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Sample records for base excision dna

  1. Slow base excision by human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase limits the rate of formation of AP sites and AP endonuclease 1 does not stimulate base excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Robyn L; Vallur, Aarthy C; Feller, Joyce A; Bloom, Linda B

    2007-01-01

    The base excision repair pathway removes damaged DNA bases and resynthesizes DNA to replace the damage. Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) is one of several damage-specific DNA glycosylases that recognizes and excises damaged DNA bases. AAG removes primarily damaged adenine residues. Human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) recognizes AP sites produced by DNA glycosylases and incises the phophodiester bond 5' to the damaged site. The repair process is completed by a DNA polymerase and DNA ligase. If not tightly coordinated, base excision repair could generate intermediates that are more deleterious to the cell than the initial DNA damage. The kinetics of AAG-catalyzed excision of two damaged bases, hypoxanthine and 1,N6-ethenoadenine, were measured in the presence and absence of APE1 to investigate the mechanism by which the base excision activity of AAG is coordinated with the AP incision activity of APE1. 1,N6-ethenoadenine is excised significantly slower than hypoxanthine and the rate of excision is not affected by APE1. The excision of hypoxanthine is inhibited to a small degree by accumulated product, and APE1 stimulates multiple turnovers by alleviating product inhibition. These results show that APE1 does not significantly affect the kinetics of base excision by AAG. It is likely that slow excision by AAG limits the rate of AP site formation in vivo such that AP sites are not created faster than can be processed by APE1. PMID:17018265

  2. EXCISED DAMAGED BASE DETERMINES THE TURNOVER OF HUMAN N-METHYLPURINE-DNA GLYCOSYLASE

    OpenAIRE

    Adhikari, Sanjay; Üren, Aykut; Roy, Rabindra

    2009-01-01

    N-Methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) initiates base excision repair in DNA by removing a wide variety of alkylated, deaminated, and lipid peroxidation-induced purine adducts. In this study, we tested the role of excised base on MPG’s enzymatic activity. After the reaction, MPG produced two products: free damaged base and AP-site containing DNA. Our results showed that MPG excises 1, N6-ethenoadenine (εA) from εA-containing oligonucleotide (εA-DNA) at a similar or slightly increased efficiency...

  3. Base excision repair deficient mice lacking the Aag alkyladenine DNA glycosylase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.P. Engelward (Bevin); G. Weeda (Geert); M.D. Wyatt; J.L.M. Broekhof (Jose'); J. de Wit (Jan); I. Donker (Ingrid); J.M. Allan (James); B. Gold (Bert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.D. Samson (Leona)

    1997-01-01

    textabstract3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases remove 3MeAs from alkylated DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Here we report the generation of mice deficient in the 3MeA DNA glycosylase encoded by the Aag (Mpg) gene. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase turns out to be the major DNA glyc

  4. Base excision by thymine DNA glycosylase mediates DNA-directed cytotoxicity of 5-fluorouracil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Kunz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU, a chemotherapeutic drug commonly used in cancer treatment, imbalances nucleotide pools, thereby favoring misincorporation of uracil and 5-FU into genomic DNA. The processing of these bases by DNA repair activities was proposed to cause DNA-directed cytotoxicity, but the underlying mechanisms have not been resolved. In this study, we investigated a possible role of thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG, one of four mammalian uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs, in the cellular response to 5-FU. Using genetic and biochemical tools, we found that inactivation of TDG significantly increases resistance of both mouse and human cancer cells towards 5-FU. We show that excision of DNA-incorporated 5-FU by TDG generates persistent DNA strand breaks, delays S-phase progression, and activates DNA damage signaling, and that the repair of 5-FU-induced DNA strand breaks is more efficient in the absence of TDG. Hence, excision of 5-FU by TDG, but not by other UDGs (UNG2 and SMUG1, prevents efficient downstream processing of the repair intermediate, thereby mediating DNA-directed cytotoxicity. The status of TDG expression in a cancer is therefore likely to determine its response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

  5. The role of DNA base excision repair in brain homeostasis and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Morevati, Marya; Croteau, Deborah;

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification and spontaneous loss of nucleotide bases from DNA are estimated to occur at the rate of thousands per human cell per day. DNA base excision repair (BER) is a critical mechanism for repairing such lesions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Defective expression or function of p...... energy homeostasis, mitochondrial function and cellular bioenergetics, with especially strong influence on neurological function. Further studies in this area could lead to novel approaches to prevent and treat human neurodegenerative disease....

  6. Vertebrate POLQ and POLβ Cooperate in Base Excision Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, Michio; Kohzaki, Masaoki; Nakamura, Jun; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Hou, Esther; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H.; TANO, KEIZO; Yasui, Akira; Lan, Li; Seki, Mineaki; Wood, Richard D.; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Buerstedde, Jean-Marie

    2006-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) plays an essential role in protecting cells from mutagenic base damage caused by oxidative stress, hydrolysis, and environmental factors. POLQ is a DNA polymerase, which appears to be involved in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) past base damage. We disrupted POLQ, and its homologs HEL308 and POLN in chicken DT40 cells, and also created polq/hel308 and polq/poln double mutants. We found that POLQ-deficient mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to oxidative base damage ind...

  7. Chk2-dependent phosphorylation of XRCC1 in the DNA damage response promotes base excision repair

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Hui-Chun; Wong, Fen-Hwa; Ding, Shian-ling; Wu, Pei-Ei; Shieh, Sheau-Yann; Shen, Chen-Yang

    2008-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has an essential function in maintaining genomic stability. Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR)-Chk1, triggered, respectively, by DNA double-strand breaks and blocked replication forks, are two major DDRs processing structurally complicated DNA damage. In contrast, damage repaired by base excision repair (BER) is structurally simple, but whether, and how, the DDR is involved in repairing this damage is un...

  8. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott;

    2014-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial...... rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional...... DNA replication and transcription and generate mutations. We carried out BER analysis in highly purified mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines U2OS and HeLa, and mouse brain using a circular DNA substrate containing a lesion at a specific position. We found that DNA ligation is significantly...

  9. Reprint of "Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H

    2015-12-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and such lesions can promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5'-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER. PMID:26596511

  10. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokhansanj, B A; Wilson, III, D M

    2004-05-13

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker have led to estimates varying over 3-4 orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our results show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  11. Differential modes of DNA binding by mismatch uracil DNA glycosylase from Escherichia coli: implications for abasic lesion processing and enzyme communication in the base excision repair pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Grippon, Seden; Zhao, Qiyuan; Robinson, Tom; Marshall, Jacqueline J. T.; O’Neill, Rory J.; Manning, Hugh; Kennedy, Gordon; Dunsby, Christopher; Neil, Mark; Halford, Stephen E.; French, Paul M. W.; Baldwin, Geoff S.

    2010-01-01

    Mismatch uracil DNA glycosylase (Mug) from Escherichia coli is an initiating enzyme in the base-excision repair pathway. As with other DNA glycosylases, the abasic product is potentially more harmful than the initial lesion. Since Mug is known to bind its product tightly, inhibiting enzyme turnover, understanding how Mug binds DNA is of significance when considering how Mug interacts with downstream enzymes in the base-excision repair pathway. We have demonstrated differential binding modes o...

  12. The DNA glycosylase AlkD uses a non-base-flipping mechanism to excise bulky lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Elwood A.; Shi, Rongxin; Parsons, Zachary D.; Yuen, Philip K.; David, Sheila S.; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2015-11-01

    Threats to genomic integrity arising from DNA damage are mitigated by DNA glycosylases, which initiate the base excision repair pathway by locating and excising aberrant nucleobases. How these enzymes find small modifications within the genome is a current area of intensive research. A hallmark of these and other DNA repair enzymes is their use of base flipping to sequester modified nucleotides from the DNA helix and into an active site pocket. Consequently, base flipping is generally regarded as an essential aspect of lesion recognition and a necessary precursor to base excision. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, DNA glycosylase mechanism that does not require base flipping for either binding or catalysis. Using the DNA glycosylase AlkD from Bacillus cereus, we crystallographically monitored excision of an alkylpurine substrate as a function of time, and reconstructed the steps along the reaction coordinate through structures representing substrate, intermediate and product complexes. Instead of directly interacting with the damaged nucleobase, AlkD recognizes aberrant base pairs through interactions with the phosphoribose backbone, while the lesion remains stacked in the DNA duplex. Quantum mechanical calculations revealed that these contacts include catalytic charge-dipole and CH-π interactions that preferentially stabilize the transition state. We show in vitro and in vivo how this unique means of recognition and catalysis enables AlkD to repair large adducts formed by yatakemycin, a member of the duocarmycin family of antimicrobial natural products exploited in bacterial warfare and chemotherapeutic trials. Bulky adducts of this or any type are not excised by DNA glycosylases that use a traditional base-flipping mechanism. Hence, these findings represent a new model for DNA repair and provide insights into catalysis of base excision.

  13. On-bead fluorescent DNA nanoprobes to analyze base excision repair activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •On magnetic beads fluorescent enzymatic assays. •Simple, easy, non-radioactive and electrophoresis-free functional assay. •Lesion-containing hairpin DNA probes are selective for repair enzymes. •The biosensing platform allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or within cell free extracts. -- Abstract: DNA integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous agents that can modify its physical and chemical structure. Changes in DNA sequence can cause mutations sparked by some genetic diseases or cancers. Organisms have developed efficient defense mechanisms able to specifically repair each kind of lesion (alkylation, oxidation, single or double strand break, mismatch, etc). Here we report the adjustment of an original assay to detect enzymes’ activity of base excision repair (BER), that supports a set of lesions including abasic sites, alkylation, oxidation or deamination products of bases. The biosensor is characterized by a set of fluorescent hairpin-shaped nucleic acid probes supported on magnetic beads, each containing a selective lesion targeting a specific BER enzyme. We have studied the DNA glycosylase alkyl-adenine glycosylase (AAG) and the human AP-endonuclease (APE1) by incorporating within the DNA probe a hypoxanthine lesion or an abasic site analog (tetrahydrofuran), respectively. Enzymatic repair activity induces the formation of a nick in the damaged strand, leading to probe's break, that is detected in the supernatant by fluorescence. The functional assay allows the measurement of DNA repair activities from purified enzymes or in cell-free extracts in a fast, specific, quantitative and sensitive way, using only 1 pmol of probe for a test. We recorded a detection limit of 1 μg mL−1 and 50 μg mL−1 of HeLa nuclear extracts for APE1 and AAG enzymes, respectively. Finally, the on-bead assay should be useful to screen inhibitors of DNA repair activities

  14. Mitochondrial base excision repair assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten;

    2010-01-01

    The main source of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage is reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during normal cellular metabolism. The main mtDNA lesions generated by ROS are base modifications, such as the ubiquitous 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesion; however, base loss and strand breaks may also occur....... Many human diseases are associated with mtDNA mutations and thus maintaining mtDNA integrity is critical. All of these lesions are repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. It is now known that mammalian mitochondria have BER, which, similarly to nuclear BER, is catalyzed by DNA...

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi contains a single detectable uracil-DNA glycosylase and repairs uracil exclusively via short patch base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Akbari, Mansour; Sundheim, Ottar; Farez-Vidal, M Esther; Andersen, Sonja; Sneve, Ragnhild; Gonzalez-Pacanowska, Dolores; Krokan, Hans E; Slupphaug, Geir

    2004-01-01

    Enzymes involved in genomic maintenance of human parasites are attractive targets for parasite-specific drugs. The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi contains at least two enzymes involved in the protection against potentially mutagenic uracil, a deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (d......UTPase) and a uracil-DNA glycosylase belonging to the highly conserved UNG-family. Uracil-DNA glycosylase activities excise uracil from DNA and initiate a multistep base-excision repair (BER) pathway to restore the correct nucleotide sequence. Here we report the biochemical characterisation of T.cruzi UNG (Tc......UNG) and its contribution to the total uracil repair activity in T.cruzi. TcUNG is shown to be the major uracil-DNA glycosylase in T.cruzi. The purified recombinant TcUNG exhibits substrate preference for removal of uracil in the order ssU>U:G>U:A, and has no associated thymine-DNA glycosylase activity. T.cruzi...

  16. Enhanced base excision repair capacity in carotid atherosclerosis may protect nuclear DNA but not mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarpengland, Tonje; B. Dahl, Tuva; Skjelland, Mona;

    2016-01-01

    carotid plaques, 8 disease-free carotid specimens from patients with carotid plaques and 10 non-atherosclerotic control arteries. Genomic integrity, mitochondrial (mt) DNA copy number, oxidative DNA damage and BER proteins were evaluated in a subgroup of plaques and controls. Our major findings were: (i...... response of BER genes in atherosclerosis may contribute to lesional nuclear DNA stability but appears insufficient to maintain mtDNA integrity, potentially influencing mitochondrial function in cells within the atherosclerotic lesion....

  17. Mutants of the Base Excision Repair Glycosylase, Endonuclease III: DNA Charge Transport as a First Step in Lesion Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Romano, Christine A.; Sontz, Pamela A.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-01-01

    Endonuclease III (EndoIII) is a base excision repair glycosylase that targets damaged pyrimidines and contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster. We have proposed a model where BER proteins that contain redox-active [4Fe-4S] clusters utilize DNA charge transport (CT) as a first step in the detection of DNA lesions. Here, several mutants of EndoIII were prepared to probe their efficiency of DNA/protein charge transport. Cyclic voltammetry experiments on DNA-modified electrodes show that aromatic residues F30...

  18. Effects of post mortem interval and gender in DNA base excision repair activities in rat brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most human tissues used in research are of post mortem origin. This is the case for all brain samples, and due to the difficulty in obtaining a good number of samples, especially in the case of neurodegenerative diseases, male and female samples are often included in the same experimental group. However, the effects of post mortem interval (PMI) and gender differences in the endpoints being analyzed are not always fully understood, as is the case for DNA repair activities. To investigate these effects, in a controlled genetic background, base excision repair (BER) activities were measured in protein extracts obtained from Wistar rat brains from different genders and defined PMI up to 24 hours, using a novel fluorescent-based in vitro incision assay. Uracil and AP-site incision activity in nuclear and mitochondrial extracts were similar in all groups included in this study. Our results show that gender and PMI up to 24 hours have no influence in the activities of the BER proteins UDG and APE1 in rat brains. These findings demonstrate that these variables do not interfere on the BER activities included in these study, and provide a security window to work with UDG and APE1 proteins in samples of post mortem origin

  19. Effects of post mortem interval and gender in DNA base excision repair activities in rat brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltys, Daniela Tathiana; Pereira, Carolina Parga Martins; Ishibe, Gabriela Naomi; Souza-Pinto, Nadja Cristhina de, E-mail: nadja@iq.usp.br

    2015-06-15

    Most human tissues used in research are of post mortem origin. This is the case for all brain samples, and due to the difficulty in obtaining a good number of samples, especially in the case of neurodegenerative diseases, male and female samples are often included in the same experimental group. However, the effects of post mortem interval (PMI) and gender differences in the endpoints being analyzed are not always fully understood, as is the case for DNA repair activities. To investigate these effects, in a controlled genetic background, base excision repair (BER) activities were measured in protein extracts obtained from Wistar rat brains from different genders and defined PMI up to 24 hours, using a novel fluorescent-based in vitro incision assay. Uracil and AP-site incision activity in nuclear and mitochondrial extracts were similar in all groups included in this study. Our results show that gender and PMI up to 24 hours have no influence in the activities of the BER proteins UDG and APE1 in rat brains. These findings demonstrate that these variables do not interfere on the BER activities included in these study, and provide a security window to work with UDG and APE1 proteins in samples of post mortem origin.

  20. Nuclear translocation contributes to regulation of DNA excision repair activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Lützen, Anne; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2009-01-01

    DNA mutations are circumvented by dedicated specialized excision repair systems, such as the base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR) pathways. Although the individual repair pathways have distinct roles in suppressing changes in the nuclear DNA, it is...... co-import appears to be a mechanism employed by the composite repair systems NER and MMR to enhance and regulate nuclear accumulation of repair proteins thereby ensuring faithful DNA repair....

  1. Comparative assessment of plasmid and oligonucleotide DNA substrates in measurement of in vitro base excision repair activity

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Esther W.; Prasad, Rajendra; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Masaoka, Aya; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian base excision repair (BER) is mediated through at least two subpathways designated ‘single-nucleotide’ (SN) and ‘long-patch’ (LP) BER (2-nucleotides long/more repair patch). Two forms of DNA substrate are generally used for in vitro BER assays: oligonucleotide- and plasmid-based. For plasmid-based BER assays, the availability of large quantities of substrate DNA with a specific lesion remains the limiting factor. Using sequence-specific endonucleases that cleave only one strand of D...

  2. Metal inhibition of human alkylpurine-DNA-N-glycosylase activityin base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ping; Guliaev, Anton B.; Hang, Bo

    2006-02-28

    Cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}), nickel (Ni{sup 2+}) and cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) are human and/or animal carcinogens. Zinc (Zn{sup 2+}) is not categorized as a carcinogen, and rather an essential element to humans. Metals were recently shown to inhibit DNA repair proteins that use metals for their function and/or structure. Here we report that the divalent ions Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} can inhibit the activity of a recombinant human N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) toward a deoxyoligonucleotide with ethenoadenine (var epsilonA). MPG removes a variety of toxic/mutagenic alkylated bases and does not require metal for its catalytic activity or structural integrity. At concentrations starting from 50 to 1000 {micro}M, both Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} showed metal-dependent inhibition of the MPG catalytic activity. Ni{sup 2+} also inhibited MPG, but to a lesser extent. Such an effect can be reversed with EDTA addition. In contrast, Co{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} did not inhibit the MPG activity in the same dose range. Experiments using HeLa cell-free extracts demonstrated similar patterns of inactivation of the var epsilonA excision activity by the same metals. Binding of MPG to the substrate was not significantly affected by Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+} at concentrations that show strong inhibition of the catalytic function, suggesting that the reduced catalytic activity is not due to altered MPG binding affinity to the substrate. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with Zn{sup 2+} showed that the MPG active site has a potential binding site for Zn{sup 2+}, formed by several catalytically important and conserved residues. Metal binding to such a site is expected to interfere with the catalytic mechanism of this protein. These data suggest that inhibition of MPG activity may contribute to metal genotoxicity and depressed repair of alkylation damage by metals in vivo.

  3. DNA polymerase X from Deinococcus radiodurans implicated in bacterial tolerance to DNA damage is characterized as a short patch base excision repair polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Misra, Hari S

    2009-09-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans R1 genome encodes an X-family DNA repair polymerase homologous to eukaryotic DNA polymerase beta. The recombinant deinococcal polymerase X (PolX) purified from transgenic Escherichia coli showed deoxynucleotidyltransferase activity. Unlike the Klenow fragment of E. coli, this enzyme showed short patch DNA synthesis activity on heteropolymeric DNA substrate. The recombinant enzyme showed 5'-deoxyribose phosphate (5'-dRP) lyase activity and base excision repair function in vitro, with the help of externally supplied glycosylase and AP endonuclease functions. A polX disruption mutant of D. radiodurans expressing 5'-dRP lyase and a truncated polymerase domain was comparatively less sensitive to gamma-radiation than a polX deletion mutant. Both mutants showed higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Excision repair mutants of E. coli expressing this polymerase showed functional complementation of UV sensitivity. These results suggest the involvement of deinococcal polymerase X in DNA-damage tolerance of D. radiodurans, possibly by contributing to DNA double-strand break repair and base excision repair. PMID:19542005

  4. Nonhomologous end joining of complex DNA double-strand breaks with proximal thymine glycol and interplay with base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohaini, Mohammed; Chalasani, Sri Lakshmi; Bafail, Duaa; Akopiants, Konstantin; Zhou, Tong; Yannone, Steven M; Ramsden, Dale A; Hartman, Matthew C T; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2016-05-01

    DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation are often accompanied by ancillary oxidative base damage that may prevent or delay their repair. In order to better define the features that make some DSBs repair-resistant, XLF-dependent nonhomologous end joining of blunt-ended DSB substrates having the oxidatively modified nonplanar base thymine glycol at the first (Tg1), second (Tg2), third (Tg3) or fifth (Tg5) positions from one 3' terminus, was examined in human whole-cell extracts. Tg at the third position had little effect on end-joining even when present on both ends of the break. However, Tg as the terminal or penultimate base was a major barrier to end joining (>10-fold reduction in ligated products) and an absolute barrier when present at both ends. Dideoxy trapping of base excision repair intermediates indicated that Tg was excised from Tg1, Tg2 and Tg3 largely if not exclusively after DSB ligation. However, Tg was rapidly excised from the Tg5 substrate, resulting in a reduced level of DSB ligation, as well as slow concomitant resection of the opposite strand. Ligase reactions containing only purified Ku, XRCC4, ligase IV and XLF showed that ligation of Tg3 and Tg5 was efficient and only partially XLF-dependent, whereas ligation of Tg1 and Tg2 was inefficient and only detectable in the presence of XLF. Overall, the results suggest that promoting ligation of DSBs with proximal base damage may be an important function of XLF, but that Tg can still be a major impediment to repair, being relatively resistant to both trimming and ligation. Moreover, it appears that base excision repair of Tg can sometimes interfere with repair of DSBs that would otherwise be readily rejoined. PMID:27049455

  5. 3CAPS – a structural AP–site analogue as a tool to investigate DNA base excision repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuermann, David; Scheidegger, Simon P.; Weber, Alain R.; Bjørås, Magnar; Leumann, Christian J.; Schär, Primo

    2016-01-01

    Abasic sites (AP-sites) are frequent DNA lesions, arising by spontaneous base hydrolysis or as intermediates of base excision repair (BER). The hemiacetal at the anomeric centre renders them chemically reactive, which presents a challenge to biochemical and structural investigation. Chemically more stable AP-site analogues have been used to avoid spontaneous decay, but these do not fully recapitulate the features of natural AP–sites. With its 3′–phosphate replaced by methylene, the abasic site analogue 3CAPS was suggested to circumvent some of these limitations. Here, we evaluated the properties of 3CAPS in biochemical BER assays with mammalian proteins. 3CAPS-containing DNA substrates were processed by APE1, albeit with comparably poor efficiency. APE1-cleaved 3CAPS can be extended by DNA polymerase β but repaired only by strand displacement as the 5′–deoxyribophosphate (dRP) cannot be removed. DNA glycosylases physically and functionally interact with 3CAPS substrates, underlining its structural integrity and biochemical reactivity. The AP lyase activity of bifunctional DNA glycosylases (NTH1, NEIL1, FPG), however, was fully inhibited. Notably, 3CAPS-containing DNA also effectively inhibited the activity of bifunctional glycosylases on authentic substrates. Hence, the chemically stable 3CAPS with its preserved hemiacetal functionality is a potent tool for BER research and a potential inhibitor of bifunctional DNA glycosylases. PMID:26733580

  6. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 regulates activity of DNA polymerase {beta} in long patch base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanova, Maria; Khodyreva, Svetlana [Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Lavrik, Olga, E-mail: lavrik@niboch.nsc.ru [Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP1), functioning as DNA nick-sensor, interacts with base excision repair (BER) DNA intermediates containing single-strand breaks. When bound to DNA breaks, PARP1 catalyzes synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) covalently attached to itself and some nuclear proteins. Autopoly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of PARP1 facilitates its dissociation from DNA breaks and is considered as a factor regulating DNA repair. In the study, using system reconstituted from purified BER proteins, bovine testis nuclear extract and model BER DNA intermediates, we examined the influence of PARP1 and its autopoly(ADP-ribosyl)ation on DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta})-mediated long patch (LP) BER DNA synthesis that is accomplished through a cooperation between Pol {beta} and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1) or flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and gap-filling activity of Pol {beta}. PARP1 upon interaction with nicked LP BER DNA intermediated, formed after gap-filling, was shown to suppress the subsequent steps in LP pathway. PARP1 interferes with APE1-dependent stimulation of DNA synthesis by Pol {beta} via strand-displacement mechanism. PARP1 also represses Pol {beta}/FEN1-mediated LP BER DNA synthesis via a 'gap translation' mechanism inhibiting FEN1 activity on the nicked DNA intermediate. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of PARP1 abolishes its inhibitory influence on LP BER DNA synthesis catalyzed by Pol {beta} both via APE1-mediated strand-displacement and FEN1-mediated 'gap translation' mechanism. Thus PARP1 may act as a negative regulator of Pol {beta} activity in LP BER pathway and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of PARP1 seems to play a critical role in enablement of Pol {beta}-mediated DNA synthesis in this process. In contrast, interaction of PARP1 with one nucleotide gapped DNA mimicking the intermediate of short patch (SP) BER slightly inhibits the gap-filling activity of Pol {beta} and the overall efficiency of SP BER is practically unaffected by PARP1. Thus

