WorldWideScience

Sample records for base present contamination

  1. Radioactive contamination in Arctic - present situation and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is currently a focus on radioactivity and the Arctic region. The reason for this is probably the high number of nuclear sources in parts of the Arctic and the vulnerability of Arctic systems to radioactive contamination. The Arctic environment is also perceived as a wilderness and the need for the protection of this wilderness against contamination is great. In the last decade information has also been released concerning the nuclear situation which has caused concern in many countries. Due to such concerns, the International Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy (IAEPS) was launched in 1991 and the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) was established. AMAP is undertaking an assessment of the radioactive contamination of the Arctic and its radiological consequences. In 1996 IAEPS became part of the Arctic Council. AMAP presented one main report in 1997 and another in 1998. There are also several other national, bilateral and international programmes in existence which deal with this issue. This paper summarises some of current knowledge about sources of radioactive contamination, vulnerability, exposure of man, and potential sources for radioactive contamination within Arctic and some views on the future needs for work concerning radioactivity in Arctic. (au)

  2. Radioactive contamination in Arctic - present situation and future challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, Per [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraes (Norway)

    2002-04-01

    There is currently a focus on radioactivity and the Arctic region. The reason for this is probably the high number of nuclear sources in parts of the Arctic and the vulnerability of Arctic systems to radioactive contamination. The Arctic environment is also perceived as a wilderness and the need for the protection of this wilderness against contamination is great. In the last decade information has also been released concerning the nuclear situation which has caused concern in many countries. Due to such concerns, the International Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy (IAEPS) was launched in 1991 and the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) was established. AMAP is undertaking an assessment of the radioactive contamination of the Arctic and its radiological consequences. In 1996 IAEPS became part of the Arctic Council. AMAP presented one main report in 1997 and another in 1998. There are also several other national, bilateral and international programmes in existence which deal with this issue. This paper summarises some of current knowledge about sources of radioactive contamination, vulnerability, exposure of man, and potential sources for radioactive contamination within Arctic and some views on the future needs for work concerning radioactivity in Arctic. (au)

  3. Present level of contaminants in the Romanian Black Sea sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of environmental quality in the Romanian Black Sea sector is being constantly made by the Romanian Marine Research Institute (RMRI) within the National Integrated Monitoring System. The contamination of the marine environment is expressed by considering four chemical and a biological parameter: nutrients (N-NO2, N-NO3, N-NH4, P-PO4, organic P, Si-SiO4), heavy metals (Mn, Fe, Cu, Cd, Pb), artificial radionuclides (90Sr, 137Cs), total hydrocarbons, parasite and saprophyte fungi in sediments, sea water and/or biota. Present levels of contaminants are discussed as to their historical evolution during the last few years or decades. Inorganic N and P concentrations still exceed three to five times those before eutrophication started to intensify in the early '70s. Practical uses of results by national and regional authorities are discussed. (author)

  4. Radioactive contamination in the Arctic - Present situation and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is currently a focus on radioactivity and the Arctic region. The reason for this is the high number of nuclear sources in parts of the Arctic and the vulnerability of Arctic systems to radioactive contamination. The Arctic environment is also perceived as a wilderness and the need for the protection of this wilderness against contamination is great. In 1991, the International Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy (IAEPS) was launched and the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) established. AMAP is undertaking an assessment of the radioactive contamination of the Arctic and its radiological consequences. This paper summarises some of current knowledge about sources of radioactive contamination, vulnerability, exposure of man, and potential sources for radioactive contamination within Arctic and some views on the future needs for work concerning radioactivity in Arctic. (author)

  5. Contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Cundill, A.; J. Bacon; Dale, P; Fordyce, F.M.; Fowler, D; Hedmark, A.; Hern, A.; Skiba, U.

    2011-01-01

    Soil contamination occurs when substances are added to soil, resulting in increases in concentrations above background or reference levels. Pollution may follow from contamination when contaminants are present in amounts that are detrimental to soil quality and become harmful to the environment or human health. Contamination can occur via a range of pathways including direct application to land and indirect application from atmospheric deposition. Contamination was identified b...

  6. Scientific bases of agriculture in contaminated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the environmental radioactivity study at agricultural lands of Belarus due to the Chernobyl accident are presented as well as results of the development of methods of agricultural industry at contaminated lands. Characteristics of the radionuclides behaviour in soil-plant-animals-foodstuffs chain is revealed. Measures permitting to reduce the long-lived radionuclide injection in plant products 3 times and, therefore, decrease much meat and milk contamination. 2 figs.; 6 tabs

  7. Integrating Individual-Based Indices of Contaminant Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L. Rowe

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Habitat contamination can alter numerous biological processes in individual organisms. Examining multiple individual-level responses in an integrative fashion is necessary to understand how individual health or fitness reflects environmental contamination. Here we provide an example of such an integrated perspective based upon recent studies of an amphibian (the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana that experiences several, disparate changes when larval development occurs in a trace element�contaminated habitat. First, we present an overview of studies focused on specific responses of individuals collected from, or transplanted into, a habitat contaminated by coal combustion residues (CCR. These studies have reported morphological, behavioral, and physiological modifications to individuals chronically interacting with sediments in the CCR-contaminated site. Morphological abnormalities in the oral and tail regions in contaminant-exposed individuals influenced other properties such as grazing, growth, and swimming performance. Behavioral changes in swimming activities and responses to stimuli appear to influence predation risk in the contaminant-exposed population. Significant changes in bioenergetics in the contaminated habitat, evident as abnormally high energetic expenditures for survival (maintenance costs, may ultimately influence production pathways (growth, energy storage in individuals. We then present a conceptual model to examine how interactions among the affected systems (morphological, behavioral, physiological may ultimately bring about more severe effects than would be predicted if the responses were considered in isolation. A complex interplay among simultaneously occurring biological changes emerges in which multiple, sublethal effects ultimately can translate into reductions in larval or juvenile survival, and thus reduced recruitment of juveniles into the population. In systems where individuals are exposed to low concentrations of

  8. Emerging contaminants: Presentations at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A session entitled 'Emerging Contaminants' was held in April 2009 in Cincinnati, OH at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference. The purpose of the session was to share information on both programmatic and technical aspects associated with emerging contaminants. Emerging contaminants are chemicals or materials that are characterized by a perceived or real threat to human health or environment, a lack of published health standards or an evolving standard. A contaminant may also be 'emerging' because of the discovery of a new source, a new pathway to humans, or a new detection method or technology. The session included five speakers representing the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and each of the military services. The DoD created the Emerging Contaminant Directorate to proactively address environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with emerging contaminants. This session described the scan-watch-action list process, impact assessment methodology, and integrated risk management concept that DoD has implemented to manage emerging contaminants. EPA presented emerging trends in health risk assessment. Researchers made technical presentations on the status of some emerging contaminates in the assessment process (i.e. manganese, RDX, and naphthalene).

  9. GM detector based contamination monitor for screening of TLD badges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present individual monitoring in India is carried out using the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre made thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) used as chest and wrist badge. The Bhabha Atomic Research Centre TLD badge consisting of CaSO4:Dy Teflon TLD discs (13.3 mm dia x 0.8 mm thickness) mechanically clipped over three symmetrical circular holes each of diameter 12 mm on a nickel plated aluminium plate (52.5 mm x 29.9 mm x 1 mm), a thin paper wrapper (with user information printed on it). To protect the TLD discs from dust, water, oil etc. the card along with its wrapper is sealed in a thin plastic (polythene) pouch which also protects the card from contamination by chemicals or radioactive materials. Normally the collected TLD cards are checked for any radioactive contamination using contamination monitor before the readout. This paper presents a microcontroller based contamination monitor developed using a pair of large area pancake type GM detector for screening of TLD badges prior to their readout in the TLD badge reader. The GM detector pair simultaneously monitors the possible contamination on both sides of the TLD personnel monitoring badge

  10. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  11. The role of packaging size on contamination rates during simulated presentation to a sterile field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Trier

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the impact of package size on the contact between medical devices and non-sterile surfaces (i.e. the hands of the practitioner and the outside of the package during aseptic presentation to a simulated sterile field. Rationale for this objective stems from the decades-long problem of hospital-acquired infections. This work approaches the problem from a unique perspective, namely packaging size.Randomized complete block design with subsampling.Research study conducted at professional conferences for surgical technologists and nursing professionals.Ninety-seven healthcare providers, primarily surgical technologists and nurses.Participants were gloved and asked to present the contents of six pouches of three different sizes to a simulated sterile field. The exterior of pouches and gloves of participants were coated with a simulated contaminant prior to each opening trial. After presentation to the simulated sterile field, the presence of the contaminant on package contents was recorded as indicative of contact with non-sterile surfaces and analyzed in a binary fashion using a generalized linear mixed model.Recruited subjects were 26-64 years of age (81 females, 16 males, with 2.5-44 years of professional experience. Results indicated a significant main effect of pouch size on contact rate of package contents (P = 0.0108, whereby larger pouches induced greater rates of contact than smaller pouches (estimates±SEM: 14.7±2.9% vs. 6.0±1.7%, respectively.This study utilized novel methodologies which simulate contamination in aseptic presentation. Results of this work indicate that increased contamination rates are associated with larger pouches when compared to smaller pouches. The results add to a growing body of research which investigate packaging's role in serving as a pathway for product contamination during aseptic presentation. Future work should investigate other packaging design factors (e

  12. Synthesis of present methods of surface contamination detection (skin, clothes, laboratories)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The signification of the term ''contamination'' is briefly recalled. To measure the levels of contamination, there are only two methods: the direct method and the indirect method. Finally, the recent improvements in the surface contamination detection field are shortly reviewed

  13. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  14. Promoting justified risk-based decisions in contaminated land management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinikainen, Jussi; Sorvari, Jaana

    2016-09-01

    Decision making and regulatory policies on contaminated land management (CLM) are commonly governed by risk assessment. Risk assessment, thus, has to comply with legislation, but also provide valid information in terms of actual risks to correctly focus the potentially required measures and allocate the available resources. Hence, reliable risk assessment is a prerequisite for justified and sustainable risk management. This paper gives an introduction to the Finnish risk-based regulatory framework, outlines the challenges within the policies and the practice and provides an overview of the new guidance document to promote risk-based and sustainable CLM. We argue that the current risk assessment approaches in the policy frameworks are not necessarily efficient enough in supporting justified risk-based decisions. One of the main reasons for this is the excessive emphasis put on conservative risk assessments and on generic guideline values without contributing to their appropriate application. This paper presents how some of the challenges in risk-based decision making have been tackled in the Finnish regulatory framework on contaminated land. We believe that our study will also stimulate interest with regard to policy frameworks in other countries. PMID:26767620

  15. Transuranic contaminated waste container characterization and data base. Revision I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1980-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is developing regulations governing the management, handling and disposal of transuranium (TRU) radioisotope contaminated wastes as part of the NRC's overall waste management program. In the development of such regulations, numerous subtasks have been identified which require completion before meaningful regulations can be proposed, their impact evaluated and the regulations implemented. This report was prepared to assist in the development of the technical data base necessary to support rule-making actions dealing with TRU-contaminated wastes. An earlier report presented the waste sources, characteristics and inventory of both Department of Energy (DOE) generated and commercially generated TRU waste. In this report a wide variety of waste sources as well as a large TRU inventory were identified. The purpose of this report is to identify the different packaging systems used and proposed for TRU waste and to document their characteristics. This document then serves as part of the data base necessary to complete preparation and initiate implementation of TRU waste container and packaging standards and criteria suitable for inclusion in the present TRU waste management program. It is the purpose of this report to serve as a working document which will be used as appropriate in the TRU Waste Management Program. This report, and those following, will be compatible not only in format, but also in reference material and direction.

  16. Transuranic contaminated waste container characterization and data base. Revision I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is developing regulations governing the management, handling and disposal of transuranium (TRU) radioisotope contaminated wastes as part of the NRC's overall waste management program. In the development of such regulations, numerous subtasks have been identified which require completion before meaningful regulations can be proposed, their impact evaluated and the regulations implemented. This report was prepared to assist in the development of the technical data base necessary to support rule-making actions dealing with TRU-contaminated wastes. An earlier report presented the waste sources, characteristics and inventory of both Department of Energy (DOE) generated and commercially generated TRU waste. In this report a wide variety of waste sources as well as a large TRU inventory were identified. The purpose of this report is to identify the different packaging systems used and proposed for TRU waste and to document their characteristics. This document then serves as part of the data base necessary to complete preparation and initiate implementation of TRU waste container and packaging standards and criteria suitable for inclusion in the present TRU waste management program. It is the purpose of this report to serve as a working document which will be used as appropriate in the TRU Waste Management Program. This report, and those following, will be compatible not only in format, but also in reference material and direction

  17. Risk based treatment selection and optimization of contaminated site remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past few years numerous remediation technologies for the cleanup of contaminated sites have been developed. Because of the associated uncertainties concerning treatment reliability it is important to develop strategies to characterize their risks to achieve the cleanup requirements. For this purpose it is necessary to integrate existing knowledge on treatment efficacy and efficiency into the planning process for the management of contaminated sites. Based on field-scale experience data for the remediation of soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, two treatment technologies, biological land treatment and phyisco-chemical soil washing, were analyzed with respect to their general performance risks to achieve given cleanup standards. For a specific contamination scenario, efficient application ranges were identified using the method of linear optimization in combination with sensitivity analysis. Various constraints including cleanup standards, available financial budget, amount of contamination and others were taken into account. While land treatment was found to be most efficient at higher cleanup standards and less contaminated soils, soil washing exhibited better efficiency at lower cleanup standards and higher contaminated soils. These results compare favorably with practical experiences and indicate the utility of this approach to support decision making and planning processes for the general management of contaminated sites. In addition, the method allows for the simultaneous integration of various aspects such as risk based characteristics of treatment technologies, cleanup standards and more general ecological and economical remedial action objectives

  18. Limits determination of microbial contamination present on surfaces from a pharmaceutical microbiology district reference laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Charry

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: The bioburden present on the pharmaceutical microbiology laboratory’s surfaces, may increase the risk of cross-contamination when analytical tests are being carried out; periodic monitoring allows to set limits that reduce the risk. Aims: To determinate the limits of bioburden present on seven surfaces of the pharmaceutical microbiology laboratory, after the cleaning and disinfection process. Methods: The swabbing method was used for sampling. With a 25 cm2 stencil and a sterile swab, a sample was taken, passing the swab over five points of every surface chosen. A total aerobic microbial count and a total yeast and mold count was done. Finally, the average and the standard deviation of the counts was obtained. Results: The average from the counts obtained on each surface selected for the study, were below the recommended limits by international entities like the World Health Organization and the European Union, between others; also, the results generated in this study, allow to classify the biosafety cabinet as an ISO 5 area and the other areas as ISO 7. Conclusions: Bioburden levels on the tested surfaces are considered low, reducing the risk of cross-contamination, which could have a negative impact on laboratory’s activities. Also, it follows that disinfectant concentration used, is effectively.

  19. Levels of contamination for various pollutants present in Belgian human plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouwe, N. Van; Goeyens, L. [Scientific Inst. of Public Health, Brussels (Belgium); Covaci, A. [Toxicological Center, Univ. of Antwerp, Wilrijk (Belgium); Kannan, K. [Wadsworth Center, New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States); Gordon, J.; Chu, A. [Xenobiotic Detection System Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Eppe, G.; Pauw, E. De [Center of Analysis of residues in Traces (CART), Univ. of Liege (Belgium)

    2004-09-15

    During the last century, numerous compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) or organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), were banned because of their bioaccumulative and toxic properties, while other compounds, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), appeared on the market and consequently in the environment. The experiences gained from accidents involving PBBs, PCBs or PCDD/Fs are useful to conduct scientific investigations focused on preventing similar catastrophies with the newly introduced compounds. Several studies have reported potential increase in the concentration of PBDEs in food and wildlife. Monitoring the levels of toxic chemicals is therefore useful to understand the exposure pathways, sources and trends. The aim of the paper is to present actual contamination's levels of various pollutants in human plasma from Belgium. Several classes of pollutants, such PCDD/Fs, PCBs and OCPs were determined in 20 human plasmas. In addition, perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and related fluorochemicals, which are of current concern, were measured. Although anticipated, concentrations of PBDEs in the same samples were not yet determined. Through this study, a good approximation of the contamination level in Belgian human is given, allowing thus comparison with concentrations observed in other countries.

  20. A count rate based contamination control standard for electron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R.T.; Schwahn, S.O.

    1996-12-31

    Accelerators of sufficient energy and particle fluence can produce radioactivity as an unwanted byproduct. The radioactivity is typically imbedded in structural materials but may also be removable from surfaces. Many of these radionuclides decay by positron emission or electron capture; they often have long half lives and produce photons of low energy and yield making detection by standard devices difficult. The contamination control limit used throughout the US nuclear industry and the Department of Energy is 1,000 disintegrations per minute. This limit is based on the detection threshold of pancake type Geiger-Mueller probes for radionuclides of relatively high radiotoxicity, such as cobalt-60. Several radionuclides of concern at a high energy electron accelerator are compared in terms of radiotoxicity with radionuclides commonly found in the nuclear industry. Based on this comparison, a count-rate based contamination control limit and associated measurement strategy is proposed which provides adequate detection of contamination at accelerators without an increase in risk.

  1. Special RADMIL report. Assessment of the past and present implications of radioactive contamination of Lancashire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The county of Lancashire in the United Kingdom has a unique relationship with the nuclear industry in respect of the number of nuclear facilities within or close to its boundaries. This special Radiation Monitoring in Lancashire (RADMIL) report collates data collected from 1976 to 1994 to provide a dose reconstruction for that period. It is shown that the radiation exposure of the population of Lancashire has decreased over the past twenty years. This has been due largely to a decrease in the authorised discharges from the facilities at Sellafield. Despite the fact that the advisory public dose limits have been reduced fivefold over the period, the dose to the most exposed groups has been consistently below those limits. Present contamination of the Lancashire environment is much reduced by comparison with earlier years. The accumulated effect of past discharges will mean that little further improvement can be expected, however. Similarly, dose levels to the populations are also expected to remain steady unless discharges increase again. This data compilation will form a baseline against which RADMIL can compare the results of future monitoring. (17 figures, 38 tables, 182 references) (UK).

  2. Present situation of radioactive contamination in and around the former Soviet Union's Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field missions were sent to the Semipalatinsk regions to investigate the present radioecological situation as a result of the radioactive fallout from nuclear test explosions carried out at the former Soviet Union's Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (SNTS). For this purpose, surface and core soil samples were collected at more than 60 sites, including several settlements such as Dolon, Chagan and Sarzhal, within and outside the SNTS territory. The radioactivities of long-lived radionuclides, 137Cs, 238Pu and 239,240Pu, and the atomic ratio of 240Pu/239Pu were determined in combination with non-destructive g-ray spectrometric method and radiochemical separation followed by a-particle spectrometric and/or ICP-MS methods. The results showed a distinction of 137Cs and 239,240Pu inventories in soil depending on a sampling sites. Although 137Cs was within typical environmental levels except for the area near the first nuclear test site and Balapan, 239,240Pu was at elevated levels in all areas we visited. This high Pu contamination was recognized to be due to the weapons-grade Pu from the SNTS by the measurement of 240Pu/239Pu atomic ratio in soil samples. (author)

  3. Special RADMIL report. Assessment of the past and present implications of radioactive contamination of Lancashire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The county of Lancashire in the United Kingdom has a unique relationship with the nuclear industry in respect of the number of nuclear facilities within or close to its boundaries. This special Radiation Monitoring in Lancashire (RADMIL) report collates data collected from 1976 to 1994 to provide a dose reconstruction for that period. It is shown that the radiation exposure of the population of Lancashire has decreased over the past twenty years. This has been due largely to a decrease in the authorised discharges from the facilities at Sellafield. Despite the fact that the advisory public dose limits have been reduced fivefold over the period, the dose to the most exposed groups has been consistently below those limits. Present contamination of the Lancashire environment is much reduced by comparison with earlier years. The accumulated effect of past discharges will mean that little further improvement can be expected, however. Similarly, dose levels to the populations are also expected to remain steady unless discharges increase again. This data compilation will form a baseline against which RADMIL can compare the results of future monitoring. (17 figures, 38 tables, 182 references) (UK)

  4. THE SCENARIOS APPROACH TO ATTENUATION-BASED REMEDIES FOR INORGANIC AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, K.; Rysz, M.; Truex, M.; Brady, P.; Newell, C.; Denham, M.

    2011-08-04

    Guidance materials based on use of conceptual model scenarios were developed to assist evaluation and implementation of attenuation-based remedies for groundwater and vadose zones contaminated with inorganic and radionuclide contaminants. The Scenarios approach is intended to complement the comprehensive information provided in the US EPA's Technical Protocol for Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) of Inorganic Contaminants by providing additional information on site conceptual models and extending the evaluation to consideration of Enhanced Attenuation approaches. The conceptual models incorporate the notion of reactive facies, defined as units with hydrogeochemical properties that are different from surrounding units and that react with contaminants in distinct ways. The conceptual models also incorporate consideration of biogeochemical gradients, defined as boundaries between different geochemical conditions that have been induced by waste disposal or other natural phenomena. Gradients can change over time when geochemical conditions from one area migrate into another, potentially affecting contaminant mobility. A recognition of gradients allows the attenuation-affecting conditions of a site to be projected into the future. The Scenarios approach provides a stepwise process to identify an appropriate category of conceptual model and refine it for a specific site. Scenario materials provide links to pertinent sections in the EPA technical protocol and present information about contaminant mobility and important controlling mechanism for attenuation-based remedies based on the categories of conceptual models.

  5. Present status of contamination monitoring at the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Van Nguyen [Dalat Nuclear Research Inst. (Viet Nam)

    1997-06-01

    The Dalat nuclear research reactor was renovated and upgraded from the previous TRIGA reactor. In Vietnam, it is a unique nuclear device having suitable neutron flux for the radioisotope production and neutron activation analysis. Soon after the reactor reached its initial criticality in November 1983, a programme has been formed to develop the application of nuclear techniques in various fields. In addition, the use of radioisotopes for diagnostic, therapeutic and other research purposes has been in progress. In order to support these activities, the radiation protection, especially the radiation contamination monitoring has been properly paid attention to. In DNRI, the Radiation Protection Department is responsible for controlling and supervising radiation and working safety for all activities. In this paper, the following items are described on radiation contamination monitoring: controlled area, surface contamination monitoring, and airborne concentration monitoring. (G.K.)

  6. Characteristics of the photoneutron contamination present in a high-energy radiotherapy treatment room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnica-Garza, H M [Coordinacion de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan S/N, Toluca, Estado de Mexico 50180 (Mexico)

    2005-02-07

    The photoneutron contamination arising from a high-energy medical lineal accelerator is calculated using Monte Carlo simulation, as a function of the radiation field size. The information is used to model the neutron propagation in a radiotherapy treatment room and the transmission across concrete mazes. The Monte Carlo code MCNP4C is used to model the main components of a medical lineal accelerator. Simulations were performed to calculate the photoneutron yields and spectra as a function of the radiation field size. The yield of contaminant photoneutrons is observed to increase with the size of the radiation beam, but the energy spectra remain the same, suggesting that the contamination arises from above the movable collimator. The transport of the photoneutrons across a treatment room corroborates the validity of empirical models, but the transmission across a concrete maze produces a dose-equivalent tenth-value layer that differs from previous data.

  7. Waste Contaminants at Military Bases Working Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Contaminants at Military Bases Working Group has screened six prospective demonstration projects for consideration by the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT). These projects include the Kirtland Air Force Base Demonstration Project, the March Air Force Base Demonstration Project, the McClellan Air Force Base Demonstration Project, the Williams Air Force Base Demonstration Project, and two demonstration projects under the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence. A seventh project (Port Hueneme Naval Construction Battalion Center) was added to list of prospective demonstrations after the September 1993 Working Group Meeting. This demonstration project has not been screened by the working group. Two additional Air Force remediation programs are also under consideration and are described in Section 6 of this document. The following information on prospective demonstrations was collected by the Waste Contaminants at Military Bases Working Group to assist the DOIT Committee in making Phase 1 Demonstration Project recommendations. The remainder of this report is organized into seven sections: Work Group Charter's mission and vision; contamination problems, current technology limitations, and institutional and regulatory barriers to technology development and commercialization, and work force issues; screening process for initial Phase 1 demonstration technologies and sites; demonstration descriptions -- good matches;demonstration descriptions -- close matches; additional candidate demonstration projects; and next steps

  8. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  9. MERCURY CONTAMINATION OF FISHES IN THE SECOND SONGHUA RIVER OF CHINA: PRESENT AND HISTORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; WANG Qi-Chao; SHAO Zhi-Guo

    2005-01-01

    The mercury content in 158 fishes and 28 mussels in the Second Songhua river were detected. The range of mercury concentrations in fishes and mussels was 0.02-0.66 mg/kg and 0.002-0.056 mg/kg, respectively. The history change of mercury content in fishes was analyzed in this paper. From upstream to downstream, the average mercury concentrations in fishes increased with the increase of the distance to the headstream, then decreased in the downstream of Wujiazhan town (sampling site). The fact illuminated that the source of mercury contamination was mercury in sediment. In the different species of fishes, the mercury concentration in Parasiburus asvtus was the highest and the order of mercury distribution in fishes was: the mercury value in fishes in the river bottom >that in fishes in the surface and that in predacious fishes>that in herbivorous fishes. In the investigation, there were amount of fishes whose mercury value exceeded the criterion for that in fishes that suggested that the mercury contamination in the Second Songhua River have not completely been eliminated until now.

  10. Online prediction for contamination of chlortetracycline fermentation based on Dezert-Smarandache theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianwen Yang; Xiangguang Chen; Huaiping Jin

    2015-01-01

    Fermentative production of chlortetracycline is a complex fed-batch bioprocess. It generally takes over 90 h for cultivation and is often contaminated by undesired microorganisms. Once the fermentation system is contami-nated to certain extent, the product quality and yield wil be seriously affected, leading to a substantial economic loss. Using information fusion based on the Dezer–Smarandache theory, self-recursive wavelet neural network and unscented kalman filter, a novel method for online prediction of contamination is developed. Al state vari-ables of culture process involving easy-to-measure and difficult-to-measure variables commonly obtained with soft-sensors present their contamination symptoms. By extracting and fusing latent information from the chang-ing trend of each variable, integral and accurate prediction results for contamination can be achieved. This makes preventive and corrective measures be taken promptly. The field experimental results show that the method can be used to detect the contamination in time, reducing production loss and enhancing economic efficiency.

  11. Present and potential contamination of the river system at Mayak PA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of mobility of radionuclides in environmental samples at Mayak show that strontium-90 is the most mobile of the relevant radionuclides and hence can be transported by river water. Cesium-137, although less mobile, can also be transported over large distances. The main source of river contamination today is the remobilization of strontium-90 from the boggy area at the upper reaches of Techa River (Asanov Swamp). Regular Russian monitoring programmes show that levels of strontium-90 leaving the swamp are three times higher than levels entering the swamp. The net outflow from the Swamp is now estimated to 2-3% of the 37 TBq of strontium-90 located in the swamp, 1992 levels

  12. Transit time distributions to assess present and future contamination risk of karst aquifers over Europe and the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Gleeson, Tom; Wada, Yoshihide; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Karst develops through the dissolution of carbonate rock. Karst groundwater in Europe is a major source of fresh water contributing up to half of the total drinking water supply in some countries. Climate model projections suggest that in the next 100 years, karst regions will experience a strong increase in temperature and a serious decrease of precipitation - especially in the Mediterranean region. Previous work showed that the karstic preferential recharge processes result in enhanced recharge rates and future climate sensitivity. But as there is fast water flow form the surface to the aquifer, there is also an enhanced risk of groundwater contamination. In this study we will assess the contamination risk of karst aquifers over Europe and the Mediterranean using simulated transit time distributions. Using a new type of semi-distributed model that considers the spatial heterogeneity of the karst system by distribution functions we simulated a range of spatially variable pathways of karstic groundwater recharge. The model is driven by the bias-corrected 5 GCMs of the ISI-MIP project (RCP8.5). Transit time distributions are calculated by virtual tracer experiments. These are repeated several times in the present (1991-2010) and the future (2080-2099). We can show that regions with larger fractions of preferential recharge show higher risks of contamination and that spatial patterns of contamination risk change towards the future.

  13. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  14. Development of microprocessor-based hand and foot contamination monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the improvements and revisions of a microprocessor-based hand and foot contamination monitor, manufactured in fiscal year 1988. The main revisions were the change of CPU from i8088 to one chip microcontroller i8752BH that enables the reduction of electronic parts used, the change of detectors from pancake type GM tubes to flat type ones with large active area, which eliminated the dead spots resulted from using pancake type detectors, and the change of message display device from plasma display to LED and LCD to make the man-machine interface function effective. (author)

  15. GPS-based handheld device for mapping contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sometimes one is confronted with the challenge to map large areas with enhanced radioactivity. Examples are mine tailings or waste rock piles, deposits of the phosphate industry, flooding zones contaminated by effluents of plants processing ores containing enhanced natural radiation, nuclear accident sites etc. Car borne measuring equipment is not always an option, as the terrain might be rough and only accessible by foot. Airborne mapping with helicopters on the other hand is fast, but expensive, not readily available, shows difficulties with complex topography and lacks the necessary detail. The objective of this study was to create a portable and easily usable tool for the real time logging of radiation and location data, allowing mapping the radioactivity by simply walking over any kind of terrain with the portable equipment and post processing the data in the office. We also assessed the performance of the GPS based system on contaminated sites with areas varying from less than a hectare to several tens of hectares, with respect to speed, precision and ease of use. At sites of large scale mining and processing of uranium ore, tailings and waste rock piles are today the most visible relics of the uranium extractive industry. These mining relics are constantly subjected to weathering and leaching processes causing the dissemination of radioactive and toxic elements and sometimes requiring remedial operations. The in situ remediation of waste rock piles usually includes their revegetation for minimizing the water infiltration and for increasing surface soil stability. Thanks to its biomass density and longevity, the perennial vegetation plays an important role in stabilisation of the water cycling. The buffer role of forest vegetation can reduce water export from watersheds as well as erosion and hydrological losses of chemicals including radionuclides from contaminated sites. If long term reduction of contaminant dispersion at revegetated uranium mining sites is

  16. The organic contamination level based on the total soil mass is not a proper index of the soil contamination intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of organic contaminants in common productive soils based on the total soil mass give a misleading account of actual contamination effects. This is attributed to the fact that productive soils are essentially water-saturated, with the result that the soil uptake of organic compounds occurs principally by partition into the soil organic matter (SOM). This report illustrates that the soil contamination intensity of a compound is governed by the concentration in the SOM (Com) rather than by the concentration in whole soil (Cs). Supporting data consist of the measured levels and toxicities of many pesticides in soils of widely differing SOM contents and the related levels in in-situ crops that defy explanation by the Cs values. This SOM-based index is timely needed for evaluating the contamination effects of food crops grown in different soils and for establishing a dependable priority ranking for intended remediation of numerous contamination sites. - The concentration of an organic compound in soil based on the entire soil mass is not a proper measure of its contamination intensity.

  17. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented materials consist of presentations of international workshop which held in Warsaw from 4 to 5 October 2007. Main subject of the meeting was progress in manufacturing as well as research program development for neutron detector which is planned to be placed at GANIL laboratory and will be used in nuclear spectroscopy research

  18. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vicente

    2013-06-01

    effectivities more than a number of fixed essential characteristics. Luiz Artur Ferrareto (UFRGS, undertaking a theoretical proposal for categorizing radio content in four different levels of planning (segment, form, programming and content itself tries to “compare and contrast the practices of Brazilian commercial broadcasting companies to those used on the radio in the United States, a reference market for our national entrepreneurs”. Madalena Oliveira (University of Minho focuses on the current stage of communication researches in Portugal reflecting on the challenges for studying a culture based on listening in times of looking. Marko Ala-Fossi, (University of Tampere beginning with the statement that “radio evolution greatly depends not only on the cultural context of a country but also on the whole social, political, economic development of societies” gives us a projection on radio development around the world for the next decades. Closing the dossier, Rafael Duarte Oliveira Venancio (UFU assuming radio as language by definition and not as a device understands it as a section and an operating model in such language as it intersects the world. Another six articles, not enrolled in the dossier, round the edition off. Fernando de Tacca debates the category of “photocine” recurring to three recent Spanish productions. Gustavo Souza investigates the possibility of identifying a point of view in documentary movies while establishing a debate that joins the materialities of image and sound with the subjectivity resulting from interpretation. Vinicius Bandeira develops on the special duplicity present in the movies between what is and what is not subsumed by the camera. Neide Jallageas proposes the study of visual communication design from the first modelings, attempting especially to the radical propositions from the early XXth century avant-garde movement. Gilson Schwartz debates on the impact from the distribution of videogames as hegemonic cultural practice in

  19. A Likelihood-Based Approach to Identifying Contaminated Food Products Using Sales Data: Performance and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufman, James; Lessler, Justin; Harry, April; Edlund, Stefan; Hu, Kun; Douglas, Judith; Thoens, Christian; Appel, Bernd; Käsbohrer, Annemarie; Filter, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne disease outbreaks of recent years demonstrate that due to increasingly interconnected supply chains these type of crisis situations have the potential to affect thousands of people, leading to significant healthcare costs, loss of revenue for food companies, and—in the worst cases—death. When a disease outbreak is detected, identifying the contaminated food quickly is vital to minimize suffering and limit economic losses. Here we present a likelihood-based approach that has the pote...

  20. A likelihood-based approach to identifying contaminated food products using sales data: performance and challenges.

    OpenAIRE

    James Kaufman; Justin Lessler; April Harry; Stefan Edlund; Kun Hu; Judith Douglas; Christian Thoens; Bernd Appel; Annemarie Käsbohrer; Matthias Filter

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne disease outbreaks of recent years demonstrate that due to increasingly interconnected supply chains these type of crisis situations have the potential to affect thousands of people, leading to significant healthcare costs, loss of revenue for food companies, and--in the worst cases--death. When a disease outbreak is detected, identifying the contaminated food quickly is vital to minimize suffering and limit economic losses. Here we present a likelihood-based approach that has the po...

  1. A Likelihood-Based Approach to Identifying Contaminated Food Products Using Sales Data: Performance and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    James Kaufman; Justin Lessler; April Harry; Stefan Edlund; Kun Hu; Judith Douglas; Christian Thoens; Bernd Appel; Annemarie Käsbohrer; Matthias Filter

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne disease outbreaks of recent years demonstrate that due to increasingly interconnected supply chains these type of crisis situations have the potential to affect thousands of people, leading to significant healthcare costs, loss of revenue for food companies, and--in the worst cases--death. When a disease outbreak is detected, identifying the contaminated food quickly is vital to minimize suffering and limit economic losses. Here we present a likelihood-based approach that has the po...

  2. Biofuel and other biomass based products from contaminated sites - Potentials and barriers from Swedish perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson-Skoeld, Yvonne; Enell, Anja; Rihm, Thomas; Haglund, Kristina; Wik, Ola (Swedish Geotechnical Institute, Linkoeping (Sweden)); Blom, Sonja; Angelbratt, Alexandra (FB Engineering AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Bardos, Paul (r3 Environmental Technology Ltd, Reading (United Kingdom)); Track, Thomas (DECHEMA e. V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)); Keuning, Sytze (Bioclear b.v., Groningen (Netherlands))

    2009-07-01

    In this report, results are presented based on interviews and literature surveys on the triggers and stoppers for non food crop on contaminated land in Sweden. The report also includes a first estimate of potential marginal land for biofuel production in Sweden. The report is a first step to explore the feasibility of a range of possible approaches to combine risk based land management (RBLM) with non-food crop land-uses and organic matter re-use as appropriate in a Swedish context. The focus of the report is on the treatment of contaminated land by phyto-remediation and on biofuel cultivation. In Sweden, like all other countries in Europe, areas of land have been degraded by past use. Such previously developed land includes areas affected by mining, fallout from industrial processes such as smelting, areas elevated with contaminated dredged sediments, former landfill sites and many other areas where the decline of industrial activity has left a legacy of degraded land and communities. The extent of contamination may not be sufficient to trigger remediation under current regulatory conditions, and there may be little economic incentive to regenerate the affected areas. An ideal solution would be a land management approach that is able to pay for itself. Biomass from coppice or other plantations has long been seen as a possible means of achieving this goal. Phyto remediation offers a low cost method for remediation of areas that are not candidates for conventional regeneration. The optimal conditions for phyto remediation are large land areas of low or mediate contamination. Phyto remediation is also suitable to prevent spreading of contaminants, for example in green areas such as in cities, as waste water buffer and small size remediation areas with diffuse spreading. Phyto remediation implies that plants, fungi or algae are used to remediate, control or increase the natural attenuation of contaminants. Depending on the contaminating species and the site conditions

  3. Laser-based characterization and decontamination of contaminated facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines the application of laser ablation to the characterization and decontamination of painted and unpainted concrete and metal surfaces that are typical of many facilities within the US Department of Energy complex. The utility of this promising technology is reviewed and the essential requirements for efficient ablation extracted. Recent data obtained on the ablation of painted steel surfaces and concrete are presented. The affects of beam irradiance, ablation speed and efficiency, and characteristics of the aerosol effluent are discussed. Characterization of the ablated components of the surface offers the ability of concurrent determination of the level of contamination. This concept can be applied online where the ablation endpoint can be determined. A conceptual system for the characterization and decontamination of surfaces is proposed

  4. International workshop on scientific bases for decision making after a radioactive contamination of an urban environment. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This workshop aims to discuss the most important aspects of scientific bases for decision making after a radioactive contamination in urban environment and to identify some scientific, social and economic open questions. Papers explaining in more details the principles of intervention, computational capabilities and measurements after a contamination of urban areas are presented. A review on practical experiences from Chernobyl and Goiania accidents is also included

  5. International workshop on scientific bases for decision making after a radioactive contamination of an urban environment. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This workshop aims to discuss the most important aspects of scientific bases for decision making after a radioactive contamination in urban environment and to identify some scientific, social and economic open questions. Papers explaining in more details the principles of intervention, computational capabilities and measurements after a contamination of urban areas are presented. A review on practical experiences from Chernobyl and Goiania accidents is also included.

  6. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PARIS meeting held in Cracow, Poland from 14 to 15 May 2007. The main subjects discussed during this meeting were the status of international project dedicated to gamma spectroscopy research. The scientific research program includes investigations of giant dipole resonance, probe of hot nuclei induced in heavy reactions, Jacobi shape transitions, isospin mixing and nuclear multifragmentation. The mentioned programme needs Rand D development such as new scintillations materials as lanthanum chlorides and bromides as well as new photo detection sensors as avalanche photodiodes - such subjects are also subjects of discussion. Additionally results of computerized simulations of scintillation detectors properties by means of GEANT- 4 code are presented

  7. Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Vicente; Rosana de Lima Soares; Eduardo Victorio Morettin

    2013-01-01

    In the present edition of Significação – Scientific Journal for Audiovisual Culture and in the others to follow something new is brought: the presence of thematic dossiers which are to be organized by invited scholars. The appointed subject for the very first one of them was Radio and the invited scholar, Eduardo Vicente, professor at the Graduate Course in Audiovisual and at the Postgraduate Program in Audiovisual Media and Processes of the School of Communication and Arts of the University ...

  8. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Freire Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This dossier focuses on one of the essential debate topics today about the territorial dimension of the new development strategies concerned with the worsening of the global socioecological crisis, that is: the challenges related to the activation and integration in networks of localized agri-food systems. For its composition, some contributions presented and debated during the VI International Conference on Localized Agri-food System - The LAFS facing the opportunities and challenges of the new global context have been gathered. The event took place in the city of Florianópolis, from May 21th to 25th of 2013. The event was promoted by the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC and by the Center for the International Cooperation on Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD. Besides UFSC and CIRAD, EPAGRI, State University of Santa Catarina (UDESC, as well as research institutes and universities from other states (UFMG, IEA/SP, UFS, UFRGS and Mexican and Argentinian partners from the RED SIAL Latino Americana also participated in the organization of lectures, discussion tables and workshops.

  9. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidor Marí Mayans

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available As was the case at the conference, "Humanities professions in the knowledge society", the Director of Humanities and Philology Studies at the UOC, Isidor Marí, presents this Dossier, and the subsequent virtual debate, with the aim of gaining useful conclusions, with specific repercussions on the organisation of the degree studies and its professional projection, especially at this time, which requires study plans to be redesigned in line with the Bologna process. In the author's opinion, we can only make the right operative decisions when we are able to understand the transformations taking place in the humanistic culture framed by the knowledge society, and to do so, debate has to be opened in which students, graduates, academics, researchers, professionals and analysts can all take part.In this article, Isidor Marí analyses the tensions and contradictions that arise when attempts are made to relate the concepts of the professional world, Humanities and the knowledge society. Firstly, neither are Humanities a profession nor the study of Humanities seen by students or society to be adaptable to the definition of professional profiles. However, this highlights an important paradox, as the culture economy, (and, thus, occupations in the cultural sector, is growing increasingly throughout western societies. Likewise, in terms of the relationship between Humanities and the knowledge society, the author describes and analyses how there currently coexist voices foreseeing the worst alongside those that see information and communications technologies opening the way for an enormously positive transformation in human civilisation and a new cultural era.

  10. Community-Based Presentations in the Unit Operations Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brian S.; Law, Victor J.

    2005-01-01

    A method for incorporating community­-based oral presentations into the undergraduate chemical engineering unit operations laboratory experience is described. Examples are given of appropriate topics and how these presentations can be incorporated into the experiment sequence. Course evaluations reflect the fact that these presentations are an…

  11. Risk-Based Approach for Thermal Treatment of Soils Contaminated with Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cocârţă D. M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the actual context of limited soil resources and the significant degree of environmental pollution, public administrations and authorities are interested in restoring contaminated sites paying attention to the impact of these soils on human health. This paper aims to present the efficiency of the the incineration as a method for treatment of the contaminated soils t based on human health risk assessment. Through various experimentations, the following metals have been studied: Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Cr, Co, Cd, Hg, As and Be. The most important and interesting results concerning both thermal treatment removal efficiency and associated human health risk assessments were achieved concerning Cd, Pb and Ni contaminants. The behavior of Cadmium (Cd, Lead (Pb and Nickel (Ni concentrations from heavy metals incineration soil has been analyzed for three incineration temperatures (600°C, 800°C and 1000°C and two resident times of soil within the incineration reactor (30 min. and 60 min.. In this case, the level of contaminants in the treated soil can be reduced but not enough to ensure an acceptable risk for human health.

  12. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicanor Lopes

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Journal Caminhando debuts with a new editorial format: eachmagazine will have a Dossier.In 2010 Christianity celebrated the centenary of Edinburgh. TheWorld Missionary Conference in Edinburgh in 1910 is regarded by manyas missiological watershed in the missionary and ecumenical movement.So the Faculty of Theology of the Methodist Church (FATEO decidedto organize a Wesleyan Week discussing the issue of mission. For anevent of this magnitude FATEO invited the Rev. Dr. Wesley Ariarajah,Methodist pastor and teacher of Sri Lanka with extensive experience inpastoral ministry in local churches and professor of History of Religionsand the New Testament at the Theological College of Lanka, maintainedby the Protestant Churches in Sri Lanka. In 1981 he was invited to jointhe World Council of Churches, where he presided for over ten years theCouncil of Interreligious Dialogue. From 1992 he served as Deputy GeneralSecretary of the WCC.The following texts are not the speeches of the Rev. Dr. WesleyAriarajah, for they will be published separately. Nevertheless, the journaldialogs with the celebrations of the centenary of Edinburgh, parting formthe intriguing theme: "Mission in the 21st century in Brazil". After all, howis it that mission takes place among us in personal, church, and communityactivities?Within the Dossier, as common to the journal, the textos are organizedas follows: Bible, Theology / History and Pastoral Care. Other items thatdo not fit within the Dossier, but, do articulate mission, can be found inthe section Declarations and Documents and Book Reviews.The authors of the Dossier have important considerations in buildinga contemporary missiological concept considering Brazilian reality.Anderson de Oliveira, in the Bible-Section, presents a significantexegeses of Matthew 26.6-13. What does it mean when Jesus is quotedwith the words: "For the poor always ye have with you, but me ye havenot always." Is this declaration challenging the gospels

  13. Quantification of Human and Animal Viruses to Differentiate the Origin of the Fecal Contamination Present in Environmental Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Bofill-Mas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many different viruses are excreted by humans and animals and are frequently detected in fecal contaminated waters causing public health concerns. Classical bacterial indicator such as E. coli and enterococci could fail to predict the risk for waterborne pathogens such as viruses. Moreover, the presence and levels of bacterial indicators do not always correlate with the presence and concentration of viruses, especially when these indicators are present in low concentrations. Our research group has proposed new viral indicators and methodologies for determining the presence of fecal pollution in environmental samples as well as for tracing the origin of this fecal contamination (microbial source tracking. In this paper, we examine to what extent have these indicators been applied by the scientific community. Recently, quantitative assays for quantification of poultry and ovine viruses have also been described. Overall, quantification by qPCR of human adenoviruses and human polyomavirus JC, porcine adenoviruses, bovine polyomaviruses, chicken/turkey parvoviruses, and ovine polyomaviruses is suggested as a toolbox for the identification of human, porcine, bovine, poultry, and ovine fecal pollution in environmental samples.

  14. Biofuel and other biomass based products from contaminated sites - Potentials and barriers from Swedish perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson-Skoeld, Yvonne; Enell, Anja; Rihm, Thomas; Haglund, Kristina; Wik, Ola (Swedish Geotechnical Institute, Linkoeping (Sweden)); Blom, Sonja; Angelbratt, Alexandra (FB Engineering AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Bardos, Paul (r3 Environmental Technology Ltd, Reading (United Kingdom)); Track, Thomas (DECHEMA e. V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)); Keuning, Sytze (Bioclear b.v., Groningen (Netherlands))

    2009-07-01

    In this report, results are presented based on interviews and literature surveys on the triggers and stoppers for non food crop on contaminated land in Sweden. The report also includes a first estimate of potential marginal land for biofuel production in Sweden. The report is a first step to explore the feasibility of a range of possible approaches to combine risk based land management (RBLM) with non-food crop land-uses and organic matter re-use as appropriate in a Swedish context. The focus of the report is on the treatment of contaminated land by phyto-remediation and on biofuel cultivation. In Sweden, like all other countries in Europe, areas of land have been degraded by past use. Such previously developed land includes areas affected by mining, fallout from industrial processes such as smelting, areas elevated with contaminated dredged sediments, former landfill sites and many other areas where the decline of industrial activity has left a legacy of degraded land and communities. The extent of contamination may not be sufficient to trigger remediation under current regulatory conditions, and there may be little economic incentive to regenerate the affected areas. An ideal solution would be a land management approach that is able to pay for itself. Biomass from coppice or other plantations has long been seen as a possible means of achieving this goal. Phyto remediation offers a low cost method for remediation of areas that are not candidates for conventional regeneration. The optimal conditions for phyto remediation are large land areas of low or mediate contamination. Phyto remediation is also suitable to prevent spreading of contaminants, for example in green areas such as in cities, as waste water buffer and small size remediation areas with diffuse spreading. Phyto remediation implies that plants, fungi or algae are used to remediate, control or increase the natural attenuation of contaminants. Depending on the contaminating species and the site conditions

  15. Recent advances in nanoparticle based aptasensors for food contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Ragavan, K V; Thakur, M S; Raghavarao, K S M S

    2015-12-15

    Food safety and hazard analysis is a prime concern of human life, thus quality assessment of food and water is the need of the day. Recent advances in nano-biotechnology play a significant role in providing possible solutions for developing highly sensitive and affordable detection tools for food analysis. Nanomaterials based aptasensors hold great potential to overcome the drawbacks of conventional analytical techniques. Aptamers comprise a novel class of highly specific bio-recognition elements which are produced by SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) process. They bind to target molecules by folding into 3D structures that can discriminate different chiral compounds. The flexibility in making modifications in aptamers contribute to the design of biosensors, enabling the generation of bio-recognition elements for a wide variety of target molecules. Nanomaterials such as metal nanoparticles, metal nanoclusters, metal oxide nanoparticles, metal and carbon quantum dots, graphene, carbon nanotubes and nanocomposites enable higher sensitivity by signal amplification and introduce several novel transduction principles such as enhanced chemiluminescence, fluorescence, Raman signals, electrochemical signals, enhanced catalytic activity, and super-paramagnetic properties to the biosensor. Although there are a few reviews published recently which deal with the potential of aptamers in various fields, none are devoted exclusively to the potential of aptasensors based on nanomaterials for the analysis of food contaminants. Hence, the current review discusses several transduction systems and their principles used in aptamer based nanosensors which have been developed in the past five years, the challenges faced in their designing, along with their strengths and limitations. PMID:26190473

  16. Bayesian based design of real-time sensor systems for high-risk indoor contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreedharan, Priya [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    -system performance and offset the need for more contaminant sensors. Physics- and algorithm-based frameworks are presented for selecting and fusing information from noncontaminant sensors. The frameworks are demonstrated with door-position sensors, which are found to be more useful in natural airflow conditions, but which cannot compensate for poor placement of contaminant sensors. The concepts and empirical findings have the potential to help in the design of sensor systems for more complex building systems. The research has broader relevance to additional environmental monitoring problems, fault detection and diagnostics, and system design.

  17. Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains 5 appendices. Title listing are: technologies for recovery of transuranics; nondestructive assay of TRU contaminated wastes; miscellaneous waste characteristics; acceptance criteria for TRU waste; and TRU waste treatment technologies

  18. Insulator Contamination Forecasting Based on Fractal Analysis of Leakage Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Luo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an artificial pollution test is carried out to study the leakage current of porcelain insulators. Fractal theory is adopted to extract the characteristics hidden in leakage current waveforms. Fractal dimensions of the leakage current for the security, forecast and danger zones are analyzed under four types of degrees of contamination. The mean value and the standard deviation of the fractal dimension in the forecast zone are calculated to characterize the differences. The analysis reveals large differences in the fractal dimension of leakage current under different contamination discharge stages and degrees. The experimental and calculation results suggest that the fractal dimension of a leakage current waveform can be used as a new indicator of the discharge process and contamination degree of insulators. The results provide new methods and valid indicators for forecasting contamination flashovers.

  19. Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniazewycz, B.G.; McArthur, W.C.

    1980-07-01

    This volume contains 5 appendices. Title listing are: technologies for recovery of transuranics; nondestructive assay of TRU contaminated wastes; miscellaneous waste characteristics; acceptance criteria for TRU waste; and TRU waste treatment technologies.

  20. Map Visualizations Of Contaminated Water - Usability Research In Zimbabwe: GIS Supported Organization And Presentation Of Data On Contaminated Water Caused By Mining Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Sørjoten, Merete

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this project was to find a method for organization and visualization of water contamination in a mining area north of Harare in Zimbabwe. This was important because it does not exist a synopsis that gives a good picture of the situation of contamination in the area. There is many people living there, and they are dependent on water to survive. Some measurement data from the ground water and from the river flowing through the area has been taken earlier. Those measurement data were ...

  1. Historical and Present Day Mercury Contamination From Gold Mining in Three Feeding Guilds of Bats From the Peruvian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Divoll, T.

    2014-12-01

    Miners in many countries use mercury as an amalgam to separate gold from river sediments. In the last twenty years the price of gold has risen and the number of small-scale, artisanal gold mining operations in the Amazon basin have also increased. The influx of mercury into natural river systems has detrimental consequences for the surrounding ecosystem and for organisms, particularly those at higher trophic levels. Toxic mercury levels have been shown to impair reproductive, neurological and behavioral functioning of organisms. I used bats (Chiroptera) as a mammalian model system to study mercury contamination and accumulation due to gold mining from field caught and museum collection specimens in Amazonian Perú and showed that: (1) Total mercury concentrations in Amazonian bat species have increased over time since the 1920's; (2) Bat species from sites with current active mining have higher concentrations of mercury than non-mining sites, with some species having levels exceeding those considered toxic for mammals; (3) Higher trophic levels of bats (piscivores and insectivores) bioaccumulate more mercury than bats of lower trophic levels (frugivores); (4) Bats located in present day uncontaminated sites have the same mercury levels as bats collected in the 1920's from the Amazon basin. The variety of bat feeding guilds allowed for a comparison of how mercury accumulation is affected by diet within one taxonomic order. The novel use of museum specimens allowed for a look back into the historical timeline of mercury contamination in the Amazon basin. Bats represent a new and exciting study system since, like humans, they are mammals and should therefore show similar neurochemical and behavioral responses to this toxic element.

  2. Monitoring contamination due to materials outgassing by QCM-based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirri, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    F. Dirri, E. Palomba, A. Longobardo, D. Biondi, A. Boccaccini, E. Zampetti, B. Saggin, D. Scaccabarozzi, A. Tortora, A. Nanni, J. Alves, A. Tighe Outgassing from spacecraft materials often occurs and degassing contaminants can degrade critical spacecraft surfaces, such as optical systems, solar panels, thermal radiators and thermal management systems. The main contaminants are the water adsorbed by cold surface, organics from spacecraft structure, electronics, insulation and thrusters firings [1]. Thus, it is fundamental to monitor these low-outgassing rates especially in a long duration mission: Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) based sensors (i.e. single and double crystal configurations) are a suitable instruments to monitor step by step these degradation processes which occur in space conditions. The Contamination Assessment Microbalance (CAM) is a device aimed at monitoring in-orbit contamination of sensitive surfaces and payloads on ESA's future satellites. The device, developed by a consortium of Italian research Institutes, is based on QCM technology, previously considered by NASA and ESA experiments performed on Space Shuttle and satellite missions [2,3,4]. CAM is a low mass (200 grams for the sensor head), low volume (smaller than 5x5x5 cm3 for the sensor head) and low power consumption (less than 1.5 W) sensor. The device is composed by: 1) the Sensor Head, containing a sensing crystal (which measures the deposited contaminant mass), a reference crystal (used as frequency reference), their related Proximity Electronics (PE) and a Temperature Control System (TCS); 2) the Main Electronics Unit (MEU), which acquires the signal in output from Sensor Head unit; 3) the Harness connecting Sensor Head and MEU; 4) the User Interface (UI) to read and display the data. The device shows several improvements, i.e. possibility to measure directly the crystal temperature (with an accuracy better than 0.1°C), large measurable mass range (from 5•10-9 to 7•10-4 g/cm2

  3. Review of contamination monitoring systems based on large area plastic scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the applicability of wide area plastic scintillation detectors for contamination monitoring in radiation facilities. Plastic scintillation detectors have proved themselves to be more compliant for beta/gamma contamination monitoring. The detector discussed in this paper has an area of ∼ 500 cm2 and is coupled to matching light guide with an embedded 2 pi sensitive photomultiplier tube. Three systems based on these detectors have been developed and evaluated for their performance. These are (i) Ground surface contamination monitor; (ii) Hand and Foot contamination monitor and (iii) Handheld contamination monitor. A brief review of the experience gained in this development work has been described. The contamination monitoring systems developed with the plastic scintillation detectors are very effective for estimation of contamination in all radiation facilities where beta/gamma contamination levels on ground surfaces, hands and feet of radiation workers as well as their clothes and shoes are to be assessed. The systems equipped with a user friendly interface and high degree of personal comfort to the user serve to help check beta/gamma contamination associated radiation risks. The systems provide a visual alarm to flag contamination levels much lower than the limits fixed by the regulatory authorities

  4. Emerging contaminants in the environment: Risk-based analysis for better management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Ravi; Arias Espana, Victor Andres; Liu, Yanju; Jit, Joytishna

    2016-07-01

    Emerging contaminants (ECs) are chemicals of a synthetic origin or deriving from a natural source that has recently been discovered and for which environmental or public health risks are yet to be established. This is due to limited available information on their interaction and toxicological impacts on receptors. Several types of ECs exist such as antibiotics, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, effluents, certain naturally occurring contaminants and more recently nanomaterials. ECs may derive from a known source, for example released directly to the aquatic environment from direct discharges such as those from wastewater treatment plants. Although in most instances the direct source cannot be identified, ECs have been detected in virtually every country's natural environment and as a consequence they represent a global problem. There is very limited information on the fate and transport of ECs in the environment and their toxicological impact. This lack of information can be attributed to limited financial resources and the lack of analytical techniques for detecting their effects on ecosystems and human health on their own or as mixture. We do not know how ECs interact with each other or various contaminants. This paper presents an overview of existing knowledge on ECs, their fate and transport and a risk-based analysis for ECs management and complementary strategies. PMID:27062002

  5. Evidence based decontamination protocols for the removal of external Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) from contaminated hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvivier, Wilco F; Peeters, Ruth J P; van Beek, Teris A; Nielen, Michel W F

    2016-02-01

    External contamination can cause false positive results in forensic hair testing for drugs of abuse and is therefore a major concern when hair evidence is used in court. Current literature about decontamination strategies is mainly focused on external cocaine contamination and no consensus on the best decontamination procedure for hair samples containing cannabinoids has been reached so far. In this study, different protocols with solvents, both organic as well as aqueous, were tested on blank and drug user hair for their performance on removing external cannabis contamination originating from either smoke or indirect contact with cannabis plant material. Smoke contamination was mimicked by exposing hair samples to smoke from a cannabis cigarette and indirect contact contamination by handling hair with cannabis contaminated gloves or hands. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) levels in the hair samples and wash solvents were determined using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Aqueous surfactant solutions removed more THC contamination compared to water, but much less than organic solvents. Methanol, dichloromethane and chloroform were most efficient in removing THC contamination. Due to its lower environmental impact, methanol was chosen as the preferred decontamination solvent. After testing of different sequential wash steps on externally contaminated blank hair, three protocols performed equally well, removing all normal level and more than 99% of unrealistically high levels of external cannabis contamination. Thorough testing on cannabis users' hair, both as such and after deliberate contamination, showed that using these protocols all contamination could be washed from the hair while no incorporated THC was removed from truly positive samples. The present study provides detailed scientific evidence in support of the recommendations of the Society of Hair Testing: a protocol using a single methanol wash followed by a single aqueous

  6. Challenge Based Innovation @ mediterranean - final presentations & prototype expo

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Challenge Based Innovation @ mediterranean - Final presentations & prototype expo Challenge Based Innovation (CBI) is a six-month project course, where multidisciplinary student teams and their instructors collaborate with researchers at CERN to discover novel solutions for the future of humankind. The projects are an elaborate mixture, where societal, human-driven needs meet research at CERN. More info about CBI from the course website, cbi-course.com The Gala on 10.12. will introduce the proof-of concept prototypes the four student teams have developed to answer a wide range of societal challenges, inspired by people and research at CERN.   Dress code: a suit / dress  is not required - come as you are! Register for live attendance & CERN access for external visitors. Webcast and/or recorded presentations will be available here in the Indico page for anyone interested.  The space is limited to 50 participants, so act quickly! &...

  7. Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, W.C.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1980-07-01

    This report outlines the sources, quantities, characteristics and treatment of transuranic wastes in the United States. This document serves as part of the data base necessary to complete preparation and initiate implementation of transuranic wastes, waste forms, waste container and packaging standards and criteria suitable for inclusion in the present NRC waste management program. No attempt is made to evaluate or analyze the suitability of one technology over another. Indeed, by the nature of this report, there is little critical evaluation or analysis of technologies because such analysis is only appropriate when evaluating a particular application or transuranic waste streams. Due to fiscal restriction, the data base is developed from a myriad of technical sources and does not necessarily contain operating experience and the current status of all technologies. Such an effort was beyond the scope of this report.

  8. Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report outlines the sources, quantities, characteristics and treatment of transuranic wastes in the United States. This document serves as part of the data base necessary to complete preparation and initiate implementation of transuranic wastes, waste forms, waste container and packaging standards and criteria suitable for inclusion in the present NRC waste management program. No attempt is made to evaluate or analyze the suitability of one technology over another. Indeed, by the nature of this report, there is little critical evaluation or analysis of technologies because such analysis is only appropriate when evaluating a particular application or transuranic waste streams. Due to fiscal restriction, the data base is developed from a myriad of technical sources and does not necessarily contain operating experience and the current status of all technologies. Such an effort was beyond the scope of this report

  9. Health Risk-Based Assessment and Management of Heavy Metals-Contaminated Soil Sites in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zueng-Sang Chen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Risk-based assessment is a way to evaluate the potential hazards of contaminated sites and is based on considering linkages between pollution sources, pathways, and receptors. These linkages can be broken by source reduction, pathway management, and modifying exposure of the receptors. In Taiwan, the Soil and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Act (SGWPR Act uses one target regulation to evaluate the contamination status of soil and groundwater pollution. More than 600 sites contaminated with heavy metals (HMs have been remediated and the costs of this process are always high. Besides using soil remediation techniques to remove contaminants from these sites, the selection of possible remediation methods to obtain rapid risk reduction is permissible and of increasing interest. This paper discusses previous soil remediation techniques applied to different sites in Taiwan and also clarified the differences of risk assessment before and after soil remediation obtained by applying different risk assessment models. This paper also includes many case studies on: (1 food safety risk assessment for brown rice growing in a HMs-contaminated site; (2 a tiered approach to health risk assessment for a contaminated site; (3 risk assessment for phytoremediation techniques applied in HMs-contaminated sites; and (4 soil remediation cost analysis for contaminated sites in Taiwan.

