor (WHO-2005) as a variant of ameloblastoma. The tumor resembles benign fibro-osseous lesion for being frequently occurring in the anterior region of jaws as a mixed radiopaque-radiolucent lesion. We present a case of DA in a 43-year-old female with a painless swelling in the anterior region of mandible. No fluid was evident on fine needle aspiration. A mixed lesion with multilocular appearance was evident on both panoramic radiographs as well as computed tomography scan. An incisional biopsy confirmed it to be a case of desmoplastic ameloblastoma. Segmental mandibulectomy was performed from teeth 35 to 44. The patient is on routine follow-up and is currently free of ailment. The present case deserves emphasis because of its unfamiliar appearance, potentially aggressive nature and deceptive radiologic appearance maximizing the chances of misdiagnosis. So, the clinician should be alert enough to include desmoplastic ameloblastoma in differential diagnosis of any lesion/growth with mixed radiolucent-radiopaque appearance having ill-defined borders and occurring in anterior maxilla or mandible.

  5. Differential diagnosis between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawazu, Toshiyuki; Yoshiura, Kazunori; Yuasa, Kenji; Kanda, Shigenobu; Ohzeki, Satoru; Shinohara, Masanori [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry; Araki, Kazuyuki; Higuchi, Yoshinori

    1997-09-01

    Radiographic features of ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst are similar although their biological behaviors are different. Therefore, it is very important to differentiate these lesions before treatment. The aim of this study was to differentiate between the two lesions based on characteristic CT findings. Fifty-three patients diagnosed histopathologically as having ameloblastoma (29 cases) or odontogenic keratocyst (24 cases) and who underwent CT were evaluated radiologically, and some characteristic radiological features to differentiate both lesions were assessed. Ameloblastomas tended to be more than 40 mm in long diameter and 0.5 short/long diameter ratio, whereas odontogenic keratocysts were less than 40 mm and 0.5, respectively (P<0.05: Chi-square test). Buccal expansion of the cortex was seen more often in ameloblastomas than in odontogenic keratocysts (P<0.05: Chi-square test). Together with these features and internal high density structure, which was only seen in odontogenic keratocysts, differential diagnostic criteria between ameloblastomas and odontogenic keratocysts were proposed. Diagnostic accuracy based on these criteria was 84.9%. These results that our criteria to differentiate ameloblastomas from odontogenic keratocysts using CT are clinically useful prior to treatment. (author)

  6. BRAF inhibitor treatment of primary BRAF-mutant ameloblastoma with pathologic assessment of response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Serena; Pollack, Jonathan R; Kaplan, Michael J; Colevas, A Dimitri; West, Robert B

    2016-07-01

    Molecular characterization of ameloblastoma has indicated a high frequency of driver mutations in BRAF and SMO. Preclinical data suggest that Food and Drug Administration-approved BRAF-targeted therapies may be immediately relevant for patients with ameloblastoma positive for the BRAF V600E mutation. A neoadjuvant treatment regime of dabrafenib was given to a patient with recurrent BRAF-mutant mandibular ameloblastoma. The patient subsequently underwent left mandible composite resection of the tumor and pathologic evaluation of treatment response. The ameloblastoma had a slow but dramatic response with >90% tumor volume reduction. The inner areas of the tumor underwent degeneration and squamous differentiation, and intact ameloblastoma was present in the outer areas associated with bone. Targeted neoadjuvant therapy for ameloblastoma may be useful in certain clinical settings of primary ameloblastoma. These might include tumors of advanced local stage when a neoadjuvant reduction could alter the extent of surgery and instances of local recurrence when surgical options are limited. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MicroRNAs expression profile in solid and unicystic ameloblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Setién-Olarra

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors (OT represent a specific pathological category that includes some lesions with unpredictable biological behavior. Although most of these lesions are benign, some, such as the ameloblastoma, exhibit local aggressiveness and high recurrence rates. The most common types of ameloblastoma are the solid/multicystic (SA and the unicystic ameloblastoma (UA; the latter considered a much less aggressive entity as compared to the SA. The microRNA system regulates the expression of many human genes while its deregulation has been associated with neoplastic development. The aim of the current study was to determine the expression profiles of microRNAs present in the two most common types of ameloblastomas.MicroRNA expression profiles were assessed using TaqMan® Low Density Arrays (TLDAs in 24 samples (8 SA, 8 UA and 8 control samples. The findings were validated using quantitative RTqPCR in an independent cohort of 19 SA, 8 UA and 19 dentigerous cysts as controls.We identified 40 microRNAs differentially regulated in ameloblastomas, which are related to neoplastic development and differentiation, and with the osteogenic process. Further validation of the top ranked microRNAs revealed significant differences in the expression of 6 of them in relation to UA, 7 in relation to SA and 1 (miR-489 that was related to both types.We identified a new microRNA signature for the ameloblastoma and for its main types, which may be useful to better understand the etiopathogenesis of this neoplasm. In addition, we identified a microRNA (miR-489 that is suggestive of differentiating among solid from unicystic ameloblastoma.

  8. Recurrent unicystic mural type ameloblastoma in a 9-year-old boy, 8 years follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Sengüven

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicystic ameloblastoma is not a rare odontogenic tumor in the pediatric population. A significant care should be given to unicystic ameloblastoma if it has mural invasions due to its local aggressiveness, high recurrence rates and radical management options as in conventional ameloblastoma. Fine needle aspiration (FNA cytology is a rapid, non-traumatic diagnostic method that provides a required attention prior to surgery. We present an excisionsl biopsy proved FNA diagnosed mural type unicystic ameloblastoma in a 9-year-old child recurred as a solid ameloblastoma after 8 years. When distinctive features of ameloblastoma are known, an accurate diagnosis can be made by FNA cytology, in combination with clinicoradiological findings. This method gives benefit to the patients especially the younger ones both for the pre-operative surgical planning and the post-operative follow-up.

  9. A study of ameloblastoma on the relationship between histopathologic patterns and radiographic characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyun Bae; You, Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlationship between histopathologic types of ameloblastoma and their radiographic appearance.The materials for this study consisted of 106 patients diagnosed as ameloblastoma both radiographically and histologically. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The incidence of ameloblastoma in male (60 cases, 56.6%) was slightly higher than that in female (46 cases, 43.4%). The average age was estimated as 30.7 years with a range from 6 to 76 years. The second decade revealed the highest rate. 2. 106 ameloblastomas were histopathologically classified as 36 uicystic, 28 plexiform, 20 follicular, 14 acanthomatous, 7 granular cell, and 1 basalcell ameloblastoma. 3. Unilocular, soap-bubble appearance and scalloped margin were the radiographic appearances frequently seen in unicystic ameloblastoma . The predominant radiographic appearance of plexiform ameloblastoma showed unilocular radiolucency with scalloped margin. 4. 19.8%, 21 cases of ameloblastoma in this study showed containing tooth in their tumor mass by radiography. 5. Root resorption occurred in 37 cases (34.9%) and tooth displacement in 7 cases (6.6%). Root resorption and tooth displacement occurred in same patient were 24 cases (22.6%). 6. Recurrence occurred in 21.7% and average year between initial treatment and recurrence were 2 years.

  10. Tumor odontogênico cístico calcificante com proliferação ameloblastomosa em seio maxilar Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor with ameloblastoma proliferation in the maxillary sinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Gonçalves Carnasciali

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available O tumor odontogênico cístico calcificante (TOCC com proliferação ameloblastomosa é uma variante rara entre os cistos maxilares. Este trabalho objetiva apresentar o relato clínico de um paciente do sexo masculino, 18 anos de idade, que apresentava aumento de volume extra e intraoral do lado esquerdo da maxila, firme à palpação, de característica normocrômica e indolor. A conduta consistiu em realização de tomografia Cone Beam, biópsia incisional, remoção completa da lesão, curetagem e fixação maxilar. O paciente encontra-se em acompanhamento clínico e radiográfico sem recidiva após doze meses. Dessa forma, ressalta-se a importância do diagnóstico precoce, a conduta clínica empregada e o acompanhamento periódico.Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors (CCOT with proliferative ameloblastoma are a rare variant among maxillary cysts. This study aims to present a clinical report of an 18-year-old male patient with extra and intra oral swelling of the left maxilla, firm to touch, with normochromic characteristics and painless. The clinical approach comprised cone-beam tomography, incisional biopsy, complete removal of the lesion, curettage and maxilla fixation. His clinical and radiographic follow-up has revealed no relapse after 12 months. Hence, this study corroborates the importance of early diagnosis, clinical approach and periodical follow-ups.

  11. Acanthomatous ameloblastoma with atypical foci in five dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, Jennifer L; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Powers, Barb E; Schaffer, Paula A

    2017-03-01

    Acanthomatous ameloblastoma is a common, locally invasive, nonmetastasizing tumor of the canine oral cavity. The long-term prognosis for canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma is good if complete excision can be achieved, usually by maxillectomy or mandibulectomy. A variant of acanthomatous ameloblastoma with atypical foci was noted in 5 dogs. There was no age, breed, or sex predisposition. Atypical cells were pleomorphic with a high mitotic rate. They were immunohistochemically negative for cytokeratin, vimentin, melan A, PNL2, CD3, Pax5, CD18, chromogranin A, and synaptophysin. Ultrastructurally, the atypical cells had modest amounts of electron-lucent cytoplasm, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, zonula adherens junctions, cleaved or irregular nuclei, and occasional cytoplasmic structures consistent with secretory granules or lysosomes. Complete excision was achieved by maxillectomy or mandibulectomy in 3 dogs; the lesion was incompletely excised in 2 dogs. No ancillary therapy was elected in any patient. No local recurrence or distant metastasis was reported in any case. One patient died of heart failure 20 mo following complete excision; all other patients were alive at last follow-up (average follow-up: 18.8 mo, range: 6-30 mo). The histogenesis of the atypical foci is unclear, but atypical foci within acanthomatous ameloblastoma do not appear to be associated with metastasis or with a poor prognosis relative to acanthomatous ameloblastoma with typical histologic morphology.

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma (Marjolin's ulcer in an orocutaneous fistula of a large mandibular ameloblastoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nthumba Peter M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Ameloblastomas are rare lesions constituting 1% of all jaw tumors. Oral squamous cell carcinomas are common lesions; these constitute about 90% of all oral cancers. Concurrent tumors consisting of ameloblastoma and squamous cell carcinoma are extremely rare. Case presentation This case report describes a 35-year-old African man who presented with a large mandibular tumor with an orocutaneous fistula that was found to be an ameloblastoma on histopathological examination, with concurrent squamous cell carcinoma histology within the fistula. This presentation was consistent with a Marjolin's ulcer within an ameloblastoma. Conclusion Ameloblastomas and Marjolin's ulcers require different management strategies. Careful histopathological examination of surgical specimens is key to patient outcome, as treatment of these patients depends on an accurate diagnosis.

  13. Is Conservative Surgical Treatment Sufficient to Treat Unicystic Mural Ameloblastoma in Infant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Ahmet Hüseyin; Yolcu, Ümit; Erdem, Necip Fazil; Asutay, Fatih

    2015-06-01

    Ameloblastoma, a benign neoplasm derived from odontogenic epithelium, is an aggressive and locally invasive tumor. It represents 11% of all odontogenic tumors and 1% of all oral odontogenic epithelial tumors. In this case report, a 20-month-old boy was referred to our clinic with complaint of collapse in his symphysis region of the mandible. Radiographic examination revealed unilocular radiolucency in this region. The lesion was enucleated with 1 tooth germ under general anesthesia and diagnosed as mural unicystic ameloblastoma by histopathologic examination. After the surgery, complete healing was obtained clinically and radiographically. No sign of recurrence has been seen during the follow-up period of 4.5 years. To our knowledge, this was the second youngest case of ameloblastoma in the English literature. However, it is the youngest case of ameloblastoma that occurred in an infant boy.

  14. Tissue microarray use for immunohistochemical study of ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves-Silva, Rodrigo; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; de Jesus, Adriana Souza; Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo; Rocha, André Caroli; Brandão, Thais Bianca; Vargas, Pablo Agustin; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger

    2016-10-01

    Ameloblastoma is a locally aggressive odontogenic tumor with high rates of recurrence. To better understand the molecular basis of ameloblastoma, tissue microarray (TMA) may represent a useful tool. However, despite TMA has been considered a high-throughput technique for different human neoplasms, it remains to be validated in the ameloblastoma context. Therefore, the objective of this study was to validate TMA for immunohistochemical study of ameloblastoma, determining its most appropriate design. Forty cases of ameloblastoma were manually distributed in two TMA blocks assembled in triplicate containing 1.0- and 2.0-mm cores (20 cases each). Immunohistochemistry for cytokeratins 14 and 19, and Bcl-2 and Ki-67 was performed, and semiquantitative analysis was performed. Results obtained with TMA sections were compared to their corresponding conventional whole-section slides (CWSS). Kappa statistical test demonstrated that both 1.0- and 2.0-mm cores assessed as duplicate or triplicate significantly correlated with CWSS, with higher levels obtained using Ki67 (k = 0.98, 0.97, 0.88, 0.87) and CK19 (k = 0.62, 0.58, 0.85, 0.85). There was no significant difference between 1.0- and 2.0-mm cores, and between duplicate and triplicate values. 1.0-mm TMA showed a higher index of core loss (33.74% vs. 4.99%). Using a manual arrayer, it was demonstrated that 1.0-mm TMA arranged in duplicate is a valid method for ameloblastoma immunohistochemical study with satisfactory levels of agreement between TMA cylinders and CWSS. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Desmoplastic ameloblastoma in the anterior mandible crossing the midline: A rare variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appaji Athota

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmoplastic ameloblastoma (DA is a rare variant of ameloblastoma. One hundred and forty-five cases of desmoplastic ameloblastoma have been reported till 2007 in the literature. This article presents a rare case of desmoplastic ameloblastoma in the parasymphysial region. Review of the literature has revealed that the tumor most commonly occurs in the third to fifth decade of life, with a male predilection of 3:2. The anterior region of the maxilla is the part that is most commonly found to be affected. The radiological features reveal a mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesion with poorly defined to well-defined borders. However, our case differed from the reviewed cases, as it was found to be with well-defined borders. The histological findings of the case were consistent with the histological appearance of the reviewed cases and showed extensive stromal desmoplasia and small tumor nests of odontogenic epithelium scattered in the stroma.

  16. Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Mandibular Ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Eswar

    2003-01-01

    Five interesting cases of mandibular ameloblastoma are presented here, each case showing different histological pattern and corresponding computer tomographic appearance. Also an attempt is made to establish CT pattern in these histological varieties of ameloblastoma.

  17. Assessment of ameloblastomas using MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaumi, Jun-ichi; Hisatomi, Miki; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Choi, Yong Suk; Kawai, Noriko; Konouchi, Hironobu; Kishi, Kanji

    2005-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated magnetic resonance images (MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) of ameloblastomas. MRI and DCE-MRI were performed for 10 ameloblastomas. We obtained the following results from the MRI and DCE-MRI. (a) Ameloblastomas can be divided into solid and cystic portions on the basis of MR signal intensities. (b) Ameloblastomas show a predilection for intermediate signal intensity on T1WI, high signal intensity on T2WI, and well enhancement in the solid portion; they also show a homogeneous intermediate signal intensity on T1WI and homogeneous high signal intensity on T2WI, and no enhancement in the cystic portion. (c) The mural nodule or thick wall can be detected in ameloblastomas lesions. (d) CI curves of ameloblastomas show two patterns: the first pattern increases, reaches a plateau at 100-300 s, then sustains the plateau or decreases gradually to 600-900 s, while the other increases relatively rapidly, reaches a plateau at 90-120 s, then decreases relatively rapidly to 300 s, and decreases gradually thereafter. There was no difference in the CI curve patterns among primary and recurrent cases, a case with glandular odontogenic tumor in ameloblastoma or among histopathological types such as plexiform, follicular, mixed, desmoplastic, and unicystic type

  18. Odontogenic tumors: A review of 675 cases in Eastern Libya | Goteti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diagnosis was based on the most recent WHO (2005) classification of OTs. Results: OTs constituted 12.6% of all oral/jaw tumors and tumor-like lesions. Ameloblastoma (28.2%) was the most common type, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (25.2%) and odontoma (19.9%). The male: female ratio was 1.2:1, and ...

  19. Cystic ameloblastoma--behavior and treatment of 21 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, T; Pogrel, M A; Smith, R A; Regezi, J A

    2001-11-01

    This article presents a series of cystic ameloblastomas in which an unexpected capacity for bony destruction and recurrence was shown. Proliferation rates were evaluated to see if there is a correlation to the biologic behavior of these lesions. Clinical and histologic material on 21 consecutive cystic ameloblastomas was retrieved and reviewed. Immunohistochemical analysis of proliferation-associated Ki-67 protein was carried out to determine mitotic indices for 10 cystic ameloblastomas, and these were compared to 10 solid ameloblastomas and 10. dentigerous cysts. Lesions from 10 males and 11 females (age range, 12 to 72 years; mean age, 35 years) were included. All lesions were in the mandible; 18 in posterior sites. Lesion size ranged from 2 to 8 cm in greatest dimension. Cortical perforation was evident in 7 lesions, and multilocularity (more often in older patients) was evident in 6 lesions. Recurrences were seen in 9 cases (43%), and the time between initial treatment and recurrence was as long as 10 years. The characteristic histopathologic feature was a thin, stratified squamous cystic lining with spongiosis and basal palisades. Ten cases also showed mural invasion, and 4 had plexiform luminal proliferation. The proliferation rate of the cystic ameloblastomas (represented as a percentage of cells in cell cycle) was 4.3%, compared with solid tumors at 2.8% and dentigerous cysts at 6.6%. Cystic ameloblastomas occur within a wide age range, but at slightly lower mean age than solid lesions. There is a very strong predilection for the mandible, and there appears to be no gender difference. Lesions frequently become large, destructive, and/or multilocular. There is a significant recurrence potential, and extended follow-up is advisable. The deceptively innocent histology of cystic ameloblastomas belies the biologic potential of these lesions. The mechanism(s) by which cystic ameloblastomas gain their destructive behavior seems less likely associated with

  20. An unusual case of unicystic intramural ameloblastoma and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Ricci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is the most common tumor of odontogenic origin. There are various types of this tumor and confusion still exists among the clinicians about the correct classification. Multicystic ameloblastoma is the most frequent subtype while unicystic ameloblastoma can be considered as a variant of the solid or multycistic. This subtype is considered as a less aggressive tumor with a variable recurrence rate. However, its frequency is often underestimated. The aim of this article is reviewing the recent literature about unicystic ameloblastoma using our unusual clinical case as a starting point to illustrate this discussion. A 30-year-old man who had been complaining of slight pain in the premolar and molar area of the left side of mandible had a check up at our department. X-rays revealed a unilocular radiotrasparency with radiopaque margins. The first histological diagnosis was an odontogenic cyst. Successive histological evaluations revealed that ameloblastic epithelial islands were present in lassus connective tissue. We think that our case report provides new insights into the approach to the ameloblastoma diagnosis. We agree with authors who have pointed out that a single small biopsy may often be inadequate for the correct diagnosis of amelobastoma. Moreover, in the light of our experience, it should be kept in mind that ameloblastomas may have sometimes unusual presentations and this fact should induce surgeons and pathologists to consider carefully each lesion.

  1. Ameloblastoma: a clinical and therapeutic analysis on six cases,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Barra de Moraes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastomas are odontogenic tumors that are locally invasive and slow-growing. Their etiology is still not well defined, but the forms of treatment have been widely discussed because of the possibility of tumor recurrence and postoperative complications. In this study, six patients who were diagnosed with ameloblastoma in the mandibular region and were treated in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Hospital das Clínicas, Federal University of Goiás, between 1958 and 1963, were evaluated. The radiological, clinical and therapeutic characteristics were evaluated. There was no predominance regarding gender in the sample studied. The symptoms most often presented by the patients were pain and tumor formation. The radiological characteristics with greatest incidence were multilocular lesions and the treatment used for all the patients was radical surgery. There was no recurrence over the minimum follow-up period of one year and six months.

  2. Hybrid desmoplastic ameloblastoma: A case report of rare entity and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Shirish Joshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastomas are one of the common odontogenic tumors of the oral cavity. They usually present with unilocular or multilocular radiolucency associated with or without impacted tooth. Among the variants of ameloblastomas, desmoplastic ameloblastoma (DA casts a mixed radiolucent/radiopaque shadow on X-ray and radiograph seldom suggests a diagnosis of ameloblastoma. DA is a rare entity that exhibits important differences in anatomic distribution, histologic appearance, radiographic findings when compared to other variants of ameloblastoma. This fact has been considered by World Health Organization (WHO and now it has been included as a separate entity in WHO classification (2005 of odontogenic tumors. About 145 cases of DA have been reported worldwide, but cases reported in India are very few. We report a case of a hybrid variety of DA in a female patient in the anterior maxillary region between 12 and 13 as painless hard swelling, showing mixed radiolucent/radiopaque shadow on radiographic examination. Histopathology revealed odontogenic epithelium in the form of follicles, typical of solid/multicystic ameloblastoma, with cystic degeneration and squamous metaplasia at places and elsewhere there were odontogenic islands compressed by dense fibrocellular stroma suggestive of desmoplasia. Also seen was osseous metaplasia. We have also done a detailed review of literature concerning the presentation of DA.

  3. Potential involvement of chondroitin sulfate A in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangjun; Kurita, Hiroshi; Xiao, Tiepeng; Iijima, Kyou; Kurashina, Kenji; Nakayama, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Ameloblastoma is classified as a benign odontogenic tumor characterized by locally invasive behavior and high risk of recurrence. Here, we evaluate a potential role for glycosaminoglycan, a structural component of cell membranes and extracellular matrix, in ameloblstoma pathogenesis. We subjected formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 34 cases of ameloblastoma, 10 of odontogenic keratocyst, and 17 of dentigerous cyst to immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies recognizing chondroitin sulfate A (CS-A), heparan sulfate (HS), and keratan sulfate (KS). Expression levels of CS-A in epithelial component and stroma of ameloblastoma were significantly higher than those in odontogenic keratocyst and dentigerous cyst. Moreover, CS-A in ameloblastoma was more strongly expressed in stellate reticulum-like cells than in amelobast-like cells with statistical significance. On the other hand, expression levels of HS and KS in epithelial component and stroma of ameloblastoma were lower compared with CS-A. These results overall reveal that among these odontogenic lesions, CS-A is preferentially expessed in ameloblastoma, suggesting potential pathogenetic role probably in cytodifferention of tumor cells to stellate reticulum-like cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel marker of ameloblastoma and systematic review of immunohistochemical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalele, Bacem A E O; Al-Shiaty, Rami A

    2016-06-01

    This study aims at investigating the pathogenesis and oncogenesis of ameloblastoma. Being the commonest odontogenic tumor with idiopathic nature, ameloblastoma poses a fierce controversy about its oncogenesis. Immunohistochemical markers, over years, have highlighted specific pathways which are inherently undertaken in the tumorigenic process of ameloblastoma. Besides the recently pronounced clue of BRAF V600E mutant gene, this study introduces a new marker with its outstanding impact on our contemporary knowledge about ameloblastoma. Extrapolating from the systematic review of medical literature and recruiting a novel immunohistochemical marker, ameloblastoma enacts a new scenario supporting the approved involvement of MAPK by overexpressing WT1 a total of 37 archival cases, regardless of the histological variant in study. There evinces a significant contribution of Wilm's tumor gene, as an oncogene rather than a suppressor gene, to the pathogenesis of the ameloblastomatous tumorigenesis. Moreover, no ameloblastomatous histological phenotype has established, given the literature underpinned, a concrete impact on the clinical behavior. Immunohistochemical research papers which investigated tumorigenesis - although they do not quantitatively measure much- had the most significant impact on the diagnostic and prognostic levels. WT1 may play, therefore, a remarkable role in the oncogenesis of ameloblastoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Conservative approach: using decompression procedure for management of a large unicystic ameloblastoma of the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Samuel Porfirio; de Mello-Filho, Francisco Veríssimo; Rodrigues, Willian Caetano; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; de Melo, Willian Morais

    2014-05-01

    Ameloblastoma is a relatively uncommon benign odontogenic tumor, which is locally aggressive and has a high tendency to recur, despite its benign histopathologic features. This pathology can be classified into 4 groups: unicystic, solid or multicystic, peripheral, and malignant. There are 3 variants of unicystic ameloblastoma, as luminal, intraluminal, and mural. Therefore, in mural ameloblastoma, the fibrous wall of the cyst is infiltrated with tumor nodules, and for this reason it is considered the most aggressive variant of unicystic ameloblastomas. Various treatment techniques for ameloblastomas have been proposed, which include decompression, enucleation/curettage, sclerotizing solution, cryosurgery, marginal resection, and aggressive resection. Literature shows treatment of this lesion continues to be a subject of intense interest and some controversy. Thus, the authors aimed to describe a case of a mural unicystic ameloblastoma of follicular subtype in a 19-year-old subject who was successfully treated using conservative approaches, as decompression. The patient has been followed up for 3 years, and has remained clinically and radiographically disease-free.

  6. Anti-apoptotic role of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in the proliferation of ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Shiori; Mitsuyasu, Takeshi; Nakao, Yu; Kawano, Shintaro; Goto, Yuichi; Matsubara, Ryota; Nakamura, Seiji

    2013-09-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway is crucial to growth and patterning during organogenesis. Aberrant activation of the SHH signaling pathway can result in tumor formation. We examined the expression of SHH signaling molecules and investigated the involvement of the SHH pathway in the proliferation of ameloblastoma, the most common benign tumor of the jaws. We used immunohistochemistry on ameloblastoma specimens and immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR on the ameloblastoma cell line AM-1. We also used the inhibitors of SHH signaling, SHH neutralizing antibody and cyclopamine, to assess the effects of SHH on the proliferation of AM-1 cells. We detected expression of SHH, patched, GLI1, GLI2 and GLI3 in the ameloblastoma specimens and AM-1 cells. The proliferation of these cells was significantly inhibited in the presence of SHH neutralizing antibody or cyclopamine; this was confirmed by BrdU incorporation assays. Furthermore, in the presence of SHH neutralizing antibody, nuclear translocation of GLI1 and GLI2 was abolished, apoptosis was induced, BCL-2 expression decreased and BAX expression increased. Our results suggest that the SHH signaling pathway is constitutively active in ameloblastoma and plays an anti-apoptotic role in the proliferation of ameloblastoma cells through autocrine loop stimulation.

  7. Maxillary Ameloblastoma with Orbital Involvement: An Institutional Experience and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Tatyana; Lee, Vivian; LiVolsi, Virginia

    To describe 8 patients with orbital involvement by ameloblastoma and to review the literature on this topic. The electronic medical records and pathology databases of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania were searched to identify all patients with histopathologically confirmed ameloblastoma diagnosed between 1990 and 2015. PubMed database was searched for all well-documented cases of maxillary ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma ex-ameloblastoma with orbital involvement published in the English literature. The information collected on the compiled 23 patients included age, sex, clinical presentation, imaging findings, management, tumor histopathologic features, and follow up. Review of medical records identified 8 patients with orbital involvement by ameloblastoma. Literature search yielded 15 patients with well-documented orbital involvement by ameloblastoma. Most tumors occurred in men (19 of 23, M:F = 4-5:1) with an average age of 56 years. The overall rates of recurrence, visual compromise, death, and confirmed disease-related mortality were 70% (16/23), 26% (6/23), 39% (9/23), and 22% (5/23), respectively. The initial surgical approach correlated with prognosis. The rates of recurrence, orbital exenteration, and mortality in the cohort managed with conservative surgery or partial maxillectomy were 57% (8/14), 29% (4/14), and 50% (7/14), respectively. In contrast, the patients initially managed with a radical resection had substantially lower frequencies of tumor recurrence (2/7, 29%), exenteration (1/7, 14%), and death (1/7, 14%). Malignant transformation to ameloblastic carcinoma occurred in the setting of recurrent disease in 3 patients and in 1 patient with prolonged duration of symptoms, suggestive of a long-standing tumor. Maxillary ameloblastoma can rarely involve the orbit, leading to significant ocular morbidity and occasional mortality. Prompt radical resection of the tumor has the potential to decrease the likelihood of recurrence and

  8. Intraosseous Ameloblastoma with a Prominent Extraosseous Component: Pitfalls in Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kenji; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Saito, Ichiro; Kusama, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    For many years, gingival tumors of what appear to be peripherally located intraosseous ameloblastoma (IA) arising from the alveolar bone surface have often been confused with peripheral ameloblastoma (PA) causing resorption of the underlying bone. We analyzed a series of five cases of ameloblastoma that demonstrated a combined PA and IA architecture. The tumor commonly involved the anterior-premolar area, mostly in the maxilla and mainly in middle-aged men. The clinical presentation was an exophytic gingival mass inferior to which was a small bone defect. The predominant extraosseous component showed a papillary gross surface, reflecting the histologic proof of fusion between the submucosal tumor and the surface epithelium. In addition to the PA-like growth pattern, common to all was the presence of neoplastic destruction of the alveolar process, corresponding to an associated radiolucent lesion. This restrained component was acceptable as IA. In two cases, recurrence was observed deep in the alveolar bone with no involvement of the gingiva. These tumors appear to be IA that arose from the marginal alveolar bone and grew preferentially in the gingiva, forming a PA-like appearance. From diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic points of view, this type of IA should not be confused with PA. PMID:20549402

  9. PTCH-1 and MDM2 expression in ameloblastoma from a West African sub-population: implication for chemotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udeabor, Samuel Ebele; Adisa, Akinyele Olumuyiwa; Lawal, Ahmed Oluwatoyin; Barbeck, Mike; Booms, Patrick; Sader, Robert Alexander; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a slow growing, painless odontogenic swelling which can attain sizes that result in severe deformities of the craniofacial complex. It is the most commonly encountered odontogenic tumor in Nigeria. Surgical intervention is currently the method of treatment; however identification of altered molecular pathways may inform chemotherapeutic potential. The Protein Patched homolog 1 (PTCH-1) is overexpressed in ameloblastoma. Also, mutation in the MDM2 gene can reduce the tumor suppressor function of p53 and promote ameloblastoma growth. No study however has characterized the molecular profile of African cases of ameloblastoma with a view to developing chemotherapeutic alternatives. The objective was to characterize the PTCH-1 genetic profile of Ameloblastoma in Nigerian patients as a first step in investigating its potential for chemotherapeutic intervention. Twenty-eight FFPE blocks of ameloblastoma cases from Nigerian patients were prepared for antibody processing to PTCH-1 (Polyclonal Anti-PTCH antibody ab39266) and MDM2 (Monoclonal Anti-MDM2 antibody (2A10) ab16895). Cytoplasmic brown staining was considered as positive for PTCH while nuclear staining was positive for MDM2. Moderate and strong expressions for PTCH in ameloblast and stellate reticulum were 78.6% and 60.7% respectively. Only 3 (10.7%) cases expressed MDM2. The importance of our study is that it supports, in theory, anti-PTCH/SHH chemotherapeutics for Nigerian ameloblastoma cases and also infers the possible additional use of anti-p53 agents.

  10. Invadopodia proteins, cortactin, N-WASP and WIP differentially promote local invasiveness in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siar, Chong Huat; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Bin Abdul; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Mohamed Om Alblazi, Kamila; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Ng, Kok Han

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration and invasion through interstitial tissues are dependent upon several specialized characteristics of the migratory cell notably generation of proteolytic membranous protrusions or invadopodia. Ameloblastoma is a benign odontogenic epithelial neoplasm with a locally infiltrative behaviour. Cortactin and MMT1-MMP are two invadopodia proteins implicated in its local invasiveness. Other invadopodia regulators, namely N-WASP, WIP and Src kinase remain unclarified. This study addresses their roles in ameloblastoma. Eighty-seven paraffin-embedded ameloblastoma cases (20 unicystic, 47 solid/multicystic, 3 desmoplastic and 17 recurrent) were subjected to immunohistochemistry for expression of cortactin, N-WASP, WIP, Src kinase and F-actin, and findings correlated with clinicopathological parameters. Invadopodia proteins (except Src kinase) and F-actin were widely detected in ameloblastoma (cortactin: n = 73/87, 83.9%; N-WASP: n = 59/87; 67.8%; WIP: n = 77/87; 88.5%; and F-actin: n = 87/87, 100%). Protein localization was mainly cytoplasmic and/or membranous, and occasionally nuclear for F-actin. Cortactin, which functions as an actin-scaffolding protein, demonstrated significantly higher expression levels within ameloblastoma tumoral epithelium than in stroma (P ameloblastoma is dependent upon the migratory potential of its tumour cells as defined by their distribution of cortactin, N-WASP and WIP in correlation with F-actin cytoskeletal dynamics. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Expression and mechanism of regulation of PP2A/Pr65 in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiuqiu; Wang, Guannan; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Zhong, Ming

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the expression of PP2A/PR65 protein in ameloblastoma and the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of PP2A/PR65. The association between PP2A/PR65 and the clinicopathological characteristics of tumor specimens in ameloblastoma were to provide a theoretical basis for the diagnosis, therapy and prognosis of ameloblastoma. Streptavidin-peroxidase (S-P) immunohistochemical staining was used to detect PP2A/Pr65 expression changes in a total of 68 cases of ameloblastoma, six ameloblastic carcinomas, 21 squamous cell carcinomas and seven normal oral mucosas. Western blot was used to analyze PP2A/PR65 protein expression in 15 cases of ameloblastoma and three cases of normal oral mucosa. Of the 68 cases analyzed, four cases were negative, 25 cases were weakly positive, 20 cases were moderately positive and 19 cases were strongly positive. In six cases of ameloblastic carcinoma, three cases were weak positive, one case was positive, two cases were strongly positive and none were negative. In 21 cases of squamous cell carcinomas, three cases were negative, 17 cases were weakly positive, one case was moderately positive and none were strongly positive. Western blot analysis showed that, PP2A/Pr65 protein expression was lower in ameloblastoma tissue compared with normal oral mucosa. Reduced expression of PP2A/PR65 in ameloblastoma compared with normal oral mucosa indicates that PP2A/PR65 is involved in the occurrence and development of ameloblastoma. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Case Report of Conventional Solid Ameloblastoma presenting with Non-Classical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Ganapathy

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastomas constitute approximately 1 percent of all cysts and tumors of the jaws. The occurrence in the mandible is four times higher than in the maxilla; in the mandible there is a predilection for the molar-ramus area with a little more than two-thirds occurring in this region. The tumor is relatively uncommon anteriorly. The average age of occurrences is in the third or fourth decade. They can grow quite large without metastasizing. The selection of treatment for an individual ameloblastoma depends to a large extent on its clinical type i. e. whether the tumor is a typical intraosseous solid or Multicystic ameloblastoma with poorly defined margins. Other factors of importance are its location in the jaws and its size, the age of the patient and patients availability for follow up examination.

  13. Ameloblastoma: an aggressive lesion of the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suma, M S; Sundaresh, K J; Shruthy, R; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-10-09

    Ameloblastoma is a benign locally invasive epithelial odontogenic tumour comprising 1% of all tumours and cysts arising in the jaws. It is commonly found in the third and fourth decade in the molar ramus region of the mandible. Among all types of ameloblastoma, multicystic ameloblastoma is believed to be locally aggressive lesion that has the tendency for recurrence. In this report we present a large multicystic ameloblastoma in the left body-ramus region of the mandible in a 55-year-old woman. This large lesion was diagnosed with the help of CT and was successfully managed by hemimandibulectomy with simultaneous reconstruction using iliac crest bone.

  14. Immunohistochemical expression of podoplanin (D2-40), lymphangiogenesis, and neoangiogenesis in tooth germ, ameloblastomas, and ameloblastic carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Romero, Celeste; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2017-09-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign but locally aggressive odontogenic tumor, while ameloblastic carcinoma is its malignant counterpart. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in malignancies have been correlated with higher aggressiveness and poor prognosis, as well as greater expression of podoplanin by tumoral cells. Immunohistochemical expression of podoplanin, CD34, and CD105 (endoglin) was evaluated in 53 ameloblastomas and three ameloblastic carcinomas; additionally, immunohistochemistry for podoplanin was also performed in 10 tooth germs. Microvessel density of blood and lymphatic vessels was calculated and compared between ameloblastomas and ameloblastic carcinomas. Immunoexpression of podoplanin by ameloblastic cells was evaluated in tooth germs, ameloblastomas, and ameloblastic carcinomas. Podoplanin was similarly expressed by odontogenic epithelial cells of tooth germs and ameloblastomas, while its expression was lower in ameloblastic carcinomas. There was no difference in microvessel density assessed by CD34 between ameloblastomas and ameloblastic carcinomas; nevertheless, the latter presented higher amounts of lymphatic and new formed blood vessels. Results suggest that podoplanin does not seem to be involved in invasion mechanisms of ameloblastic carcinomas, as its expression was decreased in the malignant tumoral cells. On the other hand, the increased lymphatic microvessel density and neoangiogenesis found in ameloblastic carcinomas could be related to its aggressiveness and potential for metastasis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Multilocular Unicystic Ameloblastoma of Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manas Bajpai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We report a rare case of unicystic ameloblastoma (UA of mandible which showed multilocular radiolucency on the left side of mandible on radiographic examination which is very unusual, and the majority of the cases of UAs till date has been reported of unilocular radiolucency. On histopathological examination, an odontogenic cystic lining that proliferates that intraluminally resembling ameloblastomatous epithelium was observed, leading to a definitive diagnosis of unicystic ameloblastoma. Case Presentation. A 42-year-old male patient presented with a swelling on the left side of the mandible extending from 33 to 36. Radiographically, it showed a multilocular radiolucent lesion resembling odontogenic cyst; however, the final diagnosis was made on histopathological ground with the inclusion of radiological and clinical features. Conclusion. It can be concluded that at present, histopathologic examination is the most sensitive tool for differentiating between odontogenic cysts and UAs. However, both clinical and radiologic findings share equal contribution to the final diagnosis.

  16. Acanthomatous ameloblastoma in a female Spitz dog with rare atypical histomorphology: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhagata Das

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A 6 year old female Spitz dog was admitted to Teaching Veterinary Hospital at Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University with the history of inappetance and asymmetric lower jaw. Oral inspection revealed a pair of pale enlarged lobulated mass around the third molar tooth of the left mandible. The dog was clinically diagnosed with epulis and successfully cured by surgical excision. Histopathological section of the excised masses revealed characteristic features of acanthomatous ameloblastoma with some atypical lesions. Multifocal areas of ameloblastic islands were found in the dense sheet of proliferating epithelial layer protruding towards the sub epithelial connective tissue stroma. These islands were characterized with irregular epithelial stratification at the basal layer. Besides, presence of ghost cells was the unusual findings for such case. Prominent intercellular bridging and nuclear polymorphism in odontogenic cells were other decisive characters of the lesion. Based on the histomorphological appearance, the gingival tumor was designated as canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma (CAA with atypical histomorphology. [Vet World 2013; 6(4.000: 219-222

  17. CYSTIC AMELOBLASTOMA: A CLINICO-PATHOLOGIC REVIEW

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a tertiary health care centre. Materials: All cases diagnosed as cystic ameloblastoma in the ..... Unicystic amelobla- stoma. A prognostically distinct entity. Cancer. 1977;40: 2278-2285. 4. Ackermann GL, Altini M, Shear M: The unicystic ameloblastoma: A clinicopathologic study of 57 cases. J Oral Pathol. 1988;17: 541-546. 5.

  18. Unicystic ameloblastoma arising from a residual cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Amit D; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Khurana, Neha M; Shah, Navin

    2014-01-01

    Intraoral swellings involving alveolar ridges in edentulous patients are clinically diagnosed as residual cysts, traumatic bone cysts, Stafne's jaw bone cavity, ameloblastoma and metastatic tumours of the jaw. This case report describes a residual cyst in a 68-year-old edentulous male patient which was enucleated and histopathologically confirmed as a unicystic ameloblastoma. PMID:25199192

  19. Differential expression of the epithelial mesenchymal transition factors Snail, Slug, Twist, TGF-β, and E-cadherin in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurioka, Kagami; Wato, Masahiro; Iseki, Tomio; Tanaka, Akio; Morita, Shosuke

    2017-06-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), the transition of epithelial cells into motile mesenchymal cells, plays an important role in embryogenesis, cancer invasion, and metastasis. Ameloblastomas are common epithelial odontogenic tumors, occurring exclusively in the mandible with locally invasive growth. Thirty-seven ameloblastoma cases were evaluated for the involvement of EMT by immunohistochemical staining and western blotting using antibodies against Slug, Snail, Twist, TGF-β, and E-cadherin. Double immunostaining was also performed. Slug and TGF-β were expressed in the nuclei of peripheral and stellate reticulum cells of ameloblastoma nests. Twenty cases of Snail, 36 of Slug, 8 of Twist, and 19 of TGF-β showed strong expression in tumor cells in follicular and plexiform patterns. Expression of Slug and TGF-β increased in regions where the expression of E-cadherin was reduced. EMT was found to be associated with the local invasive growth of ameloblastoma. These data suggest that reduced expression of E-cadherin and over-expression of Slug, Snail, and TGF-β induce EMT. Given that ameloblastomas are characterized by local invasiveness, EMT might be related to their development. Thus, strong expression of Slug and TGF-β and reduced expression of E-cadherin might be related to the local invasiveness of ameloblastoma.

  20. Mandibular reconstruction with tissue engineering in multiple recurrent ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Alfaro, Federico; Ruiz-Magaz, Vanessa; Chatakun, Punjamun; Guijarro-Martínez, Raquel

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new approach to bone regeneration in a patient with multiple recurrent ameloblastoma of the left mandibular angle. Through an extraoral approach, complete resection of the tumor was achieved. Bone marrow aspirate from the iliac crest was centrifuged to concentrate the mesenchymal cellular fraction. Based on a stereolithographic cast, titanium mesh was bent preoperatively to accurately reconstruct the mandibular angle. The mesh was filled with two blocks of xenogenic material mixed with recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) and stem cells. Nine months later, three endosseous implants were placed in the regenerated bone to restore the patient's masticatory function. At this time, bone samples were obtained for histomorphometric analysis. New bone formation was confirmed around the particles of xenograft material. The results indicate that adequate esthetics and function may be achieved with bone marrow aspirate seeded on a scaffold obtained from bovine xenograft blocks and BMP-7. This technique attains new bone formation with sufficient quantity and quality to allow for implant placement, with decreased patient morbidity and surgical time compared to conventional reconstructive methods.

  1. Differential expression of transcription factors Snail, Slug, SIP1, and Twist in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siar, Chong Huat; Ng, Kok Han

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via the mechanism of transcription repression is a crucial process for the induction of invasiveness in many human tumors. Ameloblastoma is a benign odontogenic epithelial neoplasm with a locally infiltrative behavior. Twist, an EMT promoter, has been implicated in its invasiveness. The roles of the other transcription factors remain unclarified. Four transcription factors, namely Snail, Slug, SIP1, and Twist, were examined immunohistochemically in 64 ameloblastoma [18 unicystic (UA), 20 solid/multicystic (SA), 4 desmoplastic (DA), and 22 recurrent (RA)]. All four transcription factors were differentially expressed in ameloblastoma [Snail: n = 60/64 (94%); Slug: n = 21/64 (33%); SIP: n = 18/64 (28%); Twist: n = 26/64 (41%)] (P 0.05). Intracellular protein localization was predominantly nuclear for Snail, cytoplasmic>nuclear for Slug and SIP1, and cytoplasmic/nuclear for Twist. Overexpression of Snail in most subsets (UA = 18/18; SMA = 19/20; DA = 4/4; RA = 19/22) compared with the other transcription factors (P ameloblastoma. Overexpression of Snail in most subsets suggests that this molecule is most likely the prototype transcription factor involved in inducing EMT in the ameloblastoma. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Conservative management of unicystic ameloblastoma in a young child: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Kalaskar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicystic ameloblastoma is a rare, benign, locally invasive odontogenic neoplasm of young age that show clinical, radiographic, or gross features of an odontogenic cyst, but histologically shows typical ameloblastomatous epithelium lining part of the cyst cavity, with or without luminal and/or mural tumor growth. The article presents atypical cases of a large, asymptomatic unicystic ameloblastoma of posterior maxilla and mandibular molar-ramus regions which were treated by surgical enucleation and application of Carnoy′s solution for 3 min. The article also describes the importance and complexity of differential diagnosis of an odontogenic lesion sharing common clinical and radiographical features.

  3. Skull base tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Nader, Remi; van Doormaal, Tristan; Kamel, Mahmoud; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Lasio, Giovanni; Aboud, Emad; Regli, Luca; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2010-11-01

    Resident duty-hours restrictions have now been instituted in many countries worldwide. Shortened training times and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. The development of educational models for brain anatomy is a fascinating innovation allowing neurosurgeons to train without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. The authors describe the use of Stratathane resin ST-504 polymer (SRSP), which is inserted at different intracranial locations to closely mimic meningiomas and other pathological entities of the skull base, in a cadaveric model, for use in neurosurgical training. Silicone-injected and pressurized cadaveric heads were used for studying the SRSP model. The SRSP presents unique intrinsic metamorphic characteristics: liquid at first, it expands and foams when injected into the desired area of the brain, forming a solid tumorlike structure. The authors injected SRSP via different passages that did not influence routes used for the surgical approach for resection of the simulated lesion. For example, SRSP injection routes included endonasal transsphenoidal or transoral approaches if lesions were to be removed through standard skull base approach, or, alternatively, SRSP was injected via a cranial approach if the removal was planned to be via the transsphenoidal or transoral route. The model was set in place in 3 countries (US, Italy, and The Netherlands), and a pool of 13 physicians from 4 different institutions (all surgeons and surgeons in training) participated in evaluating it and provided feedback. All 13 evaluating physicians had overall positive impressions of the model. The overall score on 9 components evaluated--including comparison between the tumor model and real tumor cases, perioperative requirements, general impression, and applicability--was 88% (100% being the best possible

  4. Parenchyma-stromal interactions induce fibrosis by secreting CCN2 and promote osteoclastogenesis by stimulating RANKL and CD68 through activated TGF-β/BMP4 in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Yuichiro; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Katase, Naoki; Siar, Chong Huat; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Fujii, Masae; Tamamura, Ryo; Nakano, Keisuke; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Tumor parenchyma-stromal interactions affect the properties of tumors and their dynamics. Our group previously showed that secreted frizzled related protein (sFRP)-2 impairs bone formation and promotes bone invasion in ameloblastoma. However, the effects of the secreted growth factors CCN2, TGF-β, and BMP4 on stromal tissues in ameloblastoma remain unclear. Thirty-five paraffin-embedded ameloblastoma cases, ameloblastoma-derived cell lines (AM-1), and primary cultures of ameloblastoma stromal fibroblasts (ASF) were used. Immunohistochemistry, MTT assay, Western blotting, and RT-PCR were performed on these samples. Parenchyma-stromal CCN2 overexpression correlated significantly with fibrous-type stroma, but not with myxoid-type stroma, suggesting a role of CCN2 in fibrosis (P ameloblastoma with fibrous-type stroma. These data suggest that stromal properties influence bone resorption-related activities and growth rates, respectively. These results suggest that the effects of secreted growth factors are governed by ameloblastoma parenchyma-stromal interactions. CCN2 promotes fibrogenesis independent of TGF-β signaling. Absence of CCN2 expression is associated with a phenotypic switch to a myxoid-type microenvironment that is conducive for TGF-β/BMP4 signaling to promote osteoclastogenesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. EGFR signaling downstream of EGF regulates migration, invasion, and MMP secretion of immortalized cells derived from human ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa, Marina Rolo Pinheiro; Falcão, Aline Semblano Carreira; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; da Silva Kataoka, Maria Sueli; Ribeiro, André L R; Boccardo, Enrique; de Siqueira, Adriane Sousa; Jaeger, Ruy G; de Jesus Viana Pinheiro, João; de Melo Alves Júnior, Sérgio

    2014-11-01

    Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic tumor characterized by local invasiveness and frequent recurrence. The surrounding stroma, composed of different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM), may influence ameloblastoma invasive behavior. Furthermore, tumor and stromal cells secrete matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), which, in turn, can modulate the matrix and promote the release of ECM-bound growth factors. Among these growth factors, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor, EGFR, have already been shown to stimulate MMP synthesis, suggesting that an interdependent mechanism, involving MMP activity and growth factors release, may contribute to tumor invasiveness. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the EGF/EGFR signaling pathway on migration, invasion, and MMP activity, in a primary cell line derived from human ameloblastoma. We established and characterized a primary cell line (AME-1) from a human ameloblastoma sample. This cell line was transduced with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6/E7 oncogenes, generating the AME-HPV continuous cell line. EGF, MMP2, and MMP9 expression in ameloblastoma biopsies and in the AME-HPV cell line was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, respectively. Migratory activity of EGF-treated AME-HPV cells was investigated using monolayer wound assays and Transwell chambers. EGF-induced invasion was assessed in Boyden chambers coated with Matrigel. Conditioned medium from EGF-treated cells was subjected to zymography. EGFR expression in AME-HPV cells was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA), to verify the relationship between this receptor and MMP secretion. Ameloblastoma samples and AME-HPV cells expressed EGF, EGFR, MMP2, and MMP9. AME-HPV cells treated with EGF showed increased rates of migration and invasion, as well as enhanced MMP2 and MMP9 activity. EGFR knockdown decreased MMP2 and MMP9 levels in AME-HPV cells. EGFR signaling downstream of EGF probably regulates migration, invasion

  6. Immunohistochemicai study of Ki- 67 expression in unicystic Ameloblastoma and Dentigerous cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslami M.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Differentiation of dentigerous cyst from unicystic ameloblastoma, discovering any initial ameloblastic changes in lining epithelium of dentigerous cyst at early stage, and differentiation between hyperplastic odontogenic epithelium in fibrous capsule of dentigerous cyst from ameloblastic proliferation, need to an accurate and reliable technique."nPurpose: The aim of this study was to determine and compare Ki-67 immunoreactivity in various locations of the epithelium of Dentigerous cyst and Unicystic Ameloblastoma."nMaterials and Methods: In this historical Cohort study, 15 cases of dentigerous cyst and 9 cases of unicystic ameloblastoma were selected. Immunohistochemistry staining was performed by M1B-1 (murine monoclonal antibody against Ki-67. The stained nucleous were counted in basal and suprabasal layer of lining epithelium of both lesions in 3000 epithelial cells. Finally, the percentage of positive cells (presented as labeling index was calculated, t- student test was used to analyze the related data."nResults: Ki-67 (LI in basal layer of Dentigerous cyst (2.59±1.66 and Unicystic Ameloblastoma (3.76±79 had no significant differences, but Ki-67 (LI in suprabasal layer of unicystic ameloblastoma (2.15±0.69 was significantly higher than dentigerous cyst (0.77±0.55 P=0.003."nThe difference between the average numbers of positive cells for Ki-67 (LI in these two lesions was statistically significant (P<0.05 and it was higher in Unicystic Ameloblastoma than Dentigerous cyst."nConclusion: Based on the findings of this study, it is suggested that Ki-67 (LI in suprabasal layer or throughout the epithelium can be considered as a useful marker for differential diagnosis between dentigerous cyst and unicystic ameloblastoma.

  7. [Expression of HOXC13 in ameloblastoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ming; Wang, Jie; Gong, Yan-bing; Li, Jin-cheng; Zhang, Bo; Hou, Lin

    2007-01-01

    To study the expression of HOXC13 mRNA in ameloblastoma (AB), and to investigate its biological significance. HOXC13 mRNA was examined in 47 cases of AB (primary AB 29 cases, recurrent AB 14 cases, malignant AB 4 cases). 2 cases of fibrous dysplasia of bone, 10 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and 7 cases of normal oral mucosa were selected as control. The positive rates of HOXC13 mRNA in AB, KCOT, and normal oral mucosa were 97.9% (46/47), 7/10 and 3/7, respectively. There was a significant difference among AB, OKC and normal mucosa (chi(2) = 21.665, P = 0.001). For HOXC13, the keratinizing cells and granulizing cells in AB were negative, some fibroblasts were positive, 2 cases of fibrous dysplasia of bone were positive. HOXC13 was highly expressed in AB. The expression of HOXC13 mRNA in AB had heterogeneity, which could improve the epithelial proliferation, and its loss may lead to the cornification and degeneration of epithelial cells.

  8. Recurrent giant mandibular ameloblastoma in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravvanis, Andreas; Koumoullis, Harry D; Anterriotis, Dimitrios; Tsoutsos, Dimosthenis; Katsikeris, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to define the most appropriate management of the giant mandibular ameloblastoma (GMA) in young adults. A retrospective study was performed on patients with GMA <30 years old. The data collected included initial treatment, tumor margins, reconstruction, and follow-up. Patients evaluated speech, chewing, swallowing, and facial appearance after definitive treatment. Thirteen patients were identified with recurrent solid/multicystic disease requiring further treatment. Definitive treatment involved segmental mandibulectomy and reconstruction with free fibular flap in all patients. Seven patients had immediate reconstruction (group A) and 6 had secondary (group B). Mandibular resection was planned at least 2 cm beyond the radiological limit, free margins were achieved in all patients, and all flaps were transplanted successfully. In group A, functional score was 13.7 ± 0.45 and facial appearance score was 4.5 ± 0.49, whereas in group B were 11.16 ± 0.37 and 3.3 ± 0.5, respectively (both p < .05). Aggressive resection of the GMA and immediate reconstruction is strongly advised. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1947-E1954, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Are podoplanin and ezrin involved in the invasion process of the ameloblastomas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.F. Costa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The association between podoplanin and ezrin in the process of odontogenic tumors invasion has been suggested, but was not studied yet. Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between podoplanin and ezrin expressions in the odontogenic epithelium of ameloblastomas. Forty-seven ameloblastomas were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using anti-podoplanin and anti-ezrin antibodies. The expressions of both proteins were evaluated using a score method and the comparison and association between these proteins were verified, respectively, by Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test and by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient, using a statistical significance level of 0.05. The majority of tumors (87.2% exhibited strong membranous expression of podoplanin in the peripheral cells. Cytoplasmic expression of ezrin in the peripheral cells of ameloblastomas was stronger than its membranous expression. No statistically significant correlation was observed between podoplanin and ezrin. However, there was statistically significant difference between membranous podoplanin and membranous ezrin expressions, between cytoplasmic podoplanin and membranous ezrin expressions, and between cytoplasmic podoplanin and cytoplasmic ezrin expressions. There was no statistical difference between membranous podoplanin and cytoplasmic ezrin expressions. These results suggest a synergistic role of both proteins in the process of invasion of ameloblastomas.