  7. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 regulates activity of DNA polymerase β in long patch base excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP1), functioning as DNA nick-sensor, interacts with base excision repair (BER) DNA intermediates containing single-strand breaks. When bound to DNA breaks, PARP1 catalyzes synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) covalently attached to itself and some nuclear proteins. Autopoly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of PARP1 facilitates its dissociation from DNA breaks and is considered as a factor regulating DNA repair. In the study, using system reconstituted from purified BER proteins, bovine testis nuclear extract and model BER DNA intermediates, we examined the influence of PARP1 and its autopoly(ADP-ribosyl)ation on DNA polymerase β (Pol β)-mediated long patch (LP) BER DNA synthesis that is accomplished through a cooperation between Pol β and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1) or flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and gap-filling activity of Pol β. PARP1 upon interaction with nicked LP BER DNA intermediated, formed after gap-filling, was shown to suppress the subsequent steps in LP pathway. PARP1 interferes with APE1-dependent stimulation of DNA synthesis by Pol β via strand-displacement mechanism. PARP1 also represses Pol β/FEN1-mediated LP BER DNA synthesis via a 'gap translation' mechanism inhibiting FEN1 activity on the nicked DNA intermediate. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of PARP1 abolishes its inhibitory influence on LP BER DNA synthesis catalyzed by Pol β both via APE1-mediated strand-displacement and FEN1-mediated 'gap translation' mechanism. Thus PARP1 may act as a negative regulator of Pol β activity in LP BER pathway and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of PARP1 seems to play a critical role in enablement of Pol β-mediated DNA synthesis in this process. In contrast, interaction of PARP1 with one nucleotide gapped DNA mimicking the intermediate of short patch (SP) BER slightly inhibits the gap-filling activity of Pol β and the overall efficiency of SP BER is practically unaffected by PARP1. Thus, PARP1 differentially influences DNA synthesis in SP- and

  8. APE1, the DNA base excision repair protein, regulates the removal of platinum adducts in sensory neuronal cultures by NER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the major side effects of treatment with the anticancer drug, cisplatin. One proposed mechanism for this neurotoxicity is the formation of platinum adducts in sensory neurons that could contribute to DNA damage. Although this damage is largely repaired by nuclear excision repair (NER), our previous findings suggest that augmenting the base excision repair pathway (BER) by overexpressing the repair protein APE1 protects sensory neurons from cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The question remains whether APE1 contributes to the ability of the NER pathway to repair platinum-damage in neuronal cells. To examine this, we manipulated APE1 expression in sensory neuronal cultures and measured Pt-removal after exposure to cisplatin. When neuronal cultures were treated with increasing concentrations of cisplatin for two or three hours, there was a concentration-dependent increase in Pt-damage that peaked at four hours and returned to near baseline levels after 24 h. In cultures where APE1 expression was reduced by ∼80% using siRNA directed at APE1, there was a significant inhibition of Pt-removal over eight hours which was reversed by overexpressing APE1 using a lentiviral construct for human wtAPE1. Overexpressing a mutant APE1 (C65 APE1), which only has DNA repair activity, but not its other significant redox-signaling function, mimicked the effects of wtAPE1. Overexpressing DNA repair activity mutant APE1 (226 + 177APE1), with only redox activity was ineffective suggesting it is the DNA repair function of APE1 and not its redox-signaling, that restores the Pt-damage removal. Together, these data provide the first evidence that a critical BER enzyme, APE1, helps regulate the NER pathway in the repair of cisplatin damage in sensory neurons

  9. APE1, the DNA base excision repair protein, regulates the removal of platinum adducts in sensory neuronal cultures by NER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Suk [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Guo, Chunlu; Thompson, Eric L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Jiang, Yanlin [Department of Pediatrics and Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Kelley, Mark R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Pediatrics and Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Vasko, Michael R. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Lee, Suk-Hee, E-mail: slee@iu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the major side effects of treatment with the anticancer drug, cisplatin. One proposed mechanism for this neurotoxicity is the formation of platinum adducts in sensory neurons that could contribute to DNA damage. Although this damage is largely repaired by nuclear excision repair (NER), our previous findings suggest that augmenting the base excision repair pathway (BER) by overexpressing the repair protein APE1 protects sensory neurons from cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The question remains whether APE1 contributes to the ability of the NER pathway to repair platinum-damage in neuronal cells. To examine this, we manipulated APE1 expression in sensory neuronal cultures and measured Pt-removal after exposure to cisplatin. When neuronal cultures were treated with increasing concentrations of cisplatin for two or three hours, there was a concentration-dependent increase in Pt-damage that peaked at four hours and returned to near baseline levels after 24 h. In cultures where APE1 expression was reduced by ∼80% using siRNA directed at APE1, there was a significant inhibition of Pt-removal over eight hours which was reversed by overexpressing APE1 using a lentiviral construct for human wtAPE1. Overexpressing a mutant APE1 (C65 APE1), which only has DNA repair activity, but not its other significant redox-signaling function, mimicked the effects of wtAPE1. Overexpressing DNA repair activity mutant APE1 (226 + 177APE1), with only redox activity was ineffective suggesting it is the DNA repair function of APE1 and not its redox-signaling, that restores the Pt-damage removal. Together, these data provide the first evidence that a critical BER enzyme, APE1, helps regulate the NER pathway in the repair of cisplatin damage in sensory neurons.

  10. Repair of DNA damage in mammalian cells after treatment with UV and dimethyl sulphate: discrimination between nucleotide and base excision repair by their temperature dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjertvik, M; Erixon, K; Ahnström, G

    1998-03-01

    Alkylating agents have been reported to give rise to both short and long patches of repair. The reason for the different patch sizes is not known. One possibility is that alkylating agents can trigger both base and nucleotide excision repair. Another possibility is that base excision repair itself can result in different patch sizes. Recognition and incision at lesions is the rate limiting step in excision repair. In order to discriminate between base and nucleotide excision repair it would be desirable to be able to distinguish between different incision activities. In order to accurately measure incision rates, the rejoining of the strand-breaks formed must be inhibited. We have used two inhibitors, aphidicolin and 3-aminobenzamide. Aphidicolin, an inhibitor of DNA polymerases alpha/delta/epsilon. caused accumulation of single-strand breaks both after UV and dimethylsulphate. 3-Aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase caused accumulation of single-strand breaks only after alkylating agents and is thus specific for base excision repair. Enzymatic activities can be characterised by their activation energy. In order to discriminate between base and nucleotide excision repair the temperature dependence of incision activities was determined. When the temperature is decreased, the incision rate is reduced to a larger extent for UV than for DMS-induced repair. Incisions in UV-irradiated cells are practically cut off at temperatures of 15 degrees C and below, whereas DMS-exposed cells still are actively repairing at this temperature. In DMS treated cells the temperature dependence was the same whether aphidicolin or 3-aminobenzamide was used, speaking against an involvement of nucleotide excision repair. In addition, cell lines deficient in nucleotide excision repair responded in the same way to aphidicolin after DMS treatment as normal cells and were able to make incisions at 15 degrees C. This indicates that nucleotide excision repair is not to any

  11. Base excision repair in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnez-Lima Lucymara F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage can be induced by a large number of physical and chemical agents from the environment as well as compounds produced by cellular metabolism. This type of damage can interfere with cellular processes such as replication and transcription, resulting in cell death and/or mutations. The low frequency of mutagenesis in cells is due to the presence of enzymatic pathways which repair damaged DNA. Several DNA repair genes (mainly from bacteria, yeasts and mammals have been cloned and their products characterized. The high conservation, especially in eukaryotes, of the majority of genes related to DNA repair argues for their importance in the maintenance of life on earth. In plants, our understanding of DNA repair pathways is still very poor, the first plant repair genes having only been cloned in 1997 and the mechanisms of their products have not yet been characterized. The objective of our data mining work was to identify genes related to the base excision repair (BER pathway, which are present in the database of the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (SUCEST Project. This search was performed by tblastn program. We identified sugarcane clusters homologous to the majority of BER proteins used in the analysis and a high degree of conservation was observed. The best results were obtained with BER proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana. For some sugarcane BER genes, the presence of more than one form of mRNA is possible, as shown by the occurrence of more than one homologous EST cluster.

  12. Acetylation regulates WRN catalytic activities and affects base excision DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; Kusumoto, Rika; Speina, Elzbieta;

    2008-01-01

    The Werner protein (WRN), defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, participates in a number of DNA metabolic processes, and we have been interested in the possible regulation of its function in DNA repair by post-translational modifications. Acetylation mediated by histone...... acetyltransferases is of key interest because of its potential importance in aging, DNA repair and transcription....

  13. Excised radicle tips as a source of genomic DNA for PCR-based genotyping and melting curve analysis in cotton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Srinivasa Rao; P Sateesh Kumar; Ramesh V Sonti

    2013-03-01

    Genomic DNA isolation in cotton is complicated because of the presence of secondary metabolites that are inhibitory to PCR amplification. We report here that radicle tips, but not other parts of cotton seedlings, yield high-quality DNA that is readily amenable for PCR. The radicle-tip-excised seedlings retain viability because of the formation of adventitious roots. We demonstrate the utility of this method in distinguishing homozygotes from heterozygotes in a cotton breeding population and in hybrid seed purity testing.

  14. The Base Excision Repair system of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium counteracts DNA damage by host nitric oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Richardson

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens must withstand nitric oxide (NO. generated by host phagocytes. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium interferes with intracellular trafficking of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and possesses multiple systems to detoxify NO.. Consequently, the level of NO. stress encountered by S. Typhimurium during infection in vivo has been unknown. The Base Excision Repair (BER system recognizes and repairs damaged DNA bases including cytosine and guanine residues modified by reactive nitrogen species. Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP sites generated by BER glycosylases require subsequent processing by AP endonucleases. S. Typhimurium xth nfo mutants lacking AP endonuclease activity exhibit increased NO. sensitivity resulting from chromosomal fragmentation at unprocessed AP sites. BER mutant strains were thus used to probe the nature and extent of nitrosative damage sustained by intracellular bacteria during infection. Here we show that an xth nfo S. Typhimurium mutant is attenuated for virulence in C3H/HeN mice, and virulence can be completely restored by the iNOS inhibitor L-NIL. Inactivation of the ung or fpg glycosylase genes partially restores virulence to xth nfo mutant S. Typhimurium, demonstrating that NO. fluxes in vivo are sufficient to modify cytosine and guanine bases, respectively. Mutants lacking ung or fpg exhibit NO.-dependent hypermutability during infection, underscoring the importance of BER in protecting Salmonella from the genotoxic effects of host NO.. These observations demonstrate that host-derived NO. damages Salmonella DNA in vivo, and the BER system is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity.

  15. An inverse switch in DNA base excision and strand break repair contributes to melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta M L Sousa

    Full Text Available Alterations in checkpoint and DNA repair pathways may provide adaptive mechanisms contributing to acquired drug resistance. Here, we investigated the levels of proteins mediating DNA damage signaling and -repair in RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cells and its Melphalan-resistant derivative 8226-LR5. We observed markedly reduced steady-state levels of DNA glycosylases UNG2, NEIL1 and MPG in the resistant cells and cross-resistance to agents inducing their respective DNA base lesions. Conversely, repair of alkali-labile sites was apparently enhanced in the resistant cells, as substantiated by alkaline comet assay, autoribosylation of PARP-1, and increased sensitivity to PARP-1 inhibition by 4-AN or KU58684. Reduced base-excision and enhanced single-strand break repair would both contribute to the observed reduction in genomic alkali-labile sites, which could jeopardize productive processing of the more cytotoxic Melphalan-induced interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs. Furthermore, we found a marked upregulation of proteins in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ pathway of double-strand break (DSB repair, likely contributing to the observed increase in DSB repair kinetics in the resistant cells. Finally, we observed apparent upregulation of ATR-signaling and downregulation of ATM-signaling in the resistant cells. This was accompanied by markedly increased sensitivity towards Melphalan in the presence of ATR-, DNA-PK, or CHK1/2 inhibitors whereas no sensitizing effect was observed subsequent to ATM inhibition, suggesting that replication blocking lesions are primary triggers of the DNA damage response in the Melphalan resistant cells. In conclusion, Melphalan resistance is apparently contributed by modulation of the DNA damage response at multiple levels, including downregulation of specific repair pathways to avoid repair intermediates that could impair efficient processing of cytotoxic ICLs and ICL-induced DSBs. This study has revealed several novel

  16. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline;

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of th...

  17. Sequence Context Specific Mutagenesis and Base Excision Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Donigan, Katherine; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2009-01-01

    Base excision repair is critical for the maintenance of genome stability because it repairs at least 20,000 endogenously generated DNA lesions per cell per day. Several enzymes within the base excision repair pathway exhibit sequence context dependency during the excision and DNA synthesis steps of repair. New evidence is emerging that germ line and tumor-associated variants of enzymes in this repair pathway exhibit sequence context dependence that is different from their ancestral counterpar...

  18. uv photobiology: excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are discussed: steps in nucleotide excision; damage to DNA by uv-endonuclease; use of complementation to study DNA repair in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells; role of BUDR photolysis in excision repair, relation between DNA repair defect and human disease; base excision repair; and excision repair by removal of damaged region of a base in DNA without excision

  19. Recombinant methods for screening human DNA excision repair proficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for measuring DNA excision repair in response to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage has been developed, validated, and field-tested in cultured human lymphocytes. The methodology is amenable to population-based screening and should facilitate future epidemiologic studies seeking to investigate associations between excision repair proficiency and cancer susceptibility. The impetus for such endeavors derives from the belief that the high incidence of skin cancer in the genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) primarily is a result of the reduced capacity of patients cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. For assay, UV-irradiated non-replicating recombinant plasmid DNA harboring a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) indicator gene is introduced into lymphocytes using DEAE-dextran short-term transfection conditions. Exposure to UV induces transcriptionally-inactivating DNA photoproducts in the plasmid DNA which inactivate CAT gene expression. Excision repair of the damaged CAT gene is monitored indirectly as a function of reactivated CAT enzyme activity following a 40 hour repair/expression incubation period

  20. Reconstitution of DNA base excision-repair with purified human proteins: interaction between DNA polymerase beta and the XRCC1 protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Kubota, Y; Nash, R. A.; Klungland, A; Schär, P; Barnes, D E.; Lindahl, T

    1996-01-01

    Repair of a uracil-guanine base pair in DNA has been reconstituted with the recombinant human proteins uracil-DNA glycosylase, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, DNA polymerase beta and DNA ligase III. The XRCC1 protein, which is known to bind DNA ligase III, is not absolutely required for the reaction but suppresses strand displacement by DNA polymerase beta, allowing for more efficient ligation after filling of a single nucleotide patch. We show that XRCC1 interacts directly with DNA polym...

  1. Low-dose formaldehyde delays DNA damage recognition and DNA excision repair in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luch

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks.

  2. Evidence implying DNA polymerase beta function in excision repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Siedlecki, J A; Szyszko, J.; Pietrzykowska, I; Zmudzka, B

    1980-01-01

    Comparison was made of the ability of calf thymus DNA polymerases alpha and beta to replicate the following templates: native E. coli CR-34 DNA (T-DNA), calf thymus DNA activated by DNase I (act.DNA), BU-DNA (from E. coli CR-34 cells cultured on BUdR-containing medium) with damages resulting from incomplete excision repair, as well as thermally denatured act.DNA and BU-DNA (s.s.act.DNA and s.s.BU-DNA). 3H-TTP incorporation during extensive replication of act.DNA was similar for both enzymes, ...

  3. Variant Base Excision Repair Proteins: Contributors to Genomic Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Antonia A.; Wallace, Susan S.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2012-01-01

    Cells sustain endogenous DNA damage at rates greater than 20,000 DNA lesions per cell per day. These damages occur largely as a result of the inherently unstable nature of DNA and the presence of reactive oxygen species within cells. The base excision repair system removes the majority of DNA lesions resulting from endogenous DNA damage. There are several enzymes that function during base excision repair. Importantly, there are over 100 germline single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes that function in base excision repair and that result in non-synonymous amino acid substitutions in the proteins they encode. Somatic variants of these enzymes are also found in human tumors. Variant repair enzymes catalyze aberrant base excision repair. Aberrant base excision repair combined with continuous endogenous DNA damage over time has the potential to lead to a mutator phenotype. Mutations that arise in key growth control genes, imbalances in chromosome number, chromosomal translocations, and loss of heterozygosity can result in the initiation of human cancer or its progression. PMID:20955798

  4. Is the Oxidative DNA Damage Level of Human Lymphocyte Correlated with the Antioxidant Capacity of Serum or the Base Excision Repair Activity of Lymphocyte?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chih Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A random screening of human blood samples from 24 individuals of nonsmoker was conducted to examine the correlation between the oxidative DNA damage level of lymphocytes and the antioxidant capacity of serum or the base excision repair (BER activity of lymphocytes. The oxidative DNA damage level was measured with comet assay containing Fpg/Endo III cleavage, and the BER activity was estimated with a modified comet assay including nuclear extract of lymphocytes for enzymatic cleavage. Antioxidant capacity was determined with trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay. We found that though the endogenous DNA oxidation levels varied among the individuals, each individual level appeared to be steady for at least 1 month. Our results indicate that the oxidative DNA damage level is insignificantly or weakly correlated with antioxidant capacity or BER activity, respectively. However, lymphocytes from carriers of Helicobacter pylori (HP or Hepatitis B virus (HBV tend to give higher levels of oxidative DNA damage (P<0.05. Though sera of this group of individuals show no particular tendency with reduced antioxidant capacity, the respective BER activities of lymphocytes are lower in average (P<0.05. Thus, reduction of repair activity may be associated with the genotoxic effect of HP or HBV infection.

  5. Measurement of DNA base and nucleotide excision repair activities in mammalian cells and tissues using the comet assay - A methodological overview

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Azqueta, A.; Langie, S. A. S.; Slyšková, Jana; Collins, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 11 (2013), s. 1007-1010. ISSN 1568-7864 Grant ostatní: EU FP6(XE) LSHB-CT-2006-037575 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : comet assay * base excision repair * nucleotide excision repair Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.362, year: 2013

  6. Both base excision repair and O6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protect against methylation-induced colon carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wirtz, Stefan; Nagel, Georg; Eshkind, Leonid; Neurath, Markus F; Samson, Leona D.; Kaina, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Methylating agents are widely distributed environmental carcinogens. Moreover, they are being used in cancer chemotherapy. The primary target of methylating agents is DNA, and therefore, DNA repair is the first-line barrier in defense against their toxic and carcinogenic effects. Methylating agents induce in the DNA O[superscript 6]-methylguanine (O[superscript 6]MeG) and methylations of the ring nitrogens of purines. The lesions are repaired by O[superscript 6]-methylguanine-DNA methyltransf...

  7. Polymorphisms in base excision DNA repair genes and association with melanoma risk in a pilot study on Central-South Italian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santonocito, Concetta; Scapaticci, Margherita; Penitente, Romina; Paradisi, Andrea; Capizzi, Rodolfo; Lanza-Silveri, Sara; Ficarra, Silvana; Landi, Francesco; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2012-10-01

    Base excision repair plays a key role in the removing of DNA damage from exposure to endogenous and exogenous carcinogens. The BER pathway removes alterations of a single oxidized, reduced or methylated base. Recently some studies have explored the association between risk for cutaneous melanoma and non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in DNA-repair genes, although with contradictory results. We hypothesized that common nsSNPs of BER genes, specifically ADPRT rs1136410, XRCC1 rs25487, rs25489, rs1799782, APEX1 rs1130409, OGG1 rs1052133, LIG3 rs3136025 and MUTYH rs3219466, may contribute to risk of melanoma. The aim of this study is to investigate whether or not a correlation between these nsSNPs and melanoma risk and/or aggressiveness is present. 167 melanoma patients and 186 healthy control subjects were analysed. By multivariate statistical analysis no association was found between nsSNP and melanoma aggressiveness, while only the two XRCC1 (rs25487 and rs25489) nsSNPs showed a strong correlation (p<0.001) with melanoma risk. To our knowledge this is the first study reporting an association between BER nsSNPs and melanoma risk in Central-South Italian individuals. Our findings, if confirmed in larger population studies, will allow the inclusion of these XRCC1 nsSNPs in a screening panel for those individuals at higher risk for melanoma. PMID:22687647

  8. Kin-cohort estimates for familial breast cancer risk in relation to variants in DNA base excision repair, BRCA1 interacting and growth factor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subtle functional deficiencies in highly conserved DNA repair or growth regulatory processes resulting from polymorphic variation may increase genetic susceptibility to breast cancer. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes can impact protein function leading to genomic instability facilitated by growth stimulation and increased cancer risk. Thus, 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight genes involved in base excision repair (XRCC1, APEX, POLD1), BRCA1 protein interaction (BRIP1, ZNF350, BRCA2), and growth regulation (TGFß1, IGFBP3) were evaluated. Genomic DNA samples were used in Taqman 5'-nuclease assays for most SNPs. Breast cancer risk to ages 50 and 70 were estimated using the kin-cohort method in which genotypes of relatives are inferred based on the known genotype of the index subject and Mendelian inheritance patterns. Family cancer history data was collected from a series of genotyped breast cancer cases (N = 748) identified within a cohort of female US radiologic technologists. Among 2,430 female first-degree relatives of cases, 190 breast cancers were reported. Genotypes associated with increased risk were: XRCC1 R194W (WW and RW vs. RR, cumulative risk up to age 70, risk ratio (RR) = 2.3; 95% CI 1.3–3.8); XRCC1 R399Q (QQ vs. RR, cumulative risk up to age 70, RR = 1.9; 1.1–3.9); and BRIP1 (or BACH1) P919S (SS vs. PP, cumulative risk up to age 50, RR = 6.9; 1.6–29.3). The risk for those heterozygous for BRCA2 N372H and APEX D148E were significantly lower than risks for homozygotes of either allele, and these were the only two results that remained significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. No associations with breast cancer were observed for: APEX Q51H; XRCC1 R280H; IGFPB3 -202A>C; TGFß1 L10P, P25R, and T263I; BRCA2 N289H and T1915M; BRIP1 -64A>C; and ZNF350 (or ZBRK1) 1845C>T, L66P, R501S, and S472P. Some variants in genes within the base-excision repair pathway (XRCC1) and BRCA1 interacting proteins (BRIP1) may play a role

  9. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Osorio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase, and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2 gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03-1.16, p = 2.7 × 10(-3 for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, p = 4.8 × 10(-3. DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied.

  10. Kinetics of excision of purine lesions from DNA by Escherichia coli Fpg protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Karakaya, A; Jaruga, P; Bohr, V A; Grollman, A P; Dizdaroglu, M

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of excision of damaged purine bases from oxidatively damaged DNA by Escherichia coli Fpg protein were investigated. DNA substrates, prepared by treatment with H2O2/Fe(III)-EDTA or by gamma-irradiation under N2O or air, were incubated with Fpg protein, followed by precipitation of DNA. Precipitated DNA and supernatant fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. Kinetic studies revealed efficient excision of 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OH-Gua), 2,6-dia...

  11. Endonuclease IV Is the Main Base Excision Repair Enzyme Involved in DNA Damage Induced by UVA Radiation and Stannous Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos P. De Mattos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stannous chloride (SnCl2 and UVA induce DNA lesions through ROS. The aim of this work was to study the toxicity induced by UVA preillumination, followed by SnCl2 treatment. E. coli BER mutants were used to identify genes which could play a role in DNA lesion repair generated by these agents. The survival assays showed (i The nfo mutant was the most sensitive to SnCl2; (ii lethal synergistic effect was observed after UVA pre-illumination, plus SnCl2 incubation, the nfo mutant being the most sensitive; (iii wild type and nfo mutants, transformed with pBW21 plasmid (nfo+ had their survival increased following treatments. The alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis assays pointed that (i UVA induced DNA breaks and fpg mutant was the most sensitive; (ii SnCl2-induced DNA strand breaks were higher than those from UVA and nfo mutant had the slowest repair kinetics; (iii UVA+SnCl2 promoted an increase in DNA breaks than SnCl2 and, again, nfo mutant displayed the slowest repair kinetics. In summary, Nfo protects E. coli cells against damage induced by SnCl2 and UVA+ SnCl2.

  12. Correlation between base-excision repair gene polymorphisms and levels of in-vitro BPDE-induced DNA adducts in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongping Yu

    Full Text Available In vitro benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE-induced DNA adducts in cultured peripheral lymphocytes have been shown to be a phenotypic biomarker of individual's DNA repair phenotype that is associated with cancer risk. In this study, we explored associations between genotypes of base-excision repair genes (PARP1 Val762Ala, APEX1 Asp148Glu, and XRCC1 Arg399Gln and in vitro BPDE-induced DNA adducts in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes in 706 cancer-free non-Hispanic white subjects. We found that levels of BPDE-induced DNA adducts were significantly higher in ever smokers than in never smokers and that individuals with the Glu variant genotypes (i.e., Asp/Glu and Glu/Glu exhibited lower levels of BPDE-induced DNA adducts than did individuals with the common Asp/Asp homozygous genotype (median RAL levels: 32.0 for Asp/Asp, 27.0 for Asp/Glu, and 17.0 for Glu/Glu, respectively; P(trend = 0.030. Further stratified analysis showed that compared with individuals with the common APEX1-148 homozygous Asp/Asp genotype, individuals with the APEX1-148Asp/Glu genotype or the Glu/Glu genotype had a lower risk of having higher-level adducts (adjusted OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.36-0.98 and adjusted OR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.26-0.86, respectively; P(trend = 0.012 among smokers. Such an effect was not observed in non-smokers. However, there was no significant interaction between the APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism and smoking exposure in this study population (P = 0.512. Additional genotype-phenotype analysis found that the APEX1-148Glu allele had significantly increased expression of APEX1 mRNA in 270 Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines, which is likely associated with more active repair activity. Our findings suggest that the functional APEX1-148Glu allele is associated with reduced risk of having high levels of BPDE-induced DNA adducts mediated with high levels of mRNA expression.