  10. Detection of water-quality contamination events based on multi-sensor fusion using an extented Dempster-Shafer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Dibo; He, Huimei; Huang, Pingjie; Zhang, Guangxin; Loaiciga, Hugo

    2013-05-01

    This study presents a method for detecting contamination events of sources of drinking water based on the Dempster-Shafer (D-S) evidence theory. The detection method has the purpose of protecting water supply systems against accidental and intentional contamination events. This purpose is achieved by first predicting future water-quality parameters using an autoregressive (AR) model. The AR model predicts future water-quality parameters using recent measurements of these parameters made with automated (on-line) water-quality sensors. Next, a probabilistic method assigns probabilities to the time series of residuals formed by comparing predicted water-quality parameters with threshold values. Finally, the D-S fusion method searches for anomalous probabilities of the residuals and uses the result of that search to determine whether the current water quality is normal (that is, free of pollution) or contaminated. The D-S fusion method is extended and improved in this paper by weighted averaging of water-contamination evidence and by the analysis of the persistence of anomalous probabilities of water-quality parameters. The extended D-S fusion method makes determinations that have a high probability of being correct concerning whether or not a source of drinking water has been contaminated. This paper's method for detecting water-contamination events was tested with water-quality time series from automated (on-line) water quality sensors. In addition, a small-scale, experimental, water-pipe network was tested to detect water-contamination events. The two tests demonstrated that the extended D-S fusion method achieves a low false alarm rate and high probabilities of detecting water contamination events.

  11. Detection of water-quality contamination events based on multi-sensor fusion using an extented Dempster–Shafer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents a method for detecting contamination events of sources of drinking water based on the Dempster–Shafer (D-S) evidence theory. The detection method has the purpose of protecting water supply systems against accidental and intentional contamination events. This purpose is achieved by first predicting future water-quality parameters using an autoregressive (AR) model. The AR model predicts future water-quality parameters using recent measurements of these parameters made with automated (on-line) water-quality sensors. Next, a probabilistic method assigns probabilities to the time series of residuals formed by comparing predicted water-quality parameters with threshold values. Finally, the D-S fusion method searches for anomalous probabilities of the residuals and uses the result of that search to determine whether the current water quality is normal (that is, free of pollution) or contaminated. The D-S fusion method is extended and improved in this paper by weighted averaging of water-contamination evidence and by the analysis of the persistence of anomalous probabilities of water-quality parameters. The extended D-S fusion method makes determinations that have a high probability of being correct concerning whether or not a source of drinking water has been contaminated. This paper's method for detecting water-contamination events was tested with water-quality time series from automated (on-line) water quality sensors. In addition, a small-scale, experimental, water-pipe network was tested to detect water-contamination events. The two tests demonstrated that the extended D-S fusion method achieves a low false alarm rate and high probabilities of detecting water contamination events. (paper)

  12. Core needle biopsy guidance based on EMOCT imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Park, Jesung; Maguluri, Gopi

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel method, based on encoder mapping OCT imaging, for real-time guidance of core biopsy procedures. This method provides real-time feedback to the interventional radiologist, such that he/she can reorient the needle during the biopsy and sample the most representative area of the suspicious mass that is being investigated. This aspect is very important for tailoring therapy to the specific cancer based on biomarker analysis, which will become one of the next big advances in our search for the optimal cancer therapy. To enable individualized treatment, the genetic constitution and the DNA repair status in the affected areas is needed for each patient. Thus, representative sampling of the tumor is needed for analyzing various biomarkers, which are used as a tool to personalize cancer therapy. The encoder-based OCT enables samping of large size masses and provides full control on the imaging probe, which is passed through the bore of the biopsy guidance needle. The OCT image is built gradually, based on the feedback of an optical encoder which senses the incremental movement of the needle with a few microns resolution. Tissue mapping is independent of the needle speed, while it is advanced through the tissue. The OCT frame is analyzed in real-time and tissue cellularity is reported in a very simple manner (pie chart). Our preliminary study on a rabbit model of cancer has demonstrated the capability of this technology for accurately differentiating between viable cancer and heterogeneous or necrotic tissue.

  13. Present concept on current water protection and remediation activities for the areas contaminated by the 1986 Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovitch, O; Prister, B; Nasvit, O; Los, I; Berkovski, V

    1996-07-01

    The results of radiation monitoring data and migration pathway analysis of water bodies within areas affected by the 1986 Chernobyl accident provide a unique opportunity for decision-makers working in other extensively contaminated regions to optimize their approaches to surface and groundwater protection. Most engineering measures within the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone were focused on preventing secondary contamination of surface and groundwater from entering the Pripyat River and the Kiev Reservoir. However, implementation of these measures required huge financial and human resources. Therefore, lessons about post-accidental water protection activities can be learned from the Chernobyl example. PMID:8655324

  14. Raman-spectroscopy-based chemical contaminant detection in milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S.

    2015-05-01

    Addition of edible and inedible chemical contaminants in food powders for purposes of economic benefit has become a recurring trend. In recent years, severe health issues have been reported due to consumption of food powders contaminated with chemical substances. This study examines the effect of spatial resolution used during spectral collection to select the optimal spatial resolution for detecting melamine in milk powder. Sample depth of 2mm, laser intensity of 200mw, and exposure time of 0.1s were previously determined as optimal experimental parameters for Raman imaging. Spatial resolution of 0.25mm was determined as the optimal resolution for acquiring spectral signal of melamine particles from a milk-melamine mixture sample. Using the optimal resolution of 0.25mm, sample depth of 2mm and laser intensity of 200mw obtained from previous study, spectral signal from 5 different concentration of milk-melamine mixture (1%, 0.5%, 0.1%, 0.05%, and 0.025%) were acquired to study the relationship between number of detected melamine pixels and corresponding sample concentration. The result shows that melamine concentration has a linear relation with detected number of melamine pixels with correlation coefficient of 0.99. It can be concluded that the quantitative analysis of powder mixture is dependent on many factors including physical characteristics of mixture, experimental parameters, and sample depth. The results obtained in this study are promising. We plan to apply the result obtained from this study to develop quantitative detection model for rapid screening of melamine in milk powder. This methodology can also be used for detection of other chemical contaminants in milk powders.

  15. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 1, Site assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  16. FILTRATION LOSSES IN OILWELL CEMENT CONTAMINATED BY PSEUDO OIL BASE MUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Isehunwa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of oilfield cement slurries by drilling fluids is one of the causes of cement job failures and it results in expensive remedial actions. While the general adverse effects of Pseudo Oil Base Mud (POBM contamination of cement slurries are known, little has been published on the actual effects of POBM on specific slurry properties. The effect of POBM on the filtration losses in oil well cement slurries was investigated. POBM contaminated slurries at varying contamination volumes up to 40% at intervals of 5% were prepared. The filtration losses were determined using standard American Petroleum Institute (API procedures. The results show that while API fluid losses increased with time, it decreased with increasing POBM contamination in cement slurries.

  17. Applying the risk-based corrective action process to ecological assessment of contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk-Based Corrective Action (RBCA) is a process in which site investigation and corrective action are focused on the goals of minimizing human health and environmental risk. A basic framework for the RBCA process is outlined in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Emergency Standard Guide ES 38-94, Risk-Based Corrective Action Applied at Petroleum Release Sites . This presentation will include discussion of the critical features and, framework of the RBCA process, and will introduce a propose or RBCA which is specifically tailored to the problem of evaluating and responding to environmental risks. The RBCA process includes a number of useful features which expedite and streamline the site assessment and corrective action selection process. Of particular interest, with respect to environmental risk, is a tiered approach to site investigation. This new proposal includes a tiered methodology for investigating environmental risk which begins with a simple, generic analysis and progresses to a more detailed, site-specific analysis, if warranted. The discussion will also cover an example RBCA assessment of a site contaminated with weathered crude oil, and will include results from a laboratory investigation of the ecological toxicity of the contaminated site soils

  18. Metamaterial-based single pixel imaging system (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Willie; Watts, Claire M.; Nadell, Christian; Montoya, John A.; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    Single pixel cameras are useful imaging devices where it is difficult or infeasible to fashion focal plan arrays. For example in the Far Infrared (FIR) it is difficult to perform imaging by conventional detector arrays, owing to the cost and size of such an array. The typical single pixel camera uses a spatial light modulator (SLM) - placed in the conjugate image plane - and is used to sample various portions of the image. The spatially modulated light emerging from the SLM is then sent to a single detector where the light is condensed with suitable optics for detection. Conventional SLMs are either based on liquid crystals or digital mirror devices. As such these devices are limited in modulation speeds of order 30 kHz. Further there is little control over the type of light that is modulated. We present metamaterial based spatial light modulators which provide the ability to digitally encode images - with various measurement matrix coefficients - thus permitting high speed and fidelity imaging capability. In particular we use the Hadamard matrix and related S-matrix to encode images for single pixel imaging. Metamaterials thus permit imaging in regimes of the electromagnetic spectrum where conventional SLMs are not available. Additionally, metamaterials offer several salient features that are not available with commercial SLMs. For example, metamaterials may be used to enable hyperspectral, polarimetric, and phase sensitive imaging. We present the theory and experimental results of single pixel imaging with digital metamaterials in the far infrared and highlight the future of this exciting field.

  19. Environmental toxicity testing of contaminated soil based on microcalorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruiz, K; Feigl, V; Hajdu, Cs; Tolner, M

    2010-10-01

    Contaminated site assessment and monitoring requires efficient risk-management tools including innovative environmental toxicity tests. The first application of microcalorimetry for toxicity testing draw the attention to a possible new tool to increase sensitivity, to eliminate matrix effect and to study effect-mechanism. A Thermal Activity Monitor (TAM) microcalorimeter was used for measuring the heat production of various test organisms when getting in contact with sterile toxic soils. Well known bacterial (Azomonas agilis), animal (Folsomia candida) and plant test organisms (Sinapis alba) were tested for heat production. The heat response of selected testorganisms was measured in case of metal (Cu and Zn) and organic pollutant (Diesel oil, DBNPA and PCP) contaminated soils. In addition to the quantitative determination of the heat production, the mechanism of the toxic effect can be characterized from the shape of the power-time curve (slope of the curve, height and time of the maximum). In certain concentration ranges the higher the pollutant concentration of the soil the lower the maximum of the time-heat curve. At low pollutant concentrations an increased heat production was measured in case of A. agile and 20 and 200 mg Zn kg(-1) soil. The microcalorimetric testing was more sensitive in all cases than the traditional test methods. Our results showed that the microcalorimetric test method offers a new and sensitive option in environmental toxicology, both for research and routine testing. PMID:20549622

  20. Atmospheric contamination for CMB ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Errard, J; Akiba, Y; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Baccigalupi, C; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Cukierman, A; Delabrouille, J; Dobbs, M; Ducout, A; Elleflot, T; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Feeney, S; Gilbert, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Hill, C; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A H; Jeong, O; Katayama, N; Kaufman, J; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leon, D; Linder, E; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Miller, N J; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Okamura, T; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Puglisi, G; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K M; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Tajima, O; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Whitehorn, N; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive an analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the POLARBEAR-I project first season data set. We compare our results to previous st...

  1. Speciation And Distribution Of Arsenic In Fresh Water Pond Sediments Impacted By Contaminated Ground-Water Discharge (Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The speciation and mineralogy of sediments contaminated with arsenic due to arsenic enriched groundwater discharging into the pond at the Ft. Devens Super Fund Site in Ft. Devens, MA were determined using X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Speci...

  2. Communication-based positioning systems: past, present and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews positioning systems in the context of communication systems. First, the basic positioning technique is described for location based service (LBS) in mobile communication systems. Then the high integrity global positioning system (iGPS) is introduced in terms of aspects of what it is and how the low Earth orbit (LEO) Iridium telecommunication satellites enhance the global positioning system (GPS). Emphasis is on the Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS) which is mainly based on commercial geostationary (GEO) communication satellites, including decommissioned GEO and inclined geosynchronous communication satellites. Characterized by its low cost, high flexibility, wide-area coverage and ample frequency resources, a distinctive feature of CAPS is that its navigation messages are generated on the ground, then uploaded to and forwarded by the communication satellites. Fundamental principles and key technologies applied in the construction of CAPS are presented in detail from the CAPS validation phase to its experimental system setup. A prospective view of CAPS has concluded it to be a seamless, high accuracy, large capacity navigation and communication system which can be achieved by expanding it world wide and enhancing it with LEO satellites and mobile base stations. Hence, this system is a potential candidate for the next generation of radio navigation after GPS. (invited reviews)

  3. Non-target screening analyses of organic contaminants in river systems as a base for monitoring measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzbauer, J.

    2009-04-01

    revealed complex pattern of anthropogenic contaminants comprising a lot of still unnoticed pollutants (e.g. specific sulfones, trifluoromethyl substituted substances, nitrogen heterocycles etc.) or still unidentified compounds (such as selected brominated aromatics) of obviously high environmental relevance. In this presentation, a selection of several different contaminants will be discussed in detail comprising their emission sources, their emission behaviour, their fate within the river water bodies and in particular their structural properties. Generally. this investigation demonstrated the need to expand our analytical focus on a broader spectrum of organic contaminants, in particular to build up an adapted base for advanced monitoring studies.

  4. Extragalactic Foreground Contamination in Temperature-based CMB Lens Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Osborne, S J; Doré, O

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the effect of unresolved point source contamination on estimates of the CMB lensing potential, from components such as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, radio point sources, and the Cosmic Infrared Background. We classify the possible trispectra associated with such source populations, and construct estimators for the amplitude and scale-dependence of several of the major trispectra. We show how to propagate analytical models for these source trispectra to biases for lensing. We also construct a "source-hardened" lensing estimator which experiences significantly smaller biases when exposed to unresolved point sources than the standard quadratic lensing estimator. We demonstrate these ideas in practice using the sky simulations of Sehgal et. al., for cosmic-variance limited experiments designed to mimic ACT, SPT, and Planck.

  5. Platinum-based drugs: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilruba, Shahana; Kalayda, Ganna V

    2016-06-01

    Platinum-based drugs cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin are widely used in the therapy of human neoplasms. Their clinical success is, however, limited due to severe side effects and intrinsic or acquired resistance to the treatment. Much effort has been put into the development of new platinum anticancer complexes, but none of them has reached worldwide clinical application so far. Nedaplatin, lobaplatin and heptaplatin received only regional approval. Some new platinum complexes and platinum drug formulations are undergoing clinical trials. Here, we review the main classes of new platinum drug candidates, such as sterically hindered complexes, monofunctional platinum drugs, complexes with biologically active ligands, trans-configured and polynuclear platinum complexes, platinum(IV) prodrugs and platinum-based drug delivery systems. For each class of compounds, a detailed overview of the mechanism of action is given, the cytotoxicity is compared to that of the clinically used platinum drugs, and the clinical perspectives are discussed. A critical analysis of lessons to be learned is presented. Finally, a general outlook regarding future directions in the field of new platinum drugs is given. PMID:26886018

  6. Environmental migration of radium and other contaminants present in liquid and solid wastes from the mining and milling of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This coordinated research programme has been directed at studying the migration of radium and other contaminants from tailings. It is therefore particularly concerned with the migration and transfer processes caused by ingress of water into tailings piles. Some of the studies in the programme have been concerned with the behaviour of radium after transfer into aquatic systems while others were concerned with the basic processes which occur in tailings piles. Studies of the latter type are essential if the long-term behaviour of radium and other contaminants is to be predicted with confidence and the effects of various treatment schemes are to be understood. The migration behaviour of radium-226, as a precursor to radon-222, will also have an effect on the long-term emission of this gas. The appendices of this report contain the guidance on analysis and measurement procedures and the summaries of research carried out by individual contractors

  7. Fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared (FO-FTIR) spectroscopy for detecting endotoxin contamination in ophthalmic viscosurgical devices (OVDS) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Moinuddin; Ilev, Ilko

    2016-03-01

    Ophthalmic Viscosurgical Devices (OVDs) in clinical setting are a major health risk factor for potential endotoxin contamination in the eye, due to their extensive applications in cataract surgery for space creation, stabilization and protection of intraocular tissue and intraocular lens (IOL) during implantation. Endotoxin contamination of OVDs is implicated in toxic anterior syndrome (TASS), a severe complication of cataract surgery that leads to intraocular damage and even blindness. Current standard methods for endotoxin contamination detection utilize rabbit assay or Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assays. These endotoxin detection strategies are extremely difficult for gel-like type devices such as OVDs. To overcome the endotoxin detection limitations in OVDs, we have developed an alternative optical detection methodology for label-free and real-time sensing of bacterial endotoxin in OVDs, based on fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared (FO-FTIR) transmission spectrometry in the mid-IR spectral range from 2.5 micron to 12 micron. Endotoxin contaminated OVD test samples were prepared by serial dilutions of endotoxins on OVDs. The major results of this study revealed two salient spectral peak shifts (in the regions 2925 to 2890 cm^-1 and 1125 to 1100 cm^-1), which are associated with endotoxin in OVDs. In addition, FO-FTIR experimental results processed using a multivariate analysis confirmed the observed specific peak shifts associated with endotoxin contamination in OVDs. Thus, employing the FO-FTIR sensing methodology integrated with a multivariate analysis could potentially be used as an alternative endotoxin detection technique in OVD.

  8. Extragalactic foreground contamination in temperature-based CMB lens reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the effect of unresolved point source contamination on estimates of the CMB lensing potential, from components such as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, radio point sources, and the Cosmic Infrared Background. We classify the possible trispectra associated with such source populations, and construct estimators for the amplitude and scale-dependence of several of the major trispectra. We show how to propagate analytical models for these source trispectra to biases for lensing. We also construct a ''source-hardened'' lensing estimator which experiences significantly smaller biases when exposed to unresolved point sources than the standard quadratic lensing estimator. We demonstrate these ideas in practice using the sky simulations of Sehgal et al., for cosmic-variance limited experiments designed to mimic ACT, SPT, and Planck. We find that for radio sources and SZ the bias is significantly reduced, but for CIB it is essentially unchanged. However, by using the high-frequency, all-sky CIB measurements from Planck and Herschel it may be possible to suppress this contribution

  9. Extragalactic foreground contamination in temperature-based CMB lens reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, Stephen J. [Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo, Varian Building, Stanford, CA, 94305-4060 (United States); Hanson, Duncan [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Doré, Olivier, E-mail: steve.j.osborne@gmail.com, E-mail: dhanson@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: olivier.p.dore@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the effect of unresolved point source contamination on estimates of the CMB lensing potential, from components such as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, radio point sources, and the Cosmic Infrared Background. We classify the possible trispectra associated with such source populations, and construct estimators for the amplitude and scale-dependence of several of the major trispectra. We show how to propagate analytical models for these source trispectra to biases for lensing. We also construct a ''source-hardened'' lensing estimator which experiences significantly smaller biases when exposed to unresolved point sources than the standard quadratic lensing estimator. We demonstrate these ideas in practice using the sky simulations of Sehgal et al., for cosmic-variance limited experiments designed to mimic ACT, SPT, and Planck. We find that for radio sources and SZ the bias is significantly reduced, but for CIB it is essentially unchanged. However, by using the high-frequency, all-sky CIB measurements from Planck and Herschel it may be possible to suppress this contribution.

  10. Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma presenting as skull base metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Bo; LIU Dian-gang; L(U) Hai-li; ZHANG Qiu-hang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of well-differentiated thyroid cancer and is considered to be a relatively indolent tumor in which distant metastasis and death are rare.1 The metastasis of PTC is usually to regional lymph nodes, especially the cervical and mediastinal nodes. Metastases to the brain are rare, and constitute 0.1%-5.0% of distant metastases of papillary carcinoma.2 Skull metastasis is uncommon,and is found in 2.5%-5.8% of cases of thyroid cancer.3 Skull base metastasis of PTC is extremely rare, with only eight reported cases in the literature involving the clivus,cavernous sinus, sella turcica, and the petrous apex and ridge.4 A metastatic lesion can arise from histologically benign and silent thyroid neoplasms,5 and differential diagnosis between ectopic and metastatic thyroid cancer can be difficult,6 therefore, the management of thyroid cancer is controversial after removal of metastatic disease.Here we reported a case of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) that was manifested as a solitary clivus metastasis and discussed the diagnostic and therapeutic management strategies. The 73-year-old patient presented with visual impairment in the right eye,and epistaxis. The patient subsequently underwent complete total thyroidectomy after a diagnosis of papillary microcarcinoma. This finding emphasizes that clinically significant metastases can arise from thyroid papillary microcarcinoma. Total thyroidectomy and careful review of the histology are necessary to prevent delay in proper diagnosis.

  11. Estimation of the collective sanitary impact of the land contamination by the radioactivity found at Gif sur Yvette; Estimation de l'impact sanitaire collectif de la contamination des terrains par la radioactivite presente a Gif sur Yvette

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    The company 'Societe Nouvelle du Radium' extracted radium and produced radium needles in Gif-sur-Yvette (Essonne) from 1904 to 1957. In 1959, this site was converted into a habitable zone. Since then, this district called the 'Petite Coudraie' has been going through several radioactivity measurements and decontamination works. In 2000, the detection of very high levels of radon above sanitary recommendations in one house encouraged the local authorities to launch a systematic investigation and risk analysis in order to take the necessary measures against radiological risks for the whole concerned district. The 'Direction Departementale des Affaires Sanitaires et Sociales' (D.D.A.S.S.), the French Institute of Public Health (InVS) and the Institute of Nuclear Protection and Security (I.P.S.N.) conducted a health impact assessment of the pollution in this area. The Office for the Protection against Ionizing Radiations (O.P.R.I.) and the I.P.S.N. first measured the radioactivity found on the surface area. The I.P.S.N. then conducted a dosimetric study based on the measurement results and realistic exposure scenarios of adults and children present in the area. Finally, on the base of these results, the InVs did a quantitative risk assessment of cancer due to exposure to the radioactive residuals from the past industrial activities which is the subject of this report. This assessment allows to estimate the extent of this potential health impact due to the contamination of the area with the current scientific knowledge. It assesses the contribution of the various sources ways of exposure to risk and therefore directs the measures of management priority. Finally, it also allows to appreciate the relevance of an epidemiological study on the population who was present in this area. (author)

  12. An analytically based model for the simultaneous leaching-chain decay of radionuclides from contaminated ground surface soil layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzemba, M S; Manteufel, R D

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes an analytically based method for modeling the time-dependent radionuclide areal densities of contaminated soil surface layers when the soil experiences simultaneous leaching, surface erosion and chain radioactive decay. The model is used to predict time-dependent radionuclide areal densities in a volcanic ash blanket contaminated with spent nuclear fuel particles for the purpose of assessing the risks of radiation exposure from an extrusive volcanic event near a proposed high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The method uses general analytical solutions (an expansion of the Bateman equations) for calculating serial decay, including non-radioactive decay loss terms, in order to calculate time-dependent radionuclide areal densities in the ash blanket. In the presented example, 43 "key" radionuclides are tracked and their concentrations in the blanket are displayed for a 10,000-y time period following the volcanic event. Although the analysis presented herein is for modeling contaminated volcanic ash blankets, the model would work equally well for modeling time-dependent radionuclide contamination of land surfaces in, for example, site decommissioning. It is suggested that the general solutions for serial decay (with non-radioactive decay loss terms) can also be used to model the release of radionuclides from the waste packages under anticipated repository conditions. PMID:9373070

  13. Distance Transform Based Hand Gestures Recognition For Powerpoint Presentation Navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Ram Rajesh J; Nagarjunan D; Arunachalam RM; Aarthi R

    2012-01-01

    Information conveyed in seminars, project presentation or even in class rooms can be effective when slideshow presentation is used. There are various means to control slides which require devices like mouse, keyboard, or laser pointer etc. The disadvantage is one must have prior knowledge about the devices in order to operate them. This paper proposes two methods to control the slides during a presentation using bare hands and compares their efficiencies. The proposed methods employ hand gest...

  14. Newly described human polyomaviruses Merkel Cell, KI and WU are present in urban sewage and may represent potential environmental contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carratala Anna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, three new polyomaviruses (KI, WU and Merkel cell polyomavirus have been reported to infect humans. It has also been suggested that lymphotropic polyomavirus, a virus of simian origin, infects humans. KI and WU polyomaviruses have been detected mainly in specimens from the respiratory tract while Merkel cell polyomavirus has been described in a very high percentage of Merkel cell carcinomas. The distribution, excretion level and transmission routes of these viruses remain unknown. Here we analyzed the presence and characteristics of newly described human polyomaviruses in urban sewage and river water in order to assess the excretion level and the potential role of water as a route of transmission of these viruses. Nested-PCR assays were designed for the sensitive detection of the viruses studied and the amplicons obtained were confirmed by sequencing analysis. The viruses were concentrated following a methodology previously developed for the detection of JC and BK human polyomaviruses in environmental samples. JC polyomavirus and human adenoviruses were used as markers of human contamination in the samples. Merkel cell polyomavirus was detected in 7/8 urban sewage samples collected and in 2/7 river water samples. Also one urine sample from a pregnant woman, out of 4 samples analyzed, was positive for this virus. KI and WU polyomaviruses were identified in 1/8 and 2/8 sewage samples respectively. The viral strains detected were highly homologous with other strains reported from several other geographical areas. Lymphotropic polyomavirus was not detected in any of the 13 sewage neither in 9 biosolid/sludge samples analyzed. This is the first description of a virus isolated from sewage and river water with a strong association with cancer. Our data indicate that the Merkel cell polyomavirus is prevalent in the population and that it may be disseminated through the fecal/urine contamination of water. The procedure developed may

  15. Worldwide survey of fumonisin contamination of corn and corn-based products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, G S; Thiel, P G; Stockenström, S; Sydenham, E W

    1996-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive risk assessment study for fumonisins, reliable data on exposure of populations to these dietary toxins must be obtained. To assess the extent of worldwide exposure, the published literature on the contamination of food and feed supplies has been reviewed and supplemented with unpublished material from various international sources. Fumonisin contamination of corn and corn-based products occurs in many countries. Animal mycotoxicoses such as equine leukoencephalomalacia and porcine pulmonary edema are caused by heavily contaminated animal feeds. For example, as much as 330 micrograms/g fumonisin B1 (FB1) has been found in swine feed. Although commercially available refined corn products for human consumption are generally contaminated at levels below 1 microgram/g FB1, individual products in certain countries can reach far higher levels. Health risks associated with consumption of these products depend on the extent to which they are consumed in a varied diet. Home-grown corn in certain rural areas, where it also constitutes the staple diet, can be contaminated at > 100 micrograms/g. Consumption of corn contaminated at these high levels has been associated with a high incidence of esophageal cancer in these areas. PMID:8634537

  16. Risk-based land management towards sustainable management of contaminated land in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vegter, J. [Technical soil protection committee (TCB) (Netherlands); Lowe, J.; Kasamas, H. [Ministry of Environment (BMLFUW) (Australia)

    2003-07-01

    The Risk-based Land Management (RBLM) concept developed during the course of the CLARINET concerted action to provide a framework for development of policy, research and practice in sustainable management of contaminated land. It focuses on legacy contamination (contamination resulting from past practices) and allows for regional and site-specific solutions in policy and other decision-making across Europe. The RBLM concept aims to assist policy makers and regulators, as well as other stakeholders, in making balanced and informed decisions to achieve sustainable management of land. The common ground in contaminated land policies in the EU countries is increasing with their stronger interaction with spatial planning and water-/soil protection and their longer time perspective of sustainable enviromental management. Current contaminated land approaches focus on sustainable solutions which will manage the contamination effectively and restore the social, environmental and economic value of the land. The RBLM concept provides a framework to structure the decision-making process to achieve sustainable solutions. (orig.)

  17. Radiation contamination air monitoring basing on NATO normalization documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conditions and actions connected with conducting of the air radiation monitoring have been described in the article. The staff and tasks of special military troops for air sampling as well as commonly used methods for air sampling have been presented and discussed

  18. Mannich Bases: An Important Pharmacophore in Present Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Bala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannich bases are the end products of Mannich reaction and are known as beta-amino ketone carrying compounds. Mannich reaction is a carbon-carbon bond forming nucleophilic addition reaction and is a key step in synthesis of a wide variety of natural products, pharmaceuticals, and so forth. Mannich reaction is important for the construction of nitrogen containing compounds. There is a number of aminoalkyl chain bearing Mannich bases like fluoxetine, atropine, ethacrynic acid, trihexyphenidyl, and so forth with high curative value. The literature studies enlighten the fact that Mannich bases are very reactive and recognized to possess potent diverse activities like anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antifilarial, antibacterial, antifungal, anticonvulsant, anthelmintic, antitubercular, analgesic, anti-HIV, antimalarial, antipsychotic, antiviral activities and so forth. The biological activity of Mannich bases is mainly attributed to α, β-unsaturated ketone which can be generated by deamination of hydrogen atom of the amine group.

  19. Present status of unsealed radioisotope therapy in Japan based on the nation-wide questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, clinical application of unsealed radioisotopes is strictly regulated. Especially in the field of therapy, we are allowed to use only Na131I at present. Under such circumstances, the present status of therapeutic nuclear medicine in Japan was surveyed by means of a nation-wide questionnaire, conducted in 193 hospitals. Then, 113 hospitals replied to such questionnaire (recovery rate: 58.5%), and it was found that in 77 hospitals, radioisotope therapy is being performed for Graves' disease and/or thyroid cancer. The questionnaire covered the following points: for Graves' disease-the basic strategy of 131I therapy, its indications, absorbed doses planned to be given, whether the therapy had been conducted on outpatient basis or in-patient basis, method of thyroid weight estimation, interval of administration in case of multiple doses, number of patients treated per year (1996) etc., and for thyroid cancer-strategy for thyroid remnant, the doses to be given, the maximum doses permitted by the authorities in each hospital both per day and per year, handling of highly contaminated urine in each hospital, interval of administration in case of multiple doses, number of patients treated per year (1996) etc. Also questioned were dissatisfaction with the present regulation by the authorities and/or requests for the better daily work, if any. Based on the above questionnaire, the present status of unsealed radioisotope therapy in Japan was investigated. (author)

  20. Woodchip-sulfur based heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (WSHAD) process for nitrate contaminated water remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Feng, Chuanping; Hu, Weiwu; Xi, Beidou; Chen, Nan; Zhao, Baowei; Liu, Ying; Hao, Chunbo; Pu, Jiaoyang

    2016-02-01

    Nitrate contaminated water can be effectively treated by simultaneous heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (HAD). In the present study, woodchips and elemental sulfur were used as co-electron donors for HAD. It was found that ammonium salts could enhance the denitrifying activity of the Thiobacillus bacteria, which utilize the ammonium that is produced by the dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in the woodchip-sulfur based heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (WSHAD) process. The denitrification performance of the WSHAD process (reaction constants range from 0.05485 h(-1) to 0.06637 h(-1)) is better than that of sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification (reaction constants range from 0.01029 h(-1) to 0.01379 h(-1)), and the optimized ratio of woodchips to sulfur is 1:1 (w/w). No sulfate accumulation is observed in the WSHAD process and the alkalinity generated in the heterotrophic denitrification can compensate for alkalinity consumption by the sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification. The symbiotic relationship between the autotrophic and the heterotrophic denitrification processes play a vital role in the mixotrophic environment. PMID:26650451

  1. What Is Game-Based Learning? Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Mingfong; Gaydos, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at clarifying and conceptualizing game-based learning (GBL) in order to pinpoint directions for practices and research. The authors maintain that GBL should be conceptualized toward the transformation of a textbook-learning culture. The authors emphasize the importance of a paradigm shift in learning and a reorientation in…

  2. Which Microbial Communities Are Present? Sequence-Based Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Sean M.

    The use of metagenomic methods that directly sequence environmental samples has revealed the extraordinary microbial diversity missed by traditional culture-based methodologies. Therefore, to develop a complete and representative model of an environment's microbial community and activities, metagenomic analysis is an essential tool.

  3. Present status of SU(5)-based grand unifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a brief communique on the Georgi-Glashow SU(5) paper: Unity of all Elementary Forces, published in 1974; and the other more important papers based on SU(5) or linked with the Georgi-Glashow paper which was welcomed by many a theoretical physicist as a great step. At the end of the paper, a concise review of the experiments (in operation) and the proposed ones is given. (author). 22 refs

  4. New phosphate-based binder for stabilization of soils contaminated with heavy metals: leaching, strength and microstructure characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan-Jun; Wei, Ming-Li; Reddy, Krishna R; Jin, Fei; Wu, Hao-Liang; Liu, Zhi-Bin

    2014-12-15

    Cement stabilization is used extensively to remediate soils contaminated with heavy metals. However, previous studies suggest that the elevated zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) concentrations in the contaminated soils would substantially retard the cement hydration, leading to the deterioration of the performance of cement stabilized soils. This study presents a new binder, KMP, composed of oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock, monopotassium phosphate and reactive magnesia. The effectiveness of stabilization using this binder is investigated on soils spiked with Zn and Pb, individually and together. Several series of tests are conducted including toxicity characteristic leaching (TCLP), ecotoxicity in terms of luminescent bacteria test and unconfined compressive strength. The leachability of a field Zn- and Pb- contaminated soil stabilized with KMP is also evaluated by TCLP leaching test. The results show that the leached Zn concentrations are lower than the China MEP regulatory limit except when Zn and Pb coexist and for the curing time of 7 days. On the other hand, the leached Pb concentrations for stabilized soils with Pb alone or mixed Zn and Pb contamination are much lower than the China MEP or USEPA regulatory limit, irrespective of the curing time. The luminescent bacteria test results show that the toxicity of the stabilized soils has been reduced considerably and is classified as slightly toxic class. The unconfined compressive strength of the soils decrease with the increase in the Zn concentration. The stabilized soils with mixed Zn and Pb contaminants exhibit notably higher leached Zn concentration, while there is lower unconfined compressive strength relative to the soils when contaminated with Zn alone. The X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope analyses reveal the presence of bobierrite (Mg3(PO4)2·8H2O) and K-struvite (MgKPO4·6H2O) as the main products formed in the KMP stabilized uncontaminated soils; the formation of hopeite (Zn3(PO4)2·4H2O

  5. An outline of a model-based expert system to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring contaminated acquatic ecosystems: The project ``moira``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelgren, A.; Bergstrom, U. [Studsvik Eco and AB, Nykoping (Sweden); Brittain, J. [Oslo Univ. (Norway). LFI Zoological Museum; Gallego Diaz, E. [Madrid Universidad Politecnica (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Nuclear; Hakanson, L. [KEMA Nuclear, Arnhem (Niger); Monte, L. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1996-10-01

    The present report describes the fundamental principles of the research programme MOIRA (a model based computerized system for management support to Identify optimal remedial strategies for Restoring radionuclide contaminated Aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas) financed by the EC (European Community) (Contract N F14P-CT96-0036). The interventions to restore radionuclides contaminated aquatic systems may result in detrimental ecological, social and economical effects. Decision makers must carefully evaluate these impacts. The main aim of the MOIRA project is the development of an expert system based on validated models predicting the evolution of the radioactive contamination of fresh water systems following countermeasure applications and their relevant ecological, social and economical impacts. The expert system will help decision makers, that are not necessarily gifted with experience in environmental modeling, to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring contaminated fresh water systems.

  6. An outline of a model-based expert system to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring contaminated aquatic ecosystems: the project MOIRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report describes the fundamental principles of the research programme MOIRA (a model based computerized system for management support to Identify optimal remedial strategies for Restoring radionuclide contaminated Aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas) financed by the EC (European Community) (Contract N F14P-CT96-0036). The interventions to restore radionuclides contaminated aquatic systems may result in detrimental ecological, social and economical effects. Decision makers must carefully evaluate these impacts. The main aim of the MOIRA project is the development of an expert system based on validated models predicting the evolution of the radioactive contamination of fresh water systems following countermeasure applications and their relevant ecological, social and economical impacts. The expert system will help decision makers, that are not necessarily gifted with experience in environmental modeling, to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring contaminated fresh water systems

  7. Distance Transform Based Hand Gestures Recognition For Powerpoint Presentation Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Rajesh J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Information conveyed in seminars, project presentation or even in class rooms can be effective when slideshow presentation is used. There are various means to control slides which require devices like mouse, keyboard, or laser pointer etc. The disadvantage is one must have prior knowledge about the devices in order to operate them. This paper proposes two methods to control the slides during a presentation using bare hands and compares their efficiencies. The proposed methods employ hand gestures given by the user as input. The gestures are identified by counting the number of active fingers and then slides are controlled. Unlike the conventional method for hand gesture recognition which makes use of gloves or markers or any other devices, this method does not require any additional devices andmakes the user comfortable. The proposed method for gesture recognition does not require any database to identify a particular gesture. The experiment was tested under different kinds of light sources like incandescent bulb, fluorescent lamp and natural light.

  8. Effects of contaminants on reproductive success of aquatic birds nesting at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothem, R L; Crayon, J J; Law, M A

    2006-11-01

    Contamination by organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and trace elements at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), located in the Mojave Desert, could adversely affect nesting aquatic birds, especially at the sewage lagoons that comprise Piute Ponds. Estimates of avian reproduction, in conjunction with analyses of eggs and avian foods for contaminant residues, may indicate the potential for negative effects on avian populations. From 1996 to 1999, we conducted studies at the Piute Ponds area of EAFB to evaluate the impacts of contaminants on nesting birds. Avian reproduction was evaluated in 1999. Eggs were collected for chemical analyses in 1996 and 1999, and African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis), a likely food source, were collected for chemical analyses in 1998. Avian species occupying the higher trophic levels--black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi), and American avocet (Recurvirostra americana)--generally bioaccumulated higher concentrations of contaminants in their eggs. Reproductive success and egg hatchability of night-herons and white-faced ibises in the Piute Ponds were similar to results observed at other western colonies. Deformities were observed in only one embryo in this study, but concentrations of contaminants evaluated in this ibis embryo were considered insufficient to have caused the deformities. Because clawed frogs, a primary prey item for night-herons at Piute Ponds, had no detectable levels of any OCs, it is likely that OCs found in night-heron eggs were acquired from the wintering grounds rather than from EAFB. The presence of isomers of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in ibis eggs indicated recent exposure, but invertebrates used for food by ibises were not sampled at Piute Ponds, and conclusions about the source of OCs in ibis eggs could not be made. Concentrations of contaminants in random and failed eggs of individual species were not different, and we concluded

  9. Imaging-based liver function tests. Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoperative assessment of liver function and prediction of postoperative functional reserve are important in patients scheduled for liver resection. While determination of absolute liver function currently mostly relies on laboratory tests and clinical scores, postoperative remnant liver function is estimated volumetrically using imaging data obtained with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accurate estimation of hepatic function is also relevant for intensive care patients, oncologic patients, and patients with diffuse liver disease. The indocyanine green (ICG) test is still the only established test for estimating true global liver function. However, more recent tools such as the LiMAx test also allow global assessment of hepatic function. These tests are limited when liver function is inhomogeneously distributed, which is the case in such conditions as unilateral cholestasis or after portal vein embolization. Imaging-based liver function tests were first developed in nuclear medicine and, compared with laboratory tests, have the advantage of displaying the spatial distribution of liver function. Nuclear medicine scans are obtained using tracers such as 99mTc galactosyl and 99mTc mebrofenin. Liver function is typically assessed using planar scintigraphy. However, three-dimensional volumetry is possible with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT). Another technique for image-based liver function estimation is Gd-EOB-enhanced MRI. While metabolization of Gd-EOB in the body is similar to that of ICG and mebrofenin, its distribution in the liver can be displayed by MRI with higher temporal and spatial resolution. Moreover, MRI-based determination of liver function can be integrated into routine preoperative imaging. This makes MRI an ideal candidate for preoperative determination of liver function, though the best pulse sequence and the parameter to be derived from the image information remain to be identified. Another

  10. Presenting new solution based on Business Architecture for Enterprise Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Darvish Rouhani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to software production dominance development among all structures and information exchange growth among systems, Utilizing a suitable method for correct connection among information systems is important and worth to consider. At first look, work dependence to technology was more than business because of production variety. As business processes have their own shares in Project purposes' implementation growth, it could not be considered as less important component. In another view, technology architecture had reached equitable level and become more and more important. This article peruses the current EA and also its atmosphere at subsequent years and introduces new EA structure based on a balance between technology and business. The most important advantages of this structure are paying attention to stakeholders' concerns, discovering the securest solution for business and accomplishing works repetitive with adjustment in order to make it dynamic. Reducing work's risks by means of patterns and agility are other advantages of this.

  11. A Contamination Sensor Based on an Array of Microfibers with Nanoscale-Structured Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guorui Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A contamination sensor based on an array of microfibers with nanoscale-structured film using evanescent field is proposed and demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. When the molecular contaminants deposit on the nanoscale-structured film, the refractive index of the film will change and the additional loss will be produced due to the disturbance of evanescent field. The possibility of the sensor is demonstrated theoretically by using three-dimensional finite-difference time domain (3D-FDTD. The corresponding experiments have also been carried out in order to demonstrate the theoretical results. Microfibers are fabricated by using hydrogen-oxygen flame-heated scanning fiber drawing method and the nanoscale-structured film coated on the surface of microfibers is deposited by using dip coating process. Then an array of microfibers is assembled to demonstrate the feasibility of the device. The experimental results show that contaminants detection with the device can agree well with the results measured by the laser-scattering particle counter, which demonstrates the feasibility of the new type of contaminant sensor. The device can be used to monitor contaminants on-line in the high-power laser system.

  12. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size

  13. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

  14. Field—Based Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Hydrocarbons at Industrially Contaminated Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Peggy Rigou; Steven John Setford; Selwayan Saini

    2002-01-01

    Examination of organic pollutants in groundwaters should also consider the source of the pollution, which is often a solid matrix such as soil, landfill waste, or sediment. This premise should be viewed alongside the growing trend towards field-based characterisation of contaminated sites for reasons of speed and cost. Field-based methods for the extraction of organic compounds from solid samples are generally cumbersome, time consuming, or inefficient. This paper describes the development of...

  15. Toward efficient fiber-based quantum interface (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soshenko, Vladimir; Vorobyov, Vadim V.; Bolshedvorsky, Stepan; Lebedev, Nikolay; Akimov, Alexey V.; Sorokin, Vadim; Smolyaninov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    , vol. 528, no. 1, p. 1-45, 2013. [2] A.V. Akimov, A. Mukherjee, C.L. Yu, D.E. Chang, A.S. Zibrov, P.R. Hemmer, H. Park and M.D. Lukin, "Generation of single optical plasmons in metallic nanowires coupled to quantum dots," Nature, vol. 450, p. 402-406, 2007. [3] Michael J. Burek , Yiwen Chu, Madelaine S.Z. Liddy, Parth Patel, Jake Rochman , Srujan Meesala, Wooyoung Hong, Qimin Quan, Mikhail D. Lukin and Marko Loncar High quality-factor optical nanocavities in bulk single-crystal diamond, Nature communications 6718 (2014) [4] Tim Schroder, Andreas W. Schell, Gunter Kewes, Thomas Aichele, and Oliver Benson Fiber-Integrated Diamond-Based Single Photon Source, Nano Lett. 2011, 11, 198-202 [5]Lars Liebermeister, et. al. "Tapered fiber coupling of single photons emitted by a deterministically positioned single nitrogen vacancy center", Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 031101 (2014)

  16. Development of sustainable Palladium-based catalysts for removal of persistent contaminants from drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Danmeng

    Pd-based catalytic reduction has emerged as an advanced treatment technology for drinking water decontamination, and a suite of persistent contaminants including oxyanions, N-nitrosoamines, and halogenated compounds are amenable to catalytic reduction. The primary goal of this study is to develop novel Pd-based catalysts with enhanced performance (i.e., activity, selectivity, and sustainability) to remove contaminants from drinking water. The effects of water quality (i.e., co-contaminants in water matrix), catalyst support, and catalyst metal were explored, and they provide insights for preparing catalysts with faster kinetics, higher selectivity, and extended lifetime. Azo dyes are wide-spread contaminants, and they are potentially co-exisiting with target contaminants amenable for catalytic removal. The probe azo dye methyl orange (MO) enhanced catalytic reduction kinetics of a suite of oxyanions (i.e., nitrate, nitrite, bromate, chlorate, and perchlorate) and diatrizoate significantly but not N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) with a variety of Pd-based catalysts. Nitrate was selected as a probe contaminant, and several different azo dyes (i.e., (methyl orange, methyl red, fast yellow AB, metanil yellow, acid orange 7, congo red, eriochrome black T, acid red 27, acid yellow 11, and acid yellow 17) were evaluated for their ability to enhance reduction. A hydrogen atom shuttling mechanism was proposed and a kinetic model was proposed based on Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) theory, and they suggest sorbed azo dyes and reduced hydrazo dyes shuttle hydrogen atoms to oxyanions or diatrizoate to enhance their reduction kinetics. Next, vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports were used to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). In order to evaluate the amount of interior versus exterior loading of Pd nanoparticles, a fast and accurate geometric

  17. On-site radioactive soil contamination at the Andreeva Bay shore technical base, Northwest Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive waste (RAW) storage site at Andreeva Bay in the Russian Northwest has experienced radioactive contamination both as a result of activities carried out at the site and due to incidents that have occurred there in the past such as accidental releases of radioactive materials. The site is an interesting case study for decommissioning due to the extremely large amounts of radioactivity present at the site and the conditions under which it is stored; very little has been previously published in the scientific literature about this site. This paper complements the paper describing dose rates at Andreeva Bay which is published in this issue of Journal of Environmental Radioactivity by the same authors. This study presents new data related to the activity concentrations of 137Cs and 90Sr in surface soils and measurements of α- and β-particle fluxes taken at different areas around the site. Limited data on 60Co is also presented. The results of the study indicate that the main areas of site contamination are associated with the former spent nuclear fuel storage facility at Building 5, due to accidental discharges which began in 1982. Substantial contamination is also observed at the solid radioactive waste storage facilities, probably due to the ingress of water into these facilities. More than 240 samples were measured: maximum contamination levels were 1 x 106 Bq/kg 137Cs (mean value 4.1 x 105 Bq/kg) and 4 x 106 Bq/kg 90Sr (mean value 1.2 x 105 Bq/kg). Localised patches of α and β contamination were also observed throughout the site

  18. Purification of microalgae from bacterial contamination using a disposable inertia-based microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godino, Neus; Jorde, Felix; Lawlor, Daryl; Jaeger, Magnus; Duschl, Claus

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae are a promising source of bioactive ingredients for the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Every microalgae research group or production facility is facing one major problem regarding the potential contamination of the algal cell with bacteria. Prior to the storage of the microalgae in strain collections or to cultivation in bioreactors, it is necessary to carry out laborious purification procedures to separate the microalgae from the undesired bacterial cells. In this work, we present a disposable microfluidic cartridge for the high-throughput purification of microalgae samples based on inertial microfluidics. Some of the most relevant microalgae strains have a larger size than the relatively small, few micron bacterial cells, so making them distinguishable by size. The inertial microfluidic cartridge was fabricated with inexpensive materials, like pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) and thin plastic layers, which were patterned using a simple cutting plotter. In spite of fabrication restrictions and the intrinsic difficulties of biological samples, the separation of microalgae from bacteria reached values in excess of 99%, previously only achieved using conventional high-end and high cost lithography methods. Moreover, due to the simple and high-throughput characteristic of the separation, it is possible to concatenate serial purification to exponentially decrease the absolute amount of bacteria in the final purified sample.

  19. Purification of microalgae from bacterial contamination using a disposable inertia-based microfluidic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microalgae are a promising source of bioactive ingredients for the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Every microalgae research group or production facility is facing one major problem regarding the potential contamination of the algal cell with bacteria. Prior to the storage of the microalgae in strain collections or to cultivation in bioreactors, it is necessary to carry out laborious purification procedures to separate the microalgae from the undesired bacterial cells. In this work, we present a disposable microfluidic cartridge for the high-throughput purification of microalgae samples based on inertial microfluidics. Some of the most relevant microalgae strains have a larger size than the relatively small, few micron bacterial cells, so making them distinguishable by size. The inertial microfluidic cartridge was fabricated with inexpensive materials, like pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) and thin plastic layers, which were patterned using a simple cutting plotter. In spite of fabrication restrictions and the intrinsic difficulties of biological samples, the separation of microalgae from bacteria reached values in excess of 99%, previously only achieved using conventional high-end and high cost lithography methods. Moreover, due to the simple and high-throughput characteristic of the separation, it is possible to concatenate serial purification to exponentially decrease the absolute amount of bacteria in the final purified sample. (paper)

  20. Considerations for risk-based corrective action at contaminated gas works sites: examples from Canada and the United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardisty, P.E.; Sevigny, J.H.; Croft, R.C.; Bracken, R.A.; Hobby, R. [Komex Clarke Bond, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    Risk-based corrective action programmes for contaminated gas works sites focus on organic and inorganic compounds posing potential health effects to humans and/or ecological receptors. These programmes include an understanding of the nature and extent of contamination, transport and fate in appropriate pathways, toxicological effects to human health and the environment, and remedial options. Potential risk-generating substances at gas works sites in the United Kingdom and Canada include coal tar and tar residues, spent oxides, sulphur compounds, and heavy metals. Organic compounds found in coal tar can include monocyclic (e.g. benzene, phenols) and polycyclic (e.g. naphthalene, chrysene) aromatic hydrocarbons. Tar and some of its components are carcinogenic. Metals and sulphur may be present at gas works sites. Sulphur contaminated soils can have depressed pH, which can lead to metals mobilization, and contaminated groundwater. Metals can be of concern in soils and groundwater, as can spent oxides from town gas manufacturing. These may include varying proportions of cyanide, either as relatively immobile complexed ferro-ferric cyanide (i.e. blue billy), or as more mobile and toxic free cyanide. Aquifers and surface water bodies can be pathways for dissolved metals or organic compounds with elevated aqueous solubilities. Some components of coal tar have appreciable vapour pressures and may emit odours if in near-surface soils, pathways exist via dermal contact or ingestion. Case histories from two coal gasification sites, one in the UK and one in Canada, are presented and discussed. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  1. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Appendix A, Part 1, Field Investigation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  2. A laboratory based experimental study of mercury emission from contaminated soils in the River Idrijca catchment

    OpenAIRE

    D. Kocman; Horvat, M.

    2010-01-01

    Results obtained by a laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS) focused on investigating the kinetics of the mercury emission flux (MEF) from contaminated soils of the Idrija Hg-mine region, Slovenia are presented. Representative soil samples with respect to total Hg concentrations (4–417 μg g−1) and land cover (forest, meadow and alluvial soil) alongside the River Idrijca were analysed to determine the variation in MEF versus distance from the source, ...

  3. Effect of cassava based diet on some heamatological parameters in albino rats fed petroleum contaminated diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A O Adegoke

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to ascertain the effect of a cassava based diet (gari on crude oil heamato-toxicity in albino rats by feeding diet contaminated with various concentrations of crude oil mixed with 20% gari to determine the protective effect of gari. The haematological parameters haemoglobin (Hb, Packed cell volume (PCV and white blood cell count (WBC(Total and differential were monitored in the animals. Gari feeding at 20% caused insignificant dose dependent decrease in Hb and PCV but significant dose dependent white blood cell count in gari fed albino rats compared with Petroleum fed albino rats (P<0.05. Dose dependent decrease in Hb, PCV and white blood cell count was also observed in petroleum fed rats compared with their controls (P<0.05.  The study showed that ingestion of petroleum contaminated diet caused decreased haemoglobin (Hb, Packed cell volume (PCV and white blood cell count, an indicator of possible blood damage but supplementation of the diet with 20% gari decreased the haemoglobin (Hb, Packed cell volume (PCV and white blood cell count observed in petroleum fed albino rats. This study showed that feeding on gari diet did not reverse the damage caused by crude petroleum as evidenced by insignificant differences in Hb and PCV concentrations possibly as result of cyanide present in the gari.Industrial relevanceCassava is a staple food in human diets in over 80 countries (Gomez, et al 1988. Gari a starchy food prepared from cassava (Manihot utilisima tubers is one of the most popular staple foods of the people of the rain forest belt of West Africa. Gari contains mainly starch-20% amylase and 70% amylopectin having lost the soluble carbohydrates. Crude petroleum is capable of eliciting haemolytic toxicity of the blood cells in conditions of long- exposure causing decrease haemoglobin, white cell count and PCV levels. The study was carried out to see the effect of gari, a staple food on haemolytic toxicity caused by crude

  4. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Appendix A, Draft standard operating procedures and elements: Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation, Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  5. Sensitive Multi-Species Emissions Monitoring: Infrared Laser-Based Detection of Trace-Level Contaminants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steill, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes our development of spectroscopic chemical analysis techniques and spectral modeling for trace-gas measurements of highly-regulated low-concentration species present in flue gas emissions from utility coal boilers such as HCl under conditions of high humidity. Detailed spectral modeling of the spectroscopy of HCl and other important combustion and atmospheric species such as H 2 O, CO 2 , N 2 O, NO 2 , SO 2 , and CH 4 demonstrates that IR-laser spectroscopy is a sensitive multi-component analysis strategy. Experimental measurements from techniques based on IR laser spectroscopy are presented that demonstrate sub-ppm sensitivity levels to these species. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify HCl at ppm levels with extremely high signal-to-noise even under conditions of high relative humidity. Additionally, cavity ring-down IR spectroscopy is used to achieve an extremely high sensitivity to combustion trace gases in this spectral region; ppm level CH 4 is one demonstrated example. The importance of spectral resolution in the sensitivity of a trace-gas measurement is examined by spectral modeling in the mid- and near-IR, and efforts to improve measurement resolution through novel instrument development are described. While previous project reports focused on benefits and complexities of the dual-etalon cavity ring-down infrared spectrometer, here details on steps taken to implement this unique and potentially revolutionary instrument are described. This report also illustrates and critiques the general strategy of IR- laser photodetection of trace gases leading to the conclusion that mid-IR laser spectroscopy techniques provide a promising basis for further instrument development and implementation that will enable cost-effective sensitive detection of multiple key contaminant species simultaneously.

  6. Demilitarization of conventional ordnance: Priorities for data-base assessments of environmental contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, D.W.; McKone, T.E.; Hall, C.H.; Nelson, M.A.; Ricker, Y.E.

    1986-02-01

    The primary goal of this study has been to identify a set of environmental by-products from the demilitarization of conventional ordnance that should be the subject of more detailed data-base assessments. In order to rank the by-products according to their potential health risks, estimates were made of the contaminant releases associated with destructive techniques (e.g., open burning, open detonation, and incineration) and nondestructive techniques (e.g., filler recovery and reuse). Estimates of the types and quantities of propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics in the demilitarization inventories of various installations in the US were made. To calculate hypothetical doses to man from contaminant releases, a multimedia compartmental model was used to calculate the concentrations of contaminants in water, soils, air, and biota. Based on an analysis of the doses and toxicity data for the compounds, several substances were recommended for further analysis, including DNT, TNT, and RDX and their degradation products in the environment. Other compounds are dibutyl phthalate, diphenylamine, HMX, and tetryl.

  7. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  8. Conceptual Models for the Fracture Network in Contaminated Shale Based on Different Lines of Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, B. L.; Chapman, S.; Cherry, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    In investigations of groundwater flow in fractured sedimentary rock, there is typically a large discrepancy between the number of fractures identified by different methods in boreholes. The methods directed at fracture geometry such as inspection of continuous core and borehole imaging (acoustic, optical, electrical televiewing, borehole camera, etc.) commonly identify numerous fractures. In contrast, the methods that infer fractures from measurements in the open borehole water column (borehole flow meters, temperature, electrical conductance, full borehole dilution) show far fewer fractures. These two different categories of data support two very different conceptual models for the fracture networks in which groundwater flow occurs. A study was conducted at a contaminated industrial site in an area of approximately 150m by 100m located on a fractured Ordovician shale in New York State where a fracture network conceptual model was initially developed based primarily on borehole flow metering and related cross-borehole hydraulic tests. In this conceptual model based on eight boreholes having a maximum depth of 50 m, the total number of flow zones identified was 14 over 140 m of open hole and ranged from none to five per hole. PCE DNAPL released decades ago has caused substantial VOC contamination (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE, and VC) and this contamination was delineated by means of a large number of contaminant analyses on samples from continuous rock core at an average spacing of 0.3 m. Although groundwater flow occurs almost entirely in the fractures, almost all the contaminant mass resides in the rock matrix (porosity 2-5%) because of long term diffusion-driven mass transfer from fractures to the matrix. The rock core contaminant profiles indicate that advective transport has occurred over decades through numerous fractures in each borehole. Therefore, many of the fractures identified from corelogs and televiewing must have active groundwater flow. This supports a

  9. On Hilbert-Huang Transform Based Synthesis of a Signal Contaminated by Radio Frequency Interference or Fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhner, Semion; Shiri, Ron S.; Vootukuru, Meg; Coletti, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Norden E. Huang et al. had proposed and published the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) concept correspondently in 1996, 1998. The HHT is a novel method for adaptive spectral analysis of non-linear and non-stationary signals. The HHT comprises two components: - the Huang Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), resulting in an adaptive data-derived basis of Intrinsic Mode functions (IMFs), and the Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA1) based on the Hilbert Transform for 1-dimension (1D) applied to the EMD IMF's outcome. Although paper describes the HHT concept in great depth, it does not contain all needed methodology to implement the HHT computer code. In 2004, Semion Kizhner and Karin Blank implemented the reference digital HHT real-time data processing system for 1D (HHT-DPS Version 1.4). The case for 2-Dimension (2D) (HHT2) proved to be difficult due to the computational complexity of EMD for 2D (EMD2) and absence of a suitable Hilbert Transform for 2D spectral analysis (HSA2). The real-time EMD2 and HSA2 comprise the real-time HHT2. Kizhner completed the real-time EMD2 and the HSA2 reference digital implementations respectively in 2013 & 2014. Still, the HHT2 outcome synthesis remains an active research area. This paper presents the initial concepts and preliminary results of HHT2-based synthesis and its application to processing of signals contaminated by Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI), as well as optical systems' fringe detection and mitigation at design stage. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP mission (SMAP) carries a radiometer instrument that measures Earth soil moisture at L1 frequency (1.4 GHz polarimetric - H, V, 3rd and 4th Stokes parameters). There is abundant RFI at L1 and because soil moisture is a strategic parameter, it is important to be able to recover the RFI-contaminated measurement samples (15% of telemetry). State-of-the-art only allows RFI detection and removes RFI-contaminated measurements. The HHT-based analysis and synthesis facilitates

  10. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Bill

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

  11. Gas Bubbles Investigation in Contaminated Water Using Optical Tomography Based on Independent Component Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Taufiq Mohd Khairi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of concentration profiles for gas bubble flow in a vertical pipeline containing contaminated water using an optical tomography system. The concentration profiles for the bubble flow quantities are investigated under five different flows conditions, a single bubble, double bubbles, 25% of air opening, 50% of air opening, and 100% of air opening flow rates where a valve is used to control the gas flow in the vertical pipeline. The system is aided by the independent component analysis (ICA algorithm to reconstruct the concentration profiles of the liquid-gas flow. The behaviour of the gas bubbles was investigated in contaminated water in which the water sample was prepared by adding 25 mL of colour ingredients to 3 liters of pure water. The result shows that the application of ICA has enabled the system to detect the presence of gas bubbles in contaminated water. This information provides vital information on the flow inside the pipe and hence could be very significant in increasing the efficiency of the process industries.

  12. Chemical contamination baseline in the Western basin of the Mediterranean Sea based on transplanted mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andral, Bruno; Galgani, François; Tomasino, Corinne; Bouchoucha, Marc; Blottiere, Charlotte; Scarpato, Alfonso; Benedicto, José; Deudero, Salud; Calvo, Monica; Cento, Alexandro; Benbrahim, Samir; Boulahdid, Moustapha; Sammari, Cherif

    2011-08-01

    The MYTILOS project aimed at drawing up a preliminary report on coastal chemical contamination at the scale of the Western Mediterranean (continental coasts of the Balearic Islands, Sicily, Sardinia, Corsica and Maghreb) based on a transplanted mussels methodology validated along the French coasts since 1996 by Ifremer and the Rhône Méditerranée & Corsica water board. MYTILOS is backed up by the INTERREG III B/MEDOC programme, the PNUE/PAM-MEDPOL and Rhône Méditerranée & Corsica water board. Three cruises (2004, 2005, 2006) have taken place to assess the first state of chemical contamination along the Western Mediterranean shores with the same methodology. Approximately 120 days were spent at sea deploying and retrieving 123 mussel bags. The results obtained for all studied contaminants were equivalent to those obtained along the French coast according the RINBIO network. These similarities relate to both the highest measured levels and background levels throughout the 123 stations. The areas of greatest impact were mainly urban and industrial centers and the outlets of major rivers, with a far higher midsea impact on the dilution of organic compounds than on metals. Metal levels measured in midsea zones were found to be similar to those in natural shellfish populations living along the coast. On a global scale we can observe that the contaminants levels in the Mediterranean Sea are in the same range as in other areas worldwide. Overall, the research demonstrates the reliability of this methodology for marine pollution monitoring, especially in the Mediterranean sea. PMID:20862467

  13. Comparison of Phytoscreening and Direct-Push- Based Site Investigation at a Rural Megasite Contaminated with Chlorinated Ethenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, Arno; Holm, Olaf; Trapp, Stefan;

    2015-01-01

    The reliable characterization of subsurface contamination of spatially extended contaminated sites is a challenging task, especially with an unknown history of land use. Conventional technologies often fail due to temporal and financial constraints and thus hinder the redevelopment of abandoned...... areas in particular. Here we compare two site screening techniques that can be applied quickly at relatively low cost, namely Direct Push (DP)-based groundwater sampling and tree core sampling. The effectiveness of both methods is compared for a rural megasite contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons....... Unexpected pollution hot spots could be identified using both of these methods, while tree coring even enabled the delineation of the contaminant plume flowing into an adjacent wetland inaccessible for DP units. Both methods showed a good agreement in revealing the spatial pattern of the contamination...