  10. An unusual case of ameloblastoma observed in the left anterior mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canger, Emin Murat; Çelenk, Peruze; Bulut, Emel; Günhan, Ömer

    2014-11-01

    To report a small intaalveolar ameloblastoma which resembled cystic lesion, and to emphasize the value of Computed tomography (CT) in radiographic examination. Ameloblastoma is a slow-growing, locally invasive odontogenic neoplasm that accounts for approximately 10% of all tumors detected in the jaws. Radiographically, those tumors are usually well-defined. Computerized tomography is highly recommended to confirm the diagnosis. A 48-year-old female attended with a chief complaint of painless swelling in the left anterior of mandible, 1 month duration. In intraoral examination, non-fluctuant, immobile, approximately 1 × 1 cm in dimension, painless, swelling which had a bone-like hardness and located in the mandibular canine region was detected. Panoramic radiography revealed a well circumscribed unilocular radiolucent lesion located in the inter-radicular area of left mandibular lateral and canine teeth. In CT examination it was realized that the lesion was multilocular. Histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen was reported as ameloblastoma. It is extremely difficult to find such an ameloblastoma in small dimension in alvolar bone.

  11. EGFR, CD10 and proliferation marker Ki67 expression in ameloblastoma: possible role in local recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Aziz Azza

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic neoplasm characterized by local invasiveness and tendency towards recurrence. Aims Studying the role played by EGFR, CD10 and Ki67 in the recurrence of ameloblastoma. Methods This study was carried out on 22 retrospective cases of mandibular ameloblastoma from the period from Jan 2002 to Jan 2008 with follow up period until Jan 2011 (3 to 8 years follow up peroid. Archival materials were obtained from pathology department, Mansoura university. Paraffin sections of tumor tissue from all cases were submitted for routine H&E stains and immunohistochemistry using EGFR, CD10 and Ki67 monoclonal antibodies. Statistical analysis using of clinical data for all patients, tumor type, EGFR, CD10 and Ki67 expression in relation to recurrence were evaluated. Results Among the 22 cases, 10 cases were males and 12 were females with sex ratio 1:1.2. Age ranged from 34 to 59 years old with a mean age 44.18 year. Five cases showed local recurrence within studied period and proved by biopsy. No statistically significant relation was found between local recurrence and patient age, tumor size, tumor type, EGFR expression. There was a significant relation between CD10 expression as well as Ki67 labelling index and recurrence (P value = 0.003, 0.000 respectively. Conclusion Evaluation of CD10 and Ki67 status together with conventional histological evaluation can help in providing more information about the biologic behavior of the tumor, while EGFR could be a target of an expanding class of anticancer therapies. Since ameloblastomas are EGFR-positive tumors, anti-EGFR agents could be considered to reduce the size of large tumors and to treat unresectable tumors that are in close proximity to vital structures. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1902106905645651

  12. Expression of CD34 and maspin in ameloblastoma from a West African subpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udeabor, S E; Adisa, A O; Kolude, B; Barbeck, M; Kirkpatrick, C J; Sader, R A; Ghanaati, S

    2014-08-01

    Ameloblastoma is a locally invasive odontogenic tumor with a high recurrence rate. Its local invasiveness is aided by angiogenesis, which can be correctly estimated by CD34. On the other hand, maspin decreases the local invasive and metastatic capability of cancer cells and functions as an angiogenesis inhibitor. We aim to assess the association between maspin expression and microvessel density in ameloblastoma. Twenty-five formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks of ameloblastoma cases were prepared for antibody processing to CD34 and maspin. Positive immunohistochemical staining was marked by brown cytoplasmic/membrane coloration for CD34 and by nuclear/cytoplasmic coloration for maspin. At the ×40 magnification, we counted blood vessels in two areas of dimension; 300 × 400 μm (area A) and 150 × 200 μm (area B) adjacent to the tumor region to assess relative dispersion of the vessels bordering the tumor. The overall approximate microvessel density (MVD) for area A = 11 (minimum 2, maximum 21) and that for area B = 5 (minimum 1, maximum 10). The MVD in the area A of plexiform ameloblastoma was similar to that of the unicystic, while the hemangiomatous variant had the highest MVD for area A. Maspin positivity was present only in the cytoplasm of ameloblast, stellate reticulum, and the fibrous connective tissue in varying proportions. There was no evidence of the anti-angiogenesis effect of maspin in ameloblastoma from this study. The significance of cytoplasmic localization of maspin in the ameloblasts and stellate reticulum cells needs further investigation.

  13. Analysis of Prevalence and Clinical Features of Ameloblastoma and its Histopathological Subtypes in Southeast Myanmar and Lower Northern Thailand Populations: A 13-Year Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Prevalence of ameloblastomas has been established worldwide but collective data of ameloblastoma in Southeast Asian countries has not been well analyzed. Aim Aim of this study was to report analysis and comparison of the prevalence and demographic data of clinical features of ameloblastoma and its histopathological variants in Southeast Myanmar and lower Northern Thailand populations. Materials and Methods A retrospective study on ameloblastoma was performed based on the availability of oral biopsy specimens in Faculty of Dentistry, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand, between January 2002 and August 2015. The collected data were subjected to descriptive statistical analyses with the SPSS version 17.0 statistical software package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, USA). Pearson’s chi square (χ2) test and t-test were employed. The critical level of significance was set at pameloblastoma with male:female ratio of 1.14:1. The mean age of the patients was 31.3±15.6 years. The predominance anatomical distribution was observed in the mandible (86.7%). Posterior body-ramus-angle region was the most common site. Almost all cases were asyptomatic and most common clinical manifestation was swelling of affected region. Multilocular radiolucency was observed in 70% of cases, whereas 30% were unilocular. Three subtypes of ameloblastomas were diagnosed: unicystic ameloblastoma (20%), conventional solid/multicystic ameloblastoma (70%), and desmoplastic ameloblastoma (10%). The most common histologic pattern was the plexiform type (57.2%) followed by follicular type (23.8%). Conclusion Prevalence of ameloblastoma in Southeast Myanmar and lower Northern Thailand populations correspond with data from other geographic areas of Thailand and other Asian countries. However, some demographic and histopathological profiles are different, with plexiform ameloblastoma being the most common subtype in this study. PMID:28274056

  14. Analisis inmunohistoquimico de CK14 y CK19 en germen dentario y ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delmira Apellaniz

    Full Text Available Resumen Introducción. La odontogénesis es el proceso de formación de los órganos dentarios, en el cual se expresan diversas moléculas, dentro de las cuales encontramos las citoqueratinas 14 y 19 (CK14, CK19. Una vez concluido el proceso de formación del diente quedan restos del epitelio odontogénico, el cual se ha sugerido se encuentra implicado en el desarrollo del ameloblastoma, uno de los tumores odontogénicos más frecuentes. Se ha sugerido que las CK14 y CK19 tienen utilidad como marcadores de diferenciación ameloblástica, y podrían tener implicación dentro del comportamiento tumoral de los ameloblastomas. El objetivo del presente estudio fue describir los patrones de expresión inmunohistoquímica de estas dos citoqueratinas en gérmenes dentarios y ameloblastomas. Materiales y métodos. Se incluyeron 6 ameloblastomas sólidos multiquísticos y 5 gérmenes dentarios a los cuales se les realizó técnica de inmunohistoquímica para CK14 y CK19. Resultados. Este estudio permitió visualizar la inmunoexpresión de CK14 y CK19 en el epitelio y la negatividad en el ectomesénquima, tanto en los gérmenes dentarios como en ameloblastomas. También permitió concluir que CK19 puede ser considerada como un eficiente marcador de diferenciación ameloblástica, mientras que CK14 es gradualmente remplazada por CK19 en el epitelio interno del órgano del esmalte, evidenciándose marcada inmunoexpresión de esta última en ameloblastos secretores

  15. Ameloblastoma en población del noreste de Brasil: un estudio retrospectivo de 60 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago de Santana Santos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available El ameloblastoma es un tumor de epitelio odontogénico, caracterizado por la invasión local y aumento de la tasa de recidiva. Por esto se realizó este estudio descriptivo para determinar el comportamiento de los ameloblastomas en nuestro medio. Método: estudio retrospectivo de 17 años basado en los datos existentes de los archivos del Departamento Oral de Patología. Se analizaron los archivos de pacientes de enero de 1992 a mayo de 2009, con un diagnóstico definitivo de ameloblastoma. Fué recogida la información respecto al sexo, raza, presencia de síntomas, ubicación anatómica y extensión. Resultados: dentro de los 60 pacientes con ameloblastoma se observó, mayor incidencia en la tercera década de vida (28,3 %. Las mujeres fueron más comprometidas que los hombres, con una proporción 1,22:1. La mayoría de lesiones fueron observadas en la raza blanca (51,7 %. El sitio más habitual por la ocurrencia de tumor fue la mandíbula (85 %. Los pacientes fueron sintomáticos en el 75 %. La mayoría de pacientes presentaron lesiones de 3,5 a 6,0 centímetros de extensión (55 %. Conclusiones: el ameloblastoma es mayormente observado en mujeres, en la tercera década de la vida y en la mandíbula. Las diferencias con otros estudios entre el sexo, la edad, raza, extensión, localización anatómica y los síntomas pueden ser atribuidos a las diferencias geográficas.

  16. COX-2 as a determinant of lower disease-free survival for patients affected by ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montezuma, Marco Aurélio Petroni; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Benites, Bernar Monteiro; Soares, Ciro Dantas; do Amaral-Silva, Gleyson Kleber; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Pagano, Rosana Lima; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues

    2018-03-15

    Ameloblastoma is a locally aggressive neoplasm with a poorly understood pathogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate whether COX-2 expression is associated with ameloblastoma microvascular density (MVD) and with tumor aggressiveness. Sixty-three cases of primary ameloblastomas arranged in tissue microarray were submitted to immunohistochemistry against cyclooxigenase-2 (COX-2) and CD34. Clinicopathological parameters regarding sex, age, tumour size, tumour duration, tumour location, treatment, recurrences, radiographic features, vestibular/lingual and basal cortical disruption and follow-up data were obtained from patients' medical records and correlated with the proteins expression. The results on BRAF-V600E expression were obtained from our previous study and correlated with COX-2 and CD34 expressions. Log-rank univariate analysis and multivariate Cox regression model were done to investigate the prognostic potential of the molecular markers. Twenty-eight cases (44.4%) exhibited cytoplasmic positivity for COX-2, predominantly in the columnar peripheral cells, with a mean MVD of 2.2 vessels/mm 2 . COX-2 was significantly associated with recurrences (p COX-2 was significantly associated with a lower 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate (p COX-2 expression in ameloblastomas is not associated with MVD, but it is significantly associated with recurrences and with a lower DFS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. A Conservative Approach to a Peripheral Ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocco Borrello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral Ameloblastoma (PA is the rarest variant of ameloblastoma. It differs from the other subtypes of ameloblastoma in its localization: it arises in the soft tissues of the oral cavity coating the tooth bearing bones. Generally, it manifests nonaggressive behavior and it can be treated with complete removal by local conservative excision. In this study we report a case of PA of the maxilla in a 78-year-old female patient and we describe the four different histopathological patterns revealed by histological examination. After local excision and diagnosis, we planned a long term follow-up: in one year no recurrence had been reported. The choice of treatment is illustrated in Discussion.

  18. Ameloblastoma: Our clinical experience with 68 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Fomete

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this environment, previous workers have reported on the challenges of managing large sized ameloblastoma of the jaws with less than adequate facilities. The aim of this review is to present the management of 68 cases of ameloblastoma with emphasis on surgical care. Materials and Methods: Retrospective survey of case notes of patients with histopathologic diagnosis of ameloblastoma (using the criteria of Barnes et al., 2005 seen between January 2006 and August 2010 at the Maxillofacial Unit, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Shika-Zaria, Nigeria was undertaken. Data collected includes histopathological diagnosis, age, gender, clinical information on site of lesion, form of intubation and surgical procedure performed. Results: Out of 94 patients, 68 with histological diagnosis of ameloblastoma (59 mandibular and 9 maxillary were operated within the study period. The remainder (26 was not treated in hospital. Among 68 patients treated, more were males (38 than females (30, giving a male to female ratio of 1.3:1. The age range was between 14 and 74 years (mean-standard deviation. The duration of the symptoms ranged from 7 months to 24 years, most were follicular ameloblastoma (n = 13 followed by acanthomatous type (n = 7. Endotracheal intubation was the most common (n = 55 followed by fiber optic laryngoscopy (n = 8. The surgical approach most used was extended Risdon with intraoral (n = 24 followed by extended Risdon with lip split and intraoral (n = 17. Segmental resection (en block formed the bulk of our procedures (n = 22 followed by subtotal mandibulectomy (n = 16. Conclusion: The treatment of ameloblastoma remains controversial. Its destructive nature has left patients with wide defects difficult to reconstruct.

  19. Recurrent ameloblastoma in temporal fossa: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar S Vaishampayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is a unique, histologically benign but aggressive neoplasm of the jaws, arising from odontogenic epithelium with potency to cause extensive destruction of jaw bones and infiltration into the surrounding tissues. Recurrences are common after incomplete treatment. Recurrences can occur at difficult sites such as temporal and infratemporal fossa, orbit, anterior cranial base, paranasal sinuses etc. Fine needle aspiration cytology or core biopsy of these recurrent lesions may be misleading. Clinical course and radiological features help immensely in these situations. Good communication between surgeon, radiologist, and pathologist is of paramount importance.

  20. Radiographic analysis of ameloblastoma: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandramani More

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Radiographs are an important aid for the diagnosis of oral lesions of various types, especially those that involve bone. It is important for the practicing clinicians to know the salient features of ameloblastoma which are peculiar to the local population.

  1. Rehabilitation of recurrent unicystic ameloblastoma using distraction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This method of providing additional bone and soft tissue for implant placement is becoming more common. This clinical report describes the use of distraction osteogenesis and fixed implant supported prosthesis to treat a postsurgical alveolar defect as a result of the resection of a unicystic ameloblastoma in the anterior ...

  2. Premolar Cystic Ameloblastoma in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Sanyog; Sonalika, Wanjari Ghate; Hs, Vanishree; Tegginammani, Anand S

    2017-01-01

    Mandibular swellings may occur as a result of many benign lesions of odontogenic or non-odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are benign tumours of odontogenic origin, whose importance lies in its potential to grow into enormous size with resulting bone deformity, it is a slow-growing, persistent, and locally aggressive neoplasm. The unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) represents an ameloblastoma variant, presenting as a cyst clinically and radiographically, but showing typical ameloblastomatous epithelium lining histologically. It commonly occurs in second and third decades of life and is rare in children under 12 years of age, and better response to conservative treatment. It shares many clinical and radiographic features with odontogenic cysts/tumours and/or periapical disease of endodontic origin. Reported here is an unusual case of unicystic ameloblastoma involving the crown of an unerupted mandibular first premolar in a 9-year boy in an uncommon location, which was misdiagnosed as periapical lesion of inflammatory origin clinically, and as a dentigerous cyst radiographically. This highlights the importance to routinely submit the removed surgical specimen for histopathological examination.

  3. Desmoplastic ameloblastoma mimicking a periapical lesion = Ameloblastoma desmoplásico mimetizando lesão periapical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, Esaú Pinheiro dos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma desmoplásico (AD é uma rara variante do ameloblastoma, com características clínicas, imaginológicas e histopatológicas específicas. O perfil biológico deste tumor não é totalmente compreendido, devido ao número limitado de casos notificados. O objetivo deste trabalho é relatar um caso de AD simulando uma lesão periapical. Este tumor apareceu na região anterior da maxila esquerda numa paciente do gênero feminino de 24 anos de idade, entre o incisivo lateral esquerdo e o canino. A lesão era indolor e apresentava apenas um ligeiro inchaço da mucosa do palato duro. Radiograficamente, uma área radiolúcida bem delimitada que promovia a divergência radicular foi observada. O incisivo lateral respondeu negativamente aos testes pulpares. Diagnóstico provisório de cisto radicular versus cisto fissural foi estabelecido e enucleação cirúrgica seguida de curetagem foi realizada. O exame histológico das amostras revelou a proliferação dos ninhos e cordões de epitélio odontogênico comprimido imersos em um estroma densamente colagenizado, associada a um trabeculado ósseo levemente irregular. Estas características eram consistentes com AD. A necrose pulpar do incisivo e o aparecimento radiográfico atípico, deixava a doença em absconso. Apesar das altas taxas de recorrência, nenhum sinal clínico ou radiográfico de recidiva do tumor foi detectado um ano mais tarde

  4. Peripheral ameloblastoma with histologically low-grade malignant features of the buccal mucosa: a case report with immunohistochemical study and genetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Hiroyuki; Nakashiro, Kohichi; Ogawa, Ikuko; Takata, Takashi; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral ameloblastoma (PA), a rare and unusual variant of odontogenic tumors, comprises about 1% of all ameloblastomas. PA is an exophytic growth localized to the soft tissues overlying the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws, and the initial diagnosis is often fibrous epulis. PA with histologically low-grade malignant features is extremely rare. We report a case of peripheral ameloblastoma with histologically low-grade malignant features in a 69-year-old woman that presented with a hemorrhage from a tumor on the right buccal mucosa. The tumor was surgically removed by blunt dissection, with no evidence of recurrence after two years and six months. After the case presentation, microscopic and genetic findings are discussed.

  5. Ameloblastoma in the Northeast region of Brazil: A review of 112 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Thiago de Santana; Piva, Marta Rabello; Andrade, Emanuel Sávio de Souza; Vajgel, André; Vasconcelos, Ricardo José de Holanda; Martins-Filho, Paulo Ricardo Saquete

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ameloblastomas are benign tumors of the jaws with locally invasive capacity. Aim: The aim of this study was to review 112 cases of ameloblastoma seen over an 18-year period (1992-2009) at the Pernambuco Dental School, University of Pernambuco and at Federal University of Sergipe, in the northeast region of Brazil. Materials and Methods: The following data were selected for analysis: age, gender, race, site distribution, radiographic appearance, association with an impacted tooth, size, presence of symptoms, clinicopathologic subtypes and recurrence. Settings and Design: In this retrospective study, Pearson's χ2 test and t-test were employed. The critical level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean age of the patients at presentation was 35.1 ± 16.8 years with a slight female preference. The peak prevalence was in the 11- to 20-year age group and declined with increasing age. Total 75 patients were black and 37 were white, for a 2:1 black: white ratio. The location of the ameloblastomas showed a marked predominance in the mandible (84.8%) and 69% of the cases presented with a multilocular radiographic appearance. The tumor was associated with an embedded tooth in 14 cases (12.7%): nine unilocular and five multilocular ameloblastomas. The maximum radiological extension of the lesions on panoramic radiographs was 0.5-20 cm (mean ± SD: 5.2 ± 3.3 cm) and most cases were symptom-free (75.9%). Solid/multicystic ameloblastoma was the most common clinicopathologic subtype. There was an association between the clinicopathologic subtypes and radiographic appearance (P < 0.001). Recurrence was observed in 13.3% of cases. Conclusion: We propose that racial factors may have strong influence on the incidence of ameloblastomas in the northeast region of Brazil, since most people have African descent. Data related to gender, location, radiographic appearance, size, symptoms, clinicopathologic subtypes and recurrence were similar to previous studies

  6. Unicystic ameloblastoma with mural proliferation: conservative or surgical approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Soumi; Mistry, Freddy K; Chopra, Shilpa; Pillai, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Ameloblastoma occurs in a wide variety of forms. Various forms of ameloblastomas have various treatment modalities ranging from a conservative approach to surgical resection with reconstruction. We report a case of unicystic ameloblastoma with mural proliferation in a 17-year-old girl, who presented with a swelling in the lower left jaw associated with dull aching pain and was managed initially by a conservative approach followed by surgical enucleation on recurrence. PMID:25103487

  7. Immunoexpression of Ki-67, MCM2, and MCM3 in Ameloblastoma and Ameloblastic Carcinoma and Their Correlations with Clinical and Histopathological Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón-Burciaga, Ramón Gil; González-González, Rogelio; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2015-01-01

    Cell proliferation assays are performed using antibodies against nuclear proteins associated with DNA replication. These nuclear proteins have gained special interest to predict the biological and clinical behaviors of various tumors. The aim of this study was to analyze the presence of Ki-67 protein and the minichromosome maintenance-2 (MCM2) and maintenance-3 (MCM3) proteins in ameloblastoma. Materials and Methods. Cell proliferation marker expression levels were assessed via immunohistochemistry in 111 ameloblastoma cases (72 unicystic ameloblastoma samples, 38 solid/multicystic ameloblastoma samples, and 1 ameloblastic carcinoma). The label index was performed as described previously. Results. MCM2 and MCM3 showed higher proliferation indexes in all variants of ameloblastoma compared to the classic marker Ki-67. No correlation between the proliferation index and the clinical and protein expression data was observed. Conclusion. The results suggest that clinical features do not directly affect tumor cell proliferation. Moreover, the high levels of cellular proliferation of MCM2 and MCM3 compared with Ki-67 may indicate that MCM2 and MCM3 are more sensitive markers for predicting the growth rate and eventually might be helpful as a tool for predicting aggressive and recurrent behaviors in these tumors.

  8. Fibroblast growth factors 7 and 10 are involved in ameloblastoma proliferation via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Yu; Mitsuyasu, Takeshi; Kawano, Shintaro; Nakamura, Norifumi; Kanda, Shiori; Nakamura, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    Ameloblastoma is an epithelial benign tumor of the odontogenic apparatus and its growth mechanisms are not well understood. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 3, FGF7 and FGF10, which are expressed by the neural crest-derived ectomesenchymal cells, induce the proliferation of odontogenic epithelial cells during tooth development. Therefore, we examined the expression and function of these FGFs in ameloblastoma. We examined 32 cases of ameloblastoma as well as AM-1 cells (an ameloblastoma cell line) and studied the expression of FGF3, FGF7, FGF10 and their specific receptors, namely, FGF receptor (FGFR) 1 and FGFR2. Proliferation, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and PI3K signaling were examined in AM-1 cells after the addition of FGF7, FGF10 and these neutralizing antibodies. The expression of FGF7, FGF10, FGFR1 and FGFR2 was detected in ameloblastoma cells and AM-1 cells, while that of FGF3 was not. FGF7 and FGF10 stimulated AM-1 cell proliferation and phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK. However, Akt was not phosphorylated. Blocking the p44/42 MAPK pathway by using a specific mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitor (U0126) completely neutralized the effects of FGF7 and FGF10 on AM-1 cell proliferation. However, Anti FGF7 and FGF10 neutralizing antibodies did not decrease cell proliferation and MAPK phosphorylation of AM-1 cells. These results suggested that FGF7 and FGF10 are involved in the proliferation of ameloblastoma cells through the MAPK pathway.

  9. Unicystic Ameloblastoma with Mural Proliferation Managed by Conservative Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Galvão Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicystic ameloblastoma is a distinguishable entity of ameloblastomas, characterized by slow growth and being relatively locally aggressive. Three histological types are recognized according to the degree of ameloblastomatous epithelial extension, namely, luminal, intraluminal, and mural types. This classification has a direct bearing on their biological behavior, treatment, and prognosis. However, there is difficulty in determining the most appropriate form of treatment for unicystic ameloblastoma. We present a case of unicystic ameloblastoma that occurred in the right posterior mandible of 19-year-old girl, which was enucleated and did not recur after 12-month follow-up.

  10. Extensive ameloblastoma of the jaws: surgical management and immediate reconstruction using microvascular flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemann, Wolfgang; Feichtinger, Matthias; Kowatsch, Eberhard; Kärcher, Hans

    2007-02-01

    Ameloblastoma is a rare histological benign but locally aggressive tumor with a marked tendency for recurrence. Especially larger, aggressive lesions require a more radical surgical approach resulting in large jaw defects. The purpose of this study is to analyze the long-term functional and esthetic results after immediate reconstruction of large jaw defects using microvascular flaps. A review of 7 cases of giant ameloblastoma (2 in the maxillary and 5 in the mandibular region) is presented. The lesions were between 4 and 8 cm in diameter. All patients were treated by a radical surgical protocol. All cases were immediately reconstructed using microvascular grafts from either the scapula or the iliac crest bone. Dental implants were inserted in all patients after removal of the osteosynthesis material. All patients were prosthetically rehabilitated. All implants survived throughout the observation time. The esthetic and functional outcomes were satisfying in all patients. No case of recurrence of the tumor could be observed so far. According to our opinion, immediate reconstruction is the treatment of choice after radical surgical excision of ameloblastoma. This 1-step procedure decreases the number of surgeries and allows earlier prosthetic rehabilitation.

  11. Central Ameloblastoma with a Peripheral Ameloblastoma-Like Component: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Hosein Tabatabaei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Amebloblastoma as the most common epithelial odontogenic neoplasm may occur in two forms of central and peripheral. This report presents a case of a 41-year-old Iranian female with a six-month complaint from a painless mass in the right posterior portion of the mandible. The case was diagnosed as an exophytic epulis-like peripheral component with characteristics of peripheral ameloblastoma and an intrabony component like solid ameloblastoma. Two probable hypotheses considered for this case is also discussed.

  12. Ameloblastoma in Tanzania: A retrospective analysis of histological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    World-wide, ameloblastoma have been discussed in relation and modalities of treatment. In Tanzania, case,s of ameloblastoma are seen but no data is available to quantify the magnitude of the disease within the community. The present study aims at describing the occurrence, sex, age and regional distribution of ...

  13. case reports treatment of ameloblastoma of the jaws in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-01

    Mar 1, 2011 ... SUMMARY. Background: To report the surgical experience on the treatment of ameloblastoma of the jaws in children. Method: This is a prospective study of six children below the age of 16 years with ameloblastoma of the jaws seen at the Maxillofacial Unit of the Department of Surgery, Korle Bu Teaching ...

  14. Treatment of ameloblastoma of the jaws in children | Abdulai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To report the surgical experience on the treatment of ameloblastoma of the jaws in children. Method: This is a prospective study of six children below the age of 16 years with ameloblastoma of the jaws seen at the Maxillofacial Unit of the Department of Surgery, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital over a fifteen

  15. Maxillary Ameloblastoma: An Enigma for the Surgeon. | Ajike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ameloblastoma is a benign but locally aggressive odontogenic tumour. Worldwide, maxillary ameloblastoma is rare but its late detection renders adequate treatment difficult. Majority occur in the mandible with about 5-20% occurring in the maxillary bone. Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze 21 ...

  16. The Complexity of Stromal Changes in Desmoplastic Ameloblastoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ameloblastoma is usually considered a homogenous neoplasm and is thought of as the most primitive of all odontogenic neoplasms. However, detailed investigations have proven clinicopathological diversity in a significant number of cases, thus mounting the evidence in favor of considering ameloblastoma as a ...

  17. Hemimandibulektomi dengan Rekonstruksi Mandibula dan Fiksasi Intermaksila sebagai Penatalaksanaan Ameloblastoma Mandibula Sinistra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indria Nehriasari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang. Ameloblastoma adalah tumor odontogenik yang jarang terjadi. Walaupun jinak tetapi bersifat merusak dan mempunyai tingkat kekambuhan yang tinggi. Hemimandibulektomy adalah salah satu tindakan yang dipilih jika lesi patologis telah melibatkan processus coronoideus dan condyle walaupun efek dari tindakan tersebut adalah terjadinya defek wajah dan deviasi mandibula. Tujuan. Melaporkan tindakan hemimandibulektomy dengan rekonstruksi bridging plate dan traksi intermaksila pada ameloblastoma mandibula sebelah kiri yang dilakukan untuk mengurangi deviasi dan defek wajah. Kasus dan perawatan. Laki-laki umur 46 tahun datang ke klinik bedah mulut dan maksilofacial RS Dr Sardjito Yogyakarta dengan keluhan utama adanya pembengkakan pada sisi kiri rahang bawah di area pipi. Keadaan tersebut dirasakan sejak 4 tahun yang lalu, tidak sakit, keras, warna sesuai dengan jaringan sekitar. Diagnosa yang ditegakkan Ameloblastoma mandibula. Perawatan dari kasus ini adalah hemimandibulektomy dengan rekonstruksi bridging plate dengan anestesi umum. Enam minggu dengan kawat dan 3 bulan dengan traksi elastic digunakan untuk mengurangi deviasi mandibula setelah tulang rahang direseksi. Kesimpulan. Hemimandibulektomi dilakukan untuk mengambil lesi patologi secara radikal untuk mencegah rekurensi. Bridging plate digunakan sebagai tindakan rekontruksi mandibula. Traksi intermaksila merupakan salah satu cara yang bisa digunakan untuk mengurangi deviasi mandibula setelah hemimandibulektomy.   Background. Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic tumor which rarely happened. Although it is benign, it can be destructive and has a high recurrency rate. Hemimandibulectomy is one kind of treatments which can be choosed if pathologic fracture has involved coronoid processus and condyle, eventhough its effect can cause mandible deviation and facial defect. Purpose. Reported a hemimandibulectomy with bridging plate reconstruction and intermaxillary function on the left mandible

  18. Unicystic ameloblastoma of the maxilla: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paikkatt V

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Unicystic ameloblastoma is believed to be less aggressive and responds more favorably to conservative surgery than the solid or multicystic ameloblastomas. This report is a rare case of unicystic ameloblastoma of the maxilla that was treated by enucleation under suspicion of a radicular cyst related to a dens in dente. The neoplastic nature of the lesion became evident only when the enucleated material was available for histologic examination. With this report, the authors illustrate the importance and complexity of a differential diagnosis of lesions with a cystic aspect in the anterior region of the maxilla, among them - inflammatory radicular cysts, odontogenic keratocysts, adenomatoid odontogenic and unicystic ameloblastoma. Relevant diagnostic problems and choice of treatment of unicystic ameloblastoma are presented along with a review of the literature.

  19. Ameloblastoma: A clinicoradiographic and histopathologic correlation of 11 cases seen in Goa during 2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel R Figueiredo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this case series was to compare the clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features of 11 cases of ameloblastoma that reported to the Goa Dental College and Hospital over a period of 4 years from January 2008 to December 2012. Study Design: Data with respect to the patients′ ages, sex, location of lesions, radiographic features, histopathologic features and surgical treatment and follow-up, was analyzed. Results: The mean age in males was 23.25 ± 6.99 years, while that in females was 43.43 ± 17.13 years. Seven (63.63% of the 11 subjects were females, and four (36.36% were males. 10 (90.9% of the 11 ameloblastomas were located in the mandible. Swelling was noted in all 11 patients. 10 cases showed radiographic findings, while one case was a peripheral soft-tissue variant. Seven (70% of the 10 tumors were multilocular with a well-demarcated corticated border, and three cases (30% were unilocular. Two cases showed a soap-bubble appearance. Histologically, five cases were unicystic, four were multicystic, one was desmoplastic and one was a peripheral variant. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 34 months and there were no signs of recurrence in any of the patients. Conclusions: Ameloblastomas more commonly occur in females at an older age, as compared with males. Radiographic features that could help in diagnosing ameloblastomas include its predominant occurrence in the mandible, multilocular radiolucency with well-defined, corticated, scalloped margins, expansion of buccal and lingual cortical plates, root resorption and tooth displacement.

  20. Oral Verrucous Carcinoma and Ameloblastoma: A Rare Coincidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Dalirsani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC is a rare malignancy of the oral cavity that was first described by Ackerman. This tumor is a well-differentiated low-grade, slow growing cancer that is locally invasive without metastasis. Ameloblastoma is one of the most common odontogenic tumors, which originates from the odontogenic epithelium. Verrucous carcinoma along with central ambloblastoma is a rare phenomenon.   Case Report: A case of verrucous carcinoma along with central ambloblastoma in a 49-year-old man, which was referred with a painless exophytic lesion with a verrucous and granular surface, is reported.  Panoramic radiography revealed a well-defined radiolucency with sclerotic borders. To the best available knowledge, this phenomenon has not yet been reported.   Conclusion:  Verrucous carcinoma could occur in the wall of odontogenic cysts and tumors and should be considered during the differential diagnosis of a radiolucency, which is observed in the jaws with rapid growth or which presents some changes from its previous appearance. 

  1. Ameloblastoma vs basal cell carcinoma: an immunohistochemical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Salam N; Abdullah, Bashar H

    2016-12-01

    Despite behavioral mimicry of ameloblastoma (AB) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), they are classified at 2 extremes within pertinent WHO classifications with respect to benign and malignant designation. This study aims to appraise the current allocation of AB in the classification through an immunohistochemical comparison of some aspects of behavior with BCC. Sections from retrospectively retrieved formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of AB (n = 37) and BCC (n = 34) were comparatively examined for the immunohistochemical expression for Ki-67, Bcl-2, MMP-2, MMP-9, CD31, and D2-40 monoclonal antibodies. No statistically significant differences between the tumors were found regarding the immunoexpressions of Bcl-2 (P = .252), CD31 microvessel density (P = .895), lymphatic vessel density (P = .642), and MMP-9 stromal expression (P = .083). MMP-2 expression was significantly higher in epithelial and stromal regions of AB (P = .009 and P = .001, respectively), whereas Ki-67 and MMP-9 epithelial expressions were significantly higher in BCC (P < .000 and P = .026, respectively). Within the studied immunohistochemical attributes for tumor behavior, the study accentuated the overall behavioral mimicry of the tumors and indicated that BCCs surmount ABs by the proliferative rate only. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mandibular resection via mandibular-lip L flap for the treatment of extensive multicystic Ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Martins Oliveira Junior

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is a benign odontogenic tumor accounting for 1% of all tumors of the maxilla and mandibula. The mandibula is committed in 85% of the cases. The tumor is locally invasive, able to infiltrate bone marrow spaces, without radiographic or macroscopic evidence. High recurrence rates are associated with different surgical techniques, which range from simple tumoral enucleation to extensive resections. The authors report a case of a 26-year old female patient with an 8-year history of progressive, non-tender, swelling of the left mandibular region. The intraoral examination showed that the floor of mouth was raised on the left side by a bulging along the bottom of the left mandibular vestibule as well as the lingual region. Over this area, there were ulcerated areas in the alveolar region of the molars and mucosal fenestration in the alveolar and lingual regions were present. A panoramic radiography revealed a multicystic lesion, resembling the soap-bubble shape endosseous lesion. The computed tomography revealed an expandable multicystic lesion compromising both mandibular cortices. The patient underwent a biopsy, which revealed the diagnosis of a multicystic variant of Ameloblastoma, with plexiform pattern, treated with left mandibular resection and immediate installation of a customized prosthesis. After a year of follow-up, no evidence of the tumor relapse was evidenced.

  3. XRCC1 gene polymorphisms and risk of ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee; Boonsuwan, Titiporn; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Kitkumthorn, Nakarin

    2013-06-01

    Ameloblastoma is a common benign odontogenic tumour with inherently aggressive behaviour. Genetic susceptibility of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) can likely predict ameloblastoma at risk patients but this data remains limited. Here, we studied XRCC1 polymorphism as a risk factor for ameloblastoma. Eighty-two ameloblastoma samples and blood from 140 healthy controls were used to perform polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for XRCC1 at codons 194, 280 and 399, and confirmed by sequence analysis. Compare to healthy control, a significant increase was noted in the occurrence of polymorphism at codon 194 and 399 in ameloblastoma patients. At codon 194, tryptophan encoded by T, was the susceptibility allele showed an ODD ratio of (95% CI)=1.62 (1.05-2.48), p=0.027. At codon 399, glycine encoded by A was the susceptibility allele showing ODD ratio of (95% CI)=1.83 (1.19-2.84), p=0.005. Moreover at codon 399, we found AG as the susceptibility genotype (2.06 (1.14-3.72), p=0.015). However, we did not find any significant increase in polymorphic occurrence in ameloblastoma patients at codon 280. For haplotype analysis of 3 codons, we found GGC as protective haplotype, and AGT as the risk haplotype. Our data suggest that polymorphism at codons 194 and 399, likely contributes to the risk of developing ameloblastoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High frequency of BRAF V600E mutations in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurppa, Kari J; Catón, Javier; Morgan, Peter R; Ristimäki, Ari; Ruhin, Blandine; Kellokoski, Jari; Elenius, Klaus; Heikinheimo, Kristiina

    2014-04-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign but locally infiltrative odontogenic neoplasm. Although ameloblastomas rarely metastasise, recurrences together with radical surgery often result in facial deformity and significant morbidity. Development of non-invasive therapies has been precluded by a lack of understanding of the molecular background of ameloblastoma pathogenesis. When addressing the role of ERBB receptors as potential new targets for ameloblastoma, we discovered significant EGFR over-expression in clinical samples using real-time RT-PCR, but observed variable sensitivity of novel primary ameloblastoma cells to EGFR-targeted drugs in vitro. In the quest for mutations downstream of EGFR that could explain this apparent discrepancy, Sanger sequencing revealed an oncogenic BRAF V600E mutation in the cell line resistant to EGFR inhibition. Further analysis of the clinical samples by Sanger sequencing and BRAF V600E-specific immunohistochemistry demonstrated a high frequency of BRAF V600E mutations (15 of 24 samples, 63%). These data provide novel insight into the poorly understood molecular pathogenesis of ameloblastoma and offer a rationale to test drugs targeting EGFR or mutant BRAF as novel therapies for ameloblastoma. © 2013 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging of ameloblastoma: 2 case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oder, P.; Royster, A. [Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gibbons, D. [Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Pathology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mulligan, N.; Kavanagh, P.; Eustace, S. [Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Cysts of the mandible are uncommon. Most arise from epithelium lining the alveolus or root of the tooth (tooth derivatives), and the rest arise from the cortical and cancellous osseous matrix of the mandible. Of cysts arising from the alveolus (odontogenic epithelium), radicular cysts are the most common, accounting for almost 90% of cases. They are almost always found either in association with a dental cavity or at the base of a devitalized, amalgam-filled tooth. Of the remaining 10% of cases, most are dentigerous cysts, arising from the outer epithelial lining of the developing tooth, which is displaced to the base of the cyst as the lesion grows. Ameloblastoma, which also arises from odontogenic epithelium, accounts for less than 1% of cases. In this case report, we review the imaging appearance, histology and management of this uncommon tumour. In doing so, we highlight signal characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may allow noninvasive characterization of ameloblastoma before surgical resection. (author)

  6. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging of ameloblastoma: 2 case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oder, P.; Royster, A.; Gibbons, D.; Mulligan, N.; Kavanagh, P.; Eustace, S.

    1999-01-01

    Cysts of the mandible are uncommon. Most arise from epithelium lining the alveolus or root of the tooth (tooth derivatives), and the rest arise from the cortical and cancellous osseous matrix of the mandible. Of cysts arising from the alveolus (odontogenic epithelium), radicular cysts are the most common, accounting for almost 90% of cases. They are almost always found either in association with a dental cavity or at the base of a devitalized, amalgam-filled tooth. Of the remaining 10% of cases, most are dentigerous cysts, arising from the outer epithelial lining of the developing tooth, which is displaced to the base of the cyst as the lesion grows. Ameloblastoma, which also arises from odontogenic epithelium, accounts for less than 1% of cases. In this case report, we review the imaging appearance, histology and management of this uncommon tumour. In doing so, we highlight signal characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may allow noninvasive characterization of ameloblastoma before surgical resection. (author)

  7. Immunohistochemical detection of p53 protein in ameloblastoma types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Sissy, N A

    1999-05-01

    Overexpression of p53 protein in unicystic ameloblastoma (uAB) is denser than in the conventional ameloblastoma (cAB) type, indicating increased wild type p53--suppressing the growth potential of uAB and denoting the early event of neoplastic transformation, probably of a previous odontogenic cyst. Overexpression of p53 in borderline cAB and malignant ameloblastoma (mAB) types might reflect a mutational p53 protein playing an oncogenic role, promoting tumour growth. Overexpression of p53 protein could be a valid screening method for predicting underlying malignant genetic changes in AB types, through increased frequency of immunoreactive cells or increased staining density.

  8. Recurrent unicystic ameloblastoma in mandibular anterior teeth area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Do; Lee, Wan; Kim, Jin Hoa; Choi, Dong Hoon; Paeng, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Cheol [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Wonkwang Dental Research Institute, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    The unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) is a variant of the solid or multicystic ameloblastoma, a less encountered variant of the ameloblastoma. It appears more frequently in the second or third decade with no sexual or racial predilection. It is almost exclusively encountered asymptomatically in the posterior mandible. We report a case of a 43-year old patient with UA, who had previously undergone a surgical treatment on the same site about 1 year ago, this lesion recurred and presented as an exophytic gingival lesion in the anterior mandibular region.

  9. Recurrent unicystic ameloblastoma in mandibular anterior teeth area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Do; Lee, Wan; Kim, Jin Hoa; Choi, Dong Hoon; Paeng, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Cheol

    2008-01-01

    The unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) is a variant of the solid or multicystic ameloblastoma, a less encountered variant of the ameloblastoma. It appears more frequently in the second or third decade with no sexual or racial predilection. It is almost exclusively encountered asymptomatically in the posterior mandible. We report a case of a 43-year old patient with UA, who had previously undergone a surgical treatment on the same site about 1 year ago, this lesion recurred and presented as an exophytic gingival lesion in the anterior mandibular region.

  10. Estudo retrospectivo dos casos diagnosticados como ameloblastoma no Serviço de Anatomia Patológica do Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro entre 1997 e 2007 A retrospective study of ameloblastoma in the Anatomic Pathology Service of Antônio Pedro University Hospital between 1997 and 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Otero Pereira da Costa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O ameloblastoma é um tumor odontogênico de origem epitelial que, pela freqüência, subtipos clínicos, grande capacidade infiltrativa e alta tendência à recorrência tem merecido bastante atenção. OBJETIVO:Realizar estudo retrospectivo dos casos diagnosticados histopatologicamente de ameloblastoma no Serviço de Anatomia Patológica do Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro da Universidade Federal Fluminense (HUAP/UFF no período de 1997 a 2007. Material e métodos: Foram selecionados casos de ameloblastoma correspondentes ao período da pesquisa, e dados como idade, sexo, raça, localização da lesão, aspecto radiográfico, tipo de biópsia, diagnósticos clínico e histopatológico foram compilados das fichas de requisição e/ou prontuários. RESULTADOS:Depois do levantamento e da revisão das lâminas para confirmação do diagnóstico de ameloblastoma, a amostra totalizada foi de 23 casos. Os pacientes mais acometidos eram do sexo masculino, leucodermas e estavam entre a primeira e a terceira década de vida. Todos os casos ocorreram na mandíbula, sendo a região posterior a mais afetada. Predominaram o aspecto radiográfico multilocular e, histopatologicamente, o padrão multicístico, sendo os subtipos folicular e híbrido os mais freqüentes. Não foram observados casos de ameloblastoma desmoplásico e de células basais. CONCLUSÕES: A freqüência do ameloblastoma varia de acordo com a região geográfica avaliada, e a realização de estudos retrospectivos pode contribuir para a identificação de grupos e dos possíveis fatores associados ao seu desenvolvimento.BACKGROUND: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin that has received considerable attention due to its frequency, clinical subtypes and high tendency to infiltrate and recur. OBJECTIVE: To perform a retrospective study of cases histopathologically diagnosed of ameloblastoma at the Pathological Anatomy Department of APUH/UFF-RJ from

  11. Ameloblastoma in a wild black rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolli, Jessica R; Olsen, Haley M H; Seguel, Mauricio; Schnellbacher, Rodney W; Fox, Andrew J; Divers, Stephen J; Sakamoto, Kaori

    2015-07-01

    Reports of neoplasia in captive reptiles are becoming more frequent; however, there is still scarce knowledge of the occurrence of neoplasia in wild reptiles. A wild black rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) was presented to the Zoological Medicine service of the University of Georgia's Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a 3 cm in diameter solid mandibular mass that was partially ulcerated. Radiographically, the mass was radiopaque with small bone spicules and partial osteolysis of the adjacent mandible. Histologic examination of the mass revealed a neoplasm composed of cuboidal to polygonal cells arranged in islands, anastomosing cords, and trabeculae of pseudostratified epithelium with a palisading peripheral layer of densely packed columnar cells with cytoplasmic clearing. The neoplastic tissue was separated from the mesenchyme by a prominent band of fine collagen. Neoplastic cells were positive for cytokeratin and negative for smooth muscle actin. Electron microscopy highlighted the presence of tonofilaments and microvilli. These findings led to the diagnosis of ameloblastoma, an odontogenic epithelial tumor known to occur in humans and most veterinary species. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. Two Stage Enucleation and Deflation of a Large Unicystic Ameloblastoma with Mural Invasion in Mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Ando, Tomohiro; Akizuki, Tanetaka

    2014-01-01

    A treatment for strategy of unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) should be decided by its pathology type including luminal or mural type. Luminal type of UA can be treated only by enucleation alone, but UA with mural invasion should be treated aggressively like conventional ameloblastomas. However, it is difficult to diagnose the subtype of UA by an initial biopsy. There is a possibility that the lesion is an ordinary cyst or keratocystic odontogenic tumor, leading to a possible overtreatment. Therefore, this study performed the enucleation of the cyst wall and deflation at first, and the pathological finding confirmed mural invasion into the cystic wall, leading to the second surgery. The second surgery enucleated scar tissue, bone curettage, and deflation, and was able to contribute to the reduction of the recurrence rate by removing tumor nest in scar tissue or new bone, enhancing new bone formation, and shrinking the mandibular expanding by fenestration. In this study, a large UA with mural invasion including condyle was treated by “two-stage enucleation and deflation” in a 20-year-old patient. PMID:25050148

  13. Two stage enucleation and deflation of a large unicystic ameloblastoma with mural invasion in mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Ando, Tomohiro; Akizuki, Tanetaka

    2014-06-01

    A treatment for strategy of unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) should be decided by its pathology type including luminal or mural type. Luminal type of UA can be treated only by enucleation alone, but UA with mural invasion should be treated aggressively like conventional ameloblastomas. However, it is difficult to diagnose the subtype of UA by an initial biopsy. There is a possibility that the lesion is an ordinary cyst or keratocystic odontogenic tumor, leading to a possible overtreatment. Therefore, this study performed the enucleation of the cyst wall and deflation at first, and the pathological finding confirmed mural invasion into the cystic wall, leading to the second surgery. The second surgery enucleated scar tissue, bone curettage, and deflation, and was able to contribute to the reduction of the recurrence rate by removing tumor nest in scar tissue or new bone, enhancing new bone formation, and shrinking the mandibular expanding by fenestration. In this study, a large UA with mural invasion including condyle was treated by "two-stage enucleation and deflation" in a 20-year-old patient.

  14. Suppression of local invasion of ameloblastoma by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anxun; Zhang, Bin; Huang, Hongzhang; Zhang, Leitao; Zeng, Donglin; Tao, Qian; Wang, Jianguang; Pan, Chaobin

    2008-01-01

    Background Ameloblastomas are odontogenic neoplasms characterized by local invasiveness. This study was conducted to address the role of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the invasiveness of ameloblastomas. Methods Plasmids containing either MMP-2 siRNA or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) cDNA were created and subsequently transfected into primary ameloblastoma cells. Zymography, RT-PCR, and Western blots were used to assess MMP-2 activity and expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-2, as well as protein levels. Results Primary cultures of ameloblastoma cells expressed cytokeratin (CK) 14 and 16, and MMP-2, but only weakly expressed CK18 and vimentin. MMP-2 mRNA and protein levels were significantly inhibited by RNA interference (P ameloblastoma. Conclusion These results indicate that inhibition of MMP-2 activity suppresses the local invasiveness of ameloblastoma cells. This mechanism may serve as a novel therapeutic target in ameloblastomas pursuant to additional research. PMID:18588710

  15. Unicystic plexiform ameloblastoma with mural proliferation: a full-blown lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchlia, Sonal; Bahl, Sumit; Vyas, Siddharth; Raju, Godishala Swamy Sugunakar

    2016-04-06

    Ameloblastoma is the most common aggressive benign odontogenic tumour of the jaws and has received considerable attention due to its frequency, clinical subtypes and high tendency to infiltrate and recur. There are various types of this tumour and confusion still exists among clinicians as to its correct classification. Multicystic ameloblastoma is the most frequent subtype while unicystic ameloblastoma can be considered a variant of the solid or multicystic subtype. Unicystic ameloblastoma is considered a less aggressive tumour with a variable recurrence rate. However, its frequency is often underestimated. Ameloblastoma is often asymptomatic, presenting as a slowly enlarging facial swelling or an incidental finding on radiograph. It is seen in all age groups but is most commonly diagnosed in the third and fourth decades. We report a case of unusual unicystic ameloblastoma and present its clinical, radiological and full-blown histological changes and treatment modalities, providing new insights into ameloblastomas. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Expression of TP53 and IL-1α in unicystic ameloblastoma predicts the efficacy of marsupialization treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Liu, Liu; Yang, Xi; Wang, Lizhen; Zhang, Chenping; Hu, Yongjie

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of marsupialization in treating unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) and investigated the relationship between TP53 and interleukin 1 α (IL-1α) expression and the clinical outcome of UA treated with marsupialization.Consecutive patients treated with marsupialization and curettage at Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital were included. According to the unified standard, 48 patients were included in this study. Of these, 20 showed a good response, 10 a partial response, and 18 no response, based on the outcome of the marsupialization procedure. The expression of proteins TP53 and IL-1α was detected with immunohistochemistry (IHC). The clinical and pathological characteristics of the patients were analyzed.Analysis of the clinical and pathological characteristics showed that the effects of marsupialization treatment were significantly associated with lesion location (P < .001) and tumor diameter (P = .01). IHC showed that TP53 expression was significantly higher in the good-response group than in the partial- or no-response group (P = .02), and IL-1α expression was significantly higher in the good-response group than in the partial- and no-response groups (P = .03).Marsupialization is an effective preliminary procedure for treating UA before curettage and peripheral ostectomy. The expression of the TP53 and IL-1α proteins correlates directly with the outcome of UA treated with marsupialization.

  17. Desmoplastic variant of ameloblastoma of the maxilla: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kwang Joon; Park, Ha Na; Kim, Kyoung A [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The desmoplastic variant of ameloblastoma is a rare form of ameloblastoma characterized by unique radiographic and histologic features. A 46-year-old female was referred to our hospital, complaining of swelling in the left upper lip area. Radiographic findings revealed an ill-defined multilocular lesion with a large cystic lesion and thick sclerotic trabeculae on the left anterior maxilla. After the patient underwent partial osteotomy, histologic analysis revealed a desmoplastic ameloblastoma with no evidence of a hybrid lesion or cyst formation. The radiographic findings in the present case were different from those described in previous case reports. These findings are of special importance due to the unfamiliar radiographic and histologic features of this lesion.

  18. Clinicoradiologic Differential Diagnosis of Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    2000-01-01

    To clarify the clinical and radiologic parameters that can be used to differentiate odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma. The records of 46 patients of ameloblstoma and 48 patients of odontogenic keratocyst at the Yonsei University Dental Hospital during the period of 1979 to 1995 were retrospectively reviewed. As a possible means for differentiating between the odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma, the clinical parameters and the radiologic parameters were evaluated. In the clinical parameters, there was no significant deference in age, sex, and sign and symptoms (p>0.05).In the radiologic parameters, there was significant difference in site, shape of the lesion, and external root resorption of adjacent teeth (p<0.05). The site, shape of the lesion, and external root resorption of adjacent teeth can be the parameters to differentiate odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma, but a definite differentiation of these two lesions needs a more specialized imaging modality.

  19. Desmoplastic variant of ameloblastoma of the maxilla: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Kwang Joon; Park, Ha Na; Kim, Kyoung A

    2015-01-01

    The desmoplastic variant of ameloblastoma is a rare form of ameloblastoma characterized by unique radiographic and histologic features. A 46-year-old female was referred to our hospital, complaining of swelling in the left upper lip area. Radiographic findings revealed an ill-defined multilocular lesion with a large cystic lesion and thick sclerotic trabeculae on the left anterior maxilla. After the patient underwent partial osteotomy, histologic analysis revealed a desmoplastic ameloblastoma with no evidence of a hybrid lesion or cyst formation. The radiographic findings in the present case were different from those described in previous case reports. These findings are of special importance due to the unfamiliar radiographic and histologic features of this lesion

  20. Unicystic ameloblastoma with diverse mural proliferation - a hybrid lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadesh, Jyothi; Rayapati, Dilip Kumar; Maligi, Prathima M; Ramachandra, Prashanth

    2011-01-01

    A 46-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment, complaining of swelling on the right mandibular molar region. Radiographic examination revealed a well defined multilocular radiolucent lesion with root resorption of right lower anteriors and molars. Following biopsy, a diagnosis of unicystic ameloblastoma of mural type was made and hemimandibulectomy was performed under general anesthesia. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen exhibited a unicystic ameloblastoma of luminal, intraluminal, and mural type. Intraluminal proliferation was of plexiform pattern and mural proliferation showed unusual histopathological findings, which revealed follicular, acanthomatous areas coexisted with desmoplastic areas. This mural picture was similar to the so-called 'hybrid lesion of ameloblastoma', whose biological profile is not elicited due to the lack of adequate published reports. Two years follow up till date has not revealed any signs of recurrence.