  13. Base excision repair mechanisms and relevance to cancer susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway is considered the predominant DNA repair system in mammalian cells for eliminating small DNA lesions generated at DNA bases either exogenously by environmental agents or endogenously by normal cellular metabolic processes (e.g. production of oxyradical species, alkylating agents, etc). The main goal of this project is the understanding of the involvement of BER in genome stability and in particular in sporadic cancer development associated with inflammation such as gastric cancer (GC). A major risk factor of GC is the infection by Helicobacter pylori, which causes oxidative stress. Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by BER

  14. Excision repair of 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine from the DNA of Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major ionizing radiation products, 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine (thymine glycol), was measured in the DNA of Micrococcus radiodurans following exposure of cells to 6.8-MeV electrons or 254-nm ultraviolet light. Removal of 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine was measured in both an ionizing radiation-sensitive strain (262) and a highly radioresistant strain (the wild type W+) of Micrococcus radiodurans. Within 30 min of incubation (330C) following exposure to ultraviolet light (2400 J/m2) approximately 60% of the thymine glycols were excised, whereas in the case of ionizing radiation (250 krad) only 35% were removed from the cellular DNA of the wild-type strain. In contrast less than 50% of the thymine glycols were excised from the sensitive strain. The amount of DNA degradation induced by radiation was less than 10% in both strains. The results suggest a possible correlation between reduced excision repair of base damage and increased radiation sensitivity

  15. Ku80-Deleted Cells are Defective at Base Excision Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Han; Marple, Teresa; Hasty, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Ku80 forms a heterodimer with Ku70, called Ku, that repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. As a consequence of deleting NHEJ, Ku80-mutant cells are hypersensitive to agents that cause DNA DSBs like ionizing radiation. Here we show that Ku80 deletion also decreased resistance to ROS and alkylating agents that typically cause base lesions and single-strand breaks (SSBs). This is unusual since base excision repair (BER), not NHEJ, typically repa...

  16. Human DNA mismatch repair: coupling of mismatch recognition to strand-specific excision

    OpenAIRE

    WANG Huixian; Hays, John B.

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic mismatch-repair (MMR) proteins MutSα and MutLα couple recognition of base mismatches to strand-specific excision, initiated in vivo at growing 3′ ends and 5′ Okazaki-fragment ends or, in human nuclear extracts, at nicks in exogenous circular substrates. We addressed five biochemical questions relevant to coupling models. Excision remained fully efficient at DNA:MutSα ratios of nearly 1 to 1 at various mismatch-nick distances, suggesting a requirement for only one MutSα molecule per...

  17. DDB2 (Damaged DNA binding protein 2) in nucleotide excision repair and DNA damage response

    OpenAIRE

    Stoyanova, Tanya; Roy, Nilotpal; Kopanja, Dragana; Raychaudhuri, Pradip; Bagchi, Srilata

    2009-01-01

    DDB2 was identified as a protein involved in the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER), a major DNA repair mechanism that repairs UV damage to prevent accumulation of mutations and tumorigenesis. However, recent studies indicated additional functions of DDB2 in the DNA damage response pathway. Herein, we discuss the proposed mechanisms by which DDB2 activates NER and programmed cell death upon DNA damage through its E3 ligase activity.

  18. Base excision repair activities differ in human lung cancer cells and corresponding normal controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karahalil, Bensu; Bohr, Vilhelm A; De Souza-Pinto, Nadja C

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA is thought to play a role in carcinogenesis by causing mutations, and indeed accumulation of oxidized DNA bases has been observed in samples obtained from tumors but not from surrounding tissue within the same patient. Base excision repair (BER) is the main pathway for the...

  19. Cdt2-mediated XPG degradation promotes gap-filling DNA synthesis in nucleotide excision repair

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Chunhua; Wani, Gulzar; Zhao, Ran; Qian, Jiang; Sharma, Nidhi; He, Jinshan; Zhu, Qianzheng; Wang, Qi-En; Wani, Altaf A.

    2014-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group G (XPG) protein is a structure-specific repair endonuclease, which cleaves DNA strands on the 3′ side of the DNA damage during nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG also plays a crucial role in initiating DNA repair synthesis through recruitment of PCNA to the repair sites. However, the fate of XPG protein subsequent to the excision of DNA damage has remained unresolved. Here, we show that XPG, following its action on bulky lesions resulting from exposures to UV ir...

  20. Nucleosomes determine their own patch size in base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) processes non-helix distorting lesions (e.g., uracils and gaps) and is composed of two subpathways that differ in the number of nucleotides (nts) incorporated during the DNA synthesis step: short patch (SP) repair incorporates 1 nt and long patch (LP) repair incorporates 2-12 nts. This choice for either LP or SP repair has not been analyzed in the context of nucleosomes. Initial studies with uracil located in nucleosome core DNA showed a distinct DNA polymerase extension profile in cell-free extracts that specifically limits extension to 1 nt, suggesting a preference for SP BER. Therefore, we developed an assay to differentiate long and short repair patches in 'designed' nucleosomes containing a single-nucleotide gap at specific locations relative to the dyad center. Using cell-free extracts or purified enzymes, we found that DNA lesions in the nucleosome core are preferentially repaired by DNA polymerase β and there is a significant reduction in BER polymerase extension beyond 1 nt, creating a striking bias for incorporation of short patches into nucleosomal DNA. These results show that nucleosomes control the patch size used by BER. PMID:27265863

  1. Enzymic excision of ultraviolet-induced cytosine hydrates from left-handed DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet irradiation of DNA produces a variety of pyrimidine modifications. These include cytosine hydrate (5,6-dihydro-6-hydroxycytosine), released as a free base by E. coli endonuclease III. The enzymic excision of cytosine hydrate by this purified enzyme was investigated by assaying release of labeled photoproduct from DNA into the ethanol-soluble fraction. Ultraviolet-irradiated poly(dG-dC):poly(dG-dC), radio-labeled in cytosines, was used as substrate. Shifts between the right-handed B-conformation and the left-handed Z-conformation were effected by heating the polymer in the presence of either Ni[II] or Co[II]. Conformational states were determined by ultraviolet circular dichroism. Rates of enzymic cytosine hydrate release did not differ between the different substrate conformations, B-DNA and Z-DNA. Irradiation of left-handed poly(dG-dC):poly(dG-dC) resulted in cytosine hydrate formation. Therefore, neither formation nor enzymic excision of ultraviolet-induced cytosine hydrates are substantially affected by the DNA conformational state. Cytosine hydrates are most likely to occur in alternating purine:pyrimidine sequences. Such segments can adopt the Z-conformation as a result of reactions with chemical carcinogens, the presence of metal ions, or negative superhelicity. These results indicate repair of cytosine hydrates to be likely, regardless of the DNA conformational state

  2. Base Excision Repair, a Pathway Regulated by Posttranslational Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Rachel J; Parsons, Jason L

    2016-05-15

    Base excision repair (BER) is an essential DNA repair pathway involved in the maintenance of genome stability and thus in the prevention of human diseases, such as premature aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs), including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, SUMOylation, and ubiquitylation, have emerged as important contributors in controlling cellular BER protein levels, enzymatic activities, protein-protein interactions, and protein cellular localization. These PTMs therefore play key roles in regulating the BER pathway and are consequently crucial for coordinating an efficient cellular DNA damage response. In this review, we summarize the presently available data on characterized PTMs of key BER proteins, the functional consequences of these modifications at the protein level, and also the impact on BER in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26976642

  3. POLYMORPHISMS IN THE DNA BASE EXCISION REPAIR GENES APEX1 AND XRCC1 AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN XUAN WEI, CHINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuan Wei County is among the highest in China and has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays a key role in revers...

  4. Accurate DNA assembly and genome engineering with optimized uracil excision cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Seppala, Susanna;

    2015-01-01

    produces β-carotene to optimize assembly junctions and the uracil excision protocol. By combining uracil excision cloning with a genomic integration technology, we demonstrate that up to six DNA fragments can be assembled in a one-tube reaction for direct genome integration with high accuracy, greatly...

  5. Mechanisms of DNA Repair by Photolyase and Excision Nuclease (Nobel Lecture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancar, Aziz

    2016-07-18

    Ultraviolet light damages DNA by converting two adjacent thymines into a thymine dimer which is potentially mutagenic, carcinogenic, or lethal to the organism. This damage is repaired by photolyase and the nucleotide excision repair system in E. coli by nucleotide excision repair in humans. The work leading to these results is presented by Aziz Sancar in his Nobel Lecture. PMID:27337655

  6. Alar base reduction: the boomerang-shaped excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2011-04-01

    A boomerang-shaped alar base excision is described to narrow the nasal base and correct the excessive alar flare. The boomerang excision combined the external alar wedge resection with an internal vestibular floor excision. The internal excision was inclined 30 to 45 degrees laterally to form the inner limb of the boomerang. The study included 46 patients presenting with wide nasal base and excessive alar flaring. All cases were followed for a mean period of 18 months (range, 8 to 36 months). The laterally oriented vestibular floor excision allowed for maximum preservation of the natural curvature of the alar rim where it meets the nostril floor and upon its closure resulted in a considerable medialization of alar lobule, which significantly reduced the amount of alar flare and the amount of external alar excision needed. This external alar excision measured, on average, 3.8 mm (range, 2 to 8 mm), which is significantly less than that needed when a standard vertical internal excision was used ( P < 0.0001). Such conservative external excisions eliminated the risk of obliterating the natural alar-facial crease, which did not occur in any of our cases. No cases of postoperative bleeding, infection, or vestibular stenosis were encountered. Keloid or hypertrophic scar formation was not encountered; however, dermabrasion of the scars was needed in three (6.5%) cases to eliminate apparent suture track marks. The boomerang alar base excision proved to be a safe and effective technique for narrowing the nasal base and elimination of the excessive flaring and resulted in a natural, well-proportioned nasal base with no obvious scarring. PMID:21404164

  7. Resistance to Nucleotide Excision Repair of Bulky Guanine Adducts Opposite Abasic Sites in DNA Duplexes and Relationships between Structure and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Liu

    Full Text Available The nucleotide excision repair of certain bulky DNA lesions is abrogated in some specific non-canonical DNA base sequence contexts, while the removal of the same lesions by the nucleotide excision repair mechanism is efficient in duplexes in which all base pairs are complementary. Here we show that the nucleotide excision repair activity in human cell extracts is moderate-to-high in the case of two stereoisomeric DNA lesions derived from the pro-carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (cis- and trans-B[a]P-N2-dG adducts in a normal DNA duplex. By contrast, the nucleotide excision repair activity is completely abrogated when the canonical cytosine base opposite the B[a]P-dG adducts is replaced by an abasic site in duplex DNA. However, base excision repair of the abasic site persists. In order to understand the structural origins of these striking phenomena, we used NMR and molecular spectroscopy techniques to evaluate the conformational features of 11mer DNA duplexes containing these B[a]P-dG lesions opposite abasic sites. Our results show that in these duplexes containing the clustered lesions, both B[a]P-dG adducts adopt base-displaced intercalated conformations, with the B[a]P aromatic rings intercalated into the DNA helix. To explain the persistence of base excision repair in the face of the opposed bulky B[a]P ring system, molecular modeling results suggest how the APE1 base excision repair endonuclease, that excises abasic lesions, can bind productively even with the trans-B[a]P-dG positioned opposite the abasic site. We hypothesize that the nucleotide excision repair resistance is fostered by local B[a]P residue-DNA base stacking interactions at the abasic sites, that are facilitated by the absence of the cytosine partner base in the complementary strand. More broadly, this study sets the stage for elucidating the interplay between base excision and nucleotide excision repair in processing different types of clustered DNA lesions that are substrates of

  8. Base excision repair deficiency in acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy of the hematopoietic system arising from a transformed myeloid progenitor cell. Genomic instability is the hallmark of AML and characterized by a variety of cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities. Whereas 10% to 20% of AML cases reflect long-term sequelae of cytotoxic therapies for a primary disorder, the etiology for the majority of AMLs remains unknown. The integrity of DNA is under continuous attack from a variety of exogenous and endogenous DNA damaging agents. The majority of DNA damage is caused by constantly generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting from metabolic by-products. Base excision repair (BER) is the major DNA repair mechanism dealing with DNA base lesions that are induced by oxidative stress or alkylation. In this study we investigated the BER in AML. Primary AML patients samples as well as AML cell lines were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). DNA damage induction and repair was monitored by the alkaline comet assay. In 15/30 leukemic samples from patients with therapy-related AML, in 13/35 with de novo AML and 14/26 with AML following a myelodysplastic syndrome, significantly reduced single strand breaks (SSBs) representing BER intermediates were found. In contrast, normal SSB formation was seen in mononuclear cells of 30 healthy individuals and 30/31 purified hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cell preparations obtained from umbilical cord blood. Additionally, in 5/10 analyzed AML cell lines, no SSBs were formed upon H2O2 treatment, either. Differences in intracellular ROS concentrations or apoptosis could be excluded as reason for this phenomenon. A significantly diminished cleavage capacity for 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine as well as for Furan was observed in cell lines that exhibited no SSB formation. These data demonstrate for the first time that initial steps of BER are impaired in a proportion of AML cell lines and leukemic cells from patients with different forms of AML

  9. Copper-Controllable, Site-Specific DNA Excision in Transgenic Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xiang-lei; LIANG Bin; CHEN Ming; HU Yuan-lei; LIN Zhong-ping

    2003-01-01

    A copper-inducible, Cre-loxP recombination-mediated DNA excision system has been developed in transgenic tobacco plants. The copper inducible system derived from yeast was used for the control of the expression of the Cre recombinase. Upon copper induction, the GUS reporter gene expression unit flanked by two direct lox sites was excised from the transgenic tobacco genome. Quantitative fluorometric GUS assays,Northern blot and PCR analyses showed a high-efficient, copper-dependent and Cre-loxP mediated DNA recombination in all the tested transgenic lines. The copper inducible foreign gene excision might be of great potential in genetic control of transgenic crops.

  10. An unprecedented nucleic acid capture mechanism for excision of DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinson, Emily H.; Prakasha Gowda, A.S.; Spratt, Thomas E.; Gold, Barry; Eichmanbrand, Brandt F. (Pitt); (Vanderbilt); (Penn)

    2010-11-18

    DNA glycosylases that remove alkylated and deaminated purine nucleobases are essential DNA repair enzymes that protect the genome, and at the same time confound cancer alkylation therapy, by excising cytotoxic N3-methyladenine bases formed by DNA-targeting anticancer compounds. The basis for glycosylase specificity towards N3- and N7-alkylpurines is believed to result from intrinsic instability of the modified bases and not from direct enzyme functional group chemistry. Here we present crystal structures of the recently discovered Bacillus cereus AlkD glycosylase in complex with DNAs containing alkylated, mismatched and abasic nucleotides. Unlike other glycosylases, AlkD captures the extrahelical lesion in a solvent-exposed orientation, providing an illustration for how hydrolysis of N3- and N7-alkylated bases may be facilitated by increased lifetime out of the DNA helix. The structures and supporting biochemical analysis of base flipping and catalysis reveal how the HEAT repeats of AlkD distort the DNA backbone to detect non-Watson-Crick base pairs without duplex intercalation.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of DNA damage recognition for mammalian nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2016-08-01

    For faithful DNA repair, it is crucial for cells to locate lesions precisely within the vast genome. In the mammalian global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, this difficult task is accomplished through multiple steps, in which the xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex plays a central role. XPC senses the presence of oscillating 'normal' bases in the DNA duplex, and its binding properties contribute to the extremely broad substrate specificity of NER. Unlike XPC, which acts as a versatile sensor of DNA helical distortion, the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) is more specialized, recognizing UV-induced photolesions and facilitating recruitment of XPC. Recent single-molecule analyses and structural studies have advanced our understanding of how UV-DDB finds its targets, particularly in the context of chromatin. After XPC binds DNA, it is necessary to verify the presence of damage in order to avoid potentially deleterious incisions at damage-free sites. Accumulating evidence suggests that XPA and the helicase activity of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) cooperate to verify abnormalities in DNA chemistry. This chapter reviews recent findings about the mechanisms underlying the efficiency, versatility, and accuracy of NER. PMID:27264556

  12. Nucleotide-excision repair of DNA in cell-free extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide spectrum of DNA lesions are repaired by the nucleotide-excision repair (NER) pathway in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. We have developed a cell-free system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that supports NER. NER was monitored by measuring repair synthesis in DNA treated with cisplatin or with UV radiation. Repair synthesis in vitro was defective in extracts of rad1, rad2, and rad10 mutant cells, all of which have mutations in genes whose products are known to be required for NER in vivo. Additionally, repair synthesis was complemented by mixing different mutant extracts, or by adding purified Rad1 or Rad10 protein to rad1 or rad10 mutant extracts, respectively. The latter observation demonstrates that the Rad1 and Rad10 proteins directly participate in the biochemical pathway of NER. NER supported by nuclear extracts requires ATP and Mg2+ and is stimulated by polyethylene glycol and by small amounts of whole cell extract containing overexpressed Rad2 protein. The nuclear extracts also contain base-excision repair activity that is present at wild-type levels in rad mutant extracts. This cell-free system is expected to facilitate studies on the biochemical pathway of NER in S. cerevisiae

  13. Ku80-deleted cells are defective at base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Han [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Tumor Suppression Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid 28029 (Spain); Marple, Teresa [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Hasty, Paul, E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Tumor Suppression Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid 28029 (Spain)

    2013-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ku80-deleted cells are hypersensitive to ROS and alkylating agents. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Ku70 or Lig4, have reduced BER capacity. • OGG1 rescues hypersensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and paraquat in Ku80-mutant cells. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Lig4, are defective at repairing AP sites. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Lig4 or Brca2 exon 27, exhibit increased PAR. - Abstract: Ku80 forms a heterodimer with Ku70, called Ku, that repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. As a consequence of deleting NHEJ, Ku80-mutant cells are hypersensitive to agents that cause DNA DSBs like ionizing radiation. Here we show that Ku80 deletion also decreased resistance to ROS and alkylating agents that typically cause base lesions and single-strand breaks (SSBs). This is unusual since base excision repair (BER), not NHEJ, typically repairs these types of lesions. However, we show that deletion of another NHEJ protein, DNA ligase IV (Lig4), did not cause hypersensitivity to these agents. In addition, the ROS and alkylating agents did not induce γ-H2AX foci that are diagnostic of DSBs. Furthermore, deletion of Ku80, but not Lig4 or Ku70, reduced BER capacity. Ku80 deletion also impaired BER at the initial lesion recognition/strand scission step; thus, involvement of a DSB is unlikely. Therefore, our data suggests that Ku80 deletion impairs BER via a mechanism that does not repair DSBs.

  14. Gut Microbiota Imbalance and Base Excision Repair Dynamics in Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Debolina; Kidane, Dawit

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota are required for host nutrition, energy balance, and regulating immune homeostasis, however, in some cases, this mutually beneficial relationship becomes twisted (dysbiosis), and the gut flora can incite pathological disorders including colon cancer. Microbial dysbiosis promotes the release of bacterial genotoxins, metabolites, and causes chronic inflammation, which promote oxidative DNA damage. Oxidized DNA base lesions are removed by base excision repair (BER), however, the role of this altered function of BER, as well as microbiota-mediated genomic instability and colon cancer development, is still poorly understood. In this review article, we will discuss how dysbiotic microbiota induce DNA damage, its impact on base excision repair capacity, the potential link of host BER gene polymorphism, and the risk of dysbiotic microbiota mediated genomic instability and colon cancer.

  15. X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 in base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanssen-Bauer, Audun; Solvang-Garten, Karin; Akbari, Mansour;

    2012-01-01

    X-ray Repair Cross Complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) acts as a scaffolding protein in the converging base excision repair (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR) pathways. XRCC1 also interacts with itself and rapidly accumulates at sites of DNA damage. XRCC1 can thus mediate the assembly of large...... multiprotein DNA repair complexes as well as facilitate the recruitment of DNA repair proteins to sites of DNA damage. Moreover, XRCC1 is present in constitutive DNA repair complexes, some of which associate with the replication machinery. Because of the critical role of XRCC1 in DNA repair, its common...... variants Arg194Trp, Arg280His and Arg399Gln have been extensively studied. However, the prevalence of these variants varies strongly in different populations, and their functional influence on DNA repair and disease remains elusive. Here we present the current knowledge about the role of XRCC1 and its...

  16. Substrate specificity of the Escherichia coli Fpg protein (Formamidopyrimidine - DNA glycosylase): Excision of purine lesions in DNA produced by ionizing radiation or photosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have investigated the excision of a variety of modified bases from DNA by the Escherichia coli Fpg protein (formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase). DNA used as a substrate was modified either by exposure to ionizing radiation or by photosensitization using visible light in the presence of methylene blue (MB). The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, which can unambiguously identify and quantitate pyrimidine- and purine-derived lesions in DNA, was used for analysis of hydrolyzed and derivatized DNA samples. Thirteen products resulting from pyrimidines and purines were detected in γ-irradiated DNA, whereas only the formation of 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua) and 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OH-Gua) was observed in visible light/MB-treated DNA. Analysis of γ-irradiated DNA after incubation with the Fpg protein followed by precipitation revealed that the Fpg protein significantly excised 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyAde), FapyGua, and 8-OH-Gua. The excision of a small but detectable amount of 8-hydroxyadenine was also observed. The results suggest that one of the biological roles of the Fpg protein, which is present in bacteria as well as in mammalian cells, is the repair of DNA damage caused by free radicals or by other oxygen-derived species such as singlet oxygen. The Fpg protein appears to be specific for recognition of imidazole ring opened purines and 8-hydroxypurines in DNA and may complement pyrimidine-specific enzymes in repair of DNA damage in vivo

  17. Mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair proteins cooperate in the recognition of DNA interstrand crosslinks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Junhua; Jain, Aklank; Iyer, Ravi R.; Modrich, Paul L.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, thus ICL-inducing agents such as psoralen, are clinically useful chemotherapeutics. Psoralen-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) have been used to target ICLs to specific genomic sites to increase the selectivity of these agents. However, how TFO-directed psoralen ICLs (Tdp-ICLs) are recognized and processed in human cells is unclear. Previously, we reported that two essential nucleotide excision ...

  18. Structural Basis for Bulky-Adduct DNA-Lesion Recognition by the Nucleotide Excision Repair Protein Rad14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nina; Ebert, Charlotte; Schneider, Sabine

    2016-07-25

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines react with purine bases and result in bulky DNA adducts that cause mutations. Such structurally diverse lesions are substrates for the nucleotide excision repair (NER). It is thought that the NER machinery recognises and verifies distorted DNA conformations, also involving the xeroderma pigmentosum group A and C proteins (XPA, XPC) that act as a scaffold between the DNA substrate and several other NER proteins. Here we present the synthesis of DNA molecules containing the polycyclic, aromatic amine C8-guanine lesions acetylaminophenyl, acetylaminonaphthyl, acetylaminoanthryl, and acetylaminopyrenyl, as well as their crystal structures in complex with the yeast XPA homologue Rad14. This work further substantiates the indirect lesion-detection mechanism employed by the NER system that recognises destabilised and deformable DNA structures. PMID:27223336

  19. DNA damage and nucleotide excision repair capacity in healthy individuals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slyšková, Jana; Naccarati, Alessio; Poláková, Veronika; Pardini, Barbara; Vodičková, Ludmila; Štětina, R.; Schmuczerová, Jana; Šmerhovský, Z.; Lipská, L.; Vodička, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 7 (2011), s. 511-517. ISSN 0893-6692 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/1286; GA MŠk 7F10069 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) GAUK124710 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : BPDE-induced DNA repair capacity * comet assay * interindividual variability Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.709, year: 2011

  20. snRNA and Heterochromatin Formation Are Involved in DNA Excision during Macronuclear Development in Stichotrichous Ciliates

    OpenAIRE

    Juranek, Stefan A.; Rupprecht, Sina; Postberg, Jan; Lipps, Hans J.

    2008-01-01

    Several models for specific excision of micronucleus-specific DNA sequences during macronuclear development in ciliates exist. While the template-guided recombination model suggests recombination events resulting in specific DNA excision and reordering of macronucleus-destined sequences (MDS) guided by a template, there is evidence that an RNA interference-related mechanism is involved in DNA elimination in holotrichous ciliates. We describe that in the stichotrichous ciliate Stylonychia, snR...