  14. A survey of benthic sediment contaminants in reaches of the Columbia River Estuary based on channel sedimentation characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counihan, Timothy D.; Waite, Ian R.; Nilsen, Elena B.; Hardiman, Jill M.; Elias, Edwin; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Zaugg, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    While previous studies have documented contaminants in fish, sediments, water, and wildlife, few specifics are known about the spatial distribution of contaminants in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). Our study goal was to characterize sediment contaminant detections and concentrations in reaches of the CRE that were concurrently being sampled to assess contaminants in water, invertebrates, fish, and osprey (Pandion haliaetus) eggs. Our objectives were to develop a survey design based on sedimentation characteristics and then assess whether sediment grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), and contaminant concentrations and detections varied between areas with different sedimentation characteristics. We used a sediment transport model to predict sedimentation characteristics of three 16 km river reaches in the CRE. We then compartmentalized the modeled change in bed mass after a two week simulation to define sampling strata with depositional, stable, or erosional conditions. We collected and analyzed bottom sediments to assess whether substrate composition, organic matter composition, and contaminant concentrations and detections varied among strata within and between the reaches. We observed differences in grain size fractions between strata within and between reaches. We found that the fine sediment fraction was positively correlated with TOC. Contaminant concentrations were statistically different between depositional vs. erosional strata for the industrial compounds, personal care products and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons class (Indus–PCP–PAH). We also observed significant differences between strata in the number of detections of Indus–PCP–PAH (depositional vs. erosional; stable vs. erosional) and for the flame retardants, polychlorinated biphenyls, and pesticides class (depositional vs. erosional, depositional vs. stable). When we estimated mean contaminant concentrations by reach, we observed higher contaminant concentrations in the furthest

  15. Thermodynamic Considerations of Contamination by Alloying Elements of Remelted End-of-Life Nickel- and Cobalt-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2016-06-01

    Cobalt and nickel are high-value commodity metals and are mostly used in the form of highly alloyed materials. The alloying elements used may cause contamination problems during recycling. To ensure maximum resource efficiency, an understanding of the removability of these alloying elements and the controllability of some of the primary alloying elements is essential with respect to the recycling of end-of-life (EoL) nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys by remelting. In this study, the distribution behaviors of approximately 30 elements that are usually present in EoL nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys in the solvent metal (nickel, cobalt, or nickel-cobalt alloy), oxide slag, and gas phases during the remelting were quantitatively evaluated using a thermodynamic approach. The results showed that most of the alloying elements can be removed either in the slag phase or into the gas phase. However, the removal of copper, tin, arsenic, and antimony by remelting is difficult, and they remain as tramp elements during the recycling. On the other hand, the distribution tendencies of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten can be controlled by changing the remelting conditions. To increase the resource efficiency of recycling, preventing contamination by the tramp elements and identifying the alloying compositions of EoL superalloys are significantly essential, which will require the development of efficient prior alloy-sorting systems and advanced separation technologies.

  16. Field—Based Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Hydrocarbons at Industrially Contaminated Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Rigou

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Examination of organic pollutants in groundwaters should also consider the source of the pollution, which is often a solid matrix such as soil, landfill waste, or sediment. This premise should be viewed alongside the growing trend towards field-based characterisation of contaminated sites for reasons of speed and cost. Field-based methods for the extraction of organic compounds from solid samples are generally cumbersome, time consuming, or inefficient. This paper describes the development of a field-based supercritical fluid extraction (SFE system for the recovery of organic contaminants (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons from soils. A simple, compact, and robust SFE system has been constructed and was found to offer the same extraction efficiency as a well-established laboratory SFE system. Extraction optimisation was statistically evaluated using a factorial analysis procedure. Under optimised conditions, the device yielded recovery efficiencies of >70% with RSD values of 4% against the standard EPA Soxhlet method, compared with a mean recovery efficiency of 48% for a commercially available field-extraction kit. The device will next be evaluated with real samples prior to field deployment.

  17. Optimization of monitoring networks based on uncertainty quantification of model predictions of contaminant transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; Harp, D.

    2010-12-01

    The process of decision making to protect groundwater resources requires a detailed estimation of uncertainties in model predictions. Various uncertainties associated with modeling a natural system, such as: (1) measurement and computational errors; (2) uncertainties in the conceptual model and model-parameter estimates; (3) simplifications in model setup and numerical representation of governing processes, contribute to the uncertainties in the model predictions. Due to this combination of factors, the sources of predictive uncertainties are generally difficult to quantify individually. Decision support related to optimal design of monitoring networks requires (1) detailed analyses of existing uncertainties related to model predictions of groundwater flow and contaminant transport, (2) optimization of the proposed monitoring network locations in terms of their efficiency to detect contaminants and provide early warning. We apply existing and newly-proposed methods to quantify predictive uncertainties and to optimize well locations. An important aspect of the analysis is the application of newly-developed optimization technique based on coupling of Particle Swarm and Levenberg-Marquardt optimization methods which proved to be robust and computationally efficient. These techniques and algorithms are bundled in a software package called MADS. MADS (Model Analyses for Decision Support) is an object-oriented code that is capable of performing various types of model analyses and supporting model-based decision making. The code can be executed under different computational modes, which include (1) sensitivity analyses (global and local), (2) Monte Carlo analysis, (3) model calibration, (4) parameter estimation, (5) uncertainty quantification, and (6) model selection. The code can be externally coupled with any existing model simulator through integrated modules that read/write input and output files using a set of template and instruction files (consistent with the PEST

  18. A review of what is an emerging contaminant

    OpenAIRE

    Sauvé, Sébastien; Desrosiers, Mélanie

    2014-01-01

    A review is presented of how one defines emerging contaminants and what can be included in that group of contaminants which is preferably termed “contaminants of emerging concern”. An historical perspective is given on the evolution of the issues surrounding emerging contaminants and how environmental scientists have tackled this issue. This begins with global lead contamination from the Romans two millennia ago, moves on to arsenic-based and DDT issues and more recently to pharmaceuticals, c...

  19. BIOREGIS software platform based on GIS technology to support in-situ remediation of petroleum contaminated sites. Case study: razvad - dambovita county, Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anicai, Ovidiu [Institute for Computers - ITC SA, Bucharest (Romania); Anicai, Liana [PSV COMPANY SA, Direction of Research, Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-12-15

    With a need for the management of petroleum contaminated sites on Romanian territory, an experimental software platform involving ESRI-ArcGIS technologies (BIOREGIS) is presented in this study. The BIOREGIS platform is aimed to: (i) Build the structure of relational, standardized databases to store spatial and textual characteristic information on polluted sites for further risk analysis and planning of remediation actions, (ii) improve the pollution risk assessment methodology for Romanian petroleum contaminated sites and its informatics implementation, and (iii) develop and operate the software platform for pollution risk based management involving GIS/remote sensing technologies and remediation activities. The operation of BIOREGIS has been tested for a pilot contaminated area situated at Razvad - Dambovita County, which has been subjected to in situ remediation procedures involving both bioremediation and electrokinetic processes. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    An environmental investigation of ground water conditions has been undertaken at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio to obtain data to assist in the evaluation of a potential removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, migration of the contaminated ground water across Base boundaries. Field investigations were limited to the central section of the southwestern boundary of Area C and the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B. Further, the study was limited to a maximum depth of 150 feet below grade. Three primary activities of the field investigation were: (1) installation of 22 monitoring wells, (2) collection and analysis of ground water from 71 locations, (3) measurement of ground water elevations at 69 locations. Volatile organic compounds including trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and/or vinyl chloride were detected in concentrations exceeding Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) at three locations within the Area C investigation area. Ground water at the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B occurs in two primary units, separated by a thicker-than-expected clay layers. One well within Area B was determined to exceed the MCL for trichloroethylene.

  1. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990 Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential CERCLA removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground-water contamination in the Mad River Valley Aquifer within and across WPAFB boundaries. The action will be based on a Focused Feasibility Study with an Action Memorandum serving as a decision document that is subject to approval by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The first phase (Phase 1) of this effort involves an investigation of ground-water contamination migrating across the southwest boundary of Area C and across Springfield Pike adjacent to Area B. Task 4 of Phase 1 is a field investigation to collect sufficient additional information to evaluate removal alternatives. The field investigation will provide information in the following specific areas of study: water-level data which will be used to permit calibration of the ground-water flow model to a unique time in history; and ground-water quality data which will be used to characterize the current chemical conditions of ground water.

  2. Optimization-based multicriteria decision analysis for identification of desired petroleum-contaminated groundwater remediation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongwei; Feng, Mao; He, Li; Ren, Lixia

    2015-06-01

    The conventional multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) methods used for pollution control generally depend on the data currently available. This could limit their real-world applications, especially where the input data (e.g., the most cost-effective remediation cost and eventual contaminant concentration) might vary by scenario. This study proposes an optimization-based MCDA (OMCDA) framework to address such a challenge. It is capable of (1) capturing various preferences of decision-makers, (2) screening and analyzing the performance of various optimized remediation strategies under changeable scenarios, and (3) compromising incongruous decision analysis results. A real-world case study is employed for demonstration, where four scenarios are considered with each one corresponding to a set of weights representative of the preference of the decision-makers. Four criteria are selected, i.e., optimal total pumping rate, remediation cost, contaminant concentration, and fitting error. Their values are determined through running optimization and optimization-based simulation procedures. Four sets of the most desired groundwater remediation strategies are identified, implying specific pumping rates under varied scenarios. Results indicate that the best action lies in groups 32 and 16 for the 5-year, groups 49 and 36 for the 10-year, groups 26 and 13 for the 15-year, and groups 47 and 13 for the 20-year remediation. PMID:25613797

  3. A model presented for classification ECG signals base on Case-Based Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Sayari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of heart diseases/abnormalities can prolong life and enhance the quality of living through appropriate treatment; thus classifying cardiac signals will be helped to immediate diagnosing of heart beat type in cardiac patients. The present paper utilizes the case base reasoning (CBR for classification of ECG signals. Four types of ECG beats (normal beat, congestive heart failure beat, ventricular tachyarrhythmia beat and atrial fibrillation beat obtained from the PhysioBank database was classified by the proposed CBR model. The main purpose of this article is classifying heart signals and diagnosing the type of heart beat in cardiac patients that in proposed CBR (Case Base Reasoning system, Training and testing data for diagnosing and classifying types of heart beat have been used. The evaluation results from the model are shown that the proposed model has high accuracy in classifying heart signals and helps to clinical decisions for diagnosing the type of heart beat in cardiac patients which indeed has high impact on diagnosing the type of heart beat aided computer.

  4. The potential of compost-based biobarriers for Cr(VI) removal from contaminated groundwater: Column test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of a column reactor test, aiming at evaluating the performance of a biological permeable barrier made of low-cost waste materials, for Cr(VI) removal from contaminated groundwater. A 1:1 by volume mixture of green compost and siliceous gravel was tested as reactive medium in the experimental activity. A 10 mg/l Cr(VI) contaminated solution was used and the residual Cr(VI) concentration along the column height and in the outlet was determined in the water samples collected daily. Also pH, redox potential and COD were analyzed. At the end of the test, the reactive medium was characterized in terms of Cr(VI) and total chromium. The Cr(VI) removal efficiency was higher than 99% during the entire experimental activity. The influence of the biological activity on Cr(VI) removal efficiency was evaluated by varying the organic carbon and nitrogen dosages in the contaminated solution fed to the system; a removal decrease was observed when the organic carbon was not enough to sustain the microbial metabolism. The Cr(VI) removal was strictly linked to the biological activity of the native biomass of compost. No Cr(III) was detected in the outlet: the Cr(III) produced was entrapped in the solid matrix. Two main processes involved were: adsorption on the organic-based matrix and reduction into Cr(III) mediated by the anaerobic microbial metabolism of the bacteria residing in green compost. Siliceous gravel was used as the structure matrix, since its contribution to the removal was almost negligible. Thanks to the proven efficiency and to the low-cost, the reactive medium used can represent a valid alternative to conventional approaches to chromium remediation.

  5. Contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The term 'Contaminated sites' refers to soil and groundwater contamination caused by local sources such as landfills or industrial sites. As of July 2002, there were in Austria 2,372 sites registered as potentially contaminated sites, from them: 165 sites required remediation, for 55 sites non remedial measures were necessary and to date 65 sites were remediated with a cost of 700,000 M Euro. An overview about funding of remedial measures, estimation of the extent of the problem (remediation requirements, chlorinated hydrocarbons accidents), deficits (lack of legal harmonization, slow implementation of remedial measures, etc.) is presented. Table 1. (nevyjel)

  6. Physiologically-based toxicokinetic models help identifying the key factors affecting contaminant uptake during flood events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A PBTK model for trout was coupled with a sediment equilibrium partitioning model. • The influence of physical exercise on pollutant uptake was studies using the model. • Physical exercise during flood events can increase the level of biliary metabolites. • Cardiac output and effective respiratory volume were identified as relevant factors. • These confounding factors need to be considered also for bioconcentration studies. - Abstract: As a consequence of global climate change, we will be likely facing an increasing frequency and intensity of flood events. Thus, the ecotoxicological relevance of sediment re-suspension is of growing concern. It is vital to understand contaminant uptake from suspended sediments and relate it to effects in aquatic biota. Here we report on a computational study that utilizes a physiologically based toxicokinetic model to predict uptake, metabolism and excretion of sediment-borne pyrene in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To this end, data from two experimental studies were compared with the model predictions: (a) batch re-suspension experiments with constant concentration of suspended particulate matter at two different temperatures (12 and 24 °C), and (b) simulated flood events in an annular flume. The model predicted both the final concentrations and the kinetics of 1-hydroxypyrene secretion into the gall bladder of exposed rainbow trout well. We were able to show that exhaustive exercise during exposure in simulated flood events can lead to increased levels of biliary metabolites and identified cardiac output and effective respiratory volume as the two most important factors for contaminant uptake. The results of our study clearly demonstrate the relevance and the necessity to investigate uptake of contaminants from suspended sediments under realistic exposure scenarios

  7. Physiologically-based toxicokinetic models help identifying the key factors affecting contaminant uptake during flood events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, Markus; Eichbaum, Kathrin [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt – Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Kammann, Ulrike [Thünen-Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg (Germany); Hudjetz, Sebastian [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt – Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Cofalla, Catrina [Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg [Federal Institute of Hydrology (BFG), Department G3: Biochemistry, Ecotoxicology, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz (Germany); Schüttrumpf, Holger [Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Preuss, Thomas [Department of Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt- Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); and others

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A PBTK model for trout was coupled with a sediment equilibrium partitioning model. • The influence of physical exercise on pollutant uptake was studies using the model. • Physical exercise during flood events can increase the level of biliary metabolites. • Cardiac output and effective respiratory volume were identified as relevant factors. • These confounding factors need to be considered also for bioconcentration studies. - Abstract: As a consequence of global climate change, we will be likely facing an increasing frequency and intensity of flood events. Thus, the ecotoxicological relevance of sediment re-suspension is of growing concern. It is vital to understand contaminant uptake from suspended sediments and relate it to effects in aquatic biota. Here we report on a computational study that utilizes a physiologically based toxicokinetic model to predict uptake, metabolism and excretion of sediment-borne pyrene in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To this end, data from two experimental studies were compared with the model predictions: (a) batch re-suspension experiments with constant concentration of suspended particulate matter at two different temperatures (12 and 24 °C), and (b) simulated flood events in an annular flume. The model predicted both the final concentrations and the kinetics of 1-hydroxypyrene secretion into the gall bladder of exposed rainbow trout well. We were able to show that exhaustive exercise during exposure in simulated flood events can lead to increased levels of biliary metabolites and identified cardiac output and effective respiratory volume as the two most important factors for contaminant uptake. The results of our study clearly demonstrate the relevance and the necessity to investigate uptake of contaminants from suspended sediments under realistic exposure scenarios.

  8. The effect of multifunctional polymer-based gels on wound healing in full thickness bacteria-contaminated mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, Cecelia Christina; Whaley, Diana; Babu, Ranjith; Zhang, Jianying; Krishna, Priya; Beckman, Eric; Pasculle, A. William; Wells, Alan

    2007-01-01

    We determined whether a two part space-conforming polyethyleneglycol/dopa polymer-based gel promoted healing of contaminated wounds in mice. This silver-catalysed gel was previously developed to be broadly microbiocidal in vitro while being biocompatible with human wound cell functioning. Full-thickness wounds were created on the backs of mice. The wounds were inoculated with 104 CFU of each of four common skin wound contaminants, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter b...

  9. EPR and TL-based beta dosimetry measurements in various tooth components contaminated by {sup 90}Sr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronese, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: ivan.veronese@unimi.it; Fattibene, P. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 00161 Roma (Italy); Cantone, M.C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Coste, V. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 00161 Roma (Italy); Giussani, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Helmholtz Center Munich, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Onori, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 00161 Roma (Italy); Shishkina, E.A. [Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, 454076 Medgorodok, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2008-02-15

    Thermoluminescence-based beta dosimetry, previously proposed for the estimate of the internal contamination in teeth, and EPR has been used in this paper to investigate the homogeneity of {sup 90}Sr contamination and of dose within nine teeth of one person born in the year of the onset of waterborne radioactive releases of the Mayak plutonium facility. A large deviation of dose and activity distributions in both enamel and radical dentine of the various teeth was observed. Average dose was 27{+-}7Gy in enamel and 0.90{+-}0.31Gy in radical dentine. Average {sup 90}Sr concentration was 52{+-}8Bq/g in enamel and 5{+-}2Bq/g in radical dentine. The observed deviation around the mean value of dose and {sup 90}Sr concentration can be explained due to the specific mineral evolution of each tooth at the time of Sr intake. In the same donor, a negative correlation was also observed between radical dentine and enamel for the {sup 90}Sr specific activity as well for the dose. Similar analyses performed on one massive molar belonging to a second donor revealed absence of correlation between dose and {sup 90}Sr concentration in the same tissue, indicating a dose contribution from {sup 90}Sr present in neighbouring tissue compartments. Systematic differences in cumulated dose and activity levels between the lingual and the buccal parts of crown dentine and of enamel were also observed.

  10. Microbiological Contamination of Cosmetic Creams in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshtvarz, M. (Msc

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Transmission of pathogens by cosmetics is one of the major health complications. Direct contact with contaminated non-standard cosmetics can have irreparable side effects for the consumers. Thus, the evaluation of microbial contamination in cosmetic products is important. The aim of this study was to assess the microbiological contamination of one of frequently used cream. Material and Methods: In the present study, 135 samples of a special moisturizing cream were randomly selected from pharmacies in Tehran. The microbial contamination assessment, sampling and culturing method were based on the protocol (No.3978 of Iranian Institute of Standard and Industrial Research. Results: sixty-two (46% out of 135 samples were contaminated. The highest and lowest contaminations observed were Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus, respectively. Conclusion: Due to the high contamination rate of cosmetic creams, we recommend extremely monitoring and controlling these products by health centers. Keywords: Cosmetics, Microbial Contamination, Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

  11. Risk-based remediation guidelines for petroleum contaminated soil and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standards and practices for the remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated by petroleum products vary widely between jurisdications and between petroleum industry operators. In addition to statutory requirements, various guidelines have been developed by operators and industry groups. Attention has focused in recent years on the significant problem of leaking underground storage tanks (USTs). Many provinces and states have implemented regulations designed to ensure proper management, installation, replacement and abandonment of USTs. However, these regulations often do not cover levels to which groundwater and soil must be remediated in the event of a UST spill, leak or closure. The province of Alberta has recently initiated a project to develop a strategy for the management of underground storage tanks under which specific remediation guidelines for soil and groundwater have been recommended. The recommended guidelines explicitly embrace the principles of risk assessment and risk management, both in the numerical clean-up procedure and in the application of the guidelines. Site sensitivity ranking is a measure of human and environmental risk based on receptor sensitivity and site specific factors that govern likelihood of impact. The petroleum constituents considered include toxic volatile aromatic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, phenols and lead. Two alternatives to numerical criteria are site-specific criteria on the basis of risk assessment, and a risk management/reduction strategy that allows contaminants to remain in the subsurface at higher concentrations provided measures are taken to manage, control and reduce associated risks. 1 fig., 3 tabs

  12. Challenge to the volume reduction of contaminated soil based on magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A great amount of radioactive substances were released in the neighborhood of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station following the accident of this plant. In particular, damage from radioactive cesium (134 or 137) has become the main case of trouble, incurring the necessity of decontamination of soil in the contaminated territory. In addition, a large amount of contaminated soil was generated due to the decontamination work, and its volume reduction has become a large challenge for the management and storage. This paper takes up magnetic separation technology as one of the technologies of volume reduction, and introduces its development condition. In this method, soil is firstly classified by size, and clay (or silt) with small particles, which adsorbs about 80% of radioactive cesium in soil, is separated from sand gravel. Furthermore, this clay portion is separated based on magnetic separation to 1:1 type and 1:2 type clay minerals with different magnetic susceptibilities, for the purpose of volume reduction. This paper describes the principle of the above method, as well as the development history to date. (A.O.)

  13. Estimating initial contaminant mass based on fitting mass-depletion functions to contaminant mass discharge data: Testing method efficacy with SVE operations data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainhagu, J.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2016-09-01

    The mass of contaminant present at a site, particularly in the source zones, is one of the key parameters for assessing the risk posed by contaminated sites, and for setting and evaluating remediation goals and objectives. This quantity is rarely known and is challenging to estimate accurately. This work investigated the efficacy of fitting mass-depletion functions to temporal contaminant mass discharge (CMD) data as a means of estimating initial mass. Two common mass-depletion functions, exponential and power functions, were applied to historic soil vapor extraction (SVE) CMD data collected from 11 contaminated sites for which the SVE operations are considered to be at or close to essentially complete mass removal. The functions were applied to the entire available data set for each site, as well as to the early-time data (the initial 1/3 of the data available). Additionally, a complete differential-time analysis was conducted. The latter two analyses were conducted to investigate the impact of limited data on method performance, given that the primary mode of application would be to use the method during the early stages of a remediation effort. The estimated initial masses were compared to the total masses removed for the SVE operations. The mass estimates obtained from application to the full data sets were reasonably similar to the measured masses removed for both functions (13 and 15% mean error). The use of the early-time data resulted in a minimally higher variation for the exponential function (17%) but a much higher error (51%) for the power function. These results suggest that the method can produce reasonable estimates of initial mass useful for planning and assessing remediation efforts.

  14. GC/MS Based Non-target Screening of Organic Contaminants in River Indus and its Tributaries in Sindh (Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Shaikh1

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate presence of organic contaminants in river Indus and its tributaries screening studies were carried out. Two years screening studies were based on four sampling campaigns in 13 sampling points out of which 9 sampling points belong to river Indus and its tributaries, 4 to municipal sewerage and 1 to industrial sewerage. Deconvolution Reporting Software (DRS was used to analyze scan data. Deconvolution is capable of screening the compounds whose peaks become invisible due to co-extracted compounds. Furthermore it significantly reduces analysis time and chromatographic resolution requirements. Results reveal that all the sampling points were greatly polluted with phthalate esters and tributyl phosphate (TBP. Apart from these, numerous long chain hydrocarbons, toxic phenols i.e. bisphenol A, analgesic i.e. ibuprofen and mefenamic acid, pesticides i.e. endosulfan, PCPIs, etc have significantly contaminated water bodies. In this screening analysis many compounds are identified that can be possible emerging contaminants and that are rarely documented. The identified contaminants are debated in accordance with their use, possible emission source and pathway. To the best of our knowledge this study holds first detailed screening of organic contaminants in river Indus and its tributaries. The information gathered in this analysis can be useful for future studies based on individual contamination in river Indus.

  15. Development of a HPGe-based on-line water contamination monitoring system in Hong Kong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, H. Y.; Chan, John K. W. [Hong Kong Observatory, Kowloon (China)

    2002-07-01

    Much of the fresh water supply in Hong Kong comes from the neighboring province of Guangdong. Before the raw fresh water is transported to Hong Kong, it is stored in a reservoir, which is some 45 km from Guangdong's two nuclear power stations. To monitor the activity concentrations of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the raw fresh water supplied from Guangdong, a NaI-based On-line Water Contamination Monitoring System (OWCMS) was developed in 1991 and installed at the Muk Wu pumping station in the northern part of Hong Kong, the point of entry for the raw fresh water into the territory. With advances in electro-mechanical cooling techniques and information technology, a second-generation OWCMS using a high-resolution gamma spectrometer was developed. This paper describes the design of the system, communication and control strategy as well as the reporting rationale and operational experience of the prototype system.

  16. Identification of Contamination Information of Vegetation in Coal Mines Based on Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The development and application of the hyper-spectral remote sensing (HRS) in the environment investigation and evaluation of coal mines have been discussed in detail. By using Hyperion HRS technology and field spectrum measuring and integrating traditional geological method as well as laboratory chemical measurement, the absorption spectrum features and the spectral variation rules of vegetation caused by coal mine waste piles were studied. Based on the spectral modeling methods and Vegetation Red Edge Parameter (VREP), the diagnose spectra information and spectral variation parameter were extracted, and the mapping methods of VREP were researched. The spatial distributions of contaminative vegetation have been quickly found out.This study has provided technical supports for the environment investigation and pollution management of coal mines.

  17. Development of Triad approach based system for ecological risk assessment for contaminated areas of Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydralieva, Kamilia; Uzbekov, Beksultan; Khudaibergenova, Bermet; Terekhova, Vera; Jorobekova, Sharipa

    2014-05-01

    This research is aimed to develop a high-effective system of an ecological risk assessment and risk-based decision making for anthropogenic ecosystems, with particular focus on the soils of the Kyrgyz Republic. The study is focused on the integration of Triad data including chemical, biological and ecotoxicological soil markers to estimate the potential risk from soils of highly anthropized areas impacted by deposition of different pollutants from mining operation. We focus on technogenic areas of Kyrgyzstan, the former uranium-producing province. Triad-based ecological risk assessment for technogenic sites are not currently used in Kyrgyzstan. However, the vitality of such research is self-evident. There are about 50 tailing dumps and more than 80 tips of radioactive waste which are formed as a result of uranium and complex ores (mercury, antimony, lead, cadmium and etc) mining around the unfavorable aforementioned places. According to the Mining Wastes' Tailings and Fills Rehabilitation Centre established in 1999 by a special Government's Resolution, one of the most ecologically dangerous uranium tailings resides in Kadzhi-Say. Although uranium processing is no longer practiced in Kadzhi-Say, a large number of open landfills and uranium ore storages still remain abandoned at the vicinity of this settlement. These neglected sites have enormous problems associated with soil erosion known as "technogenic deserts". The upper soil horizons are deprived of humus and vegetation, which favor the formation of low-buffer landscapes in the zones of maximum contamination. As a result, most of these areas are not re-cultivated and remain in critical environmental condition (Bykovchenko, et al., 2005; Tukhvatshin, 2005; Suranova, 2006). Triad data for assessing environmental risk and biological vulnerability at contaminated sites will be integrated. The following Triad-based parameters will be employed: 1) chemical soil analyses (revealing the presence of potentially dangerous

  18. Microlith-based Structured Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide, Humidity, and Trace Contaminant Control in Manned Space Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaedi, Christian; Roychoudhury, SUbir; Howard, David F.; Perry, Jay L.; Knox, James C.

    2011-01-01

    To support continued manned space exploration, the development of atmosphere revitalization systems that are lightweight, compact, durable, and power efficient is a key challenge. The systems should be adaptable for use in a variety of habitats and should offer operational functionality to either expel removed constituents or capture them for closedloop recovery. As mission durations increase and exploration goals reach beyond low earth orbit, the need for regenerable adsorption processes for continuous removal of CO2 and trace contaminants from cabin air becomes critical. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) and NASA Marshall (MSFC) have been developing an Engineered Structured Sorbents (ESS) approach based on PCI s patented Microlith technology to meet the requirements of future, extended human spaceflight explorations. This technology offers the inherent performance and safety attributes of zeolite and other sorbents with greater structural integrity, regenerability, and process control, thereby providing potential durability and efficiency improvements over current state-of-the-art systems. The major advantages of the ESS explored in this study are realized through the use of metal substrates to provide structural integrity (i.e., less partition of sorbents) and enhanced thermal control during the sorption process. The Microlith technology also offers a unique internal resistive heating capability that shows potential for short regeneration time and reduced power requirement compared to conventional systems. This paper presents the design, development, and performance results of the integrated adsorber modules for removing CO2, water vapor, and trace chemical contaminants. A related effort that utilizes the adsorber modules for sorption of toxic industrial chemicals is also discussed. Finally, the development of a 4-person two-leg ESS system for continuous CO2 removal is also presented.

  19. Adaptive sampling based on the cumulative distribution function of order statistics to delineate heavy-metal contaminated soils using kriging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correctly classifying 'contaminated' areas in soils, based on the threshold for a contaminated site, is important for determining effective clean-up actions. Pollutant mapping by means of kriging is increasingly being used for the delineation of contaminated soils. However, those areas where the kriged pollutant concentrations are close to the threshold have a high possibility for being misclassified. In order to reduce the misclassification due to the over- or under-estimation from kriging, an adaptive sampling using the cumulative distribution function of order statistics (CDFOS) was developed to draw additional samples for delineating contaminated soils, while kriging. A heavy-metal contaminated site in Hsinchu, Taiwan was used to illustrate this approach. The results showed that compared with random sampling, adaptive sampling using CDFOS reduced the kriging estimation errors and misclassification rates, and thus would appear to be a better choice than random sampling, as additional sampling is required for delineating the 'contaminated' areas. - A sampling approach was derived for drawing additional samples while kriging

  20. A physically-based integrated numerical model for flow,upland erosion,and contaminant transport in surface-subsurface systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a physically-based integrated hydrologic model that can simulate the rain-fall-induced 2D surface water flow, 3D variably saturated subsurface flow, upland soil erosion and transport, and contaminant transport in the surface-subsurface system of a watershed. The model couples surface and subsurface flows based on the assumption of continuity conditions of pressure head and exchange flux at the ground, considering infiltration and evapotranspiration. The upland rill/interrill soil erosion and transport are simulated using a non-equilibrium transport model. Contaminant transport in the integrated surface and subsurface domains is simulated using advection-diffusion equations with mass changes due to sediment sorption and desorption and exchanges between two domains due to infiltration, diffusion, and bed change. The model requires no special treatments at the interface of upland areas and streams and is suitable for wetland areas and agricultural watersheds with shallow streams.

  1. Bench-scale studies of reactor-based treatment of fuel-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological treatment of hazardous wastes from accidental spills or underground storage tank leaks has generated interest in bioremediation as a natural, economical mechanism for site decontamination. Because of drawbacks of batch systems, and the successful use of continuous flow treatment of wastewater for several decades, it was felt that continuous treatment of such soils would be a feasible alternative treatment technique. Therefore, bench-scale bioreactor treatability studies were conducted and used contaminated soil made in the laboratory using No. 2 diesel fuel and sand. Contamination levels studied were from 1,335--6,675 mg (TPH) as derived from No. 2 fuel oil per kg sand. Variation in mean cell age was obtained between reactors, with sufficient nutrients and oxygen made available to ensure the fuel oil organics were the only limit to microbial growth. A theoretical biokinetic model was formulated based on Monod's theory of limiting substrate and continuous cultures. Biokinetic constants and removal efficiencies were evaluated. The off-gases, CO2, and volatile hydrocarbons were monitored for mass balance analysis of the process. The solids retention times for evaluating final TPH concentration of 100 mg/kg were also calculated. Removal efficiencies of up to 91% were attained at a loading of 1,335 mg TPH/kg wet sand, operated at a biological solid retention time (BSRT) of 60 days. Experiments also showed that TPH desorption and volatilization were not rate-limiting in the overall removal process. Sand-to-moisture ratios in excess of 3:1 were also shown to retard TPH removal rates very little. However, biokinetic constants were found to vary over a range of values. This was particularly true at varying diesel loading levels. Nevertheless, significant removal efficiency (up to 86%) was noted at the highest loading level tested, 6,675 mg TPH/kg wet sand

  2. A GIS model-based screening of potential contamination of soil and water by pyrethroids in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistocchi, A; Vizcaino, P; Hauck, M

    2009-08-01

    The paper presents a geographic information system (GIS) model-based approach for analysis of potential contamination of soil and water by pyrethroids for the European continent. Pyrethroids are widely used pesticides and their chemical and toxicological characteristics suggest there may be concerns about human health and ecosystems, although so far there is no strong evidence indicating actual risk. However, little monitoring has been conducted and limited experimental information is available. We perform an assessment exercise that demonstrates how accessible information and GIS-based modeling allow to estimate the spatial distribution of chemical concentrations and fluxes at a screening level. The assessment highlights potential hot spots and the main environmental transport pathways, in a quick and simple way. By combining information on pesticide use, crop distribution and landscape and climate parameters we identify potential problem areas to help focusing monitoring campaigns. The approach presented here is simple and fast, and can be applied to virtually all pesticide classes used over a large domain, and is therefore suitable for the screening of large quantities of chemicals, of which the majority has not undergone any systematic environmental monitoring program. The method has been tested through benchmarking with other well-established models. However, further research is needed to evaluate it against experimental observations. PMID:19540036

  3. A laboratory based experimental study of mercury emission from contaminated soils in the River Idrijca catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kocman

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Results obtained by a laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS focused on investigating the kinetics of the mercury emission flux (MEF from contaminated soils of the Idrija Hg-mine region, Slovenia are presented. Representative soil samples with respect to total Hg concentrations (4–417 μg g−1 and land cover (forest, meadow and alluvial soil alongside the River Idrijca were analysed to determine the variation in MEF versus distance from the source, regulating three major environmental parameters comprising soil temperature, soil moisture and solar radiation. MEFs ranged from less than 2 to 530 ng m−2 h−1, with the highest emissions from contaminated alluvial soils and soils near the mining district in the town of Idrija. A significant decrease of MEF was then observed with increasing distance from these sites. The results revealed a strong positive effect of all three parameters investigated on momentum MEF. The light-induced flux was shown to be independent of the soil temperature, while the soil aqueous phase seems to be responsible for recharging the pool of mercury in the soil available for both the light- and thermally-induced flux. The overall flux response to simulated environmental conditions depends greatly on the form of Hg in the soil. Higher activation energies are required for the overall process to occur in soils where insoluble cinnabar prevails compared to soils where more mobile Hg forms and forms available for transformation processes are dominant.

  4. A Cercla-Based Decision Model to Support Remedy Selection for an Uncertain Volume of Contaminants at a DOE Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) operated by the Department of Energy is challenged with selecting the appropriate remediation technology to cleanup contaminants at Waste Area Group (WAG) 6. This research utilizes value-focused thinking and multiattribute preference theory concepts to produce a decision analysis model designed to aid the decision makers in their selection process. The model is based on CERCLA's five primary balancing criteria, tailored specifically to WAG 6 and the contaminants of concern, utilizes expert opinion and the best available engineering, cost, and performance data, and accounts for uncertainty in contaminant volume. The model ranks 23 remediation technologies (trains) in their ability to achieve the CERCLA criteria at various contaminant volumes. A sensitivity analysis is performed to examine the effects of changes in expert opinion and uncertainty in volume. Further analysis reveals how volume uncertainty is expected to affect technology cost, time and ability to meet the CERCLA criteria. The model provides the decision makers with a CERCLA-based decision analysis methodology that is objective, traceable, and robust to support the WAG 6 Feasibility Study. In addition, the model can be adjusted to address other DOE contaminated sites

  5. A Cercla-Based Decision Model to Support Remedy Selection for an Uncertain Volume of Contaminants at a DOE Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christine E. Kerschus

    1999-03-31

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) operated by the Department of Energy is challenged with selecting the appropriate remediation technology to cleanup contaminants at Waste Area Group (WAG) 6. This research utilizes value-focused thinking and multiattribute preference theory concepts to produce a decision analysis model designed to aid the decision makers in their selection process. The model is based on CERCLA's five primary balancing criteria, tailored specifically to WAG 6 and the contaminants of concern, utilizes expert opinion and the best available engineering, cost, and performance data, and accounts for uncertainty in contaminant volume. The model ranks 23 remediation technologies (trains) in their ability to achieve the CERCLA criteria at various contaminant volumes. A sensitivity analysis is performed to examine the effects of changes in expert opinion and uncertainty in volume. Further analysis reveals how volume uncertainty is expected to affect technology cost, time and ability to meet the CERCLA criteria. The model provides the decision makers with a CERCLA-based decision analysis methodology that is objective, traceable, and robust to support the WAG 6 Feasibility Study. In addition, the model can be adjusted to address other DOE contaminated sites.

  6. Fumonisin mycotoxin contamination of corn-based foods consumed by potentially pregnant women in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Fumonisins are Fusarium mold mycotoxins that contaminate corn and corn food products and interfere with animal folic acid metabolism. Consumption of fumonisin-contaminated staple foods is associated with increased risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). We evaluated a sample of locally availa...

  7. A parameter selection for Raman spectroscopy-based detection of chemical contaminants in food powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy technique has proven to be a reliable method for detection of chemical contaminants in food ingredients and products. To detect each contaminant particle in a food sample, it is important to determine the effective depth of penetration of laser through the food sample and the corr...

  8. A model for risk-based monitoring of contaminants in feed ingredients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels, van der Ine; Adamse, P.; Jong, de J.; Hoogenboom, R.; Nijs, de M.; Bikker, P.

    2015-01-01

    A qualitative spreadsheet model has been developed for ranking feed ingredients on the basis of the potential risk of exceeding existing guidance or maximum levels in the EU for a certain contaminant, and the potential consequence of the presence of this contaminant on the health of animals and/o

  9. Evidence based decontamination protocols for the removal of external Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) from contaminated hair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duvivier, W.F.; Peeters, R.J.; Beek, van T.A.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2016-01-01

    External contamination can cause false positive results in forensic hair testing for drugs of abuse and is therefore a major concern when hair evidence is used in court. Current literature about decontamination strategies is mainly focused on external cocaine contamination and no consensus on the be

  10. Data sheet based countermeasure evaluation for radioactively contaminated Nordic food-producing areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Nordic expert group has identified and critically evaluated the countermeasures that may potentially be implemented in connection with major nuclear accident situations contaminating Nordic food-producing areas. This paper demonstrates how the derived technical information can be applied by decision-makers to identify practicable and cost-effective means for mitigation of the impact of contamination. (au)

  11. Research on fiber-based portable large area surface contamination monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large area portable surface contamination monitor is suitable searching the hot point, especially in the situations of large contamination area such as work site radioactive monitoring, nuclear facility decommissioning or nuclear emergency response. This paper focus on beta radioactive surface contamination. Through researching upon the detector which is made of large area plastic scintillation coupled with fibers, the first large area plastic scintillation surface contamination monitor was established. The effective area of detector reaches 1200 cm2. The verifying experiments indicates that the detection efficiency to 90Sr-90Y plate source comes to 7%. The results show this kind of detector is competent for beta radioactive surface contamination. This work laid a foundation for research and development of the relative instrument. (authors)

  12. Field-based detection and monitoring of uranium in contaminated groundwater using two immunosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melton, S.J.; Yu, H.; Williams, K.H.; Morris, S.A.; Long, P.E.; Blake, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Field-based monitoring of environmental contaminants has long been a need for environmental scientists. Described herein are two kinetic exclusion-based immunosensors, a field portable sensor (FPS) and an inline senor, that were deployed at the Integrated Field Research Challenge Site of the U.S. Department of Energy in Rifle, CO. Both sensors utilized a monoclonal antibody that binds to a U(VI)-dicarboxyphenanthroline complex (DCP) in a kinetic exclusion immunoassay format. These sensors were able to monitor changes of uranium in groundwater samples from {approx} 1 {micro}M to below the regulated drinking water limit of 126 nM (30 ppb). The FPS is a battery-operated sensor platform that can determine the uranium level in a single sample in 5-10 min, if the instrument has been previously calibrated with standards. The average minimum detection level (MDL) in this assay was 0.33 nM (79 ppt), and the MDL in the sample (based on a 1:200?1:400 dilution) was 66?132 nM (15.7?31.4 ppb). The inline sensor, while requiring a grounded power source, has the ability to autonomously analyze multiple samples in a single experiment. The average MDL in this assay was 0.12 nM (29 ppt), and the MDL in the samples (based on 1:200 or 1:400 dilutions) was 24?48 nM (5.7?11.4 ppb). Both sensor platforms showed an acceptable level of agreement (r{sup 2} = 0.94 and 0.76, for the inline and FPS, respectively) with conventional methods for uranium quantification.

  13. Environmental contaminants in freshwater fish and their risk to piscivorous wildlife based on a national monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, J.E.; Schmitt, C.J.; Chojnacki, K.A.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    Organochlorine chemical residues and elemental concentrations were measured in piscivorous and benthivorous fish at 111 sites from large U.S. river basins. Potential contaminant sources such as urban and agricultural runoff, industrial discharges, mine drainage, and irrigation varied among the sampling sites. Our objectives were to provide summary statistics for chemical contaminants and to determine if contaminant concentrations in the fish were a risk to wildlife that forage at these sites. Concentrations of dieldrin, total DDT, total PCBs, toxaphene, TCDD-EQ, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium, and zinc exceeded toxicity thresholds to protect fish and piscivorous wildlife in samples from at least one site; most exceedences were for total PCBs, mercury, and zinc. Chemical concentrations in fish from the Mississippi River Basin exceeded the greatest number of toxicity thresholds. Screening level wildlife risk analysis models were developed for bald eagle and mink using no adverse effect levels (NOAELs), which were derived from adult dietary exposure or tissue concentration studies and based primarily on reproductive endpoints. No effect hazard concentrations (NEHC) were calculated by comparing the NOAEL to the food ingestion rate (dietary-based NOAEL) or biomagnification factor (tissue-based NOAEL) of each receptor. Piscivorous wildlife may be at risk from a contaminant if the measured concentration in fish exceeds the NEHC. Concentrations of most organochlorine residues and elemental contaminants represented no to low risk to bald eagle and mink at most sites. The risk associated with pentachloroanisole, aldrin, Dacthal, methoxychlor, mirex, and toxaphene was unknown because NOAELs for these contaminants were not available for bald eagle or mink. Risk differed among modeled species and sites. Our screening level analysis indicates that the greatest risk to piscivorous wildlife was from total DDT, total PCBs, TCDD-EQ, mercury, and selenium. Bald eagles

  14. Spacecraft contamination prediction and testing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, J. A.; Maag, C. R.; Morelli, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques used in the prediction of spacecraft contamination for the Galileo Jupiter Orbiter and in the determination of the effects of such contamination are presented. Following a quick-look assessment of the contributions of ground-based initial contaminant loading, launch vehicle interface effects, vacuum-exposed outgassing deposition and attitude control thruster impingement and venting to the spacecraft contamination burden, the evaluations centered on the effects of the attitude control thruster on the scan platform optics, including calculations of thruster flowfields and a high-fidelity computer simulation of contaminant distribution. The evaluations revealed a considerable problem with thruster contamination, which could be solved by the use of a thrust shield and the avoidance of thruster operation at certain scan platform orientations. The effects of the various possible contaminants on spacecraft thermal and optical system performances were also investigated in studies of the optical transmittance of deposited monomethyl hydrazine nitrate, vacuum optical degradation due to contaminant outgassing and re-emission outgassing, and an operational satellite contaminant monitor on the NOAA-C satellite. It is concluded that with a good evaluation and testing program, contamination control may become a necessary portion of system design procedures, and recommendations for the implementation of various practices and tests to minimize contamination effects are presented.

  15. Characterization and remediation of a mixed waste-contaminated site at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the area of environmental restoration, one of the most challenging problems is the task of remediating mixed waste-contaminated sites. This paper discusses a successful Interim Corrective Measure (ICM) performed at a mixed waste-contaminated site on Kirtland Air Force Base (AFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The site, known as RW-68, Cratering Area and Radium Dump/Slag Piles, was used during the late 1940s and early 1950s for the destruction and incineration of captured World War II aircraft. It contained 19 slag piles totaling approximately 150 tons of slag, ash, refractory brick, and metal debris. The piles were contaminated with radium-226 and RCRA-characteristic levels of heavy metals. Therefore, the piles were considered mixed waste. To eliminate the threat to human health and the environment, an ICM of removal, segregation, stabilization, and disposal was conducted from October through December 1996. Approximately 120 cubic yards (cu yds) of mixed waste, 188 cu yds of low-level radioactive-contaminated soil, 1 cu yd of low-level radioactive-contaminated debris, 5 cu yds of RCRA-characteristic hazardous waste, and 45 tons of nonhazardous debris were stabilized and disposed of during the ICM. To render the RCRA metals and radionuclides insoluble, stabilization was performed on the mixed and RCRA-characteristic waste streams. All stabilized material was subjected to TCLP analysis to verify it no longer exhibited RCRA-characteristic properties. Radiological and geophysical surveys were conducted concurrently with site remediation activities. These surveys provided real-time documentation of site conditions during each phase of the ICM and confirmed successful cleanup of the site. The three radioactive waste streams, stabilized mixed waste, low-level radioactive-contaminated soil, and low-level radioactive-contaminated debris, were disposed of at the Envirocare low-level radioactive disposal facility

  16. Drifter-based Predictions of the Spread of Surface Contamination Using Iterative Statistics: A Local Example with Global Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertitta, D. A.; Macdonald, A. M.; Rypina, I.

    2015-12-01

    In the aftermath of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, it became critical to determine how radionuclides, both from atmospheric deposition and direct ocean discharge, were spreading in the ocean. One successful method used drifter observations from the Global Drifter Program (GDP) to predict the timing of the spread of surface contamination. U.S. coasts are home to a number of nuclear power plants as well as other industries capable of leaking contamination into the surface ocean. Here, the spread of surface contamination from a hypothetical accident at the existing Pilgrim nuclear power plant on the coast of Massachusetts is used as an example to show how the historical drifter dataset can be used as a prediction tool. Our investigation uses a combined dataset of drifter tracks from the GDP and the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center. Two scenarios are examined to estimate the spread of surface contamination: a local direct leakage scenario and a broader atmospheric deposition scenario that could result from an explosion. The local leakage scenario is used to study the spread of contamination within and beyond Cape Cod Bay, and the atmospheric deposition scenario is used to study the large-scale spread of contamination throughout the North Atlantic Basin. A multiple-iteration method of estimating probability makes best use of the available drifter data. This technique, which allows for direct observationally-based predictions, can be applied anywhere that drifter data are available to calculate estimates of the likelihood and general timing of the spread of surface contamination in the ocean.

  17. Assessments of risk indices and decision-making support within risk based land management and sustainable rehabilitation of radioactive contaminated territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of the applied Geoinformation Decision-Support System PRANA for risk based land management and rehabilitation of territories of Bryansk region (Russia), subjected to radioactive contamination as a result of the Chernobyl accident, is presented. The main blocks of PRANA DSS, including electronic maps, databases and models are described. Implementation of vector land use map with corresponding integration of different models allows integrating both local and regional level of analysis and practical implementation (from each field and settlement up to farm and district and regional levels). Some examples of model assessments (map of countermeasures and doses) are presented

  18. Scientific bases for decision making after a radioactive contamination of an urban environment: The design of the repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper to be presented will discuss, specifically, technical aspects of the Repository design in case of urban contamination. It will be emphasise what to decide, how to decide and what are the difficulties to decide. The case of Goiania it will be used as demonstration, in some cases, as a practical example. (author)

  19. Contamination and solid state welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2007-05-01

    Since sensitivity to contamination is one of the verities of solid state joining, there is a need for assessing contamination of the part(s) to be joined, preferably nondestructively while it can be remedied. As the surfaces that are joined in pinch welds are inaccessible and thus provide a greater challenge, most of the discussion is of the search for the origin and effect of contamination on pinch welding and ways to detect and mitigate it. An example of contamination and the investigation and remediation of such a system is presented. Suggestions are made for techniques for nondestructive evaluation of contamination of surfaces for other solid state welds as well as for pinch welds. Surfaces that have good visual access are amenable to inspection by diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Although other techniques are useful for specific classes of contaminants (such as hydrocarbons), DRIFT can be used most classes of contaminants. Surfaces such as the interior of open tubes or stems that are to be pinch welded can be inspected using infrared reflection spectroscopy. It must be demonstrated whether or not this tool can detect graphite based contamination, which has been seen in stems. For tubes with one closed end, the technique that should be investigated is emission infrared spectroscopy.

  20. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 9, Removal action system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

  1. Bilirubin oxidase based enzymatic air-breathing cathode: Operation under pristine and contaminated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Carlo; Babanova, Sofia; Erable, Benjamin; Schuler, Andrew; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-04-01

    The performance of bilirubin oxidase (BOx) based air breathing cathode was constantly monitored over 45 days. The effect of electrolyte composition on the cathode oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) output was investigated. Particularly, deactivation of the electrocatalytic activity of the enzyme in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution and in activated sludge (AS) was evaluated. The greatest drop in current density was observed during the first 3 days of constant operation with a decrease of ~60 μA cm(-2) day(-1). The rate of decrease slowed to ~10 μA cm(-2) day(-1) (day 3 to 9) and then to ~1.5 μA cm(-2)day(-1) thereafter (day 9 to 45). Despite the constant decrease in output, the BOx cathode generated residual current after 45 days operations with an open circuit potential (OCP) of 475 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. Enzyme deactivation was also studied in AS to simulate an environment close to the real waste operation with pollutants, solid particles and bacteria. The presence of low-molecular weight soluble contaminants was identified as the main reason for an immediate enzymatic deactivation within few hours of cathode operation. The presence of solid particles and bacteria does not affect the natural degradation of the enzyme. PMID:26544631

  2. Monitoring method based on land classification for assessing the distribution of environmental contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the Chernobyl accident, areas of western Great Britain were subject to contamination, primarily by rainfall. A rapid response was needed to assess the degree and distribution of the radionuclide deposition. Sample collection over Great Britain was made possible by the wide geographical spread of the research stations of the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (ITE). Samples were required to be representative of the area from which they were collected and sample numbers were a limiting factor. A land classification developed by ITE was used as a basis of the sampling scheme. In all, 320 samples sites from 16 land classes were used and a map of deposition produced. The results agree well with estimated deposition patterns based on rainfall data. Using data from the survey combined with those from the land use database, predictive estimates of the fallout in Great Britain have been made. These estimates show that in the best case up to 88% of the variability in the 137Cs values can be accounted for by variables used in the land classification. It is suggested, in view of the information available, that this approach could be extended to indicate vulnerable areas and ecosystems within Europe. (author). 14 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Microfluidic platform for environmental contaminants sensing and degradation based on boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Sánchez, Mariana; Mayorga-Martinez, CarmenC; Watanabe, Takeshi; Ivandini, TribidasariA; Honda, Yuki; Pino, Flavio; Nakata, Kazuya; Fujishima, Akira; Einaga, Yasuaki; Merkoçi, Arben

    2016-01-15

    We have developed a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) platform for electrochemical detection and degradation of the pesticide atrazine (Atz). It is based on boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes and a competitive magneto-enzyme immunoassay (EIA) that enables high sensitivity. To detect the enzymatic reaction, we employed a BDD electrode modified with platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs), as a highly conductive catalytic transducer. Chronoamperometry revealed a limit of detection (LOD) of 3.5 pM for atrazine, which, to the best of our knowledge, is one of the lowest value published to date. Finally, we degraded Atz in the same platform, using a bare BDD electrode that features remarkable corrosion stability, a wide potential window, and much higher O2 overvoltage as compared to conventional electrodes. These characteristics enable the electrode to produce a greater amount of HO• on the anode surface than do conventional electrodes and consequently, to destroy the pollutant more rapidly. Our new LOC platform might prove interesting as a smart system for detection and remediation of diverse pesticides and other contaminants. PMID:26339934

  4. Feasibility of Using Phytoextraction to Remediate a Compost-Based Soil Contaminated with Cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisien, Michele A; Rutter, Allison; Zeeb, Barbara A

    2015-01-01

    Greenhouse and in-situ field experiments were used to determine the potential for phytoextraction to remediate soil contaminated with Cd from municipal solid waste (MSW) and sewage sludge (SS) compost application at a Peterborough (Canada) site. For the greenhouse experiment, one native (Chenopodium album) and three naturalized (Poa compressa, Brassica juncea, Helianthus annuus) plant species were planted in soil containing no detectable Cd (<1.0 μg·g(-1)), and soil from the site containing low (5.0 ± 0.3 μg·g(-1) Cd), and high (16.5 ± 1.2 μg⋅g(-1) Cd) Cd concentrations. Plant uptake was low (root BAFs ≤0.5) for all species except P. compressa in the low Cd treatment (BAF 1.0). Only B. juncea accumulated Cd in its shoots, though uptake was low (BAF ≤0.3). For the field experiment, B. juncea was planted in-situ in areas of low and high Cd concentrations. Brassica juncea Cd uptake was low (root and shoot BAFs <0.2) in both treatments. Sequential extraction analysis indicated that Cd is retained primarily by low bioavailability soil fractions, and phytoextraction is therefore not feasible at this site. Though low Cd bioavailability has negative implications for Cd phytoextraction from MSW/SS compost-based soils, it may limit receptor exposure to Cd sufficiently to eliminate the potential for risk at this site. PMID:25848836

  5. Presentation of Medical Knowledge by Arden Syntax with Extensions Based on Fuzzy Set Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Tiffe, Sven; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter

    2001-01-01

    The Arden Syntax for Medical Logic Systems (Arden) is an approach to present medical knowledge by defining rules that include crisp decision logic. Clinical rules based on natural language usually contain uncertainty by way of vagueness which cannot be handled by Arden. Uncertain knowledge can be presented by extending Arden to include concepts of fuzzy set theory.

  6. Identification of Transport Parameters and Pollution Sources for a Physically Based Groundwater Contaminant Transport Model: A Comparison of Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Y.; Sykes, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    Transport parameter estimation and contaminant source identification are critical steps in the development of a physically based groundwater contaminant transport model. For most transient field scale problems, the high computational burden required by parameter identification algorithms combined with sparse data sets often limits calibration. However, when data are available, a high performance computing system and parallel computing may make the calibration process feasible. The selection of the optimization algorithm is also critical. In this paper, the contaminant transport and source parameters were estimated and compared using optimization with two heuristic search algorithms (a dynamically dimensioned search and a parallelized micro genetic algorithm) and a gradient based multi-start PEST algorithm which were implemented on the Shared Hierarchical Academic Research Computing Network (Sharcnet). The case study is located in New Jersey where improper waste disposal resulted in the contamination of down gradient public water supply wells. Using FRAC3DVS, a physically based transient three-dimensional groundwater flow model with spatially and temporally varying recharge was developed and calibrated using both approximately 9 years of head data from continuous well records and data over a period of approximately 30 years from traditional monitoring wells. For the contaminant system, the parameters that were estimated include source leaching rate, source concentration, dispersivities, and retardation coefficient. The groundwater domain was discretized using 214,520 elements. With highly changing pump rates at the 7 municipal wells, time increments over the approximately 30 year simulation period varied dynamically between several days and 3 months. On Sharcnet, one forward simulation on a single processor of both transient flow and contaminant transport takes approximately 3 to 4 hours. The contaminant transport model calibration results indicate that overall

  7. A Filter-based Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Assay for Rapid Detection of Chemical Contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Siyue; Glasser, Jessica; He, Lili

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to fabricate highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic (SERS) substrates using a filter syringe system that can be applied to the detection of various chemical contaminants. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are synthesized via reduction of silver nitrate by sodium citrate. Then the NPs are aggregated by sodium chloride to form nanoclusters that could be trapped in the pores of the filter membrane. A syringe is connected to the filter holder, with a filter membrane inside. By loading the nanoclusters into the syringe and passing through the membrane, the liquid goes through the membrane but not the nanoclusters, forming a SERS-active membrane. When testing the analyte, the liquid sample is loaded into the syringe and flowed through the Ag NPs coated membrane. The analyte binds and concentrates on the Ag NPs coated membrane. Then the membrane is detached from the filter holder, air dried and measured by a Raman instrument. Here we present the study of the volume effect of Ag NPs and sample on the detection sensitivity as well as the detection of 10 ppb ferbam and 1 ppm ampicillin using the developed assay. PMID:26966831

  8. A GIS-based approach to prevent contamination of groundwater at regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderacchi, M.; Vischetti, C.; di Guardo, A.; Trevisan, M.

    2009-04-01

    Sustainable development is a fundamental objective of the European Union. Since 1991, the use of numerical models has been used to assess the environmental fate of pesticides (directive 91/414 EC). Since then, new approaches to assess pesticide contamination have been developed. This is an ongoing process, with approaches getting increasingly close to reality. Actually, there is a new challenge to integrate the most advanced and cost-effective monitoring strategies with simulation models so that reliable indicators of unsaturated flow and transport can be suitably mapped and coupled with other indicators related to productivity and sustainability. The most relevant role of GIS in the analysis of pesticide fate in soil is its application to process together input data and the results of distribution model based simulations of pesticide transport. FitoMarche is a GIS-based software tool that estimates pesticide movement in the unsaturated zone using MACRO 5 and it is able to simulate complex and real crop rotations at the regional scale. Crop rotation involves the sequential production of different plant species on the same land, every crop is characterized by different agricultural practices that involve the use of different pesticides at different doses. FitoMarche extracts MACRO input data from a series of geographic data sets (shapefiles) and an internal database, writes input files for MACRO, executes the simulation and extracts solute and water fluxes from MACRO output files. The study has been performed in the Marche region, located in central Italy along the Adriatic coast. Soil, climate, land use shapefiles were provided from public authorities, crop rotation schemes were estimated from ISTAT (the national statistics institute) 5th agricultural census database using a municipality detail and agricultural practices following the local customs. Two herbicides have been tested: "A" is employed on maize crop, and "B" on maize, sunflower and sugarbeet. In the

  9. A canonical correlation analysis based method for contamination event detection in water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruonan; Liu, Shuming; Smith, Kate; Che, Han

    2016-06-15

    In this study, a general framework integrating a data-driven estimation model is employed for contamination event detection in water sources. Sequential canonical correlation coefficients are updated in the model using multivariate water quality time series. The proposed method utilizes canonical correlation analysis for studying the interplay between two sets of water quality parameters. The model is assessed by precision, recall and F-measure. The proposed method is tested using data from a laboratory contaminant injection experiment. The proposed method could detect a contamination event 1 minute after the introduction of 1.600 mg l(-1) acrylamide solution. With optimized parameter values, the proposed method can correctly detect 97.50% of all contamination events with no false alarms. The robustness of the proposed method can be explained using the Bauer-Fike theorem. PMID:27264637

  10. Magnesium-Based Corrosion Nano-Cells For Reductive Transformation Of Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium, with its potential to reduce a variety of aqueous contaminants, unique self-limiting corrosion behavior affording long active life times, natural abundance, low cost, and environmentally friendly nature, promises to be an effective technology. However, nanoparticles o...

  11. An Agent-based Modeling Framework for Sociotechnical Simulation of Water Distribution Contamination Events

    OpenAIRE

    Shafiee, M. Ehsan; Zechman, Emily M.

    2014-01-01

    In the event that a bacteriological or chemical toxin is intro- duced to a water distribution network, a large population of consumers may become exposed to the contaminant. A contamination event may be poorly predictable dynamic process due to the interactions of consumers and utility managers during an event. Consumers that become aware of a threat may select protective actions that change their water demands from typical demand patterns, and new hydraulic conditions can arise that differ f...

  12. Contamination sources of pyronema domesticum on Chinese cotton-based medical products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Aoshuang

    1998-06-01

    A typical cotton product, swab gauze, was selected in this study and samples taken from different manufactures in China and from different stages during manufacturing were tested for detection of the occurring of pyronema domesticum. The findings indicate that the contamination source of P. domesticum is originating in the raw cotton materials possibly contaminated in the field. No clear relationship between number of pyronema positives and bioburden levels was found from this study.

  13. Selective suppression of bacterial contaminants by process conditions during lignocellulose based yeast fermentations

    OpenAIRE

    Albers Eva; Johansson Emma; Franzén Carl Johan; Larsson Christer

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Contamination of bacteria in large-scale yeast fermentations is a serious problem and a threat to the development of successful biofuel production plants. Huge research efforts have been spent in order to solve this problem, but additional ways must still be found to keep bacterial contaminants from thriving in these environments. The aim of this project was to develop process conditions that would inhibit bacterial growth while giving yeast a competitive advantage. Result...

  14. Correlation of gene expression and contaminant concentrations in wild largescale suckers: a field-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Helena E; Mehinto, Alvine C; Yu, Fahong; Perry, Russell W; Denslow, Nancy D; Maule, Alec G; Mesa, Matthew G

    2014-06-15

    Toxic compounds such as organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants (PBDEs) have been detected in fish, birds, and aquatic mammals that live in the Columbia River or use food resources from within the river. We developed a custom microarray for largescale suckers (Catostomus macrocheilus) and used it to investigate the molecular effects of contaminant exposure on wild fish in the Columbia River. Using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) we identified 72 probes representing 69 unique genes with expression patterns that correlated with hepatic tissue levels of OCs, PCBs, or PBDEs. These genes were involved in many biological processes previously shown to respond to contaminant exposure, including drug and lipid metabolism, apoptosis, cellular transport, oxidative stress, and cellular chaperone function. The relation between gene expression and contaminant concentration suggests that these genes may respond to environmental contaminant exposure and are promising candidates for further field and laboratory studies to develop biomarkers for monitoring exposure of wild fish to contaminant mixtures found in the Columbia River Basin. The array developed in this study could also be a useful tool for studies involving endangered sucker species and other sucker species used in contaminant research. PMID:24050789

  15. Ensemble of surrogates-based optimization for identifying an optimal surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation strategy at heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xue; Lu, Wenxi; Hou, Zeyu; Zhao, Haiqing; Na, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify an optimal surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) strategy for aquifers contaminated by dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) based on an ensemble of surrogates-based optimization technique. A saturated heterogeneous medium contaminated by nitrobenzene was selected as case study. A new kind of surrogate-based SEAR optimization employing an ensemble surrogate (ES) model together with a genetic algorithm (GA) is presented. Four methods, namely radial basis function artificial neural network (RBFANN), kriging (KRG), support vector regression (SVR), and kernel extreme learning machines (KELM), were used to create four individual surrogate models, which were then compared. The comparison enabled us to select the two most accurate models (KELM and KRG) to establish an ES model of the SEAR simulation model, and the developed ES model as well as these four stand-alone surrogate models was compared. The results showed that the average relative error of the average nitrobenzene removal rates between the ES model and the simulation model for 20 test samples was 0.8%, which is a high approximation accuracy, and which indicates that the ES model provides more accurate predictions than the stand-alone surrogate models. Then, a nonlinear optimization model was formulated for the minimum cost, and the developed ES model was embedded into this optimization model as a constrained condition. Besides, GA was used to solve the optimization model to provide the optimal SEAR strategy. The developed ensemble surrogate-optimization approach was effective in seeking a cost-effective SEAR strategy for heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated sites. This research is expected to enrich and develop the theoretical and technical implications for the analysis of remediation strategy optimization of DNAPL-contaminated aquifers.