  1. Giant ameloblastoma mortality; a consequence of ignorance, poverty and fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etetafia, Mabel Okiemute; Arisi, Andrew Arotuah; Omoregie, Osawe F

    2014-05-22

    Ameloblastoma is a benign tumour of odontogenic origin. Although locally invasive, delay in treatment can lead to severe disfiguring of the facial region. In this report, we present two cases, a man and a woman, of a large ameloblastoma that presented with the typical radiographic features of variably sized radiolucent loculations. Patients presented initially with relatively small tumours but due to fear of surgery, ignorance and possibly poverty, tumour growth became enormous. The female patient died while awaiting consent for surgery and the male patient died at home due to complications closely associated with fear and growth of tumour. Literatures on mortality of ameloblastoma are reviewed. The need for more public enlightenment on the nature and treatment of facial tumours is highlighted. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Unicystic ameloblastoma with diverse mural proliferation - a hybrid lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadesh, Jyothi [Sri Siddhartha Dental College and Hospital, (India); Rayapati, Dilip Kumar; Maligi, Prathima M; Ramachandra, Prashanth [Dayananda Sagar College of Dental Sciences, Bengaluru (India)

    2011-03-15

    A 46-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment, complaining of swelling on the right mandibular molar region. Radiographic examination revealed a well defined multilocular radiolucent lesion with root resorption of right lower anteriors and molars. Following biopsy, a diagnosis of unicystic ameloblastoma of mural type was made and hemimandibulectomy was performed under general anesthesia. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen exhibited a unicystic ameloblastoma of luminal, intraluminal, and mural type. Intraluminal proliferation was of plexiform pattern and mural proliferation showed unusual histopathological findings, which revealed follicular, acanthomatous areas coexisted with desmoplastic areas. This mural picture was similar to the so-called 'hybrid lesion of ameloblastoma', whose biological profile is not elicited due to the lack of adequate published reports. Two years follow up till date has not revealed any signs of recurrence.

  3. Clinicoradiologic Differential Diagnosis of Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    To clarify the clinical and radiologic parameters that can be used to differentiate odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma. The records of 46 patients of ameloblstoma and 48 patients of odontogenic keratocyst at the Yonsei University Dental Hospital during the period of 1979 to 1995 were retrospectively reviewed. As a possible means for differentiating between the odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma, the clinical parameters and the radiologic parameters were evaluated. In the clinical parameters, there was no significant deference in age, sex, and sign and symptoms (p>0.05).In the radiologic parameters, there was significant difference in site, shape of the lesion, and external root resorption of adjacent teeth (p<0.05). The site, shape of the lesion, and external root resorption of adjacent teeth can be the parameters to differentiate odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma, but a definite differentiation of these two lesions needs a more specialized imaging modality.

  4. Podoplanin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and CD44v6 in recurrent ameloblastoma: their distribution patterns and relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siar, Chong Huat; Ishak, Ismadi; Ng, Kok Han

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign but locally infiltrative odontogenic epithelial neoplasm with a high risk for recurrence. Podoplanin, a lymphatic endothelium marker, putatively promotes collective cell migration and invasiveness in this neoplasm. However, its role in the recurrent ameloblastoma (RA) remains unclear. As morphological, signaling, and genetic differences may exist between primary and recurrent tumors, clarification of their distribution patterns is of relevance. Podoplanin was examined immunohistochemically in conjunction with E-cadherin, β-catenin, and CD44v6 in 25 RA. Immunostaining according to tumor area, cellular type, and location, and relationship of these proteins were analyzed. Findings were compared with 25 unrelated primary ameloblastomas (UPA). All four proteins were detected in RA and UPA samples. Expression rates for each protein were not significantly different between these two groups. RA demonstrated significant upregulation of podoplanin at the invasive front (P 0.05). Immunolocalization for all four proteins was predominantly membranous and less frequently cytoplasmic. Pre-ameloblast-like cells were podoplanin(+) /CD44v6(-), while stellate reticulum-like cells were podoplanin(-)/CD44v6(+). Acanthomatous, granular cell, and desmoplastic variants in both RA and UPA were podoplanin(-/low) but stained weak-to-moderate for E-cadherin, β-catenin, and CD44v6. Stromal fibroblasts and lymph channels were variably podoplanin-positive. Podoplanin, β-catenin, and CD44v6 upregulation at the tumor invasive fronts in RA and UPA supports a differential regulatory role by these molecules in mediating collective cell migration and local invasiveness. E-cadherin downregulation suggests altered cell adhesion function during tumor progression. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Nuclear morphometry in canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas and squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Martano

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate whether morphometrical analysis can be of diagnostic value for canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma. We calculated, by means of an automated image analyser, some morphometric nuclear parameters, in particular: mean nuclear area (MNA, mean nuclear perimeter (MNP, maximum and minimum diameters (MDx and MDm coefficient of variation of the nuclear area (NACV, largest to smallest dimension ratio (LS ratio, and form factor (FF, in 8 canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas, and we compared these morphometric data to those of 13 squamous cell carcinomas of canine gingiva. The results indicated a progressive increase of the MNA, NACV, MNP and MDm proceeding from acanthomatous ameloblastomas (MNA: 42.11±8.74; NACV: 28,36±7,23; MNP: 24.18± 2.68; MDm: 5.69±0.49 to squamous cell carcinomas (MNA:49,69±9,10; NACV: 30,89±7,75; MNP: 25.63±2.54; MDm: 6.64±0.73. On the contrary, the LS ratio and the FF resulted greater in acanthomatous ameloblastomas (LS ratio: 1,63±0,12; FF: 1,13±0,002 than in SCCs (LS ratio: 1,40±0,12; FF:0.91±0.38. Moreover, the MNA, MNP,MDx and MDm resulted similar (MNA: p=0.89; MNP: p=0,65; MDm: p=0,16; MDx: p=0,13 in a subset of four acanthomatous ameloblastomas with cellular atypia (MNA:49,01±6,88; MNP: 26,28±1,99; MDm: 6.08±0.41; MDx: 10.18±0.88 and in squamous cell carcinomas (MNA:49.69±9,10; MNP: 25.63±2.54; MDm: 6.64±0.73; MDx: 9.26±1.05. While the NACV values resulted higher in typical acanthomatous ameloblastoma (29,99±6,06 than in atypical acanthomatous ameloblastoma (26,74±8,84 and similar to those of the SCCs (30,89±7,75. These results seem to confirm that acanthomatous ameloblastoma is a malignant or potentially malignant lesion and emphasizes that nuclear morphometry analysis can be an useful diagnostic and prognostic method in canine oral pathology.

  6. The skull base: tumoral lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casselman, Jan W.

    2005-01-01

    Many lesions occur in the anterior, central and posterior skull base. In order to detect and characterise them, one has to apply the best imaging technique. Today MR is the preferred technique, and the use of CT is more and more restricted to evaluate the presence of calcifications and involvement of thin bony walls, foramina and fissures. However, MR is only superior when the right sequences and imaging planes are used. Many lesions can be characterised by their specific signal intensity on different sequences and by their location. Nevertheless some lesions can only be characterised after biopsy. The purpose of imaging in skull base tumours remains in the first place the evaluation of the exact tumour extent, and this is again best achieved with MR. In this paper the imaging technique and the most frequent skull base tumours are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Relative expression of α-smooth muscle actin and matrix metalloproteinases-2 in ameloblastoma of a black African sub-population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adisa, Akinyele O; Udeabor, Samuel E; Adeyemi, Bukola F; Alica, Kubesch; Booms, Patrick; Ghanaati, Shahram; Sader, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastoma although a benign odontogenic tumor, is locally invasive. The abundant presence of myofibroblasts (marked by α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) in the stroma and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the neoplastic or stromal cells have been linked with the tumor's ability for both local and distant spread. We aim to estimate the relative expression of α-SMA and MMP-2 in ameloblastoma from a black African subgroup to gauge their relative potential for enhancing local invasiveness and hence, their prospects as possible chemotherapeutic targets. Twenty-five formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks of ameloblastoma cases from Nigeria were prepared for antibody processing to α-SMA (Dako Monoclonal Mouse Anti-Human α-SMA antibody clone 1A4) and MMP-2 (Abcam Mouse Monoclonal Anti-MMP-2 antibody [CA-4001/CA719E3C] ab3158). The score for percentage positivity of the tumor cells and the score for staining intensities were then multiplied in order to generate an immunoreactive score. α-smooth muscle actin was only expressed in the fibrous connective tissues adjacent to the tumor islands while MMP-2 was expressed in the ameloblasts, stellate reticulum, and the connective tissues in varying proportions. All the variants analyzed expressed α-SMA mildly or moderately, except for the follicular variant that either did not express α-SMA or expressed it mildly. The highest number of strong immunoreactivity to MMP-2 in the ameloblast region was found in the plexiform variant. Chemotherapeutic targeting of both molecules may, therefore, be a vital step in the control of local ameloblastoma invasiveness.

  8. A Classification System for Recurrent Ameloblastoma of the Jaws ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Classification System for Recurrent Ameloblastoma of the Jaws- Review of 30 Cases in Nigerians. GT Arotiba, AO Effiom, ASO Ayodele, MO Ogundana, MO Gbotolorun, HO Olasoji, O James, AL Ladeinde, VI Ugboko, KC Ndukwe, IC Ikem, RO Braimah ...

  9. A single cervical lymph node metastasis of malignant ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoori; Choi, Sung-Weon; Lee, Jong-Ho; Ahn, Kang-Min

    2014-12-01

    Cervical node metastasis of malignant ameloblastoma is extremely rare. Because of its rarity, there is no standard treatment modality in a single lymph node metastasis in malignant ameloblastoma. Eleven patients of malignant ameloblastoma involving a single cervical lymph node metastasis and one new case were reviewed. Neck treatment was classified into neck dissection and simple excision. Local nodal recurrence, distant metastasis and follow-up periods were investigated. Eight patients were treated with neck dissection (group A) and four patients underwent a simple node excision (group B). Two patients in group A experienced multiple organ metastases such as liver and lung seven months and 13 years after neck dissection respectively. The other patients showed no recurrence and metastasis. In group B, there was no report of a regional neck recurrence and distant metastasis during follow-up of 1-7 years. Multiple nodes metastasis requires a radical neck dissection; however, simple excision with close follow-up may be used in a single node metastasis in malignant ameloblastoma. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. BRAFV600E mutation in the diagnosis of unicystic ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Núbia Braga; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; Coura, Bruna Pizziolo; Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; de Castro, Wagner Henriques; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2016-11-01

    Unicystic ameloblastoma, an odontogenic neoplasm, presents clinical and radiographic similarities with dentigerous and radicular cysts, non-neoplastic lesions. It is not always possible to reach a final diagnosis with the incisional biopsy, leading to inappropriate treatment. The BRAFV600E activating mutation has been reported in a high proportion of ameloblastomas. The purpose of the study was to assess the utility of the detection of the BRAFV600E mutation in the differential diagnosis of unicystic ameloblastoma with dentigerous and radicular cysts. Twenty-six archival samples were included, comprising eight unicystic ameloblastomas (UAs), nine dentigerous and nine radicular cysts. The mutation was assessed in all samples by anti-BRAFV600E (clone VE1) immunohistochemistry (IHC) and by TaqMan mutation detection qPCR assay. Sanger sequencing was further carried out when samples showed conflicting results in the IHC and qPCR. Although all UAs (8/8) showed positive uniform BRAFV600E staining along the epithelial lining length, the mutation was not confirmed by qPCR and Sanger sequencing in three samples. Positive staining for the BRAFV600E protein was observed in one dentigerous cyst, but it was not confirmed by the molecular methods. Furthermore, 2/9 dentigerous cysts and 2/9 radicular cysts showed non-specific immunostaining of the epithelium or plasma cells. None of the dentigerous or radicular cysts cases presented the BRAFV600E mutation in the qPCR assay. The BRAFV600E antibody (clone VE1) IHC may show non-specific staining, but molecular assays may be useful for the diagnosis of unicystic ameloblastoma, in conjunction with clinical, radiological and histopathological features. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Clinicopathologic features of ameloblastoma in Kenya: a 10-year audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeline, Vilembwa L; Dimba, Elizabeth A O; Wakoli, Kevin A; Njiru, Anthony K; Awange, David O; Onyango, John F; Chindia, Mark L

    2008-11-01

    This study describes the clinical and pathologic features of ameloblastomas seen in the 2 main craniofacial treatment centers in Kenya in the 10-year period between January 1995 and December 2005. A total of 184 patient records were analyzed for this study. Eighty-two (44.6%) of the patients were male, and 102 (55.4%) were female with an overall age range of 10 to 80 years (mean, 30.2 years; SD, 14.1 years). There was no significant difference in gender presentation of ameloblastomas, although females presented at a slightly older age. The mean age for males was 29.9 years, and for females, it was 30.5 years. Patients generally tended to seek medical advice late, with the mean duration at first presentation of 46.3 months for males and 44.4 months for females. Most of the ameloblastomas (n = 172; 93.5%) were located in the mandible, 11 (6.0%) were in the maxilla, and 1 (0.5%) was in the soft tissues. Presenting symptoms included swelling (n = 182; 98.9%), pain (n = 64; 36.0%), mobile teeth/history of extraction (n = 104; 57.5%), purulent discharge (n = 39; 21.7%) and paresthesia (n = 10; 5.6%). The posterior mandible was the most commonly affected site, whereas maxillary ameloblastomas tended to occur in anterior sites. One hundred fifty-three ameloblastomas (83.2%) were of the solid/multicystic subtype; 8 (5.3%) were unicystic; 1 (0.5%) was of extraosseous origin; 1 (0.5%) was desmoplastic; 9 (6.0%) were malignant, and 12 of the records had no histopathologic pattern specified.

  12. Hybrid Desmoplastic/Follicular Ameloblastoma of the Mandible: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayasu Iwase

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmoplastic ameloblastoma (DA is one of the 6 histopathological subtypes of ameloblastoma. Hybrid lesions in which histopathologically conventional ameloblastoma coexists with areas of DA are rare. A 40-year-old male was referred to our hospital complaining of a swelling in the right premolar region of the mandible. A panoramic radiograph showed an area of radiolucency with a well-defined corticated border, whereas computed tomography revealed a unilocular radiolucent lesion and buccal expansion together with cortical perforation. The lesion was treated via enucleation and curettage of the marginal bone and fenestration. A histopathological examination showed a hybrid ameloblastoma with a pronounced desmoplastic pattern and follicular changes. The patient’s postoperative course has been favorable up to now, and no marked changes have been observed. We presented a case of hybrid ameloblastoma and reviewed the 36 reported cases of hybrid ameloblastoma that have been reported in the English literature.

  13. Hybrid Desmoplastic/Follicular Ameloblastoma of the Mandible: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Airi; Tanaka, Yoko; Saida, Naoyuki; Onaka, Eriko; Bando, Sanae; Kondo, Gen

    2017-01-01

    Desmoplastic ameloblastoma (DA) is one of the 6 histopathological subtypes of ameloblastoma. Hybrid lesions in which histopathologically conventional ameloblastoma coexists with areas of DA are rare. A 40-year-old male was referred to our hospital complaining of a swelling in the right premolar region of the mandible. A panoramic radiograph showed an area of radiolucency with a well-defined corticated border, whereas computed tomography revealed a unilocular radiolucent lesion and buccal expansion together with cortical perforation. The lesion was treated via enucleation and curettage of the marginal bone and fenestration. A histopathological examination showed a hybrid ameloblastoma with a pronounced desmoplastic pattern and follicular changes. The patient's postoperative course has been favorable up to now, and no marked changes have been observed. We presented a case of hybrid ameloblastoma and reviewed the 36 reported cases of hybrid ameloblastoma that have been reported in the English literature. PMID:28584671

  14. Comparison between Manual and Automated Methods for Ki-67 Immunoexpression Quantification in Ameloblastomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogelio González-González

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is a common and unpredictable odontogenic tumor with high relapse rates. Several studies assessing the proliferative capacity of these neoplasms have been published, mainly using the protein Ki-67. Cell counts must be completed to determine the cell proliferation rate. Multiple methods have been developed for this purpose. The most widely used method is the labeling index, which has undergone changes over time to better facilitate cell counting. Here, we compared manual cell counting methods with automated cell counting (ImmunoRatio to determine the relative effectiveness of these methods. The results suggest that ImmunoRatio, a free software tool, may be highly advantageous and provide results similar to manual cell counting methods when used with the appropriate calibration. However, ImmunoRatio has flaws that may affect the labeling index results. Therefore, this automated cell counting method must be supplemented with manual cell counting methods.

  15. Metastasizing Ameloblastoma - a perennial pathological enigma? Report of a case and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraj, Gifrina; Sherlin, Herald Justin; Ramani, Pratibha; Premkumar, Priya; Natesan, Anuja; Ramasubramanian, Abilasha; Jagannathan, Nithya

    2014-09-01

    The Ameloblastoma is a slow growing locally invasive odontogenic epithelial neoplasm with a high recurrence rate and a low tendency to metastasize. Metastasis in Ameloblastoma was first described by Simmons and Emura in the 1920s. Slootweg and Muller proposed the term Malignant Ameloblastoma to describe a well-differentiated ameloblastoma that metastasizes but maintains the characteristic cytologic features of the original tumour and the term Ameloblastic Carcinoma to an ameloblastoma with malignant cytological features. About 2% of ameloblastomas undergo metastasis. So far there have only been two cases of Metastasizing Ameloblastoma reported from the Indian Subcontinent. We present the case of a 22-year-old male Indian patient, who presented with a diffuse swelling in the left posterior mandible. Radiographs revealed a multilocular radiolucency in the left mandible. On histopathological examination, the lesion was diagnosed as follicular ameloblastoma. Four years later the patient presented with a swelling in the left submandibular region. Histological examination revealed metastatic ameloblastoma within the cervical lymph node. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Recurrence rate following treatment for primary multicystic ameloblastoma: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, R de A C; Andrade, E S de S; Barbalho, J C; Vajgel, A; Vasconcelos, B C do E

    2016-03-01

    Opinions regarding the treatment of multicystic ameloblastoma are divergent due to its benign nature and the high rate of recurrence if not adequately excised. The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic review of the literature for a qualitative and quantitative assessment of studies addressing primary multicystic ameloblastoma with regard to treatment and recurrence. Searches were conducted of the Ovid Medline and Embase databases for articles published up to January 2014. Based on predefined eligibility criteria, studies were selected in a two-stage screening process conducted by two independent reviewers. Quality assessment of the selected articles was performed using the modified criteria of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager (RevMan) software. Statistical heterogeneity was investigated by performing a χ(2) test at the 5% significance level (Pameloblastoma in comparison to radical treatment (Pameloblastoma with bone resection. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  18. Ameloblastoma of the jaws: Management and recurrence rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, A; Nicot, R; Wojcik, T; Ferri, J; Raoul, G

    2017-02-01

    Ameloblastoma is a rare, benign odontogenic tumour associated with a high recurrence rate. It accounts for 1% of all tumours of the jaws. The purpose of this study was to compare the ameloblastoma recurrence rate according to the type of treatment: radical or conservative. All patients with a diagnosis of ameloblastoma between 1991 and 2013 were retrospectively identified in order to extract topographic, radiological, and histological data and the type of treatment: conservative (marsupialization, enucleation, curettage) or radical (segmental resection) and to compare the recurrence rate according to the type of treatment. Twenty-seven patients were included, managed by conservative treatment (CT) in 22 cases and radical treatment (RT) in 14 cases. The recurrence rate was 90.9% in the CT group and 9.1% in the RT group (P=0.025) with a mean follow-up of 56.2 months. The recurrence rate after conservative treatment was higher than that after radical treatment. These results are similar to those reported in the literature. The choice of treatment must be adapted to the macroscopic and histological characteristics of each tumour and to the patient. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Treatment of ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, William R; Werning, John W; Kaye, Frederic J; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to report our institutional experience using radiotherapy in the treatment of ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma. Three patients with ameloblastoma and 3 patients with ameloblastic carcinoma were treated with radiotherapy alone (2 patients) or surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (4 patients) at the University of Florida between 1973 and 2007. Follow-up ranged from 4.0 to 13.1 years with a median of 7.8 years. Radiotherapy complications were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Local control was achieved in 4 of the 6 patients. One patient treated with RT alone for an unresectable ameloblastoma developed a local recurrence and metastases in both the cervical lymph nodes and lungs, but had excellent response to dual BRAF/MEK inhibition with dabrafenib and trametinib. Another patient treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for an ameloblastic carcinoma recurred locally without metastasis, but was not salvaged. No significant treatment-related complications were observed. For patients with local recurrence or inadequate margins after surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy provides the potential for disease control. In the setting of metastatic disease, targeted therapies may provide an additional opportunity for salvage.

  20. Role of Immunomarkers in the Clinicopathological Analysis of Unicystic Ameloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Parul; Kamath, Asha; Chandrashekar, Chetana; Carnelio, Sunitha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The clinical behavior of unicystic ameloblastoma varies according to its subtype. The assessment of its proliferative capacity, neovascularization, and invasiveness using relevant immunomarkers may aid in appropriate surgical therapeutic protocol. Methods. 18 cases of clinically and histologically confirmed unicystic ameloblastoma, categorized as luminal, intraluminal, or mural subtypes, were analyzed retrospectively. Immunomarkers such as Ki-67, CD34, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were studied to evaluate their behavior. Results. Labeling index of Ki-67 was 4.25% in the intraluminal subtype, compared with 2.14% in the luminal and 4.04% in the mural variant (P = 0.3). CD34 immunostaining was significantly higher in the mural variant (43 per high power field) than the other two subtypes (P = 0.04). MMP-2 and MMP-9 were strongly expressed in mural, moderately in intraluminal, and weakly to absent in luminal variant. Conclusions. High proliferative index, angiogenesis, and protease activity in the mural ameloblastoma, ascertained by the expression of these markers, confirm its aggressive phenotype. The intraluminal and luminal subtype exhibiting decreased expression are compatible with their indolent clinical behavior. PMID:24223460

  1. Caracterização imuno-histoquímica de lesão híbrida de ameloblastoma desmoplásico e convencional "Hybrid" lesion of desmoplastic and conventional ameloblastoma: immunohistochemical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Jean Nunes dos Santos; Veronica Ferreira De Souza; Roberto Almeida Azevêdo; Viviane Almeida Sarmento; Lélia Batista Souza

    2006-01-01

    O ameloblastoma é uma neoplasia odontogênica benigna comumente encontrada nos ossos maxilares. Histologicamente, mostra diversos padrões, incluindo a ameloblastoma plexiforme e folicular. Quando estes padrões histológicos coexistem com um ameloblastoma que exibe abundante desmoplasia, são então denominados de lesão ‘híbrida" de ameloblastoma desmoplásico e convencional. No presente trabalho, nos propomos a relatar um caso de lesão híbrida de ameloblastoma desmoplásico e convencional destacand...

  2. Epidemiology of ameloblastomas of the jaws; a report from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, M.A.E.M.; van der Waal, I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To provide epidemiological data of ameloblastomas of the jaws in the Netherlands over a 25-year time period (1985-2010) and to compare these data with data from other parts of the world. Material and Methods: The data of all patients diagnosed with a primary ameloblastoma of the jaws in

  3. Immunohistochemical Detection of p75 Neurotrophin Receptor (p75-NTR) in Follicular and Plexiform Ameloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Nirmal Ramadas; Mohan, Sunil Paramel; Kumar, Srichinthu Kenniyan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ameloblastoma holds a unique position among benign tumours by its locally destructive and invasive nature. Recently improvised molecular techniques helped researchers to unravel the myth behind such biologic behaviour. Though interesting findings have been delivered, the rhythmic correlation regarding the exact mechanism still remains lacking. Neurotrophins and their receptor mediated pathways play a crucial role in survival, death and differentiation of many neuroectoderm derived cells. With this background, the study has been aimed to investigate the expression of p75-NTR (Neurotrophin Receptor) in follicular and plexiform ameloblastoma. Aim To analyze the immunohistochemical expression pattern of p75-NTR in ameloblastoma and to compare the immunohistochemical expression pattern of p75-NTR among the histological types of ameloblastoma, follicular and plexiform patterns. Materials and Methods Total 22 ameloblastomas (12 follicular, 10 plexiform) were immuno-stained with anti-human p75-NTR mouse IgG monoclonal antibody and the pattern of staining is statistically analyzed. Results Only 11 (10 follicular, 1 plexiform) out of 22 ameloblastomas showed immuno-reactivity to p75-NTR. In ameloblastoma, only the peripheral pre-ameloblast like tall columnar cells showed reactivity whereas the stellate reticulum-like cells were immuno-negative. The staining pattern was membranous in the immuno-reactive cells. The results were studied with the downstream pathways from the literature and a possible mechanism has been proposed. Conclusion The expression pattern of p75-NTR was found to be more in follicular ameloblastoma than plexiform. PMID:27656566

  4. Treatment of an extensive unicystic ameloblastoma in a 7-year-old child: the best approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paulo, L F B; Oliveira, M T F; Rodrigues, Á R; Zanetta-Barbosa, D

    2015-03-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign, slow-growing neoplasm of the jaw that arises from odontogenic epithelium. We present the case of a 7-year-old girl with a unicystic ameloblastoma of the mandible, and describe our approach to treatment. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinicopathological analysis of histological variants of ameloblastoma in a suburban Nigerian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndukwe Kizito C

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was carried out to establish the relative incidence and provide clinico-pathologic information on the various histological types of ameloblastoma seen at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital complex, Ile-Ife in order to provide a baseline data which will be of significance to the pathologist and clinician. Methods Clinico-pathologic data on a total of 77 histologically diagnosed cases of ameloblastoma archieved at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife over a 15 year period were obtained and analysed descriptively. Results Follicular ameloblastoma was the most common histological type (50 cases, 64.9%, followed by plexiform ameloblastoma (10 cases, 13.0%. 4 (5.2% cases of desmoplastic and 3 (3.9% cases of acanthomatous ameloblastoma were seen while the basal cell variant accounted for 2 (2.6% cases. Only 1 case of the unicystic type was seen. Some of the 77 cases presented as a mixture of two or more histological types. Ameloblastoma occurred over an age range of 11 to 70 years with a peak age incidence in the 3rd decade. Conclusion This study provides a baseline data on variants of ameloblastoma as obtained in a suburban Nigerian population. Since variants of ameloblastoma differ in biologic behaviour, the data collected in this study provides clinicopathologic information which is of significance to the pathologist and clinician.

  6. Clinicopathological analysis of histological variants of ameloblastoma in a suburban Nigerian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebiyi, Kehinde E; Ugboko, Vincent I; Omoniyi-Esan, Ganiat O; Ndukwe, Kizito C; Oginni, Fadekemi O

    2006-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to establish the relative incidence and provide clinico-pathologic information on the various histological types of ameloblastoma seen at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital complex, Ile-Ife in order to provide a baseline data which will be of significance to the pathologist and clinician. Methods Clinico-pathologic data on a total of 77 histologically diagnosed cases of ameloblastoma archieved at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife over a 15 year period were obtained and analysed descriptively. Results Follicular ameloblastoma was the most common histological type (50 cases, 64.9%), followed by plexiform ameloblastoma (10 cases, 13.0%). 4 (5.2%) cases of desmoplastic and 3 (3.9%) cases of acanthomatous ameloblastoma were seen while the basal cell variant accounted for 2 (2.6%) cases. Only 1 case of the unicystic type was seen. Some of the 77 cases presented as a mixture of two or more histological types. Ameloblastoma occurred over an age range of 11 to 70 years with a peak age incidence in the 3rd decade. Conclusion This study provides a baseline data on variants of ameloblastoma as obtained in a suburban Nigerian population. Since variants of ameloblastoma differ in biologic behaviour, the data collected in this study provides clinicopathologic information which is of significance to the pathologist and clinician. PMID:17125498

  7. Odontogenic tumors: A review of 675 cases in Eastern Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana HL Goteti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a total of 675 tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral and perioral structures, for gender, age, tumor site, and frequency. The diagnosis was based on the most recent WHO (2005 classification of OTs. Results: OTs constituted 12.6% of all oral/jaw tumors and tumor-like lesions. Ameloblastoma (28.2% was the most common type, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (25.2% and odontoma (19.9%. The male: female ratio was 1.2:1, and maxilla: mandible ratio 1:2. The mean age of occurrence of tumors was 29 years with a peak incidence between 10 and 40 years. Conclusions: OTs are relatively common lesion in this Libyan Population, but the incidence of tumors is neither similar to Caucasians nor Sub-Saharan population.

  8. Ameloblastoma RNA profiling uncovers a distinct non-coding RNA signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davanian, Haleh; Balasiddaiah, Anangi; Heymann, Robert; Sundström, Magnus; Redenström, Poppy; Silfverberg, Mikael; Brodin, David; Sällberg, Matti; Lindskog, Sven; Kruger Weiner, Carina; Chen, Margaret

    2017-01-17

    Ameloblastoma of the jaws remains the top difficult to treat odontogenic tumour and has a high recurrence rate. New evidence suggests that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play a critical role in tumourgenesis and prognosis of cancer. However, ameloblastoma ncRNA expression data is lacking. Here we present the first report of ameloblastoma ncRNA signatures. A total of 95 ameloblastoma cases and a global array transcriptome technology covering > 285.000 full-length transcripts were used in this two-step analysis. The analysis first identified in a test cohort 31 upregulated ameloblastoma-associated ncRNAs accompanied by signalling pathways of cancer, spliceosome, mRNA surveillance and Wnt. Further validation in an independent cohort points out the long non-coding (lncRNAs) and small nucleolar RNA (snoRNAs): LINC340, SNORD116-25, SNORA11, SNORA21, SNORA47 and SNORA65 as a distinct ncRNA signature of ameloblastoma. Importantly, the presence of these ncRNAs was independent of BRAF-V600E and SMO-L412F mutations, histology type or tumour location, but was positively correlated with the tumour size. Taken together, this study shows a systematic investigation of ncRNA expression of ameloblastoma, and illuminates new diagnostic and therapeutic targets for this invasive odontogenic tumour.

  9. Suppression of local invasion of ameloblastoma by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Anxun; Zhang, Bin; Huang, Hongzhang; Zhang, Leitao; Zeng, Donglin; Tao, Qian; Wang, Jianguang; Pan, Chaobin

    2008-01-01

    Ameloblastomas are odontogenic neoplasms characterized by local invasiveness. This study was conducted to address the role of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the invasiveness of ameloblastomas. Plasmids containing either MMP-2 siRNA or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) cDNA were created and subsequently transfected into primary ameloblastoma cells. Zymography, RT-PCR, and Western blots were used to assess MMP-2 activity and expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-2, as well as protein levels. Primary cultures of ameloblastoma cells expressed cytokeratin (CK) 14 and 16, and MMP-2, but only weakly expressed CK18 and vimentin. MMP-2 mRNA and protein levels were significantly inhibited by RNA interference (P < 0.05). Both MMP-2 siRNA and TIMP-2 overexpression inhibited MMP-2 activity and the in vitro invasiveness of ameloblastoma. These results indicate that inhibition of MMP-2 activity suppresses the local invasiveness of ameloblastoma cells. This mechanism may serve as a novel therapeutic target in ameloblastomas pursuant to additional research

  10. Achieving Adequate Margins in Ameloblastoma Resection: The Role for Intra-Operative Specimen Imaging. Clinical Report and Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Anand; Mirkazemi, Mansoor; Baillieu, Charles; Ptasznik, Ronnie; Leong, James

    2012-01-01

    Background Ameloblastoma is a locally aggressive odontogenic neoplasm. With local recurrence rates reaching 90%, only completeness of excision can facilitate cure. Surgical clearance has widely been based on pre-operative imaging to guide operative excision margins, however use of intra-operative specimen x-ray or frozen-section has been sought to improve clearance rates, and advanced imaging technologies in this role have been proposed. This manuscript aims to quantify the evidence for evaluating intra-operative resection margins and present the current standard in this role. Method The current study comprises the first reported comparison of imaging modalities for assessing ameloblastoma margins. A case is presented in which margins are assessed with each of clinical assessment based on preoperative imaging, intra-operative specimen x-ray, intra-operative specimen computed tomography (CT) and definitive histology. Each modality is compared quantitatively. These results are compared to the literature through means of systematic review of current evidence. Results A comparative study highlights the role for CT imaging over plain radiography. With no other comparative studies and a paucity of high level evidence establishing a role for intra-operative margin assessment in ameloblastoma in the literature, only level 4 evidence supporting the use of frozen section and specimen x-ray, and only one level 4 study assesses intra-operative CT. Conclusion The current study suggests that intra-operative specimen CT offers an improvement over existing techniques in this role. While establishing a gold-standard will require higher level comparative studies, the use of intra-operative CT can facilitate accurate single-stage resection. PMID:23094099

  11. Achieving adequate margins in ameloblastoma resection: the role for intra-operative specimen imaging. Clinical report and systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoka De Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ameloblastoma is a locally aggressive odontogenic neoplasm. With local recurrence rates reaching 90%, only completeness of excision can facilitate cure. Surgical clearance has widely been based on pre-operative imaging to guide operative excision margins, however use of intra-operative specimen x-ray or frozen-section has been sought to improve clearance rates, and advanced imaging technologies in this role have been proposed. This manuscript aims to quantify the evidence for evaluating intra-operative resection margins and present the current standard in this role. METHOD: The current study comprises the first reported comparison of imaging modalities for assessing ameloblastoma margins. A case is presented in which margins are assessed with each of clinical assessment based on preoperative imaging, intra-operative specimen x-ray, intra-operative specimen computed tomography (CT and definitive histology. Each modality is compared quantitatively. These results are compared to the literature through means of systematic review of current evidence. RESULTS: A comparative study highlights the role for CT imaging over plain radiography. With no other comparative studies and a paucity of high level evidence establishing a role for intra-operative margin assessment in ameloblastoma in the literature, only level 4 evidence supporting the use of frozen section and specimen x-ray, and only one level 4 study assesses intra-operative CT. CONCLUSION: The current study suggests that intra-operative specimen CT offers an improvement over existing techniques in this role. While establishing a gold-standard will require higher level comparative studies, the use of intra-operative CT can facilitate accurate single-stage resection.

  12. BRAF-V600E expression correlates with ameloblastoma aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregnani, Eduardo R; Perez, Danyel E da Cruz; Paes de Almeida, Oslei; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Soares, Fernando A; Castro-Junior, Gilberto; Alves, Fábio A

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the expression of BRAF-V600E determines an aggressive clinical and molecular presentation of ameloblastoma. Ninety-three cases of solid ameloblastomas were arranged in a 1.0-mm tissue microarray (TMA) block. Immunohistochemistry against a large panel of cytokeratins (CK), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), syndecan-1, Ki67, p53 and BRAF-V600E were performed. Clinicopathological parameters, including sex, age, tumour size, tumour duration, tumour location, treatment, recurrences, radiographic pattern, vestibular/lingual and basal cortical plates disruption and follow-up data, were obtained from patients' medical records. Immunoexpression of BRAF-V600E was investigated in 73 cases that remained available in TMA sections. Our results indicated that 46.6% (34 cases) demonstrated cytoplasm positivity (six weak and 28 strong positivity). BRAF-V600E expression was associated significantly with the expression of CK8 (P = 0.00077), CK16 (P = 0.05), PTHrP (P = 0.0082) and p53 (P = 0.0087). Additionally, a significant association was seen with the presence of recurrences (P = 0.0008), multilocular radiographic appearance (P = 0.044) and disruption of basal bone cortical (P = 0.05). Univariate analysis showed that BRAF-positive cases (P = 0.001), EGFR-negative/weak positive cases (P = 0.03) and multilocular tumours (P = 0.04) had a significantly lower disease-free survival rate, but these parameters were not considered independent prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis (P > 0.05). Our findings suggest an association of BRAF-V600E with parameters of a more aggressive behaviour of ameloblastoma, supporting the future use of BRAF inhibitors for targeted therapy of this neoplasm. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Enriched vascularity in ameloblastomas, an indeterminate entity: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Hegde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascularity is a highly essential element that is required for the growth, development, and functioning of the body and variations in it can cause pathologies. It is one of the prime features of a proliferating lesion, where it aids in the growth of the lesion through its nutrition supply. Highly increased vascularity in a disease can itself affect the prognosis of the lesion, and in malignancies, it can induce tumor seeding and secondaries. Most of the pathologies including tumors, related to blood vessels, and vascularity are well established. There are some conditions, wherein altered vascularity is one of the prime components along with other diagnostic components of an established disease. In such cases, these lesions are diagnosed with special names, with varying biological behavior and prognosis in comparison to that of established entity. However, there still are few similar conditions whose nature is uncertain due to the rarity of the lesion and the insufficient scientific evidence which eludes the diagnostician. Here is the report of two cases of ameloblastoma, an established entity, with significant vascularity whose nature is indeterminate.

  14. Expression of molecules related to AKT pathway as putative regulators of ameloblastoma local invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecim, Rodolpho L; Carmo, Hicso A F; Kataoka, Maria S S; Freitas, Vanessa M; de Melo Alves Júnior, Sérgio; Pedreira, Erick N; Jaeger, Ruy G; Pinheiro, Joao J V

    2014-02-01

    Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic neoplasm with local invasiveness and high recurrence. We previously suggested that growth factors, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and TIMPs influence ameloblastoma invasiveness (Pathol. Res. Pract., 208, 2012, 225; Oral. Surg. Oral. Med. Oral. Pathol. Oral Radiol. Endod., 111, 2011, 474). Signals generated by this molecular network would be transduced by ERK 1/2 pathway (Oral. Surg. Oral. Med. Oral. Pathol. Oral Radiol. Endod., 111, 2011, 474). Others signaling pathways may influence ameloblastoma biology. Here, we studied expression of AKT and related molecules in ameloblastoma. Fourteen cases of solid/multicystic ameloblastomas were examined. Immunohistochemistry was carried out to detected AKT (phospho-AKT), NF-қB (phospho-NF-қB), β-catenin, cyclin-D1, and COX-2 in ameloblastoma samples. These molecules were evaluated in neoplastic cells and stroma. All proteins were detected in ameloblastoma. Expression of these markers was quantified and compared. Spearman's rank test was carried out to address positive correlations between proteins (P Ameloblastoma had a significant positive correlation of AKT (phospho-AKT) with β-catenin. β-catenin correlated with Cyclin-D1 and COX-2 in neoplastic cells. AKT (phospho-AKT) correlated with β-catenin; β-catenin with Cyclin-D1; AKT (phospho-AKT) with NF-қB (phospho-NF-қB); and NF-қB (phospho-NF-қB) with COX-2 in stromal cells. Results suggest that proteins studied are present and probably involved in a functional pathway in neoplastic cells and stroma and may therefore influence the local invasiveness of ameloblastoma. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A comparative study of bone remodeling molecules expression in different types of jaw ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovou, Maria; Chrysomali, Evanthia; Piperi, Evangelia; Fanourakis, Galinos; Sklavounou, Alexandra; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitrios; Tseleni-Balafouta, Sophia

    2015-08-01

    Solid ameloblastoma demonstrates a more invasive behavior compared to unicystic. The follicular ameloblastoma is referred that may present a higher recurrence potential compared to the plexiform variant. In this study, the different ameloblastoma clinical types and histopathological variants were examined regarding the expression of bone remodeling-related molecules OPG, RANKL, and TRAIL. Immunostained sections of 29 solid and 11 unicystic ameloblastoma cases were semi-quantitatively evaluated and analyzed using Mann-Whitney or Kruskal-Wallis tests. Solid ameloblastoma showed a significantly increased OPG expression (P = 0.004) associated with the follicular (P ameloblastoma for differences by the histopathological pattern (no RANKL expression when plexiform pattern was seen compared to follicular). Comparison between the clinical types showed differences regarding the ratio of OPG/RANKL and TRAIL/RANKL expression. Higher OPG expression over RANKL was observed in 86.2% of the solid compared to 36.4% of the unicystic type. There was no difference in the ratio of TRAIL/RANKL expression in the unicystic, whereas 55.2% of the solid ameloblastomas showed a greater TRAIL expression over RANKL. Our results suggest OPG overexpression and RANKL underexpression in solid ameloblastoma; this may reflect a possible prevalence of the OPG/TRAIL over the OPG/RANKL signaling pathway, resulting in inactivation of TRAIL-induced apoptosis in ameloblastic cells. In unicystic ameloblastoma, the RANKL/OPG expression immunoprofile among histological variants is compatible with the reported biologic behavior. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Reconstruction of palate with buccal fat pad secondary to resection of desmoplastic ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhimappa Mallappa Rudagi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Desmoplastic ameloblastoma (DA is an unusual variant of ameloblastoma exhibiting important differences in the anatomical distribution, radiographic features and histologic appearance compared with the classic type of ameloblastoma. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of DA in the anterior left maxilla and to describe a simple method of reconstruction with the use of buccal fat pad (BFP. BFP is an excellent choice for reconstruction of small to medium sized defects. It should be manipulated gently and hemostasis should be achieved meticulously during this surgery. It should not be sutured under tension.

  17. Plexiform unicystic ameloblastoma-a case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant O. Kasat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is categorized into four types; conventional solid (multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic and peripheral varieties. Unicystic ameloblastoma (UA may originate de novo as a neoplasm or from the epithelium lining of an odontogenic cyst. When UA arising from cystic epithelium reveals a plexiform pattern of epithelial proliferation without early ameloblastic changes, it is called as "plexiform unicystic ameloblastoma" (PUA. The purpose of this article is to report a case of PUA in 22-year-old male and to discuss its pathogenesis, clinical features and management. Also, an effort is made to review early literature on this entity.

  18. Ameloblastoma of the Sinonasal Tract: Report of a Case with Clinicopathologic Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Tranchina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastomas are locally aggressive jaw tumours with a high propensity for recurrence and are believed to arise from remnants of dental lamina or odontogenic epithelium. Extragnathic ameloblastomas are unusual, and primary sinonasal tract origin is very uncommon with few cases reported in the literature. We herein report a case of primary sinonasal ameloblastoma presented in a 74-year-old male with nasal obstruction, rhinorrhoea, and sinusitis. Nasal endoscopy showed the right nasal cavity completely obstructed by a polypoid lesion attached to the lateral nasal wall. A preoperative CT scan was performed showing a solid lesion, measuring 2 cm in the maximum diameter, extending from the nasopharynx area with obstruction of the ostiomeatal unit and sphenoethmoidal recess into the lateral pharyngeal space, laterally to the parotid, without continuity with maxillary alveola and antrum. The tumour was completely excised endoscopically, and a final diagnosis of ameloblastoma was rendered. At the 12-month followup, there was no evidence of recurrence.

  19. 3D cone beam computed tomography reconstruction images in diagnosis of ameloblastomas of lower jaw: A case report and mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dize; Yang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Tao; Guan, Chao; Wang, Feilong; Matz, Ethan L; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Ji, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has obvious advantages over regular radiography in diagnosis of complex diseases. Objective of this study is to report a case of a mandibular jaw ameloblastoma recurring cyst, which represents a benign tumor of odontogenic epithelium, using CBCT imaging technology. CBCT examination of the patient suffering with recurrent lower jaw cyst (relapsing four years after surgery) showed a decrease in irregular bone density and appearance of a honeycomb pattern (3.5 cm×2.5 cm×1.8 cm) in the right lower jaw. This suggests that the lesion is more likely to be an ameloblastoma. Preoperative tissue biopsy and pathological examination of surgical sample confirmed the diagnosis. Surgical resection of the diseased tissue and autogenous bone grafting in the mandible was performed. Postoperative CBCT examination showed that the bone defect healed well, without recurrence of the tumor 22 months postoperatively. In conclusion, the rotated 3D CBCT images clearly displays the exact size, location, borders and internal changes of the tumor in the jaw cyst itself and the adjacent tissues. Thus, the dental CBCT allows clinicians to better evaluate lesions, leading to better treatment outcomes.

  20. An unusual case of bilateral unicystic ameloblastoma in third molar region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Deshmukh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicystic ameloblastoma (UA is less encountered variant which is believed to be less aggressive. A rare case of bilateral unicystic mural ameloblastoma in a 24 year old pregnant female is presented which was treated by en-block resection with preservation of the lower border of the mandible. The rationale for this treatment modalitiy and other treatment options for this condition including post resection reconstruction have been discussed in this article.

  1. Study of Ki67 and CD10 expression as predictive factors of recurrence of ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlem, B; Wided, A; Amani, L; Nadia, Z; Amira, A; Faten, F

    2015-11-01

    Ameloblastoma is a rare, benign, purely epithelial odontogenic tumour, characterized by a high potential for local invasion and recurrence. To study the epidemiological and histological characteristics of ameloblastoma. To study Ki67 and CD10 immunostaining in ameloblastoma and to investigate a possible correlation between these two markers and recurrence of this tumour. An immunohistochemical study using Ki67 and CD10 monoclonal antibodies was performed on 37 paraffin blocks obtained from the Charles-Nicolle hospital pathology department in Tunis over a 9-year period (2004-2012). Statistical analysis was performed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 15.1. This series of 37 cases comprised 21 males and 16 females (sex ratio: 1.3) with a mean age of 39 years (range: 7 to 70 years), corresponding to 36 cases of intraosseous ameloblastoma and one case of gingival ameloblastoma. Thirty-two cases were polycystic and 5 cases were unicystic. Eighteen cases of local recurrence were observed. No correlation was demonstrated between recurrence and the various clinical and histological parameters and treatment modalities. However, a significant correlation was demonstrated between recurrence and Ki67 and CD10 expression (P=0.000 and 0.002, respectively). The Ki67 proliferation index and stromal CD10 expression can be considered to be predictive factors of ameloblastoma recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunohistochemical Expression of GLUT-1 and HIF-1α in Tooth Germ, Ameloblastoma, and Ameloblastic Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Romero, Celeste; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Paes de Almeida, Oslei

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) promotes proteins that enable cell survival during hypoxia, such as glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1). Their coexpression has been associated with aggressiveness in malignancies and has not been studied in odontogenic tumors. Immunohistochemical expression of HIF-1α and GLUT-1 was analyzed in 13 tooth germs (TGs), 55 ameloblastomas (AMs), and 3 ameloblastic carcinomas (ACs). HIF-1α was negative in all TGs, and just 1 case of AM and 1 of AC had nuclear positivity. GLUT-1 expressed in ameloblastic cells of all TGs, AMs, and ACs, with an increasing intensity, respectively, and was significantly higher in solid AM than in unicystic AM (P = .041). Absence of nuclear HIF-1α in TGs and most AMs suggest that GLUT-1 may be induced by alternative pathways to hypoxia. However, in ACs, HIF-1α may be activated; however, to confirm this, additional cases are needed. GLUT-1 overexpression could be related to aggressiveness in AMs and ACs and must represent a normal metabolite in TGs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Tumor-size-based morphological features of metastatic lymph node tumors from primary lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Eiji; Ishii, Genichiro; Aramaki, Nao; Aokage, Keiju; Hishida, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Junji; Kojima, Motohiro; Nagai, Kanji; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2014-12-01

    Most primary lung adenocarcinomas show histological diversity, however, histological diversity in the metastatic lymph node tumors (LNT) is not well defined. The aim of this study was to explore the histological characteristics of the metastatic LNT based on their sizes. We analyzed 163 primary tumors and 509 metastatic LNTs. When the primary tumor showed papillary-predominant subtype, the most frequent histological subtype in the metastatic LNT that were ≤2 mm in diameter was solid subtype (49%), followed by papillary subtype (35%); on the other hand, in the metastatic LNT measuring >2 mm in size, the frequency of tumors showing papillary-predominant subtype increased significantly to 52% (P = 0.04). When the primary tumor showed acinar-predominant subtype, the most predominant subtype in the ≤2 mm metastatic LN tumors was acinar subtype (55%), followed by solid subtype (40%), with the frequency of acinar subtype increasing significantly to 76% in the metastatic LNT that were >2 mm in diameter (P = 0.04). These results indicate that solid subtype is the characteristic histological subtype in the early phase of the LN metastatic process, and that as the metastatic LNT grow larger, they develop morphological features resembling those in the primary tumor. © 2014 Japanese Society of Pathology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Odontogenic tumors: analysis of 706 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Kerr, D A; Courtney, R M

    1978-10-01

    From a total of 54,534 oral biopsy specimens, 706 (1.3%) odontogenic tumors were retrieved and reviewed. Odontomas comprised more than 65% of the odontogenic tumors, ameloblastomas about 10%, and the remaining six categories of odontogenic tumors accounted for approximately 25% of the lesions. The distribution by age, sex, and location of these tumors generally supported the data from other previously reported cases. A possible variant of the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor was described, and instances of two granular cell ameloblastic fibromas were reported. The myxomas as a group were characterized histologically more by residual bony trabeculae than by the presence of odontogenic rests. Because the clinical, histological, and behavioral features of the ameloblastic fibroma and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma were similar, these lesions were considered to be essentially the same. From limited follow-up information, the ameloblastoma was the only lesion that recurred. With the exception of one ameloblastoma found in the lung, no malignant odontogenic tumors were encountered.

  5. A novel ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3) secretes MMP-9 in response to Wnt-3a and induces osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibe, Toshiro; Fuchigami, Takao; Kishida, Michiko; Iijima, Mikio; Ishihata, Kiyohide; Hijioka, Hiroshi; Miyawaki, Akihiko; Semba, Ichiro; Nakamura, Norifumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Kishida, Shosei

    2013-06-01

    Ameloblastoma has a high risk of bone invasion and local recurrence. However, the mechanisms of bone invasion in ameloblastoma remain unclear. In this study, we established an experimental model for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) induction and osteoclastogenesis using ameloblastoma-derived cells. We established an ameloblastoma-derived cell line without viral genes and analyzed the expression of all Wnt and Frizzled members and MMPs by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and analyzed the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by the in-gel-gelatinase assay. AM-3, newly established ameloblastoma-derived cells retained the morphology of primary-cultured ameloblastoma cells. AM-3 cells overexpressed the messenger RNA of Wnt-5a, Frizzled-2, MMP-2, and MMP-9 and showed the potential of osteoclastogenesis. In addition, Wnt-3a-treatment induced expression and activation of MMP-9 in AM-3 cells. Our study suggests that AM-3 cells retained the characteristics of ameloblastoma, without acquiring typical features of cancer cells. Furthermore, Wnt signaling induced MMP-9 in ameloblastoma cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Benign Tumors and Tumor-like Lesions of the Oral Cavity and Jaws ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-15

    Jun 15, 2016 ... nonodontogenic benign tumors and tumor-like lesions. Pathology. Male Female Male:female ratio. Total (%). Odontogenic. KCOT. 35. 16. 2.2:1. 51 (42.2). Compound odontoma. 11. 12. 1:1.1. 23 (19). Complex odontoma. 10. 7. 1.4:1. 17 (14.1). Ameloblastoma. 4. 10. 1:2.5. 14 (11.6). Odontogenic myxoma. 2.

  7. Peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant S Kamat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentinogenic ghost cell tumors (DGCT are uncommon lesions mainly with rare peripheral types. This report presents a case of peripheral DGCT on the left side of the mandibular alveolar ridge of a heavy smoker, a 68-year-old man, with main presenting feature as a mild pain. Submandibular lymphadenopathy and radiological "saucerization" were evident. Differential diagnosis included fibroma, neurofibroma, peripheral ameloblastoma, peripheral odontogenic fibroma, and peripheral giant cell granuloma. Histologically, ameloblastoma-like epithelial elements were seen in association with grouped ghost cells. Proliferating polyhedral cells and stellate reticulum-like cells with various densities were spread over a wide range of the field. The lesion was curetted and after 2 years of follow up, it did not recur.

  8. Proton therapy for tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J.E.; Liebsch, N.J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Univ. Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating skull base and cervical spine tumors: dose can be focused in the target, while achieving significant sparing of the brain, brain stem, cervical cord, and optic nerves and chiasm. For skull base tumors, 10-year local control rates with combined proton-photon therapy are highest for chondrosarcomas, intermediate for male chordomas, and lowest for female chordomas (94%, 65%, and 42%, respectively). For cervical spine tumors, 10-year local control rates are not significantly different for chordomas and chondrosarcomas (54% and 48%, respectively), nor is there any difference in local control between males and females. Observed treatment-related morbidity has been judged acceptable, in view of the major morbidity and mortality which accompany uncontrolled tumor growth. (orig.)