  1. Nucleotide excision repair DNA synthesis by excess DNA polymerase beta: a potential source of genetic instability in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitrot, Y; Hoffmann, J S; Calsou, P; Hayakawa, H; Salles, B; Cazaux, C

    2000-09-01

    The nucleotide excision repair pathway contributes to genetic stability by removing a wide range of DNA damage through an error-free reaction. When the lesion is located, the altered strand is incised on both sides of the lesion and a damaged oligonucleotide excised. A repair patch is then synthesized and the repaired strand is ligated. It is assumed that only DNA polymerases delta and/or epsilon participate to the repair DNA synthesis step. Using UV and cisplatin-modified DNA templates, we measured in vitro that extracts from cells overexpressing the error-prone DNA polymerase beta exhibited a five- to sixfold increase of the ultimate DNA synthesis activity compared with control extracts and demonstrated the specific involvement of Pol beta in this step. By using a 28 nt gapped, double-stranded DNA substrate mimicking the product of the incision step, we showed that Pol beta is able to catalyze strand displacement downstream of the gap. We discuss these data within the scope of a hypothesis previously presented proposing that excess error-prone Pol beta in cancer cells could perturb the well-defined specific functions of DNA polymerases during error-free DNA transactions. PMID:10973926

  2. Initial steps of the base excision repair pathway within the nuclear architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidative stress induced lesions threaten aerobic organisms by representing a major cause of genomic instability. A common product of guanine oxidation, 8-oxo-guanine (8- oxoG) is particularly mutagenic by provoking G to T transversions. Removal of oxidised bases from DNA is initiated by the recognition and excision of the damaged base by a DNA glycosylase, initiating the base excision repair (BER) pathway. In mammals, 8-oxoG is processed by the 8-oxoG-DNA-glycosylase I (OGG1), which biochemical mechanisms has been well characterised in vitro. However how and where this enzyme finds the modified base within the complex chromatin architecture is not yet understood. We show that upon induction of 8-oxoG, OGG1, together with at least two other proteins involved in BER, is recruited from a soluble fraction to chromatin. Formation kinetics of this patches correlates with 8-oxoG excision, suggesting a direct link between presence of this chromatin-associated complexes and 8-oxoG repair. More precisely, these repair patches are specifically directed to euchromatin regions, and completely excluded from heterochromatin regions. Inducing of artificial chromatin compaction results in a complete inhibition of the in vivo repair of 8-oxoG, probably by impeding the access of OGG1 to the lesion. Using OGG1 mutants, we show that OGG1 direct recognition of 8-oxoG did not trigger its re-localisation to the chromatin. We conclude that in response to the induction of oxidative DNA damage, the DNA glycosylase is actively recruited to regions of open chromatin allowing the access of the BER machinery to the lesions. (author)

  3. Repair of triplex-directed DNA alkylation by nucleotide excision repair

    OpenAIRE

    Ziemba, Amy; Derosier, L. Chris; Methvin, Russell; Song, Chun-Yan; Clary, Eric; Kahn, Wendy; Milesi, David; Gorn, Vladimir; Reed, Mike; Ebbinghaus, Scot

    2001-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are being investigated as highly specific DNA binding agents to inhibit the expression of clinically relevant genes. So far, they have been shown to inhibit transcription from the HER-2/neu gene in vitro, whereas their use in vivo has been studied to a limited extent. This study uses a TFO–chlorambucil (chl) conjugate capable of forming site-specific covalent guanine adducts within the HER-2/neu promoter. We demonstrate that nucleotide excision repair (...

  4. Twist-open mechanism of DNA damage recognition by the Rad4/XPC nucleotide excision repair complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Chen, Xuejing; Slogoff Sevilla, Phillip; Min, Jung-Hyun; Ansari, Anjum

    2016-04-19

    DNA damage repair starts with the recognition of damaged sites from predominantly normal DNA. In eukaryotes, diverse DNA lesions from environmental sources are recognized by the xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) nucleotide excision repair complex. Studies of Rad4 (radiation-sensitive 4; yeast XPC ortholog) showed that Rad4 "opens" up damaged DNA by inserting a β-hairpin into the duplex and flipping out two damage-containing nucleotide pairs. However, this DNA lesion "opening" is slow (˜5-10 ms) compared with typical submillisecond residence times per base pair site reported for various DNA-binding proteins during 1D diffusion on DNA. To address the mystery as to how Rad4 pauses to recognize lesions during diffusional search, we examine conformational dynamics along the lesion recognition trajectory using temperature-jump spectroscopy. Besides identifying the ˜10-ms step as the rate-limiting bottleneck towards opening specific DNA site, we uncover an earlier ˜100- to 500-μs step that we assign to nonspecific deformation (unwinding/"twisting") of DNA by Rad4. The β-hairpin is not required to unwind or to overcome the bottleneck but is essential for full nucleotide-flipping. We propose that Rad4 recognizes lesions in a step-wise "twist-open" mechanism, in which preliminary twisting represents Rad4 interconverting between search and interrogation modes. Through such conformational switches compatible with rapid diffusion on DNA, Rad4 may stall preferentially at a lesion site, offering time to open DNA. This study represents the first direct observation, to our knowledge, of dynamical DNA distortions during search/interrogation beyond base pair breathing. Submillisecond interrogation with preferential stalling at cognate sites may be common to various DNA-binding proteins. PMID:27035942

  5. Quantitative characterization of pyrimidine dimer excision from UV-irradiated DNA (excision capacity) by cell-free extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell-free extracts from wild-type yeast (RAD+) and from rad mutants belonging to the RAD3 epistatic group (rad1-1, rad2-1, rad3-1, rad4-1) contain activities catalyzing the excision of pyrimidine dimers (PD) from purified ultraviolet-irradiated DNA which was not pre-treated with exogenous UV-endonuclease. The level of these activities in cell-free extracts from rad mutants did not differ from that in wild-type extract and was close to the in vivo excision capacity of the latter calculated from the LD37 (about 104 PD per haploid genome). (Auth.)

  6. Role of the Escherichia coli Nucleotide Excision Repair Proteins in DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Moolenaar, Geri F.; Moorman, Celine; Goosen, Nora

    2000-01-01

    DNA polymerase I (PolI) functions both in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and in the processing of Okazaki fragments that are generated on the lagging strand during DNA replication. Escherichia coli cells completely lacking the PolI enzyme are viable as long as they are grown on minimal medium. Here we show that viability is fully dependent on the presence of functional UvrA, UvrB, and UvrD (helicase II) proteins but does not require UvrC. In contrast, ΔpolA cells grow even better when the u...

  7. Cdt2-mediated XPG degradation promotes gap-filling DNA synthesis in nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chunhua; Wani, Gulzar; Zhao, Ran; Qian, Jiang; Sharma, Nidhi; He, Jinshan; Zhu, Qianzheng; Wang, Qi-En; Wani, Altaf A

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group G (XPG) protein is a structure-specific repair endonuclease, which cleaves DNA strands on the 3' side of the DNA damage during nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG also plays a crucial role in initiating DNA repair synthesis through recruitment of PCNA to the repair sites. However, the fate of XPG protein subsequent to the excision of DNA damage has remained unresolved. Here, we show that XPG, following its action on bulky lesions resulting from exposures to UV irradiation and cisplatin, is subjected to proteasome-mediated proteolytic degradation. Productive NER processing is required for XPG degradation as both UV and cisplatin treatment-induced XPG degradation is compromised in NER-deficient XP-A, XP-B, XP-C, and XP-F cells. In addition, the NER-related XPG degradation requires Cdt2, a component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase, CRL4(Cdt2). Micropore local UV irradiation and in situ Proximity Ligation assays demonstrated that Cdt2 is recruited to the UV-damage sites and interacts with XPG in the presence of PCNA. Importantly, Cdt2-mediated XPG degradation is crucial to the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerase δ and DNA repair synthesis. Collectively, our data support the idea of PCNA recruitment to damage sites which occurs in conjunction with XPG, recognition of the PCNA-bound XPG by CRL4(Cdt2) for specific ubiquitylation and finally the protein degradation. In essence, XPG elimination from DNA damage sites clears the chromatin space needed for the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerase δ to the damage site and completion of gap-filling DNA synthesis during the final stage of NER. PMID:25483071

  8. Excision of HIV-1 DNA by gene editing: a proof-of-concept in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, R; Bella, R; Yin, C; Otte, J; Ferrante, P; Gendelman, H E; Li, H; Booze, R; Gordon, J; Hu, W; Khalili, K

    2016-08-01

    A CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing strategy has been remarkable in excising segments of integrated HIV-1 DNA sequences from the genome of latently infected human cell lines and by introducing InDel mutations, suppressing HIV-1 replication in patient-derived CD4+ T-cells, ex vivo. Here, we employed a short version of the Cas9 endonuclease, saCas9, together with a multiplex of guide RNAs (gRNAs) for targeting the viral DNA sequences within the 5'-LTR and the Gag gene for removing critically important segments of the viral DNA in transgenic mice and rats encompassing the HIV-1 genome. Tail-vein injection of transgenic mice with a recombinant Adeno-associated virus 9 (rAAV9) vector expressing saCas9 and the gRNAs, rAAV:saCas9/gRNA, resulted in the cleavage of integrated HIV-1 DNA and excision of a 978 bp DNA fragment spanning between the LTR and Gag gene in the spleen, liver, heart, lung and kidney as well as in the circulating lymphocytes. Retro-orbital inoculation of rAAV9:saCas9/gRNA in transgenic rats eliminated a targeted segment of viral DNA and substantially decreased the level of viral gene expression in circulating blood lymphocytes. The results from the proof-of-concept studies, for the first time, demonstrate the in vivo eradication of HIV-1 DNA by CRISPR/Cas9 on delivery by an rAAV9 vector in a range of cells and tissues that harbor integrated copies of viral DNA. PMID:27194423

  9. Evidence that DNA excision-repair in xeroderma pigmentosum group A is limited but biologically significant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The loss of pyrimidine dimers in nondividing populations of an excision-repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum group. A strain (XP12BE) was measured throughout long periods (up to 5 months) following exposure to low doses of ultraviolet light (UV, 254 nm) using a UV endonuclease-alkaline sedimentation assay. Excision of about 90% of the dimers induced by 1 J/m2 occurred during the first 50 days. The rate curve has some similarities with that of normal excision-repair proficient cultures that may not be coincidental. Rate curves for both XP12BE and normal cultures are characterized by a fast and slow component, with both rate constants for the XP12BE cultures (0.15 day-1 and 0.025 day-1) a factor of 10 smaller than those observed for the respective components of normal cell cultures. The slow components for both XP12BE and normal cultures extrapolate to about 30% of the initial number of dimers. No further excision was detected throughout an additional 90-day period even though the cultures were capable of excision-repair of other newly-introduced pyrimidine dimers. We conclude that nondividing XP12BE cells in addition to having a slower repair rate, cannot repair some of the UV-induced DNA damage. The repair in XP12BE is shown to have biological significance as detected by a cell-survival assay and dose-fractionation techniques. Nondividing XP12BE cells are more resistant to UV when irradiated chronically than when irradiated acutely with the same total dose. (orig.)

  10. True Lies: The Double Life of the Nucleotide Excision Repair Factors in Transcription and DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Le May

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER is a major DNA repair pathway in eukaryotic cells. NER removes structurally diverse lesions such as pyrimidine dimers, arising upon UV irradiation or bulky chemical adducts, arising upon exposure to carcinogens and some chemotherapeutic drugs. NER defects lead to three genetic disorders that result in predisposition to cancers, accelerated aging, neurological and developmental defects. During NER, more than 30 polypeptides cooperate to recognize, incise, and excise a damaged oligonucleotide from the genomic DNA. Recent papers reveal an additional and unexpected role for the NER factors. In the absence of a genotoxic attack, the promoters of RNA polymerases I- and II-dependent genes recruit XPA, XPC, XPG, and XPF to initiate gene expression. A model that includes the growth arrest and DNA damage 45α protein (Gadd45α and the NER factors, in order to maintain the promoter of active genes under a hypomethylated state, has been proposed but remains controversial. This paper focuses on the double life of the NER factors in DNA repair and transcription and describes the possible roles of these factors in the RNA synthesis process.

  11. The molecular genetics of the incision step in the DNA excision repair process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this historical review one particular aspect of excision repair, DNA incision, and how it is controlled at the genetic level in bacteriophage, bacteria, S. cerevisae, D. melanogaster, rodent cells and humans is examined. In phage T4, DNA is incised by a DNA glycosylase-AP endonuclease coded for by the denV gene. In E. coli, products of three genes, uvrA, uvrB and uvrC, are required to form UVRABC excinuclease that cleaves DNA and releases a fragment 12-13 nucleotides long containing the damage site. In S. cerevisiae, genes complementing five mutants of the RAD3 epistasis group, rad1, rad2, rad3, rad4 and rad10 have been cloned and analyzed. Rodent cells sensitive to a variety of mutagenic agents and deficient in excision repair are being used in molecular studies to identify and clone human repair genes (e.g. ERCC1) capable of complementing mammalian repair defects. Most studies of the human system, have been done with cells isolated from patients xeroderma pigmentosum, and these are now beginning to be characterized at the molecular level. (author)

  12. The influence of some prostaglandins on DNA synthesis and DNA excision repair in mouse spleen cells ''in vitro''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ''In vitro'' experiments were performed on mouse spleen cells to establish possible influences of some naturally occurring prostaglandins on DNA synthesis and DNA excision repair. The prostaglandins A1, B1, E1, E2 and Fsub(2α) were tested in concentrations of 10 pg, 5 ng and 2,5μg per ml cell suspension. DNA synthesis was significantly increased by PgFsub(2α) in all the three concentrations tested, while the other tested prostaglandins were essentially ineffective. DNA excision repair was significantly inhibited by PgE1 and PgE2 at 5 ng/ml and at 2,5 μg/ml but increased by PgFsub(2α) in the two lower concentrations. The rejoining of DNA-strand breaks after gamma-irradiation was slightly reduced by PgE1, PgE2 and PgF2 at 2,5 μg/ml. (author)

  13. Recovery of DNA synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation of xeroderma pigmentosum cells depends on excision repair and is blocked by caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP, excision-defective group A) cells (both SV40-transformed) pulse-labeled with [3H] thymidine at various times after irradiation with ultraviolet light showed a decline and recovery of both the molecular weights of newly synthesized DNA and the rated of synthesis per cell. At the same ultraviolet dose, both molecular weights and rates of synthesis were inhibited more in XP than in normal cells. This indicates that excision repair plays a role in minimizing the inhibition of chain growth, possibly by excision of dimers ahead of the growing point. The ability to synthesize normal-sized DNA recovered more rapidly than rates of synthesis in normal cells, but both parameters recovered in phase in XP cells. During recovery in normal cells there are therefore fewer actively replicating clusters of replicons because the single-strand breaks involved in the excision of dimers inhibit replicon initiation. XP cells have few excision repair events and therefore fewer breaks to interfere with initiation, but chain growth is blocked by unexcised dimers. In both cell types recovery of the ability to synthesize normal-sized DNA was prevented by growing cells in caffeine after irradiation, possibly because of competition between the DNA binding properties of caffeine and replication proteins. These observations imply that excision repair and semiconservative replication interact strongly in irradiated cells to produce a complex spectrum of changes in DNA replication which may be confused with parts of alternative systems such as post-replication repair. (author)

  14. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T4 endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157 E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein were exposed to red (660 nm and infrared (808 nm lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T4 endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers: i had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells, ii induced bacterial filamentation, iii did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, and iv did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T4 endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers.

  15. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, A.S.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhaes, L.A.G., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria. Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas. Departamento de Morfologia

    2015-10-15

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T{sub 4} endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T{sub 4} endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers: i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells, ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, and iv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T{sub 4} endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers. (author)

  16. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links

  17. 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine is cytotoxic in quiescent normal lymphocytes undergoing DNA excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have sought to clarify the potential activity of the S-phase-specific antileukemic agent 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C), an inhibitor of DNA synthesis, in quiescent cells that are substantially non-sensitive to nucleoside analogues. It was hypothesized that the combination of ara-C with DNA damaging agents that initiate DNA repair will expand ara-C cytotoxicity to non-cycling cells. The repair kinetics, which included incision of damaged DNA, gap-filling by DNA synthesis and rejoining by ligation, were evaluated using the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay and the thymidine incorporation assay. When normal lymphocytes were treated with ultraviolet C or with 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU), the processes of DNA excision repair were promptly initiated and rapidly completed. When the cells were incubated with ara-C prior to irradiation or BCNU treatment, the steps of DNA synthesis and rejoining in the repair processes were both inhibited. The ara-C-mediated inhibition of the repair processes was concentration-dependent, with the effect peaking at 10μM. The combination of ara-C with these DNA repair initiators exerted subsequent cytotoxicity, which was proportional to the extent of the repair inhibition in the presence of ara-C. In conclusion, ara-C was cytotoxic in quiescent cells undergoing DNA repair. This might be attributed to unrepaired DNA damage that remained in the cells, thereby inducing lethal cytotoxicity. Alternatively, ara-C might exert its own cytotoxicity by inhibiting DNA synthesis in the repair processes. Such a strategy may be effective against a dormant subpopulation in acute leukemia that survives chemotherapy. (author)

  18. ALKBH1 is dispensable for abasic site cleavage during base excision repair and class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Tina A; Yu, Kefei; Hausinger, Robert P; Meek, Katheryn

    2013-01-01

    Potential roles of the abasic site lyase activity associated with AlkB homolog 1 (ALKBH1) were assessed by studies focusing on the two cellular processes that create abasic sites as intermediates: base excision repair and class switch recombination. Alkbh1(-/-) pups (lacking exon 3) were born at a lower than expected frequency from heterozygous parents, suggesting a reduced survival rate and non-Mendelian inheritance, and they exhibited a gender bias in favor of males (70% males and 30% females). To study ALKBH1's potential involvement in DNA repair, fibroblasts were isolated from Alkbh1(-/-) mice, spontaneously immortalized and tested for resistance to DNA damaging agents. Alkbh1(-/-) and isogenic cells expressing hALKBH1 showed no difference in survival to the DNA damaging agents methyl-methionine sulfate or H2O2. This result indicates that ALKBH1 does not play a major role in the base excision repair pathway. To assess ALKBH1's role in class switch recombination, splenic B cells were isolated from Alkbh1(-/-) and Alkbh1(+/+) mice and subjected to switching from IgM to IgG1. No differences were found in IgG1 switching, suggesting that Alkbh1 is not involved in class switch recombination of the immunoglobulin heavy chain during B lymphocyte activation. PMID:23825659

  19. ALKBH1 is dispensable for abasic site cleavage during base excision repair and class switch recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina A Müller

    Full Text Available Potential roles of the abasic site lyase activity associated with AlkB homolog 1 (ALKBH1 were assessed by studies focusing on the two cellular processes that create abasic sites as intermediates: base excision repair and class switch recombination. Alkbh1(-/- pups (lacking exon 3 were born at a lower than expected frequency from heterozygous parents, suggesting a reduced survival rate and non-Mendelian inheritance, and they exhibited a gender bias in favor of males (70% males and 30% females. To study ALKBH1's potential involvement in DNA repair, fibroblasts were isolated from Alkbh1(-/- mice, spontaneously immortalized and tested for resistance to DNA damaging agents. Alkbh1(-/- and isogenic cells expressing hALKBH1 showed no difference in survival to the DNA damaging agents methyl-methionine sulfate or H2O2. This result indicates that ALKBH1 does not play a major role in the base excision repair pathway. To assess ALKBH1's role in class switch recombination, splenic B cells were isolated from Alkbh1(-/- and Alkbh1(+/+ mice and subjected to switching from IgM to IgG1. No differences were found in IgG1 switching, suggesting that Alkbh1 is not involved in class switch recombination of the immunoglobulin heavy chain during B lymphocyte activation.

  20. Abnormal Base Excision Repair at Trinucleotide Repeats Associated with Diseases: A Tissue-Selective Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathi-Vasiliki Goula

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available More than fifteen genetic diseases, including Huntington’s disease, myotonic dystrophy 1, fragile X syndrome and Friedreich ataxia, are caused by the aberrant expansion of a trinucleotide repeat. The mutation is unstable and further expands in specific cells or tissues with time, which can accelerate disease progression. DNA damage and base excision repair (BER are involved in repeat instability and might contribute to the tissue selectivity of the process. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms of trinucleotide repeat instability, focusing more specifically on the role of BER.

  1. XPC is essential for nucleotide excision repair of zidovudine-induced DNA damage in human hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-dexoythymidine, AZT), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, can be incorporated into DNA and cause DNA damage. The mechanisms underlying the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage are unknown. To investigate the pathways involved in the recognition and repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, human hepatoma HepG2 cells were incubated with AZT for 2 weeks and the expression of DNA damage signaling pathways was determined using a pathway-based real-time PCR array. Compared to control cultures, damaged DNA binding and nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways showed significantly increased gene expression. Further analysis indicated that AZT treatment increased the expression of genes associated with NER, including XPC, XPA, RPA1, GTF2H1, and ERCC1. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels of XPC and GTF2H1 were also significantly up-regulated. To explore further the function of XPC in the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, XPC expression was stably knocked down by 71% using short hairpin RNA interference. In the XPC knocked-down cells, 100 μM AZT treatment significantly increased [3H]AZT incorporation into DNA, decreased the total number of viable cells, increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase, induced apoptosis, and caused a more extensive G2/M cell cycle arrest when compared to non-transfected HepG2 cells or HepG2 cells transfected with a scrambled short hairpin RNA sequence. Overall, these data indicate that XPC plays an essential role in the NER repair of AZT-induced DNA damage.

  2. XRCC1 and base excision repair balance in response to nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutamba, James T; Svilar, David; Prasongtanakij, Somsak; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Ying-Chih; Dedon, Peter C; Sobol, Robert W; Engelward, Bevin P

    2011-12-10

    Inflammation associated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONs), including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and nitric oxide (NO), create base lesions that potentially play a role in the toxicity and large genomic rearrangements associated with many malignancies. Little is known about the role of base excision repair (BER) in removing these endogenous DNA lesions. Here, we explore the role of X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) in attenuating RONs-induced genotoxicity. XRCC1 is a scaffold protein critical for BER for which polymorphisms modulate the risk of cancer. We exploited CHO and human glioblastoma cell lines engineered to express varied levels of BER proteins to study XRCC1. Cytotoxicity and the levels of DNA repair intermediates (single-strand breaks; SSB) were evaluated following exposure of the cells to the ONOO(-) donor, SIN-1, and to gaseous NO. XRCC1 null cells were slightly more sensitive to SIN-1 than wild-type cells. We used small-scale bioreactors to expose cells to NO and found that XRCC1-deficient CHO cells were not sensitive. However, using a molecular beacon assay to test lesion removal in vitro, we found that XRCC1 facilitates AAG-initiated excision of two key NO-induced DNA lesions: 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine and hypoxanthine. Furthermore, overexpression of AAG rendered XRCC1-deficient cells sensitive to NO-induced DNA damage. These results show that AAG is a key glycosylase for BER of NO-induced DNA damage and that XRCC1's role in modulating sensitivity to RONs is dependent upon the cellular level of AAG. This demonstrates the importance of considering the expression of other components of the BER pathway when evaluating the impact of XRCC1 polymorphisms on cancer risk. PMID:22041025

  3. Persistence of human papillomavirus DNA in cervical lesions after treatment with diathermic large loop excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distéfano, A L; Picconi, M A; Alonio, L V; Dalbert, D; Mural, J; Bartt, O; Bazán, G; Cervantes, G; Lizano, M; Carrancá, A G; Teyssié, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesions and to evaluate the persistence of viral DNA after diathermic large loop excision (DLLE) treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Biopsies from 36 patients with low- and high-grade CIN lesions were studied before and after DLLE treatment looking for HPV sequences. DNA was extracted to perform a radioactive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using GP 5,6 generic primers. PCR products were analyzed by the single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) which is a simultaneous detection and typing method. Dot-blot hybridization with generic and type-specific biotinylated oligonucleotide probes was applied in some cases. RESULTS: HPV DNA was found in all pretreatment samples, and the viral type was identified in 80% of them, HPV 16 being the most prevalent. The viral type coincided with that detected in the first biopsy in all except one case. Seventy five percent of the patients (27 cases) were negative for CIN at follow up, but 50% of them remained HPV DNA positive. CONCLUSION: DLLE treatment was effective in removing the CIN lesion but not the HPV. This fact points out the need to asses the presence of HPV in DNA during the follow-up, since viral persistence has been considered a high risk factor for recurrence and/or malignant transformation. PMID:9894176

  4. DNA with Damage in Both Strands as Affinity Probes and Nucleotide Excision Repair Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanchikova, N V; Petruseva, I O; Evdokimov, A N; Silnikov, V N; Lavrik, O I

    2016-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multistep process of recognition and elimination of a wide spectrum of damages that cause significant distortions in DNA structure, such as UV-induced damage and bulky chemical adducts. A series of model DNAs containing new bulky fluoro-azidobenzoyl photoactive lesion dC(FAB) and well-recognized nonnucleoside lesions nFlu and nAnt have been designed and their interaction with repair proteins investigated. We demonstrate that modified DNA duplexes dC(FAB)/dG (probe I), dC(FAB)/nFlu+4 (probe II), and dC(FAB)/nFlu-3 (probe III) have increased (as compared to unmodified DNA, umDNA) structure-dependent affinity for XPC-HR23B (Kdum > KdI > KdII ≈ KdIII) and differentially crosslink to XPC and proteins of NER-competent extracts. The presence of dC(FAB) results in (i) decreased melting temperature (ΔTm = -3°C) and (ii) 12° DNA bending. The extended dC(FAB)/dG-DNA (137 bp) was demonstrated to be an effective NER substrate. Lack of correlation between the affinity to XPC-HR23B and substrate properties of the model DNA suggests a high impact of the verification stage on the overall NER process. In addition, DNAs containing closely positioned, well-recognized lesions in the complementary strands represent hardly repairable (dC(FAB)/nFlu+4, dC(FAB)/nFlu-3) or irreparable (nFlu/nFlu+4, nFlu/nFlu-3, nAnt/nFlu+4, nAnt/nFlu-3) structures. Our data provide evidence that the NER system of higher eukaryotes recognizes and eliminates damaged DNA fragments on a multi-criterion basis. PMID:27262196

  5. Genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cadmium compounds: impact on oxidative DNA damage and nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtle, Tanja; Ebert, Franziska; Thuy, Christina; Richter, Constanze; Mullenders, Leon H F; Hartwig, Andrea