  16. Radiological assessment of past, present and potential sources to environmental contamination in the Southern Urals and strategies for remedial measures (SUCON)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarkrog, A. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Simmonds, J. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Christensen, G. [Institute of Energy Technology (Norway); Salbu, B. [Agricultural Univ. of Norway (Norway)

    2000-12-01

    This report summarises work done on the SUCON Project during 1996-1999 (European Commission Contract No. FI4C-CT95-0001). The project has focused on three major objectives: 1) An assessment of the radiological consequences of the contamination of the South Urals and the Ob river system from the production of plutonium at 'Mayak', 2) The development of models to calculate doses to individuals and populations in the South Urals using environmental data, and 3) The intercomparison, harmonisation and standardisation of techniques used in dose reconstruction and specification of good practice in particular with regard to remedial measures. (au)

  17. Radiological assessment of past, present and potential sources to environmental contamination in the Southern Urals and strategies for remedial measures (SUCON)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarises work done on the SUCON Project during 1996-1999 (European Commission Contract No. FI4C-CT95-0001). The project has focused on three major objectives: 1) An assessment of the radiological consequences of the contamination of the South Urals and the Ob river system from the production of plutonium at 'Mayak', 2) The development of models to calculate doses to individuals and populations in the South Urals using environmental data, and 3) The intercomparison, harmonisation and standardisation of techniques used in dose reconstruction and specification of good practice in particular with regard to remedial measures. (au)

  18. Procedures for addressing uncertainty and variability in exposure to characterize potential health risk from trichloroethylene contaminated ground water at Beale Air Force Base in California; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conservative deterministic, screening-level calculations of exposure and risk commonly are used in quantitative assessments of potential human-health consequences from contaminants in environmental media. However, these calculations generally are based on multiple upper-bound point estimates of input parameters, particularly for exposure attributes, and can therefore produce results for decision makers that actually overstate the need for costly remediation. Alternatively, a more informative and quantitative characterization of health risk can be obtained by quantifying uncertainty and variability in exposure. This process is illustrated in this report for a hypothetical population at a specific site at Beale Air Force Base in California, where there is trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated ground water and a potential for future residential use. When uncertainty and variability in exposure were addressed jointly for this case, the 95th-percentile upper-bound value of individual excess lifetime cancer risk was a factor approaching 10 lower than the most conservative deterministic estimate. Additionally, the probability of more than zero additional cases of cancer can be estimated, and in this case it is less than 0.5 for a hypothetical future residential population of up to 26,900 individuals present for any 7.6-y interval of a 70-y time period. Clearly, the results from application of this probabilistic approach can provide reasonable and equitable risk-acceptability criteria for a contaminated site

  19. Procedures for addressing uncertainty and variability in exposure to characterize potential health risk from trichloroethylene contaminated ground water at Beale Air Force Base in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J I; Bogen, K T; Hall, L C

    1999-10-05

    Conservative deterministic, screening-level calculations of exposure and risk commonly are used in quantitative assessments of potential human-health consequences from contaminants in environmental media. However, these calculations generally are based on multiple upper-bound point estimates of input parameters, particularly for exposure attributes, and can therefore produce results for decision makers that actually overstate the need for costly remediation. Alternatively, a more informative and quantitative characterization of health risk can be obtained by quantifying uncertainty and variability in exposure. This process is illustrated in this report for a hypothetical population at a specific site at Beale Air Force Base in California, where there is trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated ground water and a potential for future residential use. When uncertainty and variability in exposure were addressed jointly for this case, the 95th-percentile upper-bound value of individual excess lifetime cancer risk was a factor approaching 10 lower than the most conservative deterministic estimate. Additionally, the probability of more than zero additional cases of cancer can be estimated, and in this case it is less than 0.5 for a hypothetical future residential population of up to 26,900 individuals present for any 7.6-y interval of a 70-y time period. Clearly, the results from application of this probabilistic approach can provide reasonable and equitable risk-acceptability criteria for a contaminated site.

  20. Long period grating based toluene sensor for use with water contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Partridge, Matthew; Wong, Rebecca; James, Stephen W.; Davis, Frank; Higson, Seamus P. J.; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2014-01-01

    A demonstration of the use of a calix[4]resorcinarene coated optical fibre long period grating sensor for the detection of toluene in water is presented. Monitoring water quality both for domestic use and around industrial sites is critical to the preservation of clean water provision. Here we show that, by using a fibre optic based sensor system, water quality monitoring can be carried out without the requirement for water sampling or pre-concentration. The results presented demonstrate that...

  1. Radioactive contamination monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At nuclear power plants, in order to prevent radioactive materials from spreading contamination outside the radiation control area, the surface contamination of all material transferred outside the control area is monitored. This paper presents an overview and describes features of: (1) personnel surface contamination monitoring assemblies for measuring the surface contamination on workers, (2) articles surface contamination monitoring assemblies for measuring the surface contamination on articles of all sizes, (3) laundry monitors for measuring the surface contamination on worker clothes worn inside the control area, (4) whole-body counters for measuring the worker's internal exposure, and (5) hand-foot-clothing contamination monitors for measuring the surface contamination on hands, feet and clothing. (author)

  2. Application Of The SPV-based Surface Lifetime Technique To In-Line Monitoring Of Surface Cu Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, John; Savtchouk, Alexandre; Wilson, Matthew; Kim, Chul Hong; Yoo, Hyung Won; Lee, Chang Hwan; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Son, Sang Hoon

    2009-09-01

    Implementation of Cu interconnects into Silicon Integrated Circuits (IC's) has been instrumental in the continuing improvement of IC device performance. Copper as a well known Gate Oxide Integrity (GOI) killer [1, 2] requires extensive protocols to minimize the possibility of cross contamination. Despite such protocols the risk for cross contamination exists, and consequently there is the need for in-line Cu cross-contamination detection metrology. Preferably the metrology will be non-destructive, fast, and capable of mapping on product wafers. Up to now the most common approaches for monitoring Cu contamination in IC fabrication lines either measure Cu in the bulk Si, which is not applicable to Cu cross-contamination monitoring because Back-End-of-the-Line thermal budgets restrict the ability to diffuse the surface Cu into the bulk Si; or the techniques are not optimal for in-line monitoring due to their destructive, time-consuming, or costly nature. In this work we demonstrate for the first time the application of the ac-Surface Photo Voltage (ac-SPV) surface lifetime approach [3] to in-line, full wafer coverage mapping of low level (<1E9 cm-2) surface Cu contamination. The low level sensitivity is achieved through integration of a novel preferential surface Cu activation procedure into a production ready metrology system. Furthermore, because the metrology is non-contact (utilizing edge-grip handling) and non-destructive, it is directly applicable to measurement of production wafers. In-line fab data acquired using this metrology is presented and compared to data from Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS).

  3. Impact of Contaminants Present in Coal-Biomass Derived Synthesis Gas on Water-gas Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Gokhan [TDA Research, Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Co-gasification of biomass and coal in large-scale, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants increases the efficiency and reduces the environmental impact of making synthesis gas ("syngas") that can be used in Coal-Biomass-to-Liquids (CBTL) processes for producing transportation fuels. However, the water-gas shift (WGS) and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts used in these processes may be poisoned by multiple contaminants found in coal-biomass derived syngas; sulfur species, trace toxic metals, halides, nitrogen species, the vapors of alkali metals and their salts (e.g., KCl and NaCl), ammonia, and phosphorous. Thus, it is essential to develop a fundamental understanding of poisoning/inhibition mechanisms before investing in the development of any costly mitigation technologies. We therefore investigated the impact of potential contaminants (H2S, NH3, HCN, AsH3, PH3, HCl, NaCl, KCl, AS3, NH4NO3, NH4OH, KNO3, HBr, HF, and HNO3) on the performance and lifetime of commercially available and generic (prepared in-house) WGS and FT catalysts.

  4. Retrospective evaluation of lead contamination in honey from 2005 to present in northeastern Italy and future perspectives in the light of updated legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinello, Marianna; Dainese, Nicoletta; Manzinello, Chiara; Borin, Alice; Gallina, Albino; Mutinelli, Franco

    2016-09-01

    Lead is a naturally occurring element but largely originating from human activities. Food is the major source of exposure to lead for humans and the publication of a scientific opinion from the European Food Safety Authority on the risks to human health related to the presence of lead in foodstuffs, led European Union to establish more restrictive limits for this contaminant in food from 1 January 2016. In particular, a maximum level of 0.10 mg kg(-1) was established for honey. The retrospective evaluation of 995 honey samples analysed since 2005, revealed a progressive reduction in the concentration of lead, with a mean value of 0.045 mg kg(-1) in 2015. Total 1.5% of honeys analysed in 2015 exceeded the maximum lead level and therefore will no longer be marketable. Interested beekeepers should clarify the causes of honey contamination and adopt corrective actions to keep their honey production within the legal levels of lead. PMID:27076265

  5. An Efficient ERP-Based Brain-Computer Interface Using Random Set Presentation and Face Familiarity

    OpenAIRE

    Seul-Ki Yeom; Siamac Fazli; Klaus-Robert Müller; Seong-Whan Lee

    2014-01-01

    Event-related potential (ERP)-based P300 spellers are commonly used in the field of brain-computer interfaces as an alternative channel of communication for people with severe neuro-muscular diseases. This study introduces a novel P300 based brain-computer interface (BCI) stimulus paradigm using a random set presentation pattern and exploiting the effects of face familiarity. The effect of face familiarity is widely studied in the cognitive neurosciences and has recently been addressed for th...

  6. Metal contamination budget at the river basin scale: a critical analysis based on the Seine River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lestel

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Material flow analysis and environmental contamination analysis are merged into a flux-flow analysis (F2A as illustrated for the metal circulation in the Seine River catchment. F2A combines about 30 metal flows in the anthroposphere (14 million people and/or metal fluxes in the environment (atmosphere, soils, and aquatic system originating from two dozens of sources. The nature and quality of data is very heterogeneous going from downscaled national economic statistics to upscaled daily environmental surveys.

    A triple integration is performed: space integration over the catchment (65000 km2, time integration for the 1950–2000 trend analysed at 5 year resolution, and a conceptual integration resulting in two F2A indicators.

    Despite the various data sources an average metal circulation is established for the 1994–2003 period and illustrated for zinc: (i metal circulation in the anthroposphere is now two orders of magnitude higher than river outputs, (ii long term metal storage, and their potential leaks, in soils, wastedumps and structures is also orders of magnitude higher than present river fluxes. Trend analysis is made through two F2A indicators, the per capita excess load at the river outlet and the leakage ratio (excess fluxes/metal demand. From 1950 to 2000, they both show a ten fold improvement of metal recycling while the metal demand has increased by 2.5 to 5 for Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb and Zn, and the population by 50%.

  7. GIS-BASED location optimization of a biomass conversion plant on contaminated willow in the Campine region (Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Campine region is diffusely contaminated with heavy metals like cadmium. Since traditional excavation techniques are too expensive, phytoremediation is preferred as a remediation technique. In a previous study, the biomass potential from phytoremediation of contaminated agricultural land in the Campine region in Belgium was assessed. Based on recently upgraded figures of willow potential from phytoremediation on agricultural land in the seven most contaminated municipalities of the Belgian Campine region, the current paper uses GIS-knowledge to investigate which of three previously identified locations is most suitable for a biomass plant, taking into account the spatial distribution of the contaminated willow supply and the total cost of willow transport. Biomass transport distance from the centroid of each contaminated agricultural parcel to each of the three potential biomass plant locations was determined following Euclidian distance calculations and distance calculations over the existing road network. A transport cost model consisting of distance fixed and distance dependent biomass transport costs was developed. Of the locations identified, the Overpelt Fabriek site results in the lowest biomass transport distance and costs. When willow allocation for each parcel occurs based on the nearest potential plant location, transport costs are on average 23% lower than when all biomass is transported to the single Overpelt Fabriek site location. Therefore, when only considering transport costs, installing a smaller plant at each of the three potential plant locations would be less expensive than when installing a single biomass plant at the Overpelt Fabriek site. -- Highlights: ► Overpelt Fabriek site most attractive for time frames considered. ► Average tortuosity factor in Campine region between 1.27 and 1.42. ► Share of willow transport costs in willow supply costs 21%. ► Optimal allocation of willow results in lower transport costs

  8. Eosinophilic granuloma of the skull base: patient with unique clinical moreover, radiographic presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Dalili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report presents an eight-year-old girl having periauricular swelling and severe pain during mouth opening on the right-side temporomandibular joint (TMJ. CBCT showed extensive destruction of the base of the skull and the roof of the glenoid fossa on the right side. The findings based on CT and MRI images with and without contrast are discussed herein. This report highlights a skull base eosinophilic granuloma that mimics TMJ disorder and the importance of proper evaluation of CBCT images to make an early diagnosis.

  9. Restoration of contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A great variety of techniques are used for the restoration of contaminated soils. The contamination is present by both organic and inorganic pollutants. Environmental conditions and soil characteristics should take into account in order to implement a remedial technique. The bioremediation technologies are showed as help to remove a variety of soil contaminants. (author)

  10. [Safety value of contaminant in water pollution accident based on human health risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bing-Hui; Luo, Jin-Hong; Fu, Qing; Qin, Yan-Wen; Hu, Lin-Lin

    2012-02-01

    The acute human health risk assessment of contaminant in water pollution accident is a new study field of environmental sciences. This study established a model for calculating acute safety value of contaminant in water pollutant. The acute safety value of contaminant in mainly water pollution during 2000-2010 was calculated by this model. The safety value of sodium cyanide, cadmium, formaldehyde, ammonia, toluene, nitrobenzene, microcystin-LR were 0.1, 0.6, 8, 20, 6, 0.07, 0.004 mg x L(-1), respectively. The differences of safety value calculate methods between acute and chronic exposure were compared from the following aspects, the toxicology exposure end-point, allocation of intake, exposure sensitive subpopulation. PMID:22509564

  11. Field-based evidence for consistent responses of bacterial communities to copper contamination in two contrasting agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eLi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper contamination on China’s arable land could pose severe economic, ecological and healthy consequences in the coming decades. As the drivers in maintaining ecosystem functioning, the responses of soil microorganisms to long-term copper contamination in different soil ecosystems are still debated. This study investigated the impacts of copper gradients on soil bacterial communities in two agricultural fields with contrasting soil properties. Our results revealed consistent reduction in soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC with increasing copper levels in both soils, coupled by significant declines in bacterial abundance in most cases. Despite of contrasting bacterial community structures between the two soils, the bacterial diversity in the copper-contaminated soils showed considerably decreasing patterns when copper levels elevated. High-throughput sequencing revealed copper selection for major bacterial guilds, in particular, Actinobacteria showed tolerance, while Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi were highly sensitive to copper. The thresholds that bacterial communities changed sharply were 800 and 200 added copper mg kg-1 in the fluvo-aquic soil and red soil, respectively, which were similar to the toxicity thresholds (EC50 values characterized by SMBC. Structural equation model (SEM analysis ascertained that the shifts of bacterial community composition and diversity were closely related with the changes of SMBC in both soils. Our results provide field-based evidence that copper contamination exhibits consistently negative impacts on soil bacterial communities, and the shifts of bacterial communities could have largely determined the variations of the microbial biomass.

  12. The oral case presentation: toward a performance-based rhetorical model for teaching and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mei Yuit

    2015-01-01

    The oral case presentation is an important communicative activity in the teaching and assessment of students. Despite its importance, not much attention has been paid to providing support for teachers to teach this difficult task to medical students who are novices to this form of communication. As a formalized piece of talk that takes a regularized form and used for a specific communicative goal, the case presentation is regarded as a rhetorical activity and awareness of its rhetorical and linguistic characteristics should be given due consideration in teaching. This paper reviews practitioners’ and the limited research literature that relates to expectations of medical educators about what makes a good case presentation, and explains the rhetorical aspect of the activity. It is found there is currently a lack of a comprehensive model of the case presentation that projects the rhetorical and linguistic skills needed to produce and deliver a good presentation. Attempts to describe the structure of the case presentation have used predominantly opinion-based methodologies. In this paper, I argue for a performance-based model that would not only allow a description of the rhetorical structure of the oral case presentation, but also enable a systematic examination of the tacit genre knowledge that differentiates the expert from the novice. Such a model will be a useful resource for medical educators to provide more structured feedback and teaching support to medical students in learning this important genre. PMID:26194482

  13. The oral case presentation: toward a performance-based rhetorical model for teaching and learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yuit Chan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The oral case presentation is an important communicative activity in the teaching and assessment of students. Despite its importance, not much attention has been paid to providing support for teachers to teach this difficult task to medical students who are novices to this form of communication. As a formalized piece of talk that takes a regularized form and used for a specific communicative goal, the case presentation is regarded as a rhetorical activity and awareness of its rhetorical and linguistic characteristics should be given due consideration in teaching. This paper reviews practitioners’ and the limited research literature that relates to expectations of medical educators about what makes a good case presentation, and explains the rhetorical aspect of the activity. It is found there is currently a lack of a comprehensive model of the case presentation that projects the rhetorical and linguistic skills needed to produce and deliver a good presentation. Attempts to describe the structure of the case presentation have used predominantly opinion-based methodologies. In this paper, I argue for a performance-based model that would not only allow a description of the rhetorical structure of the oral case presentation, but also enable a systematic examination of the tacit genre knowledge that differentiates the expert from the novice. Such a model will be a useful resource for medical educators to provide more structured feedback and teaching support to medical students in learning this important genre.

  14. Spin contamination-free N-electron wave functions in the excitation-based configuration interaction treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoba, Diego R.; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E.; Oña, Ofelia B.; Capuzzi, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the spin contamination in N-electron wave functions provided by the excitation-based configuration interaction methods. We propose a procedure to ensure a suitable selection of excited N-electron Slater determinants with respect to a given reference determinant, required in these schemes. The procedure guarantees the construction of N-electron wave functions which are eigenfunctions of the spin-squared operator S ˆ 2 , avoiding any spin contamination. Our treatment is based on the evaluation of the excitation level of the determinants by means of the expectation value of an excitation operator formulated in terms of spin-free replacement operators. We report numerical determinations of energies and expectation values, arising from our proposal as well as from traditional configuration interaction methods, in selected open-shell systems, in order to compare the behavior of these procedures and their computational costs.

  15. A heuristic two-dimensional presentation of microsatellite-based data applied to dogs and wolves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foerster Martin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Methods based on genetic distance matrices usually lose information during the process of tree-building by converting a multi-dimensional matrix into a phylogenetic tree. We applied a heuristic method of two-dimensional presentation to achieve a better resolution of the relationship between breeds and individuals investigated. Four hundred and nine individuals from nine German dog breed populations and one free-living wolf population were analysed with a marker set of 23 microsatellites. The result of the two-dimensional presentation was partly comparable with and complemented a model-based analysis that uses genotype patterns. The assignment test and the neighbour-joining tree based on allele sharing estimate allocated 99% and 97% of the individuals according to their breed, respectively. The application of the two-dimensional presentation to distances on the basis of the proportion of shared alleles resulted in comparable and further complementary insight into inferred population structure by multilocus genotype data. We expect that the inference of population structure in domesticated species with complex breeding histories can be strongly supported by the two-dimensional presentation based on the described heuristic method.

  16. Improving the Accuracy of Software-Based Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polly, B.

    2011-09-01

    This presentation describes the basic components of software-based energy analysis for residential buildings, explores the concepts of 'error' and 'accuracy' when analysis predictions are compared to measured data, and explains how NREL is working to continuously improve the accuracy of energy analysis methods.

  17. Lichen sclerosus: a potpourri of misdiagnosed cases based on atypical clinical presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ventolini G

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gary Ventolini, Ravi Patel, Robert Vasquez Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Permian Basin, Odessa, TX, USA Objective: Lichen sclerosus (LS is a chronic progressive inflammatory autoimmune-induced disease that primarily affects the epidermis and dermis of the external genital-anal region. Intense and recalcitrant pruritus is the hallmark of LS. Physical exam reveals thinning, hyperkeratosis, and parchment-like appearance. However, the classic symptom and signs of LS may not always be present and patients may be asymptomatic for pruritus. Hence, we describe 15 misdiagnosed cases with atypical clinical presentations. We believe that the absence of pruritus contributed to their initial misdiagnosis. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of atypical presentations of LS. Methods: Data base review of de-identified clinical case pictures was performed. All patients had histopathology-confirmed diagnoses of LS. The data base file contains 800 cases of vulvovaginal disorders. The Institutional Review Board (IRB considered that searching a de-identified data base of pictures did not require IRB approval. Results: We identified 15 different atypical clinical cases. Patient ages were 18–75 years old. These patients were asymptomatic for pruritus and were misdiagnosed before they presented to the vulvovaginal specialized clinic. Conclusion: Fifteen patients asymptomatic for pruritus with histopathology-confirmed diagnosis of LS were identified. They illustrate atypical clinical presentations that LS may have. Keywords: vulvovaginal, vulvar, atypical, lichen sclerosus, asymptomatic

  18. GC/MS Based Non-target Screening of Organic Contaminants in River Indus and its Tributaries in Sindh (Pakistan)

    OpenAIRE

    Huma Shaikh1; Najma Memon; M. I. Bhanger; S. M. Nizamani1

    2014-01-01

    To investigate presence of organic contaminants in river Indus and its tributaries screening studies were carried out. Two years screening studies were based on four sampling campaigns in 13 sampling points out of which 9 sampling points belong to river Indus and its tributaries, 4 to municipal sewerage and 1 to industrial sewerage. Deconvolution Reporting Software (DRS) was used to analyze scan data. Deconvolution is capable of screening the compounds whose peaks become invisible due to co-e...

  19. An efficient ERP-based brain-computer interface using random set presentation and face familiarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seul-Ki Yeom

    Full Text Available Event-related potential (ERP-based P300 spellers are commonly used in the field of brain-computer interfaces as an alternative channel of communication for people with severe neuro-muscular diseases. This study introduces a novel P300 based brain-computer interface (BCI stimulus paradigm using a random set presentation pattern and exploiting the effects of face familiarity. The effect of face familiarity is widely studied in the cognitive neurosciences and has recently been addressed for the purpose of BCI. In this study we compare P300-based BCI performances of a conventional row-column (RC-based paradigm with our approach that combines a random set presentation paradigm with (non- self-face stimuli. Our experimental results indicate stronger deflections of the ERPs in response to face stimuli, which are further enhanced when using the self-face images, and thereby improving P300-based spelling performance. This lead to a significant reduction of stimulus sequences required for correct character classification. These findings demonstrate a promising new approach for improving the speed and thus fluency of BCI-enhanced communication with the widely used P300-based BCI setup.

  20. An Efficient ERP-Based Brain-Computer Interface Using Random Set Presentation and Face Familiarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2014-01-01

    Event-related potential (ERP)-based P300 spellers are commonly used in the field of brain-computer interfaces as an alternative channel of communication for people with severe neuro-muscular diseases. This study introduces a novel P300 based brain-computer interface (BCI) stimulus paradigm using a random set presentation pattern and exploiting the effects of face familiarity. The effect of face familiarity is widely studied in the cognitive neurosciences and has recently been addressed for the purpose of BCI. In this study we compare P300-based BCI performances of a conventional row-column (RC)-based paradigm with our approach that combines a random set presentation paradigm with (non-) self-face stimuli. Our experimental results indicate stronger deflections of the ERPs in response to face stimuli, which are further enhanced when using the self-face images, and thereby improving P300-based spelling performance. This lead to a significant reduction of stimulus sequences required for correct character classification. These findings demonstrate a promising new approach for improving the speed and thus fluency of BCI-enhanced communication with the widely used P300-based BCI setup. PMID:25384045

  1. Atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is about the levels of contamination in center America, the population's perception on the problem, effects of the atmospheric contamination, effects in the environment, causes of the atmospheric contamination, possibilities to reduce the atmospheric contamination and list of Roeco Swisscontac in atmospheric contamination

  2. SVM-based feature extraction and classification of aflatoxin contaminated corn using fluorescence hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Support Vector Machine (SVM) was used in the Genetic Algorithms (GA) process to select and classify a subset of hyperspectral image bands. The method was applied to fluorescence hyperspectral data for the detection of aflatoxin contamination in Aspergillus flavus infected single corn kernels. In the...

  3. Early detection of fungal contamination on green coffee by a MOX sensors based Electronic Nose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fungal growth can occur on green coffee beans along all the distribution chain, eventually bringing on health hazards to consumers, because of the production of toxic metabolites (mycotoxins). Besides, the sensorial contamination due to volatiles by-products of fungal metabolism could cause defects on coffee also after roasting. Therefore, it is necessary to devise strategies to detect and quantify fungal infection and toxin production at early stages of the food chain. One of the most promising techniques is the analysis of volatile compounds in the headspace gas surrounding the samples. The aim of this work was to verify the ability of the Electronic Nose (EN EOS835) to early detect the microbial contamination of Arabica green coffee. This EN is equipped with Metal Oxide Semiconductor sensor array. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the static headspace of non-contaminated Arabica green coffee samples was carried out to confirm the EN ability to provide satisfactory indications about the presence of contamination.

  4. Early detection of fungal contamination on green coffee by a MOX sensors based Electronic Nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sberveglieri, V.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.; Gobbi, E.; Pulvirenti, A.; Fava, P.

    2011-09-01

    Fungal growth can occur on green coffee beans along all the distribution chain, eventually bringing on health hazards to consumers, because of the production of toxic metabolites (mycotoxins) [1]. Besides, the sensorial contamination due to volatiles by-products of fungal metabolism could cause defects on coffee also after roasting. Therefore, it is necessary to devise strategies to detect and quantify fungal infection and toxin production at early stages of the food chain. One of the most promising techniques is the analysis of volatile compounds in the headspace gas surrounding the samples. The aim of this work was to verify the ability of the Electronic Nose (EN EOS835) to early detect the microbial contamination of Arabica green coffee. This EN is equipped with Metal Oxide Semiconductor sensor array. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the static headspace of non-contaminated Arabica green coffee samples was carried out to confirm the EN ability to provide satisfactory indications about the presence of contamination.

  5. Fluorescence-based rapid detection of microbiological contaminants in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meder, Hervé; Baumstummler, Anne; Chollet, Renaud; Barrier, Sophie; Kukuczka, Monika; Olivieri, Frédéric; Welterlin, Esther; Beguin, Vincent; Ribault, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of process waters is a current issue for pharmaceutical industries. Traditional methods require several days to obtain results; therefore, rapid microbiological methods are widely requested to shorten time-to-result. Milliflex Quantum was developed for the rapid detection and enumeration of microorganisms in filterable samples. It combines membrane filtration to universal fluorescent staining of viable microorganisms. This new alternative method was validated using European and United States Pharmacopeia definitions, with sterile water and/or sterile water artificially contaminated with microorganisms. The Milliflex Quantum method was demonstrated to be reliable, robust, specific, accurate, and linear over the whole range of assays following these guidelines. The Milliflex Quantum system was challenged to detect natural contaminants in different types of pharmaceutical purified process waters. Milliflex Quantum was demonstrated to detect accurately contaminants 3- to 7-fold faster than traditional membrane filtration method. The staining procedure is nondestructive allowing downstream identification following a positive result. The Milliflex Quantum offers a fast, sensitive, and robust alternative to the compendial membrane filtration method. PMID:22623887

  6. Application of clay-based sorbents for cleaning radioactively contaminated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under a special program of ecological rehabilitation of surface water bodies radioactively contaminated due to nuclear tests a study is in progress to investigate properties of various sorbents to remove radionuclides from water running out of tunnels. Search for and application of natural sorbents locally available are preferable. (author)

  7. Fluorescence-Based Rapid Detection of Microbiological Contaminants in Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Meder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological contamination of process waters is a current issue for pharmaceutical industries. Traditional methods require several days to obtain results; therefore, rapid microbiological methods are widely requested to shorten time-to-result. Milliflex Quantum was developed for the rapid detection and enumeration of microorganisms in filterable samples. It combines membrane filtration to universal fluorescent staining of viable microorganisms. This new alternative method was validated using European and United States Pharmacopeia definitions, with sterile water and/or sterile water artificially contaminated with microorganisms. The Milliflex Quantum method was demonstrated to be reliable, robust, specific, accurate, and linear over the whole range of assays following these guidelines. The Milliflex Quantum system was challenged to detect natural contaminants in different types of pharmaceutical purified process waters. Milliflex Quantum was demonstrated to detect accurately contaminants 3- to 7-fold faster than traditional membrane filtration method. The staining procedure is nondestructive allowing downstream identification following a positive result. The Milliflex Quantum offers a fast, sensitive, and robust alternative to the compendial membrane filtration method.

  8. Sensitive Procedure for Rapid Detection of Human Brucellosis, Based on PCR Method in Contaminated Serum Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslam Ghezelsofla

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and objective: Brucellosis is a zoonosis transmittable to humans poses a significant public health problem in many developing countries and requires rapid and accurate diagnostic methods. Here, our aim was to develop a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay in artificially contaminated serum samples as a model for rapid and accurate laboratory confirmation of human brucellosis. Material and methods: In this study, initially the standard Brucella abortus strain (2308 were cultured on Brucella agar medium and then colonies were inactivated by formalin 10 %. Genomic DNA was extracted from inactivated bacterial colonies. Serial dilutions of bacterial-DNA were prepared in fetal bovine serum (FBS and water and subsequently DNA extraction were repeated on these artificially contaminated samples. The two pairs of primers amplified two different fragments included in: a gene encoding an outer membrane protein (omp-2 (primers JPF/JPR and a sequence 16S rRNA of B. abortus (primers F4/R2. Results: The two primers assayed showed a difference in sensitivity for detecting Brucella DNA, ranging between 5 pg and 50 pg for artificially contaminated serum samples and 50Fg and 5 pg for contaminated control samples. Therefore, the sensitivity of PCR using F4/R2 primers was greater than the PCR using JPF/JPR primers.Conclusion: Although the sensitivity of PCR using these primers was affected by serum inhibitors, they are still the most sensitive and they could provide a useful tool for the diagnosis of human brucellosis.

  9. Environmental Application of Reporter-Genes Based Biosensors for Chemical Contamination Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matejczyk Marzena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research concerning possibilities of applications of reporter-genes based microorganisms, including the selective presentation of defects and advantages of different new scientific achievements of methodical solutions in genetic system constructions of biosensing elements for environmental research. The most robust and popular genetic fusion and new trends in reporter genes technology – such as LacZ (β-galactosidase, xylE (catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, gfp (green fluorescent proteins and its mutated forms, lux (prokaryotic luciferase, luc (eukaryotic luciferase, phoA (alkaline phosphatase, gusA and gurA (β-glucuronidase, antibiotics and heavy metals resistance are described. Reporter-genes based biosensors with use of genetically modified bacteria and yeast successfully work for genotoxicity, bioavailability and oxidative stress assessment for detection and monitoring of toxic compounds in drinking water and different environmental samples, surface water, soil, sediments.

  10. The interplay between cost accounting knowledge and presentation formats in cost-based decision-making.

    OpenAIRE

    Cardinaels, Eddy

    2008-01-01

    Most studies on cost-based decision-making examine the profit impact of cost reports that rely on different methods to allocate costs. In practice, firms’ cost reports often employ the same cost allocation method with subtle variations in the way that the cost data are presented. This paper examines experimentally the profit impact of a cost report’s presentation format in relation to a decision maker’s level of cost accounting knowledge. Using a customer profitability report prepared using a...

  11. Nanomaterial based detection and degradation of biological and chemical contaminants in a microfluidic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayamohan, Harikrishnan

    Monitoring and remediation of environmental contaminants (biological and chemical) form the crux of global water resource management. There is an extant need to develop point-of-use, low-power, low-cost tools that can address this problem effectively with minimal environmental impact. Nanotechnology and microfluidics have made enormous advances during the past decade in the area of biosensing and environmental remediation. The "marriage" of these two technologies can effectively address some of the above-mentioned needs. In this dissertation, nanomaterials were used in conjunction with microfluidic techniques to detect and degrade biological and chemical pollutants. In the first project, a point-of-use sensor was developed for detection of trichloroethylene (TCE) from water. A self-organizing nanotubular titanium dioxide (TNA) synthesized by electrochemical anodization and functionalized with photocatalytically deposited platinum (Pt/TNA) was applied to the detection. The morphology and crystallinity of the Pt/TNA sensor was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dis- persive x-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The sensor could detect TCE in the concentrations ranging from 10 to 1000 ppm. The room-temperature operation capability of the sensor makes it less power intensive and can potentially be incorporated into a field-based sensor. In the second part, TNA synthesized on a foil was incorporated into a flow-based microfluidic format and applied to degradation of a model pollutant, methylene blue. The system was demonstrated to have enhanced photocatalytic performance at higher flow rates (50-200 muL/min) over the same microfluidic format with TiO2 nanoparticulate (commercial P25) catalyst. The microfluidic format with TNA catalyst was able to achieve 82% fractional conversion of 18 mM methylene blue in comparison to 55% in the case of the TiO2 nanoparticulate layer at a flow rate of 200 L/min. The microfluidic device was

  12. Design of a web-based courseware authoring and presentation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engr. Prof Hyacinth C. Inyiama

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A Web-based Courseware Authoring and Presentation System is a user-friendly and interactive e-learning software that can be used by both computer experts and non-computer experts to prepare a courseware in any subject of interest and to present lectures to the target audience in full media. The resultant courseware is accessed online by the target audience. The software features automated assessment and grading of students. Top-down methodology was adopted in the development of the authoring software. Implementation languages include Asp.Net and Visual Basic 9.0 and Microsoft Access 2007. An author can use the system to create a web-based courseware on any topic of his choice, while the software platform still remains intact for yet another author. A major contribution of this work is that it eases courseware preparation and delivery for lecturers and trainers.

  13. [The historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare and clinical nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jung-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based healthcare (EBHC) emphasizes the integration of the best research evidence with patient values, specialist suggestions, and clinical circumstances during the process of clinical decision-making. EBHC is a recognized core competency in modern healthcare. Nursing is a professional discipline of empirical science that thrives in an environment marked by advances in knowledge and technology in medicine as well as in nursing. Clinical nurses must elevate their skills and professional qualifications, provide efficient and quality health services, and promote their proficiency in EBHC. The Institute of Medicine in the United States indicates that evidence-based research results often fail to disseminate efficiently to clinical decision makers. This problem highlights the importance of better promoting the evidence-based healthcare fundamentals and competencies to frontline clinical nurses. This article describes the historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare from the perspective of modern clinical nursing in light of the importance of evidence-based healthcare in clinical nursing; describes the factors associated with evidence-based healthcare promotion; and suggests strategies and policies that may improve the promotion and application of EBHC in clinical settings. The authors hope that this paper provides a reference for efforts to improve clinical nursing in the realms of EBHC training, promotion, and application. PMID:25464952

  14. Multi Dark Lens Simulations: weak lensing light-cones and data base presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocoli, Carlo; Jullo, Eric; Metcalf, R. Benton; de la Torre, Sylvain; Yepes, Gustavo; Prada, Francisco; Comparat, Johan; Göttlober, Stefan; Kyplin, Anatoly; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Petkova, Margarita; Shan, Huan Yuan; Tessore, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a large data base of weak lensing light cones constructed using different snapshots from the Big MultiDark simulation (BigMDPL). The ray-tracing through different multiple plane has been performed with the GLAMER code accounting both for single source redshifts and for sources distributed along the cosmic time. This first paper presents weak lensing forecasts and results according to the geometry of the VIPERS-W1 and VIPERS-W4 field of view. Additional fields will be available on our data base and new ones can be run upon request. Our data base also contains some tools for lensing analysis. In this paper we present results for convergence power spectra, one point and high order weak lensing statistics useful for forecasts and for cosmological studies. Covariance matrices have also been computed for the different realizations of the W1 and W4 fields. In addition we compute also galaxy-shear and projected density contrasts for different halo masses at two lens redshift according to the CFHTLS source redshift distribution both using stacking and cross-correlation techniques, finding very good agreement.

  15. Information on which to base assessments of risk from environments contaminated with anthrax spores.

    OpenAIRE

    WATSON, A.; Keir, D.

    1994-01-01

    Although there has been a considerable amount of research conducted into Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, the data are widely disseminated in the scientific literature and are therefore not always easy to assimilate. In view of continuing concern about potential anthrax contamination in environmental materials and sites, this review brings together the currently available information relating to the health hazards from B. anthracis. The relevance of the available informatio...

  16. Effect of reactive media composition and co-contaminants on sulfur-based auto trophic denitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of a study developing a biological reactive barrier system to treat nitrate-contaminated groundwater, the effects of reactive media composition and co-contaminants on sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification were investigated. The size of sulfur granules affected the denitrification rates; kinetic constants of 2.883, 2.949, and 0.677 mg-N1/2/L1/2/day were obtained when the granule sizes were below 2 mm, between 2 and 5 mm, and over 5 mm, respectively. When the volume ratios of sulfur to limestone were 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, and 4:1, kinetic constants of 5.490, 3.903, 4.072, and 2.984 mg-N1/2/L1/2/day were obtained, respectively. The presence of TCE up to 20 mg/L didn't significantly affect nitrate removal efficiency. At the TCE concentration of 80 mg/L, however, nitrate removal was markedly inhibited. Also, Zn and Cu inhibited the denitrification activity at more than 0.5 mg/L of concentration whereas Cr (VI) did not significantly affect the nitrate removal efficiency at all levels tested. - The effect of co-contaminants on nitrate removal in a biological PRB system

  17. Designing PDT-based combinations to overcome chemoresistance in heterocellular 3D tumor models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Imran; Briars, Emma A.; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Anbil, Sriram; Vecchio, Daniela; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Hanna, William R.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    A major barrier to treating advanced-stage cancers is heterogeneity in the responsiveness of metastatic disease to conventional therapies leading to resistance and treatment failure. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to synergize with conventional agents and to overcome the evasion pathways that cause resistance. Developing PDT-based combinations that target resistant tumor populations and cooperate mechanistically with conventional agents is an increasingly promising approach to improve therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity, particularly in complex disease sites. Identifying the molecular, cellular, and microenvironmental cues that lead to heterogeneity and treatment resistance is critical to developing strategies to target unresponsive regions of stubborn disease. Cell-based research platforms that integrate key microenvironmental cues are emerging as increasingly important tools to improve the translational efficiency of new agents, and to design combination regimens. Among the challenges associated with developing and scaling complex cell-based screening platforms is the need to integrate, and balance, biological relevance with appropriate, high-content imaging routines that provide meaningful quantitative readouts of therapeutic response. The benefits and challenges associated with deriving meaningful insights from complex cell-based models will be presented, with a particular emphasis on overcoming chemoresistance mediated by physical stress and communication with stromal partners (e.g. tumor endothelial cells, which are emerging as dynamic regulators of treatment resistance) using PDT-based combinations.

  18. Gaseous deposition contributes to the contamination of surface waters by pesticides close to treated fields. A process-based model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedos, Carole; Loubet, Benjamin; Barriuso, Enrique

    2013-12-17

    The contribution of atmospheric pathways to surface waters contamination by pesticides has been demonstrated. At the local scale, modeling approaches as well as measurements show situations where the contribution of gaseous dry deposition is of the same order or even higher than the drift contribution. The approach presented here consists in estimating the gaseous emissions of pesticides applied in the field, their atmospheric dispersion, and finally their gaseous deposition into aquatic ecosystems at the local scale by running process-based models, that is, the one-dimensional model for pesticide volatilization following application on bare soil (Volt'Air) and the local-scale dispersion and deposition model (FIDES-2D), adapted for pesticides. A significant number of scenarios describes contrasted situations in terms of pedoclimatic conditions (covering 9 years of meteorological data), periods of pesticide application per year, physicochemical properties of the pesticides, and spatial configurations. The identification of the main factors governing gaseous deposition led to the definition of an effective emission factor which explains a large part of the deposition variability. Based on the model outputs, deposition curves are proposed, as a base for a new tool to assess the contribution of gaseous deposition to nontarget ecosystem contamination. PMID:24206530

  19. GIS - Based data presentation and interactive communication system for public involvement in EIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data presentation and interactive communication system has as main task to integrate technical and administrative information, as well as to ensure an efficient public participation. The system can achieve desired inter-operability between specialists, government and public in decision-making and environmental impact assessment (EIA). It incorporates different modules relative to specific types of parameters and authorities involved. The GIS-based system provides mapping, database, automatic information collection and advanced presentation techniques. It includes a graphically oriented executive support, which has the ability to present information by geographical representation of the zones on the map. The public opinion is taking into account by consideration of alternatives and providing access to the monitoring of environmental effects. The system offers an effective way to avoid negative reactions by interactive communication based on real-time information exchange. The system can be integrated into national or international management systems, being a useful tool for an efficient communication, handling and exchanging a vast amount of information. (authors)

  20. Natural Oxidant Demand Variability, Potential Controls, and Implications for in Situ, Oxidation-Based Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, A.; Cruz, S.; Dungan, B.; Holguin, F. O.; Ulery, A. L.; Hunter, B.; Carroll, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Naturally occurring reduced species associated with subsurface materials can impose a significant natural oxidant demand (NOD), which is the bulk consumption of oxidants by soil water, minerals, and organic matter. Although injection of oxidants has been used for chemical transformation of organic contaminants, NOD represents a challenge for the in-situ delivery of oxidants as a remediation alternative. Co-injection of complexation agents with oxidants has been proposed to facilitate the delivery of oxidants for in situ chemical oxidation remediation of contaminated groundwater. This study investigates variability of NOD for different oxidants and sediments. The effect of the addition of various complexation agents, including EDTA, tween 80, hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD), humic acid, and four generations of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, on the NOD was also examined. NOD was measured for a clay loam (collected from Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, AZ). Varying amounts of biosolids were mixed with subsamples of the clay loam to create three additional reference soils in order to study the effect of organic matter and other soil characteristics on the NOD. Bench-scale laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the NOD for various oxidants, using the four soils, and replicated with and without various delivery agents. Measured NOD showed variability for each soil and oxidant composition. Additionally, significant differences were observed in NOD with the addition of delivery agents. The results support the elucidation of potential controls over NOD and have implications for in situ, oxidation-based remediation of contaminated groundwater.

  1. Spectral imaging for contamination detection in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Jens Michael

    application of the technique is finding anomalies I supposedly homogeneous matter or homogeneous mixtures. This application occurs frequently in the food industry when different types of contamination are to be detected. Contaminants could be e.g. foreign matter, process-induced toxins, and microbiological...... spoilage. Many of these contaminants may be detected in the wavelength range visible to normal silicium-based camera sensors i.e. 350-1050 nm with proper care during sample preparation, sample presentation, image acquisition and analysis. This presentation will give an introduction to the techniques behind...

  2. Texosome-based drug delivery system for cancer therapy:from past to present

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamideh Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini; Raheleh Halabian; Mohsen Amin; Abbas Ali Imani Fooladi

    2015-01-01

    Rising worldwide cancer incidence and resistance to current anti-cancer drugs necessitate the need for new pharmaceutical compounds and drug delivery system. Malfunction of the immune system, particularly in the tumor microenvironment, causes tumor growth and enhances tumor progression. Thus, cancer immunotherapy can be an appropriate approach to provoke the systemic immune system to combat tumor expansion. Texosomes, which are endogenous nanovesicles released by all tumor cells, contribute to cell-cell communication and modify the phenotypic features of recipient cells due to the texosomes’ ability to transport biological components. For this reason, texosome-based delivery system can be a valuable strategy for therapeutic purposes. To improve the pharmaceutical behavior of this system and to facilitate its use in medical applications, biotechnology approaches and mimetic techniques have been utilized. In this review, we present the development history of texosome-based delivery systems and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each system.

  3. Present and next steps of the JAERI superconducting rf linac based FEL program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JAERI superconducting rf linac based FEL has successfully been lased to produce a 0.3 kW FEL light and 100 kW or larger electron beam output in quasi continuous wave operation in 1999. The 1 kW class output as our present program goal will be achieved to improve the optical out coupling method in the FEL optical resonator, the electron gun, and the electron beam optics in the JAERI FEL driver. As our next 5 year program goal is the 100 kW class FEL light and a few tens MW class electron beam output in average, quasi continuous wave operation of the light and electron beam will be planned in the JAERI superconducting rf linac based FEL facility. Conceptual design options needed for such a very high power operation and shorter wavelength light sources will be discussed to improve and to upgrade the exciting facility. (author)

  4. Texosome-based drug delivery system for cancer therapy: from past to present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rising worldwide cancer incidence and resistance to current anti-cancer drugs necessitate the need for new pharmaceutical compounds and drug delivery system. Malfunction of the immune system, particularly in the tumor microenvironment, causes tumor growth and enhances tumor progression. Thus, cancer immunotherapy can be an appropriate approach to provoke the systemic immune system to combat tumor expansion. Texosomes, which are endogenous nanovesicles released by all tumor cells, contribute to cell-cell communication and modify the phenotypic features of recipient cells due to the texosomes’ ability to transport biological components. For this reason, texosome-based delivery system can be a valuable strategy for therapeutic purposes. To improve the pharmaceutical behavior of this system and to facilitate its use in medical applications, biotechnology approaches and mimetic techniques have been utilized. In this review, we present the development history of texosome-based delivery systems and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each system

  5. Emerging Environment Friendly, Magnesium-Based Composite Technology for Present and Future Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenashisundaram, G. K.; Gupta, M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium is the lightest and one of the most abundant elements in the universe. In addition, magnesium possesses several other benefits like excellent castability, high damping capacity, good electromagnetic shielding, and excellent machinability. These inherent characteristics of magnesium-based materials ensure fuel economy, reduced CO2 emissions, and a greener earth. Furthermore, as magnesium-based materials are almost 35% lighter than aluminum-based materials, a tremendous surge in magnesium demand over the next 5 years is expected. One way in which the engineering capabilities of magnesium and its alloys can further be enhanced is to use composite technology. The addition of nanoparticles, for example, leads to enhanced tensile, compressive, fatigue, creep, dynamic, tribological, and corrosion properties. In addition, amorphous and hollow reinforcements can also enhance targeted mechanical/physical properties. Accordingly, the present study will highlight the key capabilities of magnesium-based composite technology. An attempt is made to summarize on the size effects and type of reinforcements such as metallic or ceramic nanoparticles, and amorphous and hollow reinforcements on the microstructural and mechanical properties of monolithic pure magnesium.

  6. Emerging Environment Friendly, Magnesium-Based Composite Technology for Present and Future Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenashisundaram, G. K.; Gupta, M.

    2016-07-01

    Magnesium is the lightest and one of the most abundant elements in the universe. In addition, magnesium possesses several other benefits like excellent castability, high damping capacity, good electromagnetic shielding, and excellent machinability. These inherent characteristics of magnesium-based materials ensure fuel economy, reduced CO2 emissions, and a greener earth. Furthermore, as magnesium-based materials are almost 35% lighter than aluminum-based materials, a tremendous surge in magnesium demand over the next 5 years is expected. One way in which the engineering capabilities of magnesium and its alloys can further be enhanced is to use composite technology. The addition of nanoparticles, for example, leads to enhanced tensile, compressive, fatigue, creep, dynamic, tribological, and corrosion properties. In addition, amorphous and hollow reinforcements can also enhance targeted mechanical/physical properties. Accordingly, the present study will highlight the key capabilities of magnesium-based composite technology. An attempt is made to summarize on the size effects and type of reinforcements such as metallic or ceramic nanoparticles, and amorphous and hollow reinforcements on the microstructural and mechanical properties of monolithic pure magnesium.

  7. Feature-based characterization of motion-contaminated calcified plaques in cardiac multidetector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In coronary calcium scoring, motion artifacts affecting calcified plaques are commonly characterized using descriptive terms, which incorporate an element of subjectivity in their interpretations. Quantitative indices may improve the objective characterization of these motion artifacts. In this paper, an automated method for generating 12 quantitative indices, i.e., features that characterize the motion artifacts affecting calcified plaques, is presented. This method consists of using the rapid phase-correlated region-of-interest (ROI) tracking algorithm for reconstructing ROI images of calcified plaques automatically from the projection data obtained during a cardiac scan, and applying methods for extracting features from these images. The 12 features include two dynamic, six morphological, and four intensity-based features. The two dynamic features are three-dimensional (3D) velocity and 3D acceleration. The six morphological features include edge-based volume, threshold-based volume, sphericity, irregularity, average margin gradient, and variance of margin gradient. The four intensity-based features are maximum intensity, mean intensity, minimum intensity, and standard deviation of intensity. The 12 features were extracted from 54 reconstructed sets of simulated four-dimensional images from the dynamic NCAT phantom involving six calcified plaques under nine heart rate/multi-sector gating combinations. In order to determine how well the 12 features correlated with a plaque motion index, which was derived from the trajectory of the plaque, partial correlation coefficients adjusted for heart rate, number of gated sectors, and mean feature values of the six plaques were calculated for all 12 features. Features exhibiting stronger correlations (|r| set-membership sign [0.60,1.00]) with the motion index were 3D velocity, maximum intensity, and standard deviation of intensity. Features demonstrating stronger correlations (|r| set-membership sign [0.60,1.00]) with other

  8. Assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in contaminated sediments and soils using green fluorescent protein-based bacterial biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based bacterial biosensor Escherichia coli DH5α (pVLCD1) was developed based on the expression of gfp under the control of the cad promoter and the cadC gene of Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258. DH5α (pVLCD1) mainly responded to Cd(II), Pb(II), and Sb(III), the lowest detectable concentrations being 0.1 nmol L-1, 10 nmol L-1, and 0.1 nmol L-1, respectively, with 2 h exposure. The biosensor was field-tested to measure the relative bioavailability of the heavy metals in contaminated sediments and soil samples. The results showed that the majority of heavy metals remained adsorbed to soil particles: Cd(II)/Pb(II) was only partially available to the biosensor in soil-water extracts. Our results demonstrate that the GFP-based bacterial biosensor is useful and applicable in determining the bioavailability of heavy metals with high sensitivity in contaminated sediment and soil samples and suggests a potential for its inexpensive application in environmentally relevant sample tests. - Nonpathogenic GFP-based bacterial biosensor is applicable in determining the bioavailability of heavy metals in environmental samples

  9. Modes of Presentation of Reactive Arthritis Based on the Affected Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Lahu, Ali; Backa, Teuta; Ismaili, Jehona; Lahu, Vendenis; Saiti, Valton

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Reactive arthritis is an autoimmune condition that occurs as a reaction against an infection site elsewhere in the body. Reactive arthritis affects mostly young ages, mainly group age 20-40 y.o., mostly males with ratio 2:1 against females, sometimes 3:1, and even 14:1. The purpose of the study was to observe the mode of illness presentation based on the number of affected joints. Material and Methods: During the 01.03.2012 – 01.03.2014 in the Clinic for Rheumatology and O.S.I.R...

  10. Ubiquitous Presenter: A Tablet PC-based System to Support Instructors and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Edward; Simon, Beth

    2009-12-01

    Digital lecturing systems (computer and projector, often with PowerPoint) offer physics instructors the ability to incorporate graphics and the power to share and reuse materials. But these systems do a poor job of supporting interaction in the classroom. For instance, with digital presentation systems, instructors have limited ability to spontaneously respond to student questions. This limitation is especially acute during classroom activities such as problem solving, Peer Instruction, and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs).2 A Tablet PC, a laptop computer with a stylus that can be used to "write" on the screen, provides a way for instructors to add digital ink spontaneously to a presentation in progress. The Tablet PC can be a powerful tool for teaching,3,4 especially when combined with software systems specifically designed to leverage digital ink for pedagogical uses. Ubiquitous Presenter (UP) is one such freely available system.5 Developed at the University of California, San Diego, and based on Classroom Presenter,6 UP allows the instructor to ink prepared digital material (such as exported PowerPoint slides) in real time in class. Ink is automatically archived stroke by stroke and can be reviewed through a web browser (by both students and instructors). The system also supports spontaneous in-class interaction through a web interface—students with web-enabled devices (Tablet PCs, regular laptops, PDAs, and cell phones) can make text-, ink-, or image-based submissions on the instructor's slides. The instructor can review and then project submitted slides to the class and add additional ink, so that material generated by students can be a focus for discussion. A brief video showing UP in action is at http://physics.csusm.edu/UP. In this article, we describe UP and give examples of how UP can support the physics classroom.

  11. Selective suppression of bacterial contaminants by process conditions during lignocellulose based yeast fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albers Eva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination of bacteria in large-scale yeast fermentations is a serious problem and a threat to the development of successful biofuel production plants. Huge research efforts have been spent in order to solve this problem, but additional ways must still be found to keep bacterial contaminants from thriving in these environments. The aim of this project was to develop process conditions that would inhibit bacterial growth while giving yeast a competitive advantage. Results Lactic acid bacteria are usually considered to be the most common contaminants in industrial yeast fermentations. Our observations support this view but also suggest that acetic acid bacteria, although not so numerous, could be a much more problematic obstacle to overcome. Acetic acid bacteria showed a capacity to drastically reduce the viability of yeast. In addition, they consumed the previously formed ethanol. Lactic acid bacteria did not show this detrimental effect on yeast viability. It was possible to combat both types of bacteria by a combined addition of NaCl and ethanol to the wood hydrolysate medium used. As a result of NaCl + ethanol additions the amount of viable bacteria decreased and yeast viability was enhanced concomitantly with an increase in ethanol concentration. The successful result obtained via addition of NaCl and ethanol was also confirmed in a real industrial ethanol production plant with its natural inherent yeast/bacterial community. Conclusions It is possible to reduce the number of bacteria and offer a selective advantage to yeast by a combined addition of NaCl and ethanol when cultivated in lignocellulosic medium such as wood hydrolysate. However, for optimal results, the concentrations of NaCl + ethanol must be adjusted to suit the challenges offered by each hydrolysate.

  12. Performance of three resin-based materials for treating uranium-contaminated groundwater within a PRB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three materials that are designed to treat uranium-contaminated water were investigated. These are a cation exchange resin, IRN 77; an anion exchange resin, Varion AP; and a recently developed material called PANSIL (quartz sand coated with 2% amidoxime resin by weight). The reaction rate, capacity, and effective pH range of the three materials are reported. The capacity and conditional distribution coefficient in neutral, uranyl-contaminated synthetic groundwater containing carbonate are also reported. The suitability of each material for treating uranium-contaminated groundwater using a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) approach is then discussed. All three materials react rapidly in the pH range 5-7, reaching equilibrium in less than 4 h at ∼23 deg. C. The unconditioned cation exchange resin removed 8 g UO22+ per kg of resin from neutral synthetic groundwater containing 30 mg/l of UO22+, but a lower capacity is anticipated in groundwater with either higher ionic strength or lower UO22+ concentrations. It operates by first acidifying the solution, then sorbing UO22+, and can release UO22+ when its buffering capacity has been exhausted. The anion exchange resin is very effective at removing anionic uranyl carbonate species from solutions with a pH above 5, with good specificity. Up to 50 g/kg of uranium is removed from contaminated groundwater at neutral pH. PANSIL is effective at sequestering cationic and neutral uranyl species from solutions in the pH range 4.5-7.5, with very good specificity. The capacity of PANSIL is pH-dependent, increasing from about 0.4 g/kg at pH 4.5, to about 1 g/kg at pH 6, and 1.5 g/kg around pH 7.5. In neutral groundwater containing carbonate, both the anion exchange resin and PANSIL exhibit conditional distribution coefficients exceeding 1470 ml/g, which is about an order of magnitude higher than comparable reactive barrier materials reported in the literature

  13. StressPhone: smartphone based platform for measurement of cortisol for stress detection (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aadhar; Rey, Elizabeth; Lee, Seoho; O'Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2016-03-01

    Anxiety disorders are estimated to be the most common mental illness in US affecting around 40 million people and related job stress is estimated to cost US industry up to $300 billion due to lower productivity and absenteeism. A personal diagnostic device which could help identify stressed individuals would therefore be a huge boost for workforce productivity. We are therefore developing a point of care diagnostic device that can be integrated with smartphones or tablets for the measurement of cortisol - a stress related salivary biomarker, which is known to be strongly involved in body's fight-or-flight response to a stressor (physical or mental). The device is based around a competitive lateral flow assay whose results can then be read and quantified through an accessory compatible with the smartphone. In this presentation, we report the development and results of such an assay and the integrated device. We then present the results of a study relating the diurnal patterns of cortisol levels and the alertness of an individual based on the circadian rhythm and sleep patterns of the individual. We hope to use the insight provided by combining the information provided by levels of stress related to chemical biomarkers of the individual with the physical biomarkers to lead to a better informed and optimized activity schedule for maximized work output.

  14. Use of mass and toxicity balances in risk-based corrective action decisions at contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contaminated groundwater at a sour gas plant facility was studied to identify the chemicals of environmental concern. Simple mass balance principles were used to determine the proportion of organic carbon, organic nitrogen and MicrotoxR toxicity that can be attributed to two process chemicals that have contaminated several sour gas plants in western Canada. The two process chemicals are sulfolane and diisopropanolamine (DIPA). The organic carbon balance was calculated by determining the molar contribution of sulfolane and DIPA relative to the mass of carboxylic acid-corrected dissolved organic carbon. Organic carbon balances ranged from 44 to 96 per cent. The organic nitrogen balance was calculated by determining the molar contribution of DIPA relative to the mass of ammonium ion-corrected dissolved Kjeldahl nitrogen. The nitrogen balances were highly variable between 8 to 48 per cent for samples with organic nitrogen concentrations between 10 and 32 mg/L. The MicrotoxR toxicity balance was calculated by determining the proportions of toxicity that could be accounted for by pure phase sulfolane and DIPA. The MicrotoxR toxicity balance for samples that showed significant toxicity ranged from 71 to 122 per cent

  15. Vulnerability mapping of groundwater contamination based on 3D lithostratigraphical models of porous aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducci, Daniela; Sellerino, Mariangela

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to apply a methodology in order to reconstruct a lithostratigraphic 3D model of an aquifer so as to define some parameters involved in the evaluation of the aquifer vulnerability to contamination of porous aquifers. The DRASTIC, SINTACS and AVI methods have been applied to an alluvial coastal aquifer of southern Italy. The stratigraphic reconstruction has been obtained by interpolating stratigraphic data from more than one borehole per 2 km. The lithostratigraphic reconstruction of a 3D model has been applied and used for three-dimensional or two-dimensional representations. In the first two methods, the layers of the vadose zone and the aquifer media have been evaluated not only by the interpolation of the single boreholes and piezometers, but also by the 3D model, assigning the scores of the parameters of each layer of the 3D model. The comparison between the maps constructed from the weighted values in each borehole and the maps deriving from the attribution of the values of each layer of the 3D model, highlights that the second representation avoids or minimizes the "bullseye" effect linked to the presence of boreholes with higher or lower values. The study has demonstrated that it is possible to integrate a 3D lithostratigraphic model of an aquifer in the assessment of the parameters involved in the evaluation of the aquifer vulnerability to contamination by Point Count System methods. PMID:23391897

  16. Modification of Optical Properties of Seawater Exposed to Oil Contaminants Based on Excitation-Emission Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2015-10-01

    The optical behaviour of seawater exposed to a residual amount of oil pollution is presented and a comparison of the fluorescence spectra of oil dissolved in both n-hexane and seawater is discussed based on excitation-emission spectra. Crude oil extracted from the southern part of the Baltic Sea was used to characterise petroleum properties after contact with seawater. The wavelength-independent fluorescence maximum for natural seawater and seawater artificially polluted with oil were determined. Moreover, the specific excitation-emission peaks for natural seawater and polluted water were analysed to identify the natural organic matter composition. It was found that fluorescence spectra identification is a promising method to detect even an extremely low concentration of petroleum residues directly in the seawater. In addition, alien substances disturbing the fluorescence signatures of natural organic substances in a marine environment is also discussed.

  17. Micro motor OCT enables catheter based assessment of vascular elasticity (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianshi; Pfeiffer, Tom; Wieser, Wolfgang; Lancee, Charles T.; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Huber, Robert; van Soest, Gijs

    2016-03-01

    Here, we present the first catheter-based optical coherence elasticity measurement using a newly developed super fast intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. The system is based on a 1.5 MHz Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser and a 1.2 mm outer diameter motorized catheter. To detect the local elastic properties, the micro-motor is programmed to actuate the laser beam in a "step-by-step" mode at 1 revolution per second; which can potentially be increased to > 10 revolutions/s. The beam is scanned in a limited number (up to 50) of angular steps, at each of which the beam position is held stable. When the laser beam is stable, the phase difference across a variable number of A-lines can be computed to assess the elastic displacement. Choosing a proper window delay, local elastic tissue displacement and strain can be quantified based on the phase shift. We conducted ex-vivo experiments with a cylindrical phantom where the elastic property changes at different angular positions. A syringe pump was used to generate variable pressure loading, which is synchronized to the motor driving signal. The experimental results show that the elastic displacements are detected to be different at different angular positions. The results of elastic properties detection in human artery will also be demonstrated.