  9. Unsuspected small ameloblastoma in the alveolar bone: a collaborative study of 14 cases with discussion of their cellular sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, F; Mishima, K; Yamada, H; Horie, N; Saito, I; Shimoyama, T; Kusama, K

    2008-04-01

    Intraosseous ameloblastoma (IA) is the quintessence of epithelial odontogenic tumor and histologically and behaviorally defined as an undoubted neoplastic process. Current information must lead to the consensus that IA arises from the embryologic inclusions of odontogenic epithelium within the jawbone. Nevertheless, clinically oriented evidence is limited to this day. The clinical and radiographic features, behavior, and pathology of 14 cases of small IA confined to the alveolar region were systematically examined. Six cases were a chance finding. There was no gender predilection and half of the lesions clustered in middle age (>40 years). The posterior region of the mandible (n = 7) and the anterior segment of the maxilla (n = 4) were favored. Five radiographic characteristics were recognized: interradicular (n = 5) and periradicular (n = 3), and periapical, residual and pericoronal (n = 2 each). They showed solid (n = 12) or unicystic (n = 2) growth pattern and 12 lesions were divided into seven follicular, three desmoplastic, and two plexiform subtypes. The main location of tumor was microscopically traceable in six cases; three interradicular type outside the periodontal ligament space and two periradicular and one periapical variants inside. By in-depth evaluation of the spatial relationship between tumor and its surrounding structure, the alveolar process, periodontal ligament space, and pericoronal area are all the likely starting points of IA. This report re-awakens the oral pathologist to the histogenetic significance of incipient IA as the only available human specimen for reappraisal of their origin.

  10. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, an uncommon tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Vasudevan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report a case of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT in the maxilla in a young girl aged 14 years and its surgical management. We also review the literature and variations in the nomenclature and classifications of this interesting tumor. The review of literature gives an interesting picture regarding terminologies in the past and dilemma in classifying this tumor. The introduction of the name adenomatoid odontogenic tumour has resulted in the simpler and fruitful surgical management like enucleation and curettage with no reports of recurrences. In the past, similar lesion with the terminology like adeno ameloblastoma has resulted in unnecessary mutilating surgery. The conflicting views whether the lesion is being neoplasm or an anomalous hamartomatous growth is also being discussed.

  11. Tumor classification based on orthogonal linear discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiya; Zhang, Shanwen

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression profiles have great potential for accurate tumor diagnosis. It is expected to enable us to diagnose tumors precisely and systematically, and also bring the researchers of machine learning two challenges, the curse of dimensionality and the small sample size problems. We propose a manifold learning based dimensional reduction algorithm named orthogonal local discriminant embedding (O-LDE) and apply it to tumor classification. Comparing with the classical local discriminant embedding (LDE), O-LDE aims to obtain an orthogonal linear projection matrix by solving an optimization problem. After being projected into a low-dimensional subspace by O-LDE, the data points of the same class maintain their intrinsic neighbor relations, whereas the neighboring points of the different classes are far from each other. Experimental results on a public tumor dataset validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed algorithm.

  12. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen; Haberer, Thomas; Jaekel, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications

  13. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications.

  14. Mandibular Reconstruction in Ameloblastoma Using Allogeneic Cord Stem Cells and Alloplastic Graft Material - Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, K; Chandramohan, M; Kannan, R; Sankaranarayanan, S; Ravi, V R; Sharma, Rohini

    Ameloblastoma is a histologically benign odontogenic tumour and has a tendency of locally aggressive behaviour. This is second most prevalent odontogenic tumour and most common in the molar-ramus-angle region and surgical resection is only treatment option. In this article, we propose an innovative approach to deal with these cases by using alloplastic graft with cord stem cells. Over 2.5 years follow-up, we could demonstrate bone regeneration using this technique with no recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful regeneration of part of ramus and body of mandible using allogeneic cord stem cells in cases of Ameloblastoma.

  15. Spontaneous multi-cystic peripheral ameloblastoma in the freshwater angelfish, from the Brazilian state of Pará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Videira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho registra a ocorrência espontânea de ameloblastoma em P. scalare. O tumor foi obtido a partir de um exemplar de Acará Bandeira, sendo fixado, seccionado, e os fragmentos processados para microscopia de luz e microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV. O exame macroscópico evidenciou uma massa tumoral que se estendia do rebordo alveolar do maxilar superior à face externa labial. À MEV, a neoplasia apresentou uma série de espículas. Microscopicamente, percebia-se um processo neoplásico constituído por tecido conjuntivo de característica mixoide, ricamente vascularizado, onde eram observados fragmentos de tecido osteoide. A amostra revelou proliferação neoplásica do epitélio odontogênico, onde as células neoplásicas se organizavam na forma de paliçada. Alterações histopatológicas em peixes têm sido úteis biomarcadores do efeito à exposição a substâncias tóxicas, sendo as neoplasias lesões específicas, comumente encontradas em peixes de áreas poluídas, revelando uma associação entre as lesões e a exposição a irritantes.

  16. Recommendations for reporting tumor budding in colorectal cancer based on the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lugli, Alessandro; Kirsch, Richard; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    -based standardized scoring system for tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The ITBCC included nine sessions with presentations, a pre-meeting survey and an e-book covering the key publications on tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation' method was used...... colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of survival in stage II colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding should be taken into account along with other clinicopathological features in a multidisciplinary setting (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding is counted on H&E (19/22, 86...

  17. Nanobody-based cancer therapy of solid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijanka, Marta|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328212792; Dorresteijn, Bram|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31401635X; Oliveira, Sabrina; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071919481

    The development of tumor-targeted therapies using monoclonal antibodies has been successful during the last 30 years. Nevertheless, the efficacy of antibody-based therapy is still limited and further improvements are eagerly awaited. One of the promising novel developments that may overcome the

  18. Magnesium-enriched hydroxyapatite as bone filler in an ameloblastoma mandibular defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigolato, Roberto; Pizzi, Natalia; Brotto, Maria C; Corrocher, Giovanni; Desando, Giovanna; Grigolo, Brunella

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of a magnesium-enriched hydroxyapatite biomaterial used as bone substitute in a case of mandibular ameloblastoma treated with conservative surgery. A 63 year old male patient was treated for an ameloblastoma in the anterior mandibular profile. After tissue excision, the bone defect was filled with a synthetic hydroxyapatite biomaterial enriched with magnesium ions, in order to promote bone tissue regeneration and obtain a good aesthetic result. Twenty-five months after surgery, due to ameloblastoma recurrence in an area adjacent to the previously treated one, the patient underwent to a further surgery. In that occasion the surgeon performed a biopsy in the initially treated area, in order to investigate the nature of the newly-formed tissue and to evaluate the bone regenerative potential of this biomaterial by clinical, radiographic and histological analyses. The clinical, radiographic and histological evaluations showed various characteristics of bone remodeling stage with an ongoing osteogenic formation and a good osteo-integration. In conclusion, magnesium-enriched hydroxyapatite used as bone substitute in a mandibular defect due to ameloblastoma excision showed an effective bone regeneration at 25 months follow-up, demonstrating an excellent biocompatibility and a high osteo-integration property.

  19. Pattern and prevalence of ameloblastoma in a tertiary hospital – a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ameloblastoma is the commonest odontogenic tumour afflicting our populace. Furthermore, its management has been engulfed in controversy.As a tertiary institution serving as a referral center to neighboring states, no evaluation of demographics, clinical, radiological and pathological picture of ...

  20. A system for tumor heterogeneity evaluation and diagnosis based on tumor markers measured routinely in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Liu; Rixv, Liu; Xiuying, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To develop an efficient and reliable approach to estimate tumor heterogeneity and improve tumor diagnosis using multiple tumor markers measured routinely in the clinical laboratory. A total of 161 patients with different cancers were recruited as the cancer group, and 91 patients with non-oncological conditions were required as the non-oncological disease group. The control group comprised 90 randomly selected healthy subjects. AFP, CEA, CYFRA, CA125, CA153, CA199, CA724, and NSE levels were measured in all these subjects with a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. The tumor marker with the maximum S/CO value (sample test value:cutoff value for discriminating individuals with and without tumors) was considered as a specific tumor marker (STM) for an individual. Tumor heterogeneity index (THI)=N/P (N: number of STMs; P: percentage of individuals with STMs in a certain tumor population) was used to quantify tumor heterogeneity: high THI indicated high tumor heterogeneity. The tumor marker index (TMI), TMI = STM×(number of positive tumor markers+1), was used for diagnosis. The THIs of lung, gastric, and liver cancers were 8.33, 9.63, and 5.2, respectively, while the ROC-areas under the curve for TMI were 0.862, 0.809, and 0.966. In this study, we developed a novel index for tumor heterogeneity based on the expression of various routinely evaluated serum tumor markers. Development of an evaluation system for tumor heterogeneity on the basis of this index could provide an effective diagnostic tool for some cancers. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CD56 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts and Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Jaafari-Ashkavandi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Odontogenic cysts and tumors have a wide spectrum of clinical characteristics that lead to the different management strategies. Since definite diagnosis is difficult in some cases, it has been suggested that CD56 may be a candidate marker for definitive diagnosis of some odontogenic tumors. The present study was designed to examine CD56 expression in lesions with histopathological similarities. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional, analytical study the subjects were 22 ameloblastomas, 13 dentigerous cysts, 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT, 4 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOT, 3 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts, 3 calcifying odontogenic cysts (COC and one glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC. All the samples were examined for CD56 immunoreactivity. Data were analyzed using chi-square test. Results. Twenty cases (91% of ameloblastomas, 3 (75% AOT, 4 (40% KCOT and one case of GOC were positive for CD56. None of the dentigerous cysts, COC and orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts was CD56-positive. There was a significant difference in the CD56 expression between ameloblastoma and dentigerous cyst, as well as COC. Also, KCOT showed significantly higher expression than orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst. Conclusion. In this study CD56 expression was limited to the odontogenic tumors and more aggressive cystic lesions. This marker can be a useful aid for distinguishing cysts and tumors from similar lesions.

  2. [Extensive tumor of the skull base: sphenoid sinus adenocarcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallel, Souha; Sellami, Moncef

    2017-01-01

    We report a rare case of adenocarcinoma of the sphenoid sinus manifesting as extended skull base tumor. The patient included in the study was a 42-year old woman presenting with unilateral right symptomatology consisting of nasal obstruction, diplopia and hemifacial neuralgias. Clinical examination showed paralysis of the cranial nerve pairs V and VI. Brain scanner showed voluminous heterogeneous sphenoid and clival mass reaching the right cavernous sinus, with a peripheral tissue component at the level of the sphenoid sinus. Biopsy was performed under general anesthesia, through endonasal sphenoidotomy approach. Histological examination showed non-intestinal adenocarcinoma. The patient died due to impaired general condition occurred during examinations. Skull base adenocarcinomas mainly occur in the ethmoid bone. Sphenoid origin is exceptional. Radiological appearance is not specific and suggests malignancy. Diagnosis should be suspected in patients with aggressive tumor, even when it occurs in the midline skull base.

  3. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia amin.oroji@siswa.um.edu.my, mohd@um.edu.my (Malaysia); Yarahmadian, Shantia [Mathematics Department Mississippi State University, USA Syarahmadian@math.msstate.edu (United States)

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  4. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan

  5. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, G.O. Jr.; Davis, P.C.; Patrick, L.E.; Winn, K.J.; Ball, T.I.; Wyly, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy is an uncommon neoplasm occurring primarily in the child one year or less in age. Difficulty in deciding the cellular origin of this tumor has led to numerous names, including congenital melanocarcinoma, melanotic epithelial odontoma, melanotic ameloblastoma, and retinal anlage tumor, to list a few. Electron microscopy and histochemical studies, however, have now established the neural crest the most likely origin. The most frequent site of occurrence is the maxilla followed by the skull, the brain and the mandible. The genital organs are the most frequent extracranial site. Within the skull, there is a predilection for the anterior fontanel. The following is a case report of a young child with melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy arising at the anterior fontanel. Included is a discussion of magnetic resonance (MR) findings, which to our knowledge, have not been previously reported in this tumor. (orig.)

  6. Off-label use of rhBMP-2 as bone regeneration strategies in mandibular ameloblastoma unicystic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Henrique Celestino Lima E; Cheim, Adonai Peixoto; Moreno, Roberto; Miranda, Sérgio Luis de

    2017-01-01

    Jawbone reconstruction after tumor resection is one of the most challenging clinical tasks for maxillofacial surgeons. Osteogenic, osteoinductive, osteoconductive and non-antigenic properties of autogenous bone place this bone as the gold standard for solving problems of bone availability. However, the need for a second surgical site to harvest the bone graft increases significantly both the cost and the morbidity associated with the reconstructive procedures. Bone grafting gained an important tool with the discovery of bone morphogenetic proteins in 1960. Benefit of obtaining functional and real bone matrix without need of second surgical site seems to be the great advantage of use bone morphogenetic proteins. This study analyzed the use of rhBMP-2 in unicystic ameloblastoma of the mandible, detailing its structure, mechanisms of cell signaling and biological efficacy, in addition to present possible advantages and disadvantages of clinical use of rhBMP-2 as bone regeneration strategy. RESUMO A reconstrução óssea dos maxilares após ressecções tumorais é uma das tarefas mais difíceis para o cirurgião maxilofacial. As propriedades osteogênicas, osteoindutoras, osteocondutoras e não antigênicas do osso autógeno o colocam como o padrão-ouro para a solução de problemas de disponibilidade óssea. Entretanto a coleta do enxerto ósseo necessita de um segundo sítio cirúrgico, aumentando significativamente o custo e a morbidade associados ao procedimento reconstrutivo. A enxertia óssea ganhou uma excelente ferramenta com a descoberta das proteínas ósseas morfogenéticas na década de 1960. O benefício da obtenção de matriz óssea verdadeira e funcional, sem a necessidade de um segundo sítio cirúrgico, parece ser a grande vantagem do uso das proteínas ósseas morfogenéticas. Neste contexto, o objetivo deste estudo foi analisar a utilização da rhBMP-2 na regeneração óssea de ameloblastoma mandibular unicístico, detalhando sua estrutura, seus

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell 1 (MSC1-based therapy attenuates tumor growth whereas MSC2-treatment promotes tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S Waterman

    Full Text Available Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2.Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation.These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease.

  8. Multitriggered Tumor-Responsive Drug Delivery Vehicles Based on Protein and Polypeptide Coassembly for Enhanced Photodynamic Tumor Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Fenfang; Zou, Qianli; Li, Yongxin; Ma, Guanghui; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-11-01

    Tumor-responsive nanocarriers are highly valuable and demanded for smart drug delivery particularly in the field of photodynamic therapy (PDT), where a quick release of photosensitizers in tumors is preferred. Herein, it is demonstrated that protein-based nanospheres, prepared by the electrostatic assembly of proteins and polypeptides with intermolecular disulfide cross-linking and surface polyethylene glycol coupling, can be used as versatile tumor-responsive drug delivery vehicles for effective PDT. These nanospheres are capable of encapsulation of various photosensitizers including Chlorin e6 (Ce6), protoporphyrin IX, and verteporfin. The Chlorin e6-encapsulated nanospheres (Ce6-Ns) are responsive to changes in pH, redox potential, and proteinase concentration, resulting in multitriggered rapid release of Ce6 in an environment mimicking tumor tissues. In vivo fluorescence imaging results indicate that Ce6-Ns selectively accumulate near tumors and the quick release of Ce6 from Ce6-Ns can be triggered by tumors. In tumors the fluorescence of released Ce6 from Ce6-Ns is observed at 0.5 h postinjection, while in normal tissues the fluorescence appeared at 12 h postinjection. Tumor ablation is demonstrated by in vivo PDT using Ce6-Ns and the biocompatibility of Ce6-Ns is evident from the histopathology imaging, confirming the enhanced in vivo PDT efficacy and the biocompatibility of the assembled drug delivery vehicles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Ameloblastoma after surgical removal of an impacted mandibular molar. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindia, M L; Guthua, S W; Mwaniki, D L

    1991-04-01

    A case of an ameloblastoma diagnosed about 3 1/2 years after removal of an impacted mandibular 3rd molar is presented. The pre-operative radiographs, though poor in quality, showed an ill-defined radiolucency in relation to the tooth. This feature was not apparent to the examiners at the time of first presentation. Despite unfavourable working conditions in developing countries, a high level of suspicion should be maintained to avoid serious sequelae at a later stage.

  10. Photodynamic therapy and imaging based on tumor-targeted nanoprobe, polymer-conjugated zinc protoporphyrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Liao, Long; Yin, Hongzhuan; Nakamura, Hideaki; Subr, Vladimir; Ulbrich, Karel; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the potential of tumor-targeted nanoprobe, N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer-conjugated zinc protoporphyrin (PZP) for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and tumor imaging. Materials & Methods: Different tumor models including carcinogen-induced cancer were used, PZP was intravenously injected followed by irradiation with xenon or blue fluorescent light on tumor. Results: One PZP 20 mg/kg (ZnPP equivalent) dose with two or three treatments of light at an intensity of ≥20 J/cm2 caused necrosis and disappearance of most tumors (>70%) in different tumor models. We also confirmed PZP-based tumor imaging in carcinogen-induced breast tumor and colon cancer models. Conclusion: These findings support the potential application of PZP as a tumor-selective nanoprobe for PDT as well as tumor imaging, by virtue of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. PMID:28031879

  11. Ameloblastoma with varied sites of metastasis: report of two cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; He, Jian-feng; Li, Zhi-yong; Liu, Jian-hua

    2014-07-01

    We report two rare cases of lung metastasis from maxillary ameloblastoma, in order to review its risk and analyse the types of metastases that can present with this disease. A 40-year-old male with multiple recurrences and a 46-year-old female, who had undergone successful surgical treatment of a maxillary ameloblastoma, presented with metastatic lesions. The primary tumour and metastases were benign in both patients. We reviewed and analysed 20 cases of the same condition reported in recent years. Our initial treatment for the primary maxillary lesion was performed more than 10 years before the pulmonary lesions presented. Due to the aggressive nature of this tumour, metastases in the lungs and cervical lymph nodes (male patient) were confirmed. These cases presented a diagnostic challenge due to the multiple and varied sites of recurrence, which indicate the natural behaviour of this tumour. Different routes of metastasis can occur, including implanting, haematogenous, and lymphatic spread. CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic lung biopsy is an important method to confirm metastatic ameloblastoma. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Autotransplantation of Immature Third Molars and Orthodontic Treatment After En Bloc Resection of Conventional Ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterne, Rafael Lima Verde; Moreira Neto, José Jeová Siebra; de Araújo Lima, Augusto Darwin Moreira; Nogueira, Renato Luiz Maia

    2015-09-01

    Ameloblastoma treatment can lead to significant bone defects; consequently, oral rehabilitation can be challenging. We present the case of a 14-year-old girl diagnosed with a conventional ameloblastoma in the mandible who was treated using en bloc resection and rehabilitated with autotransplantation of the immature third molars and orthodontic treatment. The lesion was in the region of the lower left canine and premolars, and en bloc resection resulted in a significant alveolar bone defect. Autotransplantation of the lower third molars to the site of the lower left premolars was performed. After 2 years, the upper left third molar was transplanted to the site of the lower left canine. During the orthodontic treatment period, considerable alveolar bone formation was observed in the region of the transplanted teeth, and roots developed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of alveolar bone formation induction caused by tooth transplantation after ameloblastoma treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Automatización de un registro hospitalario de tumores Automatization of a hospital-based tumor registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josepa Ribes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El Instituto Catalán de Oncología automatizó los procedimientos manuales de captación de la información de las bases de datos del alta hospitalaria (AH y anatomía patológica (APA mediante una aplicación informática (ASEDAT con el objetivo de aumentar la fiabilidad de los datos y reducir los costes del Registro Hospitalario de Tumores (RHT. Material y Método: ASEDAT detecta los tumores incidentes del centro a partir de las bases de datos de APA y de las AH mediante la selección de la información básica para cada uno de ellos. Se resolvió el RHT para el período 1999-2000 mediante el procedimiento manual y automatizado, y se compararon entre sí los resultados. Resultados: Se detectaron 10.498 pacientes oncológicos. La resolución manual detectó 8.309 tumores incidentes y 2.374 tumores prevalentes. ASEDAT resolvió automáticamente 8.901 pacientes (84,8%, en los cuales se detectaron 8.367 tumores incidentes, 58 tumores más que con el procedimiento manual. La validación de la concordancia se realizó en los tumores incidentes detectados por ambos métodos (7.063 tumores. En 6.185 tumores (87,6%, la información coincidió en todas las variables. De los tumores discordantes, 692 (9,8% fueron generados por el personal del RHT en la resolución manual y el resto (n = 186; 2,6% por la aplicación (resolución automática. Conclusiones: La automatización de un registro de cáncer es posible siempre y cuando el centro disponga de las bases de datos de APA y AH codificadas e informatizadas.Introduction: To increase data reliability and reduce the costs associated with the HTR, the Catalan Institute of Oncology programmed the manual procedures of data collection from databases by means of a computer application (ASEDAT. Material and method: ASEDAT detects the incident tumors of the registry from the databases of the pathology records (PR and discharge records (DR and selects the basic information from both databases. Data

  14. Extent of Endoscopic Resection for Anterior Skull Base Tumors: An MRI-Based Volumetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszewski, Ian J; Avey, Gregory; Ahmed, Azam; Leonhard, Lucas; Hoffman, Matthew R; McCulloch, Timothy M

    2017-06-01

    Objective  To determine the volume of ventral skull base tumor removed following endoscopic endonasal (EEA) resection using MRI-based volumetric analysis and to evaluate the inter-rater reliability of such analysis. Design  Retrospective case series. Setting  Academic tertiary care hospital. Participants  EEA patients November 2012 to August 2015. Main Outcome Measures  Volumetric analysis of pre- and immediately postoperative MR imaging was performed independently by two investigators. The percentage of total tumor resected was evaluated according to resection goal and tumor type. Results  A total of 39 patients underwent resection. Intraclass correlation coefficients between the raters were 0.9988 for preoperative and 0.9819 for postoperative images. Tumors (and average percentage removed) included 17 nonsecreting pituitary adenomas (95.3%), 8 secreting pituitary adenomas (86.2%), 4 meningiomas (81.6%), 3 olfactory neuroblastomas (100%), 2 craniopharyngiomas (100%), 1 large B-cell lymphoma (90.5%), 1 germ cell neoplasm (48.3), 1 benign fibrous connective tissue mass (93.4%), 1 epidermoid cyst (68.4%), and 1 chordoma (100%). For tumors treated with intent for gross total resection, 96.9 ± 4.8% was removed. Conclusion  EEAs achieved tumor resection rates of ∼97% when total resection was attempted. The radiographic finding of residual tumor is of uncertain clinical significance. The volumetric analysis employed in this study demonstrated high inter-rater reliability and could facilitate further study.

  15. Nanotechnology based therapeutic modality to boost anti-tumor immunity and collapse tumor defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaomeng; Wu, Tingting; Bao, Yuling; Zhang, Zhiping

    2017-06-28

    Cancer is still the leading cause of death. While traditional treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy play dominating roles, recent breakthroughs in cancer immunotherapy indicate that the influence of immune system on cancer development is virtually beyond our expectation. Manipulating the immune system to fight against cancer has been thriving in recent years. Further understanding of tumor anatomy provides opportunities to put a brake on immunosuppression by overcoming tumor intrinsic resistance or modulating tumor microenvironment. Nanotechnology which provides versatile engineered approaches to enhance therapeutic effects may potentially contribute to the development of future cancer treatment modality. In this review, we will focus on the application of nanotechnology both in boosting anti-tumor immunity and collapsing tumor defense. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. MR-based volumetric analysis of small tumor volumes: accuracy of phantom examinations of simulated eye tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, A.-J.; Kazi, I.; Felix, R.; Hosten, N.; Bechrakis, N.E.; Foerster, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The determination of tumor volume in ocular tumors is very important for the planning and success of radiation therapy. This study uses an animal model to evaluate the accuracy of MR-based volumetry of ocular tumors. Materials and methods: In a total of 25 porcine eyes obtained from the slaughterhouse, ocular tumors were produced by injecting a mixture of hand creme and Gd-DTPA under ophthalmoscopic guidance. The injected volume varied between 0.05 ml and 2.7 ml. The eyes were examined with a 1.5 Tesla scanner and a 4 cm circular surface coil especially developed for ocular MRI. After data transfer to a separate workstation, volumetric analysis was carried out by three independent radiologists using semiautomated software. The determined volume was compared with the injected volume. Results: Of the 25 prepared porcine eyes, 23 were suitable for volumetric analysis. The injection of the mixture of hand creme and GD-DTPA produced two different types of tumors. Ophthalmoscopically, 14 ellipsoid and 9 lobulated to mushroom-shaped tumors were found and confirmed by MRI. Minor deviation was found between injected volume and volume calculated by MRI, with a correlation coefficient of 0.96. Conclusion: Using appropriate technique, MRI is capable of determining small tumor volumes with high accuracy in an animal model. Minor differences can be expected when transferring the results to clinical studies. (orig.) [de

  17. Pattern of malignant tumors in children: a hospital based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.M.; Nasreen, S.; Zai, S.

    2001-01-01

    From 1990 to 1999 data from 32743 cancer patients (males 18502, females 14241) were analyzed to know the frequency of the most common cancers in local and well as well as afghan refugees. There were 3760 children with biopsy proven cancers 2910 belonged to the north-west frontier province (NWFP), while the remaining 850 were Afghan refugees. Among children of NWFP male were 1945 (67%) and 965(33%) females. In Afghan children, males were 570(67%) and females were 280(33%). The most common tumors in children of NWFP were lymphoid leukemia, lymphoma, tumors of the central nervous system (CNS), myeloid leukemia, soft tissue sarcoma wilms, tumours, retinoblastoma, bone tumor neuroblastoma, and ovarian tumors. Whereas Afghan children had Lymphoid leukemia, lymphoma, myeloid leukemia, wilms, tumor, retinoblastoma, tumors of soft tissue bones CNS, neuroblastoma and ovarian tumors. (author)

  18. Facilitating in vivo tumor localization by principal component analysis based on dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Chen, Maomao; Wu, Junyu; Zhou, Yuan; Cai, Chuangjian; Wang, Daliang; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging has been used to target tumors in mice with xenograft tumors. However, tumor imaging is largely distorted by the aggregation of fluorescent probes in the liver. A principal component analysis (PCA)-based strategy was applied on the in vivo dynamic fluorescence imaging results of three mice with xenograft tumors to facilitate tumor imaging, with the help of a tumor-specific fluorescent probe. Tumor-relevant features were extracted from the original images by PCA and represented by the principal component (PC) maps. The second principal component (PC2) map represented the tumor-related features, and the first principal component (PC1) map retained the original pharmacokinetic profiles, especially of the liver. The distribution patterns of the PC2 map of the tumor-bearing mice were in good agreement with the actual tumor location. The tumor-to-liver ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher on the PC2 map than on the original images, thus distinguishing the tumor from its nearby fluorescence noise of liver. The results suggest that the PC2 map could serve as a bioimaging marker to facilitate in vivo tumor localization, and dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging with PCA could be a valuable tool for future studies of in vivo tumor metabolism and progression.

  19. An unsuspected ameloblastoma in the subpontic region of the mandible with consideration of pathogenesis from the radiographic course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a case of unsuspected ameloblastoma involving the right man dibular subpontic region in a 38-year-old Cambodian female patient. This lesion was purportedly preceded by multiple radiolucencies which were diagnosed as radi cular cysts and treated a few times in the past years by enucleation followed by endodontic therapy of the affected teeth. Bridgework restoration of the partially edentulous area was performed. This case report de monstrates radiographic changes that occurred in the periods before and after the diagnosis of amelo blas to ma. The case may represent an example of radicular cysts and ameloblastoma occurring as a collision phenomenon, or the ameloblastoma may have arisen as a result of neoplastic transformation of the lining epi thelium in an inflammatory odontogenic epithelial cyst. PMID:20452900

  20. Intra-tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer has limited impact on transcriptomic-based molecular profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, Govindasamy-Muralidharan; Rantalainen, Mattias; Stålhammar, Gustav; Lövrot, John; Ullah, Ikram; Alkodsi, Amjad; Ma, Ran; Wedlund, Lena; Lindberg, Johan; Frisell, Jan; Bergh, Jonas; Hartman, Johan

    2017-11-29

    Transcriptomic profiling of breast tumors provides opportunity for subtyping and molecular-based patient stratification. In diagnostic applications the specimen profiled should be representative of the expression profile of the whole tumor and ideally capture properties of the most aggressive part of the tumor. However, breast cancers commonly exhibit intra-tumor heterogeneity at molecular, genomic and in phenotypic level, which can arise during tumor evolution. Currently it is not established to what extent a random sampling approach may influence molecular breast cancer diagnostics. In this study we applied RNA-sequencing to quantify gene expression in 43 pieces (2-5 pieces per tumor) from 12 breast tumors (Cohort 1). We determined molecular subtype and transcriptomic grade for all tumor pieces and analysed to what extent pieces originating from the same tumors are concordant or discordant with each other. Additionally, we validated our finding in an independent cohort consisting of 19 pieces (2-6 pieces per tumor) from 6 breast tumors (Cohort 2) profiled using microarray technique. Exome sequencing was also performed on this cohort, to investigate the extent of intra-tumor genomic heterogeneity versus the intra-tumor molecular subtype classifications. Molecular subtyping was consistent in 11 out of 12 tumors and transcriptomic grade assignments were consistent in 11 out of 12 tumors as well. Molecular subtype predictions revealed consistent subtypes in four out of six patients in this cohort 2. Interestingly, we observed extensive intra-tumor genomic heterogeneity in these tumor pieces but not in their molecular subtype classifications. Our results suggest that macroscopic intra-tumoral transcriptomic heterogeneity is limited and unlikely to have an impact on molecular diagnostics for most patients.

  1. The occurrence and pattern of ameloblastoma in children and adolescents: an Indian institutional study of 41 years and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, S; Desai, R S; Shirsat, P; Prasad, P; Karjodkar, F; Andrade, N

    2015-06-01

    Ameloblastoma in the paediatric age group is considered a rarity and it accounts for approximately 10-15% of all reported cases. This study assessed the clinical, radiological, and histopathological features of 39 cases of ameloblastoma in Indian children aged less than 18 years, seen over a 41-year period (1971-2011) in the Department of Oral Pathology, Nair Hospital Dental College, India. Out of 256 diagnosed cases of ameloblastoma, 39 (15.2%) occurred in patients ranging in age from 4.5 to 18 years (mean age 13.6 years; male-to-female ratio 2:1). All of the tumours were intraosseous, with a marked predilection for the mandible (97.4%), the body-angle-ramus being the most commonly involved site. Radiographically, 23 cases presented as unilocular radiolucency. Histologically, 20 cases presented as solid and 19 as unicystic ameloblastoma. The interesting finding of 10 solid ameloblastoma presenting as unilocular radiolucency and five cases of unicystic ameloblastoma manifesting as multilocular radiolucency suggests that solid ameloblastomas should be included in the differential diagnosis of unilocular radiolucency of the jaw in the paediatric age group. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in mandibular region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Cabrales, Ernesto; Vila Morales, Dadonim; Felipe Garmendia, Angel Mario; Serra Ortega, Alain; Torres Gomez de Cadiz, Alma

    2010-01-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is an uncommon neoplasm derivative of the odontogenic epithelium containing canalicular structures with inductor modifications of variable intensity in the conjunctival tissue. It is a slow growth lesion and no much invasive but that may to be similar to other odontogenic lesions more aggressive including the dentigerous cyst and the ameloblastoma among others. Its classical location (upper canine area) guides us to diagnosis and its duct histological pattern is very typical of this tumor. Other tumors included in this group are the ameloblastic fibroma, the ameloblastic odontoma, the calcified odontogenic cyst and composed and complex odontomas. This group of lesions may or not to have formations of hard tissue inside. Thus, authors present the case of a patient presenting with this type of tumor making a histopathology study, a literature review on this benign odontogenic tumor and its clinical radiographic features, treatment, as well as the differential diagnoses to be into account. (author)

  3. Changing Histopathological Diagnostics by Genome-Based Tumor Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kloth

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, tumors are classified by histopathological criteria, i.e., based on their specific morphological appearances. Consequently, current therapeutic decisions in oncology are strongly influenced by histology rather than underlying molecular or genomic aberrations. The increase of information on molecular changes however, enabled by the Human Genome Project and the International Cancer Genome Consortium as well as the manifold advances in molecular biology and high-throughput sequencing techniques, inaugurated the integration of genomic information into disease classification. Furthermore, in some cases it became evident that former classifications needed major revision and adaption. Such adaptations are often required by understanding the pathogenesis of a disease from a specific molecular alteration, using this molecular driver for targeted and highly effective therapies. Altogether, reclassifications should lead to higher information content of the underlying diagnoses, reflecting their molecular pathogenesis and resulting in optimized and individual therapeutic decisions. The objective of this article is to summarize some particularly important examples of genome-based classification approaches and associated therapeutic concepts. In addition to reviewing disease specific markers, we focus on potentially therapeutic or predictive markers and the relevance of molecular diagnostics in disease monitoring.

  4. Brainstem tolerance to conformal radiotherapy of skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debus, J.; Hug, E.B.; Munzenrider, J.E.; Liebsch, N.J.; O'Farrell, D.; Efird, J.; Daly, W.; Suit, H.D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Brainstem tolerance to inhomogenous radiation doses applied by modern conformal radiotherapy has not yet been examined. The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence of brainstem toxicity in patients treated for skull base tumors with high dose conformal radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between 1974 and 1995, 367 patients with chordomas (n=195) and chondrosarcomas (n=172) of the base of skull have been treated with combined megavoltage photon and 160 MeV proton radiotherapy. All patients had previously undergone biopsy, subtotal or total tumor removal. 104 patients had two or more surgical procedures before radiotherapy. Following 3D treatment planning with delineation of target volumes and critical non-target structures, dose distributions and dose volume histograms were calculated [at the time of treatment delivery]. Radiotherapy was given once a day, 1.8 Gy or CGE (Cobalt Gy Equivalent: Proton Gy X 1.1) per fraction, 5 fractions per week, with prescribed target doses ranging from 63 CGE to 79.2 CGE (mean = 67.8 CGE). Doses to the brainstem surface were limited to ≤64 CGE and to the brainstem center to ≤53 CGE. Dose distributions were developed to limit dose to brainstem surface and center; current plans limit dose to surface and center to ≤64 CGE and ≤53 CGE, respectively. Brainstem toxicity was scored according to the RTOG grading system. Results: Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 21.4 years (mean = 42.5 months). Brainstem symptoms, attributable to the treatment, developed in 17 of 282 patients with local tumor control (6.0%), resulting in death of three patients. The mean time to onset of symptoms was 17 months (range: 4.5 to 177 months). These symptoms appeared in 89.5% within 3 years. Grading of the brainstem toxicity is listed in table 1. Actuarial rates of 5 and 10 year toxicity free survival were 87% and 82% respectively. Increased risk of brainstem toxicity was significantly associated with maximum brainstem dose

  5. Distribution of mast cells in benign odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis Caldas Pereira, Francisco; Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo Silva; Ramos, Eduardo Antônio Gonçalves; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa; Jurisic, Vladimir; Sales, Caroline Brandi Schlaepfer; Cury, Patrícia Ramos; dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of mast cells in a series of odontogenic tumors. Forty-five cases of odontogenic tumors were investigated using immunohistochemistry for mast cell triptase, and differences between groups were statistically evaluated. Mast cells were present in 96% of odontogenic tumors. Mast cells present in solid ameloblastoma were observed in the tumor stroma surrounding more solid and follicular epithelial islands, with or without squamous metaplasia. The odontogenic mixoma showed few mast cells. In odontogenic tumors with a cystic structure, the mast cells were distributed throughout all areas of the lesions, mainly in keratocystic odontogenic tumor. In addition, the total density of mast cells between all odontogenic tumors showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). A greater mast cells distribution was found in keratocystic odontogenic tumor in relation to adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (p < 0.01), and when the unicystic ameloblastoma and keratocistic odontogenic tumor were compared to the odontogenic myxoma (p < 0.05). Syndrome keratocystic odontogenic tumor showed a higher mean of mast cells when compared with the other tumors of the sample. Mast cells values presented by syndrome keratocystic odontogenic tumor were significantly greater than those of the sporadic keratocystic odontogenic tumor that were not associated with the syndrome (p = 0.03). Mast cells are probably one of the major components of the stromal scaffold in odontogenic tumors. We found significant differences of mast cells between syndrome nonsyndrome keratocystic odontogenic tumors, although their distribution did not seem to have any influence on the biologic behavior of benign odontogenic tumors.

  6. Clinicopathological and demographic characteristics of ameloblastomas in a population from Bahia, Brazil = Características clinicopatológicas e demográficas de ameloblastomas em uma população da Bahia, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, Jean Nunes dos

    2010-01-01

    Conclusão: O perfil clínico- epidemiológico dos pacientes do presente estudo é similar ao de outras populações. Em adição, o ameloblastoma unicístico é o subtipo histológico mais comum em nossa população

  7. Predicting anti-tumor effect of deoxypodophyllotoxin in NCI-H460 tumor-bearing mice based on in vitro pharmacodynamics and physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Zhao, Kaijing; Liu, Fei; Li, Ying; Zhong, Zeyu; Hong, Shijin; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Li

    2018-04-04

    Anti-tumor evaluation in tumor-bearing mouse is time- and energy-consuming. We aimed to investigate whether in vivo anti-tumor efficacy could be predicted based on in vitro pharmacodynamics using deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), a developing anti-tumor candidate, as a model compound. Proliferation kinetics of monolayer cultivated NCI-H460 cells under various DPT concentrations was quantitatively investigated accompanied by calibration curves. Koch's two-phase natural growth model combined with sigmoid Emax model, i.e. dM/dt=2λ 0 λ 1 M/(λ 1 +2λ 0 M)-EmaxC γ /(EC 50 γ +C γ )·M, was introduced to describe cell proliferation (M) against time under DPT treatment (C). Estimated in vitro pharmacodynamic parameters were: EC 50 , 8.97 nM; Emax, 0.820 day -1 and γ, 7.13. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model including tumor compartment was introduced, which could predict DPT disposition in plasma, tumor tissue and main normal tissues of NCI-H460 tumor-bearing mice following single dose. In vivo pharmacodynamic model and parameters were assumed the same as in vitro ones, and linked with simulated tumor pharmacokinetic profiles by PBPK model, to build a physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) model. After estimating natural growth parameters (λ 0 and λ 1 ), we desirably predicted the tumor growth in NCI-H460 tumor-bearing mice during multi-dose DPT treatment, both in this study and literature, by the PBPK-PD model. The model was further successfully applied to predict tumor growth in SGC-7901 tumor-bearing mice. These data indicated that in vivo anti-tumor efficacy might be predicted based on in vitro cytotoxic assays via PBPK-PD model approach. The approach was demonstrated reasonable and applicable, which might facilitate and accelerate anti-cancer candidate screening and dose regimen design in drug discovery process. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  8. mRNA-based vaccines synergize with radiation therapy to eradicate established tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotin-Mleczek, Mariola; Zanzinger, Kai; Heidenreich, Regina; Lorenz, Christina; Kowalczyk, Aleksandra; Kallen, Karl-Josef; Huber, Stephan M

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of large, established tumors by active immunotherapy is a major challenge because of the numerous cancer evasion mechanisms that exist. This study aimed to establish a novel combination therapy consisting of messenger RNA (mRNA)-based cancer vaccines and radiation, which would facilitate the effective treatment of established tumors with aggressive growth kinetics. The combination of a tumor-specific mRNA-based vaccination with radiation was tested in two syngeneic tumor models, a highly immunogenic E.G7-OVA and a low immunogenic Lewis lung cancer (LLC). The molecular mechanism induced by the combination therapy was evaluated via gene expression arrays as well as flow cytometry analyses of tumor infiltrating cells. In both tumor models we demonstrated that a combination of mRNA-based immunotherapy with radiation results in a strong synergistic anti-tumor effect. This was manifested as either complete tumor eradication or delay in tumor growth. Gene expression analysis of mouse tumors revealed a variety of substantial changes at the tumor site following radiation. Genes associated with antigen presentation, infiltration of immune cells, adhesion, and activation of the innate immune system were upregulated. A combination of radiation and immunotherapy induced significant downregulation of tumor associated factors and upregulation of tumor suppressors. Moreover, combination therapy significantly increased CD4 + , CD8 + and NKT cell infiltration of mouse tumors. Our data provide a scientific rationale for combining immunotherapy with radiation and provide a basis for the development of more potent anti-cancer therapies. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/1748-717X-9-180) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  9. A Genomics-Based Classification of Human Lung Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Peifer, Martin; Bos, Marc; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Ansen, Sascha; Gardizi, Masyar; Nguyen, Chau; Berg, Johannes; Russell, Prudence; Wainer, Zoe; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Rogers, Toni-Maree; Solomon, Benjamin; Pao, William; Carter, Scott L.; Getz, Gad; Hayes, D. Neil; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Thunnissen, Erik; Travis, William D.; Perner, Sven; Wright, Gavin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen; Thomas, Roman; Gabler, Franziska; Wilkening, Ines; Mueller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Menon, Roopika; Koenig, Katharina; Albus, Kerstin; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Fassunke, Jana; Schmitz, Katja; Kuenstlinger, Helen; Kleine, Michaela; Binot, Elke; Querings, Silvia; Altmueller, Janine; Boessmann, Ingelore; Nuemberg, Peter; Schneider, Peter; Bogus, Magdalena; Buettner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Russell, Prudence; Thunnissen, Erik; Travis, William D.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Solberg, Steinar; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Helland, Aslaug; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A.; Chen, Yuan; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Clement, Joachim H.; Weder, Walter; Saenger, Joerg; Stoelben, Erich; Ludwig, Corinna; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Smit, Egbert; Heideman, Danille A. M.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Nogova, Lucia; Sos, Martin L.; Mattonet, Christian; Toepelt, Karin; Scheffler, Matthias; Goekkurt, Eray; Kappes, Rainer; Krueger, Stefan; Kambartel, Kato; Behringer, Dirk; Schulte, Wolfgang; Galetke, Wolfgang; Randerath, Winfried; Heldwein, Matthias; Schlesinger, Andreas; Serke, Monika; Hekmat, Khosro; Frank, Konrad F.; Schnell, Roland; Reiser, Marcel; Huenerlituerkoglu, Ali-Nuri; Schmitz, Stephan; Meffert, Lisa; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Litt-Lampe, Markus; Gerigk, Ulrich; Fricke, Rainer; Besse, Benjamin; Brambilla, Christian; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Lorimier, Philippe; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Cappuzzo, Federico; Ligorio, Claudia; Damiani, Stefania; Field, John K.; Hyde, Russell; Validire, Pierre; Girard, Philippe; Muscarella, Lucia A.; Fazio, Vito M.; Hallek, Michael; Soria, Jean-Charles; Carter, Scott L.; Getz, Gad; Hayes, D. Neil; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Seidel, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Peifer, Martin; Bos, Marc; Pao, William; Travis, William D.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen; Thomas, Roman K.

    2013-01-01

    We characterized genome alterations in 1255 clinically annotated lung tumors of all histological subgroups to identify genetically defined and clinically relevant subtypes. More than 55% of all cases had at least one oncogenic genome alteration potentially amenable to specific therapeutic

  10. Glioblastoma angiogenesis: VEGF resistance solutions and new strategies based on molecular mechanisms of tumor vessel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Shingo

    2012-04-01

    Glioblastomas are highly vascular tumors. Recent preclinical and clinical investigations have revealed that agents targeting angiogenesis may have efficacy against this type of tumor. Antibodies to vascular endothelial growth factor are being studied in this patient population. Unfortunately, treatment inevitably fails. This review provides an update on recent research on the mechanisms by which tumor cells acquire resistance, and discusses recent preclinical and experimental development of novel new-generation anti-angiogenic agents that overcome this problem, especially those based on the molecular mechanisms of tumor vessel formation. The tumor vasculature not only nourishes glioblastomas, but also provides a specialized microenvironment for tumor stem-like cells and for the brain tumor. The factors, pathways, and interactions described in this review provide information about the cell biology of glioblastomas which may ultimately result in new modes of treatment.

  11. An artificial neural network (ANN)-based lung-tumor motion predictor for intrafractional MR tumor tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jihyun; Mackenzie, Marc; Rathee, Satyapal; Robinson, Don; Fallone, B G

    2012-07-01

    To address practical issues of implementing artificial neural networks (ANN) for lung-tumor motion prediction in MRI-based intrafractional lung-tumor tracking. A feedforward four-layered ANN structure is used to predict future tumor positions. A back-propagation algorithm is used for ANN learning. Adaptive learning is incorporated by continuously updating weights and learning rate during prediction. An ANN training scheme specific for MRI-based tracking is developed. A multiple-ANN structure is developed to reduce tracking failures caused by the lower imaging rates of MRI. We used particle swarm optimization to optimize the ANN structure and initial weights (IW) for each patient and treatment fraction. Prediction accuracy is evaluated using the 1D superior-inferior lung-tumor motions of 29 lung cancer patients for system delays of 120-520 ms, in increments of 80 ms. The result is compared with four different scenarios: (1), (2) ANN structure optimization + with∕without IW optimization, and (3), (4) no ANN structure optimization + with∕without IW optimization, respectively. An additional simulation is performed to assess the value of optimizing the ANN structure for each treatment fraction. For 120-520 ms system delays, mean RMSE values (ranges 0.0-2.8 mm from 29 patients) of 0.5-0.9 mm are observed, respectively. Using patient specific ANN structures, a 30%-60% decrease in mean RMSE values is observed as a result of IW optimization, alone. No significant advantages in prediction performance are observed, however, by optimizing for each fraction. A new ANN-based lung-tumor motion predictor is developed for MRI-based intrafractional tumor tracking. The prediction accuracy of our predictor is evaluated using a realistic simulated MR imaging rate and system delays. For 120-520 ms system delays, mean RMSE values of 0.5-0.9 mm (ranges 0.0-2.8 mm from 29 patients) are achieved. Further, the advantage of patient specific ANN structure and IW in lung-tumor motion

  12. Brainstem tolerance to conformal radiotherapy of skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debus, J.; Hug, E.B.; Liebsch, N.J.; O'Farrel, D.; Finkelstein, D.; Efird, J.; Munzenrider, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term incidence of brainstem toxicity in patients treated for skull base tumors with high dose conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 1995, 367 patients with chordomas (n = 195) and chondrosarcomas (n = 172) of the base of skull have been treated with combined megavoltage photon and 160 MeV proton radiotherapy. Following 3D treatment planning with delineation of target volumes and critical nontarget structures dose distributions and dose-volume histograms were calculated. Radiotherapy was given an 1.8 Gy or CGE (=Cobalt Gray Equivalent) dose per fraction, with prescribed target doses ranging from 63 CGE to 79.2 CGE (mean = 67.8 CGE). Doses to the brainstem surface were limited to ≤64 CGE and to the brainstem center to ≤53 CGE. Results: Follow-up time ranged from 6 months to 21.4 years (mean = 42.5 months). Brainstem toxicity was observed in 17 of 367 patients attributable to treatment, resulting in death of three patients. Actuarial rates of 5 and 10-year high-grade toxicity-free survival were 94 and 88%, respectively. Increased risk of brainstem toxicity was significantly associated with maximum dose to brainstem, volume of brainstem receiving ≥50 CGE, ≥55 CGE, and ≥60 CGE, number of surgical procedures, and prevalence of diabetes or high blood pressure. Multivariate analysis identified three independent factors as important prognosticators: number of surgical procedures (p < 0.001), volume of the brainstem receiving 60 CGE (p < 0.001), and prevalence of diabetes (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Tolerance of brainstem to fractionated radiotherapy appears to be a steep function of tissue volume included in high dose regions rather than the maximum dose of brainstem alone. In addition, presence of predisposing factors as well as extent of surgical manipulation can significantly lower brainstem tolerance in the individual patient

  13. A prospective epidemiological study on odontogenic tumours in a black African population, with emphasis on the relative frequency of ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginni, F O; Stoelinga, P J W; Ajike, S A; Obuekwe, O N; Olokun, B Aluko; Adebola, R A; Adeyemo, W L; Fasola, O; Adesina, O A; Akinbami, B O; Iwegbu, I O; Ogunmuyiwa, S A; Obimakinde, O S; Uguru, C C

    2015-09-01

    The persistent view in the literature is that the relative frequency of ameloblastomas is higher in the black population than in Caucasians. The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of all odontogenic tumours (OT) in a 100% black population and to compare our findings with those of previous studies. A prospective study was undertaken of all patients presenting with OT to all 16 Nigerian departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery over a 4-year period. The following data were obtained: patient demographics, delay to presentation, extent of the lesion, and histological diagnosis. Six hundred and twenty-two cases were studied. A slight male preponderance was observed (male to female ratio 1.17:1). Patients ranged in age from 5 to 89 years, with a peak incidence in the third decade. The relative frequency of OT was 0.99 per million and that of ameloblastoma was 0.76 per million. Ameloblastoma was the most prevalent OT (76.5%), followed by adenomatoid odontogenic tumours (5.6%), odontogenic myxoma (4.5%), and keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOT) (3.1%). The relative frequency of ameloblastoma among Nigerians was not different from frequencies reported previously among Caucasian and Tanzanian black populations. KCOTs were, however, rarely diagnosed in Nigerians as compared to the white population in the Western world. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, I; Peschke, P; Karger, C P

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the model, tumor shrinkage was

  15. Maternal and Birth Characteristics and Childhood Embryonal Solid Tumors: A Population-Based Report from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Silva, Neimar; de Souza Reis, Rejane; Garcia Cunha, Rafael; Pinto Oliveira, Júlio Fernando; Santos, Marceli de Oliveira; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S; de Camargo, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Several maternal and birth characteristics have been reported to be associated with an increased risk of many childhood cancers. Our goal was to evaluate the risk of childhood embryonal solid tumors in relation to pre- and perinatal characteristics. A case-cohort study was performed using two population-based datasets, which were linked through R software. Tumors were classified as central nervous system (CNS) or non-CNS-embryonal (retinoblastoma, neuroblastoma, renal tumors, germ cell tumors, hepatoblastoma and soft tissue sarcoma). Children aged confidence intervals (CI) were computed by unconditional logistic regression analysis using SPSS. Males, high maternal education level, and birth anomalies were independent risk factors. Among children diagnosed older than 24 months of age, cesarean section (CS) was a significant risk factor. Five-minute Apgar ≤8 was an independent risk factor for renal tumors. A decreasing risk with increasing birth order was observed for all tumor types except for retinoblastoma. Among children with neuroblastoma, the risk decreased with increasing birth order (OR = 0.82 (95% CI 0.67-1.01)). Children delivered by CS had a marginally significantly increased OR for all tumors except retinoblastoma. High maternal education level showed a significant increase in the odds for all tumors together, CNS tumors, and neuroblastoma. This evidence suggests that male gender, high maternal education level, and birth anomalies are risk factors for childhood tumors irrespective of the age at diagnosis. Cesarean section, birth order, and 5-minute Apgar score were risk factors for some tumor subtypes.

  16. Maxillary unicystic ameloblastoma in a 6-week-old filly evaluated with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H L; Rosenblatt, A J; Suen, W W; Owen, H; Ahern, B J

    2017-08-01

    A 6-week-old Thoroughbred filly was presented for evaluation of an expansile mass overlying the right nasal passage and causing respiratory stertor. On skull radiographs, there was a loculated, soft tissue-opaque mass identified dorsal to the right upper premolars and effacing the right nasal cavity. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a locally extensive mass with relatively benign characteristics located centrally on the tooth root apices of the deciduous second premolar (506). The mass extended axially into the right nasal cavity, occluding the meatuses and causing displacement of the nasal septum to the left. Surgical excision was not deemed feasible with an athletic future in mind and the owners elected to euthanase the filly. Histopathologically, the mass was consistent with unicystic ameloblastoma and was lined intermittently with palisading, columnar basal cells (ameloblast-like cells) overlying a zone containing stellate cells in loose stroma. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of a CT scan of an equine ameloblastoma. Although histopathology was essential for definitive diagnosis, CT clearly defined the origin of the mass and identified its locally extensive, cystic nature, which enabled informed decisions to be made. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  17. Dilemmas in Endoscopic Management of Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Case-Based Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P. Rajca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal neuroendocrine tumors are uncommon neoplasms that historically were regarded as having an indolent course. Due to the widespread use of screening colonoscopy neuroendocrine tumors of the rectum are identified with increasing frequency. More recent literature has suggested that rectal neuroendocrine tumors may progress in a more malignant fashion than previously believed. In this case-based discussion we present management dilemmas, analyze current guidelines, and highlight the role of endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic resection, and surgery.