    2010-02-15

    Water-soluble and particulate cadmium compounds are carcinogenic to humans. While direct interactions with DNA are unlikely to account for carcinogenicity, induction of oxidative DNA damage and interference with DNA repair processes might be more relevant underlying modes of action (recently summarized, for example, in Joseph , P. (2009) Tox. Appl. Pharmacol. 238 , 271 - 279). The present study aimed to compare genotoxic effects of particulate CdO and soluble CdCl(2) in cultured human cells (A549, VH10hTert). Both cadmium compounds increased the baseline level of oxidative DNA damage. Even more pronounced, both cadmium compounds inhibited the nucleotide excision repair (NER) of BPDE-induced bulky DNA adducts and UVC-induced photolesions in a dose-dependent manner at noncytotoxic concentrations. Thereby, the uptake of cadmium in the nuclei strongly correlated with the repair inhibition of bulky DNA adducts, indicating that independent of the cadmium compound applied Cd(2+) is the common species responsible for the observed repair inhibition. Regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms in human cells, CdCl(2) (as shown before by Meplan, C., Mann, K. and Hainaut, P. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274 , 31663 - 31670 ) and CdO altered the conformation of the zinc binding domain of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In further studies applying only CdCl(2), cadmium decreased the total nuclear protein level of XPC, which is believed to be the principle initiator of global genome NER. This led to diminished association of XPC to sites of local UVC damage, resulting in decreased recruitment of further NER proteins. Additionally, CdCl(2) strongly disturbed the disassembly of XPC and XPA. In summary, our data indicate a general nucleotide excision repair inhibition by cadmium compounds, which is most likely caused by a diminished assembly and disassembly of the NER machinery. These data reveal new insights into the mechanisms involved in cadmium carcinogenesis and provide further

  6. Ku protein complex is involved in nucleotide excision repair of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The repair of ultraviolet light (UV-C, 254 nm) DNA lesions by nucleotide excision repair (NER) has been studied in the rodent cell line xrs6 belonging to complementation group 5 of ionising radiation sensitive (IRs) mutants. xrs6 cell line shows e defect in he DNA-end binding protein complex Ku which is involved in the repair of double-strand breaks (DSB) due to IR. In agreement with IR sensitivity, a bleomycin sensitive phenotype of xrs6 cell line was found as compared to the parental CHO-Kl line (factor> 8 fold). xrs6 exhibited also a slight (factor 2) but reproducible sensitivity to UV-C-light, while a revertant cell line for Ku DNA-end binding activity, xrs6rev, showed a restoration of both IR and UV-C sensitivities to the parental level. The NER activity of these cell lines was measured in vitro in nuclear protein extracts in the presence of plasmid DNA repair substrate damaged with UV-C lesions repaired by NER: xrs6 cell extracts exhibited only 55 % of NER activity as compared to the control CHO-Kl and xrs6rev cell extracts. These indicate that the Ku DSB repair protein in involved also in the NER process. (authors). 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. UV-induced DNA excision repair in rat fibroblasts during immortalization and terminal differentiation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV-induced DNA excision repair was studied as DNA repair synthesis and dimer removal in rat fibroblast cultures, initiated from either dense or sparse inocula of primary cells grown from skin biopsies. During passaging in vitro an initial increase in DNA repair synthesis, determined both autoradiographically as unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and by means of the BrdU photolysis assay as the number and average size of repair patches, was found to be associated with a morphological shift from small spindle-shaped to large pleiomorphic cells observed over the first twenty generations. In cell populations in growth crisis, a situation exclusively associated with thin-inoculum cultures in which the population predominantly consisted of large pleiomorphic cells, UDS was found to occur at a low level. After development of secondary cultures into immortal cell lines, both repair synthesis and morphology appeared to be the same as in the original primary spindle-shaped cells. At all passages the capacity to remove UV-induced pyrimidine dimers was found to be low, as indicated by the persistence of Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease-sensitive sites. These results are discussed in the context of terminal differentiation and immortalization of rat fibroblasts upon establishment in vitro

  8. Polymorphisms within base and nucleotide excision repair pathways and risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Monica; Figlioli, Gisella; Maccari, Giuseppe; Garritano, Sonia; De Santi, Chiara; Melaiu, Ombretta; Barone, Elisa; Bambi, Franco; Ermini, Stefano; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Cristaudo, Alfonso; Foddis, Rudy; Bonotti, Alessandra; Romei, Cristina; Vivaldi, Agnese; Agate, Laura; Molinari, Eleonora; Barale, Roberto; Forsti, Asta; Hemminki, Kari; Elisei, Rossella; Gemignani, Federica; Landi, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    The thyrocytes are exposed to high levels of oxidative stress which could induce DNA damages. Base excision repair (BER) is one of the principal mechanisms of defense against oxidative DNA damage, however recent evidences suggest that also nucleotide excision repair (NER) could be involved. The aim of present work was to identify novel differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) risk variants in BER and NER genes. For this purpose, the most strongly associated SNPs within NER and BER genes found in our previous GWAS on DTC were selected and replicated in an independent series of samples for a new case-control study. Although a positive signal was detected at the nominal level of 0.05 for rs7689099 (encoding for an aminoacid change proline to arginine at codon 117 within NEIL3), none of the considered SNPs (i.e. rs7990340 and rs690860 within RFC3, rs3744767 and rs1131636 within RPA1, rs16962916 and rs3136166 in ERCC4, and rs17739370 and rs7689099 in NEIL3) was associated with the risk of DTC when the correction of multiple testing was applied. In conclusion, a role of NER and BER pathways was evoked in the susceptibility to DTC. However, this seemed to be limited to few polymorphic genes and the overall effect size appeared weak. PMID:27062014

  9. Photoreversal-dependent release of thymidine and thymidine monophosphate from pyrimidine dimer-containing DNA excision fragments isolated from ultraviolet-damaged human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To elucidate the enzymatic excision-repair process operative on cyclobutane-type pyrimidine photodimers in human dermal fibroblasts, we have examined excised dimer-containing material recovered in the trichloroacetic acid soluble fraction from far-ultraviolet-irradiated (254 nm, 40 J m-2) and incubated (24 h) cell cultures. The excised DNA photoproducts were found in oligonucleotide fragments with an estimated mean chain length of approximately 3.7 bases. Exposure of these isolated excision fragments, labeled with [3H]thymidine (dT), to a secondary, dimer-photoreversing fluence of far-UV (5.5 kJ m-2) resulted in the release of free dT and thymidine monophosphate (TMP). Photorelease of these two radioactive species was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, with TMP being detected as the increase in dT following bacterial alkaline phosphatase treatment. These data imply that the photoliberated dT and TMP moieties were attached to the excision fragments solely by the cyclobutane ring of the dimer. No evidence was obtained for the photoliberation of free thymine, thus corroborating a conclusion reached by others that the excision of dimers in human cells is not initiated by scission of an intradimer N-glycosyl bond. The sum of the tritium label recovered in dT plus TMP corresponded to approximately 40% of that disappearing from thymine-containing dimers on photoreversal, suggesting that in about 80% of the isolated excision fragments the dimer is located at one end of the oligonucleotide and contains a break in its internal phosphodiester bond

  10. Repair of 3-methyladenine and abasic sites by base excision repair mediates glioblastoma resistance to temozolomide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Silber

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents have long played a central role in the adjuvant therapy of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. More recently, inclusion of temozolomide (TMZ, an orally administered methylating agent with low systemic toxicity, during radiotherapy and afterward has markedly improved survival. Extensive in vitro and in vivo evidence has shown that TMZ-induced O6-methylguanine (O6-meG mediates GBM cell killing. Moreover, low or absent expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, the sole human repair protein that removes O6-meG from DNA, is frequently associated with longer survival in GBMs treated with TMZ, promoting interest in developing inhibitors of MGMT to counter resistance. However, the clinical efficacy of TMZ is unlikely to be due solely to O6-meG, as the agent produces approximately a dozen additional DNA adducts, including cytotoxic N3-methyladenine (3-meA and abasic sites. Repair of 3-meA and abasic sites, both of which are produced in greater abundance than O6-meG, is mediated by the base excision repair (BER pathway, and occurs independently of removal of O6-meG. These observations indicate that BER activities are also potential targets for strategies to potentiate TMZ cytotoxicity. Here we review the evidence that 3-meA and abasic sites mediate killing of GBM cells. We also present in vitro and in vivo evidence that alkyladenine-DNA–glycosylase, the sole repair activity that excises 3-meA from DNA, and Ape1, the major human abasic site endonuclease, mediate TMZ resistance in GBMs and represent potential anti-resistance targets.

  11. Pol β associated complex and base excision repair factors in mouse fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Williams, Jason G; Hou, Esther W; Wilson, Samuel H

    2012-12-01

    During mammalian base excision repair (BER) of lesion-containing DNA, it is proposed that toxic strand-break intermediates generated throughout the pathway are sequestered and passed from one step to the next until repair is complete. This stepwise process is termed substrate channeling. A working model evaluated here is that a complex of BER factors may facilitate the BER process. FLAG-tagged DNA polymerase (pol) β was expressed in mouse fibroblasts carrying a deletion in the endogenous pol β gene, and the cell extract was subjected to an 'affinity-capture' procedure using anti-FLAG antibody. The pol β affinity-capture fraction (ACF) was found to contain several BER factors including polymerase-1, X-ray cross-complementing factor1-DNA ligase III and enzymes involved in processing 3'-blocked ends of BER intermediates, e.g. polynucleotide kinase and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1. In contrast, DNA glycosylases, apurinic/aprymidinic endonuclease 1 and flap endonuclease 1 and several other factors involved in BER were not present. Some of the BER factors in the pol β ACF were in a multi-protein complex as observed by sucrose gradient centrifugation. The pol β ACF was capable of substrate channeling for steps in vitro BER and was proficient in in vitro repair of substrates mimicking a 3'-blocked topoisomerase I covalent intermediate or an oxidative stress-induced 3'-blocked intermediate. PMID:23042675

  12. Mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair proteins cooperate in the recognition of DNA interstrand crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junhua; Jain, Aklank; Iyer, Ravi R; Modrich, Paul L; Vasquez, Karen M

    2009-07-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, thus ICL-inducing agents such as psoralen, are clinically useful chemotherapeutics. Psoralen-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) have been used to target ICLs to specific genomic sites to increase the selectivity of these agents. However, how TFO-directed psoralen ICLs (Tdp-ICLs) are recognized and processed in human cells is unclear. Previously, we reported that two essential nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein complexes, XPA-RPA and XPC-RAD23B, recognized ICLs in vitro, and that cells deficient in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) complex MutSbeta were sensitive to psoralen ICLs. To further investigate the role of MutSbeta in ICL repair and the potential interaction between proteins from the MMR and NER pathways on these lesions, we performed electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of MutSbeta and NER proteins with Tdp-ICLs. We found that MutSbeta bound to Tdp-ICLs with high affinity and specificity in vitro and in vivo, and that MutSbeta interacted with XPA-RPA or XPC-RAD23B in recognizing Tdp-ICLs. These data suggest that proteins from the MMR and NER pathways interact in the recognition of ICLs, and provide a mechanistic link by which proteins from multiple repair pathways contribute to ICL repair. PMID:19468048

  13. Polysulfide compounds as inhibitors of the key base excision repair enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salakhutdinov N. F.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To increase the capacity of antitumor therapy based on DNA damage it is important to minimize the repair of DNA lesions that can be achieved by inhibiting the activity of key DNA repair enzymes. To this end several benzopentathiepine and benzo[1,3]dithiol derivatives were synthesized and tested as inhibitors of the key base excision repair (BER enzymes, PARP1, DNA polymerase β, and APE1. Methods. The procedure of synthesis of several new compounds was developed. The inhibitory capacity of the compounds was estimated by comparison of the enzyme activities in specific tests in the presence of compounds versus their absence. Results. Benzopentathiepine derivative bearing trifluoromethyl group at the 1st position was shown to be a weak inhibitor of PARP1. Cyclic substituents at the 1st position attached through amide bond bring about moderate enhancement of pol β inhibition. Each studied substituent at the 1st position considerably increases the inhibition of APE1-catalyzed hydrolysis of AP sites as compared to parent compound. Conclusions. Several new inhibitors of BER enzymes were revealed. The directions for further modification of compounds to improve their inhibitory activity were found out.

  14. Mammalian Base Excision Repair: Functional Partnership between PARP-1 and APE1 in AP-Site Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Prasad

    Full Text Available The apurinic/apyrimidinic- (AP- site in genomic DNA arises through spontaneous base loss and base removal by DNA glycosylases and is considered an abundant DNA lesion in mammalian cells. The base excision repair (BER pathway repairs the AP-site lesion by excising and replacing the site with a normal nucleotide via template directed gap-filling DNA synthesis. The BER pathway is mediated by a specialized group of proteins, some of which can be found in multiprotein complexes in cultured mouse fibroblasts. Using a DNA polymerase (pol β immunoaffinity-capture technique to isolate such a complex, we identified five tightly associated and abundant BER factors in the complex: PARP-1, XRCC1, DNA ligase III, PNKP, and Tdp1. AP endonuclease 1 (APE1, however, was not present. Nevertheless, the complex was capable of BER activity, since repair was initiated by PARP-1's AP lyase strand incision activity. Addition of purified APE1 increased the BER activity of the pol β complex. Surprisingly, the pol β complex stimulated the strand incision activity of APE1. Our results suggested that PARP-1 was responsible for this effect, whereas other proteins in the complex had no effect on APE1 strand incision activity. Studies of purified PARP-1 and APE1 revealed that PARP-1 was able to stimulate APE1 strand incision activity. These results illustrate roles of PARP-1 in BER including a functional partnership with APE1.

  15. Replicon size and excision repair as factors in the inhibition and recovery of DNA synthesis from ultraviolet damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initiation of DNA replication and chain growth, analyzed by alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation, was interrupted to different extents in different cell types by irradiation with ultraviolet light. Within the first hour of irradiation DNA replication was reduced in a manner that depended on the average number of lesions per replicating unit (replicon). At low numbers of lesions per replicon, inhibition of replicon initiation was the predominant response; at higher numbers of lesions per replicon, blockage of chain growth was also observed. After irradiation with a dose that initially blocked chain growth, the rate at which cells recovered their ability to synthesize increasingly more and larger size DNA was a function both of replicon size and of excision repair capacity. Cells with small replicons recovered more rapidly than cells with large replicons, and excision repair-deficient cells recovered less rapidly than excision-competent cells. These observations indicate that excision repair capacity and replicon size play major roles in the response of DNA replication to ultraviolet damage. (Auth.)

  16. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling facilitates nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA lesions in synthetic dinucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ura, Kiyoe; Araki, Marito; Saeki, Hideaki; Masutani, Chikahide; Ito, Takashi; Iwai, Shigenori; Mizukoshi, Toshimi; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between chromatin dynamics and nucleotide excision repair (NER), we have examined the effect of chromatin structure on the formation of two major classes of UV-induced DNA lesions in reconstituted dinucleosomes. Furthermore, we have developed a model chromatin-NER system consisting of purified human NER factors and dinucleosome substrates that contain pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs) either at the center of the nucleosome or in the linker DNA....

  17. Host DNA replication or excision repair requirement for ultraviolet induction of bacteriophage lambda lysogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is stated that the mechanism for prophage induction by radiation, or chemical agents, is not known, although a variety of hypothesis have been advanced during recent years. Biochemical data have been described that seem to favour the suggestion that DNA intermediates in the repair of DNA damage compete with prophage operators for repressor binding. When sufficient repressor is bound none remains for prophage repression and induction occurs. If this is so the prediction may be made that induction should not occur in the absence of normal repair processes. Some experimental work is described with a view to testing and verifying this prediction. A bacteriophage lambda lysogen was used in the work. Irradiation was at 420C, and samples were removed at intervals and assayed for free plaque-forming units, little induction was observed over a wide range of UV doses in non-replicating non-excising lysogens, in contradiction with some earlier results. Competition between prophage operators and repair intermediates for lambda repressor appears to be the simplest way to account for the observed results, although other possibilities are discussed. (U.K.)

  18. The Role of Altered Nucleotide Excision Repair and UVB-Induced DNA Damage in Melanomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Budden

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available UVB radiation is the most mutagenic component of the UV spectrum that reaches the earth’s surface and causes the development of DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. UV radiation usually results in cellular death, but if left unchecked, it can affect DNA integrity, cell and tissue homeostasis and cause mutations in oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations, if unrepaired, can lead to abnormal cell growth, increasing the risk of cancer development. Epidemiological data strongly associates UV exposure as a major factor in melanoma development, but the exact biological mechanisms involved in this process are yet to be fully elucidated. The nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway is responsible for the repair of UV-induced lesions. Patients with the genetic disorder Xeroderma Pigmentosum have a mutation in one of eight NER genes associated with the XP complementation groups XP-A to XP-G and XP variant (XP-V. XP is characterized by diminished repair capacity, as well as a 1000-fold increase in the incidence of skin cancers, including melanoma. This has suggested a significant role for NER in melanoma development as a result of UVB exposure. This review discusses the current research surrounding UVB radiation and NER capacity and how further investigation of NER could elucidate the role of NER in avoiding UV-induced cellular death resulting in melanomagenesis.

  19. Physical interaction between components of DNA mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) and DNA mismatch repair are required for some common processes although the biochemical basis for this requirement is unknown. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 was identified in a two-hybrid screen using MSH2 as 'bait,' and pairwise interactions between MSH2 and RAD1, RAD2, RAD3, RAD10, RAD14, and RAD25 subsequently were demonstrated by two-hybrid analysis. MSH2 coimmunoprecipitated specifically with epitope-tagged versions of RAD2, RAD10, RAD14, and RAD25. MSH2 and RAD10 were found to interact in msh3 msh6 and mlh1 pms1 double mutants, suggesting a direct interaction with MSH2. Mutations in MSH2 increased the UV sensitivity of NER-deficient yeast strains, and msh2 mutations were epistatic to the mutator phenotype observed in NER-deficient strains. These data suggest that MSH2 and possibly other components of DNA mismatch repair exist in a complex with NER proteins, providing a biochemical and genetical basis for these proteins to function in common processes

  20. Repair of single-strand breaks induced in the DNA of Proteus mirabilis by excision repair after UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-strand breaks have been produced in the DNA of P. mirabilis after UV-irradiation in dependence on the incident UV-doses. It has been found that there exists a discrepancy between the single-strand breaks estimated from sedimentation in alkaline sucrose gradients and the expected single-strand breaks approximated from measurements of dimer excision. The low number in incision breaks observed by sedimentation experiments is an indication that the cells are able to repair the excision-induced breaks as fast as they are formed. Toluenized cells have been used for investigation of the incision step independently of subsequent repair processes. In presence of NMN the appearance of more single-strand breaks in the DNA has been observed. Furthermore, the number of incision breaks in toluenized cells increased in presence of exogenous ATP. The completion of the excision repair process has been investigated by observing the rejoining of incision breaks. After irradiation with UV-doses higher than approximately 240 erg/mm2 the number of single-strand breaks remaining unrepaired in the DNA increased. Studies of the influence of nutrition conditions on the repair process have shown approximately the same capacity for repair of single-strand breaks in growth medium as well as in buffer. Progress in the excision repair was also followed by investigation of the DNA synthesized at the template-DNA containing the pyrimidine dimers. In comparison with E. coli, P. mirabilis showed a somewhat lower efficiency for the repair of single-strand breaks during the excision repair. (author)

  1. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recogni...

  2. Low-dose formaldehyde delays DNA damage recognition and DNA excision repair in human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recogn...

  3. Isolation and properties of strains of Micrococcus (Deinococcus) radiodurans unable to excise ultraviolet light-induced pyrimidine dimers from DNA: evidence for two excision pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mutant of Deinococcus (formerly Micrococcus) radiodurans sensitive to both the lethal effect of mitomycin C and the mutagenic effect of simple alkylating agents, but having wild-type resistance to UV light, was treated with the mutagen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Three strains were isolated that were UV-sensitive, but had wild-type resistance to the lethal effect of methyl methanesulphonate and all were shown to be unable to excise pyrimidine dimers. The three strains UVS9, UVS25 and UVS78 had, in addition to the mutation in mtcA, mutations in loci designated uvsC, uvsD and uvsE, respectively. When the mutant mtcA gene was replaced by its wild-type allele in all three strains they became UV- and mitomycin C-resistant. On incubating the double mutants UVS9, UVS25 and UVS78 with wild-type DNA about 50% of the transformants selected for UV resistance were mitomycin C-sensitive and about 50% resistant depending on whether the mutant mtcA or the uvsC, D or E genes had been replaced by their wild-type alleles. Although strains mutant singly in uvsC, D or E were UV-resistant the rates of excision of pyrimidine dimers differed between them and was slower in all of them than in the wild-type and strain 302. (author)

  4. Interaction of DNA replication with excision repair in ultraviolet light-irradiated human normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular weights and rates of DNA synthesis per cell in human normal (E11 and GM 637) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XPICH and XP 12RO) cells irradiated with UV light and pulse labeled with 3H-thymidine undergo transient reduction and recovery during the hours immediately following irradiation. Recovery of the rate of DNA synthesis lags the recovery in molecular weight in cells capable of excision (normal and XP-varient) but dose not lag in excision defective XP group A (XP 12RO) cells. This effect is interpreted as being due to excision breaks which relex DNA coils and thereby prevent the initiation of clusters of replicons. The transient changes in molecular weights appear to be due to DNA chain growth being blocked by DNA damage soon after irradiation, but cells thereafter increasing in their ability to replicate normal sized molecules. The recovery fits an exponential curve with a similar rate constant in normal cells and a slower rate is observed in normal transformed, XP group A and variant cells. (author)

  5. Induced excision repair is required for repair of lesions in the vicinity of DNA replication forks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for resolving DNA fragments containing replication forks from linear DNA fragments by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis is described. The technique is based on the altered mobility in agarose of branched structures relative to linear double-stranded molecules as a function of gel concentration and voltage. When pulse-labeled DNA is isolated, purified, fragmented by digestion with restriction nucleases, and run in the two-dimensional gel system, the bulk of the DNA migrates in a single arc visible by staining with ethidium bromide. However, when autoradiograms are prepared from the gels, it can be seen that the nascent DNA, represented by the radioactive pulse label, is contained in a second distinct arc. We have shown by a variety of criteria that the nascent DNA migrating in this minor arc has properties consistent with replication fork structures. We have now applied this technique to testing the hypothesis that long patch repair occurs at lesions in the vicinity of DNA replication forks. 2 figs

  6. Conserved XPB Core Structure and Motifs for DNA Unwinding:Implications for Pathway Selection of Transcription or ExcisionRepair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Li; Arval, Andrew S.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Iwai, Shigenori; Hanaoka, Fumio; Tainer, John A.

    2005-04-01

    The human xeroderma pigmentosum group B (XPB) helicase is essential for transcription, nucleotide excision repair, and TFIIH functional assembly. Here, we determined crystal structures of an Archaeoglobus fulgidus XPB homolog (AfXPB) that characterize two RecA-like XPB helicase domains and discover a DNA damage recognition domain (DRD), a unique RED motif, a flexible thumb motif (ThM), and implied conformational changes within a conserved functional core. RED motif mutations dramatically reduce helicase activity, and the DRD and ThM, which flank the RED motif, appear structurally as well as functionally analogous to the MutS mismatch recognition and DNA polymerase thumb domains. Substrate specificity is altered by DNA damage, such that AfXPB unwinds dsDNA with 3' extensions, but not blunt-ended dsDNA, unless it contains a lesion, as shown for CPD or (6-4) photoproducts. Together, these results provide an unexpected mechanism of DNA unwinding with Implications for XPB damage verification in nucleotide excision repair.

  7. Yeast rad7-rad16 complex, specific for the nucleotide excision repair of the nontranscribed DNA strand, is an ATP-dependent DNA damage sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In eukaryotes, nucleotide excision repair of ultraviolet light-damaged DNA is a highly intricate process that requires a large number of evolutionary conserved protein factors. Genetic studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have indicated a specific role of the RAD7 and RAD16 genes in the repair of transcriptionally inactive DNA. Here we show that the RAD7- and RAD16-encoded products exist as a complex of 1:1 stoichiometry, exhibiting an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of <4 x 10(-10) M. The Rad7-Rad16 complex has been purified to near homogeneity in this study and is shown to bind, in an ATP-dependent manner and with high specificity, to DNA damaged by ultraviolet light. Importantly, inclusion of the Rad7-Rad16 complex in the in vitro nucleotide excision repair system that consists entirely of purified components results in a marked stimulation of damage specific incision. Thus, Rad7-Rad16 complex is the ATP-dependent DNA damage sensor that specifically functions with the ensemble of nucleotide excision repair factor (NEF) 1, NEF2, NEF3, and replication protein A in the repair of transcriptionally inactive DNA. We name this novel complex of Rad7 and Rad16 proteins NEF4. (author)

  8. Excision repair of gamma-ray-induced alkali-stable DNA lesions with the help of γ-endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    γ-endonuclease Y, an enzyme that hydrolyses phosphodiester bonds at alkali-stable lesions in γ-irradiated (N2, tris buffer) DNA, has been partially purified from Micrococcus luteus. The enzyme has a molecular weight of about 19 000, induces single-strand breaks with 3'OH-5'PO4 termini and contains endonuclease activity towards DNA treated with 7-bromomethylbenz(a)anthracene. γ-endonuclease Y induces breaks in OsO4-treated poly(dA-dT) and apparently is specific towards γ-ray-induced base lesions of the t' type. The complete excision repair of γ-endonuclease Y substrate sites has been performed in vitro by γ-endonuclease Y, DNA polymerase and ligase. (author)

  9. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Fousteri, Maria I.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase IIIa (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is indispensable for ligation of NER-induced breaks and repair of UV lesions in quiescent cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that two distinct complexes differentially carry out gap filling in NER. XRCC1-Li...