  18. [The present and future of community/home-based palliative care in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueng, Ruey-Shiuan; Hsu, Su-Hsuan; Shih, Chih-Yuan; Huang, Sheng-Jean

    2015-04-01

    In Taiwan, the Department of Health (DOH) has implemented regulations and policies related to hospice and palliative care since 1995. Taiwan is the first country in Asia to have a Natural Death Act, promulgated in 2000. Although recognition of the need for palliative care in non-cancer terminally ill patients is increasing, at present, the needs of these patients are often not met. Moreover, while a majority of the population prefers to die at home, the percentage of patients who die in the home setting remains small. The palliative care system should be adjusted to improve the accessibility and continuity of care based on the needs of patients. Therefore, the Jin-Shan Branch of the National Taiwan University Hospital has run a pilot community palliative care service model since 2012. National Health Insurance reimbursement was introduced in 2014 for community-based palliative care services. Establishing a formal system of community-based palliative care should be encouraged in order to improve the quality of care at the end of life and to allow more patients to receive end-of-life care and die in their own communities. This system will require that skilled nurses provide discharge planning, symptoms control, end-of-life communications, social-resources integration, and social-support networks in order to achieve a high quality of end-of-life care. PMID:25854944

  19. Images from the Mind: BCI image reconstruction based on Rapid Serial Visual Presentations of polygon primitives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís F Seoane

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We provide a proof of concept for an EEG-based reconstruction of a visual image which is on a user's mind. Our approach is based on the Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP of polygon primitives and Brain-Computer Interface (BCI technology. In an experimental setup, subjects were presented bursts of polygons: some of them contributed to building a target image (because they matched the shape and/or color of the target while some of them did not. The presentation of the contributing polygons triggered attention-related EEG patterns. These Event Related Potentials (ERPs could be determined using BCI classification and could be matched to the stimuli that elicited them. These stimuli (i.e. the ERP-correlated polygons were accumulated in the display until a satisfactory reconstruction of the target image was reached. As more polygons were accumulated, finer visual details were attained resulting in more challenging classification tasks. In our experiments, we observe an average classification accuracy of around 75%. An in-depth investigation suggests that many of the misclassifications were not misinterpretations of the BCI concerning the users' intent, but rather caused by ambiguous polygons that could contribute to reconstruct several different images. When we put our BCI-image reconstruction in perspective with other RSVP BCI paradigms, there is large room for improvement both in speed and accuracy. These results invite us to be optimistic. They open a plethora of possibilities to explore non-invasive BCIs for image reconstruction both in healthy and impaired subjects and, accordingly, suggest interesting recreational and clinical applications.

  20. Bioremediation of oil sludge contaminated soil using bulking agent mixture enriched consortia of microbial inoculants based by irradiated compost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulking agent mixture enriched consortia of microbial inoculants based by irradiated compost was used on bioremediation of microcosm scale contaminated by hydrocarbon soil. Bioremediation composting was carried out for 42 days. Composting was done with a mixture of bulking agent (sawdust, residual sludge biogas and compost) by 30%, mud petroleum (oil sludge) by 20% and 50% of soil. Mixture of 80% soil and 20% oil sludge was used as a control. Irradiated compost was used as a carrier for consortia of microbial inoculants (F + B) which biodegradable hydrocarbons. Treatment variations include A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2, D1 and D2. Process parameters were observed to determine the optimal conditions include: temperature, pH, water content, TPC (Total Plate Count) and degradation of % TPH (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon). Optimal conditions were achieved in the remediation of oil sludge contamination of 20% using the B2 treatment with the addition consortia of microbial inoculants based by irradiated compost of sawdust (bulking agentby 30% at concentrations of soil by 50% with TPH degradation optimal efficiency of 81.32%. The result of GC-MS analysis showed that bioremediation for 42 days by using a sawdust as a mixture of bulking agents which enriched consortia of microbial inoculants based by irradiated compost is biodegradeable, so initial hydrocarbons with the distribution of the carbon chain C-7 to C-54 into final hydrocarbons with the distribution of carbon chain C-6 to C-8. (author)

  1. Soil heavy metal contamination related to roasted stone coal slag: a study based on geostatistical and multivariate analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, De'an; Jiang, Jianguo; Li, Tianran; Wang, Jiaming

    2016-07-01

    Soil was examined for vanadium (V) and related metal contamination near a stone coal mine in Hubei Province, China. In total, 92 surface and vertical (0-200 cm) soil samples were collected from the site. A handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used for in situ analysis of the soil concentrations of heavy metals, including V, chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), and lead (Pb). The mean concentrations of these metals were 931, 721, 279, 223, 163, and 11 mg/kg, respectively. Based on the Chinese Environmental Quality Standard for Soils guidelines, up to 88.0, 76.1, and 56.5 % of the soil samples had single factor pollution indices >3 for V, Cr, and Cu, respectively. Furthermore, 2.2 % of samples were slightly polluted with Zn, while there was no Mn or Pb contamination. GaussAmp curve fitting was performed based on the sample frequency distribution of the Nemerow pollution index. The fitted mean was 5.99, indicating severe pollution. The heavy metals were clustered into two groups, V/Cr/Cu/Zn and Mn/Pb, based on the spatial distributions, the Pearson correlation and principal component analyses. The positive correlations within the V/Cr/Cu/Zn group suggested that they originated from roasted stone coal slag. Finally, the negative correlation between the two groups was attributed to mechanical mixing of the slag and original soil. PMID:27068897

  2. Microcontroller based fibre-optic visual presentation system for multisensory neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Veldri; Klemen, Jane; Chambers, Christopher D

    2011-10-30

    Presenting visual stimuli in physical 3D space during fMRI experiments carries significant technical challenges. Certain types of multisensory visuotactile experiments and visuomotor tasks require presentation of visual stimuli in peripersonal space, which cannot be accommodated by ordinary projection screens or binocular goggles. However, light points produced by a group of LEDs can be transmitted through fibre-optic cables and positioned anywhere inside the MRI scanner. Here we describe the design and implementation of a microcontroller-based programmable digital device for controlling fibre-optically transmitted LED lights from a PC. The main feature of this device is the ability to independently control the colour, brightness, and timing of each LED. Moreover, the device was designed in a modular and extensible way, which enables easy adaptation for various experimental paradigms. The device was tested and validated in three fMRI experiments involving basic visual perception, a simple colour discrimination task, and a blocked multisensory visuo-tactile task. The results revealed significant lateralized activation in occipital cortex of all participants, a reliable response in ventral occipital areas to colour stimuli elicited by the device, and strong activations in multisensory brain regions in the multisensory task. Overall, these findings confirm the suitability of this device for presenting complex fibre-optic visual and cross-modal stimuli inside the scanner. PMID:21893095

  3. Separation and concentration of water-borne contaminants utilizing insulator-based dielectrophoresis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca Hazalia; Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Cummings, Eric B.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Simmons, Blake Alexander; McGraw, Gregory J.; Salmi, Allen J.; Ceremuga, Joseph T.; Fintschenko, Yolanda

    2006-01-01

    This report focuses on and presents the capabilities of insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) microdevices for the concentration and removal of water-borne bacteria, spores and inert particles. The dielectrophoretic behavior exhibited by the different particles of interest (both biological and inert) in each of these systems was observed to be a function of both the applied electric field and the characteristics of the particle, such as size, shape, and conductivity. The results obtained illustrate the potential of glass and polymer-based iDEP devices to act as a concentrator for a front-end device with significant homeland security and industrial applications for the threat analysis of bacteria, spores, and viruses. We observed that the polymeric devices exhibit the same iDEP behavior and efficacy in the field of use as their glass counterparts, but with the added benefit of being easily mass fabricated and developed in a variety of multi-scale formats that will allow for the realization of a truly high-throughput device. These results also demonstrate that the operating characteristics of the device can be tailored through the device fabrication technique utilized and the magnitude of the electric field gradient created within the insulating structures. We have developed systems capable of handling numerous flow rates and sample volume requirements, and have produced a deployable system suitable for use in any laboratory, industrial, or clinical setting.

  4. Biofiltration of toluene-contaminated air using an agro by-product-based filter bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, B; Hima, A M; Haridas, Ajit

    2007-02-01

    An innovative, coir-pith-based, filter bed for degrading vapor phase toluene in a gas biofilter over 160 days without any external nutrient supply is reported in this study. Indigenous microflora present in the coir pith as well as in the aerobic sludge added at the start-up stage metabolized the toluene, and correspondingly, CO(2) was produced in the biofilter. Inlet toluene concentration in the range of 0.75 to 2.63 g/m(3) was supplied to the biofilter in short acclimation periods. The maximum elimination capacity achieved was 96.75 g/m(3) x h at 120.72 g/m(3) x h loading where around 60% was recovered as CO(2). The filter bed maintained a stable low-pressure drop (0-4 mm H(2)O), neutral pH range (6.5-7.5), and moisture content of 60-80% (w/w) throughout the period. In addition to toluene-degrading microbial community, a grazing fauna including rotifer, bacteriovoric nematode, tardigrade, and fly larvae were also present in the filter bed. The overall performance of the biofilter bed in pollutant removal and sustainability was analyzed in this study. PMID:17024468

  5. The relationship between field screening techniques and health risk-based cleanup criteria for petroleum contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleanup criteria for petroleum contaminated soils have traditionally been expressed in terms of maximum allowable concentrations of certain gross parameters such as oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, or gasoline. Unfortunately, however, many of these parameters are less amendable to expedient determination in the field. This paper discusses traditional cleanup criteria, still widely used in may jurisdictions, together with risk-based standards that are often developed for site-specific purposes and are also now being adopted as statutory criteria by some authorities. Methods used to measure these parameters are reviewed briefly. The correlations between these parameters are examined, based on theoretical considerations and field observations. The application of various parameters and measurement techniques to the implementation of health risk-based cleanup standards is discussed

  6. RGWSN: Presenting a genetic-based routing algorithm to reduce energy consumption in wireless sensor network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Gorbannia Delavar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a genetic- based routing algorithm to reduce energy consumption in sensor networks is presented. This method, by regarding distance hybrid parameters, energy and density, has created a fitness function which has optimal conditions compared to previous parameters. In the proposed algorithm, a new technique to select several probable cluster heads(CHs in each area, has been used. The results of simulation indicate that the proposed algorithm has increased networks lifetime, compared to former techniques. Also, we have proved , in the new technique, that the number of alive nodes at the end of each round has increased , compared to previous techniques, and that is the result of proper selection of CH in each area.

  7. Biosensor-based diagnostics of contaminated groundwater: assessment and remediation strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shallow groundwater beneath a former airfield site in southern England has been heavily contaminated with a wide range of chlorinated solvents. The feasibility of using bacterial biosensors to complement chemical analysis and enable cost-effective, and focussed sampling has been assessed as part of a site evaluation programme. Five different biosensors, three metabolic (Vibrio fischeri, Pseudomonas fluorescens 10568 and Escherichia coli HB101) and two catabolic (Pseudomonas putida TVA8 and E. coli DH5α), were employed to identify areas where the availability and toxicity of pollutants is of most immediate environmental concern. The biosensors used showed different sensitivities to each other and to the groundwater samples tested. There was generally a good agreement with chemical analyses. The potential efficacy of remediation strategies was explored by coupling sample manipulation to biosensor tests. Manipulation involved sparging and charcoal treatment procedures to simulate remediative engineering solutions. Sparging was sufficient at most locations. - Luminescent bacteria complement chemical analysis and support remediation technology

  8. Lithography-based ceramic manufacture (LCM) of auxetic structures: present capabilities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; de Blas Romero, Adrián; Schwentenwein, Martin; Jellinek, Christopher; Homa, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Auxetic metamaterials are known for having a negative Poisson’s ratio (NPR) and for displaying the unexpected properties of lateral expansion when stretched and densification when compressed. Even though a wide set of micro-manufacturing resources have been used for the development of auxetic metamaterials and related devices, additional precision and an extension to other families of materials is needed for their industrial expansion. In addition, their manufacture using ceramic materials is still challenging. In this study we present a very promising approach for the development of auxetic metamaterials and devices based on the use of lithography-based ceramic manufacturing. The process stands out for its precision and complex three-dimensional geometries attainable, without the need of supporting structures, and for enabling the manufacture of ceramic auxetics with their geometry controlled from the design stage with micrometric precision. To our knowledge it represents the first example of application of this technology to the manufacture of auxetic geometries using ceramic materials. We have used a special three-dimensional auxetic design whose remarkable NPR has been previously highlighted.

  9. Acoustic perfect absorber based on metasurface with deep sub-wavelength thickness (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouar, Badreddine; Li, Yong

    2016-04-01

    The concept of the coiling up space, based on which artificial structures could exhibit extreme acoustic properties, such as high refractive index, double negativity, near-zero index, etc., have been investigated intensively recently due to the fascinating underlying physics and diverse potential applications [1-3]. One of the most important functionality is the ability to shrink bulky structures into deep sub-wavelength scale. It is therefore intuitive to prospect that the concept of coiling up space, if could be extended into the perforated system, will benefit to significantly reduce the total thickness while keeping total absorption. Conventional acoustic absorbers require a structure with a thickness comparable to the working wavelength, resulting major obstacles in real applications in low frequency range. We present a metasurface-based perfect absorber capable of achieving the total absorption of acoustic wave in extremely low frequency region. The metasurface possessing a deep sub-wavelength thickness down to a feature size of ~ lambda/223 is composed of a perforated plate and a coiled coplanar air chamber. Simulations based on fully coupled acoustic with thermodynamic equations and theoretical impedance analysis are utilized to reveal the underlying physics and the acoustic performances, showing an excellent agreement. Our realization should have high impact on amount of applications due to the extremely thin thickness, easy fabrication and high efficiency of the proposed structure. References 1. Z. Liang and J. Li, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 114301 (2012). 2. Y. Li, B. Liang, X. Tao, X. F. Zhu, X. Y. Zou, and J. C. Cheng, Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 233508 (2012). 3. Y. Xie, W. Wang, H. Chen, A. Konneker, B. I. Popa, and S. A. Cummer, Nat. Commun. 5, 5553 (2014).

  10. A comprehensive review on droplet-based bioprinting: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudapati, Hemanth; Dey, Madhuri; Ozbolat, Ibrahim

    2016-09-01

    Droplet-based bioprinting (DBB) offers greater advantages due to its simplicity and agility with precise control on deposition of biologics including cells, growth factors, genes, drugs and biomaterials, and has been a prominent technology in the bioprinting community. Due to its immense versatility, DBB technology has been adopted by various application areas, including but not limited to, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, transplantation and clinics, pharmaceutics and high-throughput screening, and cancer research. Despite the great benefits, the technology currently faces several challenges such as a narrow range of available bioink materials, bioprinting-induced cell damage at substantial levels, limited mechanical and structural integrity of bioprinted constructs, and restrictions on the size of constructs due to lack of vascularization and porosity. This paper presents a first-time review of DBB and comprehensively covers the existing DBB modalities including inkjet, electrohydrodynamic, acoustic, and micro-valve bioprinting. The recent notable studies are highlighted, the relevant bioink biomaterials and bioprinters are expounded, the application areas are presented, and the future prospects are provided to the reader. PMID:27318933

  11. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Field Investigation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    An environmental investigation of ground water conditions has been undertaken at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio to obtain data to assist in the evaluation of a potential removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, migration of the contaminated ground water across Base boundaries. Field investigations were limited to the central section of the southwestern boundary of Area C and the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B. Further, the study was limited to a maximum depth of 150 feet below grade. Three primary activities of the field investigation were: (1) installation of 22 monitoring wells, (2) collection and analysis of ground water from 71 locations, (3) measurement of ground water elevations at 69 locations. Volatile organic compounds including trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and/or vinyl chloride were detected in concentrations exceeding Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) at three locations within the Area C investigation area. Ground water at the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B occurs in two primary units, separated by a thicker-than-expected clay layers. One well within Area B was determined to exceed the MCL for trichloroethylene.

  12. Of earprints, fingerprints, scent dogs, cot deaths and cognitive contamination--a brief look at the present state of play in the forensic arena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeders, A P A

    2006-06-01

    Over the last decades, the importance of technical and scientific evidence for the criminal justice system has been steadily increasing. Unfortunately, the weight of forensic evidence is not always easy for the trier of fact to assess, as appears from a brief discussion of some recent cases in which the weight of expert evidence was either grossly over- or understated. Also, in recent years, questions surrounding the value of forensic evidence have played a major role in the appeal and revision stages of a number of highly publicized criminal cases in several countries, including the UK and the Netherlands. Some of the present confusion is caused by the different ways in which conclusions are formulated by experts working within the traditional approach to forensic identification, as exemplified by (1) dactyloscopy and (2) the other traditional forensic identification disciplines like handwriting analysis, firearms analysis and fibre analysis, as opposed to those working within the modern scientific approach used in forensic DNA analysis. Though most clearly expressed in the way conclusions are formulated within the diverse fields, these differences essentially reflect the scientific paradigms underlying the various identification disciplines. The types of conclusions typically formulated by practitioners of the traditional identification disciplines are seen to be directly related to the two major principles underpinning traditional identification science, i.e. the uniqueness assumption and the individualization principle. The latter of these is shown to be particularly problematic, especially when carried to its extreme, as embodied in the positivity doctrine, which is almost universally embraced by the dactyloscopy profession and allows categorical identification only. Apart from issues arising out of the interpretation of otherwise valid expert evidence there is growing concern over the validity and reliability of the expert evidence submitted to courts. While

  13. Grouting design based on characterization of the fractured rock. Presentation and demonstration of a methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design methodology presented in this document is based on an approach that considers the individual fractures. The observations and analyses made during production enable the design to adapt to the encountered conditions. The document is based on previously published material and overview flow charts are used to show the different steps. Parts of or the full methodology has been applied for a number of tunneling experiments and projects. SKB projects in the Aespoe tunnel include a pillar experiment and pre-grouting of a 70 meter long tunnel (TASQ). Further, for Hallandsas railway tunnel (Skaane south Sweden), a field pre-grouting experiment and design and post-grouting of a section of 133 meters have been made. For the Nygard railway tunnel (north of Goeteborg, Sweden), design and grouting of a section of 86 meters (pre-grouting) and 60 meters (post-grouting) have been performed. Finally, grouting work at the Tornskog tunnel (Stockholm, Sweden) included design and grouting along a 100 meter long section of one of the two tunnel tubes. Of importance to consider when doing a design and evaluating the result are: - The identification of the extent of the grouting needed based on inflow requirements and estimates of tunnel inflow before grouting. - The selection of grout and performance of grouting materials including penetration ability and length. The penetration length is important for the fan geometry design. - The ungrouted compared to the grouted and excavated rock mass conditions: estimates of tunnel inflow and (if available) measured inflows after grouting and excavation. Identify if possible explanations for deviations. For the Hallandsas, Nygard and Tornskog tunnel sections, the use of a Pareto distribution and the estimate of tunnel inflow identified a need for sealing small aperture fractures (< 50 - 100 μm) to meet the inflow requirements. The tunneling projects show that using the hydraulic aperture as a basis for selection of grout is a good

  14. All-Weather Hydrogen Peroxide-Based Decontamination of CBRN Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, George W. [U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Procell, Lawrence R. [U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Sorrick, David C. [U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Lawson, Glenn E. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Dahlgren, VA (United States); Wells, Claire M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Dahlgren, VA (United States); Reynolds, Charles M. [U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab. (CRREL), Hanover, NH (United States); Ringelberg, D. B. [U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab. (CRREL), Hanover, NH (United States); Foley, Karen L. [U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab. (CRREL), Hanover, NH (United States); Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Blanchard, David L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-03-11

    A hydrogen peroxide-based decontaminant, Decon Green, is efficacious for the decontamination of chemical agents VX (S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate), GD (Soman, pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate), and HD (mustard, bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide); the biological agent anthrax (Bacillus anthracis); and radiological isotopes Cs-137 and Co-60; thus demonstrating the ability of this decontamination approach to ameliorate the aftermath of all three types of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Reaction mechanisms afforded for the chemical agents are discussed as are rationales for the enhanced removal efficacy of recalcitrant 60Co on certain surfaces. Decontaminants of this nature can be deployed, and are effective, at very low temperatures (-32 °C), as shown for studies done with VX and HD simulants, without the need for external heat sources. Finally, the efficacy of a lower-logistics, dry decontaminant powder concentrate (utilizing the solid active-oxygen compounds peracetyl borate and Peroxydone) which can be reconstituted with water in the field prior to use, is presented.

  15. Genetic markers for rapid PCR-based identification of gull, Canada goose, duck, and chicken fecal contamination in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Hyatt C; Dick, Linda K; Gilpin, Brent; Samadpour, Mansour; Field, Katharine G

    2012-01-01

    Avian feces contaminate waterways but contribute fewer human pathogens than human sources. Rapid identification and quantification of avian contamination would therefore be useful to prevent overestimation of human health risk. We used subtractive hybridization of PCR-amplified gull fecal 16S RNA genes to identify avian-specific fecal rRNA gene sequences. The subtracters were rRNA genes amplified from human, dog, cat, cow, and pig feces. Recovered sequences were related to Enterobacteriaceae (47%), Helicobacter (26%), Catellicoccus (11%), Fusobacterium (11%), and Campylobacter (5%). Three PCR assays, designated GFB, GFC, and GFD, were based on recovered sequence fragments. Quantitative PCR assays for GFC and GFD were developed using SYBR green. GFC detected down to 0.1 mg gull feces/100 ml (corresponding to 2 gull enterococci most probable number [MPN]/100 ml). GFD detected down to 0.1 mg chicken feces/100 ml (corresponding to 13 Escherichia coli MPN/100 ml). GFB and GFC were 97% and 94% specific to gulls, respectively. GFC cross-reacted with 35% of sheep samples but occurred at about 100,000 times lower concentrations in sheep. GFD was 100% avian specific and occurred in gulls, geese, chickens, and ducks. In the United States, Canada, and New Zealand, the three markers differed in their geographic distributions but were found across the range tested. These assays detected four important bird groups contributing to fecal contamination of waterways: gulls, geese, ducks, and chickens. Marker distributions across North America and in New Zealand suggest that they will have broad applicability in other parts of the world as well. PMID:22081573

  16. Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Howard

    2010-11-30

    This project met the objective to further the development of an integrated multi-contaminant removal process in which H2S, NH3, HCl and heavy metals including Hg, As, Se and Cd present in the coal-derived syngas can be removed to specified levels in a single/integrated process step. The process supports the mission and goals of the Department of Energy's Gasification Technologies Program, namely to enhance the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of gasification-based processes. The gasification program will reduce equipment costs, improve process environmental performance, and increase process reliability and flexibility. Two sulfur conversion concepts were tested in the laboratory under this project, i.e., the solventbased, high-pressure University of California Sulfur Recovery Process High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and the catalytic-based, direct oxidation (DO) section of the CrystaSulf-DO process. Each process required a polishing unit to meet the ultra-clean sulfur content goals of <50 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) as may be necessary for fuel cells or chemical production applications. UCSRP-HP was also tested for the removal of trace, non-sulfur contaminants, including ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and heavy metals. A bench-scale unit was commissioned and limited testing was performed with simulated syngas. Aspen-Plus®-based computer simulation models were prepared and the economics of the UCSRP-HP and CrystaSulf-DO processes were evaluated for a nominal 500 MWe, coal-based, IGCC power plant with carbon capture. This report covers the progress on the UCSRP-HP technology development and the CrystaSulf-DO technology.

  17. Technologies for remediation of radioactively contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents particulars on environmental restoration technologies (control and treatment) which can be applied to land based, radioactively contaminated sites. The media considered include soils, groundwater, surface water, sediments, air, and terrestrial and aquatic vegetation. The technologies addressed in this report can be categorized as follows: self-attenuation (natural restoration); in-situ treatment; removal of contamination; ex-situ treatment; and transportation and final disposal. The report provides also background information about and a general approach to remediation of radioactively contaminated sites as well as some guidance for the selection of a preferred remediation technology. Examples of remediation experience in Australia and Canada are given it annexes

  18. New solutions for standardization, monitoring and quality management of fluorescence-based imaging systems (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royon, Arnaud; Papon, Gautier

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopes have become ubiquitous in life sciences laboratories, including those focused on pharmaceuticals, diagnosis, and forensics. For the past few years, the need for both performance guarantees and quantifiable results has driven development in this area. However, the lack of appropriate standards and reference materials makes it difficult or impossible to compare the results of two fluorescence microscopes, or to measure performance fluctuations of one microscope over time. Therefore, the operation of fluorescence microscopes is not monitored as often as their use warrants - an issue that is recognized by both systems manufacturers and national metrology institutes. We have developed a new process that enables the etching of long-term stable fluorescent patterns with sub-micrometer sizes in three dimensions inside glass. In this paper, we present, based on this new process, a fluorescent multi-dimensional ruler and a dedicated software that are suitable for monitoring and quality management of fluorescence-based imaging systems (wide-field, confocal, multiphoton, high content machines). In addition to fluorescence, the same patterns exhibit bright- and dark-field contrast, DIC, and phase contrast, which make them also relevant to monitor these types of microscopes. Non-exhaustively, this new solution enables the measurement of: The stage repositioning accuracy; The illumination and detection homogeneities; The field flatness; The detectors' characteristics; The lateral and axial spatial resolutions; The spectral response (spectrum, intensity and lifetime) of the system. Thanks to the stability of the patterns, microscope performance assessment can be carried out as well in a daily basis as in the long term.

  19. Present-Day 3D Velocity Field of Eastern North America Based on Continuous GPS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad Ali; Cocard, Marc; Santerre, Rock

    2016-03-01

    The Saint Lawrence River valley in eastern Canada was studied using observations of continuously operating GPS (CGPS) stations. The area is one of the most seismically active regions in eastern North America characterized by many earthquakes, which is also subject to an ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment. We present the current three-dimensional velocity field of eastern North America obtained from more than 14 years (9 years on average) of data at 112 CGPS stations. Bernese GNSS and GITSA software were used for CGPS data processing and position time series analysis, respectively. The results show the counterclockwise rotation of the North American plate in the No-Net-Rotation model with the average of 16.8 ± 0.7 mm/year constrained to ITRF 2008. We also present an ongoing uplift model for the study region based on the present-day CGPS observations. The model shows uplift all over eastern Canada with the maximum rate of 13.7 ± 1.2 mm/year and subsidence to the south mainly over northern USA with a typical rate of -1 to -2 mm/year and the minimum value of -2.7 ± 1.4 mm/year. We compared our model with the rate of radial displacements from the ICE-5G model. Both models agree within 0.02 mm/year at the best stations; however, our model shows a systematic spatial tilt compared to ICE-5G. The misfits between two models amount to the maximum relative subsidence of -6.1 ± 1.1 mm/year to the east and maximum relative uplift of 5.9 ± 2.7 mm/year to the west. The intraplate horizontal velocities are radially outward from the centers of maximum uplift and are inward to the centers of maximum subsidence with the typical velocity of 1-1.6 ± 0.4 mm/year that is in agreement with the ICE-5G model to the first order.

  20. Present-Day 3D Velocity Field of Eastern North America Based on Continuous GPS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad Ali; Cocard, Marc; Santerre, Rock

    2016-07-01

    The Saint Lawrence River valley in eastern Canada was studied using observations of continuously operating GPS (CGPS) stations. The area is one of the most seismically active regions in eastern North America characterized by many earthquakes, which is also subject to an ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment. We present the current three-dimensional velocity field of eastern North America obtained from more than 14 years (9 years on average) of data at 112 CGPS stations. Bernese GNSS and GITSA software were used for CGPS data processing and position time series analysis, respectively. The results show the counterclockwise rotation of the North American plate in the No-Net-Rotation model with the average of 16.8 ± 0.7 mm/year constrained to ITRF 2008. We also present an ongoing uplift model for the study region based on the present-day CGPS observations. The model shows uplift all over eastern Canada with the maximum rate of 13.7 ± 1.2 mm/year and subsidence to the south mainly over northern USA with a typical rate of -1 to -2 mm/year and the minimum value of -2.7 ± 1.4 mm/year. We compared our model with the rate of radial displacements from the ICE-5G model. Both models agree within 0.02 mm/year at the best stations; however, our model shows a systematic spatial tilt compared to ICE-5G. The misfits between two models amount to the maximum relative subsidence of -6.1 ± 1.1 mm/year to the east and maximum relative uplift of 5.9 ± 2.7 mm/year to the west. The intraplate horizontal velocities are radially outward from the centers of maximum uplift and are inward to the centers of maximum subsidence with the typical velocity of 1-1.6 ± 0.4 mm/year that is in agreement with the ICE-5G model to the first order.

  1. III-V GaAs based plasmonic lasers (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafone, Lucas; Nguyen, Ngoc; Clarke, Ed; Fry, Paul; Oulton, Rupert F.

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonics is a potential route to new and improved optical devices. Many predict that sub wavelength optical systems will be essential in the development of future integrated circuits, offering the only viable way of simultaneously increasing speed and reducing power consumption. Realising this potential will be contingent on the ability to exploit plasmonic effects within the framework of the established semiconductor industry and to this end we present III-V (GaAs) based surface plasmon laser platform capable of effective laser light generation in highly focussed regions of space. Our design utilises a suspended slab of GaAs with a metallic slot printed on top. Here, hybridisation between the plasmonic mode of the slot and the photonic mode of the slab leads to the formation of a mode with confinement and loss that can be adjusted through variation of the slot width alone. As in previous designs the use of a hybrid mode provides strong confinement with relatively low losses, however the ability to print the metal slot removes the randomness associated with device fabrication and the requirement for etching that can deteriorate the semiconductor's properties. The deterministic fabrication process and the use of bulk GaAs for gain make the device prime for practical implementation.

  2. Presentation an approach for useful rate based on changing many tasks of workflow in distributed systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Parseh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing refers to a network that distributes processing power, applications, and large systems among many computers With the significant advances in Information and Communications Technology (ICT over the last half century, there is an increasingly perceived vision that computing will one day be the 5th utility (after water, electricity, gas, and telephony. This computing utility, like all other four existing utilities, will provide the basic level of computing service that is considered essential to meet the everyday needs of the general community. To deliver this vision, a number of computing paradigms have been proposed, of which the latest one is known as Cloud computing. The distributed system consists of a number of data centers that presents different services through internet. In a distributed system Timing and mapping the priority of tasks among processors is one of the issues attracted most of attention to itself. This issue consists of mapping a Direct Acyclic Graph with a set of tasks on a number of parallel processors and its purpose is allocating tasks to the available processors in order to satisfy the needs of priority and decency of tasks, and also to minimize the duration time of execution in total graph. In this article, well represent an algorithm that useful rate based on changing many tasks of workflow. Simulation is showed that the way for me is better about the list schedule algorithm.

  3. A submatrix-based P300 brain-computer interface stimulus presentation paradigm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-he SHI; Ji-zhong SHEN; Yu JI; Feng-lei DU

    2012-01-01

    The P300 event-related potential (ERP),with advantages of high stability and no need for initial training,is one of the most commonly used responses in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications.The row/column paradigm (RCP) that flashes an entire colunm or row of a visual matrix has been used successfully to help patients to spell words.However,RCP remains subject to errors that slow down communication,such as adjacency-distraction and double-flash errors.In this paper,a new visual stimulus presentation paradigm called the submatrix-based paradigm (SBP) is proposed.SBP divides a 6×6 matrix into several submatrices.Each submatrix flashes in single cell paradigm (SCP) mode and separately performs an ensemble averaging method according to the sequences.The parameter of sequence number is used to improve further the accuracy and information transfer rate (ITR).SBP has advantages of flexibility in division of the matrix and better expansion capability,which were confirmed with different divisions of the 6×6 matrix and expansion to a 6x9 matrix.Stimulation results show that SBP is superior to RCP in performance and user acceptability.

  4. Coexisting sea-based and land-based sources of contamination by PAHs in the continental shelf sediments of Coatzacoalcos River discharge area (Gulf of Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Fernández, Ana Carolina; Portela, Julián Mauricio Betancourt; Sericano, José Luis; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Espinosa, Luisa Fernanda; Cardoso-Mohedano, José Gilberto; Pérez-Bernal, Libia Hascibe; Tinoco, Jesús Antonio Garay

    2016-02-01

    The oldest refinery and the major petrochemical complexes of Mexico are located in the lower reach of the Coatzacoalcos River, considered the most polluted coastal area of Mexico. A (210)Pb-dated sediment core, from the continental shelf of the Coatzacoalcos River, was studied to assess the contamination impact by the oil industry in the southern Gulf of Mexico. The sedimentary record showed the prevalence of petrogenic PAHs between 1950s and 1970s, a period during which waste discharges from the oil industry were not regulated. Later on, sediments exhibited higher contents of pyrogenic PAHs, attributed to the incineration of petrochemical industry wastes and recurrent wildfires in open dumpsites at the nearby swamps. The total concentration of the 16 EPA-priority PAHs indicated low levels of contamination (1000 ng g(-1)) during the late 1970s, most likely due to the major oil spill produced by the blowout of the Ixtoc-I offshore oil rig in deep waters of the southwestern Gulf of Mexico. Most of the PAH congeners did not show defined temporal trends but, according to a Factor Analysis, apparently have a common origin, probably waste released from the nearby oil industry. The only exceptions were the pyrogenic benzo(b)fluoranthene and benzo(a)pyrene, and the biogenic perylene, that showed increasing concentration trends with time, which we attributed to erosional input of contaminated soil from the catchment area. Our study confirmed chronic oil contamination in the Coatzacoalcos River coastal area from land based sources for more than 60 years (since 1950s). PMID:26397475

  5. Scenario-based modelling of mass transfer mechanisms at a petroleum contaminated field site-numerical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, M; Nambi, Indumathi M; Suresh Kumar, G

    2016-06-15

    Knowledge about distribution of dissolved plumes and their influencing factors is essential for risk assessment and remediation of light non-aqueous phase liquid contamination in groundwater. Present study deals with the applicability of numerical model for simulating various hydro-geological scenarios considering non-uniform source distribution at a petroleum contaminated site in Chennai, India. The complexity associated with the hydrogeology of the site has limited scope for on-site quantification of petroleum pipeline spillage. The change in fuel composition under mass-transfer limited conditions was predicted by simultaneously comparing deviations in aqueous concentrations and activity coefficients (between Raoult's law and analytical approaches). The effects of source migration and weathering on the dissolution of major soluble fractions of petroleum fuel were also studied in relation to the apparent change in their activity coefficients and molar fractions. The model results were compared with field observations and found that field conditions were favourable for biodegradation, especially for the aromatic fraction (benzene and toluene (nearly 95% removal), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (up to 65% removal) and xylene (nearly 45% removal). The results help to differentiate the effect of compositional non-ideality from rate-limited dissolution towards tailing of less soluble compounds (alkanes and trimethylbenzene). Although the effect of non-ideality decreased with distance from the source, the assumption of spatially varying residual saturation could effectively illustrate post-spill scenario by estimating the consequent decrease in mass transfer rate. PMID:27017268

  6. Plasma-based determination of inorganic contaminants in waste of electric and electronic equipment after microwave-induced combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Paola A.; Diehl, Lisarb O.; Oliveira, Jussiane S. S.; Muller, Edson I.; Mesko, Marcia F.; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2015-03-01

    A systematic study was performed for the determination of inorganic contaminants in polymeric waste from electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) for achieving an efficient digestion to minimize interferences in determination using plasma-based techniques. The determination of As, Br, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and also by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) was carried out after digestion using microwave-induced combustion (MIC). Arsenic and Hg were determined by flow-injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICP-MS). Dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS) with ammonia was also used for Cr determination. The suitability of MIC for digestion of sample masses up to 400 mg was demonstrated using microcrystalline cellulose as aid for combustion of polymers from waste of EEEs that usually contain flame retardants that impair the combustion. The composition and concentration of acid solutions (HNO3 or HNO3 plus HCl) were evaluated for metals and metalloids and NH4OH solutions were investigated for Br absorption. Accuracy was evaluated by comparison of results with those obtained using high pressure microwave-assisted wet digestion (HP-MAWD) and also by the analysis of certified reference material (CRM) of polymer (EC680k-low-density polyethylene). Bromine determination was only feasible using digestion by MIC once losses were observed when HP-MAWD was used. Lower limits of detection were obtained for all analytes using MIC (from 0.005 μg g- 1 for Co by ICP-MS up to 3.120 μg g-1 for Sb by ICP OES) in comparison to HP-MAWD due to the higher sample mass that can be digested (400 mg) and the use of diluted absorbing solutions. The combination of HNO3 and HCl for digestion showed to be crucial for quantitative recovery of some elements, as Cr and Sb. In addition, suitable agreement of Cr to

  7. Contamination Control Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics

  8. Contamination Control Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  9. Airborne radioactive contamination monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current technologies for the detection of airborne radioactive contamination do not provide real-time capability. Most of these techniques are based on the capture of particulate matter in air onto filters which are then processed in the laboratory; thus, the turnaround time for detection of contamination can be many days. To address this shortcoming, an effort is underway to adapt LRAD (Long-Range-Alpha-Detection) technology for real-time monitoring of airborne releases of alpa-emitting radionuclides. Alpha decays in air create ionization that can be subsequently collected on electrodes, producing a current that is proportional to the amount of radioactive material present. Using external fans on a pipe containing LRAD detectors, controlled samples of ambient air can be continuously tested for the presence of radioactive contamination. Current prototypes include a two-chamber model. Sampled air is drawn through a particulate filter and then through the first chamber, which uses an electrostatic filter at its entrance to remove ambient ionization. At its exit, ionization that occurred due to the presence of radon is collected and recorded. The air then passes through a length of pipe to allow some decay of short-lived radon species. A second chamber identical to the first monitors the remaining activity. Further development is necessary on air samples without the use of particulate filtering, both to distinguish ionization that can pass through the initial electrostatic filter on otherwise inert particulate matter from that produced through the decay of radioactive material and to separate both of these from the radon contribution. The end product could provide a sensitive, cost-effective, real-time method of determining the presence of airborne radioactive contamination

  10. Zoning and contamination rate of magnesium and heavy metals of iron, zinc and copper in the north and northwest aquifer of Khoy (Zourabad based on GIS and determining the contaminated source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Khodadadi

    2015-04-01

    samples carried out in the chemistry laboratory of the University of Urmia. All water sampling procedures were performed based on standard protocols (SMEWW, 2010. The maximum concentration of heavy metal contamination of drinking water with EPA, WHO and national standards were compared. In this study, the chemical analysis of heavy metals, were used by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (at ppb for the elements Cu, Mg, Fe and Zn. Concentration of the heavy metals in acidified water samples (pH value of 2, using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer were analyzed. Discussion There are enormous amounts of Fe and magnesium in groundwater from the north and northwest Khoy plain, and the amount of Cu and zinc are in the normal range in water resources. The source of iron and magnesium in the groundwater of the study area is ultramafic and mafic rocks of the Khoy ophiolite complex. Weathering of ultramafic and mafic igneous rocks such as peridotite, olivine basalt, gabbro and pillow lava and then soil formation, high concentrations of the elements Mg and Fe were transferred to soil. Ferromagnesian olivine is formed Mg2+ and Fe2+ ions and tetrahedral silicon. If sufficient amount of Mg2+ and Fe3+ ions combine with silicon and oxygen, silicon into the soil, forms silicic acid (H4SiO4, or magnesium or iron smectite (clay minerals (Alexander et al., 2007. Several types of pyroxene are more stable than olivine. Orthopyroxene during weathering decompose into talc and smectite. Magnesite (MgCO3 is present in some serpentine soils. With respect to the empirical relationship (Kierczak et al., 2007 and based on temperature and rainfall, the study area with a drought index of 12.48 places in the category of semi-arid-cold climate between 10 and 19.9. Temperature changes in the condition cause weathering and leaching of serpentine soils, and subsequently can remove large amounts of magnesium. Weathering and leaching serpentine soils, releases immediately magnesium and

  11. Stochastic approach to municipal solid waste landfill life based on the contaminant transit time modeling using the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieda, Boguslaw, E-mail: bbieda@zarz.agh.edu.pl

    2013-01-01

    The paper is concerned with application and benefits of MC simulation proposed for estimating the life of a modern municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill. The software Crystal Ball Registered-Sign (CB), simulation program that helps analyze the uncertainties associated with Microsoft Registered-Sign Excel models by MC simulation, was proposed to calculate the transit time contaminants in porous media. The transport of contaminants in soil is represented by the one-dimensional (1D) form of the advection-dispersion equation (ADE). The computer program CONTRANS written in MATLAB language is foundation to simulate and estimate the thickness of landfill compacted clay liner. In order to simplify the task of determining the uncertainty of parameters by the MC simulation, the parameters corresponding to the expression Z2 taken from this program were used for the study. The tested parameters are: hydraulic gradient (HG), hydraulic conductivity (HC), porosity (POROS), linear thickness (TH) and diffusion coefficient (EDC). The principal output report provided by CB and presented in the study consists of the frequency chart, percentiles summary and statistics summary. Additional CB options provide a sensitivity analysis with tornado diagrams. The data that was used include available published figures as well as data concerning the Mittal Steel Poland (MSP) S.A. in Krakow, Poland. This paper discusses the results and show that the presented approach is applicable for any MSW landfill compacted clay liner thickness design. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical simulation of waste in porous media is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Statistic outputs based on correct assumptions about probability distribution are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The benefits of a MC simulation are examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The uniform probability distribution is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I report a useful tool applied to determine the life of a

  12. Stochastic approach to municipal solid waste landfill life based on the contaminant transit time modeling using the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is concerned with application and benefits of MC simulation proposed for estimating the life of a modern municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill. The software Crystal Ball® (CB), simulation program that helps analyze the uncertainties associated with Microsoft® Excel models by MC simulation, was proposed to calculate the transit time contaminants in porous media. The transport of contaminants in soil is represented by the one-dimensional (1D) form of the advection–dispersion equation (ADE). The computer program CONTRANS written in MATLAB language is foundation to simulate and estimate the thickness of landfill compacted clay liner. In order to simplify the task of determining the uncertainty of parameters by the MC simulation, the parameters corresponding to the expression Z2 taken from this program were used for the study. The tested parameters are: hydraulic gradient (HG), hydraulic conductivity (HC), porosity (POROS), linear thickness (TH) and diffusion coefficient (EDC). The principal output report provided by CB and presented in the study consists of the frequency chart, percentiles summary and statistics summary. Additional CB options provide a sensitivity analysis with tornado diagrams. The data that was used include available published figures as well as data concerning the Mittal Steel Poland (MSP) S.A. in Kraków, Poland. This paper discusses the results and show that the presented approach is applicable for any MSW landfill compacted clay liner thickness design. -- Highlights: ► Numerical simulation of waste in porous media is proposed. ► Statistic outputs based on correct assumptions about probability distribution are presented. ► The benefits of a MC simulation are examined. ► The uniform probability distribution is studied. ► I report a useful tool applied to determine the life of a modern MSW landfill.

  13. Estimation of the future nuclear power research in Romania, based on the present Cernavoda NPP evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than four decades, the electric power needs of Romania were evaluated on the basis of the State Plan for Economic Development. To identify the optimal solution, the 'least price per produced MWh' was practically the only criterion. Now, there is no convincing estimation of the future economic development and at least two additional criteria play a significant role, 'the safety in the supply of the needed electric power', and 'the need of limiting the environmental impact of electricity generation'. The analysis dedicated to evaluation of future electric power solutions must take into account several features of the present situation. There are no available internal funds to finance the construction of new generating units of the order of several hundreds of MW. Even the so-called 'refurbishing' of the existing thermal power plants is based on foreign loan. In the 2000 year, about 80 electricity generation units reached 30 years of operation, i.e., the design life. Other thermal power plants proved very modest performances during 15-20 years of operation. Consequently, the future of almost 100 generating units is either in shutdown + decommissioning or shutdown + modernization situation. The Government analyzed the situation and decided to continue the completion of the Cernavoda NPP. The Unit 2 will be commissioned in a couple of years, and there is a schedule of negotiations relating the future of the Unit 3. After almost five years of successful operation of the Unit 1, the collaboration between RDT Institutes and NPP has clear features. Based on the experience related to this collaboration and taking into account the evolution of the Cernavoda NPP, we estimated that five research domains have significant chances to obtain a stable (and, hopefully, consistent) financial support. 1. Nuclear Safety, in particular Accident Analysis. As the Government re-iterated the firm decision to meet the conditions required for European integration, most of the nuclear

  14. Ruthenium catalyst on carbon nanofiber support layers for use in silicon-based structured microreactors, Part II: Catalytic reduction of bromate contaminants in aqueous phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakur, D.B.; Tiggelaar, R.M.; Weber, Y.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Lefferts, L.; Seshan, K.

    2011-01-01

    Catalyst layers were synthesized inside a structured channel of silicon based microreactor and used to remove bromate contaminants in water. It is demonstrated that Ru/CNF based catalyst is active for bromate reduction, resulting in turn over frequencies (TOFs) higher than conventional powdered cata

  15. Evaluating Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Commercial Biosolid-based Fertilizers

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmerling, John; Mashtare, Michael L; Lee, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    The production and popularity of commercially available biosolid-based fertilizers are increasing because of their economic, environmental, and plant nutrition benefits, particularly in urban and suburban areas. Because biosolid-based fertilizers are derived from waste water treatment plant residuals, we hypothesized that there is the potential for micropollutants to persist in these products. Their presence would be of particular concern due to their potential impact on human and ecological ...

  16. Student Performance Predictors Involving Numerically Based Subject Matter: Lecture versus Web Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Krisandra

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether student performance predictors in a numerically based lecture course are similar to those for the web version of the same course. A numerically based course involves quantitative concepts and requires mathematical calculations. Data were collected from students taking a financial management class at a medium sized state…

  17. The Enhancement of Simulation Based Learning Exercises through Formalised Reflection, Focus Groups and Group Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawdesley, M.; Long, G.; Al-jibouri, S.; Scott, D.

    2011-01-01

    Computer based simulations and games can be useful tools in teaching aspects of construction project management that are not easily transmitted through traditional lecture based approaches. However, it can be difficult to quantify their utility and it is essential to ensure that students are achieving the learning outcomes required rather than…

  18. Risk-Based Management of Contaminated Groundwater: The Role of Geologic Heterogeneity, Exposure and Cancer Risk in Determining the Performance of Aquifer Remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of aquifer remediation is typically expressed in terms of a reduction in contaminant concentrations relative to a regulated maximum contaminant level (MCL), and is usually confined by sparse monitoring data and/or simple model calculations. Here, the effectiveness of remediation is examined from a risk-based perspective that goes beyond the traditional MCL concept. A methodology is employed to evaluate the health risk to individuals exposed to contaminated household water that is produced from groundwater. This approach explicitly accounts for differences in risk arising from variability in individual physiology and water use, the uncertainty in estimating chemical carcinogenesis for different individuals, and the uncertainties and variability in contaminant concentrations within groundwater. A hypothetical contamination scenario is developed as a case study in a saturated, alluvial aquifer underlying a real Superfund site. A baseline (unremediated) human exposure and health risk scenario, as induced by contaminated groundwater pumped from this site, is predicted and compared with a similar estimate based upon pump-and-treat exposure intervention. The predicted reduction in risk in the remediation scenario is not an equitable one-that is, it is not uniform to all individuals within a population and varies according to the level of uncertainty in prediction. The importance of understanding the detailed hydrogeologic connections that are established in the heterogeneous geologic regime between the contaminated source, municipal receptors, and remediation wells, and its relationship to this uncertainty is demonstrated. Using two alternative pumping rates, we develop cost-benefit curves based upon reduced exposure and risk to different individuals within the population, under the presence of uncertainty

  19. Risk-Based Management of Contaminated Groundwater: The Role of Geologic Heterogeneity, Exposure and Cancer Risk in Determining the Performance of Aquifer Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, R.M.; Carle, S.F.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    2000-04-07

    The effectiveness of aquifer remediation is typically expressed in terms of a reduction in contaminant concentrations relative to a regulated maximum contaminant level (MCL), and is usually confined by sparse monitoring data and/or simple model calculations. Here, the effectiveness of remediation is examined from a risk-based perspective that goes beyond the traditional MCL concept. A methodology is employed to evaluate the health risk to individuals exposed to contaminated household water that is produced from groundwater. This approach explicitly accounts for differences in risk arising from variability in individual physiology and water use, the uncertainty in estimating chemical carcinogenesis for different individuals, and the uncertainties and variability in contaminant concentrations within groundwater. A hypothetical contamination scenario is developed as a case study in a saturated, alluvial aquifer underlying a real Superfund site. A baseline (unremediated) human exposure and health risk scenario, as induced by contaminated groundwater pumped from this site, is predicted and compared with a similar estimate based upon pump-and-treat exposure intervention. The predicted reduction in risk in the remediation scenario is not an equitable one--that is, it is not uniform to all individuals within a population and varies according to the level of uncertainty in prediction. The importance of understanding the detailed hydrogeologic connections that are established in the heterogeneous geologic regime between the contaminated source, municipal receptors, and remediation wells, and its relationship to this uncertainty is demonstrated. Using two alternative pumping rates, we develop cost-benefit curves based upon reduced exposure and risk to different individuals within the population, under the presence of uncertainty.

  20. Impact of Technology Based Instruction on Speech Competency and Presentation Confidence Levels of Hispanic College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Marie-Anne; Padilla Oviedo, Andres; Ramirez, Juan; Taylor, Nick; Flores, Itza

    2014-01-01

    One of the main goals of universities is to graduate students who are capable and competent in competing in the workforce. As presentational communication skills are critical in today's job market, Hispanic university students need to be trained to effectively develop and deliver presentational speeches. Web/technology enhanced training techniques…

  1. Model-based prediction of long-term leaching of contaminants from secondary materials in road constructions and noise protection dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Christof; Konrad, Wilfried; Rügner, Hermann; Bauer, Sebastian; Liedl, Rudolf; Grathwohl, Peter

    2009-02-01

    In this study, contaminant leaching from three different secondary materials (demolition waste, municipal solid waste incineration ash, and blast furnace slag) to groundwater is assessed by numerical modeling. Reactive transport simulations for a noise protection dam and a road dam (a typical German autobahn), in which secondary materials are reused as base layers, were performed to predict the breakthrough of a conservative tracer (i.e., a salt) and sorbing contaminants (e.g., PAHs like naphthalene and phenanthrene or heavy metals) at the groundwater table. The dam constructions have a composite architecture with soil covers in inclined layers and distinct contrasts in the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the used materials. Capillary barrier effects result in strong spatial variabilities of flow and transport velocities. Contaminant breakthrough curves at the groundwater table show significant tailing due to slow sorption kinetics and a wide distribution of travel times. While conservative tracer breakthrough depends primarily on subsoil hydraulic properties, equilibrium distribution coefficients and sorption kinetics represent additional controlling factors for contaminant spreading. Hence, the three secondary materials show pronounced differences in the temporal development of leached contaminant concentrations with consequences for breakthrough times and peak concentrations at the groundwater table. Significant concentration reductions due to dispersion occur only if the source concentrations decrease significantly prior to the arrival of the contaminant at the groundwater table. Biodegradation causes significant reduction of breakthrough concentrations only if flow velocities are low. PMID:18707860

  2. Treatment of Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater Using Highly-Selective, Regenerable Anion-Exchange Resins at Edwards Air Force Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, B.

    2003-05-30

    Selective ion exchange is one of the most effective treatment technologies for removing low levels of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) from contaminated water because of its high efficiency without adverse impacts on the water quality caused by adding or removing any chemicals or nutrients. This report summarizes both the laboratory and a field pilot-scale studies to determine the ability and efficiency of the bifunctional synthetic resins to remove ClO{sub 4}{sup -} from the contaminated groundwater at the Edwards Air Force Base in California. Regeneration of the resins after groundwater treatment was also evaluated using the FeCl{sub 3}-HCl regeneration technique recently developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. On the basis of this study, the bifunctional resin, D-3696 was found to be highly selective toward ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and performed much better than one of the best commercial nitrate-selective resins (Purolite A-520E) and more than an order of magnitude better than the Purolite A-500 resin (with a relatively low selectivity). At an influent concentration of {approx} 450 {micro}g/L ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in groundwater, the bifunctional resin bed treated {approx} 40,000 empty bed volumes of groundwater before a significant breakthrough of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} occurred. The presence of relatively high concentrations of chloride and sulfate in site groundwater did not appear to affect the ability of the bifunctional resin to remove ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. However, the presence of high iron or iron oxyhydroxides and/or biomass in groundwater caused a significant fouling of the resin beds and greatly influenced the effectiveness in regenerating the resins sorbed with ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Under such circumstances, a prefilter ({approx} 0.5-1 {micro}m) was found to be necessary to remove these particulates and to reduce the risk of fouling of the resin beds. Without significant fouling, the resin bed could be effectively regenerated by the FeCl{sub 3} displacement technique

  3. Groundwater contamination downstream of a contaminant penetration site. I. Extension-expansion of the contaminant plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    This study concerns the possible use of boundary layer (BL) approach for the analysis and evaluation of contaminant transport in groundwater due to contaminant penetration into the groundwater aquifer through a site of limited size. The contaminant penetration may occur through either the upper (surface) or lower (bedrock) boundary of the aquifer. Two general cases of contaminant penetration mechanisms are considered: (1) the contaminant is transferred through an interface between a contaminating and freshwater fluid phases, and (2) the contaminant arrives at groundwater by leakage and percolation. For the purpose of BL evaluation the contaminant plume is divided into three different sections: (1) the penetration section, (2) the extension-expansion section, and (3) the spearhead section. In each section a different BL method approach yields simple analytical expressions for the description of the contaminant plume migration and contaminant transport. Previous studies of the BL method can be directly applied to the evaluation of contaminant transport at the contaminant penetration section. The present study extends those studies and concerns the contaminant transport in the two other sections, which are located downstream of the penetration section. This study shows that the contaminant concentration profiles in sections 2 and 3 incorporate two BLs: (1) an inner BL adjacent to the aquifer bottom or surface boundary, and (2) an outer BL, which develops above or below the inner one. The method developed in the present study has been applied to practical issues concerning salinity penetration into groundwater in south central Kansas.

  4. Radiographic solution contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, P K; Tilmon, M F; Taylor, T S

    1987-06-01

    Contamination of processor solutions adversely affects the image quality of radiographic films. The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of developer or fixer contaminant that was necessary to produce a significant densitometric change in the base plus fog, speed, or contrast optical density readings for panoramic film. Significant differences in base plus fog (after 16 mL of fixer contaminant was added to developer), speed index (after 4 mL), and contrast index (after 8 mL) were observed in comparison with control values. PMID:3473399

  5. Presenting a Model to Explain Employees Based Brand Equity in Commercial Insurance Companies of Yazd Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Yaghoub Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal branding with the aim of achieving employees based brand equity is a new strategyto ensure that employees act according to brand promises. Since in service organizations,employees have the ability to significantly influence customers’ perceptions and purchasedecisions and as they play a critical role in organizational success, thus, strengtheningemployees based brand equity can develop a long lasting competitive advantage fororganization. The aim of this study was to introduce a model for investigating brand equitybased on employees’ perspective and also identifying key factors affecting it in insurancecompanies. Required data were collected by means of questionnaire distributed among theemployees of four insurance companies in Yazd Province. Structural Equation modelingbased on partial least squares method was used to test the hypotheses. The results of thisstudy indicate that employees’ feedback, internal brand communication, and brandorientation have significant and positive effect on employees based brand equity. Anotherfinding of this study is developing a reliable model for measuring employees based brandequity.

  6. In vivo microwave-based thermoacoustic tomography of rats (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Microwave-based thermoacoustic tomography (TAT), based on the measurement of ultrasonic waves induced by microwave pulses, can reveal tissue dielectric properties that may be closely related to the physiological and pathological status of the tissues. Using microwaves as the excitation source improved imaging depth because of their deep penetration into biological tissues. We demonstrate, for the first time, in vivo microwave-based thermoacoustic imaging in rats. The transducer is rotated around the rat in a full circle, providing a full two-dimensional view. Instead of a flat ultrasonic transducer, we used a virtual line detector based on a cylindrically focused transducer. A 3 GHz microwave source with 0.6 µs pulse width and an electromagnetically shielded transducer with 2.25 MHz central frequency provided clear cross-sectional images of the rat's body. The high imaging contrast, based on the tissue's rate of absorption, and the ultrasonically defined spatial resolution combine to reveal the spine, kidney, muscle, and other deeply seated anatomical features in the rat's abdominal cavity. This non-invasive and non-ionizing imaging modality achieved an imaging depth beyond 6 cm in the rat's tissue. Cancer diagnosis based on information about tissue properties from microwave band TAT can potentially be more accurate than has previously been achievable.

  7. Presenting a Model to Explain Employee Based Brand Equity in Commercial Insurance Companies of Yazd Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Yaghoub Hossainee

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Internal branding with the aim of achieving employee based brand equity is a new strategy to ensure that employees act according to brand promises. Since in service organizations, employees have the ability to significantly influence customers’ perceptions and purchase decisions and as they play a critical role in organizational success. Thus, strengthen the employee based brand equity can develop a long lasting competitive advantage for organization. The aim of this study was to introduce a model for investigating brand equity based on employees’ perspective and also identifying key factors affecting it in insurance companies. Required data were collected by means of questionnaire distributed among the employees of four insurance companies in Yazd Province. Structural Equation modeling based on partial least squares method was used to test the hypotheses. The results of this study indicate that employees’ feedback, internal brand communication and brand orientation have significant and positive effect on employee based brand equity. Another finding of this study is developing a reliable model for measuring employee based brand equity.

  8. Functional gene array-based analysis of microbial community structure in groundwaters with a gradient of contaminant levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, P.J.; Wu, L.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Schadt, C.W.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2009-06-15

    To understand how contaminants affect microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, six groundwater monitoring wells from the Field Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP; Oak Ridge, TN), with a wide range of pH, nitrate, and heavy metal contamination were investigated. DNA from the groundwater community was analyzed with a functional gene array containing 2006 probes to detect genes involved in metal resistance, sulfate reduction, organic contaminant degradation, and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. Highly contaminated wells had lower gene diversity but greater signal intensity than the pristine well. The microbial composition was heterogeneous, with 17-70% overlap between different wells. Metal-resistant and metal-reducing microorganisms were detected in both contaminated and pristine wells, suggesting the potential for successful bioremediation of metal-contaminated groundwaters. In addition, results of Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis indicate that nitrate, sulfate, pH, uranium, and technetium have a significant (p < 0.05) effect on microbial community structure. This study provides an overall picture of microbial community structure in contaminated environments with functional gene arrays by showing that diversity and heterogeneity can vary greatly in relation to contamination.

  9. A Risk-Based Decision tool to support remediation decision-making for groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selection of remediation alternatives for large groundwater plumes containing chlorinated solvents are often complex and difficult, in part because they involve competing objectives, e.g. reduction of health risk vs. increased cost. The Department of Energy (DOE) supported development of a Decision Tool to provide a risk-based process for evaluating and comparing remedial options fairly and consistently. The Decision Tool is also intended to provide a process for constructive discussion of alternatives among the appropriate stakeholders. To use the Decision Tool, which is implemented in an Excel spreadsheet, a site manager must evaluate each alternative being considered against six objectives using detailed performance metrics. The impacts of each alternative on the individual objectives are combined through a formal multi-attribute utility analysis. Predetermined or user-specified relative weights for the objectives can be used, and a variety of visual outputs are generated. The usefulness and validity of the Decision Tool was demonstrated through a Pilot Study application for the A-Area Burning Rubble Pits/Miscellaneous Chemical Basin groundwater plume at the DOE Savannah River Site. The Pilot Study results provided a new perspective on the alternatives and objectives by demonstrating: 1) the relatively small public health risks associated with groundwater contamination at this site, 2) that more active approaches had benefits over monitored natural attenuation (MNA) in reducing time required to meet the maximum contaminant level (MCL) and maximizing regulatory responsiveness, 3) that MNA has acceptable public and worker health and safety risks, while enabling a reduction in costs. Use of the Decision Tool also promoted valuable discussion among the various stakeholders, and provided options for sensitivity analyses that can quickly be visualized to assess relative benefits of each of the alternatives. (authors)

  10. Neutrinos Oscillations with Long-Base-Line Beams (Past, Present and very near Future)

    CERN Document Server

    Stanco, Luca

    2010-01-01

    We overview the status of the studies on neutrino oscillations with accelerators at the present running experiments. Past and present results enlighten the path towards the observation of massive neutrinos and the settling of their oscillations. The very near future may still have addiction from the outcome of the on-going experiments. OPERA is chosen as a relevant example justified by the very recent results released.

  11. Presentation skills for engineers : systematic interventions in a project-based learning course

    OpenAIRE

    Hattum-Janssen, Natascha van; Fischer, Adriana; Moreira, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    This article seeks to reflect on effective presentation skills for engineering students and the effect of specific interventions on the quality of presentation skills. Most authors, who discuss transferable competencies for engineers, refer to different types of communication skills in general to oral and written communication skills. Although there is a broad recognition on the necessity of developing transferable skills in engineering education, there is no general agre...

  12. Bilirubin oxidase based enzymatic air-breathing cathode: Operation under pristine and contaminated conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Santoro, Carlo; Babanova, Sofia; Erable, Benjamin; Schuler, Andrew; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-01-01

    The performance of bilirubin oxidase (BOx) based air breathing cathode was constantly monitored over 45 days. The effect of electrolyte composition on the cathode oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) output was investigated. Particularly, deactivation of the electrocatalytic activity of the enzyme in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution and in activated sludge (AS) was evaluated. The greatest drop in current density was observed during the first 3 days of constant operation with a decrease of ~6...