  18. Clinicopathological evaluation of 164 dental follicles and dentigerous cysts with emphasis on the presence of odontogenic epithelium in the connective tissue. The hypothesis of "focal ameloblastoma"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meleti, M.; van der Waal, I.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Some ameloblastomas presumably originate from odontogenic epithelium within the connective tissue of dental follicles and dentigerous cysts. Therefore, it would seem reasonable to discuss as whether odontogenic epithelium proliferations, frankly displaying ameloblastomatous features

  19. Lateral skull base approaches in the management of benign parapharyngeal space tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sampath Chandra; Piccirillo, Enrico; Chovanec, Martin; La Melia, Claudio; De Donato, Giuseppe; Sanna, Mario

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the role of lateral skull base approaches in the management of benign parapharyngeal space tumors and to propose an algorithm for their surgical approach. Retrospective study of patients with benign parapharyngeal space tumors. The clinical features, radiology and preoperative management of skull base neurovasculature, the surgical approaches and overall results were recorded. 46 patients presented with 48 tumors. 12 were prestyloid and 36 poststyloid. 19 (39.6%) tumors were paragangliomas, 15 (31.25%) were schwannomas and 11 (23%) were pleomorphic adenomas. Preoperative embolization was performed in 19, stenting of the internal carotid artery in 4 and permanent balloon occlusion in 2 patients. 19 tumors were approached by the transcervical, 13 by transcervical-transparotid, 5 by transcervical-transmastoid, 6, 1 and 2 tumors by the infratemporal fossa approach types A, B and D, respectively. Total radical tumor removal was achieved in 46 (96%) of the cases. Lateral skull base approaches have an advantage over other approaches in the management of benign tumors of the parapharyngeal space due to the fact that they provide excellent exposure with less morbidity. The use of microscope combined with bipolar cautery reduces morbidity. Stenting of internal carotid artery gives a chance for complete tumor removal with arterial preservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mitigating Errors in External Respiratory Surrogate-Based Models of Tumor Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, Kathleen T.; McAvoy, Thomas J.; George, Rohini; Dieterich, Sonja; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of tumor site, measurement precision, tumor–surrogate correlation, training data selection, model design, and interpatient and interfraction variations on the accuracy of external marker-based models of tumor position. Methods and Materials: Cyberknife Synchrony system log files comprising synchronously acquired positions of external markers and the tumor from 167 treatment fractions were analyzed. The accuracy of Synchrony, ordinary-least-squares regression, and partial-least-squares regression models for predicting the tumor position from the external markers was evaluated. The quantity and timing of the data used to build the predictive model were varied. The effects of tumor–surrogate correlation and the precision in both the tumor and the external surrogate position measurements were explored by adding noise to the data. Results: The tumor position prediction errors increased during the duration of a fraction. Increasing the training data quantities did not always lead to more accurate models. Adding uncorrelated noise to the external marker-based inputs degraded the tumor–surrogate correlation models by 16% for partial-least-squares and 57% for ordinary-least-squares. External marker and tumor position measurement errors led to tumor position prediction changes 0.3–3.6 times the magnitude of the measurement errors, varying widely with model algorithm. The tumor position prediction errors were significantly associated with the patient index but not with the fraction index or tumor site. Partial-least-squares was as accurate as Synchrony and more accurate than ordinary-least-squares. Conclusions: The accuracy of surrogate-based inferential models of tumor position was affected by all the investigated factors, except for the tumor site and fraction index.

  1. Mitigation of motion artifacts in CBCT of lung tumors based on tracked tumor motion during CBCT acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, John H; Li Ruijiang; Jia Xun; Watkins, W Tyler; Song, William Y; Jiang, Steve B; Lou, Yifei

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm capable of mitigating respiratory motion blurring artifacts in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) lung tumor images based on the motion of the tumor during the CBCT scan is developed. The tumor motion trajectory and probability density function (PDF) are reconstructed from the acquired CBCT projection images using a recently developed algorithm Lewis et al (2010 Phys. Med. Biol. 55 2505-22). Assuming that the effects of motion blurring can be represented by convolution of the static lung (or tumor) anatomy with the motion PDF, a cost function is defined, consisting of a data fidelity term and a total variation regularization term. Deconvolution is performed through iterative minimization of this cost function. The algorithm was tested on digital respiratory phantom, physical respiratory phantom and patient data. A clear qualitative improvement is evident in the deblurred images as compared to the motion-blurred images for all cases. Line profiles show that the tumor boundaries are more accurately and clearly represented in the deblurred images. The normalized root-mean-squared error between the images used as ground truth and the motion-blurred images are 0.29, 0.12 and 0.30 in the digital phantom, physical phantom and patient data, respectively. Deblurring reduces the corresponding values to 0.13, 0.07 and 0.19. Application of a -700 HU threshold to the digital phantom results in tumor dimension measurements along the superior-inferior axis of 2.8, 1.8 and 1.9 cm in the motion-blurred, ground truth and deblurred images, respectively. Corresponding values for the physical phantom are 3.4, 2.7 and 2.7 cm. A threshold of -500 HU applied to the patient case gives measurements of 3.1, 1.6 and 1.7 cm along the SI axis in the CBCT, 4DCT and deblurred images, respectively. This technique could provide more accurate information about a lung tumor's size and shape on the day of treatment.

  2. Mathematical Based Calculation of Drug Penetration Depth in Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Namazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by out-of-control cells’ growth which affect cells and make them damaged. Many treatment options for cancer exist. Chemotherapy as an important treatment option is the use of drugs to treat cancer. The anticancer drug travels to the tumor and then diffuses in it through capillaries. The diffusion of drugs in the solid tumor is limited by penetration depth which is different in case of different drugs and cancers. The computation of this depth is important as it helps physicians to investigate about treatment of infected tissue. Although many efforts have been made on studying and measuring drug penetration depth, less works have been done on computing this length from a mathematical point of view. In this paper, first we propose phase lagging model for diffusion of drug in the tumor. Then, using this model on one side and considering the classic diffusion on the other side, we compute the drug penetration depth in the solid tumor. This computed value of drug penetration depth is corroborated by comparison with the values measured by experiments.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of three-dimensional CT reconstruction and cephalometry for lateral skull base tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X Z; Huo, X K

    2015-10-01

    To explore the diagnostic accuracy of three-dimensional CT reconstruction and cephalometry in lateral skull base tumors. Fifty-eight patients with lateral skull base tumors were randomly divided into control group (n = 29, examined with conventional diagnostic technique) or study group (n = 29, examined with three-dimensional CT reconstruction and cephalometry). The diagnostic accuracy, tumor distribution and image characteristics were compared between both patient groups. In control group, preoperative tumor diagnosis was consistent with intraoperative diagnosis in 20 patients, similar in 7 patients and discrepant in 2 patients. In study group, there were 24 consistent, 4 similar, and 1 discrepant diagnoses (p cephalometry provides accurate diagnosis of lateral skull base tumors, which is helpful for subsequent surgical treatment.

  4. Evaluation of Amelotin Expression in Benign Odontogenic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Paula Stolf

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Amelotin (AMTN is highly and selectively expressed by odontogenic epithelium-derived ameloblasts throughout the maturation stage of enamel formation. The protein is secreted and concentrated at the basal lamina interface between ameloblasts and the mineralized enamel matrix. Odontogenic tumors (OT are characterized by morphological resemblance to the developing tooth germ. OT vary from slowly expanding, encapsulated tumors to locally aggressive and destructive lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression profile of AMTN in benign odontogenic tumors and to correlate it with specific features of the lesions. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining for AMTN was performed on human ameloblastoma, ameloblastic fibroma (AF, ameloblastic fibro-odontoma (AFO, odontoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT. Results: Generally, ameloblastoma and AF did not stain for AMTN. A strong signal was detected in ameloblast-like layers of AFO and odontoma. Epithelial cells in AOT did not stain for AMTN, while calcifying areas of extracellular eosinophilic matrix were intensely stained. Interestingly, ghost cells present in odontomas and CCOT revealed variable staining, again in association with calcification foci. Conclusions: Amelotin expression was consistently detected in tumors presenting differentiated ameloblasts and obvious matrix deposition. Additionally, the presence of the protein in the eosinophilic matrix and small mineralized foci of AOT and calcification areas of ghost cells may suggest a role for AMTN in the control of mineralization events. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2013; 1(5.000: 236-245

  5. Odontogenic tumors: analysis of 127 cases Tumores odontogênicos: análise de 127 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Nunes SANTOS

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and twenty-seven cases of histologically confirmed odontogenic tumors were retrieved from a total of 5,289 oral and maxillary lesions diagnosed at the Division of Oral Pathology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, during a period of 30 years (l970-l999. The most common histological diagnosis was odontoma (50.40%, followed by ameloblastoma (30.70%. The prevalence of odontogenic tumors was greater in females and the peak incidence occurred in the second and third decades of life. The main anatomical location was the mandible, and no malignant tumors were found.De uma série de 5.289 casos de lesões orais e dos maxilares diagnosticadas no Laboratório de Patologia Oral da Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte no período de 30 anos (1970-1999, foram analisados 127 casos de tumores odontogênicos confirmados histologicamente. A lesão mais freqüente foi o odontoma (50,40% seguida pelo ameloblastoma (30,70%. A prevalência de tumores odontogênicos foi maior nas mulheres e o pico de incidência ocorreu na segunda e terceira décadas de vida. A localização anatômica mais comum foi a mandíbula e não foram encontrados casos de tumores malignos.

  6. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Interleukin-6 Promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Acquisition of Epithelial Stem-Like Cell Properties in Ameloblastoma Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunmiao; Zhang, Qunzhou; Shanti, Rabie M; Shi, Shihong; Chang, Ting-Han; Carrasco, Lee; Alawi, Faizan; Le, Anh D

    2017-09-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a biological process associated with cancer stem-like or cancer-initiating cell formation, contributes to the invasiveness, metastasis, drug resistance, and recurrence of the malignant tumors; it remains to be determined whether similar processes contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of ameloblastoma (AM), a benign but locally invasive odontogenic neoplasm. Here, we demonstrated that EMT- and stem cell-related genes were expressed in the epithelial islands of the most common histologic variant subtype, the follicular AM. Our results revealed elevated interleukin (IL)-6 signals that were differentially expressed in the stromal compartment of the follicular AM. To explore the stromal effect on tumor pathogenesis, we isolated and characterized both mesenchymal stromal cells (AM-MSCs) and epithelial cells (AM-EpiCs) from follicular AM and demonstrated that, in in vitro culture, AM-MSCs secreted a significantly higher level of IL-6 as compared to the counterpart AM-EpiCs. Furthermore, both in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that exogenous and AM-MSC-derived IL-6 induced the expression of EMT- and stem cell-related genes in AM-EpiCs, whereas such effects were significantly abrogated either by a specific inhibitor of STAT3 or ERK1/2, or by knockdown of Slug gene expression. These findings suggest that AM-MSC-derived IL-6 promotes tumor-stem like cell formation by inducing EMT process in AM-EpiCs through STAT3 and ERK1/2-mediated signaling pathways, implying a role in the etiology and progression of the benign but locally invasive neoplasm. Stem Cells 2017;35:2083-2094. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  7. Classifying Melanocytic Tumors Based on DNA Copy Number Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Bastian, Boris C.; Olshen, Adam B.; LeBoit, Philip E.; Pinkel, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Melanoma and benign melanocytic nevi can overlap significantly in their histopathological presentation and misdiagnoses are common. To determine whether genetic criteria can be of diagnostic help we determined DNA copy number changes in 186 melanocytic tumors (132 melanomas and 54 benign nevi) using comparative genomic hybridization. We found highly significant differences between melanomas and nevi. Whereas 127 (96.2%) of the melanomas had some form of chromosomal aberration, only 7 (13.0%) ...

  8. KillerRed protein based in vivo photodynamic therapy and corresponding tumor metabolic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoya Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT gains wide attention as a useful therapeutic method for cancer. It is mediated by the oxygen and photosensitizer under the specific light irradiation to produce the reactive oxygen species (ROS, which induce cellular toxicity and regulate the redox potential in tumor cells. Nowadays, genetic photosensitizers of low toxicity and easy production are required to be developed. KillerRed, a unique red fluorescent protein exhibiting excellent phototoxic properties, has the potential to act as a photosensitizer in the application of tumor PDT. Meantime, the course of tumor redox metabolism during this treatment was rarely investigated so far. Thus here, we investigated the effects of KillerRed-based PDT on tumor growth in vivo and examined the subsequent tumor metabolic states including the changes of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH and flavoprotein (Fp, two important metabolic coenzymes of tumor cells. Results showed the tumor growth had been significantly inhibited by KillerRed-based PDT treatment compared to control groups. A home-made cryo-imaging redox scanner was used to measure intrinsic fluorescence and exogenous KillerRed fluorescence signals in tumors. The Fp signal was elevated by nearly 4.5-fold, while the NADH signal decreased by 66% after light irradiation, indicating that Fp and NADH were oxidized in the course of KillerRed-based PDT. Furthermore, we also observed correlation between the fluorescence distribution of KillerRed and NADH. It suggests that the KillerRed protein based PDT might provide a new approach for tumor therapy accompanied by altering tumor metabolism.

  9. PET-based analysis of tumor glucose metabolism and tumor hypoxia before and during anti-neoplastic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollineni, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is an important contributor to chemo-radiotherapy resistance. This has been demonstrated in several tumor types including non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Tumor hypoxia is a dynamic process, some parts of the tumor exhibit higher levels of hypoxia

  10. Improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery via Raman-based technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Todd; Lewis, Spencer; Freudiger, Christian W; Sunney Xie, X; Orringer, Daniel A

    2016-03-01

    Despite advances in the surgical management of brain tumors, achieving optimal surgical results and identification of tumor remains a challenge. Raman spectroscopy, a laser-based technique that can be used to nondestructively differentiate molecules based on the inelastic scattering of light, is being applied toward improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Here, the authors systematically review the application of Raman spectroscopy for guidance during brain tumor surgery. Raman spectroscopy can differentiate normal brain from necrotic and vital glioma tissue in human specimens based on chemical differences, and has recently been shown to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues during surgery. Raman spectroscopy also forms the basis for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, a technique that amplifies spontaneous Raman signals by 10,000-fold, enabling real-time histological imaging without the need for tissue processing, sectioning, or staining. The authors review the relevant basic and translational studies on CRS microscopy as a means of providing real-time intraoperative guidance. Recent studies have demonstrated how CRS can be used to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues and that it has excellent agreement with traditional histology. Under simulated operative conditions, CRS has been shown to identify tumor margins that would be undetectable using standard bright-field microscopy. In addition, CRS microscopy has been shown to detect tumor in human surgical specimens with near-perfect agreement to standard H & E microscopy. The authors suggest that as the intraoperative application and instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy and imaging matures, it will become an essential component in the neurosurgical armamentarium for identifying residual tumor and improving the surgical management of brain tumors.

  11. The expression of calretinin and cytokeratins in canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, A; Arzi, B; Murphy, B; Naydan, D K; Verstraete, F J M

    2014-12-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma (CAA) represent two epithelium-derived neoplasms that affect the oral cavity of dogs. The expression of cytokeratins (CKs) and calretinin has been previously established in the canine tooth bud and odontogenic tumours. The aim of this study was to characterize the CK and calretinin expression profile of OSCC in comparison to CAA and canine tooth bud tissues. Samples from 15 OSCC and 15 CAA cases, as well as 6 tooth buds and 2 normal gingival tissues were examined. OSCC CK expression was consistent with the CK expression profile of CAA and canine tooth bud tissue. Calretinin was positively expressed in 10 of 15 OSCC cases, with 5 cases demonstrating high staining intensity. Only 2 of 15 CAA cases demonstrated mild-moderate staining intensity. The statistically significant difference in staining pattern and intensity of calretinin in OSCC and CAA can help distinguish between these two tumour types. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Maternal and Birth Characteristics and Childhood Embryonal Solid Tumors: A Population-Based Report from Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neimar de Paula Silva

    Full Text Available Several maternal and birth characteristics have been reported to be associated with an increased risk of many childhood cancers. Our goal was to evaluate the risk of childhood embryonal solid tumors in relation to pre- and perinatal characteristics.A case-cohort study was performed using two population-based datasets, which were linked through R software. Tumors were classified as central nervous system (CNS or non-CNS-embryonal (retinoblastoma, neuroblastoma, renal tumors, germ cell tumors, hepatoblastoma and soft tissue sarcoma. Children aged <6 years were selected. Adjustments were made for potential confounders. Odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were computed by unconditional logistic regression analysis using SPSS.Males, high maternal education level, and birth anomalies were independent risk factors. Among children diagnosed older than 24 months of age, cesarean section (CS was a significant risk factor. Five-minute Apgar ≤8 was an independent risk factor for renal tumors. A decreasing risk with increasing birth order was observed for all tumor types except for retinoblastoma. Among children with neuroblastoma, the risk decreased with increasing birth order (OR = 0.82 (95% CI 0.67-1.01. Children delivered by CS had a marginally significantly increased OR for all tumors except retinoblastoma. High maternal education level showed a significant increase in the odds for all tumors together, CNS tumors, and neuroblastoma.This evidence suggests that male gender, high maternal education level, and birth anomalies are risk factors for childhood tumors irrespective of the age at diagnosis. Cesarean section, birth order, and 5-minute Apgar score were risk factors for some tumor subtypes.

  13. Iterative volume morphing and learning for mobile tumor based on 4DCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Songan; Wu, Huanmei; Sandison, George; Fang, Shiaofen

    2017-02-21

    During image-guided cancer radiation treatment, three-dimensional (3D) tumor volumetric information is important for treatment success. However, it is typically not feasible to image a patient's 3D tumor continuously in real time during treatment due to concern over excessive patient radiation dose. We present a new iterative morphing algorithm to predict the real-time 3D tumor volume based on time-resolved computed tomography (4DCT) acquired before treatment. An offline iterative learning process has been designed to derive a target volumetric deformation function from one breathing phase to another. Real-time volumetric prediction is performed to derive the target 3D volume during treatment delivery. The proposed iterative deformable approach for tumor volume morphing and prediction based on 4DCT is innovative because it makes three major contributions: (1) a novel approach to landmark selection on 3D tumor surfaces using a minimum bounding box; (2) an iterative morphing algorithm to generate the 3D tumor volume using mapped landmarks; and (3) an online tumor volume prediction strategy based on previously trained deformation functions utilizing 4DCT. The experimental performance showed that the maximum morphing deviations are 0.27% and 1.25% for original patient data and artificially generated data, which is promising. This newly developed algorithm and implementation will have important applications for treatment planning, dose calculation and treatment validation in cancer radiation treatment.

  14. Iterative volume morphing and learning for mobile tumor based on 4DCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Songan; Wu, Huanmei; Sandison, George; Fang, Shiaofen

    2017-02-01

    During image-guided cancer radiation treatment, three-dimensional (3D) tumor volumetric information is important for treatment success. However, it is typically not feasible to image a patient’s 3D tumor continuously in real time during treatment due to concern over excessive patient radiation dose. We present a new iterative morphing algorithm to predict the real-time 3D tumor volume based on time-resolved computed tomography (4DCT) acquired before treatment. An offline iterative learning process has been designed to derive a target volumetric deformation function from one breathing phase to another. Real-time volumetric prediction is performed to derive the target 3D volume during treatment delivery. The proposed iterative deformable approach for tumor volume morphing and prediction based on 4DCT is innovative because it makes three major contributions: (1) a novel approach to landmark selection on 3D tumor surfaces using a minimum bounding box; (2) an iterative morphing algorithm to generate the 3D tumor volume using mapped landmarks; and (3) an online tumor volume prediction strategy based on previously trained deformation functions utilizing 4DCT. The experimental performance showed that the maximum morphing deviations are 0.27% and 1.25% for original patient data and artificially generated data, which is promising. This newly developed algorithm and implementation will have important applications for treatment planning, dose calculation and treatment validation in cancer radiation treatment.

  15. Pancreatic tumor detection using hypericin-based fluorescence spectroscopy and cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavu, Harish; Geary, Kevin; Fetterman, Harold R.; Saxton, Romaine E.

    2005-04-01

    Hypericin is a novel, highly fluorescent photosensitizer that exhibits selective tumor cell uptake properties and is particularly resistant to photobleaching. In this study, we have characterized hypericin uptake in human pancreatic tumor cells with relation to incubation time, cell number, and drug concentration. Ex vivo hypericin based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed to detect the presence of MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c nude mice, as well as to quantify gross tumor burden. Hypericin based cytology of peritoneal lavage samples, using both one and two photon laser confocal microscopy, demonstrated more than a two-fold increase in fluorescence emission of pancreatic tumor cells as compared to control samples. In vitro treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with hypericin based photodynamic therapy showed tumor cell cytotoxicity in a drug dose, incident laser power, and time dependent manner. For these experiments, a continuous wavelength solid-state laser source (532 nm) was operated at power levels in the range of 100-400 mW. Potential applications of hypericin in tumor diagnosis, staging, and therapy will be presented.

  16. Biodistribution of ultra small gadolinium-based nanoparticles as theranostic agent: application to brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Imen; Duc, Géraldine Le; Kryza, David; Berniard, Aurélie; Mowat, Pierre; Roux, Stéphane; Taleb, Jacqueline; Bonazza, Pauline; Perriat, Pascal; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier; Billotey, Claire; Janier, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Gadolinium-based nanoparticles are novel objects with interesting physical properties, allowing their use for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles were imaged following intravenous injection in healthy rats and rats grafted with 9L gliosarcoma tumors using magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphic imaging. Quantitative biodistribution using gamma-counting of each sampled organ confirmed that these nanoparticles were rapidly cleared essentially by renal excretion. Accumulation of these nanoparticles in 9L gliosarcoma tumors implanted in the rat brain was quantitated. This passive and long-duration accumulation of gadolinium-based nanoparticles in tumor, which is related to disruption of the blood-brain barrier, is in good agreement with the use of these nanoparticles as radiosensitizers for brain tumors.

  17. A survey of MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Stefan; Nolte, Lutz-P; Reyes, Mauricio; Wiest, Roland

    2013-01-01

    MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies is gaining attention in recent times due to an increased need for efficient and objective evaluation of large amounts of data. While the pioneering approaches applying automated methods for the analysis of brain tumor images date back almost two decades, the current methods are becoming more mature and coming closer to routine clinical application. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview by giving a brief introduction to brain tumors and imaging of brain tumors first. Then, we review the state of the art in segmentation, registration and modeling related to tumor-bearing brain images with a focus on gliomas. The objective in the segmentation is outlining the tumor including its sub-compartments and surrounding tissues, while the main challenge in registration and modeling is the handling of morphological changes caused by the tumor. The qualities of different approaches are discussed with a focus on methods that can be applied on standard clinical imaging protocols. Finally, a critical assessment of the current state is performed and future developments and trends are addressed, giving special attention to recent developments in radiological tumor assessment guidelines. (topical review)

  18. A survey of MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stefan; Wiest, Roland; Nolte, Lutz-P.; Reyes, Mauricio

    2013-07-01

    MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies is gaining attention in recent times due to an increased need for efficient and objective evaluation of large amounts of data. While the pioneering approaches applying automated methods for the analysis of brain tumor images date back almost two decades, the current methods are becoming more mature and coming closer to routine clinical application. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview by giving a brief introduction to brain tumors and imaging of brain tumors first. Then, we review the state of the art in segmentation, registration and modeling related to tumor-bearing brain images with a focus on gliomas. The objective in the segmentation is outlining the tumor including its sub-compartments and surrounding tissues, while the main challenge in registration and modeling is the handling of morphological changes caused by the tumor. The qualities of different approaches are discussed with a focus on methods that can be applied on standard clinical imaging protocols. Finally, a critical assessment of the current state is performed and future developments and trends are addressed, giving special attention to recent developments in radiological tumor assessment guidelines.

  19. Precision cancer immunotherapy: optimizing dendritic cell-based strategies to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses against individual patient tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Nagaoka, Koji; Takahara, Masashi; Yang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Cong-Xiao; Guo, Hongtao; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Hobeika, Amy; Hartman, Zachary; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-05-01

    Most dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines have loaded the DC with defined antigens, but loading with autologos tumor-derived antigens would generate DCs that activate personalized tumor-specific T-cell responses. We hypothesized that DC matured with an optimized combination of reagents and loaded with tumor-derived antigens using a clinically feasible electroporation strategy would induce potent antitumor immunity. We first studied the effects on DC maturation and antigen presentation of the addition of picibanil (OK432) to a combination of zoledronic acid, tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin E2. Using DC matured with the optimized combination, we tested 2 clinically feasible sources of autologous antigen for electroloading, total tumor mRNA or total tumor lysate, to determine which stimulated more potent antigen-specific T cells in vitro and activated more potent antitumor immunity in vivo. The combination of tumor necrosis factor-α/prostaglandin E2/zoledronic acid/OK432 generated DC with high expression of maturation markers and antigen-specific T-cell stimulatory function in vitro. Mature DC electroloaded with tumor-derived mRNA [mRNA electroporated dendritic cell (EPDC)] induced greater expansion of antigen-specific T cells in vitro than DC electroloaded with tumor lysate (lysate EPDC). In a therapeutic model of MC38-carcinoembryonic antigen colon cancer-bearing mice, vaccination with mRNA EPDC induced the most efficient anti-carcinoembryonic antigen cellular immune response, which significantly suppressed tumor growth. In conclusion, mature DC electroloaded with tumor-derived mRNA are a potent cancer vaccine, especially useful when specific tumor antigens for vaccination have not been identified, allowing autologous tumor, and if unavailable, allogeneic cell lines to be used as an unbiased source of antigen. Our data support clinical testing of this strategy.

  20. Boronic acid-tethered amphiphilic hyaluronic acid derivative-based nanoassemblies for tumor targeting and penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae Young; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Song Yi; Lee, Jae-Young; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Ko, Seung-Hak; Shim, Jae-Seong; Choe, Sunghwa; Kim, Dae-Duk; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2017-04-15

    (3-Aminomethylphenyl)boronic acid (AMPB)-installed hyaluronic acid-ceramide (HACE)-based nanoparticles (NPs), including manassantin B (MB), were fabricated for tumor-targeted delivery. The amine group of AMPB was conjugated to the carboxylic acid group of hyaluronic acid (HA) via amide bond formation, and synthesis was confirmed by spectroscopic methods. HACE-AMPB/MB NPs with a 239-nm mean diameter, narrow size distribution, negative zeta potential, and >90% drug encapsulation efficiency were fabricated. Exposed AMPB in the outer surface of HACE-AMPB NPs (in the aqueous environment) may react with sialic acid of cancer cells. The improved cellular accumulation efficiency, in vitro antitumor efficacy, and tumor penetration efficiency of HACE-AMPB/MB NPs, compared with HACE/MB NPs, in MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44 receptor-positive human breast adenocarcinoma cells) may be based on the CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis and phenylboronic acid-sialic acid interaction. Enhanced in vivo tumor targetability, infiltration efficiency, and antitumor efficacies of HACE-AMPB NPs, compared with HACE NPs, were observed in a MDA-MB-231 tumor-xenografted mouse model. In addition to passive tumor targeting (based on an enhanced permeability and retention effect) and active tumor targeting (interaction between HA and CD44 receptor), the phenylboronic acid-sialic acid interaction can play important roles in augmented tumor targeting and penetration of HACE-AMPB NPs. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: (3-Aminomethylphenyl)boronic acid (AMPB)-tethered hyaluronic acid-ceramide (HACE)-based nanoparticles (NPs), including manassantin B (MB), were fabricated and their tumor targeting and penetration efficiencies were assessed in MDA-MB-231 (CD44 receptor-positive human adenocarcinoma) tumor models. MB, which exhibited antitumor efficacies via the inhibition of angiogenesis and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1, was entrapped in HACE-AMPB NPs in this study. Phenylboronic acid located in the outer surface

  1. Deep Learning and Texture-Based Semantic Label Fusion for Brain Tumor Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyaratne, L; Alam, M; Shboul, Z; Iftekharuddin, K M

    2018-01-01

    Brain tumor segmentation is a fundamental step in surgical treatment and therapy. Many hand-crafted and learning based methods have been proposed for automatic brain tumor segmentation from MRI. Studies have shown that these approaches have their inherent advantages and limitations. This work proposes a semantic label fusion algorithm by combining two representative state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms: texture based hand-crafted, and deep learning based methods to obtain robust tumor segmentation. We evaluate the proposed method using publicly available BRATS 2017 brain tumor segmentation challenge dataset. The results show that the proposed method offers improved segmentation by alleviating inherent weaknesses: extensive false positives in texture based method, and the false tumor tissue classification problem in deep learning method, respectively. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of patient's gender on the segmentation performance using a subset of validation dataset. Note the substantial improvement in brain tumor segmentation performance proposed in this work has recently enabled us to secure the first place by our group in overall patient survival prediction task at the BRATS 2017 challenge.

  2. Nanobody-Based Delivery Systems for Diagnosis and Targeted Tumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaozhong Hu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of innovative targeted therapeutic approaches are expected to surpass the efficacy of current forms of treatments and cause less damage to healthy cells surrounding the tumor site. Since the first development of targeting agents from hybridoma’s, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs have been employed to inhibit tumor growth and proliferation directly or to deliver effector molecules to tumor cells. However, the full potential of such a delivery strategy is hampered by the size of mAbs, which will obstruct the targeted delivery system to access the tumor tissue. By serendipity, a new kind of functional homodimeric antibody format was discovered in camelidae, known as heavy-chain antibodies (HCAbs. The cloning of the variable domain of HCAbs produces an attractive minimal-sized alternative for mAbs, referred to as VHH or nanobodies (Nbs. Apart from their dimensions in the single digit nanometer range, the unique characteristics of Nbs combine a high stability and solubility, low immunogenicity and excellent affinity and specificity against all possible targets including tumor markers. This stimulated the development of tumor-targeted therapeutic strategies. Some autonomous Nbs have been shown to act as antagonistic drugs, but more importantly, the targeting capacity of Nbs has been exploited to create drug delivery systems. Obviously, Nb-based targeted cancer therapy is mainly focused toward extracellular tumor markers, since the membrane barrier prevents antibodies to reach the most promising intracellular tumor markers. Potential strategies, such as lentiviral vectors and bacterial type 3 secretion system, are proposed to deliver target-specific Nbs into tumor cells and to block tumor markers intracellularly. Simultaneously, Nbs have also been employed for in vivo molecular imaging to diagnose diseased tissues and to monitor the treatment effects. Here, we review the state of the art and focus on recent developments with Nbs as

  3. Staging of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: how we do it based on an evidence-based approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Shaunagh

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to other common types of malignant tumors, the vast majority of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are well differentiated and slowly growing with only a minority showing aggressive behavior. It is important to accurately stage patients radiologically so the correct treatment can be implemented and to improve prognosis. In this article, we critically appraise the current literature in an effort to establish the current role of radiologic imaging in the staging of neuroendocrine tumors. We also discuss our protocol for staging neuroendocrine tumors.

  4. Baculovirus-based gene silencing of Humanin for the treatment of pituitary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardo, María Florencia; Pidre, Matías L; Zuccato, Camila; Asad, Antonela S; Imsen, Mercedes; Jaita, Gabriela; Candolfi, Marianela; Romanowski, Víctor; Seilicovich, Adriana

    2018-02-01

    Pituitary tumors are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms. Humanin (HN) and Rattin (HNr), a rat homolog of HN, are short peptides with a cytoprotective action. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate whether endogenous HNr plays an antiapoptotic role in pituitary tumor cells. Thus, we used RNA interference based on short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeted to HNr (shHNr). A plasmid including the coding sequences for shHNr and dTomato fluorescent reporter gene was developed (pUC-shHNr). Transfection of somatolactotrope GH3 cells with pUC-shHNr increased apoptosis, suggesting that endogenous HNr plays a cytoprotective role in pituitary tumor cells. In order to evaluate the effect of blockade of endogenous HNr expression in vivo, we constructed a recombinant baculovirus (BV) encoding shHNr (BV-shHNr). In vitro, BV-shRNA was capable of transducing more than 80% of GH3 cells and decreased HNr mRNA. Also, BV-shHNr increased apoptosis in transduced GH3 cells. Intratumor injection of BV-shHNr to nude mice bearing s.c. GH3 tumors increased the number of apoptotic cells, delayed tumor growth and enhanced survival rate, suggesting that endogenous HNr may be involved in pituitary tumor progression. These preclinical data suggests that the silencing of HN expression could have a therapeutic impact on the treatment of pituitary tumors.

  5. A bispecific peptide based near-infrared probe for in vivo tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Chen, Wei R.; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-02-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and HER2 are members of recepeter tyrosine kinase family. Overexpression of EGFR and HER2 has been observed in a variety of human tumors, making these receptors promising targets for tumor diagnosis. An affibody targeting HER2 and a nanobody targeting EGFR were reported before. In this Manuscript, we described an bispecific peptide combined with an affibody and a nanonbody through a linker―(G4S)3 . And the bispecific peptide was labeled with near-infrared (NIR) fluorochrome ICG-Der-02 for in vivo tumor EGFR and HER2 targeting. Afterwards, the EGFR and HER2 specificity of the fluorescent probe was tested in vitro for receptor binding assay and fluorescence microscopy and in vivo for subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 tumor targeting. The results indicated that the bispecific peptide had a high affinity to EGFR and HER2. Besides, in vitro and in vivo tumor targeting experiment indicated that the ICG-Der-02-( bispecific peptide) showed excellent tumor activity accumulation. Noninvasive NIR fluorescence imaging is able to detect tumor EGFR and HER2 expression based upon the highly potent bispecific peptide probe.

  6. Systemic Administration of Interleukin 2 Enhances the Therapeutic Efficacy of Dendritic Cell-Based Tumor Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K.; Fields, R. C.; Giedlin, M.; Mule, J. J.

    1999-03-01

    We have reported previously that murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with whole tumor lysates can mediate potent antitumor immune responses both in vitro and in vivo. Because successful therapy was dependent on host immune T cells, we have now evaluated whether the systemic administration of the T cell stimulatory/growth promoting cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) could enhance tumor lysate-pulsed DC-based immunizations to further promote protective immunity toward, and therapeutic rejection of, syngeneic murine tumors. In three separate approaches using a weakly immunogenic sarcoma (MCA-207), the systemic administration of non-toxic doses of recombinant IL-2 (20,000 and 40,000 IU/dose) was capable of mediating significant increases in the potency of DC-based immunizations. IL-2 could augment the efficacy of tumor lysate-pulsed DC to induce protective immunity to lethal tumor challenge as well as enhance splenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and interferon-γ production in these treated mice. Moreover, treatment with the combination of tumor lysate-pulsed DC and IL-2 could also mediate regressions of established pulmonary 3-day micrometastases and 7-day macrometastases as well as established 14- and 28-day s.c. tumors, leading to either significant cure rates or prolongation in overall survival. Collectively, these findings show that nontoxic doses of recombinant IL-2 can potentiate the antitumor effects of tumor lysate-pulsed DC in vivo and provide preclinical rationale for the use of IL-2 in DC-based vaccine strategies in patients with advanced cancer.

  7. A kernel-based method for markerless tumor tracking in kV fluoroscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Abe, Makoto; Sugita, Norihiro; Takai, Yoshihiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2014-09-07

    Markerless tracking of respiration-induced tumor motion in kilo-voltage (kV) fluoroscopic image sequence is still a challenging task in real time image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Most of existing markerless tracking methods are based on a template matching technique or its extensions that are frequently sensitive to non-rigid tumor deformation and involve expensive computation. This paper presents a kernel-based method that is capable of tracking tumor motion in kV fluoroscopic image sequence with robust performance and low computational cost. The proposed tracking system consists of the following three steps. To enhance the contrast of kV fluoroscopic image, we firstly utilize a histogram equalization to transform the intensities of original images to a wider dynamical intensity range. A tumor target in the first frame is then represented by using a histogram-based feature vector. Subsequently, the target tracking is then formulated by maximizing a Bhattacharyya coefficient that measures the similarity between the tumor target and its candidates in the subsequent frames. The numerical solution for maximizing the Bhattacharyya coefficient is performed by a mean-shift algorithm. The proposed method was evaluated by using four clinical kV fluoroscopic image sequences. For comparison, we also implement four conventional template matching-based methods and compare their performance with our proposed method in terms of the tracking accuracy and computational cost. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is superior to conventional template matching-based methods.

  8. Statistics-Based Prediction Analysis for Head and Neck Cancer Tumor Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Azimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the current radiation therapy planning systems, which are based on pre-treatment Computer Tomography (CT images, assume that the tumor geometry does not change during the course of treatment. However, tumor geometry is shown to be changing over time. We propose a methodology to monitor and predict daily size changes of head and neck cancer tumors during the entire radiation therapy period. Using collected patients' CT scan data, MATLAB routines are developed to quantify the progressive geometric changes occurring in patients during radiation therapy. Regression analysis is implemented to develop predictive models for tumor size changes through entire period. The generated models are validated using leave-one-out cross validation. The proposed method will increase the accuracy of therapy and improve patient's safety and quality of life by reducing the number of harmful unnecessary CT scans.

  9. Mid-Ventilation Concept for Mobile Pulmonary Tumors: Internal Tumor Trajectory Versus Selective Reconstruction of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Frames Based on External Breathing Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Wilbert, Juergen; Krieger, Thomas; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of direct reconstruction of mid-ventilation and peak-phase four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) frames based on the external breathing signal. Methods and Materials: For 11 patients with 15 pulmonary targets, a respiration-correlated CT study (4D CT) was acquired for treatment planning. After retrospective time-based sorting of raw projection data and reconstruction of eight CT frames equally distributed over the breathing cycle, mean tumor position (P mean ), mid-ventilation frame, and breathing motion were evaluated based on the internal tumor trajectory. Analysis of the external breathing signal (pressure sensor around abdomen) with amplitude-based sorting of projections was performed for direct reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame and frames at peak phases of the breathing cycle. Results: On the basis of the eight 4D CT frames equally spaced in time, tumor motion was largest in the craniocaudal direction, with 12 ± 7 mm on average. Tumor motion between the two frames reconstructed at peak phases was not different in the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior directions but was systematically smaller in the left-right direction by 1 mm on average. The 3-dimensional distance between P mean and the tumor position in the mid-ventilation frame based on the internal tumor trajectory was 1.2 ± 1 mm. Reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame at the mean amplitude position of the external breathing signal resulted in tumor positions 2.0 ± 1.1 mm distant from P mean . Breathing-induced motion artifacts in mid-ventilation frames caused negligible changes in tumor volume and shape. Conclusions: Direct reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame and frames at peak phases based on the external breathing signal was reliable. This makes the reconstruction of only three 4D CT frames sufficient for application of the mid-ventilation technique in clinical practice.

  10. Image-based modeling of tumor shrinkage in head and neck radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao Ming; Xie Yaoqin; Moros, Eduardo G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Xing Lei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the kinetics of tumor growth/shrinkage represents a critical step in quantitative assessment of therapeutics and realization of adaptive radiation therapy. This article presents a novel framework for image-based modeling of tumor change and demonstrates its performance with synthetic images and clinical cases. Methods: Due to significant tumor tissue content changes, similarity-based models are not suitable for describing the process of tumor volume changes. Under the hypothesis that tissue features in a tumor volume or at the boundary region are partially preserved, the kinetic change was modeled in two steps: (1) Autodetection of homologous tissue features shared by two input images using the scale invariance feature transformation (SIFT) method; and (2) establishment of a voxel-to-voxel correspondence between the images for the remaining spatial points by interpolation. The correctness of the tissue feature correspondence was assured by a bidirectional association procedure, where SIFT features were mapped from template to target images and reversely. A series of digital phantom experiments and five head and neck clinical cases were used to assess the performance of the proposed technique. Results: The proposed technique can faithfully identify the known changes introduced when constructing the digital phantoms. The subsequent feature-guided thin plate spline calculation reproduced the ''ground truth'' with accuracy better than 1.5 mm. For the clinical cases, the new algorithm worked reliably for a volume change as large as 30%. Conclusions: An image-based tumor kinetic algorithm was developed to model the tumor response to radiation therapy. The technique provides a practical framework for future application in adaptive radiation therapy.

  11. Image-Based Monitoring of Magnetic Resonance-Guided Thermoablative Therapies for Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempp, Hansjörg; Clasen, Stephan; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive treatment options for liver tumor therapy have been increasingly used during the last decade because their benefit has been proven for primary and inoperable secondary liver tumors. Among these, radiofrequency ablation has gained widespread consideration. Optimal image-guidance offers precise anatomical information, helps to position interventional devices, and allows for differentiation between already-treated and remaining tumor tissue. Patient safety and complete ablation of the entire tumor are the overriding objectives of tumor ablation. These may be achieved most elegantly with magnetic resonance (MR)-guided therapy, where monitoring can be performed based on precise soft-tissue imaging and additional components, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and temperature mapping. New MR scanner types and newly developed sequence techniques have enabled MR-guided intervention to move beyond the experimental phase. This article reviews the current role of MR imaging in guiding radiofrequency ablation. Signal characteristics of primary and secondary liver tumors are identified, and signal alteration during therapy is described. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and temperature mapping as special components of MR therapy monitoring are introduced. Practical information concerning coils, sequence selection, and parameters, as well as sequence gating, is given. In addition, sources of artifacts are identified and techniques to decrease them are introduced, and the characteristic signs of residual tumor in T1-, T2-, and DWI are described. We hope to enable the reader to choose MR sequences that allow optimal therapy monitoring depending on the initial signal characteristics of the tumor as well as its size and location in the liver.

  12. Nanostructures based on alumina hydroxides inhibit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenko, A. N.; Korovin, M. S.

    2017-09-01

    Nanoparticles and nanostructured materials are one of the most promising developments for cancer therapy. Gold nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles based on iron and its oxides and other metal oxides have been widely used in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Much less research attention has been payed to nanoparticles and nanostructures based on aluminum oxides and hydroxides as materials for cancer diagnosis and treatment. However recent investigations have shown promising results regarding these objects. Here, we review the antitumor results obtained with AlOOH nanoparticles.

  13. [Expression of HOX C13 in odontogenic tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yan-song; Wang, Jie; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Hou, Lin; Zhong, Ming

    2007-12-01

    To study the expression of HOXC13 mRNA in odontogenic tumors. HOXC13 mRNA was detected in 47 cases of ameloblastoma (AB), 3 cases of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT), 3 cases of ameloblastic fibroma (AF), 10 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and 2 cases of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) by in situ hybridization, and 7 cases of normal oral mucosa were selected as control. SPSS10.0 software package was used for chi(2) test. HOXC13 mRNA was positively expressed in all odontogenic epithelium except AF. The positive ratios were 97.9% in AB, 100% in CCOT, 100% in CEOT, 70.0% in KCOT epithelium and 42.9% in the normal oral mucosa. There was significant difference among AB, KCOT and normal mucosa (chi(2)=21.665, PHOXC13. The expression of HOXC13 mRNA in the odontogenic lesions has heterogeneity.

  14. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi K Nair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT has been identified as a "tumor" after observation of its biological behavior and genetic abnormalities consistent with neoplastic progression. In 2005, the World Health Organization (WHO working group considered odontogenic keratocyst (OKC to be a tumor and recommended the term KCOT, distinguishing the lesion from the orthokeratinizing variant, which is now considered an OKC or orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst. Very rarely, KCOTs can transform into more aggressive lesions such as ameloblastoma and primary intraosseous carcinoma (PIOSCC. In this paper, we present a case of KCOT involving the angle and ramus of the mandible, with histopathologic evidence of ameloblastomatous changes. We also discuss about the evolution of this lesion from a cyst to a tumor along with the latest updates of the entity.

  15. WE-E-17A-01: Characterization of An Imaging-Based Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikarla, V; Jeraj, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the transient dynamics of tumor oxygenation is important when evaluating tumor-vasculature response to anti-angiogenic therapies. An imaging-based tumor-vasculature model was used to elucidate factors that affect these dynamics. Methods: Tumor growth depends on its doubling time (Td). Hypoxia increases pro-angiogenic factor (VEGF) concentration which is modeled to reduce vessel perfusion, attributing to its effect of increasing vascular permeability. Perfused vessel recruitment depends on the existing perfused vasculature, VEGF concentration and maximum VEGF concentration (VEGFmax) for vessel dysfunction. A convolution-based algorithm couples the tumor to the normal tissue vessel density (VD-nt). The parameters are benchmarked to published pre-clinical data and a sensitivity study evaluating the changes in the peak and time to peak tumor oxygenation characterizes them. The model is used to simulate changes in hypoxia and proliferation PET imaging data obtained using [Cu- 61]Cu-ATSM and [F-18]FLT respectively. Results: Td and VD-nt were found to be the most influential on peak tumor pO2 while VEGFmax was marginally influential. A +20 % change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax resulted in +50%, +25% and +5% increase in peak pO2. In contrast, Td was the most influential on the time to peak oxygenation with VD-nt and VEGFmax playing marginal roles. A +20% change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax increased the time to peak pO2 by +50%, +5% and +0%. A −20% change in the above parameters resulted in comparable decreases in the peak and time to peak pO2. Model application to the PET data was able to demonstrate the voxel-specific changes in hypoxia of the imaged tumor. Conclusion: Tumor-specific doubling time and vessel density are important parameters to be considered when evaluating hypoxia transients. While the current model simulates the oxygen dynamics of an untreated tumor, incorporation of therapeutic effects can make the model a potent tool for analyzing

  16. Cell membrane-based nanoparticles: a new biomimetic platform for tumor diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixiang Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking inspiration from nature, the biomimetic concept has been integrated into drug delivery systems in cancer therapy. Disguised with cell membranes, the nanoparticles can acquire various functions of natural cells. The cell membrane-coating technology has pushed the limits of common nano-systems (fast elimination in circulation to more effectively navigate within the body. Moreover, because of the various functional molecules on the surface, cell membrane-based nanoparticles (CMBNPs are capable of interacting with the complex biological microenvironment of the tumor. Various sources of cell membranes have been explored to camouflage CMBNPs and different tumor-targeting strategies have been developed to enhance the anti-tumor drug delivery therapy. In this review article we highlight the most recent advances in CMBNP-based cancer targeting systems and address the challenges and opportunities in this field.

  17. Hurdles of CAR-T cell-based cancer immunotherapy directed against solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing-Lan; Qin, Di-Yuan; Mo, Ze-Ming; Li, Yi; Wei, Wei; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-04-01

    Recent reports on the impressive efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells against hematologic malignancies have inspired oncologists to extend these efforts for the treatment of solid tumors. Clinical trials of CAR-T-based cancer immunotherapy for solid tumors showed that the efficacies are not as remarkable as in the case of hematologic malignancies. There are several challenges that researchers must face when treating solid cancers with CAR-T cells, these include choosing an ideal target, promoting efficient trafficking and infiltration, overcoming the immunosuppressive microenvironment, and avoiding associated toxicity. In this review, we discuss the obstacles imposed by solid tumors on CAR-T cell-based immunotherapy and strategies adopted to improve the therapeutic potential of this approach. Continued investigations are necessary to improve therapeutic outcomes and decrease the adverse effects of CAR-T cell therapy in patients with solid malignancies in the future.

  18. Optimizing a waveguide-based sandwich immunoassay for tumor biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Harshini [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xie, Hongzhi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Aaron S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grace, W Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shively, John E [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    The sensor team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a waveguide-based optical biosensor for the detection of biomarkers associated with the disease. We have previously demonstrated the application of this technology to the sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen in serum and nipple aspirate fluid from breast cancer patients. In this publication, we report improvements to this technology that will facilitate transition to a point-of-care diagnostic system and/or robust research tool.

  19. Multimodal navigated skull base tumor resection using image-based vascular and cranial nerve segmentation: A prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Gokoglu, Abdulkerim; Eichberg, Daniel; Zamani, Amir; Golby, Alexandra; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Skull base tumors frequently encase or invade adjacent normal neurovascular structures. For this reason, optimal tumor resection with incomplete knowledge of patient anatomy remains a challenge. To determine the accuracy and utility of image-based preoperative segmentation in skull base tumor resections, we performed a prospective study. Ten patients with skull base tumors underwent preoperative 3T magnetic resonance imaging, which included thin section three-dimensional (3D) space T2, 3D time of flight, and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequences. Imaging sequences were loaded in the neuronavigation system for segmentation and preoperative planning. Five different neurovascular landmarks were identified in each case and measured for accuracy using the neuronavigation system. Each segmented neurovascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe, and errors of localization were measured. Strong correspondence between image-based segmentation and microscopic view was found at the surface of the tumor and tumor-normal brain interfaces in all cases. The accuracy of the measurements was 0.45 ± 0.21 mm (mean ± standard deviation). This information reassured the surgeon and prevented vascular injury intraoperatively. Preoperative segmentation of the related cranial nerves was possible in 80% of cases and helped the surgeon localize involved cranial nerves in all cases. Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation with 3D reconstruction is highly informative preoperatively and could increase the vigilance of neurosurgeons for preventing neurovascular injury during skull base surgeries. Additionally, the accuracy found in this study is superior to previously reported measurements. This novel preliminary study is encouraging for future validation with larger numbers of patients.

  20. Saponin-based adjuvants create a highly effective anti-tumor vaccine when combined with in situ tumor destruction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brok, M.H.M.G.M. den; Nierkens, S.; Wagenaars, J.A.L.; Ruers, T.J.M.; Schrier, C.C.; Rijke, E.O.; Adema, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Today's most commonly used microbial vaccines are essentially composed of antigenic elements and a non-microbial adjuvant, and induce solid amounts of antibodies. Cancer vaccines mostly aim to induce anti-tumor CTL-responses, which require cross-presentation of tumor-derived antigens by dendritic

  1. Texture-based classification of different gastric tumors at contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Muin, Dina; Schernthaner, Ruediger; Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiana; Bastati, Nina; Stift, Judith; Gore, Richard; Mayerhoefer, Marius E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of texture analysis for the classification of gastric adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors on contrast-enhanced hydrodynamic-MDCT images. Materials and methods: The arterial phase scans of 47 patients with adenocarcinoma (AC) and a histologic tumor grade of [AC-G1, n = 4, G1, n = 4; AC-G2, n = 7; AC-G3, n = 16]; GIST, n = 15; and lymphoma, n = 5, and the venous phase scans of 48 patients with AC-G1, n = 3; AC-G2, n = 6; AC-G3, n = 14; GIST, n = 17; lymphoma, n = 8, were retrospectively reviewed. Based on regions of interest, texture analysis was performed, and features derived from the gray-level histogram, run-length and co-occurrence matrix, absolute gradient, autoregressive model, and wavelet transform were calculated. Fisher coefficients, probability of classification error, average correlation coefficients, and mutual information coefficients were used to create combinations of texture features that were optimized for tumor differentiation. Linear discriminant analysis in combination with a k-nearest neighbor classifier was used for tumor classification. Results: On arterial-phase scans, texture-based lesion classification was highly successful in differentiating between AC and lymphoma, and GIST and lymphoma, with misclassification rates of 3.1% and 0%, respectively. On venous-phase scans, texture-based classification was slightly less successful for AC vs. lymphoma (9.7% misclassification) and GIST vs. lymphoma (8% misclassification), but enabled the differentiation between AC and GIST (10% misclassification), and between the different grades of AC (4.4% misclassification). No texture feature combination was able to adequately distinguish between all three tumor types. Conclusion: Classification of different gastric tumors based on textural information may aid radiologists in establishing the correct diagnosis, at least in cases where the differential diagnosis can be narrowed down to two

  2. Treatment of malignant tumors of the skull base with multi-session radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagnon Gregory J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Malignant tumors that involve the skull base pose significant challenges to the clinician because of the proximity of critical neurovascular structures and limited effectiveness of surgical resection without major morbidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of multi-session radiosurgery in patients with malignancies of the skull base. Methods Clinical and radiographic data for 37 patients treated with image-guided, multi-session radiosurgery between January 2002 and December 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. Lesions were classified according to involvement with the bones of the base of the skull and proximity to the cranial nerves. Results Our cohort consisted of 37 patients. Six patients with follow-up periods less than four weeks were eliminated from statistical consideration, thus leaving the data from 31 patients to be analyzed. The median follow-up was 37 weeks. Ten patients (32% were alive at the end of the follow-up period. At last follow-up, or the time of death from systemic disease, tumor regression or stable local disease was observed in 23 lesions, representing an overall tumor control rate of 74%. For the remainder of lesions, the median time to progression was 24 weeks. The median progression-free survival was 230 weeks. The median overall survival was 39 weeks. In the absence of tumor progression, there were no cranial nerve, brainstem or vascular complications referable specifically to CyberKnife® radiosurgery. Conclusion Our experience suggests that multi-session radiosurgery for the treatment of malignant skull base tumors is comparable to other radiosurgical techniques in progression-free survival, local tumor control, and adverse effects.

  3. Targeted Tumor Therapy Based on Nanodiamonds Decorated with Doxorubicin and Folic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Tae-Kyung; Baek, Seung Woon; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Choi, Sung-Wook

    2017-02-01

    The fabrication of nanodiamond (ND)-based drug carriers for tumor-targeted drug delivery is described. The ND clusters with an average size of 52.84 nm are fabricated using a simple fluidic device combined with a precipitation method and then conjugated with folic acid (FA) and doxorubicin (Dox) via carbodiimide chemistry to obtain FA/Dox-modified ND (FA/Dox-ND) clusters. Cell culture experiments revealed that KB (folate receptor-positive) cells are preferentially ablated by FA/Dox-ND clusters compared to A549 (folate receptor-negative) cells. In vivo results revealed that FA/Dox-ND clusters are specifically accumulated in tumor tissues after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice, effectively reducing the volume of tumor. Based on these results, this study suggests that FA/Dox-ND clusters can be a good candidate as tumor-targeted nanovehicles for delivery of antitumor drug. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. [Craniofacial resection for tumors of paranasal sinuses involving the anterior skull base].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burduk, Paweł K; Kaźmierczak, Wojciech; Dalke, Krzysztof; Beuth, Wojciech; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Prywiński, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial resection is a treatment of choice for paranasal malignant and benign tumors invading the skull base. In this article the authors present the experience in craniofacial resection for malignant tumors invading the anterior skull base. The material consisted of four patients operated in the Department of Otolaryngology and Laryngology Oncology CM UMK between 2007 and 2010. The patients were treated for malignant neoplasms of the paranasal sinuses with anterior skull base involvement. THe age range of the group were between 60 and 75 years. Of these patients three were females and one male. We performed a lateral rhinotomy for laryngological acces for the tumor. The neurosurgeon performed anterior skull base osteotomy at and appropriate site above. The patients recovered uneventfully. The follow up period ranged between 13 and 42 months. The overall 3-year survival for all patients in our series was 66,6%. Combined craniofacial resection of tumors of the anterior skull base is an effective approach for the management of these pathologies. This type of approach in elderly patients over 70 years old could be associated with increased mortality and complications leading to poorer outcome.