  10. NDR1 modulates the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint and nucleotide excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong-Min; Choi, Ji Ye [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Joo Mi [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Woong; Leem, Sun-Hee; Koh, Sang Seok [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Hong, E-mail: thkang@dau.ac.kr [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the sole mechanism of UV-induced DNA lesion repair in mammals. A single round of NER requires multiple components including seven core NER factors, xeroderma pigmentosum A–G (XPA–XPG), and many auxiliary effector proteins including ATR serine/threonine kinase. The XPA protein helps to verify DNA damage and thus plays a rate-limiting role in NER. Hence, the regulation of XPA is important for the entire NER kinetic. We found that NDR1, a novel XPA-interacting protein, modulates NER by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint. In quiescent cells, NDR1 localized mainly in the cytoplasm. After UV irradiation, NDR1 accumulated in the nucleus. The siRNA knockdown of NDR1 delayed the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in both normal cells and cancer cells. It did not, however, alter the expression levels or the chromatin association levels of the core NER factors following UV irradiation. Instead, the NDR1-depleted cells displayed reduced activity of ATR for some set of its substrates including CHK1 and p53, suggesting that NDR1 modulates NER indirectly via the ATR pathway. - Highlights: • NDR1 is a novel XPA-interacting protein. • NDR1 accumulates in the nucleus in response to UV irradiation. • NDR1 modulates NER (nucleotide excision repair) by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint response.

  11. NDR1 modulates the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint and nucleotide excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the sole mechanism of UV-induced DNA lesion repair in mammals. A single round of NER requires multiple components including seven core NER factors, xeroderma pigmentosum A–G (XPA–XPG), and many auxiliary effector proteins including ATR serine/threonine kinase. The XPA protein helps to verify DNA damage and thus plays a rate-limiting role in NER. Hence, the regulation of XPA is important for the entire NER kinetic. We found that NDR1, a novel XPA-interacting protein, modulates NER by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint. In quiescent cells, NDR1 localized mainly in the cytoplasm. After UV irradiation, NDR1 accumulated in the nucleus. The siRNA knockdown of NDR1 delayed the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in both normal cells and cancer cells. It did not, however, alter the expression levels or the chromatin association levels of the core NER factors following UV irradiation. Instead, the NDR1-depleted cells displayed reduced activity of ATR for some set of its substrates including CHK1 and p53, suggesting that NDR1 modulates NER indirectly via the ATR pathway. - Highlights: • NDR1 is a novel XPA-interacting protein. • NDR1 accumulates in the nucleus in response to UV irradiation. • NDR1 modulates NER (nucleotide excision repair) by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint response

  12. POLYMORPHISMS IN THE DNA NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION REPAIR GENES AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN XUAN WEI, CHINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuan Wei County, China is among the highest in the country and has been etiologically attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nucleotide excision repair (NE...

  13. Affinity of yeast nucleotide excision repair factor 2, consisting of the Rad4 and Rad23 proteins, for ultraviolet damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad4 and Rad23 proteins are required for the nucleotide excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Previous studies have indicated that these two DNA repair proteins are associated in a tight complex, which we refer to as nucleotide excision repair factor 2 (NEF2). In a reconstituted nucleotide excision repair reaction, incision of UV-damaged DNA is dependent on NEF2, indicating a role of NEF2 in an early step of the repair process. NEF2 does not, however, possess an enzymatic activity, and its function in the damage-specific incision reaction has not yet been defined. Here we use a DNA mobility shift assay to demonstrate that NEF2 binds specifically to UV-damaged DNA. Elimination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from the UV-damaged DNA by enzymatic photoreactivation has little effect on the affinity of NEF2 for the DNA, suggesting that NEF2 recognizes the 6-(1, 2)-dihydro-2-oxo-4-pyrimidinyl)-5-methyl-2,4-(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione photoproducts in the damaged DNA. These results highlight the intricacy of the DNA damage-demarcation reaction during nucleotide excision repair in eukaryotes. (author)

  14. The mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in mitochondrial base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Maynard, Scott; Bayne, Anne-Cécile V;

    2010-01-01

    mitochondria, whereas base excision repair (BER) has been comprehensively characterized in these organelles. The BER proteins are associated with the inner membrane in mitochondria and thus with the mitochondrial nucleoid, where TFAM is also situated. However, a function for TFAM in BER has not yet been...

  15. Effect of cordycepin(3'-deoxyadenosine) on excision repair of 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine-type products from the DNA of Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordycepin(3'-deoxyadenosine), a nucleoside analog, has been shown to enhance radiation-induced cell killing. In an effort to elucidate the possible mechanism for enhancement of cell killing, the effect of cordycepin on the excision repair of radiation-induced 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine-type (t') products from the DNA of wild type Micrococcus radiodurans was investigated. The capacity of M. radiodurans to excise nondimeric (t') products from its DNA was significantly impaired after cordycepin treatment. The results suggest that the increased radiation sensitivity of cordycepin-treated cells could be due to alterations in cellular processes that repair DNA damage

  16. Perturbations of enzymic uracil excision due to purine damage in DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Duker, N J; Jensen, D E; Hart, D M; Fishbein, D E

    1982-01-01

    Phage PBS-2 DNA, which contains uracil in place of thymine, was selectively damaged and then used as substrate for purified Bacillus subtilis uracil-DNA glycosylase. This enzyme releases uracil from DNA in a limited processive manner. Irradiation by ultraviolet light (greater than 305 nm) in the presence of isopropanol and a free radical photoinitiator introduced covalently bound 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl)purines into DNA. Methylation by dimethylsulfate yielded 7-methylguanine. Apurinic sites wer...

  17. Unplanned Excision of Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma in Korea: A Nationwide Study Based on a Claims Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungcheol Kang

    Full Text Available Unplanned excision of extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS is common and has detrimental effects not only on patients' oncologic outcomes but also on functional and economic issues. However, no study has analyzed a nationwide population-based database. To estimate the incidence and treatment pattern of unplanned excision in extremity STS in the Korean population, a nationwide epidemiologic study was performed using the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database, a centralized nationwide healthcare claims registry of Korea that covers the entire Korean population. Among 1,517 patients with extremity STS in the 4-year study period, 553 (36.5% underwent unplanned excision (unplanned group. About 80% of unplanned excisions were performed in tertiary or general hospitals. Of the unplanned group, 240 (43.4% underwent re-excision with or without radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy, and 51 (9.2% did not undergo re-excision but were treated with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy; whereas, 262 (47.4% did not undergo any further treatment following unplanned excision. This study is the first nationwide population-based study on the unplanned excision of extremity STS. The results may have implications in establishing preventive or therapeutic measures to reduce the burden of unplanned excision of extremity STS.

  18. XRCC1 and Base Excision Repair Balance in Response to Nitric Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Mutamba, James T; Svilar, David; Prasongtanakij, Somsak; Wang, Xiao-hong; Lin, Ying-Chih; Dedon, Peter C; Sobol, Robert W.; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation associated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONs), including peroxynitrite (ONOO−) and nitric oxide (NO· ), create base lesions that potentially play a role in the toxicity and large-scale genomic rearrangements associated with many malignancies. Nevertheless, little is known about the functional role of base excision repair (BER) deficiencies following exposure to RONs. Here, we explore the role of XRCC1 in modulating the levels of RONs-induced genotoxicity. XRCC1 is a scaf...

  19. Inhibition of DNA excision repair by methotrexate in Chinese hamster ovary cells following exposure to ultraviolet irradiation or ethylmethanesulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous results have suggested that methotrexate (MTX) could interfere with the repair of spontaneous DNA damage. To determine its effects on induced DNA damage, MTX was compared to hydroxyurea and arabinofuranosylcytosine (H/A), a drug combination known to block the DNA polymerase step of excision repair, for its ability to cause the accumulation of single-strand breaks (SSB) following exposure to either UV light or the alkylating agent ethylmethanesulfonate in Chinese hamster ovary cells. SSB were measured by alkaline elution 1, 2, and 6 h after exposure to either 1.8 mg/ml of ethylmethanesulfonate or 10 J/m2 of UV in cells pretreated with MTX or H/A. Following exposure to ethylmethanesulfonate, significant accumulation of SSB occurred in cells pretreated with either H/A or MTX. Coadministration of hypoxanthine and thymidine in MTX-treated cells prevented SSB accumulation, indicating that nucleotide depletion by MTX had inhibited repair synthesis. After UV irradiation, SSB accumulation was much less in MTX- than in H/A-treated cells. MTX was found to have no effect on the incision of UV damage. These results indicate that nucleotide depletion by MTX can affect the repair of DNA damage by exogenous agents, and that the extent of inhibition is dependent on the type of damage induced

  20. Repair of UV-irradiated plasmid DNA in excision repair deficient mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The repair of UV-irradiated DNA of plasmid YEp13 was studied in the incision defective strains by measurement of cell transformation frequency. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, rad1,2,3 and 4 mutants could repair UV-damaged plasmid DNA. In Escherichia coli, uvrA mutant was unable to repair UV-damaged plasmid DNA; however, pretreatment of the plasmid with Micrococcus luteus endonuclease increased repair. It was concluded that all the mutations of yeast were probably limited only to the nuclear DNA. (author)

  1. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H F; Fousteri, Maria I

    2007-07-20

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase IIIalpha (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is indispensable for ligation of NER-induced breaks and repair of UV lesions in quiescent cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that two distinct complexes differentially carry out gap filling in NER. XRCC1-Lig3 and DNA polymerase delta colocalize and interact with NER components in a UV- and incision-dependent manner throughout the cell cycle. In contrast, DNA ligase I and DNA polymerase epsilon are recruited to UV-damage sites only in proliferating cells. This study reveals an unexpected and key role for XRCC1-Lig3 in maintenance of genomic integrity by NER in both dividing and nondividing cells and provides evidence for cell-cycle regulation of NER-mediated repair synthesis in vivo. PMID:17643379

  2. Kinetics of in vitro and in vivo dimerisation of thymines in the DNA of plant seedlings and excision of dimers from DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conditions of a chromatographic separation of the products of hydrolysis of irradiated DNA used for estimation of the quantity of thymine dimers in acid hydrolysates of polymeric DNA were studied. Using the modified methods of paper chromatography, we studied the kinetics of in vitro and in vivo thymine dimerisation in the DNA of grass pea (Lathyrus sativa L.). The germs isolated from the dry seeds of grass pea were soaked and left for 3 - 5 days in the dark in sterile Petri dishes containing WHITE's medium with 2-C14-thymidine. After UV-irradiation the seedlings were immediately frozen with liquid nitrogen. DNA was isolated according to the modified method of MARMUR and hydrolysed with formic acid. It has been shown that after in vivo irradiation of seedlings the amount of thymine dimers, when the curves dose-effect reach a saturation level, was twice lower than that in the in vitro irradiated DNA. During a 6 hours incubation of UV-irradiated seedlings nearly 30% of pyrimidine dimers were excised from the DNA. (author)

  3. UvrD Participation in Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Required for the Recovery of DNA Synthesis following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley N. Newton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available UvrD is a DNA helicase that participates in nucleotide excision repair and several replication-associated processes, including methyl-directed mismatch repair and recombination. UvrD is capable of displacing oligonucleotides from synthetic forked DNA structures in vitro and is essential for viability in the absence of Rep, a helicase associated with processing replication forks. These observations have led others to propose that UvrD may promote fork regression and facilitate resetting of the replication fork following arrest. However, the molecular activity of UvrD at replication forks in vivo has not been directly examined. In this study, we characterized the role UvrD has in processing and restoring replication forks following arrest by UV-induced DNA damage. We show that UvrD is required for DNA synthesis to recover. However, in the absence of UvrD, the displacement and partial degradation of the nascent DNA at the arrested fork occur normally. In addition, damage-induced replication intermediates persist and accumulate in uvrD mutants in a manner that is similar to that observed in other nucleotide excision repair mutants. These data indicate that, following arrest by DNA damage, UvrD is not required to catalyze fork regression in vivo and suggest that the failure of uvrD mutants to restore DNA synthesis following UV-induced arrest relates to its role in nucleotide excision repair.

  4. UvrD Participation in Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Required for the Recovery of DNA Synthesis following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Kelley N; Courcelle, Charmain T; Courcelle, Justin

    2012-01-01

    UvrD is a DNA helicase that participates in nucleotide excision repair and several replication-associated processes, including methyl-directed mismatch repair and recombination. UvrD is capable of displacing oligonucleotides from synthetic forked DNA structures in vitro and is essential for viability in the absence of Rep, a helicase associated with processing replication forks. These observations have led others to propose that UvrD may promote fork regression and facilitate resetting of the replication fork following arrest. However, the molecular activity of UvrD at replication forks in vivo has not been directly examined. In this study, we characterized the role UvrD has in processing and restoring replication forks following arrest by UV-induced DNA damage. We show that UvrD is required for DNA synthesis to recover. However, in the absence of UvrD, the displacement and partial degradation of the nascent DNA at the arrested fork occur normally. In addition, damage-induced replication intermediates persist and accumulate in uvrD mutants in a manner that is similar to that observed in other nucleotide excision repair mutants. These data indicate that, following arrest by DNA damage, UvrD is not required to catalyze fork regression in vivo and suggest that the failure of uvrD mutants to restore DNA synthesis following UV-induced arrest relates to its role in nucleotide excision repair. PMID:23056919

  5. Correlation among the rates of dimer excision, DNA repair replication, and recovery of human cells from potentially lethal damage induced by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of excision repair in confluent cultures of diploid human fibroblasts after ultraviolet irradiation at varying doses was measured by three different methods: (1) removal of thymine-containing dimers, (2) DNA excision repair synthesis, and (3) biological recovery of cells from the potentially lethal effects of the irradiation. Each method gave similar results and indicated that the excision rate was dependent upon the number of thymine-containing dimers induced (substrate concentration). For example, at a dose of 40 J/m2 (0.2% dimerization), the repair rate was 1.6 J/m2 per h as determined by a modified method to measure the number of thymine-containing dimers remaining in DNA and 1.65 J/m2 as measured by excision repair synthesis. At a dose of 7.5 J/m2, the repair rate was 0.5 J/m2 per h as measured by biological recovery, and at a dose of 7 J/m2, the repair rate was 0.46 J/m2 per h as measured by excision repair synthesis

  6. UvrD Participation in Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Required for the Recovery of DNA Synthesis following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Kelley N.; Courcelle, Charmain T; Justin Courcelle

    2012-01-01

    UvrD is a DNA helicase that participates in nucleotide excision repair and several replication-associated processes, including methyl-directed mismatch repair and recombination. UvrD is capable of displacing oligonucleotides from synthetic forked DNA structures in vitro and is essential for viability in the absence of Rep, a helicase associated with processing replication forks. These observations have led others to propose that UvrD may promote fork regression and facilitate resetting of the...

  7. Nucleotide excision repair of DNA cross-links of platinum complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Viktor; Kašpárková, Jana

    Verona, 2007. s. 70. [10th International Symposium on Platinum Coordination Compounds in Cancer Chemotherapy and Satellite Symposium "Molecular aspects of metal-anticancer drugs". 30.11.2007-03.12.2007, Verona] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA * platinum * cancer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  8. In vivo excision of pyrimidine dimers is mediated by a DNA N-glycosylase in Micrococcus luteus but not in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been previously shown that Micrococcus luteus possesses a pyrimidine dimer-specific endonuclease which in vitro, functions as both an endonuclease and DNA-glycosylase. To determine if these combined activities function in vivo, the excision products of UV-irradiated M. luteus were isolated and examined. In addition, a procedure was devised to isolate and examine the excision products from UV-irradiated human fibroblasts to determine if an endonuclease/glycosylase activity functions in the excision of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in human fibroblasts. It was shown that, in vivo, an endonuclease/glycosylase mechanism is utilized extensively in the repair of pyrimidine dimers by M. luteus, but that human fibroblasts do not appear to use this mechanism. (author)

  9. Molecular analysis of plasmid DNA repair within ultraviolet-irradiated Escherichia coli. II. UvrABC-initiated excision repair and photolyase-catalyzed dimer monomerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a novel approach to the analysis of DNA repair in Escherichia coli was employed which allowed the first direct determination of the mechanisms by which endogenous DNA repair enzymes encounter target sites in vivo. An in vivo plasmid DNA repair analysis was employed to discriminate between two possible mechanisms of target site location: a processive DNA scanning mechanism or a distributive random diffusion mechanism. The results demonstrate that photolyase acts by a distributive mechanism within E. coli. In contrast, UvrABC-initiated excision repair occurs by a limited processive DNA scanning mechanism. A majority of the dimer sites on a given plasmid molecule were repaired prior to the dissociation of the UvrABC complex. Furthermore, plasmid DNA repair catalyzed by the UvrABC complex occurs without a detectable accumulation of nicked plasmid intermediates despite the fact that the UvrABC complex generates dual incisions in the DNA at the site of a pyrimidine dimer. Therefore, the binding or assembly of the UvrABC complex on DNA at the site of a pyrimidine dimer represents the rate-limiting step in the overall process of UvrABC-initiated excision repair in vivo

  10. Distinct spatio temporal patterns and PARP dependence of XRCC1 recruitment to single-strand break and base excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-strand break repair (SSBR) and base excision repair (BER) of modified bases and abasic sites share several players. Among them is XRCC1, an essential scaffold protein with no enzymatic activity, required for the coordination of both pathways. XRCC1 is recruited to SSBR by PARP-1, responsible for the initial recognition of the break. The recruitment of XRCC1 to BER is still poorly understood. Here we show by using both local and global induction of oxidative DNA base damage that XRCC1 participation in BER complexes can be distinguished from that in SSBR by several criteria. We show first that XRCC1 recruitment to BER is independent of PARP. Second, unlike SSBR complexes that are assembled within minutes after global damage induction, XRCC1 is detected later in BER patches, with kinetics consistent with the repair of oxidized bases. Third, while XRCC1-containing foci associated with SSBR are formed both in eu- and heterochromatin domains, BER complexes are assembled in patches that are essentially excluded from heterochromatin and where the oxidized bases are detected. (authors)

  11. DNA glycosylases: in DNA repair and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Angelika L.; Schär, Primo

    2011-01-01

    The base excision repair machinery protects DNA in cells from the damaging effects of oxidation, alkylation, and deamination; it is specialized to fix single-base damage in the form of small chemical modifications. Base modifications can be mutagenic and/or cytotoxic, depending on how they interfere with the template function of the DNA during replication and transcription. DNA glycosylases play a key role in the elimination of such DNA lesions; they recognize and excise damaged bases, thereb...

  12. A Novel Variable Index and Excision CFAR Based Ship Detection Method on SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kefeng Ji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When applying the constant false alarm rate (CFAR detector to ship detection on synthetic aperture radar (SAR imagery, multiple interferers such as upwelling, breaking waves, ambiguities, and neighboring ships in a dense traffic area will degrade the probability of detection. In this paper, we propose a novel variable index and excision CFAR (VIE-CFAR based ship detection method to alleviate the masking effect of multiple interferers. Firstly, we improve the variable index (VI CFAR with an excision procedure, which censors the multiple interferers from the reference cells. And then, the paper integrates the novel CFAR concept into a ship detection scheme on SAR imagery, which adopts the VIE-CFAR to screen reference cells and the distribution to derive detection threshold. Finally, we analyze the performances of the VIE-CFAR under different environments and validate the proposed method on both ENVISAT and TerraSAR-X SAR data. The results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms other existing detectors, especially in the presence of multiple interferers.

  13. Variation in PAH-related DNA adduct levels among non-smokers: the role of multiple genetic polymorphisms and nucleotide excision repair phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Etemadi, Arash; Islami, Farhad; Phillips, David H.; Godschalk, Roger; Golozar, Asieh; Kamangar, Farin; Malekshah, Akbar Fazel-Tabar; Pourshams, Akram; Elahi, Seerat; Ghojaghi, Farhad; Strickland, Paul T.; Taylor, Philip R.; Boffetta, Paolo; Abnet, Christian C.; Dawsey, Sanford M.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) likely play a role in many cancers even in never-smokers. We tried to find a model to explain the relationship between variation in PAH-related DNA adduct levels among people with similar exposures, multiple genetic polymorphisms in genes related to metabolic and repair pathways, and nucleotide excision repair (NER) capacity. In 111 randomly selected female never-smokers from the Golestan Cohort Study in Iran, we evaluated 21 SNPs in 14 genes related to...

  14. Oxidative stress alters base excision repair pathway and increases apoptotic response in Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Redox factor-1 haploinsufficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Unnikrishnan, Archana; Raffoul, Julian J.; Patel, Hiral V.; Prychitko, Thomas M.; Anyangwe, Njwen; Meira, Lisiane B.; Friedberg, Errol C.; Cabelof, Diane C.; Heydari, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is the redox regulator of multiple stress-inducible transcription factors, such as NF-κB, and the major 5’-endonuclease in base excision repair (BER). We utilized mice containing heterozygous gene-targeted deletion of APE1/Ref-1 (Apex+/-) to determine the impact of APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency on the processing of oxidative DNA damage induced by 2-nitropropane (2-NP) in the liver tissue of mice. APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency re...

  15. Involvement of helicase II (uvrD gene product) and DNA polymerase I in excision mediated by the uvrABC protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caron, P.R.; Kushner, S.R.; Grossman, L.

    1985-08-01

    The bimodal-incision nature of the reaction of UV-irradiated DNA catalyzed by the Escherichia coli uvrABC protein complex potentially leads to excision of a 12- to 13-nucleotide-long damaged fragment. However, the oligonucleotide fragment containing the UV-induced pyrimidine dimer is not released under nondenaturing in vitro reaction conditions. Also, the uvrABC proteins are stably bound to the incised DNA and do not turn over after the incision event. In this communication it is shown that release of the damaged fragment from the parental uvrABC-incised DNA is dependent upon either chelating conditions or the simultaneous addition of the uvrD gene product (helicase II) and the polA gene product (DNA polymerase I) when polymerization of deoxynucleoside triphosphate substrates is concomitantly catalyzed. The product of this multiprotein-catalyzed series of reactions serves as a substrate for polynucleotide ligase, resulting in the restoration of the integrity of the strands of DNA. The addition of the uvrD protein to the incised DNA-uvrABC complex also results in turnover of the uvrC protein. It is suggested that the repair processes of incision, excision, resynthesis, and ligation are coordinately catalyzed by a complex of proteins in a ''repairosome'' configuration.

  16. Involvement of helicase II (uvrD gene product) and DNA polymerase I in excision mediated by the uvrABC protein complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bimodal-incision nature of the reaction of UV-irradiated DNA catalyzed by the Escherichia coli uvrABC protein complex potentially leads to excision of a 12- to 13-nucleotide-long damaged fragment. However, the oligonucleotide fragment containing the UV-induced pyrimidine dimer is not released under nondenaturing in vitro reaction conditions. Also, the uvrABC proteins are stably bound to the incised DNA and do not turn over after the incision event. In this communication it is shown that release of the damaged fragment from the parental uvrABC-incised DNA is dependent upon either chelating conditions or the simultaneous addition of the uvrD gene product (helicase II) and the polA gene product (DNA polymerase I) when polymerization of deoxynucleoside triphosphate substrates is concomitantly catalyzed. The product of this multiprotein-catalyzed series of reactions serves as a substrate for polynucleotide ligase, resulting in the restoration of the integrity of the strands of DNA. The addition of the uvrD protein to the incised DNA-uvrABC complex also results in turnover of the uvrC protein. It is suggested that the repair processes of incision, excision, resynthesis, and ligation are coordinately catalyzed by a complex of proteins in a ''repairosome'' configuration

  17. Involvement of helicase II (uvrD gene product) and DNA polymerase I in excision mediated by the uvrABC protein complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Caron, P R; Kushner, S R; Grossman, L

    1985-01-01

    The bimodal-incision nature of the reaction of UV-irradiated DNA catalyzed by the Escherichia coli uvrABC protein complex potentially leads to excision of a 12- to 13-nucleotide-long damaged fragment. However, the oligonucleotide fragment containing the UV-induced pyrimidine dimer is not released under nondenaturing in vitro reaction conditions. Also, the uvrABC proteins are stably bound to the incised DNA and do not turn over after the incision event. In this communication it is shown that r...

  18. 碱基切除修复与抗肿瘤药物耐药%Base excision repair and antineoplastic drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    况里杉; 王宇亮; 周向东

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the main methods to treat malignant tumors in clinical practice. Resistance to antineoplastic agents is one of the important reasons for treatment failure. The antineoplastic mechanism of various chemotherapeutic agents is to cause DNA damage, then result in apoptosis of tumor cells. It is suggested that the function of DNA repair is directly associated with the efficacy of antineoplastic agents. Current studies suggest that there are four major DNA repair pathways including BER (base excision repair), NER (nucleotide excision repair), MMR (mismatch repair) and DSBR (double strand break repair). Of these four pathways, BER is one of the main mechanisms of DNA repair and its malfunction is closely related to the resistance to antineoplastic agents. Recently, many kinds of agents and strategies targeting BER have been developed to reverse chemoresistance. This review summarizes the progress in research in this area and discusses the mechanism of resistance to antineoplastic agents and the potential preventive and therapeutic strategies.%化疗是目前临床上治疗肿瘤的主要方法之一,抗肿瘤药物耐药则是导致肿瘤治疗失败的重要原因之一.多种化疗药物抗肿瘤的主要机制是引起DNA损伤,进而导致肿瘤细胞凋亡;因此,DNA修复功能状态与抗肿瘤药物疗效有着直接的关系.目前,已知有4种主要的DNA修复途径:碱基切除修复(base excision repair,BER)、核苷酸切除修复(nucleotide excision repair,NER)、错配修复(mismatch repair,MMR)和双键断裂修复(double strand break repair,DSBR).其中,BER是主要的DNA修复机制之一,其修复功能异常与抗肿瘤药物耐药有着密切的联系.近年来,以BER为靶点开发了多种逆转耐药的药物或方法.本文将简要综述相关的研究进展,深入探讨抗肿瘤药物耐药的发生机制及防治措施.