  13. Use of the physiologically-based extraction test to assess the oral bioaccessibility of metals in vegetable plants grown in contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intawongse, Marisa [Biomolecular and Biomedical Research Centre, School of Applied Sciences, University of Northumbria at Newcastle, Ellison Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Dean, John R. [Biomolecular and Biomedical Research Centre, School of Applied Sciences, University of Northumbria at Newcastle, Ellison Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom)], E-mail: john.dean@unn.ac.uk

    2008-03-15

    The oral bioaccessibility of metals in vegetable plants grown on contaminated soil was assessed. This was done using the physiologically-based extraction test (PBET) to simulate the human digestion of plant material. A range of vegetable plants, i.e. carrot, lettuce, radish and spinach, were grown on metal contaminated soil. After reaching maturity the plants were harvested and analysed for their total metal content (i.e. Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The plant samples were then subsequently extracted using an in vitro gastrointestinal approach or PBET to assess the likelihood of oral bioaccessibility if the material was consumed by humans. - Evaluation of a physiologically-based extraction test to assess the risk to humans of consuming contaminated vegetables.

  14. Use of the physiologically-based extraction test to assess the oral bioaccessibility of metals in vegetable plants grown in contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oral bioaccessibility of metals in vegetable plants grown on contaminated soil was assessed. This was done using the physiologically-based extraction test (PBET) to simulate the human digestion of plant material. A range of vegetable plants, i.e. carrot, lettuce, radish and spinach, were grown on metal contaminated soil. After reaching maturity the plants were harvested and analysed for their total metal content (i.e. Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The plant samples were then subsequently extracted using an in vitro gastrointestinal approach or PBET to assess the likelihood of oral bioaccessibility if the material was consumed by humans. - Evaluation of a physiologically-based extraction test to assess the risk to humans of consuming contaminated vegetables

  15. Risk-based economic decision analysis of remediation options at a PCE-contaminated site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Gitte; Friis-Hansen, P.; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2010-01-01

    remediation activities. More attention is increasingly being given to these secondary environmental impacts when evaluating remediation options. This paper presents a methodology for an integrated economic decision analysis which combines assessments of remediation costs, health risk costs and potential...... a downstream groundwater well. Potential environmental impacts on the local, regional and global scales due to the site remediation activities are evaluated using life cycle assessments (LCA). The potential impacts on health and environment are converted to monetary units using a simplified cost...

  16. A GIS-based vulnerability assessment of brine contamination to aquatic resources from oil and gas development in eastern Sheridan County, Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Todd M; Chesley-Preston, Tara L; Thamke, Joanna N

    2014-02-15

    Water (brine) co-produced with oil in the Williston Basin is some of the most saline in the nation. The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR), characterized by glacial sediments and numerous wetlands, covers the northern and eastern portion of the Williston Basin. Sheridan County, Montana, lies within the PPR and has a documented history of brine contamination. Surface water and shallow groundwater in the PPR are saline and sulfate dominated while the deeper brines are much more saline and chloride dominated. A Contamination Index (CI), defined as the ratio of chloride concentration to specific conductance in a water sample, was developed by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology to delineate the magnitude of brine contamination in Sheridan County. Values >0.035 indicate contamination. Recently, the U.S. Geological Survey completed a county level geographic information system (GIS)-based vulnerability assessment of brine contamination to aquatic resources in the PPR of the Williston Basin based on the age and density of oil wells, number of wetlands, and stream length per county. To validate and better define this assessment, a similar approach was applied in eastern Sheridan County at a greater level of detail (the 2.59 km(2) Public Land Survey System section grid) and included surficial geology. Vulnerability assessment scores were calculated for the 780 modeled sections and these scores were divided into ten equal interval bins representing similar probabilities of contamination. Two surface water and two groundwater samples were collected from the section with the greatest acreage of Federal land in each bin. Nineteen of the forty water samples, and at least one water sample from seven of the ten selected sections, had CI values indicating contamination. Additionally, CI values generally increased with increasing vulnerability assessment score, with a stronger correlation for groundwater samples (R(2)=0.78) than surface water samples (R(2)=0.53). PMID:24364993

  17. A GIS-based vulnerability assessment of brine contamination to aquatic resources from oil and gas development in eastern Sheridan County, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Todd M.; Chesley-Preston, Tara L.; Thamke, Joanna N.

    2014-01-01

    Water (brine) co-produced with oil in the Williston Basin is some of the most saline in the nation. The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR), characterized by glacial sediments and numerous wetlands, covers the northern and eastern portion of the Williston Basin. Sheridan County, Montana, lies within the PPR and has a documented history of brine contamination. Surface water and shallow groundwater in the PPR are saline and sulfate dominated while the deeper brines are much more saline and chloride dominated. A Contamination Index (CI), defined as the ratio of chloride concentration to specific conductance in a water sample, was developed by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology to delineate the magnitude of brine contamination in Sheridan County. Values > 0.035 indicate contamination. Recently, the U.S. Geological Survey completed a county level geographic information system (GIS)-based vulnerability assessment of brine contamination to aquatic resources in the PPR of the Williston Basin based on the age and density of oil wells, number of wetlands, and stream length per county. To validate and better define this assessment, a similar approach was applied in eastern Sheridan County at a greater level of detail (the 2.59 km2 Public Land Survey System section grid) and included surficial geology. Vulnerability assessment scores were calculated for the 780 modeled sections and these scores were divided into ten equal interval bins representing similar probabilities of contamination. Two surface water and two groundwater samples were collected from the section with the greatest acreage of Federal land in each bin. Nineteen of the forty water samples, and at least one water sample from seven of the ten selected sections, had CI values indicating contamination. Additionally, CI values generally increased with increasing vulnerability assessment score, with a stronger correlation for groundwater samples (R2 = 0.78) than surface water samples (R2 = 0.53).

  18. An Intelligent Agent Based Text-Mining System: Presenting Concept through Design Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kaustubh S. Raval; Ranjeetsingh S.Suryawanshi; Devendra M. Thakore

    2011-01-01

    Text mining is a variation on a field called data mining and refers to the process of deriving high-quality information from unstructured text. In text-mining the goal is to discover unknown information, something that may not be known by people. Now here the aim is to design an intelligent agent based text-mining system which reads on the text (input) and based on the keyword provide the matching documents (in the form of links) or options (statements) according to the user’s query. In this ...

  19. Screening photoswitching properties of synthesized BODIPY-based fluorophores for multispectral superresolution microscopy (MSSRM) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittel, Amy M.; Saldivar, Isaac S.; Nan, Xiaolin; Gibbs, Summer L.

    2016-02-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) utilizes photoswitchable fluorophores to detect biological entities with 10-20 nm resolution. Multispectral superresolution microscopy (MSSRM) extends SMLM functionality by improving its spectral resolution up to 5 fold facilitating imaging of multicomponent cellular structures or signaling pathways. Current commercial fluorophores are not ideal for MSSRM as they are not designed to photoswitch and do not adequately cover the visible and far-red spectral regions required for MSSRM imaging. To obtain optimal MSSRM spatial and spectral resolution, fluorophores with narrow emission spectra and controllable photoswitching properties are necessary. Herein, a library of BODIPY-based fluorophores was synthesized and characterized to create optimal photoswitchable fluorophores for MSSRM. BODIPY was chosen as the core structure as it is photostable, has high quantum yield, and controllable photoswitching. The BODIPY core was modified through the addition of various aromatic moieties, resulting in a spectrally diverse library. Photoswitching properties were characterized using a novel polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) based film methodology to isolate single molecules. The PVA film methodology enabled photoswitching assessment without the need for protein conjugation, greatly improving screening efficiency of the BODIPY library. Additionally, image buffer conditions were optimized for the BODIPY-based fluorophores through systematic testing of oxygen scavenger systems, redox components, and additives. Through screening the photoswitching properties of BODIPY-based compounds in PVA films with optimized imaging buffer we identified novel fluorophores well suited for SMLM and MSSRM.

  20. A power-based perspective in modeling and control of switched power converters [Past and Present

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeltsema, D.; Scherpen, J. M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear passivity-based control (PBc) algorithms for switched converters have proven to be an interesting alternative to most linear, control techniques. A possible drawback though of PBC is that it relies on a (partial) system inversion. This usually results in indirect regulations schemes to con

  1. Application of ecological risk assessment based on a novel TRIAD-tiered approach to contaminated soil surrounding a closed non-sealed landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Laura; Garbisu, Carlos; Ciprián, Estela; Becerril, José M; Soto, Manu; Etxebarria, Javier; Madariaga, Juan M; Antigüedad, Iñaki; Epelde, Lur

    2015-05-01

    The Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) is a reliable tool for communicating risk to decision makers in a comprehensive and scientific evidence-based way. In this work, a site-specific ERA methodology based on the TRIAD approach was applied to contaminated soil surrounding a closed non-sealed landfill, as a case study to implement and validate such ERA methodology in the Basque Country (northern Spain). Initially, the procedure consisted of the application of a Parameter Selection Module aimed at selecting the most suitable parameters for the specific characteristics of the landfill contaminated soil, taking into consideration the envisioned land use, intended ecosystem services and nature of contaminants. Afterwards, the selected parameters were determined in soil samples collected from two sampling points located downstream of the abovementioned landfill. The results from these tests were normalized to make them comparable and integrable in a risk index. Then, risk assessment criteria were developed and applied to the two landfill contaminated soil samples. Although the lack of a proper control soil was evidenced, a natural land use was approved by the ERA (at Tier 2) for the two landfill contaminated soils. However, the existence of a potential future risk resulting from a hypothetical soil acidification must be considered. PMID:25659305

  2. A Methodology for Equitable Performance Assessment and Presentation of Wave Energy Converters Based on Sea Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Pecher, Arthur; Margheritini, Lucia;

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a methodology for the analysis and presentation of data obtained from sea trials of wave energy converters (WEC). The equitable aspect of this methodology lies in its wide application, as any WEC at any scale or stage of development can be considered as long as the tests are p...

  3. Developing Oral Presentation Competence in Professional Contexts: A Design-Based Collaborative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Anil; Le Vasan, Mani

    2015-01-01

    The need to develop oral presentation skills with reference to students' specialized professional contexts has been well-recognised. Attempts have also been made to develop collaboration between engineering faculty and language teaching professionals. In this paper, we describe an experiment where students were given an opportunity to demonstrate…

  4. SPANISH 1992 (S92) corpus-based analysis of present-day Spanish for medical purposes

    CERN Document Server

    Chandler-Burns, R M

    1994-01-01

    S92 research was begun in 1987 to analyze word frequencies in present-day Spanish for making speech pathology evaluation tools. 500 2,000-word samples of children, adolescents and adults' language were input between 1988-1991, calculations done in 1992; statistical and Lewandowski analyses were carried out in 1993.

  5. Moving to a Higher Level for PV Reliability through Comprehensive Standards Based on Solid Science (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, S.

    2014-11-01

    PV reliability is a challenging topic because of the desired long life of PV modules, the diversity of use environments and the pressure on companies to rapidly reduce their costs. This presentation describes the challenges, examples of failure mechanisms that we know or don't know how to test for, and how a scientific approach is being used to establish international standards.

  6. The realization of an international network based on radon monitoring: results of the present international collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon concentration measurements have been carried out in various regions in cooperation with other institutions. we expect to collect data of geophysical significance in the field of volcanic eruptions and earthquake predictions. We present the cooperation organisation and some relevant data already obtained. (author). 6 refs, 6 figs

  7. Application of different measures of bioavailability to support the derivation of risk-based remedial benchmarks for PHC-contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, G. [Stantec Consulting Ltd., Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Risk estimates and exposure scenarios hardly ever take into consideration site-specific bioavailability of contaminants. Risk assessors frequently adopt the assumption that a contaminant in soils is 100 percent bioavailable, resulting in an overestimation of the risks associated with contamination. Remedial targets or benchmarks derived in light of this assumption are needlessly low and might be technically unattainable or prohibitive in terms of cost. This presentation discussed a research project whose goal was to develop a tool kit to measure or determine site-specific bioavailability of contaminants (PHCs) in soils to ecological receptors. Tools that were discussed included: biological measures such as toxicity tests, contaminant residues in tissues, and bioaccumulation tests. Chemical measures such as bioaccessibility tests and other biomimetic devices (SPMDs), biotic ligand modeling, and chemical extractions were also presented. Preliminary investigation results were provided. Other topics that were discussed included: single-species toxicity tests; preliminary comparisons; the site; bioaccumulation; and toxicity to earthworms. It was concluded that total soil and water-extractable concentrations did not correlate well with toxicity. tabs., figs.

  8. College prevention: a view of present (and future) web-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Scott T; Neighbors, Clayton

    2011-01-01

    College campuses in the United States may be the most electronically "wired" environments on earth. College students use the Internet not only to write term papers and receive correspondence but also to report (and keep track of) friends' personal status, download music, view classroom lectures, and receive emergency messages. In fact, college students spend considerably more time online than the average person. In a recent survey of U.S. college students (Jones et al. 2009), nearly all respondents (94 percent) stated that they spent at least 1 hour on the Internet each day, with the main tasks including social communication, entertainment, and class work. In keeping with this trend, Web-based programs that address alcohol consumption among college students have become widely available in the United States. This sidebar provides an overview of currently available programs as well as of the advantages and disadvantages of this approach and the future outlook of Web-based programs. PMID:22330221

  9. A Neural Networks Based Operation Guidance System for Procedure Presentation and Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a neural network based operator support system is proposed to reduce operator's errors in abnormal situations in nuclear power plants (NPPs). There are many complicated situations, in which regular and suitable operations should be done by operators accordingly. In order to regulate and validate operators' operations, it is necessary to develop an operator support system which includes computer based procedures with the functions for operation validation. Many computerized procedures systems (CPS) have been recently developed. Focusing on the human machine interface (HMI) design and procedures' computerization, most of CPSs used various methodologies to enhance system's convenience, reliability and accessibility. Other than only showing procedures, the proposed system integrates a simple CPS and an operation validation system (OVS) by using artificial neural network (ANN) for operational permission and quantitative evaluation

  10. Present status and applications of bacterial cellulose-based materials for skin tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lina; Zhang, Jin; Yang, Guang

    2013-02-15

    Bacterial cellulose (BC, also known as microbial cellulose, MC) is a promising natural polymer which is biosynthesized by certain bacteria. This review focused on BC-based materials which can be utilized for skin tissue repair. Firstly, it is illustrated that BC has unique structural and mechanical properties as compared with higher plant cellulose, and is thus expected to become a commodity material. Secondly, we summarized the basic properties and different types of BC, including self-assembled, oriented BC, and multiform BC. Thirdly, composites prepared by using BC in conjunction with other polymers are explored, and the research on BC for application in skin tissue engineering is addressed. Finally, experimental results and clinical treatments assessing the performance of wound healing materials based on BC were examined. With its superior mechanical properties, as well as its excellent biocompatibility, BC was shown to have great potential for biomedical application and very high clinical value for skin tissue repair. PMID:23399174

  11. Research and development on plant inspection presentation system cooperative with mobile robots and maintenance knowledge base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to upgrade safety and reliability of nuclear power plants it is very important to develop a system of early detection of anomalies and realize adequate inspections responding to them. Based on accumulated basic technologies of cooperative active sensing systems for autonomous inspection mobile robots having active visual sensing and acoustic sensors with movable lighting and intelligent multimodal systems, 3D data processing visualization transmission technologies have been incorporated for compact storage of time and space dependent enormous inspection knowledge base. Surrounding server, simulating plant's environments with mobile robots and mockup systems, has been prepared and tested to realize this concept. Long-term operation of the server will be needed to accumulate inspection database and their efficient utilization. (T. Tanaka)

  12. Optical coherence tomography based microangiography: A tool good for dermatology applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruikang K.; Baran, Utku; Choi, Woo J.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) based microangiography (OMAG) is a new imaging technique enabling the visualization of blood flow within microcirculatory tissue beds in vivo with high resolution. In this talk, the concept and advantages of OMAG will be discussed and its potential clinical applications in the dermatology will be shown, demonstrating its usefulness in the clinical monitoring and therapeutic treatment of various skin pathologies, e.g. acne, port wine stain and wound healing.

  13. Developing a novel hepatitis B core – based antigen presentation system

    OpenAIRE

    Peyret, Hadrien

    2014-01-01

    Plant-produced proteins of pharmaceutical interest are beginning to reach the market, and the advantages of transient plant expression systems are gaining increasing recognition. In parallel, the use of virus-like particles (VLPs) has become standard in vaccine design. The pEAQ-HT vector derived from the cowpea mosaic virus – based CPMV-HT expression system has been shown to allow the production of large amounts of recombinant proteins, including VLPs, in Nicotiana benthamiana. Moreover, prev...

  14. Perioperative Management of a Jehovah's Witness Presenting for Skull Base Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Chaney, Mark A.; Jellish, W Scott; Leonetti, John P.

    1996-01-01

    A 22-year-old, otherwise healthy, female Jehovah's Witness underwent resection of a midline skull base chondrosarcoma which had been detected after a work-up for headache and diplopia. After bilateral maxillectomies, ethmoidectomies, and a sphenoidectomy, the patient's chondrosarcoma was resected. Despite proper anesthetic management and meticulous hemostasis, significant intraoperative blood loss occurred. The initial postoperative hemoglobin level was 2.3 gm/dL. The clinical concerns pertai...

  15. A yeast co-culture-based biosensor for determination of waste water contamination levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudina, N Yu; Arlyapov, V A; Chepurnova, M A; Alferov, S V; Reshetilov, A N

    2015-10-01

    Artificial microbial co-cultures were formed to develop the receptor element of a biosensor for assessment of biological oxygen demand (BOD). The co-cultures possessed broad substrate specificities and enabled assays of water and fermentation products within a broad BOD range (2.4-80 mg/dm(3)) with a high correlation to the standard method (R = 0.9988). The use of the co-cultures of the yeasts Pichia angusta, Arxula adeninivorans and Debaryomyces hansenii immobilized in N-vinylpyrrolidone-modified poly(vinyl alcohol) enabled developing a BOD biosensor possessing the characteristics not inferior to those in the known biosensors. The results are indicative of a potential of using these co-cultures as the receptor element base in prototype models of instruments for broad application. PMID:26215344

  16. Wide field OCT based microangiography in living human eye (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinqin; Chen, Chieh-Li; Chu, Zhongdi; Zhang, Anqi; An, Lin; Durbin, Mary; Sharma, Utkarsh; Rosenfeld, Philip J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the application of optical microangiography (OMAG) in living human eye. Patients with different macular diseases were recruited, including diabetic retinopathy (DR), geographic atrophy (GA), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and venous occlusion, et al. Wide field OCT angiography images can be generated by montage scanning protocol based on the tracking system. OMAG algorithm based on complex differentiation was used to extract the blood flow and removed the bulk motion by 2D cross-correlation method. The 3D angiography was segmented into 3 layers in the retina and 2 layers in the choroid. The en-face maximum projection was used to obtain 2-dimensional angiograms of different layers coded with different colors. Flow and structure images were combined for cross-sectional view. En face OMAG images of different macular diseases showed a great agreement with FA. Meanwhile, OMAG gave more distinct vascular network visions that were less affected by hemorrhage and leakage. The MAs were observed in both superficial and middle retinal layers based on OMAG angiograms in different layers of DR patients. The contour line of FAZ was extracted as well, which can be quantitative the retinal diseases. For GA patient, the damage of RPE layer enhanced the penetration of light and enabled the acquisition of choriocapillaries and choroidal vessels. The wide field OMAG angiogram enabled the capability of capturing the entire geographic atrophy. OMAG provides depth-resolved information and detailed vascular images of DR and GA patients, providing a better visualization of vascular network compared to FA.

  17. Elucidation of Listeria monocytogenes contamination routes in cold-smoked salmon processing plants detected by DNA-based typing methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Huss, Hans Henrik; Ojeniyi, B.; Ahrens, Peter; Gram, Lone

    2001-01-01

    The contamination routes of Listeria monocytogenes in cold- smoked salmon processing plants were investigated by analyzing 3,585 samples from products (produced in 1995, 1996, 1998, and 1999) and processing environments (samples obtained in 1998 and 1999) of two Danish smokehouses. The level of......, monocytogenes). A total of 429 strains of L. monocytogenes were subsequently compared by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiling, and 55 different RAPD types were found. The RAPD types detected on the products were identical to types found on the processing equipment and in the processing environment......, suggesting that contamination of the final product (cold-smoked salmon) in both plants (but primarily in plant I) was due to contamination during processing rather than to contamination from raw fish. However, the possibility that raw fish was an important source of contamination of the processing equipment...

  18. Plasma-based determination of inorganic contaminants in waste of electric and electronic equipment after microwave-induced combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Paola A.; Diehl, Lisarb O.; Oliveira, Jussiane S.S.; Muller, Edson I. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Av. Roraima, 1000, 97105-900, Santa Maria (Brazil); Mesko, Marcia F. [Centro de Ciências Químicas, Farmacêuticas e de Alimentos, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Capão do Leão, 96900-010 Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Flores, Erico M.M., E-mail: ericommf@gmail.com [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Av. Roraima, 1000, 97105-900, Santa Maria (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    A systematic study was performed for the determination of inorganic contaminants in polymeric waste from electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) for achieving an efficient digestion to minimize interferences in determination using plasma-based techniques. The determination of As, Br, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and also by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) was carried out after digestion using microwave-induced combustion (MIC). Arsenic and Hg were determined by flow-injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICP-MS). Dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS) with ammonia was also used for Cr determination. The suitability of MIC for digestion of sample masses up to 400 mg was demonstrated using microcrystalline cellulose as aid for combustion of polymers from waste of EEEs that usually contain flame retardants that impair the combustion. The composition and concentration of acid solutions (HNO{sub 3} or HNO{sub 3} plus HCl) were evaluated for metals and metalloids and NH{sub 4}OH solutions were investigated for Br absorption. Accuracy was evaluated by comparison of results with those obtained using high pressure microwave-assisted wet digestion (HP-MAWD) and also by the analysis of certified reference material (CRM) of polymer (EC680k—low-density polyethylene). Bromine determination was only feasible using digestion by MIC once losses were observed when HP-MAWD was used. Lower limits of detection were obtained for all analytes using MIC (from 0.005 μg g{sup −1} for Co by ICP-MS up to 3.120 μg g{sup −1} for Sb by ICP OES) in comparison to HP-MAWD due to the higher sample mass that can be digested (400 mg) and the use of diluted absorbing solutions. The combination of HNO{sub 3} and HCl for digestion showed to be crucial for quantitative recovery of some elements, as Cr and Sb

  19. Plasma-based determination of inorganic contaminants in waste of electric and electronic equipment after microwave-induced combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic study was performed for the determination of inorganic contaminants in polymeric waste from electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) for achieving an efficient digestion to minimize interferences in determination using plasma-based techniques. The determination of As, Br, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and also by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) was carried out after digestion using microwave-induced combustion (MIC). Arsenic and Hg were determined by flow-injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICP-MS). Dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS) with ammonia was also used for Cr determination. The suitability of MIC for digestion of sample masses up to 400 mg was demonstrated using microcrystalline cellulose as aid for combustion of polymers from waste of EEEs that usually contain flame retardants that impair the combustion. The composition and concentration of acid solutions (HNO3 or HNO3 plus HCl) were evaluated for metals and metalloids and NH4OH solutions were investigated for Br absorption. Accuracy was evaluated by comparison of results with those obtained using high pressure microwave-assisted wet digestion (HP-MAWD) and also by the analysis of certified reference material (CRM) of polymer (EC680k—low-density polyethylene). Bromine determination was only feasible using digestion by MIC once losses were observed when HP-MAWD was used. Lower limits of detection were obtained for all analytes using MIC (from 0.005 μg g−1 for Co by ICP-MS up to 3.120 μg g−1 for Sb by ICP OES) in comparison to HP-MAWD due to the higher sample mass that can be digested (400 mg) and the use of diluted absorbing solutions. The combination of HNO3 and HCl for digestion showed to be crucial for quantitative recovery of some elements, as Cr and Sb. In addition, suitable agreement of

  20. MultiDarkLens Simulations: weak lensing light-cones and data base presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocoli, Carlo; Jullo, Eric; Metcalf, R. Benton; de la Torre, Sylvain; Yepes, Gustavo; Prada, Francisco; Comparat, Johan; Göttlober, Stefan; Kyplin, Anatoly; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Petkova, Margarita; Shan, HuanYuan; Tessore, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a large database of weak lensing light cones constructed using different snapshots from the Big MultiDark simulation (BigMDPL). The ray-tracing through different multiple plane has been performed with the GLAMER code accounting both for single source redshifts and for sources distributed along the cosmic time. This first paper presents weak lensing forecasts and results according to the geometry of the VIPERS-W1 and VIPERS-W4 field of view. Additional fields will be available on our database and new ones can be run upon request. Our database also contains some tools for lensing analysis. In this paper we present results for convergence power spectra, one point and high order weak lensing statistics useful for forecasts and for cosmological studies. Covariance matrices have also been computed for the different realisations of the W1 and W4 fields. In addition we compute also galaxy-shear and projected density contrasts for different halo masses at two lens redshift according to the CFHTLS source redshift distribution both using stacking and cross-correlation techniques, finding very good agreement.

  1. MultiDarkLens Simulations: weak lensing light-cones and data base presentation

    CERN Document Server

    Giocoli, Carlo; Metcalf, R Benton; de la Torre, Sylvain; Yepes, Gustavo; Prada, Francisco; Comparat, Johan; Goettlober, Stefan; Kyplin, Anatoly; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Petkova, Margarita; Shan, HuanYuan; Tessore, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a large database of weak lensing light cones constructed using different snapshots from the Big MultiDark simulation (BigMDPL). The ray-tracing through different multiple planes has been performed with the GLAMER code accounting both for single source redshifts and for sources distributed along the cosmic time. This first paper presents weak lensing forecasts and results according to the geometry of the VIPERS-W1 and VIPERS-W4 field of view. Additional fields will be available on our database and new ones can be run upon request. Our database also contains some tools for lensing analysis. In this paper we present results for convergence power spectra, one point and high order weak lensing statistics useful for forecasts and for cosmological studies. Covariance matrices have also been computed for the different realisations of the W1 and W4 fields. In addition we compute also galaxy-shear and projected density contrasts for different halo masses at two lens redshifts according to the C...

  2. Assessment of exposure to fungi in the heavily contaminated work environment (a solid waste sorting plant based on the ergosterol analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Iwona Kozajda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This paper reports on the results of the study aimed at application of ergosterol as an quantitative indicator of fungal bioaerosol present in the indoor air in occupational environment heavily contaminated with organic dust as well as its comparison with the culturable method. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in the indoor solid waste sorting plant. Using Andersen impactor adapted to 1 plate at the flow rate of 30 l/min, indoor air was sampled in the workers’ breathing zone. Ergosterol was sampled using gelatinous filter (1000 l of air and then analyzed by means of the spectrophotometric method. Fungi were sampled on malt extract agar (MEA medium (3 replications: 2 l, 7.5 l, 15 l of air and analyzed by means of the culturable method. Based on ergosterol analyzes, concentration of fungi was calculated. Results were given as the range assuming min. as 5.1 pg ergosterol/spore and max as 1.7 pg ergosterol/spore. Results: The average concentrations of ergosterol in a working room (arithmetic mean (AM, standard deviation (SD; minimum–maximum (min.–max were, respectively: 2.16, 0.72; 0.85–2.92 μg/m3; fungi calculated based on ergosterol – 424.1×103–1272.4×103, 140.1×103– 420.4×103, 167×103–1716.5×103 CFU/m3, and culturable fungi – 13×103, 9.7×103, 1.9×103–34×103 CFU/m3. It was revealed that concentrations of calculated fungi were even 2 orders of magnitude higher than culturable fungi. Conclusions: The quantitative assessment of moldiness by means of ergosterol measurement seems to be a reliable indicator for environments heavily contaminated with organic dust, where viable and non-viable fungi are present in high proportions. Based on that result, more restrictive (as compared to a similar assessment carried out by means of the culturable method hygienic recommendations, especially those related to the use of preventive measures protecting the employees’ respiratory tract, should have been

  3. III-V strain layer superlattice based band engineered avalanche photodiodes (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sid

    2015-08-01

    Laser detection and ranging (LADAR)-based systems operating in the Near Infrared (NIR) and Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) have become popular optical sensors for remote sensing, medical, and environmental applications. Sophisticated laser-based radar and weapon systems used for long-range military and astronomical applications need to detect, recognize, and track a variety of targets under a wide spectrum of atmospheric conditions. Infrared APDs play an important role in LADAR systems by integrating the detection and gain stages in a single device. Robust silicon-APDs are limited to visible and very near infrared region ( 3um) infrared photon detection applications. Recently, various research groups (including Ghosh et. al.) have reported SWIR and MWIR HgCdTe APDs on CdZnTe and Si substrates. However, HgCdTe APDs suffer from low breakdown fields due to material defects, and excess noise increases significantly at high electric fields. During the past decade, InAs/GaSb Strain Layer Superlattice (SLS) material system has emerged as a potential material for the entire infrared spectrum because of relatively easier growth, comparable absorption coefficients, lower tunneling currents and longer Auger lifetimes resulting in enhanced detectivities (D*). Band engineering in type II SLS allows us to engineer avalanche properties of electrons and holes. This is a great advantage over bulk InGaAs and HgCdTe APDs where engineering avalanche properties is not possible. The talk will discuss the evolution of superlattice based avalanche photodiodes and some of the recent results on the work being done at Raytheon on SWIR avalanche photodiodes.

  4. Perioperative Management of a Jehovah's Witness Presenting for Skull Base Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, M A; Jellish, W S; Leonetti, J P

    1996-01-01

    A 22-year-old, otherwise healthy, female Jehovah's Witness underwent resection of a midline skull base chondrosarcoma which had been detected after a work-up for headache and diplopia. After bilateral maxillectomies, ethmoidectomies, and a sphenoidectomy, the patient's chondrosarcoma was resected. Despite proper anesthetic management and meticulous hemostasis, significant intraoperative blood loss occurred. The initial postoperative hemoglobin level was 2.3 gm/dL. The clinical concerns pertaining to the perioperative management of the Jehovah's Witness are discussed along with the patient's course and management. PMID:17170989

  5. A versatile computer based system for data acquisition manipulation and presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A data acquisition system based on the Microdata M 1600L data logger and a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VT103 computer system has been set up for use in a wide range of research and development projects in the field of fission detectors and associated technology. The philosophy underlying the system and its important features are described. Operating instructions for the logger are given, and its application to experimental measurements is considered. Observations on whole system performance, and recommendations for improvements are made. (U.K.)

  6. Clinical profile and outcome of children presenting with poisoning or intoxication: a hospital based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhathoki, S; Poudel, P; Shah, D; Bhatta, N K; Dutta, A K; Shah, G S; Bhurtyal, K K; Agrawal, B; Shrivastava, M K; Singh, M K

    2009-09-01

    Poisoning is a common preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Most of the poisoning in children less than 5 years of age is accidental. Objective of the study was to study the clinical profile and outcome of childhood poisoning and intoxication. This was a retrospective study done in patients who were admitted in pediatric wards and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences with history of ingestion of poison or intoxication or envenomation firom January 2005 to June 2008. The data collected were analyzed with SPSS 12.0 software. There were 122 children enrolled in study. Male: female ratio was 1.4:1. The mean age of presentation was 5.8 years. Among 122 patients, 43.4% received pre-referral treatment in the form of gastric lavage, atropine etc. Organophosphorus poisoning was the commonest poisoning seen in 55 (45.1%) patients followed by hydrocarbon 12 (9.8%), mushroom 10 (8.2%) and organochlorine 10 (8.2%) poisoning. During treatment, 50.0% received antidotes. 55.7% received antibiotics, gastric lavage and anticonvulsants were required in 43.4% and 13.9% respectively. Overall survival was 87.4%. The time interval between intoxication and presentation to hospital, mean Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and presence of coma (GCS cases. In conclusion, organophosphorus is the commonest agent involved in childhood poisoning. Overall, the outcome is good with 87.4% survival in our hospital. The time gap between the poisoning and presentation to hospital and presence of coma predict mortality. PMID:20334063

  7. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base

  8. Avatar Weight Estimates based on Footstep Sounds in Three Presentation Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikström, Erik; Götzen, Amalia De; Serafin, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    When evaluating a sound design for virtual environment, the context where it is to be implemented in may have an influence on how it may be perceived. In this paper we perform an experiment comparing three presentation formats (audio only, video with audio and an interactive immersive VR format......) and their influences on a sound design evaluation task concerning footstep sounds. The evaluation involved estimating the perceived weight of a virtual avatar seen from a first person perspective, as well as the suitability of the sound effect relative to the context. The results show significant...

  9. Synthesis and energy transfer within carbon-based fluorescent rare earth nanoparticles and nanocomposites (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust, Brian G.; Chipara, Mircea; Saenz, Aaron

    2016-03-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in fluorescent and upconverting rare earth-based nanoparticles for biomedical imaging and photodynamic therapy applications. While many of the widely explored upconverting contrast agents are comprised of fluoride or oxide crystal structures, very little work has been done to investigate the up- and downconversion emission in rare earth-doped carbon nanocomposites. Of particular interest, graphene-UCNP nanocomposites and sesquicarbide nanoparticles may offer a wide range of new applications when coupled with the extraordinary optical properties of rare earth-doped systems, such as potential use as nano-transducers. Carbon-based nanocomposites and sesquicarbides doped with rare earth elements were synthesized using the microwave and solvothermal methods with additional brief high temperature heat treatments. They were then characterized by XRD, visible and NIR excitation and emission spectroscopy, as well as Raman spectrsocopy. Tuning of the emission manifold ratios was explored through different compositions and size. Also, energy transfer between the emitting ions and the electronic states of the host structure was explored. Finally, cytotoxicity was tested, and cellular uptake of these nanomaterials was performed with confocal microscopy.

  10. MitBASE : a comprehensive and integrated mitochondrial DNA database. The present status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attimonelli, M.; Altamura, N.; Benne, R.; Brennicke, A.; Cooper, J. M.; D’Elia, D.; Montalvo, A. de; Pinto, B. de; De Robertis, M.; Golik, P.; Knoop, V.; Lanave, C.; Lazowska, J.; Licciulli, F.; Malladi, B. S.; Memeo, F.; Monnerot, M.; Pasimeni, R.; Pilbout, S.; Schapira, A. H. V.; Sloof, P.; Saccone, C.

    2000-01-01

    MitBASE is an integrated and comprehensive database of mitochondrial DNA data which collects, under a single interface, databases for Plant, Vertebrate, Invertebrate, Human, Protist and Fungal mtDNA and a Pilot database on nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MitBASE reports all available information from different organisms and from intraspecies variants and mutants. Data have been drawn from the primary databases and from the literature; value adding information has been structured, e.g., editing information on protist mtDNA genomes, pathological information for human mtDNA variants, etc. The different databases, some of which are structured using commercial packages (Microsoft Access, File Maker Pro) while others use a flat-file format, have been integrated under ORACLE. Ad hoc retrieval systems have been devised for some of the above listed databases keeping into account their peculiarities. The database is resident at the EBI and is available at the following site: http://www3.ebi.ac.uk/Research/Mitbase/mitbase.pl . The impact of this project is intended for both basic and applied research. The study of mitochondrial genetic diseases and mitochondrial DNA intraspecies diversity are key topics in several biotechnological fields. The database has been funded within the EU Biotechnology programme. PMID:10592207

  11. The present status and key problems of carbon nanotube based polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-art and key problems of carbon nanotube (CNT based polymer composites (CNT/polymer composites including CNT/polymer structural composites and CNT/polymer functional composites are reviewed. Based on the results reported up to now, CNTs can be an effective reinforcement for polymer matrices, and the tensile strength and elastic modulus of CNT/polymer composites can reach as high as 3600 MPa and 80 GPa, respectively. CNT/polymer composites are also promising functional composite materials with improved electrical and thermal conductivity, etc. Due to their multi-functional properties, CNT/polymer composites are expected to be used as low weight structural materials, optical devices, thermal interface materials, electric components, electromagnetic absorption materials, etc. However, the full potential of CNT/polymer composites still remains to be realized. A few key problems, such as how to prepare structure-controllable CNTs with high purity and consistently dependable high performance, how to break up entangled or bundled CNTs and then uniformly disperse and align them within a polymer matrix, how to improve the load transfer from matrix to CNT reinforcement, etc, still exist and need to be solved in order to realize the wide applications of these advanced composites.

  12. Paper-based microfluidic devices for analysis of clinically relevant analytes present in urine and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasner, Scott A; Price, Alexander K; Hoeman, Kurt W; Wilson, Rashaun S; Bell, Kayla J; Culbertson, Christopher T

    2010-07-01

    We report the use of paper-based microfluidic devices fabricated from a novel polymer blend for the monitoring of urinary ketones, glucose, and salivary nitrite. Paper-based devices were fabricated via photolithography in less than 3 min and were immediately ready for use for these diagnostically relevant assays. Patterned channels on filter paper as small as 90 microm wide with barriers as narrow as 250 microm could be reliably patterned to permit and block fluid wicking, respectively. Colorimetric assays for ketones and nitrite were adapted from the dipstick format to this paper microfluidic chip for the quantification of acetoacetate in artificial urine, as well as nitrite in artificial saliva. Glucose assays were based on those previously demonstrated (Martinez et al., Angew Chem Int Ed 8:1318-1320, 1; Martinez et al., Anal Chem 10:3699-3707, 2; Martinez et al., Proc Nat Acad Sci USA 50:19606-19611, 3; Lu et al., Electrophoresis 9:1497-1500, 4; Abe et al., Anal Chem 18:6928-6934, 5). Reagents were spotted on the detection pad of the paper device and allowed to dry prior to spotting of samples. The ketone test was a two-step reaction requiring a derivitization step between the sample spotting pad and the detection pad, thus for the first time, confirming the ability of these paper devices to perform online multi-step chemical reactions. Following the spotting of the reagents and sample solution onto the paper device and subsequent drying, color images of the paper chips were recorded using a flatbed scanner, and images were converted to CMYK format in Adobe Photoshop CS4 where the intensity of the color change was quantified using the same software. The limit of detection (LOD) for acetoacetate in artificial urine was 0.5 mM, while the LOD for salivary nitrite was 5 microM, placing both of these analytes within the clinically relevant range for these assays. Calibration curves for urinary ketone (5 to 16 mM) and salivary nitrite (5 to 2,000 microM) were

  13. Activity-Based Intelligence prevedere il futuro osservando il presente con gli strumenti Hexagon Geospatial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Zotti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The intelligence of human activities on the earth's surface, obtained through the analysis of earth observation data and other geospatial information, is vital for the planning and execution of any military action, for peacekeeping or for humanitarian emergencies. The success of these actions largely depends on the ability to analyze timely data from multiple sources. However, the proliferation of new sources of intelligence in a Geospatial big data scenario increasingly complicate the analysis of such activities by human analysts. Modern technologies solve these problems by enabling the Activity Based Intelligence, a methodology that improves the efficiency and timeliness of intelligence through the analysis of historical, current and future activity, to identify patterns, trends and relationships hidden in large data collections from different sources.

  14. SearchLight: a freely available web-based quantitative spectral analysis tool (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhat, Prashant; Peet, Michael; Erdogan, Turan

    2016-03-01

    In order to design a fluorescence experiment, typically the spectra of a fluorophore and of a filter set are overlaid on a single graph and the spectral overlap is evaluated intuitively. However, in a typical fluorescence imaging system the fluorophores and optical filters are not the only wavelength dependent variables - even the excitation light sources have been changing. For example, LED Light Engines may have a significantly different spectral response compared to the traditional metal-halide lamps. Therefore, for a more accurate assessment of fluorophore-to-filter-set compatibility, all sources of spectral variation should be taken into account simultaneously. Additionally, intuitive or qualitative evaluation of many spectra does not necessarily provide a realistic assessment of the system performance. "SearchLight" is a freely available web-based spectral plotting and analysis tool that can be used to address the need for accurate, quantitative spectral evaluation of fluorescence measurement systems. This tool is available at: http://searchlight.semrock.com/. Based on a detailed mathematical framework [1], SearchLight calculates signal, noise, and signal-to-noise ratio for multiple combinations of fluorophores, filter sets, light sources and detectors. SearchLight allows for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the compatibility of filter sets with fluorophores, analysis of bleed-through, identification of optimized spectral edge locations for a set of filters under specific experimental conditions, and guidance regarding labeling protocols in multiplexing imaging assays. Entire SearchLight sessions can be shared with colleagues and collaborators and saved for future reference. [1] Anderson, N., Prabhat, P. and Erdogan, T., Spectral Modeling in Fluorescence Microscopy, http://www.semrock.com (2010).

  15. Addressing and Presenting Quality of Satellite Data via Web-Based Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptoukh, Gregory; Lynnes, C.; Ahmad, S.; Fox, P.; Zednik, S.; West, P.

    2011-01-01

    With the recent attention to climate change and proliferation of remote-sensing data utilization, climate model and various environmental monitoring and protection applications have begun to increasingly rely on satellite measurements. Research application users seek good quality satellite data, with uncertainties and biases provided for each data point. However, different communities address remote sensing quality issues rather inconsistently and differently. We describe our attempt to systematically characterize, capture, and provision quality and uncertainty information as it applies to the NASA MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth data product. In particular, we note the semantic differences in quality/bias/uncertainty at the pixel, granule, product, and record levels. We outline various factors contributing to uncertainty or error budget; errors. Web-based science analysis and processing tools allow users to access, analyze, and generate visualizations of data while alleviating users from having directly managing complex data processing operations. These tools provide value by streamlining the data analysis process, but usually shield users from details of the data processing steps, algorithm assumptions, caveats, etc. Correct interpretation of the final analysis requires user understanding of how data has been generated and processed and what potential biases, anomalies, or errors may have been introduced. By providing services that leverage data lineage provenance and domain-expertise, expert systems can be built to aid the user in understanding data sources, processing, and the suitability for use of products generated by the tools. We describe our experiences developing a semantic, provenance-aware, expert-knowledge advisory system applied to NASA Giovanni web-based Earth science data analysis tool as part of the ESTO AIST-funded Multi-sensor Data Synergy Advisor project.

  16. Activity-Based Costing & Warm Fuzzies - - Costing, Presentation & Framing Influences on Decision-Making ~ A Business Optimization Simulation ~

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, David Shelby

    1998-01-01

    Activity-Based Costing is presented in accounting text books as a costing system that can be used to make valuable managerial decisions. Accounting journals regularly report the successful implementations and benefits of activity-based costing systems for particular businesses. Little experimental or empirical evidence exists, however, that has demonstrated the benefits of activity-based costing under controlled conditions. Similarly, although case studies report conditions that may or may...

  17. Efficient inverted organic light-emitting devices by amine-based solvent treatment (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Myoung Hoon; Choi, Kyoung-Jin; Jung, Eui Dae

    2015-10-01

    The efficiency of inverted polymer light-emitting diodes (iPLEDs) were remarkably enhanced by introducing spontaneously formed ripple-shaped nanostructure of ZnO (ZnO-R) and amine-based polar solvent treatment using 2-methoxyethanol and ethanolamine (2-ME+EA) co-solvents on ZnO-R. The ripple-shape nanostructure of ZnO layer fabricated by solution process with optimal rate of annealing temperature improves the extraction of wave guide modes inside the device structure, and 2-ME+EA interlayer enhances the electron injection and hole blocking and reduces exciton quenching between polar solvent treated ZnO-R and emissive layer. As a result, our optimized iPLEDs show the luminous efficiency (LE) of 61.6 cd A-1, power efficiency (PE) of 19.4 lm W-1 and external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 17.8 %. This method provides a promising method, and opens new possibilities for not only organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) but also other organic optoelectronic devices such as organic photovoltaics, organic thin film transistors, and electrically driven organic diode laser.

  18. Fiber-based tissue identification for electrode placement in deep brain stimulation neurosurgery (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaoli, Damon T.; Lapointe, Nicolas; Goetz, Laurent; Parent, Martin; Prudhomme, Michel; Cantin, Léo.; Galstian, Tigran; Messaddeq, Younès.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation's effectiveness relies on the ability of the stimulating electrode to be properly placed within a specific target area of the brain. Optical guidance techniques that can increase the accuracy of the procedure, without causing any additional harm, are therefore of great interest. We have designed a cheap optical fiber-based device that is small enough to be placed within commercially available DBS stimulating electrodes' hollow cores and that is capable of sensing biological information from the surrounding tissue, using low power white light. With this probe we have shown the ability to distinguish white and grey matter as well as blood vessels, in vitro, in human brain samples and in vivo, in rats. We have also repeated the in vitro procedure with the probe inserted in a DBS stimulating electrode and found the results were in good agreement. We are currently validating a second fiber optic device, with micro-optical components, that will result in label free, molecular level sensing capabilities, using CARS spectroscopy. The final objective will be to use this data in real time, during deep brain stimulation neurosurgery, to increase the safety and accuracy of the procedure.

  19. Fish consumption and risk of contamination by mercury – Considerations on the definition of edible parts based on the case study of European sea bass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We estimated the risk to humans trough ingestion of sea bass contaminated with Hg. ► Total and organic Hg in muscle exceeded weekly and daily safety limits. ► There’s risk through ingestion although Hg was below the maximum limit set by EU. ► The ingestion of European sea bass contaminated with Hg poses risk to human health. ► Other organs rather than muscle should be considered as edible tissue. - Abstract: In the present study, the risk to humans by consuming European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), captured at three sites along a Hg contamination gradient, was evaluated by comparing muscle and kidney total Hg (T-Hg) levels with the European regulations for marketed fish. Moreover, T-Hg and organic Hg (O-Hg) levels in muscle were compared with the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) and the Reference Dose (RfD). Although T-Hg levels in muscle were below the European value allowable for marketed fish, kidney’s levels were higher than the set value, stressing the importance of redefining the concept of edible tissue and which tissues should be considered. Mercury weekly ingestion in the contaminated areas was higher than the PTWI, and O-Hg daily ingestion rates were higher than the RfD in all sampling sites. Thus, populations consuming sea bass from the contaminated sites may be at risk, with particular relevance for children and pregnant women.

  20. Nonlinear Least-Squares Based Method for Identifying and Quantifying Single and Mixed Contaminants in Air with an Electronic Nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A. Ryan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has recently developed and built an electronic nose(ENose using a polymer-carbon composite sensing array. This ENose is designed to be usedfor air quality monitoring in an enclosed space, and is designed to detect, identify andquantify common contaminants at concentrations in the parts-per-million range. Itscapabilities were demonstrated in an experiment aboard the National Aeronautics and SpaceAdministration’s Space Shuttle Flight STS-95. This paper describes a modified nonlinearleast-squares based algorithm developed to analyze data taken by the ENose, and itsperformance for the identification and quantification of single gases and binary mixtures oftwelve target analytes in clean air. Results from laboratory-controlled events demonstrate theeffectiveness of the algorithm to identify and quantify a gas event if concentration exceedsthe ENose detection threshold. Results from the flight test demonstrate that the algorithmcorrectly identifies and quantifies all registered events (planned or unplanned, as singles ormixtures with no false positives and no inconsistencies with the logged events and theindependent analysis of air samples.

  1. Contaminant resorption during soil washing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the applicability of soil washing to a specific site requires some basic research in how contaminants are bound. Much can be learned from sequential extraction methodology based on micronutrient bioavailability studies wherein the soil matrix is chemically dissected to selectively remove particular fixation mechanisms independently. This procedure uses a series of progressively more aggressive solvents to dissolve the principle phases that make up a soil, however, the published studies do not appear to consider the potential for a contaminant released from one type of site to resorb on another site during an extraction. This physical model assumes no ion exchange or adsorption at sites either previously occupied by other ions, or exposed by the dissolution. Therefore, to make engineering use of the sequential extraction data, the release of contamination must be evaluated relative to the effects of resorption. Time release studies were conducted to determine the optimum duration for extraction to maximize complete destruction of the target matrix fraction while minimizing contaminant resorption. Tests with and without a potassium brine present to inhibit cesium resorption indicated extraction efficiency could be enhanced by as much as a factor of ten using the brine

  2. Clinical Presentation, Management, and Outcomes of Deep Vein Thrombosis Based on Doppler Ultrasonography Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Menyar, Ayman; Asim, Mohammad; Kiliyanni, Abdul Salim

    2016-07-01

    We studied the frequency, clinical presentation, and outcomes of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Serial Doppler ultrasonography was performed between 2008 and 2013 for 6420 patients with suspected DVT. Diagnosis was confirmed in 662 (10.3%) participants (mean age: 50 ± 17 years; 51% females). Obesity, diabetes mellitus, and malignancy were reported in 47%, 28%, and 16%, respectively. Abnormal protein C, protein S, factor V Leiden, or antithrombin III were found in 9%, 7%, 3.8%, and 4%, respectively. Left, right, and both legs were involved in 55%, 37%, and 8%, respectively. Common femoral, popliteal, and posterior tibial veins were affected in 48.5%, 72%, and 71%, respectively. Postthrombotic syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and death were reported in 50%, 12.2%, and 15% of cases, respectively. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox regression analysis showed that gender had no impact on mortality during follow-up; however, age (>50 years) was associated with greater risk of death (hazard ratio: 6.54; 95% confidence interval: 3.2-13.3). These findings will improve our understanding of the various risk factors and help develop institutional guidelines for the management of patients with DVT. PMID:26345414

  3. DVT presentations to an emergency department: a study of guideline based care and decision making

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lillis, D

    2016-02-01

    Pre-test probability scoring and blood tests for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) assessment are sensitive, but not specific leading to increased demands on radiology services. Three hundred and eighty-five patients presenting to an Emergency Department (ED), with suspected DVT, were studied to explore our actual work-up of patients with possible DVT relating to risk stratification, further investigation and follow up. Of the 205 patients with an initially negative scan, 36 (17.6%) were brought for review to the ED Consultant clinic. Thirty-four (16.6%) patients underwent repeat compression ultrasound with 5 (2.4%) demonstrating a DVT on the second scan. Repeat compression ultrasound scans were performed on 34 (16.6%) patients with an initially negative scan, with essentially the same diagnostic yield as other larger studies where 100% of such patients had repeat scanning. Where there is ongoing concern, repeat above-knee compression ultrasound within one week will pick up a small number of deep venous thromboses.

  4. Habitat type-based bioaccumulation and risk assessment of metal and As contamination in earthworms, beetles and woodlice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeulen, Frouke, E-mail: frouke.vermeulen@ua.ac.b [Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group (U7), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Van den Brink, Nico W., E-mail: nico.vandenbrink@wur.n [Alterra, Wageningen UR, Box 47, NL6700AA Wageningen (Netherlands); D' Have, Helga [Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group (U7), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Mubiana, Valentine K., E-mail: kayawe.mubiana@ua.ac.b [Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group (U7), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Blust, Ronny, E-mail: ronny.blust@ua.ac.b [Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group (U7), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Bervoets, Lieven, E-mail: lieven.bervoets@ua.ac.b [Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group (U7), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); De Coen, Wim, E-mail: wim.decoen@ua.ac.b [Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group (U7), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2009-11-15

    The present study investigated the contribution of environmental factors to the accumulation of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in earthworms, beetles and woodlice, and framed within an exposure assessment of the European hedgehog. Soil and invertebrate samples were collected in three distinct habitat types. Results showed habitat-specific differences in soil and invertebrate metal concentrations and bioaccumulation factors when normalized to soil metal concentration. Further multiple regression analysis showed residual variability (habitat differences) in bioaccumulation that could not be fully explained by differences in soil metal contamination, pH or organic carbon (OC). Therefore, the study demonstrated that in bioaccumulation studies involving terrestrial invertebrates or in risk assessment of metals, it is not sufficient to differentiate habitat types on general soil characteristics such as pH and/or OC alone. Furthermore, simple generic soil risk assessments for Cd and Cu showed that risk characterization was more accurate when performed in a habitat-specific way. - Our study provided essential insights into habitat-specific accumulation patterns with respect to factors influencing metal bioaccumulation, BAFs, and site-specific risk assessment.

  5. Habitat type-based bioaccumulation and risk assessment of metal and As contamination in earthworms, beetles and woodlice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study investigated the contribution of environmental factors to the accumulation of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in earthworms, beetles and woodlice, and framed within an exposure assessment of the European hedgehog. Soil and invertebrate samples were collected in three distinct habitat types. Results showed habitat-specific differences in soil and invertebrate metal concentrations and bioaccumulation factors when normalized to soil metal concentration. Further multiple regression analysis showed residual variability (habitat differences) in bioaccumulation that could not be fully explained by differences in soil metal contamination, pH or organic carbon (OC). Therefore, the study demonstrated that in bioaccumulation studies involving terrestrial invertebrates or in risk assessment of metals, it is not sufficient to differentiate habitat types on general soil characteristics such as pH and/or OC alone. Furthermore, simple generic soil risk assessments for Cd and Cu showed that risk characterization was more accurate when performed in a habitat-specific way. - Our study provided essential insights into habitat-specific accumulation patterns with respect to factors influencing metal bioaccumulation, BAFs, and site-specific risk assessment.

  6. Support vector machine based classification and mapping of atherosclerotic plaques using fluorescence lifetime imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatakdawala, Hussain; Gorpas, Dimitris S.; Bec, Julien; Ma, Dinglong M.; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Bishop, John W.; Marcu, Laura

    2016-02-01

    The progression of atherosclerosis in coronary vessels involves distinct pathological changes in the vessel wall. These changes manifest in the formation of a variety of plaque sub-types. The ability to detect and distinguish these plaques, especially thin-cap fibroatheromas (TCFA) may be relevant for guiding percutaneous coronary intervention as well as investigating new therapeutics. In this work we demonstrate the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) derived parameters (lifetime values from sub-bands 390/40 nm, 452/45 nm and 542/50 nm respectively) for generating classification maps for identifying eight different atherosclerotic plaque sub-types in ex vivo human coronary vessels. The classification was performed using a support vector machine based classifier that was built from data gathered from sixteen coronary vessels in a previous study. This classifier was validated in the current study using an independent set of FLIm data acquired from four additional coronary vessels with a new rotational FLIm system. Classification maps were compared to co-registered histological data. Results show that the classification maps allow identification of the eight different plaque sub-types despite the fact that new data was gathered with a different FLIm system. Regions with diffuse intimal thickening (n=10), fibrotic tissue (n=2) and thick-cap fibroatheroma (n=1) were correctly identified on the classification map. The ability to identify different plaque types using FLIm data alone may serve as a powerful clinical and research tool for studying atherosclerosis in animal models as well as in humans.

  7. Reconfigurable laser arrays with capillary fill microfluidics for chip-based flow cytometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Low cost, portable chip based flow cytometry has great potential for applications in resource poor and point of care settings. Typical approaches utilise low cost silicon or glass substrates with light emission and detection performed either off-chip using external equipment or incorporated on-chip using `pick and place' diode lasers and photo-detectors. The former approach adds cost and limits portability while the sub-micron alignment tolerances imposed by the application make the latter impractical for all but the simplest of systems. Use of an optically active semiconductor substrate, on the other hand, overcomes these limitations by allowing multiple laser/detector arrays to be formed in the substrate itself using high resolution lithographic techniques. The capacity for multiple emitters and detectors on a single chip not only enables parallel measurement for increased throughput but also allows multiple measurements to be performed on each cell as it passes through the system. Several different experiments can be performed simultaneously and throughput demand can be reduced with the facility for error checking. Furthermore, the fast switching times inherent with semiconductor lasers allows the active sections of the device to be reconfigured on a sub-microsecond time scale providing additional functionality. This is demonstrated here in a capillary fill system using pairs of laser/detectors that are operated in pulsed mode and alternated between lasing and detecting in an interleaved manner. Passing cells are alternately interrogated from opposing directions providing information that can be used to correct for differences in lateral cell position and ultimately differentiate blood cell type.

  8. OCT-based profiler for automating ocular surface prosthetic fitting (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H.; Maguluri, Gopi N.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Patel, Chirag; Agranat, Josh; Tomashevskaya, Olga; Bonte, Eugene; Ferguson, R. Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The use of a Prosthetic Replacement of the Ocular Surface Environment (PROSE) device is a revolutionary treatment for military patients that have lost their eyelids due to 3rd degree facial burns and for civilians who suffer from a host of corneal diseases. However, custom manual fitting is often a protracted painful, inexact process that requires multiple fitting sessions. Training for new practitioners is a long process. Automated methods to measure the complete corneal and scleral topology would provide a valuable tool for both clinicians and PROSE device manufacturers and would help streamline the fitting process. PSI has developed an ocular anterior-segment profiler based on Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), which provides a 3D measure of the surface of the sclera and cornea. This device will provide topography data that will be used to expedite and improve the fabrication process for PROSE devices. OCT has been used to image portions of the cornea and sclera and to measure surface topology for smaller contact lenses [1-3]. However, current state-of-the-art anterior eye OCT systems can only scan about 16 mm of the eye's anterior surface, which is not sufficient for covering the sclera around the cornea. In addition, there is no systematic method for scanning and aligning/stitching the full scleral/corneal surface and commercial segmentation software is not optimized for the PROSE application. Although preliminary, our results demonstrate the capability of PSI's approach to generate accurate surface plots over relatively large areas of the eye, which is not currently possible with any other existing platform. Testing the technology on human volunteers is currently underway at Boston Foundation for Sight.

  9. Pancreatic cancer: Wait times from presentation to treatment and survival in a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jooste, Valérie; Dejardin, Olivier; Bouvier, Véronique; Arveux, Patrick; Maynadie, Marc; Launoy, Guy; Bouvier, Anne-Marie

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic survival is one of the worst in oncology. To what extent wait times affect outcomes in unknown No population-based study has previously explored patient and treatment delays among individuals with pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to estimate patient and treatment delays in patients with pancreatic cancer and to measure their association with survival in a nonselected population. All patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer for the first time between 2009 and 2011 and registered in two French digestive cancer registries were included. Patient delay (time from onset of symptoms until the first consultation categorized into <1 or ≥1 month), and treatment delay (time between the first consultation and treatment categorized into less or more than 29 days, the median time) were collected. Overall delay was used to test associations between survival and the timeliness of care by combining patient delay and treatment delay. Patient delay was longer than 1 month in 46% of patients. A patient delay longer than one month was associated with the absence of jaundice (p < 0.001) and the presence of metastasis (p = 0.003). After adjusting for other covariates, such as symptoms and treatment, the presence of metastasis was negatively associated with treatment delay longer than 29 days (p = 0.025). After adjustment for other covariates, especially metastatic dissemination and the result of the resection, overall delay was not significantly associated with prognosis. We found little evidence to suggest that timely care was associated with the survival of patients. PMID:27130333

  10. A prospective cohort study: probe based confocal laser endomicroscopy for peripheral pulmonary lesions (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yuji; Izumo, Takehiro; Hiraishi, Yoshihisa; Tsuchida, Takaaki

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: The diagnostic value of bronchoscopy for peripheral pulmonary lesions (PPLs) has improved since the application of radial endobronchial ultrasound (R-EBUS). Though R-EBUS indicates the position of the PPL, there is often a discrepancy between the obtained R-EBUS image and the diagnostic outcome. Meanwhile, probe based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) is a novel technique which provides in vivo real-time image of the contacted surface structures. However, its findings have not been established yet. Methods: Consecutive patients who have underwent bronchoscopy for PPLs were prospectively enrolled. R-EBUS with a guide sheath (GS) was inserted to the target PPL under X-ray fluoroscopic guidance. When an adequate R-EBUS image (within or adjacent to) was obtained, pCLE was sequentially inserted through the GS. Then pCLE image was scanned and biopsy was performed where an abnormal finding was estimated. The pCLE findings of PPLs and the background were recorded and analyzed exploratorily. Results: We analyzed 19 cases that we could get appropriate tissues. In all cases, bronchial walls showed longitudinal elastic fibers whereas alveolar walls formed grid-like elastic fiber networks. Conversely, discontinuous, crushed or aggregated alveolar structures accompanied by thickened and distorted fibers were detected in PPLs. Some cases showed dark hollow with fragmented or granular fluorescence. On the other hand, 11 cases (57.9%) indicated normal elastic fibers and needed the position change (3 cases; approached other bronchus, 6 cases; adjusted the position, 2 cases; penetrated the covered bronchial wall). Conclusion: The pCLE has a potential to improve the efficacy of diagnostic bronchoscopy for PPLs.

  11. An investigation on the influence of tin foil substitute contamination on bond strength between resin denture teeth and the denture base: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Sapna Bhaskaran; Hallikerimath, R B

    2012-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The problem of acrylic resin denture teeth separating from their denture base remains a major problem in prosthodontic practice and is frustrating to the patients as well as the dentists. Purpose: This study investigated the influence of tin foil substitute contamination on bond strength between acrylic resin denture teeth and their denture base. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 modified acrylic resin maxillary left central incisors were processed to their dent...

  12. Iron contamination in silicon technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istratov, A. A.; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E. R.

    This article continues the review of fundamental physical properties of iron and its complexes in silicon (Appl. Phys. A 69, 13 (1999)), and is focused on ongoing applied research of iron in silicon technology. The first section of this article presents an analysis of the effect of iron on devices, including integrated circuits, power devices, and solar cells. Then, sources of unintentional iron contamination and reaction paths of iron during device manufacturing are discussed. Experimental techniques to measure trace contamination levels of iron in silicon, such as minority carrier lifetime techniques (SPV, μ-PCD, and ELYMAT), deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), total X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and vapor-phase decomposition TXRF (VPD-TXRF), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), mass spectrometry and its modifications (SIMS, SNMS, ICP-MS), and neutron activation analysis (NAA) are reviewed in the second section of the article. Prospective analytical tools, such as heavy-ion backscattering spectroscopy (HIBS) and synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe techniques (XPS, XANES, XRF) are briefly discussed. The third section includes a discussion of the present achievements and challenges of the electrochemistry and physics of cleaning of silicon wafers, with an emphasis on removal of iron contamination from the wafers. Finally, the techniques for gettering of iron are presented.