  5. Radiological classification of renal angiomyolipomas based on 127 tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prando Adilson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Demonstrate radiological findings of 127 angiomyolipomas (AMLs and propose a classification based on the radiological evidence of fat. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The imaging findings of 85 consecutive patients with AMLs: isolated (n = 73, multiple without tuberous sclerosis (TS (n = 4 and multiple with TS (n = 8, were retrospectively reviewed. Eighteen AMLs (14% presented with hemorrhage. All patients were submitted to a dedicated helical CT or magnetic resonance studies. All hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic lesions were grouped together since our objective was to analyze the presence of detectable fat. Out of 85 patients, 53 were monitored and 32 were treated surgically due to large perirenal component (n = 13, hemorrhage (n = 11 and impossibility of an adequate preoperative characterization (n = 8. There was not a case of renal cell carcinoma (RCC with fat component in this group of patients. RESULTS: Based on the presence and amount of detectable fat within the lesion, AMLs were classified in 4 distinct radiological patterns: Pattern-I, predominantly fatty (usually less than 2 cm in diameter and intrarenal: 54%; Pattern-II, partially fatty (intrarenal or exophytic: 29%; Pattern-III, minimally fatty (most exophytic and perirenal: 11%; and Pattern-IV, without fat (most exophytic and perirenal: 6%. CONCLUSIONS: This proposed classification might be useful to understand the imaging manifestations of AMLs, their differential diagnosis and determine when further radiological evaluation would be necessary. Small (< 1.5 cm, pattern-I AMLs tend to be intra-renal, homogeneous and predominantly fatty. As they grow they tend to be partially or completely exophytic and heterogeneous (patterns II and III. The rare pattern-IV AMLs, however, can be small or large, intra-renal or exophytic but are always homogeneous and hyperdense mass. Since no renal cell carcinoma was found in our series, from an evidence-based practice, all renal mass with detectable

  6. Glandular odontogenic cyst mimicking ameloblastoma in a 78 year old female: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Wan; Kwon, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Moon Ki; Choi, Eun Joo; Yoon, Jung Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare, potentially aggressive jaw lesion. The common radiographic features include a well-defined radiolucency with distinct borders, presenting a uni- or multilocular appearance. A cystic lesion in the posterior mandible of a 78-year-old female was incidentally found. Radiographs showed a unilocular lesion with a scalloped margin, external root resorption of the adjacent tooth, and cortical perforation. This lesion had changed from a small ovoid shape to a more expanded lesion in a period of four years. The small lesion showed unilocularity with a smooth margin and a well-defined border, but the expanded lesion produced cortical perforation and a lobulated margin. The provisional diagnosis was an ameloblastoma, whereas the histopathological examination revealed a GOC. This was a quite rare case, given that this radiographic change was observed in the posterior mandible of an elderly female. This case showed that a GOC can grow even in people in their seventies, changing from the unilocular form to an expanded, lobulated lesion. Here, we report a case of GOC with characteristic radiographic features.

  7. Glandular odontogenic cyst mimicking ameloblastoma in a 78 year old female: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Wan; Kwon, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Moon Ki; Choi, Eun Joo [College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, College of Dentistry, Daejeon Dental Hospital, Wonkwang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare, potentially aggressive jaw lesion. The common radiographic features include a well-defined radiolucency with distinct borders, presenting a uni- or multilocular appearance. A cystic lesion in the posterior mandible of a 78-year-old female was incidentally found. Radiographs showed a unilocular lesion with a scalloped margin, external root resorption of the adjacent tooth, and cortical perforation. This lesion had changed from a small ovoid shape to a more expanded lesion in a period of four years. The small lesion showed unilocularity with a smooth margin and a well-defined border, but the expanded lesion produced cortical perforation and a lobulated margin. The provisional diagnosis was an ameloblastoma, whereas the histopathological examination revealed a GOC. This was a quite rare case, given that this radiographic change was observed in the posterior mandible of an elderly female. This case showed that a GOC can grow even in people in their seventies, changing from the unilocular form to an expanded, lobulated lesion. Here, we report a case of GOC with characteristic radiographic features.

  8. Odontoma associated with calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor in deciduous dentition: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleti, Marcelo Lupion; Duarte, Bruno Gomes; Lara, Vanessa Soares; Freitas-Faria, Patrícia; Rubira-Bullen, Izabel Regina Fischer; Gonçales, Eduardo Sanches

    2013-03-01

    Initially described by Gorlin et al. in 1962, the calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) may be associated with unerupted teeth, ameloblastomas, adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, and, in many cases, with odontomas. It is rare in patients in the first decade of life, particularly involving deciduous teeth. Surgery is the treatment of choice, with low recurrence rates. We present a clinical case of CCOT associated with odontoma and a missing deciduous tooth in a 3-year-old female patient. The lesion was removed under general anesthesia. The patient has been followed up for 1 year, and no recurrence was found. This appears to be the first report in such a young age.

  9. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy targeting Wilms' tumor 1 in patients with recurrent malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Keiichi; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Maejima, Shinya; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Sano, Kenji; Higuchi, Yumiko; Koya, Terutsugu; Ochiai, Takanaga; Koide, Masanori; Uehara, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Midori; Sugiyama, Haruo; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Okamoto, Masato; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination is considered a potentially effective therapy against advanced cancer. The authors conducted a Phase I study to investigate the safety and immunomonitoring of Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1)-pulsed DC vaccination therapy for patients with relapsed malignant glioma. WT1-pulsed and/or autologous tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccination therapy was performed in patients with relapsed malignant gliomas. Approximately 1 × 10(7) to 2 × 10(7) pulsed DCs loaded with WT1 peptide antigen and/or tumor lysate were intradermally injected into the axillary areas with OK-432, a streptococcal preparation, at 2-week intervals for at least 5-7 sessions (1 course) during an individual chemotherapy regimen. Ten patients (3 men, 7 women; age range 24-64 years [median 39 years]) with the following tumors were enrolled: glioblastoma (6), anaplastic astrocytoma (2), anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (1), and anaplastic oligodendroglioma (1). Modified WT1 peptide-pulsed DC vaccine was administered to 7 patients, tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccine to 2 patients, and both tumor lysate-pulsed and WT1-pulsed DC vaccine to 1 patient. The clinical response was stable disease in 5 patients with WT1-pulsed DC vaccination. In 2 of 5 patients with stable disease, neurological findings improved, and MR images showed tumor shrinkage. No serious adverse events occurred except Grade 1-2 erythema at the injection sites. WT1 tetramer analysis detected WT1-reactive cytotoxic T cells after vaccination in patients treated with WT1-pulsed therapy. Positivity for skin reaction at the injection sites was 80% (8 of 10 patients) after the first session, and positivity remained for these 8 patients after the final session. This study of WT1-pulsed DC vaccination therapy demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and feasibility in the management of relapsed malignant gliomas.

  10. New approach to breast tumor detection based on fluorescence x-ray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okuyama, Fumio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new technical approach to breast-tumor detection is proposed. The technique is based on fluorescence x-ray analysis, and can identify a miniature malignant tumor within the breast. The primary beam intensity needed in fluorescence x-ray analysis is on a lower order of magnitude than that used in mammography. Thus, the newly-proposed technique would enable detection of a still tiny breast cancer while dramatically lowering the radiation dose. Field-emission x-ray sources might be a key for translating this concept into a medical technique.

  11. Locally linear representation Fisher criterion based tumor gene expressive data classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Tian, Bei-Bei; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Tumor gene expressive data are characterized by a large amount of genes with only a small amount of observations, which always appear with high dimensionality. So it is necessary to reduce the dimensionality before identifying their genre. In this paper, a discriminant manifold learning method, named locally linear representation Fisher criterion (LLRFC), is applied to extract features from tumor gene expressive data. In LLRFC, an inter-class graph and an intra-class graph are constructed based on their genre information, where any tumor gene expressive data in the inter-class graph should select k nearest neighbors with different class labels and in the intra-class graph the k nearest neighbors for any tumor gene expressive data must be sampled from those with the same class. And then the locally least linear reconstruction is introduced to optimize the corresponding weights in both graphs. Moreover, a Fisher criterion is modeled to explore a low dimensional subspace where the reconstruction errors in the inter-class graph can be maximized and the reconstruction errors in the intra-class graph can be minimized, simultaneously. Experiments on some benchmark tumor gene expressive data have been conducted with some related algorithms, by which the proposed LLRFC has been validated to be efficient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanotechnology-Based Strategies for Early Cancer Diagnosis Using Circulating Tumor Cells as a Liquid Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qinqin; Wang, Yin; Chen, Xingxiang; Wang, Yimeng; Li, Zhiqiang; Du, Shiming; Wang, Lianrong; Chen, Shi

    2018-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cancer cells that shed from a primary tumor and circulate in the bloodstream. As a form of "tumor liquid biopsy", CTCs provide important information for the mechanistic investigation of cancer metastasis and the measurement of tumor genotype evolution during treatment and disease progression. However, the extremely low abundance of CTCs in the peripheral blood and the heterogeneity of CTCs make their isolation and characterization major technological challenges. Recently, nanotechnologies have been developed for sensitive CTC detection; such technologies will enable better cell and molecular characterization and open up a wide range of clinical applications, including early disease detection and evaluation of treatment response and disease progression. In this review, we summarize the nanotechnology-based strategies for CTC isolation, including representative nanomaterials (such as magnetic nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, silicon nanopillars, nanowires, nanopillars, carbon nanotubes, dendrimers, quantum dots, and graphene oxide) and microfluidic chip technologies that incorporate nanoroughened surfaces and discuss their key challenges and perspectives in CTC downstream analyses, such as protein expression and genetic mutations that may reflect tumor aggressiveness and patient outcome.

  13. Measurement of Tumor Volumes Improves RECIST-Based Response Assessments in Advanced Lung Cancer1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozley, P David; Bendtsen, Claus; Zhao, Binsheng; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Thorn, Matthias; Rong, Yuanxin; Zhang, Luduan; Perrone, Andrea; Korn, René; Buckler, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to characterize the reproducibility of measurement for tumor volumes and their longest tumor diameters (LDs) and estimate the potential impact of using changes in tumor volumes instead of LDs as the basis for response assessments. METHODS: We studied patients with advanced lung cancer who have been observed longitudinally with x-ray computed tomography in a multinational trial. A total of 71 time points from 10 patients with 13 morphologically complex target lesions were analyzed. A total of 6461 volume measurements and their corresponding LDs were made by seven independent teams using their own work flows and image analysis tools. Interteam agreement and overall interrater concurrence were characterized. RESULTS: Interteam agreement between volume measurements was better than between LD measurements (ı = 0.945 vs 0.734, P = .005). The variability in determining the nadir was lower for volumes than for LDs (P = .005). Use of standard thresholds for the RECIST-based method and use of experimentally determined cutoffs for categorizing responses showed that volume measurements had a significantly greater sensitivity for detecting partial responses and disease progression. Earlier detection of progression would have led to earlier changes in patient management in most cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that measurement of changes in tumor volumes is adequately reproducible. Using tumor volumes as the basis for response assessments could have a positive impact on both patient management and clinical trials. More authoritative work to qualify or discard changes in volume as the basis for response assessments should proceed. PMID:22348172

  14. Fiber-based time-resolved fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopy of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirmanova, M.; Lukina, M.; Orlova, A.; Studier, H.; Zagaynova, E.; Becker, W.; Shcheslavskiy, V.

    2017-07-01

    The study of metabolic and oxygen states of cells in a tumor in vivo is crucial for understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the tumor development and provides background for the relevant tumor's treatment. Here, we show that a specially designed implantable fiber-optical probe provides a promising tool for optical interrogation of metabolic and oxygen states of a tumor in vivo. In our experiments, the excitation light from a ps diode laser source is delivered to the sample through an exchangeable tip via a multimode fiber, and the emission light is transferred to the detector by another multimode fiber. Fluorescence lifetime of nicotinamid adenine dinucleotide (NAD(P)H) and phosphorescence lifetime of an oxygen sensor based on iridium (III) complex of enzothienylpyridine (BTPDM1) are explored both in model experiment in solutions, and in living mice. The luminescence spectroscopy data is substantiated with immunohistochemistry experiments. To the best of our knowledge, the measurements of both metabolic status and oxygenation of tumor in vivo by fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime spectroscopy with a fiber-optic probe are done for the first time.

  15. A statistical method for lung tumor segmentation uncertainty in PET images based on user inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaojie; Wang, Xiuying; Feng, Dagan

    2015-01-01

    PET has been widely accepted as an effective imaging modality for lung tumor diagnosis and treatment. However, standard criteria for delineating tumor boundary from PET are yet to develop largely due to relatively low quality of PET images, uncertain tumor boundary definition, and variety of tumor characteristics. In this paper, we propose a statistical solution to segmentation uncertainty on the basis of user inference. We firstly define the uncertainty segmentation band on the basis of segmentation probability map constructed from Random Walks (RW) algorithm; and then based on the extracted features of the user inference, we use Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to formulate the statistical model for labeling the uncertainty band. We validated our method on 10 lung PET-CT phantom studies from the public RIDER collections [1] and 16 clinical PET studies where tumors were manually delineated by two experienced radiologists. The methods were validated using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) to measure the spatial volume overlap. Our method achieved an average DSC of 0.878 ± 0.078 on phantom studies and 0.835 ± 0.039 on clinical studies.

  16. Fuzzy logic-based tumor-marker profiles improved sensitivity in the diagnosis of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joachim; Bitterlich, Norman; Velcovsky, Hans-Georg; Morr, Harald; Katz, Norbert; Eigenbrodt, Erich

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the diagnostic efficiency of tumor markers in the diagnosis of lung cancer, by the mathematical evaluation of a tumor marker profile employing fuzzy logic modelling. A panel of four tumor markers, i.e., carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 19 antibody (CYFRA 21-1), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), squamous cell carcinoma-related antigen (SCC) and, additionally, C-reactive protein (CRP), was measured in 175 newly diagnosed lung cancer patients with different histological types and stages. Results were compared with those in 120 control subjects, including 27 with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), 65 with pneumoconiosis, and 11 persons with acute inflammatory lung diseases. A classificator was developed using a fuzzy-logic rule-based system. Application of the fuzzy-logic rule-based system to the tumor marker values of CYFRA 21-1, NSE, and CRP yielded an increase in sensitivity of approximately 20%, i.e., 92%, compared with that of the best single marker, CYFRA 21-1(sensitivity, 72%). The corresponding specificity was 95%. The fuzzy classificator significantly improved the sensitivity of the tumor marker panel in stages I and IIIa for non-small-cell lung cancer, as well as in "limited disease" status for small-cell lung cancer. Also, the diagnosis of other stages of lung cancer was enhanced. Fuzzy-logic analysis was proven to be more powerful than the measurement of single markers alone or combinations using multiple logistic regression analysis of all markers. Therefore, fuzzy logic offers a promising diagnostic tool to improve tumor marker efficiency.

  17. Visual outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy of benign anterior skull base tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Wiencke, Anne Katrine; Munck af Rosenschold, Per

    2014-01-01

    To determine visual outcome including the occurrence of radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) as well as tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) of benign anterior skull base meningiomas or pituitary adenomas. Thirty-nine patients treated with FSRT for anterior...... skull base meningiomas and 55 patients treated with FSRT for pituitary adenomas between January 1999 and December 2009 with at least 2 years follow-up were included. Patients were followed up prospectively with magnetic resonance imaging scans, visual acuity and visual field examinations. RION was found...... in four (10%) patients with anterior skull base meningiomas and seven patients (13%) with pituitary adenomas. The five-year actuarial freedom from 25% RION visual field loss was 94% following FSRT. Actuarial 2-, 5- and 10-year tumor control rates were 100, 88.4 and 64.5% for anterior skull base...

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associa...

  19. A Novel Markerless Technique to Evaluate Daily Lung Tumor Motion Based on Conventional Cone-Beam CT Projection Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yin; Zhong Zichun; Guo Xiaohu; Wang Jing; Anderson, John; Solberg, Timothy; Mao Weihua

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we present a novel markerless technique, based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) raw projection data, to evaluate lung tumor daily motion. Method and Materials: The markerless technique, which uses raw CBCT projection data and locates tumors directly on every projection, consists of three steps. First, the tumor contour on the planning CT is used to create digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) at every projection angle. Two sets of DRRs are created: one showing only the tumor, and another with the complete anatomy without the tumor. Second, a rigid two-dimensional image registration is performed to register the DRR set without the tumor to the CBCT projections. After the registration, the projections are subtracted from the DRRs, resulting in a projection dataset containing primarily tumor. Finally, a second registration is performed between the subtracted projection and tumor-only DRR. The methodology was evaluated using a chest phantom containing a moving tumor, and retrospectively in 4 lung cancer patients treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy. Tumors detected on projection images were compared with those from three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) CBCT reconstruction results. Results: Results in both static and moving phantoms demonstrate that the accuracy is within 1 mm. The subsequent application to 22 sets of CBCT scan raw projection data of 4 lung cancer patients includes about 11,000 projections, with the detected tumor locations consistent with 3D and 4D CBCT reconstruction results. This technique reveals detailed lung tumor motion and provides additional information than conventional 4D images. Conclusion: This technique is capable of accurately characterizing lung tumor motion on a daily basis based on a conventional CBCT scan. It provides daily verification of the tumor motion to ensure that these motions are within prior estimation and covered by the treatment planning volume.

  20. Can Pharmacological Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Sensitize Poor Outcome Breast Tumors to Immune-Based Therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josie eUrsini-Siegel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases are known to drive breast cancer progression, particularly in HER2 and basal tumors, the two worst prognosis subtypes. Tumour cells recruit host stromal components, including immune cells, which strongly influence disease progression. This has been studied in human breast cancer and translated to murine models of breast cancer. Stromal immune components including cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and natural killer (NK cells, destroy cancer cells through a process termed immune surveillance. Unfortunately, clinically-detectable tumors escape these immune protective effects through their ability to limit the infiltration, activation and/or survival of CTLs in breast tumors. The immunosuppressed state of established tumors limits the success rate of immune-based therapies, and possibly other therapeutic modalities that depend on host immunity. Published studies demonstrate that receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK facilitate breast cancer progression, in part, by establishing immune suppression. This raises the intriguing possibility that pharmacological RTK inhibitors may be exploited to sensitize breast cancer patients to immune-based therapies.

  1. Malignant sweat gland tumor presenting as an unusual dural-based lesion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Shun; Chang, Kung-Chao; Chen, Hsing-Hong; Sze, Chun-I

    2010-09-01

    Malignant sweat gland tumors are rare neoplasms with high recurrence and metastasis rates of over 50%. Clinically, they are often either not diagnosed or diagnosed improperly and are encountered as a histological surprise. Herein, we report a 50-year-old woman who suffered from chronic headaches and a left-side limping gait. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a T1 and T2 heterogeneous intense dural-based lesion at right-frontal convexity. The pathological diagnosis of papillary meningioma was rendered at the time. Because there was no evidence of residual tumor, tumor recurrence, or distant metastases during the three-year follow-up, the clinician believed questioning the initial diagnosis was warranted. After pathological review, the final diagnosis was low-grade hidradenocarcinoma. A review of the literature suggests this is the first reported case of dural-based hidradenocarcinoma with local brain invasion. Given the lack of scalp or skull bone involvement, we speculated that the tumor may have arisen from ectopic sweat gland cells entrapped in the dural mater.

  2. Tumor suppressor gene-based nanotherapy: from test tube to the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Manish; Jin, Jiankang; Branch, Cynthia D; Miyamoto, Shinya; Grimm, Elizabeth A; Roth, Jack A; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a major health problem in the world. Advances made in cancer therapy have improved the survival of patients in certain types of cancer. However, the overall five-year survival has not significantly improved in the majority of cancer types. Major challenges encountered in having effective cancer therapy are development of drug resistance by the tumor cells, nonspecific cytotoxicity, and inability to affect metastatic tumors by the chemodrugs. Overcoming these challenges requires development and testing of novel therapies. One attractive cancer therapeutic approach is cancer gene therapy. Several laboratories including the authors' laboratory have been investigating nonviral formulations for delivering therapeutic genes as a mode for effective cancer therapy. In this paper the authors will summarize their experience in the development and testing of a cationic lipid-based nanocarrier formulation and the results from their preclinical studies leading to a Phase I clinical trial for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Their nanocarrier formulation containing therapeutic genes such as tumor suppressor genes when administered intravenously effectively controls metastatic tumor growth. Additional Phase I clinical trials based on the results of their nanocarrier formulation have been initiated or proposed for treatment of cancer of the breast, ovary, pancreas, and metastatic melanoma, and will be discussed.

  3. Tumor Suppressor Gene-Based Nanotherapy: From Test Tube to the Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Shanker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a major health problem in the world. Advances made in cancer therapy have improved the survival of patients in certain types of cancer. However, the overall five-year survival has not significantly improved in the majority of cancer types. Major challenges encountered in having effective cancer therapy are development of drug resistance by the tumor cells, nonspecific cytotoxicity, and inability to affect metastatic tumors by the chemodrugs. Overcoming these challenges requires development and testing of novel therapies. One attractive cancer therapeutic approach is cancer gene therapy. Several laboratories including the authors' laboratory have been investigating nonviral formulations for delivering therapeutic genes as a mode for effective cancer therapy. In this paper the authors will summarize their experience in the development and testing of a cationic lipid-based nanocarrier formulation and the results from their preclinical studies leading to a Phase I clinical trial for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Their nanocarrier formulation containing therapeutic genes such as tumor suppressor genes when administered intravenously effectively controls metastatic tumor growth. Additional Phase I clinical trials based on the results of their nanocarrier formulation have been initiated or proposed for treatment of cancer of the breast, ovary, pancreas, and metastatic melanoma, and will be discussed.

  4. Content-based retrieval of brain tumor in contrast-enhanced MRI images using tumor margin information and learned distance metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Feng, Qianjin; Yu, Mei; Lu, Zhentai; Gao, Yang; Xu, Yikai; Chen, Wufan

    2012-11-01

    A content-based image retrieval (CBIR) method for T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) images of brain tumors is presented for diagnosis aid. The method is thoroughly evaluated on a large image dataset. Using the tumor region as a query, the authors' CBIR system attempts to retrieve tumors of the same pathological category. Aside from commonly used features such as intensity, texture, and shape features, the authors use a margin information descriptor (MID), which is capable of describing the characteristics of tissue surrounding a tumor, for representing image contents. In addition, the authors designed a distance metric learning algorithm called Maximum mean average Precision Projection (MPP) to maximize the smooth approximated mean average precision (mAP) to optimize retrieval performance. The effectiveness of MID and MPP algorithms was evaluated using a brain CE-MRI dataset consisting of 3108 2D scans acquired from 235 patients with three categories of brain tumors (meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor). By combining MID and other features, the mAP of retrieval increased by more than 6% with the learned distance metrics. The distance metric learned by MPP significantly outperformed the other two existing distance metric learning methods in terms of mAP. The CBIR system using the proposed strategies achieved a mAP of 87.3% and a precision of 89.3% when top 10 images were returned by the system. Compared with scale-invariant feature transform, the MID, which uses the intensity profile as descriptor, achieves better retrieval performance. Incorporating tumor margin information represented by MID with the distance metric learned by the MPP algorithm can substantially improve the retrieval performance for brain tumors in CE-MRI.

  5. Reconstruction of Temporal Hollowing Defect With Anterior-Lateral Thigh Free Flap Following Resection of Recurrent Ameloblastoma of the Infratemporal Fossa and Right Mandible (a Case Report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, James C; Hornberger, John C; Young, Simon; Shum, Jonathan W

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent invasive ameloblastoma of the infratemporal fossa is an uncommonly encountered phenomenon in the practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery and presents many surgical challenges for the practitioner. This case report describes a patient who underwent previous resection of a mandibular ameloblastoma with multiple recurrences. The patient was diagnosed with a recurrent ameloblastoma of the infratemporal fossa that was subsequently resected and reconstructed using an anterolateral thigh (ALT) free tissue transfer. There are few reported cases of recurrent ameloblastomas in the infratemporal fossa and none that describe surgical resection and reconstruction of such a lesion. Owing to the uniqueness of the surgical defect, an ALT flap was used to correct the temporal hollowing. There have been multiple reported cases of reconstruction of temporal hollowing defects using autogenous fat or allograft; however, none have described the use of a de-epithelialized ALT microvascular reconstruction of a temporal hollowing defect. This case report describes a unique clinical situation of surgical resection and reconstruction that resulted in a satisfactory outcome for the patient. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tumor-targeting delivery of herb-based drugs with cell-penetrating/tumor-targeting peptide-modified nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebebe, Dereje; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Yumei; Vilakhamxay, Maikhone; Liu, Zhidong; Li, Jiawei

    2018-01-01

    Cancer has become one of the leading causes of mortality globally. The major challenges of conventional cancer therapy are the failure of most chemotherapeutic agents to accumulate selectively in tumor cells and their severe systemic side effects. In the past three decades, a number of drug delivery approaches have been discovered to overwhelm the obstacles. Among these, nanocarriers have gained much attention for their excellent and efficient drug delivery systems to improve specific tissue/organ/cell targeting. In order to enhance targeting efficiency further and reduce limitations of nanocarriers, nanoparticle surfaces are functionalized with different ligands. Several kinds of ligand-modified nanomedicines have been reported. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are promising ligands, attracting the attention of researchers due to their efficiency to transport bioactive molecules intracellularly. However, their lack of specificity and in vivo degradation led to the development of newer types of CPP. Currently, activable CPP and tumor-targeting peptide (TTP)-modified nanocarriers have shown dramatically superior cellular specific uptake, cytotoxicity, and tumor growth inhibition. In this review, we discuss recent advances in tumor-targeting strategies using CPPs and their limitations in tumor delivery systems. Special emphasis is given to activable CPPs and TTPs. Finally, we address the application of CPPs and/or TTPs in the delivery of plant-derived chemotherapeutic agents.

  7. A GPU-based framework for modeling real-time 3D lung tumor conformal dosimetry with subject-specific lung tumor motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Yugang; Santhanam, Anand; Ruddy, Bari H; Neelakkantan, Harini; Meeks, Sanford L; Kupelian, Patrick A

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving lung tumor and its surrounding normal tissues, which are undergoing subject-specific lung deformations. The GPU-based simulation framework models the motion of the 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the dose delivery using the dose extracted from a treatment plan using Pinnacle Treatment Planning System, Phillips, for one of the 3DCTs of the 4DCT and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited inside the lung. The 4DCT lung datasets were registered with each other using a modified optical flow algorithm. The motion of the tumor and the motion of the surrounding tissues were simulated by measuring the changes in lung volume during the radiotherapy treatment using spirometry. The real-time dose delivered to the tumor for each beam is generated by summing the dose delivered to the target volume at each increase in lung volume during the beam delivery time period. The simulation results showed the real-time capability of the framework at 20 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the number of 4DCT steps (approximately 12) reconstructed during multiple breathing cycles.

  8. A GPU-based framework for modeling real-time 3D lung tumor conformal dosimetry with subject-specific lung tumor motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min Yugang; Santhanam, Anand; Ruddy, Bari H [University of Central Florida, FL (United States); Neelakkantan, Harini; Meeks, Sanford L [M D Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, FL (United States); Kupelian, Patrick A, E-mail: anand.santhanam@orlandohealth.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-09-07

    In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving lung tumor and its surrounding normal tissues, which are undergoing subject-specific lung deformations. The GPU-based simulation framework models the motion of the 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the dose delivery using the dose extracted from a treatment plan using Pinnacle Treatment Planning System, Phillips, for one of the 3DCTs of the 4DCT and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited inside the lung. The 4DCT lung datasets were registered with each other using a modified optical flow algorithm. The motion of the tumor and the motion of the surrounding tissues were simulated by measuring the changes in lung volume during the radiotherapy treatment using spirometry. The real-time dose delivered to the tumor for each beam is generated by summing the dose delivered to the target volume at each increase in lung volume during the beam delivery time period. The simulation results showed the real-time capability of the framework at 20 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the number of 4DCT steps (approximately 12) reconstructed during multiple breathing cycles.

  9. First experience with a novel luminescence-based optical sensor for measurement of oxygenation in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarm, T.; Miklavcic, D.; Lesnicar, H.; Sersa, G.

    2001-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate a novel luminescence-based fiber-optic sensor (OxyLite system) for the measurement of partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ) in tumors and for the detection of changes in pO 2 as a function of time. The new method was used simultaneously with the laser Doppler flowmetry method for the measurement of relative tissue perfusion. Materials and methods. Blood perfusion and pO 2 were measured continuously via fiber-optic sensors inserted into SA-1 tumors in anesthetized A/J mice. The changes in blood flow and oxygenation of tumors were induced by transient changes of the parameters of anesthesia and by injection of a vasoactive drug hydralazine. Results. Both optical methods used in the study successfully detected the induced changes in blood flow and pO 2 . The measurements of pO 2 were well correlated with measurements of microcirculatory blood perfusion. In the majority of pO 2 measurements, we observed an unexpected behavior of the signal during the stabilization process immediately after the insertion of the probe into tumor. This behaviour of the pO 2 signal was most probably caused by local tissue damage induced by the insertion of the probe. Conclusion. The novel luminescence-based optical oximetry can reliably detect local pO 2 changes in tumors as a function of time but some aspects of prolonged pO 2 measurement by this method require further investigation. (author)

  10. Grating-based phase-contrast imaging of tumor angiogenesis in lung metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Lin

    Full Text Available To assess the feasibility of the grating-based phase-contrast imaging (GPI technique for studying tumor angiogenesis in nude BALB/c mice, without contrast agents.We established lung metastatic models of human gastric cancer by injecting the moderately differentiated SGC-7901 gastric cancer cell line into the tail vein of nude mice. Samples were embedded in a 10% formalin suspension and dried before imaging. Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast images were obtained at the BL13W beamline of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF and compared with histological sections.Without contrast agents, grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging still differentiated angiogenesis within metastatic tumors with high spatial resolution. Vessels, down to tens of microns, showed gray values that were distinctive from those of the surrounding tumors, which made them easily identifiable. The vessels depicted in the imaging study were similar to those identified on histopathology, both in size and shape.Our preliminary study demonstrates that grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging has the potential to depict angiogenesis in lung metastases.

  11. Diphtheria toxin-based anti-human CD19 immunotoxin for targeting human CD19+tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qian; Wang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Huiping; Huang, Qi; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Wang, Zhirui

    2017-05-01

    CD19 is expressed on normal and neoplastic B cells and is a promising target for immunotherapy. However, there is still an unmet need to further develop novel therapeutic drugs for the treatment of the refractory/relapsing human CD19 + tumors. We have developed a diphtheria toxin-based anti-human CD19 immunotoxin for targeting human CD19 + tumors. We have constructed three isoforms of the CD19 immunotoxin: monovalent, bivalent, and foldback diabody. In vitro binding affinity and efficacy analysis demonstrated that the bivalent isoform had the highest binding affinity and in vitro efficacy. The in vivo efficacy of the CD19 immunotoxins was assessed using human CD19 + JeKo-1 tumor-bearing NOD/SCID IL-2 receptor γ -/- (NSG) mouse model. In these animals, CD19 immunotoxins significantly prolonged the median survival from 31 days in controls to 34, 36, and 40 days in animals receiving the monovalent isoform, foldback diabody isoform, and bivalent isoform, respectively. The bivalent CD19 immunotoxin is a promising therapeutic drug candidate for targeting relapsing/refractory human CD19 + tumors. © 2017 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Tumor size and elasticity estimation using Smartphone-based Compression-Induced scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, C-H; Goldstein, Jesse; Oleksyuk, Vira; Caroline, Dina; Pascarella, Suzanne

    2017-07-01

    A simple-to-use, noninvasive, and risk-free system, which will provide accurate identification of potentially life threatening malignant tumors using tactile pressure, is developed. The Smartphone-based Compression-Induced (SCI) Scope will allow physicians to quickly capture the mechanical properties of a benign or malignant tumor with the convenience of a smartphone platform. The size and elasticity property is described using estimating methods from the pressure-induced images of SCI Scope. The device is based on the Apple iPhone 6. The image will be captured through a waveguide. The image information in combination with the force sensor value will be transmitted wirelessly to a computer for processing. The size and elasticity estimation experiments with SCI Scope showed that the size estimation error of 2.31% and estimated relative elastic modulus error of 23.9%.

  13. SU-C-207B-03: A Geometrical Constrained Chan-Vese Based Tumor Segmentation Scheme for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L; Zhou, Z; Wang, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation of tumor in PET is challenging when part of tumor is connected with normal organs/tissues with no difference in intensity. Conventional segmentation methods, such as thresholding or region growing, cannot generate satisfactory results in this case. We proposed a geometrical constrained Chan-Vese based scheme to segment tumor in PET for this special case by considering the similarity between two adjacent slices. Methods: The proposed scheme performs segmentation in a slice-by-slice fashion where an accurate segmentation of one slice is used as the guidance for segmentation of rest slices. For a slice that the tumor is not directly connected to organs/tissues with similar intensity values, a conventional clustering-based segmentation method under user’s guidance is used to obtain an exact tumor contour. This is set as the initial contour and the Chan-Vese algorithm is applied for segmenting the tumor in the next adjacent slice by adding constraints of tumor size, position and shape information. This procedure is repeated until the last slice of PET containing tumor. The proposed geometrical constrained Chan-Vese based algorithm was implemented in Matlab and its performance was tested on several cervical cancer patients where cervix and bladder are connected with similar activity values. The positive predictive values (PPV) are calculated to characterize the segmentation accuracy of the proposed scheme. Results: Tumors were accurately segmented by the proposed method even when they are connected with bladder in the image with no difference in intensity. The average PPVs were 0.9571±0.0355 and 0.9894±0.0271 for 17 slices and 11 slices of PET from two patients, respectively. Conclusion: We have developed a new scheme to segment tumor in PET images for the special case that the tumor is quite similar to or connected to normal organs/tissues in the image. The proposed scheme can provide a reliable way for segmenting tumors.

  14. Tumor Marker Detection: Ultrasensitive Luminescent In Vitro Detection for Tumor Markers Based on Inorganic Lanthanide Nano?Bioprobes (Adv. Sci. 11/2016)

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Shanyong; Xu, Jin; Liu, Yongsheng; Huang, Ping; Liu, Yan; Chen, Xueyuan

    2016-01-01

    In article 1600197, Xueyuan Chen and co?workers report a novel luminescent bioassay technique, namely, dissolution?enhanced luminescence bioassay based on inorganic lanthanide nanoprobes, for ultrasensitive in?vitro detection of tumor markers in human sera or saliva, such as carcinoembryonic antigen, prostate specific antigen and alpha?fetoprotein, with detection sensitivities several orders of magnitude improvement relative to current commercial bioassays.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associated with the utility of MSC-based therapy such as biosafety, immunoprivilege, transfection methods, and distribution in the host. PMID:22530882

  16. Radiological and histopathological study of benign tumors of the mandible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seon Young; Baek, Seung Yon; Choi, Kyung Hee; Suh, Jeung Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-06-15

    Benign tumors of the mandible are uncommon lesions. That were classified into odontogenic tumors and nonodontogenic tumors. Author reviewed the radiological evaluation and pathological microscopic finding from 33 benign tumors of the mandible that were confirmed by the biopsy during last 10 years in Dental Clinics, Ewha Womans University Hospital and Seoul National University Dental Hospital. Following results were obtained; 1. Benign tumors of the mandible were classified into odontogenic (66.7%) and non-odontogenic tumors (33.3%). 2. The range of the age distribution was between 6 years and 67 years old. The commonest age group was the second decade (39.4%). 3. There was no difference to sex distribution. 4. The most frequent location was the body of the mandible (42.4%). 5. Radiographic findings were relatively characteristic in odontogenic tumors rather than non-odontogenic tumors. 1) Radiolucent cystic lesions-ameloblastoma, odontogenic myxoma, odontogenic fibtoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and neurofibroma. 2) Radiopaque mass lesions-odontoma, cementoma and osteoma. 3) Mixed patterns-ossifying fibroma, cementifying fibroma, calcifying odontogenic epithelial tumor and hemangioma. It was concluded that the radiographic examination was of value to diagnose the benign tumors of the mandible in symptomless patients.

  17. Radiological and histopathological study of benign tumors of the mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seon Young; Baek, Seung Yon; Choi, Kyung Hee; Suh, Jeung Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup

    1984-01-01

    Benign tumors of the mandible are uncommon lesions. That were classified into odontogenic tumors and nonodontogenic tumors. Author reviewed the radiological evaluation and pathological microscopic finding from 33 benign tumors of the mandible that were confirmed by the biopsy during last 10 years in Dental Clinics, Ewha Womans University Hospital and Seoul National University Dental Hospital. Following results were obtained; 1. Benign tumors of the mandible were classified into odontogenic (66.7%) and non-odontogenic tumors (33.3%). 2. The range of the age distribution was between 6 years and 67 years old. The commonest age group was the second decade (39.4%). 3. There was no difference to sex distribution. 4. The most frequent location was the body of the mandible (42.4%). 5. Radiographic findings were relatively characteristic in odontogenic tumors rather than non-odontogenic tumors. 1) Radiolucent cystic lesions-ameloblastoma, odontogenic myxoma, odontogenic fibtoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and neurofibroma. 2) Radiopaque mass lesions-odontoma, cementoma and osteoma. 3) Mixed patterns-ossifying fibroma, cementifying fibroma, calcifying odontogenic epithelial tumor and hemangioma. It was concluded that the radiographic examination was of value to diagnose the benign tumors of the mandible in symptomless patients

  18. CT imaging spectrum of pancreatic serous tumors: Based on new pathologic classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hye Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hyung, E-mail: shkim@radcom.snu.ac.k [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min A. [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the variety of CT findings based on new pathologic classification. Materials and methods: During a 10-year period, 59 histopathologically proven pancreatic SCTs and 13 SCTs confirmed with typical image findings and strict clinical criteria were enlisted. Two radiologists analyzed CT images for the following items in consensus: location, size, outer margin, tumor shape, the presence of mural nodule, communication with main pancreatic duct (MPD), the presence and extent of MPD dilatation, calcification, central scar, and attenuation on pre- and post-contrast CT images. In addition, typicality of CT findings was determined. A typical finding was defined as a honeycomb appearance without or with oligocystic portion. In the cases with atypical features, the type of atypical features and differential diagnosis were recorded. For the shape of the tumor, tumors were categorized into the following groups: honeycomb without or with oligocystic, pleomorphic, purely oligolocular, unilocular cystic, hypovascular solid, hypervascular solid without or with oligocystic portion, and fingerlike cystic patterns. Results: 28 SCTs (38.9%) presented a honeycomb appearance with (n = 14) or without oligocystic portion (n = 14) and were classified as typical cases. The remaining 44 atypical cases (61.1%) presented the following: purely oligolocular pattern in 18; hypervascular solid without (n = 7) or with oligocystic portion (n = 2) in 9; pleomorphic in 8; unilocular cystic in 7; and fingerlike cystic pattern in 2. Most of the lesions manifesting as hypervascular solid lesions were confused with true solid hypervascular tumors such as neuroendocrine tumors or solid pseudopapillary tumors. For most of the remaining atypical lesions, mucinous cystic neoplasm or branch duct type IPMN were included as a differential diagnosis. Conclusion: Serous cystic tumors of the pancreas can have variable CT appearances ranging from compactly

  19. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF MALIGNANT TUMORS OF LARGE SALIVARY GLANDS (POPULATION-BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Merabishvili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Malignant tumors of large salivary glands are a relatively rare malignancy. In 2014 as a whole in Russia 1236 cases of these diseases were registered. According to the latest data of the Interna- tional Agency for Research on Cancer (Volume X the most common standardized incidence rate in various countries ranges from 0.6-0.9 per 100,000 men and 0.4-0.6 per 100,000 women. aim of study. The aim of this study is to carry out for the first time in Russia an estimation of a complex of analytical rates including an evaluation of observed and relative survival rates to assess the effectiveness of cancer control related to patients with a diagnosis of malignant tumors of large salivary glands. material and methods. An estimation of a complex of analytical rates was conducted in accordance with database of the Population-based Cancer Registry of St. Petersburg. There were selected 896 patients with a diagnosis of malignant tumors of large salivary glands from 1994 to 2013. Results. It was found that the most frequent value of the standardized incidence rates of malignant tumors of large salivary glands in different countries of the world community for the male population was 0.6-0.9 per 100,000 population and 0.4-0.6 for the female. These values were 0000 equal to 0.7 and 0.4 0/ in Russia (2014, and 0.6 and 0.5 0/ in St. Petersburg (2014. The vast majority 0000 of recorded cases of malignant tumors of large salivary glands were for S07.9 - of malignant tumors of large salivary glands undefined. 46.6 % of primary patients had early stages (I + II. A relative 5-year survival rate was 61.9 % for men and 69.9 % for women, which was slightly less than the European average (Eurocare. Conclusion. This study for the first time in Russia allowed estimating series of analytical rates character- izing the effectiveness of cancer control related to patients with malignant tumors of large salivary glands in St. Petersburg including estimations of a 5

  20. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase......-reverse-transcriptase-positive cancer cells and expresses green-fluorescent-protein that identifies viable CTCs from a broad spectrum of malignancies. Our method recovered 75.5-87.2% of tumor cells spiked into healthy donor blood, as validated by different methods, including single cell sequencing. CTCs were detected in 59-100% of 326...... blood samples from patients with 6 different solid organ carcinomas and lymphomas. Significantly, CTC-positive rates increased remarkably with tumor progression from N0M0, N+M0 to M1 in each of 5 tested cancers (lung, colon, liver, gastric and pancreatic cancer, and glioma). Among 21 non-small cell lung...

  1. Real-time tumor motion estimation using respiratory surrogate via memory-based learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ruijiang; Xing Lei; Lewis, John H; Berbeco, Ross I

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory tumor motion is a major challenge in radiation therapy for thoracic and abdominal cancers. Effective motion management requires an accurate knowledge of the real-time tumor motion. External respiration monitoring devices (optical, etc) provide a noninvasive, non-ionizing, low-cost and practical approach to obtain the respiratory signal. Due to the highly complex and nonlinear relations between tumor and surrogate motion, its ultimate success hinges on the ability to accurately infer the tumor motion from respiratory surrogates. Given their widespread use in the clinic, such a method is critically needed. We propose to use a powerful memory-based learning method to find the complex relations between tumor motion and respiratory surrogates. The method first stores the training data in memory and then finds relevant data to answer a particular query. Nearby data points are assigned high relevance (or weights) and conversely distant data are assigned low relevance. By fitting relatively simple models to local patches instead of fitting one single global model, it is able to capture highly nonlinear and complex relations between the internal tumor motion and external surrogates accurately. Due to the local nature of weighting functions, the method is inherently robust to outliers in the training data. Moreover, both training and adapting to new data are performed almost instantaneously with memory-based learning, making it suitable for dynamically following variable internal/external relations. We evaluated the method using respiratory motion data from 11 patients. The data set consists of simultaneous measurement of 3D tumor motion and 1D abdominal surface (used as the surrogate signal in this study). There are a total of 171 respiratory traces, with an average peak-to-peak amplitude of ∼15 mm and average duration of ∼115 s per trace. Given only 5 s (roughly one breath) pretreatment training data, the method achieved an average 3D error of 1.5 mm and 95

  2. Is it beneficial to selectively boost high-risk tumor subvolumes? A comparison of selectively boosting high-risk tumor subvolumes versus homogeneous dose escalation of the entire tumor based on equivalent EUD plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yusung; To me, Wolfgang A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify and compare expected local tumor control and expected normal tissue toxicities between selective boosting IMRT and homogeneous dose escalation IMRT for the case of prostate cancer. Methods. Four different selective boosting scenarios and three different high-risk tumor subvolume geometries were designed to compare selective boosting and homogeneous dose escalation IMRT plans delivering the same equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to the entire PTV. For each scenario, differences in tumor control probability between both boosting strategies were calculated for the high-risk tumor subvolume and remaining low-risk PTV, and were visualized using voxel based iso-TCP maps. Differences in expected rectal and bladder complications were quantified using radiobiological indices (generalized EUD (gEUD) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP)) as well as %-volumes. Results. For all investigated scenarios and high-risk tumor subvolume geometries, selective boosting IMRT improves expected TCP compared to homogeneous dose escalation IMRT, especially when lack of control of the high-risk tumor subvolume could be the cause for tumor recurrence. Employing, selective boosting IMRT significant increases in expected TCP can be achieved for the high-risk tumor subvolumes. The three conventional selective boosting IMRT strategies, employing physical dose objectives, did not show significant improvement in rectal and bladder sparing as compared to their counterpart homogeneous dose escalation plans. However, risk-adaptive optimization, utilizing radiobiological objective functions, resulted in reduction in NTCP for the rectum when compared to its corresponding homogeneous dose escalation plan. Conclusions. Selective boosting is a more effective method than homogeneous dose escalation for achieving optimal treatment outcomes. Furthermore, risk-adaptive optimization increases the therapeutic ratio as compared to conventional selective boosting IMRT

  3. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy. MR findings and a review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, G.O. Jr.; Davis, P.C.; Patrick, L.E.; Winn, K.J.; Ball, T.I.; Wyly, J.B. (Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (USA). Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-11-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy is an uncommon neoplasm occurring primarily in the child one year or less in age. Difficulty in deciding the cellular origin of this tumor has led to numerous names, including congenital melanocarcinoma, melanotic epithelial odontoma, melanotic ameloblastoma, and retinal anlage tumor, to list a few. Electron microscopy and histochemical studies, however, have now established the neural crest the most likely origin. The most frequent site of occurrence is the maxilla followed by the skull, the brain and the mandible. The genital organs are the most frequent extracranial site. Within the skull, there is a predilection for the anterior fontanel. The following is a case report of a young child with melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy arising at the anterior fontanel. Included is a discussion of magnetic resonance (MR) findings, which to our knowledge, have not been previously reported in this tumor. (orig.).

  4. Tumor accumulation of {epsilon}-poly-lysines-based polyamines conjugated with boron clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umano, Masayuki; Uechi, Kazuhiro; Uriuda, Takatoshi; Murayama, Sayuri; Azuma, Hideki [Department of Applied Chemistry and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 5588585 (Japan); Shinohara, Atsuko [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1138421 (Japan); Liu, Young; Ono, Koji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori 5900494 (Japan); Kirihata, Mitsunori [Department of Bioscience and Informatics, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai 5998531 (Japan); Yanagie, Hironobu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1138656 (Japan); Nagasaki, Takeshi, E-mail: nagasaki@bioa.eng.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 5588585 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is one of the potent cancer radiotherapies using nuclear reaction between {sup 10}B atoms and the neutron. Whether BNCT will succeed or not depends on tumor selective delivery of {sup 10}B compounds. {epsilon}-Poly-L-lysine is a naturally occurring polyamine characterized by the peptide linkages between the carboxyl and {epsilon}-amino groups of L-lysine. Because of high safety {epsilon}-PLL is applied practically as a food additive due to its strong antimicrobial activity. In this study, we focus on a development of a novel polymeric delivery system for BNCT using biodegradable {epsilon}-PLL conjugated with {sup 10}B-containing clusters (BSH). This polymeric boron carrier will be expected to deliver safely and efficiently into tumor tissues based on Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect.

  5. Update on rare epithelial ovarian cancers: based on the Rare Ovarian Tumors Young Investigator Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ji Yon Agnes; Yanaihara, Nozomu; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Mikami, Yoshiki; Oda, Katsutoshi; Bookman, Michael; Ledermann, Jonathan; Shimada, Muneaki; Kiyokawa, Takako; Kim, Byoung Gie; Matsumura, Noriomi; Kaku, Tsunehisa; Kuroda, Takafumi; Nagayoshi, Yoko; Kawabata, Ayako; Iida, Yasushi; Kim, Jae Weon; Quinn, Michael; Okamoto, Aikou

    2017-07-01

    There has been significant progress in the understanding of the pathology and molecular biology of rare ovarian cancers, which has helped both diagnosis and treatment. This paper provides an update on recent advances in the knowledge and treatment of rare ovarian cancers and identifies gaps that need to be addressed by further clinical research. The topics covered include: low-grade serous, mucinous, and clear cell carcinomas of the ovary. Given the molecular heterogeneity and the histopathological rarity of these ovarian cancers, the importance of designing adequately powered trials or finding statistically innovative ways to approach the treatment of these rare tumors has been emphasized. This paper is based on the Rare Ovarian Tumors Conference for Young Investigators which was presented in Tokyo 2015 prior to the 5th Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG). Copyright © 2017. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology.

  6. Frequency filtering based analysis on the cardiac induced lung tumor motion and its impact on the radiotherapy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ting; Qin, Songbing; Xu, Xiaoting; Jabbour, Salma K.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yue, Ning J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/objectives: Lung tumor motion may be impacted by heartbeat in addition to respiration. This study seeks to quantitatively analyze heart-motion-induced tumor motion and to evaluate its impact on lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods/materials: Fluoroscopy images were acquired for 30 lung cancer patients. Tumor, diaphragm, and heart were delineated on selected fluoroscopy frames, and their motion was tracked and converted into temporal signals based on deformable registration propagation. The clinical relevance of heart impact was evaluated using the dose volumetric histogram of the redefined target volumes. Results: Correlation was found between tumor and cardiac motion for 23 patients. The heart-induced motion amplitude ranged from 0.2 to 2.6 mm. The ratio between heart-induced tumor motion and the tumor motion was inversely proportional to the amplitude of overall tumor motion. When the heart motion impact was integrated, there was an average 9% increase in internal target volumes for 17 patients. Dose coverage decrease was observed on redefined planning target volume in simulated SBRT plans. Conclusions: The tumor motion of thoracic cancer patients is influenced by both heart and respiratory motion. The cardiac impact is relatively more significant for tumor with less motion, which may lead to clinically significant uncertainty in radiotherapy for some patients

  7. An off-on fluorescence probe targeting mitochondria based on oxidation-reduction response for tumor cell and tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hanchun; Cao, Li; Zhao, Weiwei; Zhang, Suge; Zeng, Man; Du, Bin

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a tumor-targeting poly( d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) loaded "off-on" fluorescent probe nanoparticle (PFN) delivery system was developed to evaluate the region of tumor by off-on fluorescence. The biodegradability of the nanosize PFN delivery system readily released the probe under tumor acidic conditions. The probe with good biocompatibility was used to monitor the intracellular glutathione (GSH) of cancer cells and selectively localize to mitochondria for tumor imaging. The incorporated tumor-targeting probe was based on the molecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism preventing fluorescence ("off" state) and could be easily released under tumor acidic conditions. However, the released tumor-targeting fluorescence probe molecule was selective towards GSH with high selectivity and an ultra-sensitivity for the mitochondria of cancer cells and tissues significantly increasing the probe molecule fluorescence signal ("on" state). The tumor-targeting fluorescence probe showed sensitivity to GSH avoiding interference from cysteine and homocysteine. The PFNs could enable fluorescence-guided cancer imaging during cancer therapy. This work may expand the biological applications of PFNs as a diagnostic reagent, which will be beneficial for fundamental research in tumor imaging. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Antibody-Directed Effector Cell Therapy of Tumors: Analysis and Optimization Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart W. Friedrich

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The failure of the cellular immune response to stop solid tumor growth has been the subject of much research. Although the mechanisms for tumor evasion of immune response are poorly understood, one viable explanation is that tumor-killing lymphocytes cannot reach the tumor cells in sufficient quantity to keep the tumor in check. Recently, the use of bifunctional antibodies. (BFAs has been proposed as a way to direct immune cells to the tumor: one arm of the antibody is specific for a known tumor-associated antigen and the other for a lymphocyte marker such as CD3. Injecting this BFA should presumably result in cross-linking of lymphocytes. (either endogenous or adoptively transferred with tumor cells, thereby enhancing therapy. Results from such an approach, however, are often disappointing- frequently there is no benefit gained by using the BFA. We have analyzed the retargeting of endogenous effector cells by BFA using a physiologically based whole-body pharmacokinetic model that accounts for interactions between all relevant species in the various organs and tumor. Our results suggest that the design of the BFA is critical and the binding constants of the antigen and lymphocyte binding epitopes need to be optimized for successful therapy.