  19. Distinct spatiotemporal patterns and PARP dependence of XRCC1 recruitment to single-strand break and base excision repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Campalans (Anna); R. Amouroux (Rachel); H. Menoni (Hervé); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.P. Radicella (Pablo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractSingle-strand break repair (SSBR) and base excision repair (BER) of modified bases and abasic sites share several players. Among them is XRCC1, an essential scaffold protein with no enzymatic activity, required for the coordination of both pathways. XRCC1 is recruited to SSBR by PARP-1,

  20. In vitro Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage by Human Nucleotide Excision Repair System: Possible Explanation for Neurodegeneration in Xeroderma Pigmentosum Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Joyce T.; Bessho, Tadayoshi; Kung, Hsiang Chuan; Bolton, Philip H.; Sancar, Aziz

    1997-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients fail to remove pyrimidine dimers caused by sunlight and, as a consequence, develop multiple cancers in areas exposed to light. The second most common sign, present in 20-30% of XP patients, is a set of neurological abnormalities caused by neuronal death in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Neural tissue is shielded from sunlight-induced DNA damage, so the cause of neurodegeneration in XP patients remains unexplained. In this study, we show that two major oxidative DNA lesions, 8-oxoguanine and thymine glycol, are excised from DNA in vitro by the same enzyme system responsible for removing pyrimidine dimers and other bulky DNA adducts. Our results suggest that XP neurological disease may be caused by defective repair of lesions that are produced in nerve cells by reactive oxygen species generated as by-products of an active oxidative metabolism.

  1. Oxidative stress alters base excision repair pathway and increases apoptotic response in apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 haploinsufficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Archana; Raffoul, Julian J; Patel, Hiral V; Prychitko, Thomas M; Anyangwe, Njwen; Meira, Lisiane B; Friedberg, Errol C; Cabelof, Diane C; Heydari, Ahmad R

    2009-06-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is the redox regulator of multiple stress-inducible transcription factors, such as NF-kappaB, and the major 5'-endonuclease in base excision repair (BER). We utilized mice containing a heterozygous gene-targeted deletion of APE1/Ref-1 (Apex(+/-)) to determine the impact of APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency on the processing of oxidative DNA damage induced by 2-nitropropane (2-NP) in the liver tissue of mice. APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency results in a significant decline in NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity in response to oxidative stress in liver. In addition, loss of APE1/Ref-1 increases the apoptotic response to oxidative stress, in which significant increases in GADD45g expression, p53 protein stability, and caspase activity are observed. Oxidative stress displays a differential impact on monofunctional (UNG) and bifunctional (OGG1) DNA glycosylase-initiated BER in the liver of Apex(+/-) mice. APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency results in a significant decline in the repair of oxidized bases (e.g., 8-OHdG), whereas removal of uracil is increased in liver nuclear extracts of mice using an in vitro BER assay. Apex(+/-) mice exposed to 2-NP displayed a significant decline in 3'-OH-containing single-strand breaks and an increase in aldehydic lesions in their liver DNA, suggesting an accumulation of repair intermediates of failed bifunctional DNA glycosylase-initiated BER. PMID:19268524

  2. DNA-based hybrid catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, DNA-based hybrid catalysis has merged as a promising novel approach to homogeneous (asymmetric) catalysis. A DNA hybrid catalysts comprises a transition metal complex that is covalently or supramolecularly bound to DNA. The chiral microenvironment and the second coordination sphe

  3. Molecular cloning of eucaryotic genes required for excision repair of UV-irradiated DNA: isolation and partial characterization of the RAD3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Naumovski, L; Friedberg, E C

    1982-01-01

    We describe the molecular cloning of a 6-kilobase (kb) fragment of yeast chromosomal DNA containing the RAD3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When present in the autonomously replicating yeast cloning vector YEp24, this fragment transformed two different UV-sensitive, excision repair-defective rad3 mutants of S. cerevisiae to UV resistance. The same result was obtained with a variety of other plasmids containing a 4.5-kb subclone of the 6-kb fragment. The UV sensitivity of mutants defective ...

  4. The role of base excision repair in the development of primary open angle glaucoma in the Polish population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuchra, Magda; Markiewicz, Lukasz; Mucha, Bartosz [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Medical University of Lodz (Poland); Pytel, Dariusz [The Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Cancer Biology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Szymanek, Katarzyna [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw, SPKSO Hospital, Warsaw (Poland); Szemraj, Janusz [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P. [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw, SPKSO Hospital, Warsaw (Poland); Majsterek, Ireneusz, E-mail: ireneusz.majsterek@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Medical University of Lodz (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We suggested the association of XRCC1 gene with the increase risk of POAG development. • We indicated the association of clinical factor and XRCC1, MUTYH, ADPRT and APE1 genes with POAG progression. • We postulated the increase level of oxidative DNA damage in group of patients with POAG in relation to healthy controls. • We suggested the slightly decrease ability to repair of oxidative DNA damage. • This is the first data that showed the role of BER mechanism in POAG pathogenesis. - Abstract: Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in developing countries. Previous data have shown that progressive loss of human TM cells may be connected with chronic exposure to oxidative stress. This hypothesis may suggest a role of the base excision repair (BER) pathway of oxidative DNA damage in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate an association of BER gene polymorphism with a risk of POAG. Moreover, an association of clinical parameters was examined including cup disk ratio (c/d), rim area (RA) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) with glaucoma progression according to BER gene polymorphisms. Our research included 412 patients with POAG and 454 healthy controls. Gene polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Heidelberg Retinal Tomography (HRT) clinical parameters were also analyzed. The 399Arg/Gln genotype of the XRCC1 gene (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.02–1.89 p = 0.03) was associated with an increased risk of POAG occurrence. It was indicated that the 399Gln/Gln XRCC1 genotype might increase the risk of POAG progression according to the c/d ratio (OR 1.67; 95% CI 1.07–2.61 P = 0.02) clinical parameter. Moreover, the association of VF factor with 148Asp/Glu of APE1 genotype distribution and POAG progression (OR 2.25; 95% CI 1.30–3.89) was also found. Additionally, the analysis of the 324Gln/His MUTYH polymorphism gene distribution in the patient group according to RNFL factor showed that it might

  5. The role of base excision repair in the development of primary open angle glaucoma in the Polish population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We suggested the association of XRCC1 gene with the increase risk of POAG development. • We indicated the association of clinical factor and XRCC1, MUTYH, ADPRT and APE1 genes with POAG progression. • We postulated the increase level of oxidative DNA damage in group of patients with POAG in relation to healthy controls. • We suggested the slightly decrease ability to repair of oxidative DNA damage. • This is the first data that showed the role of BER mechanism in POAG pathogenesis. - Abstract: Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in developing countries. Previous data have shown that progressive loss of human TM cells may be connected with chronic exposure to oxidative stress. This hypothesis may suggest a role of the base excision repair (BER) pathway of oxidative DNA damage in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate an association of BER gene polymorphism with a risk of POAG. Moreover, an association of clinical parameters was examined including cup disk ratio (c/d), rim area (RA) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) with glaucoma progression according to BER gene polymorphisms. Our research included 412 patients with POAG and 454 healthy controls. Gene polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Heidelberg Retinal Tomography (HRT) clinical parameters were also analyzed. The 399Arg/Gln genotype of the XRCC1 gene (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.02–1.89 p = 0.03) was associated with an increased risk of POAG occurrence. It was indicated that the 399Gln/Gln XRCC1 genotype might increase the risk of POAG progression according to the c/d ratio (OR 1.67; 95% CI 1.07–2.61 P = 0.02) clinical parameter. Moreover, the association of VF factor with 148Asp/Glu of APE1 genotype distribution and POAG progression (OR 2.25; 95% CI 1.30–3.89) was also found. Additionally, the analysis of the 324Gln/His MUTYH polymorphism gene distribution in the patient group according to RNFL factor showed that it might

  6. Protective Effect of Diphlorethohydroxycarmalol against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced DNA Damage by Inducing the Nucleotide Excision Repair System in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Jing Piao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the protective properties of diphlorethohydroxycarmalol (DPHC, a phlorotannin, against ultraviolet B (UVB radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs in HaCaT human keratinocytes. The nucleotide excision repair (NER system is the pathway by which cells identify and repair bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions such as ultraviolet (UV radiation-induced CPDs and 6-4 photoproducts. CPDs levels were elevated in UVB-exposed cells; however, this increase was reduced by DPHC. Expression levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC and excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1, which are essential components of the NER pathway, were induced in DPHC-treated cells. Expression of XPC and ERCC1 were reduced following UVB exposure, whereas DPHC treatment partially restored the levels of both proteins. DPHC also increased expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1 and sirtuin 1, an up-regulator of XPC, in UVB-exposed cells. DPHC restored binding of the SP1 to the XPC promoter, which is reduced in UVB-exposed cells. These results indicate that DPHC can protect cells against UVB-induced DNA damage by inducing the NER system.

  7. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers affect mRNA expression of DNA nucleotide excision repair in skin and muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergio, Luiz Philippe S; Campos, Vera Maria A; Vicentini, Solange C; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; de Paoli, Flavia; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-04-01

    Lasers emit light beams with specific characteristics, in which wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode properties determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses. Low-intensity lasers could induce free radical generation in biological tissues and cause alterations in macromolecules, such as DNA. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and excision repair cross-complementing group 2 (ERCC2) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in biological tissues exposed to low-intensity lasers. Wistar rat (n = 28, 4 for each group) skin and muscle were exposed to low-intensity red (660 nm) and near-infrared (880 nm) lasers at different fluences (25, 50, and 100 J/cm(2)), and samples of these tissues were withdrawn for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and gene expression evaluation by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Laser exposure was in continuous wave and power of 100 mW. Data show that ERCC1 and ERCC2 mRNA expressions decrease in skin (p tissue (p  0.05), but ERCC2 mRNA expression decreases in skin (p tissue (p tissue exposed to low-intensity lasers depending on wavelengths and fluences used in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26796702

  8. Variation in PAH-related DNA adduct levels among non-smokers: the role of multiple genetic polymorphisms and nucleotide excision repair phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemadi, Arash; Islami, Farhad; Phillips, David H; Godschalk, Roger; Golozar, Asieh; Kamangar, Farin; Malekshah, Akbar Fazel-Tabar; Pourshams, Akram; Elahi, Seerat; Ghojaghi, Farhad; Strickland, Paul T; Taylor, Philip R; Boffetta, Paolo; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M; Malekzadeh, Reza; van Schooten, Frederik J

    2013-06-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) likely play a role in many cancers even in never-smokers. We tried to find a model to explain the relationship between variation in PAH-related DNA adduct levels among people with similar exposures, multiple genetic polymorphisms in genes related to metabolic and repair pathways, and nucleotide excision repair (NER) capacity. In 111 randomly selected female never-smokers from the Golestan Cohort Study in Iran, we evaluated 21 SNPs in 14 genes related to xenobiotic metabolism and 12 SNPs in eight DNA repair genes. NER capacity was evaluated by a modified comet assay, and aromatic DNA adduct levels were measured in blood by32P-postlabeling. Multivariable regression models were compared by Akaike's information criterion (AIC). Aromatic DNA adduct levels ranged between 1.7 and 18.6 per 10(8) nucleotides (mean: 5.8 ± 3.1). DNA adduct level was significantly lower in homozygotes for NAT2 slow alleles and ERCC5 non-risk-allele genotype, and was higher in the MPO homozygote risk-allele genotype. The sum of risk alleles in these genes significantly correlated with the log-adduct level (r = 0.4, p studies, with large inter-individual variation which could best be explained by a combination of Phase I genes and NER capacity. PMID:23175176

  9. Accurate Dna Assembly And Direct Genome Integration With Optimized Uracil Excision Cloning To Facilitate Engineering Of Escherichia Coli As A Cell Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Nørholm, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce a vast diversity of valuable compounds with medical properties, but these are often difficult to purify from the natural source or produce by organic synthesis. An alternative is to transfer the biosynthetic pathways to an efficient production host like the bacterium Escherichia co......-excision-based cloning and combining it with a genome-engineering approach to allow direct integration of whole metabolic pathways into the genome of E. coli, to facilitate the advanced engineering of cell factories....

  10. Silibinin enhances the repair of ultraviolet B-induced DNA damage by activating p53-dependent nucleotide excision repair mechanism in human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermo-Lagae, Ruth; Deep, Gagan; Ting, Harold; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-11-24

    Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB) is the main cause of DNA damage in epidermal cells; and if not repaired, this DNA damage leads to skin cancer. In earlier studies, we have reported that natural flavonolignan silibinin exerts strong chemopreventive efficacy against UVB-induced skin damage and carcinogenesis; however mechanistic studies are still being actively pursued. Here, we investigated the role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway in silibinin's efficacy to repair UVB-induced DNA damage. Normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) were exposed to UVB (1 mJ/cm2) with pre- or post- silibinin (100 μM) treatment, and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) formation/repair was measured. Results showed that post-UVB silibinin treatment accelerates DNA repair via activating the NER pathway including the expression of XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A), XPB, XPC, and XPG. In UVB exposed fibroblasts, silibinin treatment also increased p53 and GADD45α expression; the key regulators of the NER pathway and DNA repair. Consistently, post-UVB silibinin treatment increased the mRNA transcripts of XPA and GADD45α. Importantly, silibinin showed no effect on UVB-induced DNA damage repair in XPA- and XPB-deficient human dermal fibroblasts suggesting their key role in silibinin-mediated DNA damage repair. Moreover, in the presence of pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53, the DNA repair efficacy of silibinin was compromised associated with a reduction in XPA and GADD45α transcripts. Together, these findings suggest that silibinin's efficacy against UVB-induced photodamage is primarily by inhibiting NER and p53; and these findings further support silibinin's usage as a potential inexpensive, effective, and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention. PMID:26447614

  11. H. pylori-Induced DNA Strand Breaks Are Introduced by Nucleotide Excision Repair Endonucleases and Promote NF-κB Target Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara L. Hartung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori exhibits genotoxic properties that promote gastric carcinogenesis. H. pylori introduces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in epithelial cells that trigger host cell DNA repair efforts. Here, we show that H. pylori-induced DSBs are repaired via error-prone, potentially mutagenic non-homologous end-joining. A genome-wide screen for factors contributing to DSB induction revealed a critical role for the H. pylori type IV secretion system (T4SS. Inhibition of transcription, as well as NF-κB/RelA-specific RNAi, abrogates DSB formation. DSB induction further requires β1-integrin signaling. DSBs are introduced by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG, which, together with RelA, are recruited to chromatin in a highly coordinated, T4SS-dependent manner. Interestingly, XPF/XPG-mediated DNA DSBs promote NF-κB target gene transactivation and host cell survival. In summary, H. pylori induces XPF/XPG-mediated DNA damage through activation of the T4SS/β1-integrin signaling axis, which promotes NF-κB target gene expression and host cell survival.

  12. The nucleotide excision repair system of Borrelia burgdorferi is the sole pathway involved in repair of DNA damage by UV light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Pierre-Olivier; Chaconas, George

    2013-05-01

    To survive and avoid accumulation of mutations caused by DNA damage, the genomes of prokaryotes encode a variety of DNA repair pathways most well characterized in Escherichia coli. Some of these are required for the infectivity of various pathogens. In this study, the importance of 25 DNA repair/recombination genes for Borrelia burgdorferi survival to UV-induced DNA damage was assessed. In contrast to E. coli, where 15 of these genes have an effect on survival of UV irradiation, disruption of recombinational repair, transcription-coupled repair, methyl-directed mismatch correction, and repair of arrested replication fork pathways did not decrease survival of B. burgdorferi exposed to UV light. However, the disruption of the B. burgdorferi nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway (uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, and uvrD) resulted in a 10- to 1,000-fold increase in sensitivity to UV light. A functional NER pathway was also shown to be required for B. burgdorferi resistance to nitrosative damage. Finally, disruption of uvrA, uvrC, and uvrD had only a minor effect upon murine infection by increasing the time required for dissemination. PMID:23475971

  13. Kinetic Mechanism for the Flipping and Excision of 1,N 6-Ethenoadenine by AlkA

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Erin L.; O’Brien, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA), an adaptive response glycosylase with a broad substrate range, initiates base excision repair by flipping a lesion out of the DNA duplex and hydrolyzing the N-glycosidic bond. We used transient and steady state kinetics to determine the minimal mechanism for recognition and excision of 1,N 6-ethenoadenine (εA) by AlkA. The natural fluorescence of this endogenously produced lesion allowed us to directly monitor the nucleotide flipping...

  14. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  15. Post-UV survival and mutagenesis in DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of Escherichia coli K-12 grown in 5-azacytidine to inhibit DNA cytosine methylation: evidence for mutagenic excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnedge, L; Pinney, R J

    1993-03-01

    Inhibition of cytosine methylation by growth in 5-azacytidine (5-azaC), did not affect the sensitivities to DNA damage induced by exposure to ultraviolet light (UV) of Escherichia coli K-12 strains AB1157 dcm+, which is fully DNA repair-proficient, LR68 (a dcm derivative of AB1157), JC3890 dcm+ uvrB, deficient in error-free excision repair, TK702 dcm+ umuC, deficient in error-prone repair, or TK501 dcm+ uvrB umuC, which lacks both excision repair and error-prone repair. However, growth in 5-azaC increased the post-UV survival of strains AB2463 recA(Def), AB2470 recB and AB2494 lexA(Ind-), which are deficient in the induction or expression of recombination repair or error-prone repair of DNA. Spontaneous mutation frequencies were increased in strains LR68, AB2463, AB2470 and AB2494 by growth in 5-azaC, but remained unaltered in strains AB1157, JC3890, TK702 or TK501. Growth in 5-azaC significantly increased UV-induced mutation frequencies in strains AB2463 and AB2470, significantly reduced UV-induced mutation in strain JC3890, but had little effect on UV-induced mutation in the other strains. The results suggest that 5-azaC may induce a normally error-free DNA repair pathway to become error-prone and therefore genotoxic. PMID:7683337

  16. Post-UV survival and mutagenesis in DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of Escherichia coli K-12 grown in 5-azacytidine to inhibit DNA cytosine methylation: evidence for mutagenic excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhibition of cytosine methylation by growth in 5-azacytidine (5-azaC), did not affect the sensitivities to DNA damage induced by exposure to ultraviolet light (UV) of Escherichia coli K-12 strains AB1157 dcm+, which is fully DNA repair-proficient, LR68 (a dcm derivative of AB1157), JC3890 dcm+ uvr B, deficient in error-free excision repair, TK702 dcm+ umuC, deficient in error-prone repair, or TK501 dcm+ uvrB umuC, which lacks both excision repair and error-prone repair. However, growth in 5-azaC increased the post-UV survival of strains AB2463 recA(Def), AB2470 recB and AB2494 lexA(Ind-), which are deficient in the induction or expression of recombination repair or error-prone repair of DNA. Spontaneous mutation frequencies were increased in strains LR68, AB2463, AB2470 and AB2494 by growth in 5-azaC, but remained unaltered in strains AB1157, JC3890, TK702 or TK501. Growth in 5-azaC significantly increased UV-induced mutation frequencies in strains AB2463 and AB2470, significantly reduced UV-induced mutation in strain JC3890, but had little effect on UV-induced mutation in the other strains. The results suggest that 5-azaC may induce a normally error-free DNA repair pathway to become error-prone and therefore genotoxic. (Author)

  17. DNA-based human karyotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayall, B.H.; Carrano, A.V.; Moore, C.H. II; Ashworth, L.K.; Bennett, D.E.; Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Image cytometry and computer analysis are used to determine the relative DNA content and the DNA-based centromeric index of the 24 chromosomes of the human karyotype. A two-step procedure is used. Chromosomes of cells in metaphase first are stained with quinacrine and identified visually by their fluorescent Q-band patterns. They then are stained for DNA using gallocyanin-chrome alum. The chromosome images are scanned and recorded as digital values of optical density by an CYDAC image cytometric microscope system, CYDAC. The digital images are processed by computer to measure for each chromosome the relative DNA stain contents of the whole chromosome and of the p and q arms and the DNA-based centromeric index. About ten cells are analyzed for each of the donors, who are phenotypically normal men and women. The chromosome measurements are pooled by chromosome type for each donor and are compared among donors. The means of the chromosome measurements give the DNA-based human karyotype. Analysis of the DNA-based data shows that some chromosomes or portions of chromosomes vary significantly among donors. These variants do not correlate with detectable morphologic polymorphisms, such as Q- or C-band variants; thus they represent new and otherwise undetectable chromosome polymorphisms whose genetic basis and clinical significance are yet to be determined. 54 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  18. Base excision repair efficiency and mechanism in nuclear extracts are influenced by the ratio between volume of nuclear extraction buffer and nuclei—Implications for comparative studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We examine effect of volume of extraction buffer relative to volume of isolated nuclei on repair activity of nuclear extract. • Base excision repair activity of nuclear extracts prepared from the same batch and number of nuclei varies inversely with the volume of nuclear extraction buffer. • Effect of the volume of extraction buffer on BER activity of nuclear extracts can only be partially reversed after concentration of the more diluted extract by ultrafiltration. - Abstract: The base excision repair (BER) pathway corrects many different DNA base lesions and is important for genomic stability. The mechanism of BER cannot easily be investigated in intact cells and therefore in vitro methods that reflect the in vivo processes are in high demand. Reconstitution of BER using purified proteins essentially mirror properties of the proteins used, and does not necessarily reflect the mechanism as it occurs in the cell. Nuclear extracts from cultured cells have the capacity to carry out complete BER and can give important information on the mechanism. Furthermore, candidate proteins in extracts can be inhibited or depleted in a controlled way, making defined extracts an important source for mechanistic studies. The major drawback is that there is no standardized method of preparing nuclear extract for BER studies, and it does not appear to be a topic given much attention. Here we have examined BER activity of nuclear cell extracts from HeLa cells, using as substrate a circular DNA molecule with either uracil or an AP-site in a defined position. We show that BER activity of nuclear extracts from the same batch of cells varies inversely with the volume of nuclear extraction buffer relative to nuclei volume, in spite of identical protein concentrations in the BER assay mixture. Surprisingly, the uracil–DNA glycosylase activity (mainly UNG2), but not amount of UNG2, also correlated negatively with the volume of extraction buffer. These studies demonstrate

  19. Ultraviolet-induced DNA excision repair in human B and T lymphocytes. 3. Repair in lymphocyte from chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the capacity of lymphocytes from individuals with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) to undertake ultraviolet (u.v.)-induced DNA repair in comparison to control and age-matched purified B and T lymphocytes. The technique was independent of incorporation of radioactive precursor, i.e. by the recovery of normal sedimentation behaviour of nucleoid bodies obtained from these cells by lysis in high salt and non-ionic detergent. Recovery of normal sedimentation was associated with restoration of DNA supercoiling. CLL cells were found to be as sensitive to u.v. and to repair at similar rates as age-matched B controls. They were considerably more sensitive than young B cells and repaired less efficiently. Reasons for previous reported discrepancies in CLL repair were discussed. (author)

  20. Active DNA Demethylation Mediated by DNA Glycosylases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation is involved in many vital developmental and physiological processes of plants and animals. Recent genetic and biochemical studies in Arabidopsis have demonstrated that a subfamily of DNA glycosylases function to promote DNA demethylation through a base excision-repair pathway. These specialized bifunctional DNA glycosylases remove the 5-methylcytosine base and then cleave the DNA backbone at the abasic site, resulting in a gap that is then filled with an unmethylated ...

  1. Nucleotide excision repair in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Graciela

    2015-12-01

    The demonstration of DNA damage excision and repair replication by Setlow, Howard-Flanders, Hanawalt and their colleagues in the early 1960s, constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The serial steps in NER are similar in organisms from unicellular bacteria to complex mammals and plants, and involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. The transcription-coupled repair (TCR) subpathway of NER, discovered nearly two decades later, is dedicated to the removal of lesions from the template DNA strands of actively transcribed genes. In this review I will outline the essential factors and complexes involved in NER in humans, and will comment on additional factors and metabolic processes that affect the efficiency of this important process. PMID:26388429

  2. Post-UV survival and mutagenesis in DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of Escherichia coli K-12 grown in 5-azacytidine to inhibit DNA cytosine methylation: evidence for mutagenic excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radnedge, L.; Pinney, R.J. (London Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Pharmaceutics)

    1993-03-01

    Inhibition of cytosine methylation by growth in 5-azacytidine (5-azaC), did not affect the sensitivities to DNA damage induced by exposure to ultraviolet light (UV) of Escherichia coli K-12 strains AB1157 dcm[sup +], which is fully DNA repair-proficient, LR68 (a dcm derivative of AB1157), JC3890 dcm[sup +] uvr B, deficient in error-free excision repair, TK702 dcm[sup +] umuC, deficient in error-prone repair, or TK501 dcm[sup +] uvrB umuC, which lacks both excision repair and error-prone repair. However, growth in 5-azaC increased the post-UV survival of strains AB2463 recA(Def), AB2470 recB and AB2494 lexA(Ind[sup -]), which are deficient in the induction or expression of recombination repair or error-prone repair of DNA. Spontaneous mutation frequencies were increased in strains LR68, AB2463, AB2470 and AB2494 by growth in 5-azaC, but remained unaltered in strains AB1157, JC3890, TK702 or TK501. Growth in 5-azaC significantly increased UV-induced mutation frequencies in strains AB2463 and AB2470, significantly reduced UV-induced mutation in strain JC3890, but had little effect on UV-induced mutation in the other strains. The results suggest that 5-azaC may induce a normally error-free DNA repair pathway to become error-prone and therefore genotoxic. (Author).