  13. Characterization of contamination, source and degradation of petroleum between upland and paddy fields based on geochemical characteristics and phospholipid fatty acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Zhang; Renqing Wang; Xiaoming Du; Fasheng Li; Jiulan Dai

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate contamination caused by petroleum,surface soil samples were collected from both upland and paddy fields along the irrigation canals in the Hunpu wastewater irrigation region in northeast China.N-alkanes,terpanes,steranes,and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) in the surface soil samples were analyzed.The aliphatic hydrocarbon concentration was highest in the samples obtained from the upland field near an operational oil well; it was lowest at I-3P where wastewater irrigation promoted the downward movement of hydrocarbons.The Hunpu region was found contaminated by heavy petroleum from oxic lacustrine fresh water or marine deltaic source rocks.Geochemical parameters also indicated significantly heavier contamination and degradation in the upland fields compared with the paddy fields.Principal component analysis based on PLFA showed various microbial communities between petroleum contaminated upland and paddy fields.Gram-negative bacteria indicated by 15:0,3OH 12:0,and 16:1(9) were significantly higher in the paddy fields,whereas Gram-positive bacteria indicated by i16:0 and 18:1(9)c were significantly higher in the upland fields (p < 0.05).These PLFAs were related to petroleum contamination.Poly-unsaturated PLFA (18:2ω6,9; indicative of hydrocarbondegrading bacteria and fungi) was also significantly elevated in the upland fields.This paper recommends more sensitive indicators of contamination and degradation of petroleum in soil.The results also provide guidelines on soil pollution control and remediation in the Hunpu region and other similar regions.

  14. Human health risk assessment of multiple contaminants due to consumption of animal-based foods available in the markets of Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bingli; Zhang, Kaiqiong; An, Jing; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Yingxin

    2015-03-01

    To assess the health risks due to food consumption, the human daily intake and uptake of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and toxic trace elements (mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, and arsenic) were estimated based on the animal-based foods collected from markets in Shanghai, China. The estimated daily intake and uptake considering the contaminant bioaccessibility via single food consumption were 9.4-399 and 4.2-282 ng/kg body weight/day for adults, and 10.8-458 and 4.8-323 ng/kg body weight/day for children, respectively. These values were 0.2-104 and 0.05-58.1, and 0.2-119 and 0.06-66.6 ng/kg body weight/day via multiple food consumption for adults and children, respectively. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency risk assessment method, the non-cancer and cancer health risks posed by the contaminants were estimated using the hazard quotient and the lifetime cancer risk method, respectively. The results showed that the combined hazard quotient values for multiple contaminants via single or multiple food consumption were below 1, suggesting that the residents in Shanghai would not experience a significant non-cancer health risk. Among the contaminants investigated, the potential non-cancer risk of methylmercury was highest. However, the combined cancer risk posed by multiple contaminants in most foods exceeded the accepted risk level of 10(-6), and inorganic arsenic was the main contributor. The risks caused by polybrominated diphenyl ethers for cancer and non-cancer effects were negligible. The cancer risk of inorganic arsenic is a matter of concern in animal-based foods from Shanghai markets. PMID:25315930

  15. Aspergillus DNA contamination in blood collection tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Stahlberger, Thomas; Whelan, Ruth; Sugrue, Michele; Wingard, John R.; Alexander, Barbara D.; Follett, Sarah A; Bowyer, Paul; Denning, David W

    2010-01-01

    Fungal PCR-based diagnostic methods are at risk of contamination. Sample collection containers were investigated for fungal DNA contamination using real-time PCR assays. Up to 18% of blood collection tubes were contaminated with fungal DNA, probably A. fumigatus. Lower proportions of contamination in other vessels were observed.

  16. Radioactive contamination of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work opens a series of publications on the results of long-term observations of environmental radioactive contamination in the environs of Leningrad. In the first issue the technique for determination and the results of observations of surface contamination due to artificial radioactive aerosols are presented for 1959-1977. It is shown that the main source of ground air contamination in Leningrad is the global of fission products resulting from nuclear explosions in the atmosphere. The results presented in this work can be used for estimation of levels and isotope composition of radioactive contamination in the temperature zone of the northern hemisphere

  17. Development of performance objectives for Listeria monocytogenes contaminated salmon (Salmo salar) intended used as sushi and sashimi based on analyses of naturally contaminated samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjerdal, Taran; Reitehaug, Elin; Eckner, Karl

    2014-08-01

    Raw salmon is commonly used in sushi and sashimi, indicating that fresh salmon may be considered as a ready-to-eat product. Listeria monocytogenes is occasionally present in fresh salmon, but studies of prevalence and growth of the bacterium in this matrix have been few. In the present study, salmon from a company where L. monocytogenes is present in low levels has been investigated in order to develop performance objectives for L. monocytogenes in fresh salmon intended for use in ready-to-eat products as sushi and sashimi. According to the European Food Law, the maximum level of L. monocytogenes on the last day of shelf life is 100 cfu/g. The variations between and within eight batches have been determined, and the results were used to estimate limit values for L. monocytogenes in salmon and develop a tentative sampling plan for the processing day. Various time-temperature scenarios for storage until the fish is consumed as sushi, sashimi or native fillets have been taken into account. The results indicate that limit values in the range from 0.5 to 10 cfu/g are sufficient to ensure that the regulatory limit of sushi within one week of storage at 4°C after filleting, no samples should have higher levels of L. monocytogenes than 2 cfu/g at the day of filleting. PMID:24784883

  18. Cloud-based Monte Carlo modelling of BSSRDF for the rendering of human skin appearance (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, Alexander; Rushmeier, Holly E.; Meglinski, Igor; Bykov, Alexander V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new Monte Carlo based approach for the modelling of Bidirectional Scattering-Surface Reflectance Distribution Function (BSSRDF) for accurate rendering of human skin appearance. The variations of both skin tissues structure and the major chromophores are taken into account correspondingly to the different ethnic and age groups. The computational solution utilizes HTML5, accelerated by the graphics processing units (GPUs), and therefore is convenient for the practical use at the most of modern computer-based devices and operating systems. The results of imitation of human skin reflectance spectra, corresponding skin colours and examples of 3D faces rendering are presented and compared with the results of phantom studies.

  19. The effects of therapist support and treatment presentation on the clinical outcomes of an Internet based applied relaxation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Alfonsson

    2015-09-01

    A total of 162 participants were included in the study and 94 and 84 participants completed the post and follow-up measurements respectively. Participants in all conditions improved significantly on the main outcome measures, and the different levels of Presentation or therapist Support did not significantly affect treatment outcome. Registered number of completed exercises was a predictor of better treatment outcome, but this effect was independent of treatment condition. Enhancing internet based interventions by improving presentations and the quality of support may thus not be the best way to further improve the effect of internet based interventions. More specific knowledge of the mechanisms that affect outcomes in online psychotherapy is needed.

  20. Metal contamination in urban, suburban, and country park soils of Hong Kong: A study based on GIS and multivariate statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The urban environment quality is of vital importance as the majority of people now live in cities. Due to the continuous urbanisation and industrialisation in many parts of the world, metals are continuously emitted into the terrestrial environment and pose a great threat on human health. An extensive survey was conducted in the highly urbanised and commercialised Hong Kong Island area (80.3 km2) of Hong Kong using a systematic sampling strategy of five soil samples per km2 in urban areas and two samples per km2 in the suburban and country park sites (0-15 cm). The analytical results indicated that the surface soils in urban and suburban areas are enriched with metals, such as Cu, Pb, and Zn. The Pb concentration in the urban soils was found to exceed the Dutch target value. The statistical analyses using principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) showed distinctly different associations among trace metals and the major elements (Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn) in the urban, suburban, and country park soils. Soil pollution maps of trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in the surface soils were produced based on geographical information system (GIS) technology. The hot-spot areas of metal contamination were mainly concentrated in the northern and western parts of Hong Kong Island, and closely related to high traffic conditions. The Pb isotopic composition of the urban, suburban, and country park soils showed that vehicular emissions were the major anthropogenic sources for Pb. The 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb ratios in soils decreased as Pb concentrations increased in a polynomial line (degree = 2)

  1. Evaluation of contaminated groundwater cleanup objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Restoration Program will be responsible for remediating the approximately 230 contaminated groundwater sites across the DOE Complex. A major concern for remediation is choosing the appropriate cleanup objective. The cleanup objective chosen will influence the risk to the nearby public during and after remediation; risk to remedial and non-involved workers during remediation; and the cost of remediation. This paper discusses the trends shown in analyses currently being performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories' (ORNL's) Center for Risk Management (CRM). To evaluate these trends, CRM is developing a database of contaminated sites. This paper examines several contaminated groundwater sites selected for assessment from CRM's data base. The sites in this sample represent potential types of contaminated groundwater sites commonly found at an installation within DOE. The baseline risk from these sites to various receptors is presented. Residual risk and risk during remediation is reported for different cleanup objectives. The cost associated with remediating to each of these objectives is also estimated for each of the representative sites. Finally, the general trends of impacts as a function of cleanup objective will be summarized. The sites examined include the Savannah River site, where there was substantial ground pollution from radionuclides, oil, coal stockpiles, and other forms of groundwater contamination. The effects of various types of groundwater contamination on various types of future user is described. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Perinatal mortality in breech presentations as compared to vertex presentations in singleton pregnancies: an analysis based upon 57 819 computer-registered pregnancies in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, M.F.; Hemel, O.J.S. van; Berg, C. van de; Pol, A. van de

    1985-01-01

    In 1982, nationwide registration of obstetric data was instituted in The Netherlands with about 70% of all Dutch hospitals participating. The resultant data from 57 819 singleton pregnancies in vertex or breech presentation at delivery was studied. The vertex and breech groups were compared. The pr

  3. Mussel-based monitoring of trace metal and organic contaminants along the east coast of China using Perna viridis and Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green lipped mussels, Perna viridis, and blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were collected from seven locations along the east coast of China in September and October 2001. The mussel tissues were analyzed for metals (Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Se, Zn, Cu, Fe and Hg), and trace organic contaminants including organochlorine compounds (OCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; based on 24 individual PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs). Maximum concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Se, Zn, Cu, Fe and Hg in the mussel tissues were 0.14, 26.76, 5.31, 15.72, 4.78, 2.93, 7.40, 231.0, 54.17, 1002 and 317.3 μg/g dry weight respectively. Levels of DDTs, PAHs, PCBs and PHCs in the mussel samples were 14-640, 456-3495, 1-13 ng/g and 621-2863 μg/g dry weight, respectively. Results of this study indicated that contaminant levels were, in general, higher or at least comparable to those reported in other local or regional studies. Mussel samples collected in Chongming Dao in Shanghai and Jiao Zhou Wan in Qingdao had significantly higher levels of metal and trace organic contaminants among the seven sampling stations. Examination of the contaminant profiles suggests that PHCs originated from petrogenic sources, while both petrogenic and pyrolytic sources were important for PAHs. The generally high levels of metals and organochlorine compounds are probably the result of increasingly intense industrial activities along the east coast of China. An assessment of potential risks to human health due to consumption of the mussels was undertaken for the metals, PCBs, DDTs and chlordanes, and the results indicated that all metals, except Ni, could pose a health risk to heavy seafood consumers, while Hg appears to be of concern even for low level consumers. - Mussel-based monitoring revealed trace metal and organic contaminants which pose potential human health risks

  4. A framework for modeling contaminant impacts on reservoir water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeznach, Lillian C.; Jones, Christina; Matthews, Thomas; Tobiason, John E.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a framework for using hydrodynamic and water quality models to understand the fate and transport of potential contaminants in a reservoir and to develop appropriate emergency response and remedial actions. In the event of an emergency situation, prior detailed modeling efforts and scenario evaluations allow for an understanding of contaminant plume behavior, including maximum concentrations that could occur at the drinking water intake and contaminant travel time to the intake. A case study assessment of the Wachusett Reservoir, a major drinking water supply for metropolitan Boston, MA, provides an example of an application of the framework and how hydrodynamic and water quality models can be used to quantitatively and scientifically guide management in response to varieties of contaminant scenarios. The model CE-QUAL-W2 was used to investigate the water quality impacts of several hypothetical contaminant scenarios, including hypothetical fecal coliform input from a sewage overflow as well as an accidental railway spill of ammonium nitrate. Scenarios investigated the impacts of decay rates, season, and inter-reservoir transfers on contaminant arrival times and concentrations at the drinking water intake. The modeling study highlights the importance of a rapid operational response by managers to contain a contaminant spill in order to minimize the mass of contaminant that enters the water column, based on modeled reservoir hydrodynamics. The development and use of hydrodynamic and water quality models for surface drinking water sources subject to the potential for contaminant entry can provide valuable guidance for making decisions about emergency response and remediation actions.

  5. The Use of Interactive Computer Animations Based on POE as a Presentation Tool in Primary Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Ercan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of using interactive computer animations based on predict-observe-explain (POE) as a presentation tool on primary school students' understanding of the static electricity concepts. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test control group design was utilized in this study. The experiment group consisted of 30…

  6. Presentation-Practice-Production and Task-Based Learning in the Light of Second Language Learning Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Graeme

    2003-01-01

    Features of presentation-practice-production (PPP) and task-based learning (TBL) models for language teaching are discussed with reference to language learning theories. Pre-selection of target structures, use of controlled repetition, and explicit grammar instruction in a PPP lesson are given. Suggests TBL approaches afford greater learning…

  7. Attachment-Based Family Therapy With a 13-Year-Old Girl Presenting With High Risk for Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauthamer Ewing, E Stephanie; Levy, Suzanne A; Boamah-Wiafe, Linda; Kobak, Roger; Diamond, Guy

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the application of Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) to the treatment of a 13-year-old female adolescent presenting with high risk of suicide, complicated by a history of depression and sexual trauma. The article begins with an overview of ABFT, including (a) how attachment theory guides treatment; (b) the structure of the clinical model; and (c) the data that provide empirical support. A case example is then presented that exemplifies the primary clinical procedures used to reach therapeutic goals in ABFT, including attachment repair and autonomy/competence promotion. Weekly changes in suicide ideation and depression scores are presented. The article concludes with a discussion about implications for family-based treatment of suicidal youth. PMID:25329356

  8. Remote decontamination system for contaminated water tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the experience of decontamination works and achievements of construction with remote- handling/unmanned technologies, Obayashi Corporation has developed technologies for the decontamination of contaminated water tanks at the Fukushima Daiichi NPS as an entity to implement with subsidies the 'Validation of technologies for contaminated water management' project in the FY2013 Supplementary Budget. Our remote decontamination system requires no manned operation inside tanks during decontamination work and contributes to exposure reduction. The decontamination performance and system practicality have been confirmed by full-scale demonstration test. This report describes the technology outline of present system and its demonstration test results. (author)

  9. Impact of a School-Based Hygiene Promotion and Sanitation Intervention on Pupil Hand Contamination in Western Kenya: A Cluster Randomized Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Leslie E.; Matthew C. Freeman; Akoko, Daniel; Saboori, Shadi; Moe, Christine; Rheingans, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Handwashing with soap effectively reduces exposure to diarrhea-causing pathogens. Interventions to improve hygiene and sanitation conditions in schools within low-income countries have gained increased attention; however, their impact on schoolchildren's exposure to fecal pathogens has not been established. Our trial examined whether a school-based water, sanitation, and hygiene intervention reduced Escherichia coli contamination on pupils' hands in western Kenya. A hygiene promotion and wate...

  10. Reconditioning contaminated gravel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a portable screening system that will recondition radioactively contaminated gravel in the field. The separation technique employed by this system removes dirt, contaminated debris, and other fine particles from gravel. At LLNL, gravel is used in conjunction with the experimental testing of explosives to reduce shock wave propagation. The gravel surrounds the experimental device and buffers the energy generated from the explosion. During an explosion, some of the gravel is broken down into small particles and mixed with contaminants. Contaminants in the used gravel originate from metal sheathing and other parts comprising, the experimental device. These contaminants may consist of radionuclides and metals that are considered hazardous by the State of California when disposed. This paper describes the process that conveys contaminated material into the screener system, sprays the material with recycled water or other mild cleaning chemicals, and separates particles based on size. Particles greater than a specified size are discharged out of the screener separator and recycled back into use, thereby reducing the amount of mixed waste generated and minimizing the need for new gravel. The fines or silt are flushed out of the separator with the water and are removed from the water and consolidated into a drum with the use of a hydrocyclone separator and drum decant system. Because the water in the spray system is recycled, minimal makeup water is needed. The system monitors pH and total dissolved solids

  11. Assessment of exposure to fungi in the heavily contaminated work environment (a solid waste sorting plant) based on the ergosterol analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Iwona Kozajda; Karolina Jeżak; Małgorzata Sowiak; Beata Gutarowska; Irena Szadkowska-Stańczyk

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This paper reports on the results of the study aimed at application of ergosterol as an quantitative indicator of fungal bioaerosol present in the indoor air in occupational environment heavily contaminated with organic dust as well as its comparison with the culturable method. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in the indoor solid waste sorting plant. Using Andersen impactor adapted to 1 plate at the flow rate of 30 l/min, indoor air was sampled in the workers’ breathi...

  12. Microwave processing of oil contaminated drill cuttings

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Igor S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Easily accessible oil reserves are currently decreasing, leading to an increase in more complex offshore deep-sea drilling programs, which require increasingly greater depths to be drilled. Such wells are commonly drilled using oil based muds, which leads to the production of drilled rock fragments, drill cuttings, which are contaminated with the base oil present in the mud. It is a legal requirement to reduce oil content to below 1 wt% in order to dispose of these drill cuttings in the North...

  13. Development of rapid hemocyte-based extraction methods for detection of hepatitis A virus and murine norovirus in contaminated oysters

    Science.gov (United States)

    The human enteric pathogens, hepatitis A virus and human norovirus, have been shown to contaminate molluscan shellfish and cause foodborne disease in consumers. Rapid viral extraction methods are needed to replace current time consuming methods, which use whole oysters or dissected tissues. In our ...

  14. Soil invertebrate community change over fuel-contaminated sites on a subantarctic island: An ecological field-based line of evidence for site risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasley, Jane; Mooney, Thomas J; King, Catherine K

    2016-04-01

    A number of fuel spills, of both recent and historic origins, have occurred on World Heritage-listed subantarctic Macquarie Island. Sites contaminated by mainly diesel fuels are undergoing remediation by the Australian Antarctic Division. The risks posed by these sites are being managed using a "weight of evidence" approach, for which this study provides a preliminary line of evidence for the ecological assessment component of this site management decision framework. This knowledge is pertinent, given the absence of environmental guidelines for fuel contaminants in subantarctic ecosystems. We provide a field-based, site-specific ecological risk assessment for soil invertebrate communities across the fuel spill sites, before the commencement of in situ remediation activities. Springtails (Collembola) were the most abundant taxa. Springtail community patterns showed only limited correlations with the level of fuel contamination at the soil surface, even when elevated levels occurred in the substratum layers. Of the environmental variables measured, community patterns were most strongly correlated with vegetation cover. We identify a suite of 6 species that contribute most to the community dynamics across these sites. A subset of these we propose as useful candidates for future development of single-species toxicity tests: Folsomotoma punctata, Cryptopygus caecus, Cryptopygus antarcticus and Parisotoma insularis. Findings from this study advance our understanding of soil invertebrate community dynamics within these contaminated sites, directly contributing to the improved management and restoration of the sites. Not only does this study provide an important line of evidence for the island's ecological risk assessment for fuel contaminants, it also enhances our understanding of the potential impact of fuels at other subantarctic islands. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:306-314. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26202610

  15. Development, process optimization and technical realization of a novel technology for the treatment of contaminated soil based on the microbiological reactor technique by means of system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to develop a biological procedure to clean up contaminated soil using a technique based on microbiological fermentation, and to implement it for large-scale utilization. As a first step, the current procedures for the subsequent application were put into practice. The advantages and disadvantages, as well as the most sensible field of application were ascertained and contrasted. The ecological and economical prerequisites and demands on the new technology resulted from these investigations. Starting from cleaning up contaminated soil in controlled fermenters (bio-reactors) with the help of the appropriate mixed populations of aerobic bacteria, the development of the technical procedures and the guarantee as to their cost effectiveness is of foremost importance. The technical procedure of the whole concept was developed on a semicommercial scale step by step from the findings of laboratory trials and experiments. The whole concept contains the following procedural steps: 1 Preparation of the soil: 2 Mechanical disintegration using water: The soil is lead to a drum mixer by means of a conveyor device and turned into mud using water. 3 Wet-sizing: In the next step, sand and gravel are separated from very fine particles (grain sized < 0.5mm) and the wash water in a special vibrating sieve device. 4 Bio-reactor: The contaminated soil suspension, which contains all the harmful substances, is lead to the bio-reactor where, with the help of an enriched aerobic bacterial population, the contaminants are biologically degraded. A complete breakdown of the contaminants is achieved after 15 -20 hours in the reactor. 5 Drainage: Subsequently, the soil suspension is drained into a special sedimentation tank. (author)

  16. Contamination in the Kepler field. Identification of 685 KOIs as false positives via ephemeris matching based ON Q1-Q12 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kepler mission has to date found almost 6000 planetary transit-like signals, utilizing three years of data for over 170,000 stars at extremely high photometric precision. Due to its design, contamination from eclipsing binaries, variable stars, and other transiting planets results in a significant number of these signals being false positives (FPs). This directly affects the determination of the occurrence rate of Earth-like planets in our Galaxy, as well as other planet population statistics. In order to detect as many of these FPs as possible, we perform ephemeris matching among all transiting planet, eclipsing binary, and variable star sources. We find that 685 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs)—12% of all those analyzed—are FPs as a result of contamination, due to 409 unique parent sources. Of these, 118 have not previously been identified by other methods. We estimate that ∼35% of KOIs are FPs due to contamination, when performing a first-order correction for observational bias. Comparing single-planet candidate KOIs to multi-planet candidate KOIs, we find an observed FP fraction due to contamination of 16% and 2.4% respectively, bolstering the existing evidence that multi-planet KOIs are significantly less likely to be FPs. We also analyze the parameter distributions of the ephemeris matches and derive a simple model for the most common type of contamination in the Kepler field. We find that the ephemeris matching technique is able to identify low signal-to-noise FPs that are difficult to identify with other vetting techniques. We expect FP KOIs to become more frequent when analyzing more quarters of Kepler data, and note that many of them will not be able to be identified based on Kepler data alone.

  17. Modeling for Airborne Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    walls. The gamma-ray scattering properties of concrete are sufficiently similar to those of the host rock and proposed insert material; use of concrete will have no significant impact on the conclusions. The information in this report is presented primarily for use in performing pre-closure radiological safety evaluations of radiological contaminants, but it may also be used to develop strategies for contaminant leak detection and monitoring in the MGR. Included in this report are the methods for determining the source terms and release fractions, and mathematical models and model parameters for contaminant transport and distribution within the repository. Various particle behavior mechanisms that affect the transport of contaminant are included. These particle behavior mechanisms include diffusion, settling, resuspension, agglomeration and other deposition mechanisms

  18. Fall 1998 200 East area biological vector contamination report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to document the investigation into the cause of the spread of radioactive contamination in September and October 1998 at the Hanford Site's 200 East Area and its subsequent spread to the City of Richland Landfill; identify the source of the contamination; and present corrective actions. The focus and thrust of managing the incident was based on the need to accomplish the following, listed in order of importance: (1) protect the health and safety of the Site workers and the public; (2) contain and control the spread of contamination; (3) identify the source of contamination and the pathways for its spread; and (4) identify the causal factors enabling the contamination

  19. Fall 1998 200 East area biological vector contamination report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CONNELL, D.J.

    1999-03-17

    The purpose of this report is to document the investigation into the cause of the spread of radioactive contamination in September and October 1998 at the Hanford Site's 200 East Area and its subsequent spread to the City of Richland Landfill; identify the source of the contamination; and present corrective actions. The focus and thrust of managing the incident was based on the need to accomplish the following, listed in order of importance: (1) protect the health and safety of the Site workers and the public; (2) contain and control the spread of contamination; (3) identify the source of contamination and the pathways for its spread; and (4) identify the causal factors enabling the contamination.

  20. Development of a tomographic system adapted to 3D measurement of contaminated wounds based on the Cacao concept (Computer aided collimation Gamma Camera)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer aided collimation gamma camera (CACAO in French) is a gamma camera using a collimator with large holes, a supplementary linear scanning motion during the acquisition and a dedicated reconstruction program taking full account of the source depth. The CACAO system was introduced to improve both the sensitivity and the resolution in nuclear medicine. This thesis focuses on the design of a fast and robust reconstruction algorithm in the CACAO project. We start by an overview of tomographic imaging techniques in nuclear medicine. After modelling the physical CACAO system, we present the complete reconstruction program which involves three steps: 1) shift and sum 2) deconvolution and filtering 3) rotation and sum. The deconvolution is the critical step that decreases the signal to noise ratio of the reconstructed images. We propose a regularized multi-channel algorithm to solve the deconvolution problem. We also present a fast algorithm based on Splines functions and preserving the high quality of the reconstructed images for the shift and the rotation steps. Comparisons of simulated reconstructed images in 2D and 3D for the conventional system (CPHC) and CACAO demonstrate the ability of CACAO system to increase the quality of the SPECT images. Finally, this study concludes with an experimental approach with a pixellated detector conceived for a 3D measurement of contaminated wounds. This experimentation proves the possible advantages of coupling the CACAO project with pixellated detectors. Moreover, a variety of applications could fully benefit from the CACAO system, such as low activity imaging, the use of high-energy gamma isotopes and the visualization of deep organs. Moreover the combination of the CACAO system with a pixels detector may open up further possibilities for the future of nuclear medicine. (author)

  1. Th biodistribution in internal contamination of animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    from a non-contaminated rat and a solution calibrated in Th. The obtained results put into evidence that the Th was retained in all the vital organs of the contaminated rats, particularly in lung, liver, stomach and small intestine. All the contaminated rats have presented a non-uniform Th distribution in the investigated organs excepting the one which was sacrificed 2 days after contamination. In its organs Th inclusions were present. Their Th concentration were ranging from 1 ppm up to 24 ppm. We think that the rejection reaction of the contaminant element by the rats organism was stronger on the first days after contamination and, as a consequence, the Th was gathered in inclusions, as 'intruder' element. In time, these inclusions were 'washed' by blood and then eliminated. From the point of view of the medical state, the blood test revealed the normal values of the hemoglobin and a exponential increase of the leucocyte values (leucocytosis) without toxic granules in comparison with the U internal contamination where the blood test revealed granular cytopenia and acute leukopenia with toxic granules. In the next stage, we shall try to find a correlation between the ingested Th amount and the ones retained and eliminated by rats. For that, we must investigate the Th elimination through urine and excrements. We must specify that our results obtained in the studies on the U or Th internal contamination can be used only as a discussion based in order to think out a plan for a systematic biological investigation on the internal contamination in which a sufficient number of subjects must be used for a good statistics. (authors)

  2. Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Miracle, Ann L.

    2012-11-01

    Contaminants in vadose zone environments pose a long-term source and threat to groundwater resources, human health, and the environment. Several technical, regulatory, and policy challenges and opportunities are associated with contamination in vadose zone environments, particularly in remediation. In this special issue, ten papers present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate, and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments.

  3. Design and development of automated TLD contamination monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermo Luminescent Dosimeter (TLD) is issued to occupational worker to register the external exposure received during his course of work. Before sending back the TLDs for processing it is the responsibility of the parent institution to check and certify that the TLDs are free of radioactive contamination. To ease the duty of health physicist a PC based automated TLD contamination monitor was designed and developed and the details of the same are presented in this paper

  4. Use of the physiologically-based extraction test to assess the oral bioaccessibility of metals in vegetable plants grown in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intawongse, Marisa; Dean, John R

    2008-03-01

    The oral bioaccessibility of metals in vegetable plants grown on contaminated soil was assessed. This was done using the physiologically-based extraction test (PBET) to simulate the human digestion of plant material. A range of vegetable plants, i.e. carrot, lettuce, radish and spinach, were grown on metal contaminated soil. After reaching maturity the plants were harvested and analysed for their total metal content (i.e. Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The plant samples were then subsequently extracted using an in vitro gastrointestinal approach or PBET to assess the likelihood of oral bioaccessibility if the material was consumed by humans. PMID:17601641

  5. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  6. Contamination of seven workers with 241Am

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widespread contamination occurred in the building in which radiation waste was handled. An occurrence of internal contamination of workers was also suspected. Therefore, workers were measured in vivo and bioassay was performed too. Estimation of committed effective dose had to be based on results of excretion analysis as irremovable surface contamination occurred on the skin and hair of workers, thus influencing results of in vivo measurements. The results of bioassay of 7 workers are presented. Intakes and committed effective doses were calculated from excretion data using IMBA Professional Plus software. The best fits for the most of workers were obtained when combination of acute and chronic intakes was used. Acute intakes varied from 135 Bq to 1300 Bq, chronic intakes from 0.03 Bq/d to 0.3 Bq/d. Committed effective doses from 3 to 36 mSv were estimated for individual workers. (author)

  7. Arsenic Speciation in Plankton Organisms from Contaminated Lakes: Transformations at the Base of the Freshwater Food Chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caumette, Guilhem; Koch, Iris; Estrada, Esteban; Reimer, Ken J. (Royal)

    2012-02-06

    The two complementary techniques high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis were used to assess arsenic speciation in freshwater phytoplankton and zooplankton collected from arsenic-contaminated lakes in Yellowknife (Northwest Territories, Canada). Arsenic concentrations in lake water ranged from 7 {micro}g L{sup -1} in a noncontaminated lake to 250 {micro}g L{sup -1} in mine-contaminated lakes, which resulted in arsenic concentrations ranging from 7 to 340 mg kg{sup -1} d.w. in zooplankton organisms (Cyclops sp.) and from 154 to 894 mg kg{sup -1} d.w. in phytoplankton. The main arsenic compounds identified by HPLC-ICP-MS in all plankton were inorganic arsenic (from 38% to 98% of total arsenic). No other arsenic compounds were found in phytoplankton, but zooplankton organisms showed the presence of organoarsenic compounds, the most common being the sulfate arsenosugar, up to 47% of total arsenic, with traces of phosphate sugar, glycerol sugar, methylarsonate (MMA), and dimethylarsinate (DMA). In the uncontaminated Grace Lake, zooplankton also contained arsenobetaine (AB). XANES characterization of arsenic in the whole plankton samples showed AsV-O as the only arsenic compound in phytoplankton, and AsIII-S and AsV-O compounds as the two major inorganic arsenic species in zooplankton. The proportion of organoarsenicals and inorganic arsenic in zooplankton depends upon the arsenic concentration in lakes and shows the impact of arsenic contamination: zooplankton from uncontaminated lake has higher proportions of organoarsenic compounds and contains arsenobetaine, while zooplankton from contaminated area contains mostly inorganic arsenic.

  8. GIS-based assessment of the biomass potential from phytoremediation of contaminated agricultural land in the Campine region in Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    SCHREURS, Eloi; Voets, Thomas; Thewys, Theo

    2011-01-01

    Dedicated energy crop cultivation is expected to be the prevalent form of biomass production for reaching renewable energy targets set by the European Union. However, there are some concerns with regard to its sustainability. This study demonstrates how this problem can be evaded by applying phytoremediation, i.e. the use of plants to remove pollutants from moderately contaminated soils. By selecting the appropriate plants a considerable biomass flow is produced without taking in scarce agric...

  9. Risk-based screening analysis of ground water contaminated by radionuclides introduced at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in the southwestern part of Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. Underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962 and ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. This concern prompted this examination of the potential health risk to these individuals from drinking the contaminated ground water either at a location on the NTS (assuming loss of institutional control after 100 y) or at one offsite (considering groundwater migration). For the purpose of this assessment, a representative mix of the radionuclides of importance and their concentrations in ground water beneath the NTS were identified from measurements of radionuclide concentrations in groundwater samples-of-opportunity collected at the NTS. Transport of radionuclide-contaminated ground water offsite was evaluated using a travel-time-transport approach. At both locations of interest, potential human-health risk was calculated for an individual ingesting radionuclide-contaminated ground water over the course of a 70-y lifetime. Uncertainties about human physiological attributes, as well as about estimates of physical detriment per unit of radioactive material, were quantified and incorporated into the estimates of risk. The maximum potential excess lifetime risk of cancer mortality estimated for an individual at the offsite location ranges from 7 x 10-7 to 1 x 10-5, and at the onsite location ranges from 3 x 10-3 to 2 x 10-2. Both the offsite and the onsite estimates of risk are dominated by the lifetime doses from tritium. For the assessment of radionuclides in ground water, the critical uncertainty is their concentration today under the entire NTS

  10. Risk-based screening analysis of ground water contaminated by radionuclides introduced at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US); Andricevic, R.; Jacobson, R.L. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (US). Desert Research Inst.

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in the southwestern part of Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. Underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962 and ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. This concern prompted this examination of the potential health risk to these individuals from drinking the contaminated ground water either at a location on the NTS (assuming loss of institutional control after 100 y) or at one offsite (considering groundwater migration). For the purpose of this assessment, a representative mix of the radionuclides of importance and their concentrations in ground water beneath the NTS were identified from measurements of radionuclide concentrations in groundwater samples-of-opportunity collected at the NTS. Transport of radionuclide-contaminated ground water offsite was evaluated using a travel-time-transport approach. At both locations of interest, potential human-health risk was calculated for an individual ingesting radionuclide-contaminated ground water over the course of a 70-y lifetime. Uncertainties about human physiological attributes, as well as about estimates of physical detriment per unit of radioactive material, were quantified and incorporated into the estimates of risk. The maximum potential excess lifetime risk of cancer mortality estimated for an individual at the offsite location ranges from 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, and at the onsite location ranges from 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} to 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}2}. Both the offsite and the onsite estimates of risk are dominated by the lifetime doses from tritium. For the assessment of radionuclides in ground water, the critical uncertainty is their concentration today under the entire NTS.

  11. GIS-based assessment of the biomass potential from phytoremediation of contaminated agricultural land in the Campine region in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedicated energy crop cultivation is expected to be the prevalent form of biomass production for reaching renewable energy targets set by the European Union. However, there are some concerns with regard to its sustainability. This study demonstrates how this problem can be evaded by applying phytoremediation, i.e. the use of plants to remove pollutants from moderately contaminated soils. By selecting the appropriate plants a considerable biomass flow is produced without taking in scarce agricultural land, while simultaneously remediating the soil to levels of contamination below threshold values. Since phytoremediation is only applicable within a limited range of soil pollutant concentrations, the outer values of this range have to be determined at first. Subsequently, a Geographic Information System (GIS) is needed to perform further analyses. The contamination in the region is predicted using GIS, after which the agricultural area is determined that can be committed to energy crop cultivation. This way, the biomass potential and the resulting bioenergy potential from phytoremediation can be assessed. In this paper the Campine region in Belgium, a region diffusely contaminated with heavy metals like cadmium (Cd), is examined. It is illustrated that more than 2000 ha of agricultural land hold Cd concentrations exceeding guide values set by the Flemish Government. However, a large majority of these soils can be remediated by phytoremediation within a reasonable time span of 42 years. Concurrently, a significant amount of biomass is supplied for renewable energy production. -- Highlights: → More than 2000 ha of agricultural land have elevated Cd concentrations. → 87% can be remediated within 42 years by phytoremediation. → Annual biomass flow of 19 067 Mg for 21 years.

  12. Presenting evidence-based health information for people with multiple sclerosis: the IN-DEEP project protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Sophie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly, evidence-based health information, in particular evidence from systematic reviews, is being made available to lay audiences, in addition to health professionals. Research efforts have focused on different formats for the lay presentation of health information. However, there is a paucity of data on how patients integrate evidence-based health information with other factors such as their preferences for information and experiences with information-seeking. The aim of this project is to explore how people with multiple sclerosis (MS integrate health information with their needs, experiences, preferences and values and how these factors can be incorporated into an online resource of evidence-based health information provision for people with MS and their families. Methods This project is an Australian-Italian collaboration between researchers, MS societies and people with MS. Using a four-stage mixed methods design, a model will be developed for presenting evidence-based health information on the Internet for people with MS and their families. This evidence-based health information will draw upon systematic reviews of MS interventions from The Cochrane Library. Each stage of the project will build on the last. After conducting focus groups with people with MS and their family members (Stage 1, we will develop a model for summarising and presenting Cochrane MS reviews that is integrated with supporting information to aid understanding and decision making. This will be reviewed and finalised with people with MS, family members, health professionals and MS Society staff (Stage 2, before being uploaded to the Internet and evaluated (Stages 3 and 4. Discussion This project aims to produce accessible and meaningful evidence-based health information about MS for use in the varied decision making and management situations people encounter in everyday life. It is expected that the findings will be relevant to broader

  13. Development of a low cost, GPS-based upgrade to a standard handheld gamma detector for mapping environmental radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low cost extension to a standard handheld radiation monitor was developed, allowing one to perform outdoor georeferenced gamma measurements. It consists of a commercial wireless Bluetooth[reg] GPS receiver, a commercial RS-232 to Bluetooth[reg] converter combined with a standard Bluetooth[reg] enabled pocket personal computer (PPC). The system is intended for use in difficult to access areas, typically for foot campaigns. As the operator walks, a straightforward homemade visual basic program alternately reads GPS position and gamma dose rate into the PPC, creating a data log. This allows a single operator on foot to map between 50 and 200 ha of environmental radiation per day in very rugged areas, depending on the accessibility of the terrain and the detail required. On a test field with known contamination, a spatial precision of about 5-10 m was obtainable. The device was also used to reveal complex contamination patterns in the flooding zones of a radioactively contaminated small river

  14. Contaminated Aquatic Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaglal, Kendrick

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 relating to the assessment, evaluation and remediation of contaminated aquatic sediments is presented. The review is divided into the following main sections: policy and guidance, methodology, distribution, fate and transport, risk, toxicity and remediation. PMID:27620103

  15. Refining the Journal Club Presentations of Postgraduate Students in Seven Clinical Departments for Better Evidence-based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herur, A; Kolagi, S; Ramadurg, U; Hiremath, CS; Hadimani, CP; Goudar, SS

    2016-01-01

    Background: A gap between best practice and actual clinical care exists and this can be overcome by evidence-based practice (EBP), which is essential to improve the clinical decision making. A strategy to reduce deficits in care provision is to train the postgraduate students in the practice of EBP in the journal clubs as evidence from medical colleges in India reveals that current format of journal club presentations is unsatisfactory. Aim: The aim of the present study was to refine the journal club presentations of postgraduate students of clinical departments and to study the effectiveness of EBP training in them for better EBP. Subjects and Methods: This study was conducted in S. Nijalingappa Medical College, Bagalkot, Karnataka, India, and it was a pre- and post-trial. This study was a pre- and post-trial done during the journal club presentations of postgraduate students from clinical departments. Postgraduate students' understanding of concepts about EBP was assessed using Fresno test questionnaire in traditional journal club presentation. A hands-on session incorporating steps of EBP was imparted to them. Soon after the session, each student was assessed. In the next journal club presentation, 1 week later, the students were assessed again with the same questionnaire by the same faculty. Scores of the postgraduate students, before and after intervention (immediate and 1 week later), were compared. Data were analyzed by paired t-test using SPSS. Results: An increase in mean posttest scores was seen immediately and also 1 week later as compared to the pretest scores. The scores also increased significantly, when each step of EBP was considered. Conclusions: Incorporating teaching of EBP in journal club presentations improved the competencies of postgraduate students in clinical decision making. PMID:27398252

  16. Costs of groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two factors determine the cost of groundwater contamination: (1) the ways in which water was being used or was expected to be used in the future and (2) the physical characteristics of the setting that constrain the responses available to regain lost uses or to prevent related damages to human health and the environment. Most contamination incidents can be managed at a low enough cost that uses will not be foreclosed. It is important to take into account the following when considering costs: (1) natural cleansing through recharge and dilution can take many years; (2) it is difficult and costly to identify the exact area and expected path of a contamination plume; and (3) treatment or replacement of contaminated water often may represent the cost-effective strategy for managing the event. The costs of contamination include adverse health effects, containment and remediation, treatment and replacement costs. In comparing the costs and benefits of prevention programs with those of remediation, replacement or treatment, it is essential to adjust the cost/benefit numbers by the probability of their actual occurrence. Better forecasts of water demand are needed to predict more accurately the scarcity of new supply and the associated cost of replacement. This research should include estimates of the price elasticity of water demand and the possible effect on demand of more rational cost-based pricing structures. Research and development of techniques for in situ remediation should be encouraged

  17. Consumer Product in vitro digestion model: bioaccessibility of contaminants from toys and application in risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen AG; Rompelberg CJM; Brandon EFA; Kamp E van de; Duits MR; Versantvoort CHM; Engelen JGM van; Sips AJAM; SIR; ARO

    2005-01-01

    There are only a limit number of regulatory standard for contaminants present in toys. These regulatory standards mainly concern metals. These regulatory standards are based on several assumptions, for example the amount of toy swallowed by a child. In addition, for other contaminants other than ce

  18. Remediation of contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At least three types of zones of contamination exist whenever there is a chemical release. The impact of Non-Aqueous-Phase Liquids (NAPL) on soils and groundwater, together with the ultimate transport and migration of constituent chemicals in their dissolved or sorbed states, had led environmentalists to develop several techniques for cleaning a contaminated soil. Zone 1 represents the unsaturated zone which could be contaminated to retention capacity by both Dense Non-Aqueous-Phase Liquids (DNAPL) and Light Non-Aqueous-Phase Liquids (LNAPL). Zone 2 represents residual DNAPL or LNAPL contamination found below the groundwater table in the saturated zone. Zone 3 is represented by either the presence of NAPL dissolved in the aqueous phase, volatilized in the unsaturated zone or sorbed to either saturated or unsaturated soils. Cleanup of petroleum contaminated soils is presented in this paper. Among several techniques developed for this purpose, in-situ biological remediation is discussed in detail as a technique that does not involve excavation, thus, the costs and disruption of excavating soil are eliminated

  19. Environmental Contaminants in Foodstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Túri-Szerletics

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Consumers have specific concerns about food contaminants but often lack themeans to make appropriate judgements on what is high risk and what is not. Contaminantsin foods can be grouped according to their origin and nature. Environmental contaminantsof food-safety concern includes toxic metals and elements, organometallic compounds,agricultural chemicals and persistent organic pollutants such as halogenated hydrocarbonpesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons,phthalates, nirates, nitrites. These contaminants may present a potential hazard for humanhealth if exposure exceeds tolerable levels. This article shows the characteristics and thedietary intake of these elements and compounds. Further works need to concentrate onmechanism of different contaminants toxicity and metabolism, reevaluation of acceptablelimits, and their control in foods and in the environment.

  20. Accuracy and uncertainty analysis of soil Bbf spatial distribution estimation at a coking plant-contaminated site based on normalization geostatistical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Geng; Niu, Junjie; Zhang, Chao; Guo, Guanlin

    2015-12-01

    Data distribution is usually skewed severely by the presence of hot spots in contaminated sites. This causes difficulties for accurate geostatistical data transformation. Three types of typical normal distribution transformation methods termed the normal score, Johnson, and Box-Cox transformations were applied to compare the effects of spatial interpolation with normal distribution transformation data of benzo(b)fluoranthene in a large-scale coking plant-contaminated site in north China. Three normal transformation methods decreased the skewness and kurtosis of the benzo(b)fluoranthene, and all the transformed data passed the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test threshold. Cross validation showed that Johnson ordinary kriging has a minimum root-mean-square error of 1.17 and a mean error of 0.19, which was more accurate than the other two models. The area with fewer sampling points and that with high levels of contamination showed the largest prediction standard errors based on the Johnson ordinary kriging prediction map. We introduce an ideal normal transformation method prior to geostatistical estimation for severely skewed data, which enhances the reliability of risk estimation and improves the accuracy for determination of remediation boundaries. PMID:26300353

  1. Application of the base catalyzed decomposition process to treatment of PCB-contaminated insulation and other materials associated with US Navy vessels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Zacher, A.H.; Gano, S.R.

    1996-09-01

    The BCD process was applied to dechlorination of two types of PCB-contaminated materials generated from Navy vessel decommissioning activities at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard: insulation of wool felt impregnated with PCB, and PCB-containing paint chips/debris from removal of paint from metal surfaces. The BCD process is a two-stage, low-temperature chemical dehalogenation process. In Stage 1, the materials are mixed with sodium bicarbonate and heated to 350 C. The volatilized halogenated contaminants (eg, PCBs, dioxins, furans), which are collected in a small volume of particulates and granular activated carbon, are decomposed by the liquid-phase reaction (Stage 2) in a stirred-tank reactor, using a high-boiling-point hydrocarbon oil as the reaction medium, with addition of a hydrogen donor, a base (NaOH), and a catalyst. The tests showed that treating wool felt insulation and paint chip wastes with Stage 2 on a large scale is feasible, but compared with current disposal costs for PCB-contaminated materials, using Stage 2 would not be economical at this time. For paint chips generated from shot/sand blasting, the solid-phase BCD process (Stage 1) should be considered, if paint removal activities are accelerated in the future.

  2. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Sampling and analysis plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

  3. Electrode contamination effects of retarding potential analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H K; Oyama, K-I; Cheng, C Z

    2014-01-01

    The electrode contamination in electrostatic analyzers such as Langmuir probes and retarding potential analyzers (RPA) is a serious problem for space measurements. The contamination layer acts as extra capacitance and resistance and leads to distortion in the measured I-V curve, which leads to erroneous measurement results. There are two main effects of the contamination layer: one is the impedance effect and the other is the charge attachment and accumulation due to the capacitance. The impedance effect can be reduced or eliminated by choosing the proper sweeping frequency. However, for RPA the charge accumulation effect becomes serious because the capacitance of the contamination layer is much larger than that of the Langmuir probe of similar dimension. The charge accumulation on the retarding potential grid causes the effective potential, that ions experience, to be changed from the applied voltage. Then, the number of ions that can pass through the retarding potential grid to reach the collector and, thus, the measured ion current are changed. This effect causes the measured ion drift velocity and ion temperature to be changed from the actual values. The error caused by the RPA electrode contamination is expected to be significant for sounding rocket measurements with low rocket velocity (1-2 km/s) and low ion temperature of 200-300 K in the height range of 100-300 km. In this paper we discuss the effects associated with the RPA contaminated electrodes based on theoretical analysis and experiments performed in a space plasma operation chamber. Finally, the development of a contamination-free RPA for sounding rocket missions is presented. PMID:24517809

  4. Presentation of a research project addressed to the realisation of a diamond-based cellular biosensing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarino, Luca; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio; Genovese, Marco; Gosso, Sara; Olivero, Paolo; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Picollo, Federico; Traina, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    In this proceedings we will present a research project financed by Piedmont regional government (Italy; finalized to the realization and commercialization of functional devices for cellular bio-sensing based on diamond. Partners of the project are: Crisel Instruments, Torino University, Torino Polytechnic, INRIM, Politronica, Bionica Tech, Ulm University Here the main features of the final devices will be briefly summarized. We envisage an active diamond-based cellular substrate that can simultaneously stimulate and detect a variety of signals (chemical, optical, electrical) to and from neuroendocrine cells, in a fully biocompatible environment for the cellular system under test. Such a device can be realized by fully exploiting the peculiar properties of diamond: optical transparency, biocompatibility, chemical inertness, accessibility to a conductive graphite-like phase; properties that will be further explored and tested during the project.

  5. A method for tuning the excitation wavelength of an LED light source during fluorescence-based cystoscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvold, Lars R.; Hermannn, Gregers G.

    2016-02-01

    In clinical applications of fluorescence-guided endoscopy of the bladder (cystoscopy) it can be observed that the contrast in light from autofluorescence and from photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) varies from patient to patient. To compensate for this effect, a new method is presented for tuning the wavelength of a LED-based light source during fluorescence guided endoscopy of the bladder i.e. photodynamic diagnosis of bladder tumours. In the present embodiment, the wavelength of the LED source, developed in our laboratory, can be tuned to vary the excitation wavelength of both the sensitised fluorescence in the tumours (PDD) as well as the native fluorescence of the bladder mucosa and blood vessels. The contrast of the image observed through the CCD-camera attached to the cystoscope is thereby increased. In this way, patient to patient variations in autofluorescence and in sensitised fluorescence of tumours can be compensated for during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy in the clinic.

  6. PRESENT CONDITION OF FOOD WASTE RECYCLING LOOP BASED ON RECYCLING PROJECT CERTIFICATION OF THE FOOD WASTE RECYCLING LAW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Tomoko; Kanaya, Ken

    Purpose of this research is to clear present condition of food waste recycling loops based on recycling project certification of the Food Waste Recycling Law. Method of this research is questionnaire survey to companies constituting the loops. Findings of this research are as follows: 1. Proponents of the loop is most often the recycling companies. 2. Food waste recycling rate is 61% for the food retailing industry and 81% for the food service industry. These values are higher than the national average in 2006. The effect of the revision of recycling project certification is suggested.

  7. Plutonium contamination in the environment. September 1977-November 1989 (A Bibliography from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts data base). Report for September 1977-November 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the ecological impact of plutonium contamination in the environment. Topics include plutonium contamination in freshwater and marine sediments, plutonium bioaccumulation, plutonium transport in the food chain, plutonium contamination bioindicators, methods of analysis, plutonium genotoxicity, plutonium contamination in soil and groundwater, and plutonium contamination from nuclear fallout and nuclear facilities. Plutonium distribution changes due to stratification in oxic and anoxic environments are described. (Contains 83 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  8. Combined microscopies study of the C-contamination induced by extreme-ultraviolet radiation: A surface-dependent secondary-electron-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SiO2 and Al2O3 surfaces exposed to periodically modulated extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light (λ = 46.9 nm) have been investigated at the μm scale by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Kelvin probe force microscopy. The formation of a carbon contamination layer preserving the same periodical modulation of the EUV dose has been observed. The mechanisms of hydrocarbon molecules deposition have been studied with the help of correlation plots between the modulated Auger signal and the corresponding EUV dose. A surface-dependent secondary-electron-based model has been proposed.

  9. Combined microscopies study of the C-contamination induced by extreme-ultraviolet radiation: A surface-dependent secondary-electron-based model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezioso, S.; Donarelli, M.; Bisti, F.; Palladino, L.; Santucci, S.; Ottaviano, L. [Dip. di Fisica, Universita dell' Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Spadoni, S.; Avaro, L. [Micron, Process R and D, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Liscio, A.; Palermo, V. [CNR-ISOF, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-05-14

    SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces exposed to periodically modulated extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light ({lambda} = 46.9 nm) have been investigated at the {mu}m scale by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Kelvin probe force microscopy. The formation of a carbon contamination layer preserving the same periodical modulation of the EUV dose has been observed. The mechanisms of hydrocarbon molecules deposition have been studied with the help of correlation plots between the modulated Auger signal and the corresponding EUV dose. A surface-dependent secondary-electron-based model has been proposed.

  10. Technical papers presented at a DOE meeting on criteria for cleanup of transuranium elements in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transuranium element soil contamination cleanup experience gained from nuclear weapons accidents and cleanup at Eniwetok Atoll was reviewed. Presentations have been individually abstracted for inclusion in the data base

  11. Technical papers presented at a DOE meeting on criteria for cleanup of transuranium elements in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-09-01

    Transuranium element soil contamination cleanup experience gained from nuclear weapons accidents and cleanup at Eniwetok Atoll was reviewed. Presentations have been individually abstracted for inclusion in the data base. (ACR)

  12. Contamination weeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses experiments conducted to determined the applicability of a chemical ion-exchange model to characterize the problem of nuclear fuel transportation cask contamination and release (weeping). Surface charge characteristics of Cr2O3 and stainless steel powders have been measured to determined the potential for ion exchange at metal oxide aqueous interfaces. The solubility of pool contaminant Co and Cs electrolytes at varying pH and the adsorption characteristics of these ions on Cr2O3 and stainless steel powders in aqueous slurries have been studied. Experiments show that Co ions do reversibly adsorb on these powder surfaces and, more specifically, that adsorption occurs in the nominal pH range (pH-4-6) of a boric acid-moderated spent fuel pool. Desorption has been demonstrated to occur at pH ≤ 3. Cs ions also have been shown to have an affinity for these surfaces although the reversibility of Cs+ bonding by H+ ion exchange has not been fully demonstrated. These results have significant implications for effective decontamination and coating processes used on nuclear fuel transportation casks

  13. GeoChip-based analysis of functional microbial communities in a bioreduced uranium-contaminated aquifer during reoxidation by oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nostrand, J.D.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; Deng, Y.; Carley, J.; Carroll, S.; He, Z.; Gu, B.; Luo, J.; Criddle, C. S.; Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P. M.; Tiedje, J. M.; Hazen, T. C.; Zhou, J.

    2009-07-15

    A pilot-scale system was established for in situ biostimulation of U(VI) reduction by ethanol addition at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Field Research Center (Oak Ridge, TN). After achieving U(VI) reduction, stability of the bioreduced U(IV) was evaluated under conditions of (i) resting (no ethanol injection), (ii) reoxidation by introducing dissolved oxygen (DO), and (iii) reinjection of ethanol. GeoChip, a functional gene array with probes for N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation genes, was used for monitoring groundwater microbial communities. High diversity of all major functional groups was observed during all experimental phases. The microbial community was extremely responsive to ethanol, showing a substantial change in community structure with increased gene number and diversity after ethanol injections resumed. While gene numbers showed considerable variations, the relative abundance (i.e. percentage of each gene category) of most gene groups changed little. During the reoxidation period, U(VI) increased, suggesting reoxidation of reduced U(IV). However, when introduction of DO was stopped, U(VI) reduction resumed and returned to pre-reoxidation levels. These findings suggest that the community in this system can be stimulated and that the ability to reduce U(VI) can be maintained by the addition of electron donors. This biostimulation approach may potentially offer an effective means for the bioremediation of U(VI)-contaminated sites.

  14. Decision-making support on rehabilitation of radioactive contaminated territories based on the use of site-specific PRANA DSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geographic Information System (GIS) PRANA is a Decision Support System (DSS) for countermeasure analysis in agriculture in the long-term period of liquidating the consequences of a nuclear accident. However, though PRANA(-98) is used at the Chernobyl Department (Ministry of Agriculture) and at the Bryansk Centre of Agrochemical Radiology for practical needs, but its possibilities are limited by the questions of agriculture. Conceptual requirements to GIS-DSSs, which are some considerable extension of the PRANA(-98) and meet all the main demands to DSSs for practical use, research and training on rehabilitation of contaminated territories, were elaborated in contacts with interested parties in Russia: Ministry of Agriculture, Minatom, Emercom, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Science and Administration of Bryansk region. Realisation of the planned requirements and tasks have been achieved not through developing the only universal system, but through creating several GIS-DSSs (family of PRANA systems, each of them is intended for analysis of specific range of problems): - GIS-DSS for practical use (with introduction at appropriate Ministries and Centres); - GIS-DSS for research and for scientific and practical estimations; - GIS-DSS for training of the specialists; - GIS-DSS as well as computer realisation of thematic blocks for use as lectures, seminars and tests/questionnaires for aims of education (students, specialists); - elements of distributed systems and remote access to components of GIS-DSS (for practical use, training and education). The following sections, which have been realised in accordance with the chosen level of the system, represent in the aggregate a basis of each GIS-DSS indicated above: - databases (radioecological, economic, demographic and other monitoring data); - libraries of electronic maps (including different layers of vector maps of land use for territories under consideration); - spatial analysis of various data from databases

  15. Health effects from long-range transported contaminants in Arctic top predators: An integrated review based on studies of polar bears and relevant model species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Christian

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a thorough overview of the health effects from the complexed biomagnified mixture of long-range transported industrial organochlorines (OCs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and mercury (Hg) on polar bear (Ursus maritimus) health. Multiple scientific studies of polar bears indicate negative relationships between exposure to these contaminants and health parameters; however, these are all of a correlative nature and do not represent true cause-and-effects. Therefore, information from controlled studies of farmed Norwegian Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) and housed East and West Greenland sledge dogs (Canis familiaris) were included as supportive weight of evidence in the clarification of contaminant exposure and health effects in polar bears. The review showed that hormone and vitamin concentrations, liver, kidney and thyroid gland morphology as well as reproductive and immune systems of polar bears are likely to be influenced by contaminant exposure. Furthermore, exclusively based on polar bear contaminant studies, bone density reduction and neurochemical disruption and DNA hypomethylation of the brain stem seemed to occur. The range of tissue concentration, at which these alterations were observed in polar bears, were ca. 1-70,000 ng/g lw for OCs (blood plasma concentrations of some PCB metabolites even higher), ca. 1-1000 ng/g lw for PBDEs and for PFCs and Hg 114-3052 ng/g ww and 0.1-50 microg/g ww, respectively. Similar concentrations were found in farmed foxes and housed sledge dogs while the lack of dose response designs did not allow an estimation of threshold levels for oral exposure and accumulated tissue concentrations. Nor was it possible to pinpoint a specific group of contaminants being more important than others nor analyze their interactions. For East Greenland polar bears the corresponding daily SigmaOC and SigmaPBDE oral exposure was estimated to be 35 and 0.34 microg/kg body

  16. Screening halogenated environmental contaminants in biota based on isotopic pattern and mass defect provided by high resolution mass spectrometry profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariou, Ronan; Omer, Elsa; Léon, Alexis; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2016-09-14

    In the present work, we addressed the question of global seeking/screening organohalogenated compounds in a large panel of complex biological matrices, with a particular focus on unknown chemicals that may be considered as potential emerging hazards. A fishing strategy was developed based on untargeted profiling among full scan acquisition datasets provided by high resolution mass spectrometry. Since large datasets arise from such profiling, filtering useful information stands as a central question. In this way, we took advantage of the exact mass differences between Cl and Br isotopes. Indeed, our workflow involved an innovative Visual Basic for Applications script aiming at pairing features according to this mass difference, in order to point out potential organohalogenated clusters, preceded by an automated peak picking step based on the centWave function (xcms package of open access R programming environment). Then, H/Cl-scale mass defect plots were used to visualize the datasets before and after filtering. The filtering script was successfully applied to a dataset generated upon liquid chromatography coupled to ESI(-)-HRMS measurement from one eel muscle extract, allowing for realistic manual investigations of filtered clusters. Starting from 9789 initial obtained features, 1994 features were paired in 589 clusters. Hexabromocyclododecane, chlorinated paraffin series and various other compounds have been identified or tentatively identified, allowing thus broad screening of organohalogenated compounds in this extract. Although realistic, manual review of paired clusters remains time consuming and much effort should be devoted to automation. PMID:27566348

  17. Human Contamination in Public Genome Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, Kirill; Imanishi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Contamination in genome assembly can lead to wrong or confusing results when using such genome as reference in sequence comparison. Although bacterial contamination is well known, the problem of human-originated contamination received little attention. In this study we surveyed 45,735 available genome assemblies for evidence of human contamination. We used lineage specificity to distinguish between contamination and conservation. We found that 154 genome assemblies contain fragments that with high confidence originate as contamination from human DNA. Majority of contaminating human sequences were present in the reference human genome assembly for over a decade. We recommend that existing contaminated genomes should be revised to remove contaminated sequence, and that new assemblies should be thoroughly checked for presence of human DNA before submitting them to public databases. PMID:27611326

  18. Development and Performance of Detectors for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment with an Increased Sensitivity Based on a Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Beta Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Donald D.; /Case Western Reserve U.