  9. Tumor-stroma metabolic relationship based on lactate shuttle can sustain prostate cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanità, Patrizia; Capulli, Mattia; Teti, Anna; Galatioto, Giuseppe Paradiso; Vicentini, Carlo; Chiarugi, Paola; Bologna, Mauro; Angelucci, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell adopts peculiar metabolic strategies aimed to sustain the continuous proliferation in an environment characterized by relevant fluctuations in oxygen and nutrient levels. Monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 can drive such adaptation permitting the transport across plasma membrane of different monocarboxylic acids involved in energy metabolism. Role of MCTs in tumor-stroma metabolic relationship was investigated in vitro and in vivo using transformed prostate epithelial cells, carcinoma cell lines and normal fibroblasts. Moreover prostate tissues from carcinoma and benign hypertrophy cases were analyzed for individuating clinical-pathological implications of MCT1 and MCT4 expression. Transformed prostate epithelial (TPE) and prostate cancer (PCa) cells express both MCT1 and MCT4 and demonstrated variable dependence on aerobic glycolysis for maintaining their proliferative rate. In glucose-restriction the presence of L-lactate determined, after 24 h of treatment, in PCa cells the up-regulation of MCT1 and of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COX1), and reduced the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase respect to untreated cells. The blockade of MCT1 function, performed by si RNA silencing, determined an appreciable antiproliferative effect when L-lactate was utilized as energetic fuel. Accordingly L-lactate released by high glycolytic human diploid fibroblasts WI-38 sustained survival and growth of TPE and PCa cells in low glucose culture medium. In parallel, the treatment with conditioned medium from PCa cells was sufficient to induce glycolytic metabolism in WI-38 cells, with upregulation of HIF-1a and MCT4. Co-injection of PCa cells with high glycolytic WI-38 fibroblasts determined an impressive increase in tumor growth rate in a xenograft model that was abrogated by MCT1 silencing in PCa cells. The possible interplay based on L-lactate shuttle between tumor and stroma was confirmed also in human PCa tissue where we observed a positive

  10. Designing PDT-based combinations to overcome chemoresistance in heterocellular 3D tumor models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Imran; Briars, Emma A.; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Anbil, Sriram; Vecchio, Daniela; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Hanna, William R.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    A major barrier to treating advanced-stage cancers is heterogeneity in the responsiveness of metastatic disease to conventional therapies leading to resistance and treatment failure. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to synergize with conventional agents and to overcome the evasion pathways that cause resistance. Developing PDT-based combinations that target resistant tumor populations and cooperate mechanistically with conventional agents is an increasingly promising approach to improve therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity, particularly in complex disease sites. Identifying the molecular, cellular, and microenvironmental cues that lead to heterogeneity and treatment resistance is critical to developing strategies to target unresponsive regions of stubborn disease. Cell-based research platforms that integrate key microenvironmental cues are emerging as increasingly important tools to improve the translational efficiency of new agents, and to design combination regimens. Among the challenges associated with developing and scaling complex cell-based screening platforms is the need to integrate, and balance, biological relevance with appropriate, high-content imaging routines that provide meaningful quantitative readouts of therapeutic response. The benefits and challenges associated with deriving meaningful insights from complex cell-based models will be presented, with a particular emphasis on overcoming chemoresistance mediated by physical stress and communication with stromal partners (e.g. tumor endothelial cells, which are emerging as dynamic regulators of treatment resistance) using PDT-based combinations.

  11. Tumor microenvironment in focus: LA-ICP-MS bioimaging of a preclinical tumor model upon treatment with platinum(IV)-based anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiner, Sarah; Kornauth, Christoph; Varbanov, Hristo P; Galanski, Markus; Van Schoonhoven, Sushilla; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Egger, Alexander E; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2015-08-01

    The selection of drug candidates for entering clinical development relies on in vivo testing in (solid) tumor animal models. However, the heterogeneity of tumor tissue (e.g. in terms of drug uptake or tissue composition) is rarely considered when testing novel drug candidates. Therefore, we used the murine colon cancer CT-26 tumor model to study the spatially-resolved drug distribution in tumor tissue upon repetitive treatment of animals over two weeks with three investigational platinum(IV)-based anticancer agents, oxaliplatin or satraplatin. A quantitative laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) imaging method revealed a heterogeneous platinum distribution, which correlated well with the histologic features of the tumor and surrounding tissue at the microscopic level. In most of the cases, higher amounts of intratumoral platinum were found in the surrounding tissue than in the malignant parts of the sample. This indicates that determination of average platinum amounts (e.g. by microwave-assisted digestion of the sample followed by analysis with ICP-MS) might overestimate the drug uptake in tumor tissue causing misleading conclusions. In addition, we studied the platinum distribution in the kidneys of treated animals to probe if accumulation in the cortex and medulla predict potential nephrotoxicity. A 10-fold increase of platinum in the cortex of the kidney over the medulla was observed for oxaliplatin and satraplatin. Although these findings are similar to those in the platinum distribution of the nephrotoxic anticancer drug cisplatin, treatment with the compounds of our study did not show signs of nephrotoxicity in clinical use or clinical trials (oxaliplatin, satraplatin) and did not result in the alteration of renal structures. Thus, predicting the side effects based on bioimaging data by LA-ICP-MS should be considered with caution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first LA-ICP-MS study on spatially-resolved platinum

  12. Nanoparticle-based sorting of circulating tumor cells by epithelial antigen expression during disease progression in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhanna, Nidal; Mepham, Adam; Mohamadi, Reza M; Chan, Harley; Khan, Tahsin; Akens, Margarete; Besant, Justin D; Irish, Jonathan; Kelley, Shana O

    2015-10-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be used as markers for the detection, characterization, and targeted therapeutic management of cancer. We recently developed a nanoparticle-mediated approach for capture and sorting of CTCs based on their specific epithelial phenotype. In the current study, we investigate the phenotypic transition of tumor cells in an animal model and show the correlation of this transition with tumor progression. VX2 tumor cells were injected into rabbits, and CTCs were evaluated during tumor progression and correlated with computerized tomography (CT) measurements of tumor volume. The results showed a dramatic increase of CTCs during the four weeks of tumor growth. Following resection, CTC levels dropped but then rebounded, likely due to lymph node metastases. Additionally, CTCs showed a marked loss of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) relative to precursor cells. In conclusion, the device accurately traces disease progression and CTC phenotypic shift in an animal model. The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been used to predict disease prognosis. In this study, the authors developed a nanoparticle-mediated platform based on microfluidics to analyze the differential expressions of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) on CTCs in an animal model. It was found that the loss of EpCAM correlated with disease progression. Hence, the use of this platform may be further applied in other cancer models in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C; Husain, A; Vigneswaran, W; Kindler, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volume of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology

  14. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C; Husain, A; Vigneswaran, W; Kindler, H [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volume of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology.

  15. Dose to the intracranial arteries in stereotactic and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca L.; Stark, Sybille; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Busch, Raymonde; Kneschaurek, Peter; Molls, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively the maximum dose to the large skull base/intracranial arteries in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), because of the potential risk of perfusion disturbances. Methods and Materials: Overall, 56 patients with tumors adjacent to at least one major artery were analyzed. Our strategy was to perform FSRT with these criteria: 1.8 Gy per fraction, planning target volume (PTV) enclosed by the 95% isodose, maximum dose 107%. Dose limits were applied to established organs at risk, but not the vessels. If FSRT planning failed to meet any of these criteria, IMRT was planned with the same objectives. Results: In 31 patients (median PTV, 23 cm 3 ), the FSRT plan fulfilled all criteria. No artery received a dose ≥105%. Twenty-five patients (median PTV, 39 cm 3 ) needed IMRT planning. In 11 of 25 patients (median PTV, 85 cm 3 ), no plan satisfying all our criteria could be calculated. Only in this group, moderately increased maximum vessel doses were observed (106-110%, n = 7, median PTV, 121 cm 3 ). The median PTV dose gradient was 29% (significantly different from the 14 patients with satisfactory IMRT plans). Three of the four patients in this group had paranasal sinus tumors. Conclusion: The doses to the major arteries should be calculated in IMRT planning for critical tumor locations if a dose gradient >13% within the PTV can not be avoided because the PTV is large or includes air cavities

  16. Real-time temperature feedback for nanoparticles based tumor thermal treatment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Idan; Tamir, Gil; Gannot, Israel

    2017-02-01

    Systemic hyperthermia therapy exploits the fact that cancer cells are more sensitive to elevated temperatures than healthy tissue. Systemic application of hyperthermia externally usually leads to low efficiency treatment. Recently, our group and others have proposed an antibody conjugated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) approach to overcome the limitation of systemic hyperthermia. MNPs can bind specifically to the tumor sites, thus delivering internal highly effective targeted hyperthermia. However, such internal mechanism requires more complicated controls and monitoring. This current work presents a deep tissue temperature monitoring method to control hyperthermia effectiveness and minimize collateral damage to surrounding tissues. A low-frequency narrowband modulation of the RF field used for MNP heating leads to the generation of diffused thermal waves which propagate to the tissue surface and captured by a thermal camera. A Fourier domain, analytical heat transfer model is used for temperature monitoring algorithm. The ill-posed thermal inverse problem is solved efficiently by iterating over the source power until both the amplitude and phase match the recorded thermal image sequence. The narrow bandwidth thermal stimulation enables acquiring deep signals with high SNR. We show that thermal transverse resolution improves as the stimulation frequency increases even slightly above DC, enabling better heat source transverse separation and margin identification in the case of distributed tumors. These results can be used as a part of an overall image and treat system for efficient detection of tumors, manipulation of MNPs and monitoring MNP based hyperthermia.

  17. Deep learning based classification of breast tumors with shear-wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Wei; Suo, Jingfeng; Wang, Congzhi; Shi, Jun; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to build a deep learning (DL) architecture for automated extraction of learned-from-data image features from the shear-wave elastography (SWE), and to evaluate the DL architecture in differentiation between benign and malignant breast tumors. We construct a two-layer DL architecture for SWE feature extraction, comprised of the point-wise gated Boltzmann machine (PGBM) and the restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM). The PGBM contains task-relevant and task-irrelevant hidden units, and the task-relevant units are connected to the RBM. Experimental evaluation was performed with five-fold cross validation on a set of 227 SWE images, 135 of benign tumors and 92 of malignant tumors, from 121 patients. The features learned with our DL architecture were compared with the statistical features quantifying image intensity and texture. Results showed that the DL features achieved better classification performance with an accuracy of 93.4%, a sensitivity of 88.6%, a specificity of 97.1%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.947. The DL-based method integrates feature learning with feature selection on SWE. It may be potentially used in clinical computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Probing matrix and tumor mechanics with in situ calibrated optical trap based active microrheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Jack Rory; Vieira, Wilfred; Tanner, Kandice; Tissue Morphodynamics Unit Team

    Aberrant extracellular matrix deposition and vascularization, concomitant with proliferation and phenotypic changes undergone by cancer cells, alter mechanical properties in the tumor microenvironment during cancer progression. Tumor mechanics conversely influence progression, and the identification of physical biomarkers promise improved diagnostic and prognostic power. Optical trap based active microrheology enables measurement of forces up to 0.5 mm within a sample, allowing interrogation of in vitro biomaterials, ex vivo tissue sections, and small organisms in vivo. We fabricated collagen I hydrogels exhibiting distinct structural properties by tuning polymerization temperature Tp, and measured their shear storage and loss moduli at frequencies 1-15k Hz at multiple amplitudes. Lower Tp gels, with larger pore size but thicker, longer fibers, were stiffer than higher Tp gels; decreasing strain increased loss moduli and decreased storage moduli at low frequencies. We subcutanously injected probes with metastatic murine melanoma cells into mice. The excised tumors displayed storage and loss moduli 40 Pa and 10 Pa at 1 Hz, increasing to 500 Pa and 1 kPa at 15 kHz, respectively.

  19. Breast Tumor Classification Based on a Computerized Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System Feature System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Mengyun; Hu, Yuzhou; Guo, Yi; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua

    2018-02-01

    This work focused on extracting novel and validated digital high-throughput features to present a detailed and comprehensive description of the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) with the goal of improving the accuracy of ultrasound breast cancer diagnosis. First, the phase congruency approach was used to segment the tumors automatically. Second, high-throughput features were designed and extracted on the basis of each BI-RADS category. Then features were selected based on the basis of a Student t test and genetic algorithm. Finally, the AdaBoost classifier was used to differentiate benign tumors from malignant ones. Experiments were conducted on a database of 138 pathologically proven breast tumors. The system was compared with 6 state-of-art BI-RADS feature extraction methods. By using leave-one-out cross-validation, our system achieved a highest overall accuracy of 93.48%, a sensitivity of 94.20%, a specificity of 92.75%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 95.67%, respectively, which were superior to those of other methods. The experiments demonstrated that our computerized BI-RADS feature system was capable of helping radiologists detect breast cancers more accurately and provided more guidance for final decisions. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. Segmentation of tumor ultrasound image in HIFU therapy based on texture and boundary encoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Dong; Xu, Menglong; Quan, Long; Yang, Yan; Qin, Qianqing; Zhu, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    It is crucial in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy to detect the tumor precisely with less manual intervention for enhancing the therapy efficiency. Ultrasound image segmentation becomes a difficult task due to signal attenuation, speckle effect and shadows. This paper presents an unsupervised approach based on texture and boundary encoding customized for ultrasound image segmentation in HIFU therapy. The approach oversegments the ultrasound image into some small regions, which are merged by using the principle of minimum description length (MDL) afterwards. Small regions belonging to the same tumor are clustered as they preserve similar texture features. The mergence is completed by obtaining the shortest coding length from encoding textures and boundaries of these regions in the clustering process. The tumor region is finally selected from merged regions by a proposed algorithm without manual interaction. The performance of the method is tested on 50 uterine fibroid ultrasound images from HIFU guiding transducers. The segmentations are compared with manual delineations to verify its feasibility. The quantitative evaluation with HIFU images shows that the mean true positive of the approach is 93.53%, the mean false positive is 4.06%, the mean similarity is 89.92%, the mean norm Hausdorff distance is 3.62% and the mean norm maximum average distance is 0.57%. The experiments validate that the proposed method can achieve favorable segmentation without manual initialization and effectively handle the poor quality of the ultrasound guidance image in HIFU therapy, which indicates that the approach is applicable in HIFU therapy. (paper)

  1. Segmentation of tumor ultrasound image in HIFU therapy based on texture and boundary encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Xu, Menglong; Quan, Long; Yang, Yan; Qin, Qianqing; Zhu, Wenbin

    2015-02-01

    It is crucial in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy to detect the tumor precisely with less manual intervention for enhancing the therapy efficiency. Ultrasound image segmentation becomes a difficult task due to signal attenuation, speckle effect and shadows. This paper presents an unsupervised approach based on texture and boundary encoding customized for ultrasound image segmentation in HIFU therapy. The approach oversegments the ultrasound image into some small regions, which are merged by using the principle of minimum description length (MDL) afterwards. Small regions belonging to the same tumor are clustered as they preserve similar texture features. The mergence is completed by obtaining the shortest coding length from encoding textures and boundaries of these regions in the clustering process. The tumor region is finally selected from merged regions by a proposed algorithm without manual interaction. The performance of the method is tested on 50 uterine fibroid ultrasound images from HIFU guiding transducers. The segmentations are compared with manual delineations to verify its feasibility. The quantitative evaluation with HIFU images shows that the mean true positive of the approach is 93.53%, the mean false positive is 4.06%, the mean similarity is 89.92%, the mean norm Hausdorff distance is 3.62% and the mean norm maximum average distance is 0.57%. The experiments validate that the proposed method can achieve favorable segmentation without manual initialization and effectively handle the poor quality of the ultrasound guidance image in HIFU therapy, which indicates that the approach is applicable in HIFU therapy.

  2. Neuropsychological function in adults after high dose fractionated radiation therapy of skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glosser, Guila; McManus, Pat; Munzenrider, John; Austin-Seymour, Mary; Fullerton, Barbara; Adams, Judy; Urie, Marcia M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long term effects of high dose fractionated radiation therapy on brain functioning prospectively in adults without primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with histologically confirmed chordomas and low grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base were evaluated with neuropsychological measures of intelligence, language, memory, attention, motor function and mood following surgical resection/biopsy of the tumor prior to irradiation, and then at about 6 months, 2 years and 4 years following completion of treatment. None received chemotherapy. Results: In the patients without tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis, there were no indications of adverse effects on cognitive functioning in the post-acute through the late stages after brain irradiation. Even in patients who received doses of radiation up to 66 Cobalt Gy equivalent through nondiseased (temporal lobe) brain tissue, memory and cognitive functioning remained stable for up to 5 years after treatment. A mild decline in psycho-motor speed was seen in more than half of the patients, and motor slowing was related to higher radiation doses in midline and temporal lobe brain structures. Conclusion: Results suggest that in adults, tolerance for focused radiation is relatively high in cortical brain structures

  3. Glioma Groups Based on 1p/19q, IDH, and TERT Promoter Mutations in Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Lachance, Daniel H; Molinaro, Annette M; Walsh, Kyle M; Decker, Paul A; Sicotte, Hugues; Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Kosel, Matt L; Smirnov, Ivan V; Sarkar, Gobinda; Caron, Alissa A; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; Praska, Corinne E; Chada, Anisha R; Halder, Chandralekha; Hansen, Helen M; McCoy, Lucie S; Bracci, Paige M; Marshall, Roxanne; Zheng, Shichun; Reis, Gerald F; Pico, Alexander R; O'Neill, Brian P; Buckner, Jan C; Giannini, Caterina; Huse, Jason T; Perry, Arie; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchell S; Chang, Susan M; Prados, Michael D; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret R; Jenkins, Robert B

    2015-06-25

    The prediction of clinical behavior, response to therapy, and outcome of infiltrative glioma is challenging. On the basis of previous studies of tumor biology, we defined five glioma molecular groups with the use of three alterations: mutations in the TERT promoter, mutations in IDH, and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion). We tested the hypothesis that within groups based on these features, tumors would have similar clinical variables, acquired somatic alterations, and germline variants. We scored tumors as negative or positive for each of these markers in 1087 gliomas and compared acquired alterations and patient characteristics among the five primary molecular groups. Using 11,590 controls, we assessed associations between these groups and known glioma germline variants. Among 615 grade II or III gliomas, 29% had all three alterations (i.e., were triple-positive), 5% had TERT and IDH mutations, 45% had only IDH mutations, 7% were triple-negative, and 10% had only TERT mutations; 5% had other combinations. Among 472 grade IV gliomas, less than 1% were triple-positive, 2% had TERT and IDH mutations, 7% had only IDH mutations, 17% were triple-negative, and 74% had only TERT mutations. The mean age at diagnosis was lowest (37 years) among patients who had gliomas with only IDH mutations and was highest (59 years) among patients who had gliomas with only TERT mutations. The molecular groups were independently associated with overall survival among patients with grade II or III gliomas but not among patients with grade IV gliomas. The molecular groups were associated with specific germline variants. Gliomas were classified into five principal groups on the basis of three tumor markers. The groups had different ages at onset, overall survival, and associations with germline variants, which implies that they are characterized by distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  4. In Silico Analysis of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiles Predicts Tumor Cell Response to Withanolides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (L. Dunal (Indian ginseng, winter cherry, Solanaceae is widely used in traditional medicine. Roots are either chewed or used to prepare beverages (aqueous decocts. The major secondary metabolites of Withania somnifera are the withanolides, which are C-28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withania somnifera extracts exert chemopreventive and anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The aims of the present in silico study were, firstly, to investigate whether tumor cells develop cross-resistance between standard anticancer drugs and withanolides and, secondly, to elucidate the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells towards withanolides. Using IC50 concentrations of eight different withanolides (withaferin A, withaferin A diacetate, 3-azerininylwithaferin A, withafastuosin D diacetate, 4-B-hydroxy-withanolide E, isowithanololide E, withafastuosin E, and withaperuvin and 19 established anticancer drugs, we analyzed the cross-resistance profile of 60 tumor cell lines. The cell lines revealed cross-resistance between the eight withanolides. Consistent cross-resistance between withanolides and nitrosoureas (carmustin, lomustin, and semimustin was also observed. Then, we performed transcriptomic microarray-based COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of mRNA expression to identify mRNA expression profiles predicting sensitivity or resistance towards withanolides. Genes from diverse functional groups were significantly associated with response of tumor cells to withaferin A diacetate, e.g. genes functioning in DNA damage and repair, stress response, cell growth regulation, extracellular matrix components, cell adhesion and cell migration, constituents of the ribosome, cytoskeletal organization and regulation, signal transduction, transcription factors, and others.

  5. Feasibility of Affibody Molecule-Based PNA-Mediated Radionuclide Pretargeting of Malignant Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarvar, Hadis; Westerlund, Kristina; Altai, Mohamed; Sandström, Mattias; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson

    2016-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small (7 kDa), non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a potential as targeting agents for radionuclide imaging of cancer. However, high renal re-absorption of Affibody molecules prevents their use for radionuclide therapy with residualizing radiometals. We hypothesized that the use of Affibody-based peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated pretargeting would enable higher accumulation of radiometals in tumors than in kidneys. To test this hypothesis, we designed an Affibody-PNA chimera ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 containing a 15-mer HP1 PNA recognition tag and a complementary HP2 hybridization probe permitting labeling with both (125)I and (111)In. (111)In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 bound specifically to HER2-expressing BT474 and SKOV-3 cancer cells in vitro, with a KD of 6±2 pM for binding to SKOV-3 cells. Specific high affinity binding of the radiolabeled complementary PNA probe (111)In-/(125)I-HP2 to ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-treated cells was demonstrated. (111)In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 demonstrated specific accumulation in SKOV-3 xenografts in BALB/C nu/nu mice and rapid clearance from blood. Pre-saturation of SKOV-3 with non-labeled anti-HER2 Affibody or the use of HER2-negative Ramos xenografts resulted in significantly lower tumor uptake of (111)In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1. The complementary PNA probe (111)In/(125)I-HP2 accumulated in SKOV-3 xenografts when ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 was injected 4 h earlier. The tumor accumulation of (111)In/(125)I-HP2 was negligible without ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-injection. The uptake of (111)In-HP2 in SKOV-3 xenografts was 19±2 %ID/g at 1 h after injection. The uptake in blood and kidneys was approximately 50- and 2-fold lower, respectively. In conclusion, we have shown that the use of Affibody-based PNA-mediated pretargeting enables specific delivery of radiometals to tumors and provides higher radiometal concentration in tumors than in kidneys.

  6. Automated brain tumor segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging based on sliding-window technique and symmetry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yanyun; Song, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumor segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important step toward surgical planning, treatment planning, monitoring of therapy. However, manual tumor segmentation commonly used in clinic is time-consuming and challenging, and none of the existed automated methods are highly robust, reliable and efficient in clinic application. An accurate and automated tumor segmentation method has been developed for brain tumor segmentation that will provide reproducible and objective results close to manual segmentation results. Based on the symmetry of human brain, we employed sliding-window technique and correlation coefficient to locate the tumor position. At first, the image to be segmented was normalized, rotated, denoised, and bisected. Subsequently, through vertical and horizontal sliding-windows technique in turn, that is, two windows in the left and the right part of brain image moving simultaneously pixel by pixel in two parts of brain image, along with calculating of correlation coefficient of two windows, two windows with minimal correlation coefficient were obtained, and the window with bigger average gray value is the location of tumor and the pixel with biggest gray value is the locating point of tumor. At last, the segmentation threshold was decided by the average gray value of the pixels in the square with center at the locating point and 10 pixels of side length, and threshold segmentation and morphological operations were used to acquire the final tumor region. The method was evaluated on 3D FSPGR brain MR images of 10 patients. As a result, the average ratio of correct location was 93.4% for 575 slices containing tumor, the average Dice similarity coefficient was 0.77 for one scan, and the average time spent on one scan was 40 seconds. An fully automated, simple and efficient segmentation method for brain tumor is proposed and promising for future clinic use. Correlation coefficient is a new and effective feature for tumor location.

  7. PET/CT Based In Vivo Evaluation of 64Cu Labelled Nanodiscs in Tumor Bearing Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, Pie; Binderup, Tina; Pedersen, Martin Cramer

    2015-01-01

    64Cu radiolabelled nanodiscs based on the 11 α-helix MSP1E3D1 protein and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine lipids were, for the first time, followed in vivo by positron emission tomography for evaluating the biodistribution of nanodiscs. A cancer tumor bearing mouse model...... radiolabelling of proteins via a chelating agent, DOTA, was developed. The reaction was performed at sufficiently mild conditions to be compatible with labelling of the protein part of a lipid-protein particle while fully conserving the particle structure including the amphipathic protein fold....

  8. Esophagus sparing with IMRT in lung tumor irradiation: An EUD-based optimization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapet, Olivier; Thomas, Emma; Kessler, Marc L.; Fraass, Benedick A.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate (1) the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) to optimize dose escalation of lung tumors when the esophagus overlaps the planning target volume (PTV) and (2) the potential benefit of further dose escalation in only the part of the PTV that does not overlap the esophagus. Methods and Materials: The treatment-planning computed tomography (CT) scans of patients with primary lung tumors located in different regions of the left and right lung were used for the optimization of beamlet intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. In all cases, the PTV overlapped part of the esophagus. The dose in the PTV was maximized according to 7 different primary cost functions: 2 plans that made use of mean dose (MD) (the reference plan, in which the 95% isodose surface covered the PTV and a second plan that had no constraint on the minimum isodose), 3 plans based on maximizing gEUD for the whole PTV with ever increasing assumptions for tumor aggressiveness, and 2 plans that used different gEUD values in 2 simultaneous, overlapping target volumes (the whole PTV and the PTV minus esophagus). Beam arrangements and NTCP-based costlets for the organs at risk (OARs) were kept identical to the original conformal plan for each case. Regardless of optimization method, the relative ranking of the resulting plans was evaluated in terms of the absence of cold spots within the PTV and the final gEUD computed for the whole PTV. Results: Because the MD-optimized plans lacked a constraint on minimum PTV coverage, they resulted in cold spots that affected approximately 5% of the PTV volume. When optimizing over the whole PTV volume, gEUD-optimized plans resulted in higher equivalent uniform PTV doses than did the reference plan while still maintaining normal-tissue constraints. However, only under the assumption of extremely aggressive tumors could cold spots in the PTV be avoided. Generally, high-level overall results are obtained

  9. Skull Base Clear Cell Carcinoma, Metastasis of Renal Primary Tumor: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilson Sepúlveda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We report on a patient who presented with cranial nerve VI bilateral paresis, absence of pharyngeal reflex, dysarthria, right tongue deviation, and right facial paralysis. Imaging studies showed an expansive process in the cranial base with clivus and petrous apex osteolysis. A biopsy confirmed the presence of clear cell adenocarcinoma and suspicion of renal tumor metastases. Abdominal imaging studies revealed a mass in the right kidney. Consequently, radiotherapy was performed, and the patient was enrolled in a palliative care and pain control program.

  10. Parameterization des modeles tumoral bases sur des maillages des donnees experimentaux.

    OpenAIRE

    Jagiella , Nick

    2012-01-01

    In order to establish a predictive model for in-vivo tumor growth and therapy, a multiscale model has to be set-up and calibrated individually in a stepwise process to a targeted cell type and di erent environments (in-vitro and in-vivo). As a proof of principle we will present the process chain of model construction and parametrization from di erent data sources for the avascular growth of the EMT6/Ro and the SK-MES-1 cell line. In a rst step, a multiscale and individual-based model has been...

  11. Multi-step dimensionality reduction and semi-supervised graph-based tumor classification using gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Jie; Wang, Shu-Lin; Lei, Ying-Ke

    2010-11-01

    Both supervised methods and unsupervised methods have been widely used to solve the tumor classification problem based on gene expression profiles. This paper introduces a semi-supervised graph-based method for tumor classification. Feature extraction plays a key role in tumor classification based on gene expression profiles, and can greatly improve the performance of a classifier. In this paper we propose a novel multi-step dimensionality reduction method for extracting tumor-related features. First the Wilcoxon rank-sum test is used for gene selection. Then gene ranking and discrete cosine transform are combined with principal component analysis for feature extraction. Finally, the performance is evaluated by semi-supervised learning algorithms. To show the validity of the proposed method, we apply it to classify four tumor datasets involving various human normal and tumor tissue samples. The experimental results show that the proposed method is efficient and feasible. Compared with other methods, our method can achieve relatively higher prediction accuracy. Particularly, it is found that semi-supervised method is superior to support vector machines in classification performance. The proposed approach can effectively improve the performance of tumor classification based on gene expression profiles. This work is a meaningful attempt to explore and apply multi-step dimensionality reduction and semi-supervised learning methods in the field of tumor classification. Considering the high classification accuracy, there should be much room for the application of multi-step dimensionality reduction and semi-supervised learning methods to perform tumor classification. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute Metabolic Alkalosis Enhances Response of C3H Mouse Mammary Tumors to the Weak Base Mitoxantrone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Raghunand

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Uptake of weak acid and weak base chemotherapeutic drugs by tumors is greatly influenced by the tumor extracellular/interstitial pH (pHe, the intracellular pH (pHi maintained by the tumor cells, and by the ionization properties of the drug itself. The acid-outside plasmalemmal pH gradient in tumors acts to exclude weak base drugs like the anthracyclines, anthraquinones, and vinca alkaloids from the cells, leading to a substantial degree of “physiological drug resistance” in tumors. We have induced acute metabolic alkalosis in C3H tumor-bearing C3H/hen mice, by gavage and by intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of NaHCO3. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurements of 3-aminopropylphosphonate show increases of up to 0.6 pH units in tumor pHe, and 0.2 to 0.3 pH units in hind leg tissue pHe, within 2 hours of i.p. administration of NaHCO3. Theoretical calculations of mitoxantrone uptake into tumor and normal (hind leg tissue at the measured pH, and pHI values indicate that a gain in therapeutic index of up to 3.3-fold is possible with NaHCO3 pretreatment. Treatment of C3H tumor-bearing mice with 12 mg/kg mitoxantrone resulted in a tumor growth delay of 9 days, whereas combined NaHCO3mitoxantrone therapy resulted in an enhancement of the TGD to 16 days.

  13. Fourier ptychographic microscopy for filtration-based circulating tumor cell enumeration and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Anthony; Chung, Jaebum; Ou, Xiaoze; Zheng, Guoan; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Datar, Ram; Yang, Changhuei; Cote, Richard

    2014-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are recognized as a candidate biomarker with strong prognostic and predictive potential in metastatic disease. Filtration-based enrichment technologies have been used for CTC characterization, and our group has previously developed a membrane microfilter device that demonstrates efficacy in model systems and clinical blood samples. However, uneven filtration surfaces make the use of standard microscopic techniques a difficult task, limiting the performance of automated imaging using commercially available technologies. Here, we report the use of Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to tackle this challenge. Employing this method, we were able to obtain high-resolution color images, including amplitude and phase, of the microfilter samples over large areas. FPM's ability to perform digital refocusing on complex images is particularly useful in this setting as, in contrast to other imaging platforms, we can focus samples on multiple focal planes within the same frame despite surface unevenness. In model systems, FPM demonstrates high image quality, efficiency, and consistency in detection of tumor cells when comparing corresponding microfilter samples to standard microscopy with high correlation (R² = 0.99932). Based on these results, we believe that FPM will have important implications for improved, high throughput, filtration-based CTC analysis, and, more generally, image analysis of uneven surfaces.

  14. Systemic Distribution and Tumor Localization of Adoptively Transferred Lymphocytes in Mice: Comparison with Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Melder

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which tumors are able to evade cellular immune responses are still largely unknown. It is likely, however, that the initial recruitment of lymphocytes to tumor vessels is limited by cell retention in normal tissue, which results in a low flux of these cells into the tumor vasculature. We grew MCaIV. (20mouse mammary carcinoma tumors in the leg of SCID mice and injected 111In-oxine-labeled, primed T lymphocytes directed against the tumor intravenously. The systemic distribution of cells in normal organs was similar between mice injected with primed and control lymphocyte populations, except for a delayed clearance of primed lymphocytes from the lungs. Kinetics of lymphocyte localization to the tumor were identical between the primed and control lymphocyte populations. Splenectomy before the injection of primed lymphocytes increased delivery of cells to the lungs and liver after 1 hour with no significant improvement in tumor localization. Within 24 to 168 hours after injection, localization of cells in the liver of splenectomized mice was higher than in the control group. However, no significant difference in tumor localization was observed between groups. A physiologically based compartmental model of lymphocyte distribution predicted the compartmental sequestration and identified model parameters critical for experimental planning and therapeutic optimization.

  15. Ameloblastoma desmoplásico con predominio quístico: Presentación de un caso clínico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Martínez-Revilla

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available El ameloblastoma es una neoplasia odontogénica que muestra un comportamiento agresivo local. Algunas variantes como la uniquística y la desmoplásica tienen un mejor pronóstico que la sólida/multiquística. Presentamos un caso en un varón de 76 años con una lesión radiolúcida interradicular mandibular de apariencia quística, la cual se enucleó quirúrgicamente. Histológicamente correspondió a una lesión desmoplásica con una amplia zona quística que fue diagnosticada como ameloblastoma desmoplásico con predominio quístico. Trascurridos 30 meses no se evidencia recidiva. En este artículo se discuten los principales aspectos clinicopatológicos de estas entidades.

  16. Building a high-resolution T2-weighted MR-based probabilistic model of tumor occurrence in the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Raman, Steven S; Lo, Pechin; Lin, Wei-Chan; Khoshnoodi, Pooria; Sayre, James W; Ramakrishna, Bharath; Ahuja, Preeti; Huang, Jiaoti; Margolis, Daniel J A; Lu, David S K; Reiter, Robert E; Goldin, Jonathan G; Brown, Matthew S; Enzmann, Dieter R

    2018-02-19

    We present a method for generating a T2 MR-based probabilistic model of tumor occurrence in the prostate to guide the selection of anatomical sites for targeted biopsies and serve as a diagnostic tool to aid radiological evaluation of prostate cancer. In our study, the prostate and any radiological findings within were segmented retrospectively on 3D T2-weighted MR images of 266 subjects who underwent radical prostatectomy. Subsequent histopathological analysis determined both the ground truth and the Gleason grade of the tumors. A randomly chosen subset of 19 subjects was used to generate a multi-subject-derived prostate template. Subsequently, a cascading registration algorithm involving both affine and non-rigid B-spline transforms was used to register the prostate of every subject to the template. Corresponding transformation of radiological findings yielded a population-based probabilistic model of tumor occurrence. The quality of our probabilistic model building approach was statistically evaluated by measuring the proportion of correct placements of tumors in the prostate template, i.e., the number of tumors that maintained their anatomical location within the prostate after their transformation into the prostate template space. Probabilistic model built with tumors deemed clinically significant demonstrated a heterogeneous distribution of tumors, with higher likelihood of tumor occurrence at the mid-gland anterior transition zone and the base-to-mid-gland posterior peripheral zones. Of 250 MR lesions analyzed, 248 maintained their original anatomical location with respect to the prostate zones after transformation to the prostate. We present a robust method for generating a probabilistic model of tumor occurrence in the prostate that could aid clinical decision making, such as selection of anatomical sites for MR-guided prostate biopsies.

  17. Parameter estimation of brain tumors using intraoperative thermal imaging based on artificial tactile sensing in conjunction with artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Goughari, M.; Mojra, A.; Sadeghi, S.

    2016-02-01

    Intraoperative Thermal Imaging (ITI) is a new minimally invasive diagnosis technique that can potentially locate margins of brain tumor in order to achieve maximum tumor resection with least morbidity. This study introduces a new approach to ITI based on artificial tactile sensing (ATS) technology in conjunction with artificial neural networks (ANN) and feasibility and applicability of this method in diagnosis and localization of brain tumors is investigated. In order to analyze validity and reliability of the proposed method, two simulations were performed. (i) An in vitro experimental setup was designed and fabricated using a resistance heater embedded in agar tissue phantom in order to simulate heat generation by a tumor in the brain tissue; and (ii) A case report patient with parafalcine meningioma was presented to simulate ITI in the neurosurgical procedure. In the case report, both brain and tumor geometries were constructed from MRI data and tumor temperature and depth of location were estimated. For experimental tests, a novel assisted surgery robot was developed to palpate the tissue phantom surface to measure temperature variations and ANN was trained to estimate the simulated tumor’s power and depth. Results affirm that ITI based ATS is a non-invasive method which can be useful to detect, localize and characterize brain tumors.

  18. Parameter estimation of brain tumors using intraoperative thermal imaging based on artificial tactile sensing in conjunction with artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi-Goughari, M; Mojra, A; Sadeghi, S

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative Thermal Imaging (ITI) is a new minimally invasive diagnosis technique that can potentially locate margins of brain tumor in order to achieve maximum tumor resection with least morbidity. This study introduces a new approach to ITI based on artificial tactile sensing (ATS) technology in conjunction with artificial neural networks (ANN) and feasibility and applicability of this method in diagnosis and localization of brain tumors is investigated. In order to analyze validity and reliability of the proposed method, two simulations were performed. (i) An in vitro experimental setup was designed and fabricated using a resistance heater embedded in agar tissue phantom in order to simulate heat generation by a tumor in the brain tissue; and (ii) A case report patient with parafalcine meningioma was presented to simulate ITI in the neurosurgical procedure. In the case report, both brain and tumor geometries were constructed from MRI data and tumor temperature and depth of location were estimated. For experimental tests, a novel assisted surgery robot was developed to palpate the tissue phantom surface to measure temperature variations and ANN was trained to estimate the simulated tumor’s power and depth. Results affirm that ITI based ATS is a non-invasive method which can be useful to detect, localize and characterize brain tumors. (paper)

  19. Palliative radiation therapy for solid tumors in dogs: 103 cases (2007-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollett, Melissa A; Duda, Lili; Brown, Dorothy C; Krick, Erika L

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical response, adverse effects, and outcomes associated with palliative radiation therapy (PRT) in dogs with various solid tumor types at various body locations. Retrospective case series. 103 dogs with solid tumors. Medical records for dogs with solid tumors treated with PRT between July 2007 and January 2011 at a veterinary teaching hospital were reviewed. Data collected included signalment, tumor type and location, initial staging results, PRT protocol, other tumor-specific treatments, patient and tumor response, outcome, and acute and chronic adverse effects. Median progression-free survival time, median survival time (MST), and other descriptive statistics were calculated. Types of tumors treated included carcinoma, sarcoma, melanoma, primary bone tumor, mast cell tumor, and ameloblastoma. For all dogs, the overall tumor and clinical response rates to PRT were 75% and 77%, respectively, and the MST was 134 days, but those responses varied substantially among tumor types. Dogs that developed a positive clinical response or maintained stable disease after PRT had a significantly longer MST than did dogs with progressive disease. Tumor location was not significantly associated with median progression-free survival time or MST. Most dogs tolerated the PRT well. Acute and chronic adverse effects were observed in 57 and 8 dogs, respectively, but were generally self-limiting. Results indicated that dogs with various types of solid tumors that received PRT had objective beneficial responses and an improvement in quality of life that was positively associated with survival time.

  20. Rare copy number alterations and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity revealed in ameloblastomas by high-density whole-genome microarray analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Duarte, Alessandra Pires; Villacis, Rolando A

    2017-01-01

    , and PPP2R5A) covered by rare alterations, also including three MA and four normal oral tissues. RESULTS: Fifty-seven CNAs and cnLOH were observed in the ameloblastomas and six CNAs in the AC. Seven of the CNAs were rare (six in UA and one in MA), four of them encompassing genes (gains of 7q11.21, 1q32...

  1. [Impact of technical and morphological factors on the precision of software-based MR tumor volumetry: a phantom study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, S; Massberg, M; Reinhardt, J; Sartor, K; Heiland, S

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the impact of technical and morphological parameters on the precision of software-based MR tumor volumetry (SBV) in an in-vitro experimental setting. Tumor models were formed from a silicone compound in three different sizes with a max. diameter 4 cm (large). For each size a spherical, an elliptic and an irregular shaped model was produced. The true volume of the tumor models was established by water displacement. Tumor models were examined with a high-field MRI (TRIO, 3 Tesla, Siemens) with T 2-weighted sequences under optimized contrast conditions. Slice thickness was 1, 3 and 5 mm. The volume of the tumor models was then calculated using (1). manually driven volumetric software (SBVmanual) and (2). automatic volumetric software (SBVauto). The influence of the following parameters on the precision of SBV was analyzed: Size and shape of the tumor models, manual/automatic SBV, segmentation technique and slice thickness. In general, SBVauto measurements showed less deviation than measurements with SBVmanual (p technical factors. Using a "minimal" segmentation technique (e. g. excluding partial volume effects), volumes were underestimated in all cases, whereas volumes of middle and large tumor models were slightly overestimated when using a "maximum" segmentation technique (e. g. including partial volume effects; p = 0.01). Deviation of SBVmanual increased with slice thickness from 15.9 +/- 12.7 % (1 mm slices) to 27.1 +/- 21.3 % (5 mm-slices). In general, SBVauto measurements yielded smaller deviations than SBVmanual. However, both methods showed major inaccuracy in the volumetric estimation of small and irregular shaped tumor models, thus the tumor volumetry of these tumors has to be considered inappropriate for clinical practice. Moreover, the exactness of SBVmanual depended significantly on segmentation technique and slice thickness.

  2. Technical Note: A deep learning based auto segmentation of rectal tumors in MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiazhou; Lu, Jiayu; Qin, Gan; Shen, Lijun; Sun, Yiqun; Ying, Hongmei; Zhang, Zhen; Hu, Weigang

    2018-04-16

    Manual contouring of gross tumor volumes (GTV) is a crucial and time-consuming process in rectum cancer radiotherapy. This study aims to develop a simple deep learning based auto segmentation algorithm to segment rectal tumors on T2 weighted MR images. MRI scans (3T, T2-weighted) of 93 patients with locally advanced (cT3-4 and/or cN1-2) rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery were enrolled in this study. A 2D U-net similar network was established as a training model. The model was trained in two phases to increase efficiency. These phases were tumor recognition and tumor segmentation. An opening (erosion and dilation) process was implemented to smooth contours after segmentation. Data were randomly separated into training (90%) and validation (10%) datasets for a 10-folder cross-validation. Additionally, 20 patients were double contoured for performance evaluation. Four indices were calculated to evaluate the similarity of automated and manual segmentation, including Hausdorff distance (HD), average surface distance (ASD), Dice index (DSC), and Jaccard index (JSC). The DSC, JSC, HD, ASD (mean±SD) were 0.74±0.14, 0.60±0.16, 20.44±13.35 and 3.25±1.69mm for validation dataset; and these indices were 0.71±0.13, 0.57±0.15, 14.91±7.62 and 2.67±1.46mm between two human radiation oncologists, respectively. No significant difference has been observed between automated segmentation and manual segmentation considering DSC (p=0.42), JSC (p=0.35), HD (p=0.079) and ASD (p=0.16). However, significant difference was found for HD (p=0.0027) without opening process. This study showed that a simple deep learning neural network can perform segmentation for rectum cancer based on MRI T2 images with results comparable to a human. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Dose painting based on tumor uptake of Cu-ATSM and FDG: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, Malene Martini; Hansen, Anders Elias; Lundemann, Michael; Hollensen, Christian; Pommer, Tobias; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Kjær, Andreas; McEvoy, Fintan J; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia and increased glycolytic activity of tumors are associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in radiotherapy (RT) dose painting based on the uptake of 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the proposed hypoxia tracer, copper(II)diacetyl-bis(N 4 )-methylsemithiocarbazone (Cu-ATSM) using spontaneous clinical canine tumor models. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans of five spontaneous canine sarcomas and carcinomas were obtained; FDG on day 1 and 64 Cu-ATSM on day 2 and 3 (approx. 3 and 24 hours pi.). Sub-volumes for dose escalation were defined by a threshold-based method for both tracers and five dose escalation levels were formed in each sub-volume. Volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were optimized based on the dose escalation regions for each scan for a total of three dose plans for each dog. The prescription dose for the GTV was 45 Gy (100%) and it was linearly escalated to a maximum of 150%. The correlations between dose painting plans were analyzed with construction of dose distribution density maps and quality volume histograms (QVH). Correlation between high-dose regions was investigated with Dice correlation coefficients. Comparison of dose plans revealed varying degree of correlation between cases. Some cases displayed a separation of high-dose regions in the comparison of FDG vs. 64 Cu-ATSM dose plans at both time points. Among the Dice correlation coefficients, the high dose regions showed the lowest degree of agreement, indicating potential benefit of using multiple tracers for dose painting. QVH analysis revealed that FDG-based dose painting plans adequately covered approximately 50% of the hypoxic regions. Radiotherapy plans optimized with the current approach for cut-off values and dose region definitions based on FDG, 64 Cu-ATSM 3 h and 24 h uptake in canine tumors had different localization of the regional dose escalation levels. This indicates that 64 Cu-ATSM at two

  4. Assessment of quality of life in giant ameloblastoma adolescent patients who have had mandible defects reconstructed with a free fibula flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangru; Zhu, Kuicheng; Liu, Fei; Li, Hongwen

    2014-07-08

    The reconstruction of mandibular defects after giant ameloblastoma resection is one of the most challenging problems facing reconstructive surgeons. Mandibular resection has been associated with a poor quality of life (QOL), particularly in adolescent patients reconstructed with a free fibula flap. This study aims to evaluate QOL outcomes in adolescent patients who have had mandibular resections of giant ameloblastoma and reconstruction with a free fibula flap and to collect information about their socio-cultural situation. The present study assessed 45 adolescent patients who had undergone immediate mandible reconstruction with a free fibula flap for faint ameloblastoma using University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) and 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) questionnaires. Thirty-five of the 54 questionnaires were returned (64.81%). In the UW-QOL, of the twelve disease-specific domains, the best three scores from the patients related to pain, shoulder and appearance and the worst three scores related to chewing, anxiety and saliva. In the OHIP-14, the lowest-scoring domain was handicap, followed by physical pain and social disability. Mandibular reconstruction with a free fibular flap significantly influenced the adolescent patients' QOL. Adolescent patients pay more attention to postoperative facial appearance; this should be considered in surgical planning.

  5. Population based analysis of survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma and venous tumor thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Jared M; Reese, Adam C; Meng, Maxwell V

    2013-02-01

    To identify prognostic factors for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with venous tumor thrombus (VTT) and determine the significance of thrombus level on survival. Patients within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database with RCC and VTT were identified and included if managed surgically. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with disease-specific survival. A total of 1,875 patients met the inclusion criteria. One-year survival for patients undergoing surgery was 60% for patients with metastases and 90% for those without. Factors associated with worse survival included larger tumor size (HR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0-1.4), medullary, collecting duct, or sarcomatoid histology (HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.5-3.3), Fuhrman grade 3 (HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.5-3.3) or grade 4 (HR 2.9, 95% CI 1.8-4.5) tumors, positive lymph nodes (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.0), and metastases (HR 3.5, 95% CI 2.6-4.8). Thrombus level above the diaphragm (T3c) was not significantly associated with worse survival (HR 1.4, 95% CI 0.8-2.5). In this large, population-based study of patients with RCC and VTT, we identify several disease-specific factors strongly associated with cancer-specific mortality. After controlling for adverse prognostic factors, thrombus level was not associated with worse outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Monte Carlo based dosimetry and treatment planning for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamenhof, R.G.; Clement, S.D.; Harling, O.K.; Brenner, J.F.; Wazer, D.E.; Madoc-Jones, H.; Yanch, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Monte Carlo based dosimetry and computer-aided treatment planning for neutron capture therapy have been developed to provide the necessary link between physical dosimetric measurements performed on the MITR-II epithermal-neutron beams and the need of the radiation oncologist to synthesize large amounts of dosimetric data into a clinically meaningful treatment plan for each individual patient. Monte Carlo simulation has been employed to characterize the spatial dose distributions within a skull/brain model irradiated by an epithermal-neutron beam designed for neutron capture therapy applications. The geometry and elemental composition employed for the mathematical skull/brain model and the neutron and photon fluence-to-dose conversion formalism are presented. A treatment planning program, NCTPLAN, developed specifically for neutron capture therapy, is described. Examples are presented illustrating both one and two-dimensional dose distributions obtainable within the brain with an experimental epithermal-neutron beam, together with beam quality and treatment plan efficacy criteria which have been formulated for neutron capture therapy. The incorporation of three-dimensional computed tomographic image data into the treatment planning procedure is illustrated. The experimental epithermal-neutron beam has a maximum usable circular diameter of 20 cm, and with 30 ppm of B-10 in tumor and 3 ppm of B-10 in blood, it produces a beam-axis advantage depth of 7.4 cm, a beam-axis advantage ratio of 1.83, a global advantage ratio of 1.70, and an advantage depth RBE-dose rate to tumor of 20.6 RBE-cGy/min (cJ/kg-min). These characteristics make this beam well suited for clinical applications, enabling an RBE-dose of 2,000 RBE-cGy/min (cJ/kg-min) to be delivered to tumor at brain midline in six fractions with a treatment time of approximately 16 minutes per fraction

  7. Antiproliferative Activity and Cellular Uptake of Evodiamine and Rutaecarpine Based on 3D Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Guo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Evodiamine (EVO and rutaecarpine (RUT are promising anti-tumor drug candidates. The evaluation of the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids of cancer cells would better recapitulate the native situation and thus better reflect an in vivo response to the treatment. Herein, we employed the 3D culture of MCF-7 and SMMC-7721 cells based on hanging drop method and evaluated the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids, and compared the results with those obtained from 2D monolayers. The drugs’ IC50 values were significantly increased from the range of 6.4–44.1 μM in 2D monolayers to 21.8–138.0 μM in 3D multicellular spheroids, which may be due to enhanced mass barrier and reduced drug penetration in 3D models. The fluorescence of EVO and RUT was measured via fluorescence spectroscopy and the cellular uptake of both drugs was characterized in 2D tumor models. The results showed that the cellular uptake concentrations of RUT increased with increasing drug concentrations. However, the EVO concentrations uptaken by the cells showed only a small change with increasing drug concentrations, which may be due to the different solubility of EVO and Rut in solvents. Overall, this study provided a new vision of the anti-tumor activity of EVO and RUT via 3D multicellular spheroids and cellular uptake through the fluorescence of compounds.

  8. Gold-nanoparticle-based theranostic agents for radiotherapy of malignant solid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeendarbari, Sina

    Radiation therapy is one of the three major methods of cancer treatment. The fundamental goal of radiotherapy is to deliver high radiation doses to targets while simultaneously minimizing doses to critical structures and healthy normal tissues. The aim of this study is to develop a general, practical, and facile method to prepare nanoscale theranostic agents for more efficacious radiation therapy with less adverse side effects. First, a novel type of gold nanoparticle, hollow Au nanoparticles (HAuNPs) which was synthesized using the unique bubble template synthesis method developed in our lab, are studied in vitro and in vivo to investigate their effect as radiosensitizing agents to enhance the radiation dose during external radiotherapy. The results showed the promising potential of using HAuNPs as radiosensitization agents for efficacious treatment of breast cancer. Second, a novel radiolabeling method is developed to incorporate medical radioisotopes to gold nanoparticles. We incorporate palladium-103 (103Pd), a radioisotope currently in clinical brachytherapy, into a hollow gold nanoparticle. The resulting 103Pd Au nanoparticles in the form of a colloidal suspension can be administered by direct injection into tumors, serving as internal radiation sources (nanoseeds) for radiation therapy. The size of the nanoseed, 150nm in diameter, is large enough to prevent nanoseeds from diffusing into other areas while still small enough to allow them to homogeneously distribute inside the tumor. The therapeutic efficacy of 103Pd Au nanoseeds have been tested when intratumorally injected into a prostate cancer xenograft model. The findings showed that this nanoseed-based brachytherapy has the potential to provide a theranostic solution to unresectable solid tumors. Finally, to make real clinical application more plausible, multi-functional magnetic nanoseeds nanoparticles for imaging-guided radiotherapy are synthesized and characterized.

  9. An Endogenous Vaccine Based on Fluorophores and Multivalent Immunoadjuvants Regulates Tumor Micro-Environment for Synergistic Photothermal and Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Yang, Suleixin; Song, Linjiang; Zeng, Yan; He, Tao; Wang, Ning; Yu, Chuan; Yin, Tao; Liu, Li; Wei, Xiawei; Wu, Qinjie; Wei, Yuquan; Yang, Li; Gong, Changyang

    2018-01-01

    Recently, near-infrared (NIR) light-based photothermal therapy (PTT) has been widely applied in cancer treatment. However, in most cases, the tissue penetration depth of NIR light is not sufficient and thus photothermal therapy is unable to completely eradicate deep, seated tumors inevitably leading to recurrence of the tumor. Due to this significant limitation of NIR, improved therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Methods: We developed an endogenous vaccine based on a novel nanoparticle platform for combinatorial photothermal ablation and immunotherapy. The design was based on fluorophore-loaded liposomes (IR-7-lipo) coated with a multivalent immunoadjuvant (HA-CpG). In vitro PTT potency was assessed in cells by LIVE/DEAD and Annexin V-FITC/PI assays. The effect on bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) maturation and antigen presentation was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM) with specific antibodies. After treatment, the immune cell populations in tumor micro-environment and the cytokines in the serum were detected by FCM and Elisa assay, respectively. Finally, the therapeutic outcome was investigated in an animal model. Results: Upon irradiation with 808 nm laser, IR-7-lipo induced tumor cell necrosis and released tumor-associated antigens, while the multivalent immunoadjuvant improved the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on BMDC and promoted antigen presentation. The combination therapy of PTT and immunotherapy regulated the tumor micro-environment, decreased immunosuppression, and potentiated host antitumor immunity. Most significantly, due to an enhanced antitumor immune response, combined photothermal immunotherapy was effective in eradicating tumors in mice and inhibiting tumor metastasis. Conclusion: This endogenous vaccination strategy based on synergistic photothermal and immunotherapy may provide a potentially effective approach for treatment of cancers, especially those difficult to be surgically removed.

  10. Immunotherapy of tumor with vaccine based on basic fibroblast growth factor-activated fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuying; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhao, Yuwei; Yang, Hengxiu; Tong, Aiping; Zhao, Chengjian; Shi, Huashan; Li, Yang; Wang, Zhenlin; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-02-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts play a key role in tumor progression. It is conceivable that the breaking of immune tolerance of "self-antigens" associated with tumor cells and tumor stromal is an attractive approach for tumor immunotherapy. To test this concept, we used basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to activate normal fibroblasts and used these activated fibroblasts as one vaccine against tumor. Normal fibroblasts were treated with bFGF; their expressions of a-SMA and FAP were assessed by Western blot. We immunized mice with bFGF-activated fibroblasts. Auto-antibodies were assessed by flow cytometric and Western blot analysis. The deposition of auto-antibodies within the tumor tissues was assessed. The inhibition of proliferation of tumor cells and fibroblasts by purified immunoglobulins was investigated. The anti-tumor effects of purified immunoglobulins and lymphocytes of immunized mice were assessed. The bFGF-activated fibroblasts were effective in affording protection from tumor onset, growth, and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice. The immunized sera exhibited positive staining for fibroblasts and tumor cells in FCAS and Western blot analysis. The purified immunoglobulins of immunized serum could inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells and fibroblasts in vitro and had the anti-tumor activity in vivo. There was the deposition of auto-antibodies within the tumor tissues. Adoptive transfer of lymphocytes of immunized mice revealed that cellular immune response is also involved. The anti-tumor activity could be abrogated by the depletion of CD4(+), CD8(+) T lymphocytes and NK cells. In summary, bFGF-activated fibroblasts could induce an autoimmune response which was simultaneously against both cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumor cells in a cross-reaction.