    2004-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) uses cryogenically-cooled detectors made of germanium and silicon in an attempt to detect dark matter in the form of Weakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The expected interaction rate of these particles is on the order of 1/kg/day, far below the 200/kg/day expected rate of background interactions after passive shielding and an active cosmic ray muon veto. Our detectors are instrumented to make a simultaneous measurement of both the ionization energy and thermal energy deposited by the interaction of a particle with the crystal substrate. A comparison of these two quantities allows for the rejection of a background of electromagnetically-interacting particles at a level of better than 99.9%. The dominant remaining background at a depth of {approx} 11 m below the surface comes from fast neutrons produced by cosmic ray muons interacting in the rock surrounding the experiment. Contamination of our detectors by a beta emitter can add an unknown source of unrejected background. In the energy range of interest for a WIMP study, electrons will have a short penetration depth and preferentially interact near the surface. Some of the ionization signal can be lost to the charge contacts there and a decreased ionization signal relative to the thermal signal will cause a background event which interacts at the surface to be misidentified as a signal event. We can use information about the shape of the thermal signal pulse to discriminate against these surface events. Using a subset of our calibration set which contains a large fraction of electron events, we can characterize the expected behavior of surface events and construct a cut to remove them from our candidate signal events. This thesis describes the development of the 6 detectors (4 x 250 g Ge and 2 x 100 g Si) used in the 2001-2002 CDMS data run at the Stanford Underground Facility with a total of 119 livedays of data. The preliminary results presented are based on the

  19. Recent progresses in the understanding of the elastic and anelastic properties of H-free, H-doped and H-contaminated NiTi based alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Mazzolai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on the influence of interstitial hydrogen and alloy compositional changes on the internal friction (IF spectrum and elastic Young's modulus (E of NiTi based shape memory alloys. In the martensitically transforming binary alloys Ni50+xTi50-x (x≤1.3 vacuum annealed and furnace cooled (H-free, besides the well known IF peak associated with the martensitic transition two additional non-thermally activated peaks (P150K and P200K′ are present due to some sort of second-order phase transitions. In martensitically transforming Ni50+xTi50-x and Ti50Ni50-yCuy alloys doped with hydrogen two thermally activated peaks, PTWH and PH, appear which originate from stress-assisted motions of H-twin boundary complexes and isolated H-elastic dipoles (Snoek effect, respectively. In a H-free martensitically non-trasforming alloy (x=2, besides the non-thermally activated peak P150K, a frequency dependent dip is observed in the E(T curves at a temperature Tg. This dip is similar to that reported in the literature for two other non-transforming alloys (x=1.5 and x=2.5, which, however, were also found to exhibit a thermally activated IF peak just below Tg. Most likely, these two alloys were contaminated with hydrogen during the preliminary solubilization in argon atmosphere and subsequent water quenching treatments given to them. The Young's modulus dip and the lower temperature IF peak have been both attributed to a novel type of phase transition reported in the literature as “strain glass transition”. The introduction of hydrogen into the non-transforming alloy with x=2 enhances the Young's modulus dip and gives rise to the H-Snoek peak PH just below Tg, which clearly appears to be the counterpart of the peak observed in the alloys (x=1.5 and x=2.5 solubilized in argon atmosphere and water quenched. The conclusion was reached in the present work that this last peak is not related to the strain glass transition but is rather an H

  20. Contaminant Boundary at the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) have reached agreement on a corrective action strategy applicable to address the extent and potential impact of radionuclide contamination of groundwater at underground nuclear test locations. This strategy is described in detail in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 2000). As part of the corrective action strategy, the nuclear detonations that occurred underground were identified as geographically distinct corrective action units (CAUs). The strategic objective for each CAU is to estimate over a 1,000-yr time period, with uncertainty quantified, the three-dimensional extent of groundwater contamination that would be considered unsafe for domestic and municipal use. Two types of boundaries (contaminant and compliance) are discussed in the FFACO that will map the three-dimensional extent of radionuclide contamination. The contaminant boundary will identify the region wi th 95 percent certainty that contaminants do not exist above a threshold value. It will be prepared by the DOE and presented to NDEP. The compliance boundary will be produced as a result of negotiation between the DOE and NDEP, and can be coincident with, or differ from, the contaminant boundary. Two different thresholds are considered for the contaminant boundary. One is based on the enforceable National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for radionuclides, which were developed as a requirement of the Safe Drinking Water Act. The other is a risk-based threshold considering applicable lifetime excess cancer-risk-based criteria The contaminant boundary for the Faultless underground nuclear test at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is calculated using a newly developed groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model that incorporates aspects of both the original three-dimensional model (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and the two-dimensional model developed for the Faultless data decision

  1. Multi-view Hilbert transformation in full-ring-transducer-array based photoacoustic computed tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Li, Guo; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles to form images of absorbed optical energy density within tissue. Based on the photoacoustic effect, PAT directly and quantitatively measures specific optical absorption. A full-ring ultrasonic transducer array based photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system was recently developed for small animal whole-body imaging with a full-view detection angle and high in-plane resolution (100 µm). However, due to the band-pass frequency response of the piezoelectric transducer elements, the reconstructed images present bipolar (both positive and negative) pixel values, which is artificial and counterintuitive for physicians and biologists seeking to interpret the image. Moreover, bipolar pixel values hinder quantification of physiological parameters, such as oxygen saturation and blood flow speed. Unipolar images can be obtained by deconvolving the raw channel data with the transducer's electrical impulse response and applying non-negativity during iteration, but this process requires complex transducer modeling and time-consuming computation. Here, we present a multi-view Hilbert transformation method to recover the unipolar initial pressure for full-ring PACT. Multi-view Hilbert transformation along the acoustic wave propagation direction minimizes reconstruction artifacts during envelope extraction and maintains the signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images. The in-plane isotropic spatial resolution of this method was quantified to 168 μm within a 20 × 20 mm2 field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was first validated by numerical simulations and then demonstrated with ex-vivo mouse brain structural imaging and in-vivo mouse wholebody imaging.

  2. [Evaluation of the migration of contaminants from building materials produced on the base of blast-furnace slags].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugin, K G; Vaysman, Ya I

    2014-01-01

    There is experimentally established the change of the migratory activity of pollutants from building materials produced from blast furnace slag throughout their life cycle in the form of a nonlinear wave-like nature as there are appeared newly opened surfaces of a contact with aggressive waters in the process of gradual crushing of materials as a result of destructive mechanical effects on him and corrosive waters with varying pH values. There are established regularities of the migration activity ofpollutants (on the example of heavy metals) as directly dependent on the newly opening surface of the contact of the material with water having a various pH value. There is shown an expediency of introduction of alterations in the procedure for sanitary hygienic assessment of building materials with the addition of industrial waste (Methodical Instructions 2.1.674-97), allowing to take into account the migration of contaminants from them throughout the life cycle. PMID:25842493

  3. John Adams Lecture | Accelerator-Based Neutrino Physics: Past, Present and Future by Kenneth Long | 8 December

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    John Adams Lecture: Accelerator-Based Neutrino Physics: Past, Present and Future by Dr. Kenneth Long (Imperial College London & STFC).   Monday, 8 December 2014 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at CERN ( 503-1-001 - Council Chamber ) Abstract: The study of the neutrino is the study of physics beyond the Standard Model. We now know that the neutrinos have mass and that neutrino mixing occurs causing neutrino flavour to oscillate as neutrinos propagate through space and time. Further, some measurements can be interpreted as hints for new particles known as sterile neutrinos. The measured values of the mixing parameters make it possible that the matter-antimatter (CP) symmetry may be violated through the mixing process. The consequences of observing CP-invariance violation in neutrinos would be profound. To discover CP-invariance violation will require measurements of exquisite precision. Accelerator-based neutrino sources are central to the future programme and advances in technique are required ...

  4. Identification of radionuclides present in trace amount in a high resolution gamma spectrum using wavelet transformation based denoising

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For fast and non-destructive qualitative and quantitative estimate of routinely released gamma emitting radionuclides from nuclear facilities, Gamma Spectrometry is carried out. Presence of instrumental, statistical noise and Compton continuum contributions from the higher energy radionuclides proper estimation of activity becomes difficult. So filtering of the spectrum is very important for identification and evaluation of area under the gamma peak. In this work, method based on wavelet transformation (WT) is implemented for denoising of high resolution gamma spectrum obtained from plant leaves samples using an HPGe detector. Work describes the details of the WT and its application for filtering the noise in a gamma spectrum and identification of 208Tl, 137Cs, 60Co, 40K present in trace amount with an enhanced signal to noise ratio (SNR). For low activity environmental sample (plant leaves), WT based methodology provide significant improvement in SNR (about twofold). With WT methodology, the presence of 60Co (1173 and 1332 keV) and 208Tl (2612 keV) were detected with 99.7% confidence, which were not detected in the original spectrum

  5. A remediation strategy based on active phytoremediation followed by natural attenuation in a soil contaminated by pyrite waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytoremediation of metal-polluted soils can be promoted by the proper use of soil amendments and agricultural practices. A 4-year phytoremediation programme was applied to a site affected by the toxic spill of pyrite residue at Aznalcollar (Spain) in 1998, contaminated with heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd) and arsenic. This consisted of active phytoremediation, using organic amendments (cow manure and compost) and lime and growing two successive crops of Brassica juncea (L.) Czern., followed by natural attenuation without further intervention. Changes in soil pH, extractable metal and As concentrations, organic carbon content and microbial biomass was evaluated. The initial oxidation of metal sulphides from pyrite residues released soluble metals and reduced soil pH to extremely acidic values (mean 4.1, range 2.0-7.0). The addition of lime (up to 64 t ha-1) increased soil pH to adequate values for plant growth, resulting in a significant decrease in DTPA-extractable metal concentrations in all plots. Natural attenuation phase showed also a decrease in extractable metals. Organic treatments increased the soil total organic carbon, which led to higher values of microbial biomass (11.6, 15.2 and 14.9 g kg-1 TOC and 123, 170 and 275 μg g-1 biomass-C in control, compost and manure plots, respectively). Active phytoremediation followed by natural attenuation, was effective for remediation of this pyrite-polluted soil. - The addition of lime and organic amendments decreased heavy metal solubility and promoted Natural attenuation of a recently-contaminated soil

  6. Probability mapping of contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exhaustive characterization of a contaminated site is a physical and practical impossibility. Descriptions of the nature, extent, and level of contamination, as well as decisions regarding proposed remediation activities, must be made in a state of uncertainty based upon limited physical sampling. The probability mapping approach illustrated in this paper appears to offer site operators a reasonable, quantitative methodology for many environmental remediation decisions and allows evaluation of the risk associated with those decisions. For example, output from this approach can be used in quantitative, cost-based decision models for evaluating possible site characterization and/or remediation plans, resulting in selection of the risk-adjusted, least-cost alternative. The methodology is completely general, and the techniques are applicable to a wide variety of environmental restoration projects. The probability-mapping approach is illustrated by application to a contaminated site at the former DOE Feed Materials Production Center near Fernald, Ohio. Soil geochemical data, collected as part of the Uranium-in-Soils Integrated Demonstration Project, have been used to construct a number of geostatistical simulations of potential contamination for parcels approximately the size of a selective remediation unit (the 3-m width of a bulldozer blade). Each such simulation accurately reflects the actual measured sample values, and reproduces the univariate statistics and spatial character of the extant data. Post-processing of a large number of these equally likely statistically similar images produces maps directly showing the probability of exceeding specified levels of contamination (potential clean-up or personnel-hazard thresholds)

  7. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 2, Work plan: Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990 Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential CERCLA removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground-water contamination in the Mad River Valley Aquifer within and across WPAFB boundaries. The action will be based on a Focused Feasibility Study with an Action Memorandum serving as a decision document that is subject to approval by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The first phase (Phase 1) of this effort involves an investigation of ground-water contamination migrating across the southwest boundary of Area C and across Springfield Pike adjacent to Area B. Task 4 of Phase 1 is a field investigation to collect sufficient additional information to evaluate removal alternatives. The field investigation will provide information in the following specific areas of study: water-level data which will be used to permit calibration of the ground-water flow model to a unique time in history; and ground-water quality data which will be used to characterize the current chemical conditions of ground water.

  8. Identification of pets and raccoons as sources of bacterial contamination of urban storm sewers using a sequence-based bacterial source tracking method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Jeffrey L; Thompson, Brooke; Turner, Carrie; Nechvatal, Jordan M; Sheehan, Harry; Bobrin, Janis

    2007-08-01

    In urbanized areas, contaminated storm sewers can feed high bacterial levels into free-flowing streams and rivers. Although illicit connections sometimes cause contamination, urban wildlife and free-roaming domesticated or feral pets may be another source. After eliminating illicit connections as sources of high levels of Escherichia coli in two storm sewers tributary to the Huron River in southeast Michigan, the roles of urban wildlife, pets, humans, and birds were investigated using a sequence-based bacterial source tracking technology. After enumeration, E. coli were isolated from water samples collected during spring to fall, 2005. Sequences in the gene beta-glucuronidase of each isolate were compared to sequences of reference strains from humans, raccoons, pets (cats and dogs), and birds. The highest percentage source for six of ten events was pets (ANOVA, p=0.005). Among isolates attributed to pets, strains from cats occurred more frequently on seven of nine events in which pets had a non-zero probability. High raccoon percentages (up to 60%) occurred in late summer and fall, and varied significantly more than in the spring (F-test), possibly reflecting urban raccoon den-site mobility. The sequence-based bacterial source tracking method suggests that feces from pets and raccoons are important contributors to urban storm sewers. PMID:17540431

  9. Contamination of seven workers with {sup 241}Am; Contaminations de sept travailleurs par {sup 241}Am

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malatova, I.; Beckova, V.; Pospisilova, H.; Filgas, R. [National Radiation Protection Institute, Praha (Czech Republic)

    2005-10-15

    Widespread contamination occurred in the building in which radiation waste was handled. An occurrence of internal contamination of workers was also suspected. Therefore, workers were measured in vivo and bioassay was performed too. Estimation of committed effective dose had to be based on results of excretion analysis as irremovable surface contamination occurred on the skin and hair of workers, thus influencing results of in vivo measurements. The results of bioassay of 7 workers are presented. Intakes and committed effective doses were calculated from excretion data using IMBA Professional Plus software. The best fits for the most of workers were obtained when combination of acute and chronic intakes was used. Acute intakes varied from 135 Bq to 1300 Bq, chronic intakes from 0.03 Bq/d to 0.3 Bq/d. Committed effective doses from 3 to 36 mSv were estimated for individual workers. (author)

  10. Contamination from Russian Northern Fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, from an environmental group known as Bellona and based in Norway, is highly critical of the Russian navy's apparently short-sighted attitude to nuclear power's longer term economic and environmental consequences. Six main sources of radioactive contamination from the activities of the Russian Northern Fleet are summarised, namely, the still increasing numbers of nuclear-powered submarines in service, naval bases, shipyards (including the storage of solid and liquid radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuels), safety problems with service ships providing transport for nuclear materials, the whole unaddressed problem of decommissioning nuclear submarines due to go out of service (eighty-eight vessels at present), and accidents involving nuclear submarines. (UK)

  11. Presentation of the ASTRAL software; Presentation du logiciel ASTRAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This report presents the ASTRAL software (ASTRAL means technical assistance in post-accidental radioprotection) which is aimed to be used as an aid-to-decision tool in the case of an important release of radionuclides in the environment by assessing radionuclide concentration in different environments and food products, determining the potential exposure to irradiation of concerned populations, foreseeing the evolution of the situation, and proposing different scenarios for the management of contaminated areas. The report describes the software general operation, presents the calculation module (main functionalities, concentration index calculation, dose calculation or radiological impact calculation, how countermeasures are taken into account), the data bases (contextual data, data for radio-ecological calculations and for radiological calculations), the software ergonomics (general principles, result selection and display, result printing and input data). Its briefly evokes the development quality assurance, and describes the software implementation architecture

  12. Proceedings of hydrocarbon contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the 1980s witnessed a concentrated effort toward identifying the scientific concerns associated with hydrocarbon contaminated soils, the 1990s offer the hope that even more reliable solutions, both scientific and regulatory, will emerge. The hope for this transition from problem identification to problems solution is evident in these papers from the 5th Annual Conference on Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soils (formerly called Petroleum Contaminated Soils), as the presentations more clearly reflect the maturation of a rapidly evolving field in the areas of chemical analysis, fate, remediation, public health, and regulatory evaluation. This book attempts to address the multidimensional facets of soil contamination by providing various current general perspectives as well as those from the regulatory and the international communities. Technical information is also provided in specific contamination areas such as diesel fuel, as well as analysis and site assessment, remediation, risk assessment, and management

  13. Direct probability mapping of contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exhaustive characterization of a contaminated site is a physical and practical impossibility. Descriptions of the nature, extent, and level of contamination, as well as decisions regarding proposed remediation activities, must be made in a state of uncertainty based upon limited physical sampling. Geostatistical simulation provides powerful tools for investigating contaminant levels, and in particular, for identifying and using the spatial interrelationships among a set of isolated sample values. This additional information can be used to assess the likelihood of encountering contamination at unsampled locations and to evaluate the risk associated with decisions to remediate or not to remediate specific regions within a site. Past operation of the DOE Feed Materials Production Center has contaminated a site near Fernald, Ohio, with natural uranium. Soil geochemical data have been collected as part of the Uranium-in-Soils Integrated Demonstration Project. These data have been used to construct a number of stochastic images of potential contamination for parcels approximately the size of a selective remediation unit. Each such image accurately reflects the actual measured sample values, and reproduces the univariate statistics and spatial character of the extant data. Post-processing of a large number of these equally likely, statistically similar images produces maps directly showing the probability of exceeding specified levels of contamination. Evaluation of the geostatistical simulations can yield maps representing the expected magnitude of the contamination for various regions and other information that may be important in determining a suitable remediation process or in sizing equipment to accomplish the restoration

  14. Transposon leads to contamination of clinical pDNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, I; Gomez-Eerland, R; van den Berg, J H; Oosterhuis, K; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G; Beijnen, J H; Nuijen, B

    2013-07-11

    We report an unexpected contamination during clinical manufacture of a Human Papilomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 encoding plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine, with a transposon originating from the Escherichia coli DH5 host cell genome. During processing, presence of this transposable element, insertion sequence 2 (IS2) in the plasmid vector was not noticed until quality control of the bulk pDNA vaccine when results of restriction digestion, sequencing, and CGE analysis were clearly indicative for the presence of a contaminant. Due to the very low level of contamination, only an insert-specific PCR method was capable of tracing back the presence of the transposon in the source pDNA and master cell bank (MCB). Based on the presence of an uncontrolled contamination with unknown clinical relevance, the product was rejected for clinical use. In order to prevent costly rejection of clinical material, both in-process controls and quality control methods must be sensitive enough to detect such a contamination as early as possible, i.e. preferably during plasmid DNA source generation, MCB production and ultimately during upstream processing. However, as we have shown that contamination early in the process development pipeline (source pDNA, MCB) can be present below limits of detection of generally applied analytical methods, the introduction of "engineered" or transposon-free host cells seems the only 100% effective solution to avoid contamination with movable elements and should be considered when searching for a suitable host cell-vector combination. PMID:23707695

  15. Comparing statistical tests for detecting soil contamination greater than background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) recently issued a report that provides guidance on statistical issues regarding investigation and cleanup of soil and groundwater contamination under the Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Regulation. Included in the report are procedures for determining a background-based cleanup standard and for conducting a 3-step statistical test procedure to decide if a site is contaminated greater than the background standard. The guidance specifies that the State test should only be used if the background and site data are lognormally distributed. The guidance in WSDE allows for using alternative tests on a site-specific basis if prior approval is obtained from WSDE. This report presents the results of a Monte Carlo computer simulation study conducted to evaluate the performance of the State test and several alternative tests for various contamination scenarios (background and site data distributions). The primary test performance criteria are (1) the probability the test will indicate that a contaminated site is indeed contaminated, and (2) the probability that the test will indicate an uncontaminated site is contaminated. The simulation study was conducted assuming the background concentrations were from lognormal or Weibull distributions. The site data were drawn from distributions selected to represent various contamination scenarios. The statistical tests studied are the State test, t test, Satterthwaite's t test, five distribution-free tests, and several tandem tests (wherein two or more tests are conducted using the same data set)

  16. Novel method for cleaning a vacuum chamber from hydrocarbon contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method for cleaning a high vacuum chamber is presented. This method is based on concurrent in situ high-energetic UV light activation of contaminants located in the residual gas and at the vacuum chamber surfaces as well as the in situ generation of highly reactive ozone. Ozone oxidizes the contaminants to volatile species. Investigations by energy-dispersive x-ray analysis of residual gas depositions and mass-spectroscopy measurements of the residual gas in the vacuum chamber identify the contaminant species as hydrocarbons. After a cleaning period of 8 h, a decrease in measured chamber contamination by about 90% could be achieved according to atomic force microscope analysis. Mass spectroscopy measurements using a residual gas analyzer indicate the creation of volatile, carbonaceous species during the cleaning process.

  17. USE OF APATITE FOR CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. William D. Bostick

    2003-05-01

    Groundwater at many Federal and civilian industrial sites is often contaminated with toxic metals at levels that present a potential concern to regulatory agencies. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has some unique problems associated with radionuclides (primarily uranium), but metal contaminants most likely drive risk-based cleanup decisions, from the perspective of human health, in groundwater at DOE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Sites include lead (Pb), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), zinc (Zn), selenium (Se), antimony (Sb), copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni). Thus, the regulatory ''drivers'' for toxic metals in contaminated soils/groundwaters are very comparable for Federal and civilian industrial sites, and most sites have more than one metal above regulatory action limits. Thus improving the performance of remedial technologies for metal-contaminated groundwater will have ''dual use'' (Federal and civilian) benefit.

  18. Dose in a house built with contaminated wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to assess the annual effective dose which could be received by a person living in a house built in France with wood from Belarus and contaminated by cesium 137 from Chernobylsk accident fallout. After the context be specified and the potential levels of radioactivity presented, an assessment of the annual effective dose is performed, based on an as realistic as possible scenario. After calculations it appears that the annual effective dose by external exposure potentially received by an inhabitant living in a house build with contaminated wood (pine or birch) at 1,000 Bq/kg is of the order of 1 mSv, due to external exposure to walls. This dose is not negligible, and could even be much more higher if wood from highly contaminated Belarusian areas is used for building houses. Projects of such wooden buildings should be studied with a particular attention to the characterization of the contamination. (N.C.)

  19. Observations on Si-based micro-clusters embedded in TaN thin film deposited by co-sputtering with oxygen contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Mi Lee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with the synchrotron radiation we investigated Si-based micro-clusters embedded in TaSiN thin films having oxygen contamination. TaSiN thin films were deposited by co-sputtering on fixed or rotated substrates and with various power conditions of TaN and Si targets. Three types of embedded micro-clusters with the chemical states of pure Si, SiOx-capped Si, and SiO2-capped Si were observed and analyzed using SEM and Si 2p and Ta 4f core-level spectra were derived. Their different resistivities are presumably due to the different chemical states and densities of Si-based micro-clusters.

  20. Observations on Si-based micro-clusters embedded in TaN thin film deposited by co-sputtering with oxygen contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Mi; Jung, Min-Sang; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Jung, Min-Cherl

    2015-08-01

    Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with the synchrotron radiation we investigated Si-based micro-clusters embedded in TaSiN thin films having oxygen contamination. TaSiN thin films were deposited by co-sputtering on fixed or rotated substrates and with various power conditions of TaN and Si targets. Three types of embedded micro-clusters with the chemical states of pure Si, SiOx-capped Si, and SiO2-capped Si were observed and analyzed using SEM and Si 2p and Ta 4f core-level spectra were derived. Their different resistivities are presumably due to the different chemical states and densities of Si-based micro-clusters.

  1. Secondary School Students Ascribe Value to Presentation, Accuracy, and Currency in their Evaluation of Web-Based Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Miller

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To measure the importance students place on criteria used to evaluate Web-based information. Design – Online, self-report questionnaire. Setting – Secondary school in the United Kingdom. Subjects – 149 students aged 13-18 years, representing a response rate of approximately 21% of the 713 students sampled. Methods – The authors used themes generated in a previous study of Web-based information evaluation (Pickard, Gannon-Leary, & Coventry, 2010 to create a 10-item questionnaire about the importance of criteria used to evaluate Web-based information. Criteria represented in the questionnaire included accuracy, authority (2 statements, currency (2 statements, coverage, presentation, affiliation, source motivation, and citations. Students used a four-point scale from “Very important” to “Not at all important” to indicate how significant they considered each criteria to be when they evaluated websites. Students received an email invitation to participate in the study, with a link to the questionnaire in the school’s SharePoint environment. Two subsequent email reminders were sent approximately 8-10 weeks after the initial invitation to participate. Teachers at the school were also asked to promote the questionnaire in their classes. Main Results – Over 75% of the 149 student respondents rated statements about presentation (n=116, accuracy (n=114, and currency (n=116 as “Very important” or “Quite important.” A majority of students (over 50% rated the two statements about website authorship as being only “A little important” or “Not at all important” (n=92, and n=86. However, 62% of students (n=92 indicated that a website’s sponsoring organization is “Very important” or “Quite important.” The authors suggest there were some differences between responses from older and younger students, with older students more likely to rate statements about coverage, citations, organization sponsorship, and

  2. Volcanic forcing for climate modeling: a new microphysics-based dataset covering years 1600–present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Peter

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available As the understanding and representation of the impacts of volcanic eruptions on climate have improved in the last decades, uncertainties in the stratospheric aerosol forcing from large eruptions are now not only linked to visible optical depth estimates on a global scale but also to details on the size, latitude and altitude distributions of the stratospheric aerosols. Based on our understanding of these uncertainties, we propose a new model-based approach to generating a volcanic forcing for General-Circulation-Model (GCM and Chemistry-Climate-Model (CCM simulations. This new volcanic forcing, covering the 1600–present period, uses an aerosol microphysical model to provide a realistic, physically consistent treatment of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols. Twenty-six eruptions were modeled individually using the latest available ice cores aerosol mass estimates and historical data on the latitude and date of eruptions. The evolution of aerosol spatial and size distribution after the sulfur dioxide discharge are hence characterized for each volcanic eruption. Large variations are seen in hemispheric partitioning and size distributions in relation to location/date of eruptions and injected SO2 masses. Results for recent eruptions are in good agreement with observations. By providing accurate amplitude and spatial distributions of shortwave and longwave radiative perturbations by volcanic sulfate aerosols, we argue that this volcanic forcing may help refine the climate model responses to the large volcanic eruptions since 1600. The final dataset consists of 3-D values (with constant longitude of spectrally resolved extinction coefficients, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors calculated for different wavelength bands upon request. Surface area densities for heterogeneous chemistry are also provided.

  3. Critical evaluation of a simple retention time predictor based on LogKow as a complementary tool in the identification of emerging contaminants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Richard; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Sancho, Juan V; Hernández, Felix

    2015-07-01

    There has been great interest in environmental analytical chemistry in developing screening methods based on liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) for emerging contaminants. Using HRMS, compound identification relies on the high mass resolving power and mass accuracy attainable by these analyzers. When dealing with wide-scope screening, retention time prediction can be a complementary tool for the identification of compounds, and can also reduce tedious data processing when several peaks appear in the extracted ion chromatograms. There are many in silico, Quantitative Structure-Retention Relationship methods available for the prediction of retention time for LC. However, most of these methods use commercial software to predict retention time based on various molecular descriptors. This paper explores the applicability and makes a critical discussion on a far simpler and cheaper approach to predict retention times by using LogKow. The predictor was based on a database of 595 compounds, their respective LogKow values and a chromatographic run time of 18min. Approximately 95% of the compounds were found within 4.0min of their actual retention times, and 70% within 2.0min. A predictor based purely on pesticides was also made, enabling 80% of these compounds to be found within 2.0min of their actual retention times. To demonstrate the utility of the predictors, they were successfully used as an additional tool in the identification of 30 commonly found emerging contaminants in water. Furthermore, a comparison was made by using different mass extraction windows to minimize the number of false positives obtained. PMID:25882420

  4. Alpha-contaminated waste management workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings are published to provide a record of the oral presentations made at the DOE Alpha-Contaminated Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland, on August 10-13, 1982. The papers are transcriptions of these oral presentations and, as such, do not contain as significant detail as will be found in the reviewed papers to be published in the periodical Nuclear and Chemical Waste Management in the first issue for 1983. These transcriptions have been reviewed by the speakers and some illustrations have been provided, but these contain only the preliminary information that will be provided in the technical papers to be published in the periodical. These papers have been grouped under the following headings: source terms; disposal technology and practices for alpha-contaminated waste; risk analyses and safety assessments. These papers in addition to those dealing with legislative and regulatory aspects have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base

  5. Morphological study on small molecule acceptor-based organic solar cells with efficiencies beyond 7% (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Yan, He

    2015-10-01

    Despite the essential role of fullerenes in achieving best-performance organic solar cells (OSCs), fullerene acceptors have several drawbacks including poor light absorption, high-cost production and purification. For this reason, small molecule acceptor (SMA)-based OSCs have attracted much attention due to the easy tunability of electronic and optical properties of SMA materials. In this study, polymers with temperature dependent aggregation behaviors are combined with various small molecule acceptor materials, which lead to impressive power conversion efficiencies of up to 7.3%. The morphological and aggregation properties of the polymer:small molecule blends are studied in details. It is found that the temperature-dependent aggregation behavior of polymers allows for the processing of the polymer solutions at moderately elevated temperature, and more importantly, controlled aggregation and strong crystallization of the polymer during the film cooling and drying process. This results in a well-controlled and near-ideal polymer:small molecule morphology that is controlled by polymer aggregation during warm casting and thus insensitive to the choice of small molecules. As a result, several cases of highly efficient (PCE between 6-7.3%) SMA OSCs are achieved. The second part of this presentation will describe the morphology of a new small molecule acceptor with a unique 3D structure. The relationship between molecular structure and morphology is revealed.

  6. GPU-based rapid reconstruction of cellular 3D refractive index maps from tomographic phase microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardikman, Gili; Shaked, Natan T.

    2016-03-01

    We present highly parallel and efficient algorithms for real-time reconstruction of the quantitative three-dimensional (3-D) refractive-index maps of biological cells without labeling, as obtained from the interferometric projections acquired by tomographic phase microscopy (TPM). The new algorithms are implemented on the graphic processing unit (GPU) of the computer using CUDA programming environment. The reconstruction process includes two main parts. First, we used parallel complex wave-front reconstruction of the TPM-based interferometric projections acquired at various angles. The complex wave front reconstructions are done on the GPU in parallel, while minimizing the calculation time of the Fourier transforms and phase unwrapping needed. Next, we implemented on the GPU in parallel the 3-D refractive index map retrieval using the TPM filtered-back projection algorithm. The incorporation of algorithms that are inherently parallel with a programming environment such as Nvidia's CUDA makes it possible to obtain real-time processing rate, and enables high-throughput platform for label-free, 3-D cell visualization and diagnosis.

  7. GeoChip-based analysis of microbial functional gene diversity in a landfill leachate-contaminated aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenmei; He, Zhili; Parisi, Victoria A.; Kang, Sanghoon; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Masoner, Jason R.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Suflita, Joseph M.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2012-01-01

    The functional gene diversity and structure of microbial communities in a shallow landfill leachate-contaminated aquifer were assessed using a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0). Water samples were obtained from eight wells at the same aquifer depth immediately below a municipal landfill or along the predominant downgradient groundwater flowpath. Functional gene richness and diversity immediately below the landfill and the closest well were considerably lower than those in downgradient wells. Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) suggested that various geochemical parameters had a significant impact on the subsurface microbial community structure. That is, leachate from the unlined landfill impacted the diversity, composition, structure, and functional potential of groundwater microbial communities as a function of groundwater pH, and concentrations of sulfate, ammonia, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Historical geochemical records indicate that all sampled wells chronically received leachate, and the increase in microbial diversity as a function of distance from the landfill is consistent with mitigation of the impact of leachate on the groundwater system by natural attenuation mechanisms.

  8. Environmental effects of a discharge of drill cuttings contaminated with ester-based drilling muds in the North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field-monitoring program has been carried out to assess the environmental effects associated with drill cutting discharges at a drilling location in the North Sea, after drilling with ester-based muds. The study included a baseline survey just before drilling started and three postdrilling surveys, 1, 4, and 11 months after termination of drilling. During these surveys, ester concentrations and macrofauna densities were determined at distances between 75 and 3,000 m from the well. For the first and second postdrilling surveys, ester concentrations ranged between 2 and 4,700 mg·kg-1 dry sediment. During the third survey, esters were detected up to 200 m, with concentrations between 1 and 250 mg·kg-1 dry sediment. Between 500 and 3,000 m, ester concentrations were below detection level. The half-life was estimated as 133 d. This value reflects the composite effects of biodegradation and sediment relocation. During the second postdrilling survey, a reduced abundance as well as a reduced species richness of the macrofauna was observed up to 200 m from the well. Also, the presence of Capitella capitata was an obvious sign of disturbed sediment conditions in this area. A few species showed abundance gradients over the whole sampling transect and occurred in reduced abundance up to 500 or 1,000 m compared to the 3,000-m reference station. The third postdrilling survey clearly revealed effects at 75 to 200 m from the well. At distances ≥500 m, persistent effects could no longer be demonstrated. Although the results of the present study show that effects had not completely disappeared after 1 year, there are signs of recovery of the macrobenthos, because a reasonable number of species had recolonized the area in the vicinity of the well site, particularly at 200 m, in fairly high numbers

  9. Locating, quantifying and characterising radiation hazards in contaminated nuclear facilities using a novel passive non-electrical polymer based radiation imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a summary of recent trials which took place at the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during December 2010. The overall objective for the trials was to demonstrate that a newly developed technology could be used to locate, quantify and characterise the radiological hazards within two separate ORNL hot cells (B and C). The technology used, known as RadBall®, is a novel, passive, non-electrical polymer based radiation detection device which provides a 3D visualisation of radiation from areas where effective measurements have not been previously possible due to lack of access. This is particularly useful in the nuclear industry prior to the decommissioning of facilities where the quantity, location and type of contamination are often unknown. For hot cell B, the primary objective of demonstrating that the technology could be used to locate, quantify and characterise three radiological sources was met with 100% success. Despite more challenging conditions in hot cell C, two sources were detected and accurately located. To summarise, the technology performed extremely well with regards to detecting and locating radiation sources and, despite the challenging conditions, moderately well when assessing the relative energy and intensity of those sources. Due to the technology's unique deployability, non-electrical nature and its directional awareness the technology shows significant promise for the future characterisation of radiation hazards prior to and during the decommissioning of contaminated nuclear facilities.

  10. Bioenergetics-based modeling of individual PCB congeners in nestling tree swallows from two contaminated sites on the Upper Hudson River, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J.W.; Echols, K.R.; Tillitt, D.E.; Secord, A.L.; McCarty, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    A bioenergetics-based model was used to simulate the accumulation of total PCBs and 20 PCB congeners by nestling tree swallows at two contaminated sites on the Upper Hudson River, New York. PCB concentrations in birds were calculated as the sum of inherited residues and those acquired through consumption of contaminated insects. Close agreement between simulations and measured residues in 5-, 10-, and 15-day-old nestlings was obtained when PCB concentrations in the diet were set equal to those in food boli taken from adult birds. These simulations were further optimized by fitting the value of a dietary assimilation efficiency constant. Fitted constants for both sites were similar and averaged about 0.7. An evaluation of model performance for individual congeners provided no evidence of metabolic biotransformation. The results of this study are consistent with a companion effort in which principal components analysis was used to compare PCB congener patterns in insects and in tree swallow eggs, nestlings, and adults. Together, these studies establish a quantitative linkage between nestling tree swallows and the insects that they consume and provide strong support for the use of nestling swallows as a biomonitoring species for exposure assessment.

  11. Plutonium contamination in the environment. May 1978-April 1987 (A Bibliography from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Report for May 1978-April 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the ecological impact of plutonium contamination in the environment. Topics include plutonium contamination in freshwater and marine sediments, plutonium bioaccumulation, plutonium transport in the food chain, plutonium accumulation in the soil, methods of analysis, plutonium removal from contaminated soils, plutonium contamination from nuclear fallout and nuclear facilities, and the presence of plutonium in seaspray and in the atmosphere. Plutonium biokinetics in humans, and fetal effects from plutonium contamination are also described. (Contains 93 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  12. Strategies for the detection of food pathogens and contaminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hearty, Stephen; Leonard, Paul; Sheehan, Alfredo Darmanin;

    molecular contaminants such as microbial toxins and drug/pesticide residues translate well onto Biacore-based assay formats. However, larger and more complex entities such as spores and whole bacterial cells represent an altogether more difficult challenge. Here, we present an overview of our experiences to...... date with using Biacore for analysis of food contaminants and in particular the challenges associated with large analyte detection...... molecules and once suitably high affinity antibodies have been isolated, it is relatively straightforward to design and optimise concentration-based assays using SPR. Recently we have investigated the potential of applying Biacore technology to routine food analysis. Our experiences have shown that...

  13. Strategies for the detection of food pathogens and contaminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hearty, Stephen; Leonard, Paul; Sheehan, Alfredo Darmanin; Stapleton, Sharon; Tully, Elizabeth; Dunne, Lynsey; Daly, Stephen; McDonnell, Barry; Skottrup, Peter; O'Kennedy, Richard

    molecules and once suitably high affinity antibodies have been isolated, it is relatively straightforward to design and optimise concentration-based assays using SPR. Recently we have investigated the potential of applying Biacore technology to routine food analysis. Our experiences have shown that...... molecular contaminants such as microbial toxins and drug/pesticide residues translate well onto Biacore-based assay formats. However, larger and more complex entities such as spores and whole bacterial cells represent an altogether more difficult challenge. Here, we present an overview of our experiences to...... date with using Biacore for analysis of food contaminants and in particular the challenges associated with large analyte detection...

  14. Strategies for the detection of food pathogens and contaminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hearty, Stephen; Leonard, Paul; Sheehan, Alfredo Darmanin;

    that molecular contaminants such as microbial toxins and drug/pesticide residues translate well onto Biacore-based assay formats. However, larger and more complex entities such as spores and whole bacterial cells represent an altogether more difficult challenge. Here, we present an overview of our experiences...... to date with using Biacore for analysis of food contaminants and in particular the challenges associated with large analyte detection...... molecules and once suitably high affinity antibodies have been isolated, it is relatively straightforward to design and optimise concentration-based assays using SPR. Recently we have investigated the potential of applying Biacore technology to routine food analysis. Our experiences have shown...

  15. Contamination and decontamination of fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis is made of the problems of contamination and decontamination of clothes and underwear. Possible ways are described of contamination of fabrics (dry, wet) and in this connection the contaminant-fabric binding is underlined (in dry state, at different relative air humidity, in wet conditions in an environment of polar solvents). A survey is presented of decontamination methods and their importance. Dry methods include beatino., brushing and vacuum cleaning, wet methods include soaking and washing, dry cleaning in non-polar solvents, and the Intensol and Dual methods which combine dry cleaning and washing in one process. (B.S.)

  16. Fate of contaminants during utilization of peat materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since peat soils are used for a variety of industrial purposes, the fate of contaminants in peat is of interest for environmental impact studies. Peat soils effectively retain many contaminants and can receive contaminants from both the atmosphere and groundwater. The authors investigated the fate of I, Se, Cs, U, and Pb in peats subjected to treatments simulating commercial processes. The soils were contaminated with three concentrations of the study elements and incubated for 3 yr. Subsamples were subjected to static pyrolysis, extraction with base, acid hydrolysis, and extraction with chelates to represent burning of peat, humic and fulvic acid extraction as industrial materials, carbohydrate extraction for single-cell protein production, and application of chelate-based fertilizers. The results are presented as product concentration ratios and recent recoveries. In several cases, the contaminants were markedly concentrated. As an example, food products produced from fungal culture in peat hydrolysates may contain 50-fold higher U concentrations, on a dry wt. basis, than the original peat. Thus, contaminants are transferred to these products and this should be considered for environmental and human safety

  17. Microbial contamination in dental unit waterlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Gugelmin, Maria Cristina Monteiro de; Lima, Carolina Della Torre; Lima, Sergio Narciso Marques de; Mian, Henis; Ito, Izabel Yoko

    2003-01-01

    The quality of water in a dental unit is of considerable importance because patients and dental staff are regularly exposed to water and aerosol generated from the dental unit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of microbial contamination in dental unit waterlines. Water samples were collected aseptically from the waterlines (reservoir, triple-syringe, high-speed) of 15 dental units. After serial dilution to 1:10(6) in APHA, the samples were seeded by the pour-plate technique and cultured in plate count agar (Difco) for 48 h at 32 degrees C. Analysis was based on the number of colony forming units (CFU). The Wilcoxon non-parametric test indicated that the levels of water contamination were highest in the triple-syringe (13 of 15) and in the high-speed (11 of 15); both levels were higher than those of the water reservoir. There was no significant statistical difference between the level of contamination in the triple-syringe and the high-speed as determined by the Mann-Whitney test [p(H0) = 40.98%; Z = - 0.2281]. Because biofilm forms on solid surfaces constantly bathed by liquid where microorganisms are present, these results indicate that the water in the dental unit may be contaminated by biofilm that forms in these tubules. PMID:12656466

  18. Contaminated sediment transport during floods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 48 years, operations and waste disposal activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have resulted in the contamination of parts of the White Oak Creek catchment. The contaminants presenting the highest risk to human health and the environment are particle reactive and are associated with the soils and sediments in the White Oak Creek drainage system. The erosion of these sediments during floods can result in the transport of contaminants both within the catchment and off-site into the Clinch River. A data collection program and a modeling investigation are being used to evaluate the probability of contaminated sediment transport during floods and to develop strategies for controlling off-site transport under present and future conditions

  19. CEMARAN ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS DAN AFLATOKSIN PADA RANTAI DISTRIBUSI PRODUK PANGAN BERBASIS JAGUNG DAN FAKTOR YANG MEMPENGARUHINYA [Contamination of Aspergillus flavus and Aflatoxin at Distribution Chain of Maize Based Food Product and its Influencing Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsi D. Kusumaningrum*

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin is a human carcinogen, produced by fungus Aspergillus flavus that frequently contaminates maize. Analysis of A. flavus by plate counting and aflatoxin by Thin Layer Chromatography were performed on 104 samples and 25 samples, respectively, of maize grain and maize based food products from different places in Bogor-West Java, Boyolali-Central Java and Bojonegoro-East Java. These regions support significant number of maize production in Java. Forty percent of the samples were contaminated by A. flavus, whereas aflatoxin level of higher than 20 ppb was found in 4 of 25 samples. The highest contamination level of A. flavus was found at the collector trader that often stored the maize grain in average of 15 days, at room temperature. There was a significant correlation between the length of storage as well as relative humidity with the contamination levels of A. flavus. Significant correlation was also found between the contamination levels of A. flavus with the level of aflatoxin in maize grain. However, no significant correlation was found between the aflatoxin level and the contamination levels of A. flavus in the processed maize based food products.

  20. Introduction of a method for presenting health-based impacts of the emission from products, based on emission measurements of materials used in manufacturing of the products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jørgensen, Rikke Bramming, E-mail: rikke.jorgensen@iot.ntnu.no

    2013-11-15

    A method for presenting the health impact of emissions from furniture is introduced, which could be used in the context of environmental product declarations. The health impact is described by the negative indoor air quality potential, the carcinogenic potential, the mutagenic and reprotoxic potential, the allergenic potential, and the toxicological potential. An experimental study of emissions from four pieces of furniture is performed by testing both the materials used for production of the furniture and the complete piece of furniture, in order to compare the results gained by adding emissions of material with results gained from testing the finished piece of furniture. Calculating the emission from a product based on the emission from materials used in the manufacture of the product is a new idea. The relation between calculated results and measured results from the same products differ between the four pieces of furniture tested. Large differences between measured and calculated values are seen for leather products. More knowledge is needed to understand why these differences arise. Testing materials allows us to compare different suppliers of the same material. Four different foams and three different timber materials are tested, and the results vary between materials of the same type. If the manufacturer possesses this type of knowledge of the materials from the subcontractors it could be used as a selection criterion according to production of low emission products. -- Highlights: • A method for presenting health impact of emissions is introduced. • An experimental study of emissions from four pieces of furniture is performed. • Health impact is calculated based on sum of contribution from the materials used. • Calculated health impact is compared to health impact of the manufactured product. • The results show that health impact could be useful in product development and for presentation in EPDs.

  1. Introduction of a method for presenting health-based impacts of the emission from products, based on emission measurements of materials used in manufacturing of the products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for presenting the health impact of emissions from furniture is introduced, which could be used in the context of environmental product declarations. The health impact is described by the negative indoor air quality potential, the carcinogenic potential, the mutagenic and reprotoxic potential, the allergenic potential, and the toxicological potential. An experimental study of emissions from four pieces of furniture is performed by testing both the materials used for production of the furniture and the complete piece of furniture, in order to compare the results gained by adding emissions of material with results gained from testing the finished piece of furniture. Calculating the emission from a product based on the emission from materials used in the manufacture of the product is a new idea. The relation between calculated results and measured results from the same products differ between the four pieces of furniture tested. Large differences between measured and calculated values are seen for leather products. More knowledge is needed to understand why these differences arise. Testing materials allows us to compare different suppliers of the same material. Four different foams and three different timber materials are tested, and the results vary between materials of the same type. If the manufacturer possesses this type of knowledge of the materials from the subcontractors it could be used as a selection criterion according to production of low emission products. -- Highlights: • A method for presenting health impact of emissions is introduced. • An experimental study of emissions from four pieces of furniture is performed. • Health impact is calculated based on sum of contribution from the materials used. • Calculated health impact is compared to health impact of the manufactured product. • The results show that health impact could be useful in product development and for presentation in EPDs

  2. Bacterial contamination of enteral diets.

    OpenAIRE

    de Leeuw, I H; Vandewoude, M F

    1986-01-01

    Enteral feeding solutions can be contaminated by bacterial micro-organisms already present in the ingredients, or introduced during preparation or transport, or in the hospital ward. During jejunostomy feeding without pump or filter, ascending bacterial invasion of the feeding bag is possible. In patients with lowered immune response contaminated feedings can cause serious septic clinical problems. The progressive loss of the nutritional value of the enteral feeding solution by bacterial cont...

  3. Procedures for addressing uncertainty and variability in exposure to characterize potential health risk from trichloroethylene contaminated groundwater at Beale Air Force Base in California; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to accomplish two objectives. The first was to provide to the US Air Force and the regulatory community quantitative procedures that they might want to consider using for addressing uncertainty and variability in exposure to better characterize potential health risk. Such methods could be used at sites where populations may now or in the future be faced with using groundwater contaminated with low concentrations of the chemical trichloroethylene (TCE). The second was to illustrate and explain the application of these procedures with respect to available data for TCE in ground water beneath an inactive landfill site that is undergoing remediation at Beale Air Force Base in California. The results from this illustration provide more detail than the more traditional conservative deterministic, screening-level calculations of risk, also computed for purposes of comparison. Application of the procedures described in this report can lead to more reasonable and equitable risk-acceptability criteria for potentially exposed populations at specific sites

  4. Procedures for addressing uncertainty and variability in exposure to characterize potential health risk from trichloroethylene contaminated groundwater at Beale Air Force Base in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogen, K T; Daniels, J I; Hall, L C

    1999-09-01

    This study was designed to accomplish two objectives. The first was to provide to the US Air Force and the regulatory community quantitative procedures that they might want to consider using for addressing uncertainty and variability in exposure to better characterize potential health risk. Such methods could be used at sites where populations may now or in the future be faced with using groundwater contaminated with low concentrations of the chemical trichloroethylene (TCE). The second was to illustrate and explain the application of these procedures with respect to available data for TCE in ground water beneath an inactive landfill site that is undergoing remediation at Beale Air Force Base in California. The results from this illustration provide more detail than the more traditional conservative deterministic, screening-level calculations of risk, also computed for purposes of comparison. Application of the procedures described in this report can lead to more reasonable and equitable risk-acceptability criteria for potentially exposed populations at specific sites.

  5. Building-related symptoms among U.S. office workers and risks factors for moisture and contamination: Preliminary analyses of U.S. EPA BASE Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Cozen, Myrna

    2002-09-01

    The authors assessed relationships between health symptoms in office workers and risk factors related to moisture and contamination, using data collected from a representative sample of U.S. office buildings in the U.S. EPA BASE study. Methods: Analyses assessed associations between three types of weekly, workrelated symptoms-lower respiratory, mucous membrane, and neurologic-and risk factors for moisture or contamination in these office buildings. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the strength of associations for these risk factors as odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for personal-level potential confounding variables related to demographics, health, job, and workspace. A number of risk factors were associated (e.g., 95% confidence limits excluded 1.0) significantly with small to moderate increases in one or more symptom outcomes. Significantly elevated ORs for mucous membrane symptoms were associated with the following risk factors: presence of humidification system in good condition versus none (OR = 1.4); air handler inspection annually versus daily (OR = 1.6); current water damage in the building (OR = 1.2); and less than daily vacuuming in study space (OR = 1.2). Significantly elevated ORs for lower respiratory symptoms were associated with: air handler inspection annually versus daily (OR = 2.0); air handler inspection less than daily but at least semi-annually (OR=1.6); less than daily cleaning of offices (1.7); and less than daily vacuuming of the study space (OR = 1.4). Only two statistically significant risk factors for neurologic symptoms were identified: presence of any humidification system versus none (OR = 1.3); and less than daily vacuuming of the study space (OR = 1.3). Dirty cooling coils, dirty or poorly draining drain pans, and standing water near outdoor air intakes, evaluated by inspection, were not identified as risk factors in these analyses, despite predictions based on previous findings elsewhere, except that very

  6. Ecological risk assessment on a cadmium contaminated soil landfill-a preliminary evaluation based on toxicity tests on local species and site-specific information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, methodology of ecological risk assessment has been developed and applied frequently for addressing various circumstances where ecological impacts are suspected or have occurred due to environmental contamination; however, its practice is very limited in Taiwan. In 1982, brown rice from rice paddy fields in Da-Tan, Tau-Yuan, was found to be contaminated with Cd and Pb due to illegal discharges of wastewater, known as the 'Cd rice' incidence. Cadmium laden soil was transferred to a constructed landfill in an industrial park 15 years after the incident. Possible leakage of the landfill was suspected by committee members of a supervising board for the remediation process, and a preliminary ecological risk evaluation was requested. A possible risk scenario was that groundwater contamination due to the leachate containing Cd and Pb from the landfill could result in pollution of coastal water, and subsequently produce toxic effects to aquatic organisms. Chemical dissipation in groundwater systems was simulated and short-term chronic toxicity tests on larvae of three local aquatic species were also performed to determine the no-observed adverse-effect concentrations (NOAECs), as well as the predicted no effect concentrations (PNECs), of the two metals in the organisms tested. The hazard quotient (HQ), the ratio of predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) to PNECs, was used for risk characterization. A worst-case-scenario calculation showed that the maximum Cd concentration at 60 m and farther downstream from the site in the groundwater system would be 0.0028 mg l-1 with a maximum initial concentration of 0.65 mg l-1 in the leachate, while for Pb, the highest concentration of 0.044 mg l-1 would be reached at a distance of 40 m and farther, which was based on an initial concentration of 4.4 mg l-1 in the leachate; however, both cases would only occur 80 years after the initiation of leakage. A presumed dilution factor of 100 was used to calculate the

  7. Ecological risk assessment on a cadmium contaminated soil landfill--a preliminary evaluation based on toxicity tests on local species and site-specific information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Min; Liu, Ming-Chao

    2006-04-15

    In recent years, methodology of ecological risk assessment has been developed and applied frequently for addressing various circumstances where ecological impacts are suspected or have occurred due to environmental contamination; however, its practice is very limited in Taiwan. In 1982, brown rice from rice paddy fields in Da-Tan, Tau-Yuan, was found to be contaminated with Cd and Pb due to illegal discharges of wastewater, known as the "Cd rice" incidence. Cadmium laden soil was transferred to a constructed landfill in an industrial park 15 years after the incident. Possible leakage of the landfill was suspected by committee members of a supervising board for the remediation process, and a preliminary ecological risk evaluation was requested. A possible risk scenario was that groundwater contamination due to the leachate containing Cd and Pb from the landfill could result in pollution of coastal water, and subsequently produce toxic effects to aquatic organisms. Chemical dissipation in groundwater systems was simulated and short-term chronic toxicity tests on larvae of three local aquatic species were also performed to determine the no-observed adverse-effect concentrations (NOAECs), as well as the predicted no effect concentrations (PNECs), of the two metals in the organisms tested. The hazard quotient (HQ), the ratio of predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) to PNECs, was used for risk characterization. A worst-case-scenario calculation showed that the maximum Cd concentration at 60 m and farther downstream from the site in the groundwater system would be 0.0028 mg l(-1) with a maximum initial concentration of 0.65 mg l(-1) in the leachate, while for Pb, the highest concentration of 0.044 mg l(-1) would be reached at a distance of 40 m and farther, which was based on an initial concentration of 4.4 mg l(-1) in the leachate; however, both cases would only occur 80 years after the initiation of leakage. A presumed dilution factor of 100 was used to

  8. Present time

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Gustavo E.

    2014-01-01

    The idea of a moving present or `now' seems to form part of our most basic beliefs about reality. Such a present, however, is not reflected in any of our theories of the physical world. I show in this article that presentism, the doctrine that only what is present exists, is in conflict with modern relativistic cosmology and recent advances in neurosciences. I argue for a tenseless view of time, where what we call `the present' is just an emergent secondary quality arising from the interactio...

  9. Present time

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E

    2014-01-01

    The idea of a moving present or `now' seems to form part of our most basic beliefs about reality. Such a present, however, is not reflected in any of our theories of the physical world. I show in this article that presentism, the doctrine that only what is present exists, is in conflict with modern relativistic cosmology and recent advances in neurosciences. I argue for a tenseless view of time, where what we call `the present' is just an emergent secondary quality arising from the interaction of perceiving self-conscious individuals with their environment. I maintain that there is no flow of time, but just an ordered system of events.

  10. Norovirus contamination on French marketed oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Julien; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Lora, Monica; Atmar, Robert L; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2013-09-01

    Contaminated shellfish have been implicated in gastroenteritis outbreaks in different countries. As no regulation has been set up yet regarding viral contamination of food, very few data are available on the prevalence of contaminated products on the market. This study presents data obtained from oysters collected on the French market in one producing area over a 16 month period of time. Noroviruses were detected in 9% of samples with a seasonal impact and influence of climatic events. Contamination levels were low and, surprisingly, oysters sampled directly from the producer were found to have less contamination than oysters from supermarkets. PMID:23973835

  11. Promoting Early Presentation of Breast Cancer in Older Women: Implementing an Evidence-Based Intervention in Routine Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, Lindsay J. L.; Alice S Forster; Dodd, Rachael H.; Lorraine Tucker; Rachel Laming; Sarah Sellars; Julietta Patnick; Ramirez, Amanda J

    2012-01-01

    Background. Women over 70 with breast cancer have poorer one-year survival and present at a more advanced stage than younger women. Promoting early symptomatic presentation in older women may reduce stage cost effectively and is unlikely to lead to overdiagnosis. After examining efficacy in a randomised controlled trial, we piloted a brief health professional-delivered intervention to equip women to present promptly with breast symptoms, as an integral part of the final invited mammogram at a...

  12. Hydrogen Contamination of Niobium Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of hydrogen is blamed for dramatic reductions in cavity Q's. Hydrogen concentration is difficult to measure, so there is a great deal of Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (FUD) associated with the problem. This paper presents measurements of hydrogen concentration depth profiles, commenting on the pitfalls of the methods used and exploring how material handling can change the amount of hydrogen in pieces of niobium. Hydrogen analysis was performed by a forward scattering experiment with Helium used as the primary beam. This technique is variously known as FRES (Forward Recoil Elastic Scattering), FRS, HFS (Hydrogen Forward Scattering), and HRA (Hydrogen Recoil Analysis). Some measurements were also made using SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry). Both HFS and SIMS are capable of measuring a depth profile of Hydrogen. The primary difficulty in interpreting the results from these techniques is the presence of a surface peak which is due (at least in part) to contamination with either water or hydrocarbons. With HFS, the depth resolution is about 30 nm, and the maximum depth profiled is about 300 nm. (This 10-1 ratio is unusually low for ion beam techniques, and is a consequence of the compromises that must be made in the geometry of the experiment, surface roughness, and energy straggling in the absorber foil that must be used to filter out the forward scattered helium.) All the observed HFS spectra include a surface peak which includes both surface contamination and any real hydrogen uptake by the niobium surface. Some contamination occurs during the analysis. The vacuum in the analysis chamber is typically a few times 10(sup -6) torr, and some of the contamination is in the form of hydrocarbons from the pumping system. Hydrocarbons normally form a very thin (less than a monolayer) film which is in equilibrium between arrival rate and the evaporation rate. In the presence of the incoming ion beam, however, these hydrocarbons crack on the surface into non

  13. CATCHY PRESENTATIONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kaare; Tollestrup, Christian; Ovesen, Nis

    2011-01-01

    and ideas in many areas and avoiding “Death by Powerpoint”. This paper discusses the need and tools for making short presentations and describes the result from a business development project where engineering graduate students in architecture and design used the Pecha Kucha format to present their...

  14. Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) may not measure all gas-phase sulfuric acid if base molecules are present

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtén, T.; T. Petäjä; Smith,J; Ortega, I.K.; Sipilä, M.; Junninen, H.; M. Ehn; Vehkamäki, H.; Mauldin, L.; Worsnop, D.R.; M. Kulmala

    2010-01-01

    The state-of-the art method for measuring atmospheric gas-phase sulfuric acid is chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) based on nitrate reagent ions. Using computed proton affinities and reaction thermodynamics for the relevant charging reactions, we show that in the presence of strong bases such as amines, which tend to cluster with the sulfuric acid molecules, a significant fraction of the total gas-phase sulfuric acid may not be measured by a CIMS instrument. If this is the c...

  15. Measurement of radioactive soil contamination from the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ gamma spectrometry can be used to determine the qualitative and quantitative deposition of radioactive materials on the ground surface. By applying the in-situ spectrometry method using either a helicopter or an airplane, large areas can be scanned in a short period of time. In this report the results of in-situ gamma spectroscopic measurements taken from a helicopter are described. Measurements were carried out using a single point source, a field of 36 point sources, and using the present ground contamination due to fall-out from the Chernobyl accident and atom bombs. The results of these measurements were used to determine calibration factors, which were in agreement with a calibration obtained using more simple (and less expensive) laboratory measurements in combination with flux calculations. Detection limits for the measurement of surface contamination were determined. At a height of 50 meters above the surface and using a measurement time of 2 minutes, the minimally detectable surface contamination was 1.1 kBqm-2 for a Cs-137 contamination and 2.1 kBqm-2 for I-131 contamination. Fall-out determinations based on measurements taken at a height of 50 meters were in agreement with determinations taken at a height of 1 meter, and with the results obtained measuring soil samples. The in-situ gamma spectroscopy, using helicopter or airplane, is a fast and powerful method for mapping surface contamination. (author). 13 refs.; 18 figs.; 13 tabs

  16. Sources of Nitrate Contamination in Groundwater Under Developing Asian Megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Y.; Hosono, T.; Onodera, S.; Siringan, F.; Buapeng, S.; Delinom, R. M.; Yoshimizu, C.; Tayasu, I.; Nagata, T.; Taniguchi, M.

    2008-12-01

    The status of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium contamination in the water systems, and the mechanisms controlling their sources, pathways, and distributions were investigated for the Southeast Asian cities of Metro Manila, Bangkok, and Jakarta. GIS-based monitoring and dual isotope approach (nitrate d15N and d18O) suggested that human waste via severe sewer leakage was the major source of nutrient contaminants in Metro Manila and Jakarta urban areas. Furthermore, the characteristics of the nutrient contamination differed depending on the agricultural land use pattern in the suburban areas. The exponential increase in nitrate d15N along with the nitrate reduction and clear d18O/d15N slopes of nitrate (~0.5) indicated the occurrence of denitrification. An anoxic subsurface system associated with the natural geological setting (e.g., the old tidal plain at Bangkok) and artificial pavement coverage served to buffer nitrate contamination via active denitrification and reduced nitrification. Our results showed that nitrate and ammonium contamination of the aquifers in Metro Manila, Bangkok, and Jakarta was not excessive, suggesting low risk of drinking groundwater to human health, at present. However, the increased nitrogen load and increased per capita gross domestic product (GDP) in these developing cities may increase this contamination in the very near future. Continuous monitoring and management of the groundwater system is needed to minimize groundwater pollution in these areas.

  17. Dosimetry of internal contamination according to the ICRP-30 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standards for internal contamination are elaborated starting from publications of International Commission for Radiation Protection (ICRP-26 and 30). First, the ICRP limits with respect to internal contamination are presented (ICRP-2, -26 and -30). A calculation is carried out of cumulative dose equivalents; of annual limits of intake; and of the maximum permissible air concentration. Using a compartmental model of the gastrointestinal tract, the internal contamination via this way is calculated. Next, a lung deposition and decontamination study is presented and compared with other radiation hygienic models. The dosimetry of the skeleton is investigated on the base of the ICRP-30 model. The final part of the report includes several examples of dosimetric calculations and problems as a training of the practical radiation hygienist. (G.J.P.)

  18. Monte Carlo-based compensation for patient scatter, detector scatter, and crosstalk contamination in In-111 SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Stephen C. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)]. E-mail: scmoore@bwh.harvard.edu; Ouyang, Jinsong [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Park, Mi-Ae [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); El Fakhri, Georges [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2006-12-20

    We have incorporated Monte Carlo (MC)-based estimates of patient scatter, detector scatter, and crosstalk into an iterative reconstruction algorithm, and compared its performance to that of a general spectral (GS) approach. We extended the MC-based reconstruction algorithm of de Jong et al. by (1) using the 'Delta scattering' method to determine photon interaction points (2) simulating scatter maps for many energy bins simultaneously, and (3) decoupling the simulation of the object and detector by using pre-stored point spread functions (PSF) that included all collimator and detector effects. A numerical phantom was derived from a segmented CT scan of a torso phantom. The relative values of In-111 activity concentration simulated in soft tissue, liver, spine, left lung, right lung, and five spherical tumors (1.3-2.0 cm diam.) were 1.0, 1.5, 1.5, 0.3, 0.5, and 10.0, respectively. GS scatter projections were incorporated additively in an OSEM reconstruction (6 subsetsx10 projectionsx2 photopeak windows). After three iterations, GS scatter projections were replaced by MC-estimated scatter projections for two additional iterations. MC-based compensation was quantitatively compared to GS-based compensation after five iterations. The bias of organ activity estimates ranged from -13% to -6.5% (GS), and from -1.4% to +5.0% (MC); tumor bias ranged from -20.0% to +10.0% for GS (mean{+-}std.dev.=-4.3{+-}11.9%), and from -2.2 to +18.8% for MC (+4.1{+-}8.6%). Image noise in all organs was less with MC than with GS.

  19. Harvesting contaminants from liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, John T.; Hunter, Scott R.

    2016-05-31

    Disclosed are examples of apparatuses for evaporative purification of a contaminated liquid. In each example, there is a vessel for storing the contaminated fluid. The vessel includes a surface coated with a layer of superhydrophobic material and the surface is at least partially in contact with the contaminated liquid. The contaminants do not adhere to the surface as the purified liquid evaporates, thus allowing the contaminants to be harvested.

  20. Occurrence of natural Bacillus thuringiensis contaminants and residues of Bacillus thuringiensis-based insecticides on fresh fruits and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristine; Rosenquist, Hanne; Jørgensen, Kirsten;

    2006-01-01

    A total of 128 Bacillus cereus-like strains isolated from fresh fruits and vegetables for sale in retail shops in Denmark were characterized. Of these strains, 39% (50/128) were classified as Bacillus thuringiensis on the basis of their content of cry genes determined by PCR or crystal proteins...... visualized by microscopy. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and plasmid profiling indicated that 23 of the 50 B. thuringiensis strains were of the same subtype as B. thuringiensis strains used as commercial bioinsecticides. Fourteen isolates were indistinguishable from B. thuringiensis subsp....... kurstaki HD1 present in the products Dipel, Biobit, and Foray, and nine isolates grouped with B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai present in Turex. The commercial strains were primarily isolated from samples of tomatoes, cucumbers, and peppers. A multiplex PCR method was developed to simultaneously detect all...