  11. [Application of computer-aided design and navigation technology in skull base and infratemporal fossa tumor surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu-xing; Peng, Xin; Liu, Xiao-jing; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Guang-yan; Guo, Chuan-bin

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the application of computer-aided design and navigation technology in skull base and infratemporal fossa tumor surgery and to analyze its advantages and disadvantages. Twenty-nine cases with tumor of skull base and infratemporal fossa were treated with computer-aided design and navigation surgery. The Parameters of age, gender, primary or recurrent tumor, tumor nature and surgical approach were recorded. En bloc resection was performed in 20 cases and subtotal resection in 9 cases. The margin status was negative margin in 8 cases, near-tumor margin in 17 cases and positive resection margin in 4 cases. Postoperative complication rate was 14% (4/29). During the follow-up period, 2 benign cases recurred.In the malignant group, there were 7 cases of recurrence, 2 cases of metastasis and 3 deaths. The 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival rate were 69% and 40% respectively. Navigation technology can enhance the confidence of the surgeons and operation safety in handling malignant tumors in skull base and infratemporal fossa.

  12. A polymer-based magnetic resonance tracer for visualization of solid tumors by 13C spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Iida, Mitsuru; Miura, Iwao; Inubushi, Toshiro; Morikawa, Shigehiro

    2014-01-01

    Morphological imaging precedes lesion-specific visualization in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because of the superior ability of this technique to depict tissue morphology with excellent spatial and temporal resolutions. To achieve lesion-specific visualization of tumors by MRI, we investigated the availability of a novel polymer-based tracer. Although the 13C nucleus is a candidate for a detection nucleus because of its low background signal in the body, the low magnetic resonance sensitivity of the nucleus needs to be resolved before developing a 13C-based tracer. In order to overcome this problem, we enriched polyethylene glycol (PEG), a biocompatible polymer, with 13C atoms. 13C-PEG40,000 (13C-PEG with an average molecular weight of 40 kDa) emitted a single 13C signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio due to its ability to maintain signal sharpness, as was confirmed by in vivo investigation, and displayed a chemical shift sufficiently distinct from that of endogenous fat. 13C-PEG40,000 intravenously injected into mice showed long retention in circulation, leading to its effective accumulation in tumors reflecting the well-known phenomenon that macromolecules accumulate in tumors because of leaky tumor capillaries. These properties of 13C-PEG40,000 allowed visualization of tumors in mice by 13C spectroscopic imaging. These findings suggest that a technique based on 13C-PEG is a promising strategy for tumor detection.

  13. A polymer-based magnetic resonance tracer for visualization of solid tumors by 13C spectroscopic imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Suzuki

    Full Text Available Morphological imaging precedes lesion-specific visualization in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI because of the superior ability of this technique to depict tissue morphology with excellent spatial and temporal resolutions. To achieve lesion-specific visualization of tumors by MRI, we investigated the availability of a novel polymer-based tracer. Although the 13C nucleus is a candidate for a detection nucleus because of its low background signal in the body, the low magnetic resonance sensitivity of the nucleus needs to be resolved before developing a 13C-based tracer. In order to overcome this problem, we enriched polyethylene glycol (PEG, a biocompatible polymer, with 13C atoms. 13C-PEG40,000 (13C-PEG with an average molecular weight of 40 kDa emitted a single 13C signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio due to its ability to maintain signal sharpness, as was confirmed by in vivo investigation, and displayed a chemical shift sufficiently distinct from that of endogenous fat. 13C-PEG40,000 intravenously injected into mice showed long retention in circulation, leading to its effective accumulation in tumors reflecting the well-known phenomenon that macromolecules accumulate in tumors because of leaky tumor capillaries. These properties of 13C-PEG40,000 allowed visualization of tumors in mice by 13C spectroscopic imaging. These findings suggest that a technique based on 13C-PEG is a promising strategy for tumor detection.

  14. Long-term Behavior of Serous Borderline Tumors Subdivided Into Atypical Proliferative Tumors and Noninvasive Low-grade Carcinomas: A Population-based Clinicopathologic Study of 942 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vang, Russell; Hannibal, Charlotte G; Junge, Jette; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kurman, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    Ovarian serous borderline tumors (SBTs) have been the subject of considerable controversy, particularly with regard to terminology and behavior. It has been proposed that they constitute a heterogenous group of tumors composed, for the most part, of typical SBTs that are benign and designated "atypical proliferative serous tumor (APST)" and a small subset of SBTs with micropapillary architecture that have a poor outcome and are designated "noninvasive low-grade serous carcinoma (niLGSC)". It also has been argued that the difference in behavior between the 2 groups is not due to the subtype of the primary tumor but rather the presence of extraovarian disease, specifically invasive implants. According to the terminology of the 2014 WHO Classification, typical SBTs are equivalent to APSTs and SBTs displaying micropapillary architecture are synonymous with niLGSC. In addition, "invasive implants" were renamed "low-grade serous carcinoma" (LGSC). The argument as to whether it is the appearance of the primary tumor or the presence of extraovarian LGSC that determines outcome remains unsettled. The current study was initiated in 2004 and was designed to determine what factors were predictive of outcome, with special attention to the appearance of the primary tumor (APST vs. niLGSC) and that of the extraovarian disease (noninvasive vs. invasive implants). Our study is population based, involving the entire female population of Denmark. None of the women in the study were lost to follow-up, which ranged up to 36 years (median, 15 y). All the microscopic slides from the contributing hospitals were rereviewed by a panel of 2 pathologists (R.V. and R.J.K.) who were blinded to the follow-up. After excluding those that were not SBTs by the pathology panel, as well as cases with a prior or concurrent cancer or undefined stage, 942 women remained, of which 867 were APSTs and 75 were niLGSCs. The median patient age was 50 years (range, 16 to 97 y). Eight hundred nine women (86

  15. Polymeric micelles of zinc protoporphyrin for tumor targeted delivery based on EPR effect and singlet oxygen generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Arun K; Greish, Khaled; Seki, Takahiro; Okazaki, Shoko; Fang, Jun; Takeshita, Keizo; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Polymeric micelles of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) with water soluble biocompatible and amphiphilic polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG) demonstrated unique characteristics to target tumor tissues selectively based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The micellar macromolecular drug of ZnPP (SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP) previously showed notable anticancer activity as a consequence of selective tumor targeting ability and its potent HO-1 inhibitory potential, resulting in suppressed biliverdin/bilirubin production in tumors thereby leading to oxystress induced tumor cell killing. Furthermore, recent findings also showed that ZnPP efficiently generated reactive singlet oxygen under illumination of visible light, laser, or xenon light source, which could augment its oxystress induced cell killing abilities. In the present paper, we report the synergistic effects of light induced photosensitizing capabilities and HO-1 inhibitory potentials of these unique micelles when tested in vitro and in vivo on tumor models under localized, mild illumination conditions using a tungsten-xenon light source. The results indicate that these water soluble polymeric micelles of ZnPP portend to be promising candidates for targeted chemotherapy as well as photodynamic therapy against superficial tumors as well as solid tumors located at light penetrable depths.

  16. A block matching-based registration algorithm for localization of locally advanced lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Scott P; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2014-04-01

    To implement and evaluate a block matching-based registration (BMR) algorithm for locally advanced lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy. Small (1 cm(3)), nonoverlapping image subvolumes ("blocks") were automatically identified on the planning image to cover the tumor surface using a measure of the local intensity gradient. Blocks were independently and automatically registered to the on-treatment image using a rigid transform. To improve speed and robustness, registrations were performed iteratively from coarse to fine image resolution. At each resolution, all block displacements having a near-maximum similarity score were stored. From this list, a single displacement vector for each block was iteratively selected which maximized the consistency of displacement vectors across immediately neighboring blocks. These selected displacements were regularized using a median filter before proceeding to registrations at finer image resolutions. After evaluating all image resolutions, the global rigid transform of the on-treatment image was computed using a Procrustes analysis, providing the couch shift for patient setup correction. This algorithm was evaluated for 18 locally advanced lung cancer patients, each with 4-7 weekly on-treatment computed tomography scans having physician-delineated gross tumor volumes. Volume overlap (VO) and border displacement errors (BDE) were calculated relative to the nominal physician-identified targets to establish residual error after registration. Implementation of multiresolution registration improved block matching accuracy by 39% compared to registration using only the full resolution images. By also considering multiple potential displacements per block, initial errors were reduced by 65%. Using the final implementation of the BMR algorithm, VO was significantly improved from 77% ± 21% (range: 0%-100%) in the initial bony alignment to 91% ± 8% (range: 56%-100%;p < 0.001). Left-right, anterior-posterior, and

  17. A block matching-based registration algorithm for localization of locally advanced lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Scott P.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D., E-mail: gdhugo@vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, 23298 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate a block matching-based registration (BMR) algorithm for locally advanced lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: Small (1 cm{sup 3}), nonoverlapping image subvolumes (“blocks”) were automatically identified on the planning image to cover the tumor surface using a measure of the local intensity gradient. Blocks were independently and automatically registered to the on-treatment image using a rigid transform. To improve speed and robustness, registrations were performed iteratively from coarse to fine image resolution. At each resolution, all block displacements having a near-maximum similarity score were stored. From this list, a single displacement vector for each block was iteratively selected which maximized the consistency of displacement vectors across immediately neighboring blocks. These selected displacements were regularized using a median filter before proceeding to registrations at finer image resolutions. After evaluating all image resolutions, the global rigid transform of the on-treatment image was computed using a Procrustes analysis, providing the couch shift for patient setup correction. This algorithm was evaluated for 18 locally advanced lung cancer patients, each with 4–7 weekly on-treatment computed tomography scans having physician-delineated gross tumor volumes. Volume overlap (VO) and border displacement errors (BDE) were calculated relative to the nominal physician-identified targets to establish residual error after registration. Results: Implementation of multiresolution registration improved block matching accuracy by 39% compared to registration using only the full resolution images. By also considering multiple potential displacements per block, initial errors were reduced by 65%. Using the final implementation of the BMR algorithm, VO was significantly improved from 77% ± 21% (range: 0%–100%) in the initial bony alignment to 91% ± 8% (range: 56%–100%;p < 0

  18. A block matching-based registration algorithm for localization of locally advanced lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Scott P.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate a block matching-based registration (BMR) algorithm for locally advanced lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: Small (1 cm 3 ), nonoverlapping image subvolumes (“blocks”) were automatically identified on the planning image to cover the tumor surface using a measure of the local intensity gradient. Blocks were independently and automatically registered to the on-treatment image using a rigid transform. To improve speed and robustness, registrations were performed iteratively from coarse to fine image resolution. At each resolution, all block displacements having a near-maximum similarity score were stored. From this list, a single displacement vector for each block was iteratively selected which maximized the consistency of displacement vectors across immediately neighboring blocks. These selected displacements were regularized using a median filter before proceeding to registrations at finer image resolutions. After evaluating all image resolutions, the global rigid transform of the on-treatment image was computed using a Procrustes analysis, providing the couch shift for patient setup correction. This algorithm was evaluated for 18 locally advanced lung cancer patients, each with 4–7 weekly on-treatment computed tomography scans having physician-delineated gross tumor volumes. Volume overlap (VO) and border displacement errors (BDE) were calculated relative to the nominal physician-identified targets to establish residual error after registration. Results: Implementation of multiresolution registration improved block matching accuracy by 39% compared to registration using only the full resolution images. By also considering multiple potential displacements per block, initial errors were reduced by 65%. Using the final implementation of the BMR algorithm, VO was significantly improved from 77% ± 21% (range: 0%–100%) in the initial bony alignment to 91% ± 8% (range: 56%–100%;p < 0.001). Left

  19. Neural stem cell sparing by linac based intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy in intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehler, Julia; Brachwitz, Tim; Wendt, Thomas G; Banz, Nico; Walther, Mario; Wiezorek, Tilo

    2013-01-01

    most from IMSRT (p < 0.001). The feasibility of neural stem cell niches sparing with sophisticated linac based inverse IMSRT with 7 beamlets in an unselected cohort of intracranial tumors in relation to topographic situation has been demonstrated. Clinical relevance testing neurotoxicity remains to be demonstrated

  20. Birth weight and risk of childhood solid tumors in Brazil: a record linkage between population-based data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neimar de Paula Silva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To analyze the relationship between the development of childhood solid tumors and 1 birth weight and 2 fetal growth, using two Brazilian population-based data sets. Methods A case–cohort study was performed using two population-based data sets, and linkage between the Live Birth Information System (Sistema de Informação sobre Nascidos Vivos, SINASC and 14 population-based cancer registries (PBCRs was established. Four controls per case were chosen randomly from the SINASC data set. Tumors were classified as central nervous system (CNS, non-CNS embryonal, and other tumors (“miscellaneous”. Adjustments were made for potential confounders (maternal age, mode of delivery, maternal education, birth order, gestational age, sex, and geographic region. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were computed using unconditional logistic regression analysis. Results In a trend analysis, for every 500 g of additional birth weight, the crude OR was 1.12 (CI: 1.00–1.24 and the adjusted OR was 1.02 (CI: 0.90–1.16 for all tumors. For every 1 000 g of additional birth weight, the crude OR was 1.25 (CI: 1.00–1.55 and the adjusted OR was 1.04 (CI: 0.82–1.34 for all tumors. Among children diagnosed after reaching the age of 3 years, in the miscellaneous tumor category, the OR was significantly increased for every additional 500 g and 1 000 g of birth weight. Conclusions The study data suggested that increased birth weight was associated with childhood solid tumor development, especially among children more than 3 years old with “miscellaneous” tumors.

  1. Birth weight and risk of childhood solid tumors in Brazil: a record linkage between population-based data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Silva, Neimar; de Souza Reis, Rejane; Cunha, Rafael Garcia; Oliveira, Julio Fernando; da Silva de Lima, Fernanda Cristina; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria Socorro; Santos, Marceli Oliveira; de Camargo, Beatriz

    2017-04-20

    To analyze the relationship between the development of childhood solid tumors and 1) birth weight and 2) fetal growth, using two Brazilian population-based data sets. A case-cohort study was performed using two population-based data sets, and linkage between the Live Birth Information System (Sistema de Informação sobre Nascidos Vivos, SINASC) and 14 population-based cancer registries (PBCRs) was established. Four controls per case were chosen randomly from the SINASC data set. Tumors were classified as central nervous system (CNS), non-CNS embryonal, and other tumors ("miscellaneous"). Adjustments were made for potential confounders (maternal age, mode of delivery, maternal education, birth order, gestational age, sex, and geographic region). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using unconditional logistic regression analysis. In a trend analysis, for every 500 g of additional birth weight, the crude OR was 1.12 (CI: 1.00-1.24) and the adjusted OR was 1.02 (CI: 0.90-1.16) for all tumors. For every 1 000 g of additional birth weight, the crude OR was 1.25 (CI: 1.00-1.55) and the adjusted OR was 1.04 (CI: 0.82-1.34) for all tumors. Among children diagnosed after reaching the age of 3 years, in the miscellaneous tumor category, the OR was significantly increased for every additional 500 g and 1 000 g of birth weight. The study data suggested that increased birth weight was associated with childhood solid tumor development, especially among children more than 3 years old with "miscellaneous" tumors.

  2. Immunogenic Cell Death Induced by Ginsenoside Rg3: Significance in Dendritic Cell-based Anti-tumor Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Keum-Joo; Choi, Ki Ryung; Lee, Seog Jae; Lee, Hyunah

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide; therefore there is a need to discover new therapeutic modules with improved efficacy and safety. Immune-(cell) therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intractable cancers. The effectiveness of certain chemotherapeutics in inducing immunogenic tumor cell death thus promoting cancer eradication has been reported. Ginsenoside Rg3 is a ginseng saponin that has antitumor and immunomodulatory activity. In this study, we treated tumor cells with Rg3 to verify the significance of inducing immunogenic tumor cell death in antitumor therapy, especially in DC-based immunotherapy. Rg3 killed the both immunogenic (B16F10 melanoma cells) and non-immunogenic (LLC: Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells) tumor cells by inducing apoptosis. Surface expression of immunogenic death markers including calreticulin and heat shock proteins and the transcription of relevant genes were increased in the Rg3-dying tumor. Increased calreticulin expression was directly related to the uptake of dying tumor cells by dendritic cells (DCs): the proportion of CRT(+) CD11c(+) cells was increased in the Rg3-treated group. Interestingly, tumor cells dying by immunogenic cell death secreted IFN-γ, an effector molecule for antitumor activity in T cells. Along with the Rg3-induced suppression of pro-angiogenic (TNF-α) and immunosuppressive cytokine (TGF-β) secretion, IFN-γ production from the Rg3-treated tumor cells may also indicate Rg3 as an effective anticancer immunotherapeutic strategy. The data clearly suggests that Rg3-induced immunogenic tumor cell death due its cytotoxic effect and its ability to induce DC function. This indicates that Rg3 may be an effective immunotherapeutic strategy.

  3. Tumor Hypoxia: Causative Mechanisms, Microregional Heterogeneities, and the Role of Tissue-Based Hypoxia Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    Tumor hypoxia is a hallmark of solid malignant tumor growth, profoundly influences malignant progression and contributes to the development of therapeutic resistance. Pathogenesis of tumor hypoxia is multifactorial, with contributions from both acute and chronic factors. Spatial distribution of hypoxia within tumors is markedly heterogeneous and often changes over time, e.g., during a course of radiotherapy. Substantial changes in the oxygenation status can occur within the distance of a few cell layers, explaining the inability of currently used molecular imaging techniques to adequately assess this crucial trait. Due to the possible importance of tumor hypoxia for clinical decision-making, there is a great demand for molecular tools which may provide the necessary resolution down to the single cell level. Exogenous and endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia have been investigated for this purpose. Their potential use may be greatly enhanced by multiparametric in situ methods in experimental and human tumor tissue.

  4. Development and validation of a microRNA based diagnostic assay for primary tumor site classification of liver core biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perell, Katharina; Vincent, Martin; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    negatively affect the accuracy and usability of molecular classifiers. We have developed and validated a microRNA-based classifier, which predicts the primary tumor site of liver biopsies, containing a limited number of tumor cells. Concurrently we explored the influence of surrounding normal tissue...... on classification. MicroRNA profiling was performed using quantitative Real-Time PCR on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. 278 primary tumors and liver metastases, representing nine primary tumor classes, as well as normal liver samples were used as a training set. A statistical model was applied to adjust.......5% upon independent validation. Two-thirds of the samples were classified with high-confidence, with an accuracy of 92% on high-confidence predictions. A classifier trained without adjusting for liver tissue contamination, showed a classification accuracy of 38.2%. Our results indicate that surrounding...

  5. The prognostic value of dividing epithelial ovarian cancer into type I and type II tumors based on pathologic characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prahm, Kira Philipsen; Karlsen, Mona Aarenstrup; Høgdall, Estrid

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prognostic significance of dividing epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) in type I and type II tumors based on pathologic variables. METHODS: We used the Danish Gynecologic Cancer Database to identify all patients diagnosed with EOC from 2005 to 2012. Information...... on histologic type and grade were used to classify tumors as either type I or type II. Death, and several prognostic factors were used in the multivariate Cox regression, and Landmark analysis was used to estimate hazard ratios of all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Among 2660 patients diagnosed with EOC, 735 were...... categorized as type I tumors, and 1925 as type II tumors. Patients with type II EOC were more frequently diagnosed in late FIGO stages (stages III-IV) than patients with type I EOC (78.1% vs. 32.1% respectively; P

  6. Exosome-Based Cell-Cell Communication in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Maia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumors are not isolated entities, but complex systemic networks involving cell-cell communication between transformed and non-transformed cells. The milieu created by tumor-associated cells may either support or halt tumor progression. In addition to cell-cell contact, cells communicate through secreted factors via a highly complex system involving characteristics such as ligand concentration, receptor expression and integration of diverse signaling pathways. Of these, extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are emerging as novel cell-cell communication mediators in physiological and pathological scenarios. Exosomes, membrane vesicles of endocytic origin released by all cells (both healthy and diseased, ranging in size from 30 to 150 nm, transport all the main biomolecules, including lipids, proteins, DNAs, messenger RNAs and microRNA, and perform intercellular transfer of components, locally and systemically. By acting not only in tumor cells, but also in tumor-associated cells such as fibroblasts, endothelium, leukocytes and progenitor cells, tumor- and non-tumor cells-derived exosomes have emerged as new players in tumor growth and invasion, tumor-associated angiogenesis, tissue inflammation and immunologic remodeling. In addition, due to their property of carrying molecules from their cell of origin to the peripheral circulation, exosomes have been increasingly studied as sources of tumor biomarkers in liquid biopsies. Here we review the current literature on the participation of exosomes in the communication between tumor and tumor-associated cells, highlighting the role of this process in the setup of tumor microenvironments that modulate tumor initiation and metastasis.

  7. A semiautomatic CT-based ensemble segmentation of lung tumors: comparison with oncologists’ delineations and with the surgical specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Emmanuel Rios; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.; Gu, Yuhua; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Dekker, Andre; Korn, René; Gillies, Robert J.; Lambin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the clinical relevance of a semiautomatic CT-based ensemble segmentation method, by comparing it to pathology and to CT/PET manual delineations by five independent radiation oncologists in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods For twenty NSCLC patients (stage Ib – IIIb) the primary tumor was delineated manually on CT/PET scans by five independent radiation oncologists and segmented using a CT based semi-automatic tool. Tumor volume and overlap fractions between manual and semiautomatic-segmented volumes were compared. All measurements were correlated with the maximal diameter on macroscopic examination of the surgical specimen. Imaging data is available on www.cancerdata.org. Results High overlap fractions were observed between the semi-automatically segmented volumes and the intersection (92.5 ± 9.0, mean ± SD) and union (94.2 ± 6.8) of the manual delineations. No statistically significant differences in tumor volume were observed between the semiautomatic segmentation (71.4 ± 83.2 cm3, mean ± SD) and manual delineations (81.9 ± 94.1 cm3; p = 0.57). The maximal tumor diameter of the semiautomatic-segmented tumor correlated strongly with the macroscopic diameter of the primary tumor (r = 0.96). Conclusion Semiautomatic segmentation of the primary tumor on CT demonstrated high agreement with CT/PET manual delineations and strongly correlated with the macroscopic diameter considered the “gold standard”. This method may be used routinely in clinical practice and could be employed as a starting point for treatment planning, target definition in multi-center clinical trials or for high throughput data mining research. This method is particularly suitable for peripherally located tumors. PMID:23157978

  8. Development and optimization of targeted radionuclide tumor therapy using folate based radiopharmaceuticals

    CERN Document Server

    Reber, Josefine Astrid

    The folate receptor (FR) has been used for a quarter of a century as a tumor-associated target for selective delivery of drugs and imaging agents to cancer cells. While several folic acid radioconjugates have been successfully employed for imaging purposes in (pre)clinical studies, a therapeutic application of folic acid radioconjugates has not yet reached the critical stage which would allow a clinical translation. Due to a substantial expression of the FR in the proximal tubule cells, radiofolates accumulate in the kidneys which are at risk of damage by particle-radiation. To improve this situation, we aimed to develop and evaluate strategies for the performance of FR-targeted radionuclide therapy by decreasing the renal uptake of radiofolates and thereby reducing potential nephrotoxic effects. Two different strategies were investigated. First, the combination of radiofolates with chemotherapeutic agents such as pemetrexed (PMX) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and secondly, an approach based on radioiodinated fol...

  9. PET/CT Based In Vivo Evaluation of 64Cu Labelled Nanodiscs in Tumor Bearing Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pie Huda

    Full Text Available 64Cu radiolabelled nanodiscs based on the 11 α-helix MSP1E3D1 protein and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine lipids were, for the first time, followed in vivo by positron emission tomography for evaluating the biodistribution of nanodiscs. A cancer tumor bearing mouse model was used for the investigations, and it was found that the approximately 13 nm nanodiscs, due to their size, permeate deeply into cancer tissue. This makes them promising candidates for both drug delivery purposes and as advanced imaging agents. For the radiolabelling, a simple approach for 64Cu radiolabelling of proteins via a chelating agent, DOTA, was developed. The reaction was performed at sufficiently mild conditions to be compatible with labelling of the protein part of a lipid-protein particle while fully conserving the particle structure including the amphipathic protein fold.

  10. Microenvironment of Tumor-Draining Lymph Nodes: Opportunities for Liposome-Based Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddarth Chandrasekaran

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO recently reported that the total number of global cancer cases in 2013 reached 14 million, a 10% rise since 2008, while the total number of cancer deaths reached 8.2 million, a 5.2% increase since 2008. Metastasis is the major cause of death from cancer, accounting for 90% of all cancer related deaths. Tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN, the sentinel nodes, are the first organs of metastasis in several types of cancers. The extent of metastasis in the TDLN is often used in disease staging and prognosis evaluation in cancer patients. Here, we describe the microenvironment of the TDLN and review the recent literature on liposome-based therapies directed to immune cells within the TDLN with the intent to target cancer cells.

  11. Odontogenic cysts, odontogenic tumors, fibroosseous, and giant cell lesions of the jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, Joseph A

    2002-03-01

    Odontogenic cysts that can be problematic because of recurrence and/or aggressive growth include odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), calcifying odontogenic cyst, and the recently described glandular odontogenic cyst. The OKC has significant growth capacity and recurrence potential and is occasionally indicative of the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. There is also an orthokeratinized variant, the orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, which is less aggressive and is not syndrome associated. Ghost cell keratinization, which typifies the calcifying odontogenic cyst, can be seen in solid lesions that have now been designated odontogenic ghost cell tumor. The glandular odontogenic cyst contains mucous cells and ductlike structures that may mimic central mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Several odontogenic tumors may provide diagnostic challenges, particularly the cystic ameloblastoma. Identification of this frequently underdiagnosed cystic tumor often comes after one or more recurrences and a destructive course. Other difficult lesions include malignant ameloblastomas, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, squamous odontogenic tumor, and clear-cell odontogenic tumor. Histologic identification of myxofibrous lesions of the jaws (odontogenic myxoma, odontogenic fibroma, desmoplastic fibroma) is necessary to avoid the diagnostic pitfall of overdiagnosis of similar-appearing follicular sacs and dental pulps. Fibroosseous lesions of the jaws show considerable microscopic overlap and include fibrous dysplasia, ossifying fibroma, periapical cementoosseous dysplasia, and low-grade chronic osteomyelitis. The term fibrous dysplasia is probably overused in general practice and should be reserved for the rare lesion that presents as a large, expansile, diffuse opacity of children and young adults. The need to use clinicopathologic correlation in assessing these lesions is of particular importance. Central giant cell granuloma is a relatively common jaw lesion of young adults that has an

  12. A sequence-based survey of the complex structural organization of tumor genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Colin; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Volik, Stanislav; Yu, Peng; Wu, Chunxiao; Huang, Guiqing; Linardopoulou, Elena V.; Trask, Barbara J.; Waldman, Frederic; Costello, Joseph; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Mills, Gordon B.; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Sridharan, Shivaranjani; Paris, Pamela; Tao, Quanzhou; Aerni, Sarah J.; Brown, Raymond P.; Bashir, Ali; Gray, Joe W.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; de Jong, Pieter; Nefedov, Mikhail; Ried, Thomas; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Collins, Colin C.

    2008-04-03

    The genomes of many epithelial tumors exhibit extensive chromosomal rearrangements. All classes of genome rearrangements can be identified using End Sequencing Profiling (ESP), which relies on paired-end sequencing of cloned tumor genomes. In this study, brain, breast, ovary and prostate tumors along with three breast cancer cell lines were surveyed with ESP yielding the largest available collection of sequence-ready tumor genome breakpoints and providing evidence that some rearrangements may be recurrent. Sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed translocations and complex tumor genome structures that include coamplification and packaging of disparate genomic loci with associated molecular heterogeneity. Comparison of the tumor genomes suggests recurrent rearrangements. Some are likely to be novel structural polymorphisms, whereas others may be bona fide somatic rearrangements. A recurrent fusion transcript in breast tumors and a constitutional fusion transcript resulting from a segmental duplication were identified. Analysis of end sequences for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed candidate somatic mutations and an elevated rate of novel SNPs in an ovarian tumor. These results suggest that the genomes of many epithelial tumors may be far more dynamic and complex than previously appreciated and that genomic fusions including fusion transcripts and proteins may be common, possibly yielding tumor-specific biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  13. SU-G-BRA-04: Simulation of Errors in Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP)-Based Lung Tumor Internal Target Volumes (ITV) Using Real-Time 2D MRI and Deformable Image Registration Based Lung Tumor Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D; Kishan, A; Santhanam, A; Min, Y; O’Connell, D; Lamb, J; Cao, M; Agazaryan, N; Yang, Y; Lee, P; Low, D [University of California, Los Angeles, Ca (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion on the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)–based lung tumor internal target volumes (ITV), using deformable image registration of real-time 2D-sagital cine-mode MRI acquired during lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Five lung tumor patients underwent free breathing SBRT treatment on the ViewRay, with dose prescribed to PTV (4DCT MIP-based ITV+3–6mm margin). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5×3.5mm pixels) were acquired through the center of the tumor at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3–4 fractions of 21–32 minutes duration). Tumor GTVs were contoured on the first frame of the cine and tracked throughout the treatment using off-line optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. Pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITVs were generated from MIPs of the deformed GTV contours limited to short segments of image data. All possible pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITV volumes were generated with 1s resolution and compared to the ITV volume of the entire treatment course. Varying pseudo-4DCT durations from 10-50s were analyzed. Results: Tumors were covered in their entirety by PTV in the patients analysed here. However, pseudo-4DCT based ITV volumes were observed that were as small as 29% of the entire treatment-ITV, depending on breathing irregularity and the duration of pseudo-4DCT. With an increase in duration of pseudo-4DCT from 10–50s the minimum volume acquired from 95% of all pseudo-4DCTs increased from 62%–81% of the treatment ITV. Conclusion: A 4DCT MIP-based ITV offers a ‘snap-shot’ of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumor is imaged on a specific day. Real time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that the accuracy of this snap-shot varies according to inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric

  14. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  15. Solid tumors after chemotherapy or surgery for testicular nonseminoma: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Chunkit; Fossa, Sophie D; Milano, Michael T; Oldenburg, Jan; Travis, Lois B

    2013-10-20

    Increased risks of solid tumors after older radiotherapy strategies for testicular cancer (TC) are well established. Few population-based studies, however, focus on solid cancer risk among survivors of TC managed with nonradiotherapy approaches. We quantified the site-specific risk of solid cancers among testicular nonseminoma patients treated in the modern era of cisplatin-based chemotherapy, without radiotherapy. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for solid tumors were calculated for 12,691 patients with testicular nonseminoma reported to the population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (1980 to 2008) and treated initially with either chemotherapy (n = 6,013) or surgery (n = 6,678) without radiotherapy. Patients accrued 116,073 person-years of follow-up. Two hundred ten second solid cancers were observed. No increased risk followed surgery alone (SIR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.14; n = 99 solid cancers), whereas significantly increased 40% excesses (SIR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.73; n = 111 solid cancers) occurred after chemotherapy. Increased risks of solid cancers after chemotherapy were observed in most follow-up periods (median latency, 12.5 years), including more than 20 years after treatment (SIR, 1.54; 95% CI, 0.96 to 2.33); significantly increased three- to seven-fold risks occurred for cancers of the kidney (SIR, 3.37; 95% CI, 1.79 to 5.77), thyroid (SIR, 4.40; 95% CI, 2.19 to 7.88), and soft tissue (SIR, 7.49; 95% CI, 3.59 to 13.78). To our knowledge, this is the first large population-based series reporting significantly increased risks of solid cancers among patients with testicular nonseminoma treated in the modern era of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Subsequent analytic studies should focus on the evaluation of dose-response relationships, types of solid cancers, latency patterns, and interactions with other possible factors, including genetic susceptibility.

  16. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Thomas E; Yanch, Jacquelyn C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators that are injectors to larger machines in high-energy physics facilities are not considered. An ABNS for BNCT is composed of: (1) the accelerator hardware for producing a high current charged particle beam, (2) an appropriate neutron-producing target and target heat removal system (HRS), and (3) a moderator/reflector assembly to render the flux energy spectrum of neutrons produced in the target suitable for patient irradiation. As a consequence of the efforts of researchers throughout the world, progress has been made on the design, manufacture, and testing of these three major components. Although an ABNS facility has not yet been built that has optimally assembled these three components, the feasibility of clinically useful ABNSs has been clearly established. Both electrostatic and radio frequency linear accelerators of reasonable cost (approximately 1.5 M dollars) appear to be capable of producing charged particle beams, with combinations of accelerated particle energy (a few MeV) and beam currents (approximately 10 mA) that are suitable for a hospital-based ABNS for BNCT. The specific accelerator performance requirements depend upon the charged particle reaction by which neutrons are produced in the target and the clinical requirements for neutron field quality and intensity. The accelerator performance requirements are more demanding for beryllium than for lithium as a target. However, beryllium targets are more easily cooled. The accelerator performance requirements are also more demanding for greater neutron field quality and intensity. Target HRSs that are based on submerged-jet impingement and

  17. Odontogenic tumors: A retrospective study of four Brazilian diagnostic pathology centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    da-Costa, Daniela O P.; Maurício, Almir S.; de-Faria, Paulo A S.; da-Silva, Licínio E.; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This article presents the results of a retrospective study of the frequency and classification of odontogenic tumors recorded at four centers of diagnostic pathology in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Study Design: All medical records and microscopic slides of odontogenic tumor specimens for the years 1997 to 2007 were retrieved from the files of four services of diagnostic pathology in Rio de Janeiro City. Diagnoses were re-evaluated and the tumors classified according to the latest (2005) World Health Organization Classification of Tumors. Results: A total of 201 odontogenic tumors were found among 15,758 oral biopsies (1.3%). The frequencies of these tumors at the four centers ranged from 0.5% at the National Cancer Institute to 3.3% in a private laboratory. Chi-square analysis revealed statistically significant differences (p<0.05) between the proportions of odontogenic tumors in the studied centers. Of these, 94.5% were benign and 5.5% were malignant. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (32.3%) was the most frequent lesion, followed by ameloblastoma (29.8%) and odontoma (18.4%). Conclusions: Odontogenic tumors are uncommon in Brazil. Different pathology laboratories reported divergent frequencies of odontogenic tumors, which may reflect institutional specializations and the patient populations served. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, jaw neoplasms, epidemiology, WHO classification. PMID:22143740

  18. Development of diagnostic model of lung cancer based on multiple tumor markers and data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoxian; Feng, Feifei; Zhou, Xiaoshan; Duan, Liju; Wang, Jing; Wu, Yongjun; Wang, Na

    2017-11-07

    To develop early intelligent discriminative model of lung cancer and evaluate the efficiency of diagnosis value. Based on the genetic polymorphism profile of CYP1A1-rs1048943, GSTM1, mEH-rs1051740, XRCC1-rs1799782 and XRCC1-rs25489 and the methylations of p16 and RASSF1A gene, and the length of telomere in the peripheral blood from 200 lung cancer patients and 200 health persons, the discriminative model was established through decision tree and ANN technique. ACU of the discriminative model based on multiple tumour markers increased by about 10%; The accuracy rate of decision tree model and ANN model for testing set were 93.00% and 89.62% respectively. The ROC analysis showed the decision tree model's AUC is 0.929 (0.894∼0.964), the ANN model's AUC is 0.894 (0.853∼0.935). However, the classify accuracy rate and AUC of Fisher discriminatory analysis model are all about 0.7. The early intelligent discriminative model of lung cancer based on multiple tumor markers and data mining techniques has a higher accuracy rate and might be useful for early diagnosis of lung cancer.

  19. Multiplexed Detection of Tumor Markers with Multicolor Polymer Dot-Based Immunochromatography Test Strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chia-Chia; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Yang, Yong-Quan; Wei-Kai, Tsai; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Chan, Yang-Hsiang

    2018-02-06

    There have been ongoing efforts to develop more sensitive and fast quantitative screening of cancer markers by use of fluorometric immunochromatographic test strips (ICTS) since the remarkable advances in fluorescent nanomaterials. Semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) have recently emerged as a new type of biocompatible fluorescent probe with extraordinary brightness which is suitable for biological and clinical use. Here, we developed Pdot-based ICTS for quantitative rapid screening of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), α-fetoprotein (AFP), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in 10 min. Through use of the ultrahigh fluorescence brightness of Pdots, this immunosensor enabled much better detection sensitivity (2.05, 3.30, and 4.92 pg/mL for PSA, AFP, and CEA, respectively), in which the detection limit is at least 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional fluorometric ICTS. Furthermore, we performed proof-of-concept experiments for simultaneous determination of multiple tumor markers in a single test strip. These results demonstrated that this Pdot-based ICTS platform is a promising candidate for developing new generations of point-of-care diagnostics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of Pdot-based ICTS with multiplexing capability.

  20. PCA based clustering for brain tumor segmentation of T1w MRI images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Irem Ersöz; Pehlivanlı, Ayça Çakmak; Sekizkardeş, Emine Gezmez; Ibrikci, Turgay

    2017-03-01

    Medical images are huge collections of information that are difficult to store and process consuming extensive computing time. Therefore, the reduction techniques are commonly used as a data pre-processing step to make the image data less complex so that a high-dimensional data can be identified by an appropriate low-dimensional representation. PCA is one of the most popular multivariate methods for data reduction. This paper is focused on T1-weighted MRI images clustering for brain tumor segmentation with dimension reduction by different common Principle Component Analysis (PCA) algorithms. Our primary aim is to present a comparison between different variations of PCA algorithms on MRIs for two cluster methods. Five most common PCA algorithms; namely the conventional PCA, Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis (PPCA), Expectation Maximization Based Principal Component Analysis (EM-PCA), Generalize Hebbian Algorithm (GHA), and Adaptive Principal Component Extraction (APEX) were applied to reduce dimensionality in advance of two clustering algorithms, K-Means and Fuzzy C-Means. In the study, the T1-weighted MRI images of the human brain with brain tumor were used for clustering. In addition to the original size of 512 lines and 512 pixels per line, three more different sizes, 256 × 256, 128 × 128 and 64 × 64, were included in the study to examine their effect on the methods. The obtained results were compared in terms of both the reconstruction errors and the Euclidean distance errors among the clustered images containing the same number of principle components. According to the findings, the PPCA obtained the best results among all others. Furthermore, the EM-PCA and the PPCA assisted K-Means algorithm to accomplish the best clustering performance in the majority as well as achieving significant results with both clustering algorithms for all size of T1w MRI images. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimal technique of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for tumors adjacent to brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiou-Shiung; Hwang, Jing-Min; Tai, Po-An; Chang, You-Kang; Wang, Yu-Nong; Shih, Rompin; Chuang, Keh-Shih

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a well-established technique that is replacing whole-brain irradiation in the treatment of intracranial lesions, which leads to better preservation of brain functions, and therefore a better quality of life for the patient. There are several available forms of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SRS, and the goal of the present study is to identify which of these techniques is best (as evaluated by dosimetric outcomes statistically) when the target is located adjacent to brainstem. We collected the records of 17 patients with lesions close to the brainstem who had previously been treated with single-fraction radiosurgery. In all, 5 different lesion catalogs were collected, and the patients were divided into 2 distance groups-1 consisting of 7 patients with a target-to-brainstem distance of less than 0.5cm, and the other of 10 patients with a target-to-brainstem distance of ≥ 0.5 and techniques included multiple noncoplanar beams or arcs with or without intensity-modulated delivery. The volume of gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 0.2cm(3) to 21.9cm(3). Regarding the dose homogeneity index (HIICRU) and conformity index (CIICRU) were without significant difference between techniques statistically. However, the average CIICRU = 1.09 ± 0.56 achieved by VMAT was the best of the 3 techniques. Moreover, notable improvement in gradient index (GI) was observed when VMAT was used (0.74 ± 0.13), and this result was significantly better than those achieved by the 2 other techniques (p techniques required higher MU delivery than DCA, with the averages being twice as high (p technique for delivering treatment to tumors adjacent to brainstem. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical performance of LOCI™-based tumor marker assays for tumor markers CA 15-3, CA 125, CEA, CA 19-9 and AFP in gynecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolscheid-Pommerich, Ramona C; Keyver-Paik, Mignon; Hecking, Thomas; Kuhn, Walther; Hartmann, Gunther; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Holdenrieder, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Evidence is sparse regarding the clinical performance of luminescent oxygen channeling immunoassays-based tumor marker assays in gynecological cancer. Analyzing serum samples of 336 patients with Dimension™Vista1500, we investigated the diagnostic power of carbohydrate antigen 15-3, carbohydrate antigen 125, carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, and alpha-fetoprotein in patients suffering from different types of gynecological cancer and precancerous gynecological diseases and compared findings to appropriate control groups. The cohort comprised 177 female patients with gynecological cancers (73 breast, 22 cervical, 16 endometrial, 17 vulva, and 49 ovarian cancers), 26 patients with precancerous gynecological diseases (11 vulva, 4 cervical, and 10 breast), 109 patients with benign gynecological diseases, and 24 healthy controls. Discriminative power was assessed by areas under the curve in receiver operating characteristic curves, and sensitivities were determined at a fixed specificity of 95%. Levels of biomarkers in healthy controls were in the expected ranges and a discriminative power between gynecological cancers and healthy controls was observed for several tumor markers. Established tumor type-associated markers were elevated in specific gynecological cancers and benign controls as well as within precancerous gynecological diseases and healthy control group. In ovarian cancer, carbohydrate antigen 125 and carbohydrate antigen 15-3 were significantly elevated compared to the respective benign diseases. Carbohydrate antigen 125 was the most conclusive marker (area under the curve = 0.86% and 77.6% sensitivity at 95% specificity). In breast cancer, carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 15-3 were significantly higher than in the respective benign diseases. Carcinoembryonic antigen achieved the most conclusive area under the curve (0.65) with 31.5% sensitivity at 95% specificity. None of the investigated markers was found to be of

  3. Development of amphiphilic gamma-PGA-nanoparticle based tumor vaccine: potential of the nanoparticulate cytosolic protein delivery carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Okada, Naoki; Oda, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kazuhiko; Matsuo, Keisuke; Mukai, Yohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Akagi, Takami; Akashi, Mitsuru; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2008-02-08

    Nanoscopic therapeutic systems that incorporate biomacromolecules, such as protein and peptides, are emerging as the next generation of nanomedicine aimed at improving the therapeutic efficacy of biomacromolecular drugs. In this study, we report that poly(gamma-glutamic acid)-based nanoparticles (gamma-PGA NPs) are excellent protein delivery carriers for tumor vaccines that delivered antigenic proteins to antigen-presenting cells and elicited potent immune responses. Importantly, gamma-PGA NPs efficiently delivered entrapped antigenic proteins through cytosolic translocation from the endosomes, which is a key process of gamma-PGA NP-mediated anti-tumor immune responses. Our findings suggest that the gamma-PGA NP system is suitable for the intracellular delivery of protein-based drugs as well as tumor vaccines.

  4. Improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents: Gd(DOTA) conjugates of a cycloalkane-based RGD peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji-Ae; Lee, Yong Jin; Ko, In Ok; Kim, Tae-Jeong; Chang, Yongmin; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Jung Young

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents. • To increase the targeting ability of RGD, we developed cycloalkane-based RGD peptides. • Gd(DOTA) conjugates of cycloalkane-based RGD peptide show improved tumor signal enhancement in vivo MR images. - Abstract: Two new MRI contrast agents, Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACP-K) (1) and Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACH-K) (2), which were designed by incorporating aminocyclopentane (ACP)- or aminocyclohexane (ACH)-carboxylic acid into Gd-DOTA (gadolinium-tetraazacyclo dodecanetetraacetic acid) and cyclic RGDK peptides, were synthesized and evaluated for tumor-targeting ability in vitro and in vivo. Binding affinity studies showed that both 1 and 2 exhibited higher affinity for integrin receptors than cyclic RGDyK peptides, which were used as a reference. These complexes showed high relaxivity and good stability in human serum and have the potential to improve target-specific signal enhancement in vivo MR images

  5. Improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents: Gd(DOTA) conjugates of a cycloalkane-based RGD peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji-Ae, E-mail: jpark@kirams.re.kr [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Jin; Ko, In Ok [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Jeong; Chang, Yongmin [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Moo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyeong Min [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Young, E-mail: jykim@kirams.re.kr [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Development of improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents. • To increase the targeting ability of RGD, we developed cycloalkane-based RGD peptides. • Gd(DOTA) conjugates of cycloalkane-based RGD peptide show improved tumor signal enhancement in vivo MR images. - Abstract: Two new MRI contrast agents, Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACP-K) (1) and Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACH-K) (2), which were designed by incorporating aminocyclopentane (ACP)- or aminocyclohexane (ACH)-carboxylic acid into Gd-DOTA (gadolinium-tetraazacyclo dodecanetetraacetic acid) and cyclic RGDK peptides, were synthesized and evaluated for tumor-targeting ability in vitro and in vivo. Binding affinity studies showed that both 1 and 2 exhibited higher affinity for integrin receptors than cyclic RGDyK peptides, which were used as a reference. These complexes showed high relaxivity and good stability in human serum and have the potential to improve target-specific signal enhancement in vivo MR images.

  6. SU-D-BRA-01: Accurate Real-Time Tumor Motion Estimation from Respiratory Surrogates via Memory-Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R; Xing, L

    2012-06-01

    Respiratory tumor motion is a major challenge in radiation therapy. Effective beam gating or tracking approaches necessitate an accurate knowledge of the real-time tumor motion. Fluoroscopic tracking with implanted fiducial markers is invasive and exposes the patient to additional imaging dose. Respiratory surrogate signal measured by external noninvasive and non-ionizing devices provides an attractive approach, in which estimating the tumor motion from respiratory surrogates is crucial. We utilize a powerful memory-based learning approach to find the complex relations between tumor motion and respiratory surrogates. The learning method uses locally weighted functions to interpolate between and extrapolate from training data. Due to the local nature of the learning functions, it is inherently robust to outliers. Moreover, both training and adapting to new data is highly efficient and almost free, making it suitable for dynamically following possibly variable internal/external relations. We evaluated the method using respiratory motion data (3D tumor motion plus 1D surrogate) from six patients (three lung and three pancreas patients). Given only 5-sec (roughly one breath) pretreatment training data, the method achieved an average 3D error of 0.37 mm (range: 0.10 mm - 1.06 mm) and 95th percentile error of 0.86 mm (range: 0.24 mm - 2.47 mm) on 120-sec unseen test data. These errors are well below the average peak- to-peak amplitude (-10 mm). The errors decrease monotonically with an increasing amount of training data. Compared with the best linear model, the learning approach achieved a 21% reduction in error for an average patient (range: 10% - 42%). The memory-based learning technique is able to accurately capture the highly nonlinear and complex relations between tumor and surrogate motion in an efficient manner (∼1 ms per prediction). These desirable properties make it an ideal candidate for accurate and robust tumor gating/tracking using respiratory surrogates

  7. Wavelet-based 3D reconstruction of microcalcification clusters from two mammographic views: new evidence that fractal tumors are malignant and Euclidean tumors are benign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, Kendra A; Tanenbaum, Aaron B; Albert, Seth; Guimond, Lyne; Kestener, Pierre; Arneodo, Alain; Khalil, Andre

    2014-01-01

    The 2D Wavelet-Transform Modulus Maxima (WTMM) method was used to detect microcalcifications (MC) in human breast tissue seen in mammograms and to characterize the fractal geometry of benign and malignant MC clusters. This was done in the context of a preliminary analysis of a small dataset, via a novel way to partition the wavelet-transform space-scale skeleton. For the first time, the estimated 3D fractal structure of a breast lesion was inferred by pairing the information from two separate 2D projected mammographic views of the same breast, i.e. the cranial-caudal (CC) and mediolateral-oblique (MLO) views. As a novelty, we define the "CC-MLO fractal dimension plot", where a "fractal zone" and "Euclidean zones" (non-fractal) are defined. 118 images (59 cases, 25 malignant and 34 benign) obtained from a digital databank of mammograms with known radiologist diagnostics were analyzed to determine which cases would be plotted in the fractal zone and which cases would fall in the Euclidean zones. 92% of malignant breast lesions studied (23 out of 25 cases) were in the fractal zone while 88% of the benign lesions were in the Euclidean zones (30 out of 34 cases). Furthermore, a Bayesian statistical analysis shows that, with 95% credibility, the probability that fractal breast lesions are malignant is between 74% and 98%. Alternatively, with 95% credibility, the probability that Euclidean breast lesions are benign is between 76% and 96%. These results support the notion that the fractal structure of malignant tumors is more likely to be associated with an invasive behavior into the surrounding tissue compared to the less invasive, Euclidean structure of benign tumors. Finally, based on indirect 3D reconstructions from the 2D views, we conjecture that all breast tumors considered in this study, benign and malignant, fractal or Euclidean, restrict their growth to 2-dimensional manifolds within the breast tissue.

  8. Long-term tumor control after brachytherapy for base-of-prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungtaek Choi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients presenting with cancer at the base of the prostate after brachytherapyas monotherapy. Material and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who had undergone transpe -ri neal ultrasound-guided implantation with 125I or 103Pd seeds as monotherapy between March 1998 and December2006, at our institution. A minimum follow-up interval of 2 years was required for inclusion in our analysis. Dosimetrywas assessed using computed tomography 30 days after the implant. Treatment failure was defined as the appearanceof biopsy-proved tumor after seed implantation, radiographic evidence of metastases, receipt of salvage therapy,or elevation of the prostate-specific antigen level beyond the nadir value plus 2 ng/mL. Results: With a median follow-up interval of 89 months (range 25-128 months, all 52 of the identified patients hadno evidence of disease progression or biochemical failure. The mean number of cores sampled at the prostate base was2.84 (median 2; Gleason scores assigned at central review were 6-8 in all patients. Of the 30 patients (58% for whomdosimetric data were available at day 30, the median V100 values of the right and left base were 92.0% and 93.5%, respectively,and the median D90 values of the right and left base were 148 Gy and 151 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: Permanent prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy results in a high probability of disease-free survivalfor men with cancer at the base of the prostate.

  9. SNPase-ARMS qPCR: Ultrasensitive Mutation-Based Detection of Cell-Free Tumor DNA in Melanoma Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Stadler

    Full Text Available Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in the plasma of cancer patients has become a common point of interest as indicator of therapy options and treatment response in clinical cancer research. Especially patient- and tumor-specific single nucleotide variants that accurately distinguish tumor DNA from wild type DNA are promising targets. The reliable detection and quantification of these single-base DNA variants is technically challenging. Currently, a variety of techniques is applied, with no apparent "gold standard". Here we present a novel qPCR protocol that meets the conditions of extreme sensitivity and specificity that are required for detection and quantification of tumor DNA. By consecutive application of two polymerases, one of them designed for extreme base-specificity, the method reaches unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Three qPCR assays were tested with spike-in experiments, specific for point mutations BRAF V600E, PTEN T167A and NRAS Q61L of melanoma cell lines. It was possible to detect down to one copy of tumor DNA per reaction (Poisson distribution, at a background of up to 200 000 wild type DNAs. To prove its clinical applicability, the method was successfully tested on a small cohort of BRAF V600E positive melanoma patients.

  10. Autologous iPSC-Based Vaccines Elicit Anti-tumor Responses In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooreman, Nigel G; Kim, Youngkyun; de Almeida, Patricia E; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Diecke, Sebastian; Shao, Ning-Yi; Wei, Tzu-Tang; Yi, Hyoju; Dey, Devaveena; Nelakanti, Raman; Brouwer, Thomas P; Paik, David T; Sagiv-Barfi, Idit; Han, Arnold; Quax, Paul H A; Hamming, Jaap F; Levy, Ronald; Davis, Mark M; Wu, Joseph C

    2018-02-08

    Cancer cells and embryonic tissues share a number of cellular and molecular properties, suggesting that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may be harnessed to elicit anti-tumor responses in cancer vaccines. RNA sequencing revealed that human and murine iPSCs express tumor-associated antigens, and we show here a proof of principle for using irradiated iPSCs in autologous anti-tumor vaccines. In a prophylactic setting, iPSC vaccines prevent tumor growth in syngeneic murine breast cancer, mesothelioma, and melanoma models. As an adjuvant, the iPSC vaccine inhibited melanoma recurrence at the resection site and reduced metastatic tumor load, which was associated with fewer Th17 cells and increased CD11b + GR1 hi myeloid cells. Adoptive transfer of T cells isolated from vaccine-treated tumor-bearing mice inhibited tumor growth in unvaccinated recipients, indicating that the iPSC vaccine promotes an antigen-specific anti-tumor T cell response. Our data suggest an easy, generalizable strategy for multiple types of cancer that could prove highly valuable in clinical immunotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.