  3. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17). PMID:27192830

  4. Functional, genetic and epigenetic aspects of base and nucleotide excision repair in colorectal carcinomas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slyšková, Jana; Korenková, Vlasta; Collins, A. R.; Procházka, Pavel; Vodičková, Ludmila; Švec, Jiří; Lipská, L.; Levý, M.; Schneiderová, M.; Liška, V.; Holubec, L.; Kumar, R.; Souček, P.; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodička, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 21 (2012), s. 5878-5887. ISSN 1078-0432 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/1585; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/10/1286; GA MZd NT12025 Grant ostatní: UICC(XE) ICR/11/068/2011; EEA- research fund:(NO) B/CZ0046/40031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : DNA repair capacity * DNA repair gene expression * methylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.837, year: 2012

  5. Nucleotide excision repair in the test tube.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe eukaryotic nucleotide excision-repair pathway has been reconstituted in vitro, an achievement that should hasten the full enzymological characterization of this highly complex DNA-repair pathway.

  6. DNA excision repair in human cells treated with ultraviolet radiation and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene 5,6-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excision repair was measured in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum group C cells treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene 5,6-oxide and with ultraviolet radiation by the techniques of unscheduled DNA synthesis, repair replication, a modification of bromodeoxyuridine photolysis employing the dye Hoechst 33258 and 365 nm radiation, and endonuclease-sensitive sites assay. Radioautography and repair replication showed that in normal cells the magnitude of repair after a saturation dose of the epoxide (approx. 10 μM) to be 0.1-0.2 that after a saturating ultraviolet dose (20 J/m2 at 254), though survival data showed that both doses gave nearly similar killings. Repair was of the long-patch type and repair kinetics after the epoxide treatment were similar to ultraviolet. After a combined treatment with both agents, unscheduled synthesis in normal cells was more than additive, although, considering the experimental errors, these data and those of repair replication are consistent with additivity. The epoxide did not inhibit loss of sites sensitive to the ultraviolet endonuclease. However, after a combined treatment to xeroderma pigmentosum cells there was appreciably less unscheduled synthesis than for the sum of both treatments and the epoxide inhibited the loss of nuclease-sensitive sites. (Auth.)

  7. Nucleotide excision repair deficiency increases levels of acrolein-derived cyclic DNA adduct and sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by docosahexaenoic acid and acrolein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jishen; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Xuan, Zhuoli; Dyba, Marcin; Fu, Ying; Sen, Supti; Berry, Deborah; Creswell, Karen; Hu, Jiaxi; Roy, Rabindra; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2016-07-01

    The acrolein derived cyclic 1,N(2)-propanodeoxyguanosine adduct (Acr-dG), formed primarily from ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) under oxidative conditions, while proven to be mutagenic, is potentially involved in DHA-induced apoptosis. The latter may contribute to the chemopreventive effects of DHA. Previous studies have shown that the levels of Acr-dG are correlated with apoptosis induction in HT29 cells treated with DHA. Because Acr-dG is shown to be repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, to further investigate the role of Acr-dG in apoptosis, in this study, NER-deficient XPA and its isogenic NER-proficient XAN1 cells were treated with DHA. The Acr-dG levels and apoptosis were sharply increased in XPA cells, but not in XAN1 cells when treated with 125μM of DHA. Because DHA can induce formation of various DNA damage, to specifically investigate the role of Acr-dG in apoptosis induction, we treated XPA knockdown HCT116+ch3 cells with acrolein. The levels of both Acr-dG and apoptosis induction increased significantly in the XPA knockdown cells. These results clearly demonstrate that NER deficiency induces higher levels of Acr-dG in cells treated with DHA or acrolein and sensitizes cells to undergo apoptosis in a correlative manner. Collectively, these results support that Acr-dG, a ubiquitously formed mutagenic oxidative DNA adduct, plays a role in DHA-induced apoptosis and suggest that it could serve as a biomarker for the cancer preventive effects of DHA. PMID:27036235

  8. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications. PMID:26614075

  9. Variation within 3' UTRs of base excision repair genes and response to therapy in colorectal cancer patients: a potential modulation of microRNAs binding.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pardini, B.; Rosa, F.; Barone, E.; Di Gaetano, C.; Slyšková, Jana; Novotný, J.; Levý, M.; Garritano, S.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Buchler, T.; Gemignani, F.; Landi, S.; Vodička, Pavel; Naccarati, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 21 (2013), s. 6044-6056. ISSN 1078-0432 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/1286; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1585 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : colorectal cancer * base excision repair * survival Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.193, year: 2013

  10. The Mutyh base excision repair gene influences the inflammatory response in a mouse model of ulcerative colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Casorelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Mutyh DNA glycosylase is involved in the repair of oxidized DNA bases. Mutations in the human MUTYH gene are responsible for colorectal cancer in familial adenomatous polyposis. Since defective DNA repair genes might contribute to the increased cancer risk associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, we compared the inflammatory response of wild-type and Mutyh(-/- mice to oxidative stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The severity of colitis, changes in expression of genes involved in DNA repair and inflammation, DNA 8-oxoguanine levels and microsatellite instability were analysed in colon of mice treated with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS. The Mutyh(-/- phenotype was associated with a significant accumulation of 8-oxoguanine in colon DNA of treated mice. A single DSS cycle induced severe acute ulcerative colitis in wild-type mice, whereas lesions were modest in Mutyh(-/- mice, and this was associated with moderate variations in the expression of several cytokines. Eight DSS cycles caused chronic colitis in both wild-type and Mutyh(-/- mice. Lymphoid hyperplasia and a significant reduction in Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells were observed only in Mutyh(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that, in this model of ulcerative colitis, Mutyh plays a major role in maintaining intestinal integrity by affecting the inflammatory response.

  11. Effects of environmental exposure: Interplay between helix-distorting and oxidative DNA lesions and their repair

    OpenAIRE

    Lakså, Solveig Margrethe B.

    2012-01-01

    DNA lesions are introduced in all living organisms every day, both via endogenous processes and by exposure to an array of DNA damaging agents. DNA lesions require repair for the sustenance of life. Base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) are DNA repair pathways involved in removal of oxidative DNA lesions and helix-distorting DNA lesions, respectively. Several studies suggest interactions or crosstalk between these pathways, involving overlapping activities for remova...

  12. C. elegans lifespan extension by osmotic stress requires FUdR, base excision repair, FOXO, and sirtuins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Edward N; Corkins, Mark E; Li, Jia-Cheng; Singh, Komudi; Parsons, Sadé; Tucey, Tim M; Sorkaç, Altar; Huang, Huiyan; Dimitriadi, Maria; Sinclair, David A; Hart, Anne C

    2016-03-01

    Moderate stress can increase lifespan by hormesis, a beneficial low-level induction of stress response pathways. 5'-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR) is commonly used to sterilize Caenorhabditis elegans in aging experiments. However, FUdR alters lifespan in some genotypes and induces resistance to thermal and proteotoxic stress. We report that hypertonic stress in combination with FUdR treatment or inhibition of the FUdR target thymidylate synthase, TYMS-1, extends C. elegans lifespan by up to 30%. By contrast, in the absence of FUdR, hypertonic stress decreases lifespan. Adaptation to hypertonic stress requires diminished Notch signaling and loss of Notch co-ligands leads to lifespan extension only in combination with FUdR. Either FUdR treatment or TYMS-1 loss induced resistance to acute hypertonic stress, anoxia, and thermal stress. FUdR treatment increased expression of DAF-16 FOXO and the osmolyte biosynthesis enzyme GPDH-1. FUdR-induced hypertonic stress resistance was partially dependent on sirtuins and base excision repair (BER) pathways, while FUdR-induced lifespan extension under hypertonic stress conditions requires DAF-16, BER, and sirtuin function. Combined, these results demonstrate that FUdR, through inhibition of TYMS-1, activates stress response pathways in somatic tissues to confer hormetic resistance to acute and chronic stress. C. elegans lifespan studies using FUdR may need re-interpretation in light of this work. PMID:26854551

  13. Use of metabolic inhibitors to investigate the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers and non-dimer DNA damages induced in human and ICR 2A frog cells by solar ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ICR 2A frog and normal human skin fibroblasts were exposed to either 5J/m2 of 254 nm UV or 50 kJ/m2 of the Mylar-filtered solar UV wavelengths produced by a fluorescent sunlamp. Following these approximately equitoxic treatments, cells were incubated in medium containing the DNA synthesis inhibitors hydroxyurea (HU) and 1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl cytosine (ara C0 for 0-20 min (human fibroblasts) or 0-4 h (frog cells) to accumulate DNA breaks resulting from enzymatic incision during excision repair. It was found that breaks were formed in human cells at about a 200-fold-higher rate compared with the ICR 2A cells indicating a relatively low capacity for excision repair in the frog cells. In addition, the rate of DNA break formation in solar UV-irradiated cells was only one-third of the level detected in 254 nm-irradiated cells. This result is consistent with the conclusion that the pathway(s) involved in the repair of solar UV-induced DNA damages differs from the repair of lesions produced in cells exposed to 254 nm UV. (author)

  14. Base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage and association with cancer and aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Schurman, Shepherd H; Harboe, Charlotte;

    2009-01-01

    Aging has been associated with damage accumulation in the genome and with increased cancer incidence. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced from endogenous sources, most notably the oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, and from exogenous sources, such as ionizing radiation. ROS attack D...

  15. Deletion of Ogg1 DNA glycosylase results in telomere base damage and length alteration in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    LU, Jian; Liu, Yie

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres consist of short guanine-rich repeats. Guanine can be oxidized to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG). 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (Ogg1) repairs these oxidative guanine lesions through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Here we show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ablation of Ogg1p leads to an increase in oxidized guanine level in telomeric DNA. The ogg1 deletion (ogg1Δ) strain shows telomere lengthening that is dependent...

  16. DNA-based applications in molecular electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Linko, Veikko

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is mainly focused on DNA molecules and especially on self-assembled DNA constructs and their potential applications in nanotechnology and molecular electronics. In the field of molecular electronics the conductivity of DNA is a crucial - yet open - question, and it is of great concern, since DNA is a very promising molecule in a context of bottom-up based nanodevices due to its superior selfassembly characteristics. A key tool in all the experiments presented in ...

  17. Formation of isodialuric acid lesion within DNA oligomers via one-electron oxidation of 5-hydroxyuracil: characterization, stability and excision repair

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Philippe; Gasparutto, Didier; Gambarelli, Serge; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Favier, Alain; Cadet, Jean

    2006-01-01

    5-Hydroxyuracil is a major oxidized nucleobase that can be generated by the action of •OH radical and one-electron oxidants. The latter modified base that exhibits a low ionization potential is highly susceptible to further degradation upon exposure to various oxidants. Emphasis was placed in thiswork on the formation and characterization of one-electron oxidation products of 5-hydroxyuracil within DNA fragments of defined sequence. For this purpose, 5-hydroxyuracil containing single- and dou...

  18. DNA-Based Kinship Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Maguire, Christopher; Woodward, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Relatedness between individuals and groups can be investigated using DNA markers. A child’s DNA profile is a combination of alleles passed down from the father and mother. This means that relationships can be investigated between alleged family members. DNA profiling is commonly used to test for potential paternity, parentage and sibship (whether people are related as brothers or sisters) relationships. In many forensic cases more complex relationships have to be considered.

  19. DNA-Based Applications in Nanobiotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Abu-Salah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological molecules such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA have shown great potential in fabrication and construction of nanostructures and devices. The very properties that make DNA so effective as genetic material also make it a very suitable molecule for programmed self-assembly. The use of DNA to assemble metals or semiconducting particles has been extended to construct metallic nanowires and functionalized nanotubes. This paper highlights some important aspects of conjugating the unique physical properties of dots or wires with the remarkable recognition capabilities of DNA which could lead to miniaturizing biological electronics and optical devices, including biosensors and probes. Attempts to use DNA-based nanocarriers for gene delivery are discussed. In addition, the ecological advantages and risks of nanotechnology including DNA-based nanobiotechnology are evaluated.

  20. DNA-based Artificial Nanostructures: Fabrication, Properties, and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Young; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2005-01-01

    Table of Content 1. Introduction 2. DNA fundamentals 3. Attachment of DNA to surface 4. Fabrication of nanostructures using DNA 4.1 Nanostructures of pure DNA 4.2 DNA-based assembly of metal nanoparticles 4.3 Construction of semiconductor particle arrays using DNA 4.4 DNA-directed nanowires 4.5 DNA-functionalized carbon nanotubes 4.6 Field-transistor based on DNA 4.7 Nanofabrication using artificial DNA 5. DNA-based nanostructures as biosensors 6. Properties of DNA-linked gold nanoparticles 6...

  1. Xeroderma pigmentosum, DNA repair and carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are reviewed: Symptoms of xeroderma pigmentosum; xeroderma pigmentosum as a defect in the biochemistry of repair of radiation damage; major classes of DNA damage and repair mechanisms; excision repair in relation to biochemical steps and the XP defect; sensitivity of xeroderma pigmentosum cells; host-cell reactivation of UV-damaged viruses; excision of pyrimidine dimers from human cells; formation and sealing of single strand breaks during dimer excision; insertion of new bases to repair DNA; and DNA repair, carcinogens, and carcinogenesis

  2. Selective enzymatic cleavage and labeling for sensitive capillary electrophoresis laser-induced fluorescence analysis of oxidized DNA bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiping; Wang, Hailin

    2015-08-01

    Oxidatively generated DNA damage is considered to be a significant contributing factor to cancer, aging, and age-related human diseases. It is important to detect oxidatively generated DNA damage to understand and clinically diagnosis diseases caused by oxidative damage. In this study, using selective enzymatic cleavage and quantum dot (QD) labeling, we developed a novel capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence method for the sensitive detection of oxidized DNA bases. First, oxidized DNA bases are recognized and removed by one DNA base excision repair glycosylase, leaving apurinic and apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) at the oxidized positions. The AP sites are further excised by the AP nicking activity of the chosen glycosylase, generating a nucleotide gap with 5'- and 3'- phosphate groups. After dephosphorylation with one alkaline phosphatase, a biotinylated ddNTP is introduced into the nucleotide space within the DNA strand by DNA polymerase I. The biotin-tagged DNA is further labeled with a QD-streptavidin conjugate via non-covalent interactions. The DNA-bound QD is well-separated from excess DNA-unbound QD by highly efficient capillary electrophoresis and is sensitively detected by online coupled laser-induced fluorescence analysis. Using this method, we can assess the trace levels of oxidized DNA bases induced by the Fenton reaction and UV irradiation. Interestingly, the use of the formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) protein and endonuclease VIII enables the detection of oxidized purine and pyrimidine bases, respectively. Using the synthesized standard DNA, the approach has low limits of detection of 1.1×10(-19)mol in mass and 2.9pM in concentration. PMID:26105778

  3. Global-genome Nucleotide Excision Repair Controlled by Ubiquitin/Sumo Modifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eRuethemann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Global-genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER prevents genome instability by excising a wide range of structurally unrelated DNA base adducts and crosslinks induced by chemical carcinogens, ultraviolet (UV radiation or intracellular metabolic by-products. As a versatile damage sensor, xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC protein initiates this generic defense reaction by locating the damage and recruiting the subunits of a large lesion demarcation complex that, in turn, triggers the excision of aberrant DNA by endonucleases. In the very special case of a DNA repair response to UV radiation, the function of this XPC initiator is tightly controlled by the dual action of cullin-type CRL4DDB2 and sumo-targeted RNF111 ubiquitin ligases. This twofold protein ubiquitination system promotes GG-NER reactions by spatially and temporally regulating the interaction of XPC protein with damaged DNA across the nucleosome landscape of chromatin. In the absence of either CRL4DDB2 or RNF111, the DNA excision repair of UV lesions is inefficient, indicating that these two ubiquitin ligases play a critical role in mitigating the adverse biological effects of UV light in the exposed skin.

  4. Global-genome Nucleotide Excision Repair Controlled by Ubiquitin/Sumo Modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüthemann, Peter; Balbo Pogliano, Chiara; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2016-01-01

    Global-genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) prevents genome instability by excising a wide range of different DNA base adducts and crosslinks induced by chemical carcinogens, ultraviolet (UV) light or intracellular side products of metabolism. As a versatile damage sensor, xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein initiates this generic defense reaction by locating the damage and recruiting the subunits of a large lesion demarcation complex that, in turn, triggers the excision of aberrant DNA by endonucleases. In the very special case of a DNA repair response to UV radiation, the function of this XPC initiator is tightly controlled by the dual action of cullin-type CRL4(DDB2) and sumo-targeted RNF111 ubiquitin ligases. This twofold protein ubiquitination system promotes GG-NER reactions by spatially and temporally regulating the interaction of XPC protein with damaged DNA across the nucleosome landscape of chromatin. In the absence of either CRL4(DDB2) or RNF111, the DNA excision repair of UV lesions is inefficient, indicating that these two ubiquitin ligases play a critical role in mitigating the adverse biological effects of UV light in the exposed skin. PMID:27200078

  5. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Hannes Lans; Wim Vermeulen

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays an essential role in many organisms across life domains to preserve and faithfully transmit DNA to the next generation. In humans, NER is essential to prevent DNA damage-induced mutation accumulation and cell death leading to cancer and aging. NER is a versatile DNA repair pathway that repairs many types of DNA damage which distort the DNA helix, such as those induced by solar UV light. A detailed molecular model of the NER pathway has emerged from in vi...

  6. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes, Smoking, and Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Robert R McWilliams; William R Bamlet; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; de ANDRADE, MARIZA; Lisa A Boardman; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2008-01-01

    Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are vital responses to multiple types of DNA damage, including damage from tobacco exposure. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in these pathways may affect DNA repair capacity and therefore influence risk for cancer development. We performed a clinic-based, case-control study comprising 481 consecutive patients with confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 625 healthy controls. Allele and genotype frequencies for 16 SNPs in DNA repair gen...

  7. QPSO-based adaptive DNA computing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakose, Mehmet; Cigdem, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) computing that is a new computation model based on DNA molecules for information storage has been increasingly used for optimization and data analysis in recent years. However, DNA computing algorithm has some limitations in terms of convergence speed, adaptability, and effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach for improvement of DNA computing is proposed. This new approach aims to perform DNA computing algorithm with adaptive parameters towards the desired goal using quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO). Some contributions provided by the proposed QPSO based on adaptive DNA computing algorithm are as follows: (1) parameters of population size, crossover rate, maximum number of operations, enzyme and virus mutation rate, and fitness function of DNA computing algorithm are simultaneously tuned for adaptive process, (2) adaptive algorithm is performed using QPSO algorithm for goal-driven progress, faster operation, and flexibility in data, and (3) numerical realization of DNA computing algorithm with proposed approach is implemented in system identification. Two experiments with different systems were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach with comparative results. Experimental results obtained with Matlab and FPGA demonstrate ability to provide effective optimization, considerable convergence speed, and high accuracy according to DNA computing algorithm. PMID:23935409

  8. QPSO-Based Adaptive DNA Computing Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karakose

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid computing that is a new computation model based on DNA molecules for information storage has been increasingly used for optimization and data analysis in recent years. However, DNA computing algorithm has some limitations in terms of convergence speed, adaptability, and effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach for improvement of DNA computing is proposed. This new approach aims to perform DNA computing algorithm with adaptive parameters towards the desired goal using quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO. Some contributions provided by the proposed QPSO based on adaptive DNA computing algorithm are as follows: (1 parameters of population size, crossover rate, maximum number of operations, enzyme and virus mutation rate, and fitness function of DNA computing algorithm are simultaneously tuned for adaptive process, (2 adaptive algorithm is performed using QPSO algorithm for goal-driven progress, faster operation, and flexibility in data, and (3 numerical realization of DNA computing algorithm with proposed approach is implemented in system identification. Two experiments with different systems were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach with comparative results. Experimental results obtained with Matlab and FPGA demonstrate ability to provide effective optimization, considerable convergence speed, and high accuracy according to DNA computing algorithm.

  9. The Nucleotide Excision Repair System of Borrelia burgdorferi Is the Sole Pathway Involved in Repair of DNA Damage by UV Light

    OpenAIRE

    Hardy, Pierre-Olivier; Chaconas, George

    2013-01-01

    To survive and avoid accumulation of mutations caused by DNA damage, the genomes of prokaryotes encode a variety of DNA repair pathways most well characterized in Escherichia coli. Some of these are required for the infectivity of various pathogens. In this study, the importance of 25 DNA repair/recombination genes for Borrelia burgdorferi survival to UV-induced DNA damage was assessed. In contrast to E. coli, where 15 of these genes have an effect on survival of UV irradiation, disruption of...

  10. DNA Coding Based Knowledge Discovery Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ji-yun; GENG Zhao-feng; SHAO Shi-huang

    2002-01-01

    A novel DNA coding based knowledge discovery algorithm was proposed, an example which verified its validity was given. It is proved that this algorithm can discover new simplified rules from the original rule set efficiently.

  11. The DNA-based human karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayall, B H; Carrano, A V; Moore, D H; Ashworth, L K; Bennett, D E; Mendelsohn, M L

    1984-07-01

    Image cytometry and computer analysis are used to determine the relative DNA content and the DNA-based centromeric index of the 24 chromosomes of the human karyotype. A two-step procedure is used. Chromosomes of cells in metaphase first are stained with quinacrine and identified visually by their fluorescent Q-band patterns. They then are stained for DNA using gallocyanin-chrome alum. The chromosome images are scanned and recorded as digital values of optical density by an CYDAC image cytometric microscope system, CYDAC. The digital images are processed by computer to measure for each chromosome the relative DNA stain contents of the whole chromosome and of the p and q arms and the DNA-based centromeric index. About ten cells are analyzed for each of the donors, who are phenotypically normal men and women. The chromosome measurements are pooled by chromosome type for each donor and are compared among donors. The means of the chromosome measurements give the DNA-based human karyotype. Analysis of the DNA-based data shows that some chromosomes or portions of chromosomes vary significantly among donors. These variants do not correlate with detectable morphologic polymorphisms, such as Q- or C-band variants; thus they represent new and otherwise undetectable chromosome polymorphisms whose genetic basis and clinical significance are yet to be determined. PMID:6205836

  12. DNA Cryptography Based on Symmetric Key Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tausif Anwar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA cryptography is a technology of bio science to encrypt large message in compact volume. Now a day, researchers are going to research in the field of secure data transmission. Hiding the encrypted message is important part of Cryptography. Hidden message is in the form of DNA sequence, image, audio and video, which is used to prevent important data from the intruders. In this paper, a new cryptography technique is proposed using Symmetric Key Exchange, one-time pad scheme and DNA hybridization to minimize time complexity.XOR operation with OTP DNA sequence is used as encryption technique based on DNA cryptography. Symmetric Key Exchange is presenting a secure key generation scheme. This method is very efficient in encrypting, hiding, transmitting and preventing powerful attacks.

  13. DNA-Based Enzyme Reactors and Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veikko Linko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, the possibility to create custom biocompatible nanoshapes using DNA as a building material has rapidly emerged. Further, these rationally designed DNA structures could be exploited in positioning pivotal molecules, such as enzymes, with nanometer-level precision. This feature could be used in the fabrication of artificial biochemical machinery that is able to mimic the complex reactions found in living cells. Currently, DNA-enzyme hybrids can be used to control (multi-enzyme cascade reactions and to regulate the enzyme functions and the reaction pathways. Moreover, sophisticated DNA structures can be utilized in encapsulating active enzymes and delivering the molecular cargo into cells. In this review, we focus on the latest enzyme systems based on novel DNA nanostructures: enzyme reactors, regulatory devices and carriers that can find uses in various biotechnological and nanomedical applications.

  14. DNA Sequence Optimization Based on Continuous Particle Swarm Optimization for Reliable DNA Computing and DNA Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Khalid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In DNA based computation and DNA nanotechnology, the design of good DNA sequences has turned out to be an essential problem and one of the most practical and important research topics. Basically, the DNA sequence design problem is a multi-objective problem and it can be evaluated using four objective functions, namely, Hmeasure, similarity, continuity and hairpin. Approach: There are several ways to solve multi-objective problem, however, in order to evaluate the correctness of PSO algorithm in DNA sequence design, this problem is converted into single objective problem. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO is proposed to minimize the objective in the problem, subjected to two constraints: melting temperature and GCcontent. A model is developed to present the DNA sequence design based on PSO computation. Results: Based on experiments and researches done, 20 particles are used in the implementation of the optimization process, where the average values and the standard deviation for 100 runs are shown along with comparison to other existing methods. Conclusion: The results achieve verified that PSO can suitably solves the DNA sequence design problem using the proposed method and model, comparatively better than other approaches.

  15. Molecular analysis of plasmid DNA repair within ultraviolet-irradiated Escherichia coli. I. T4 endonuclease V-initiated excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process by which DNA-interactive proteins locate specific sequences or target sites on cellular DNA within Escherichia coli is a poorly understood phenomenon. In this study, we present the first direct in vivo analysis of the interaction of a DNA repair enzyme, T4 endonuclease V, and its substrate, pyrimidine dimer-containing plasmid DNA, within UV-irradiated E. coli. A pyrimidine dimer represents a small target site within large domains of DNA. There are two possible paradigms by which endonuclease V could locate these small target sites: a processive mechanism in which the enzyme scans DNA for dimer sites or a distributive process in which dimers are located by random three-dimensional diffusion. In order to discriminate between these two possibilities in E. coli, an in vivo DNA repair assay was developed to study the kinetics of plasmid DNA repair and the dimer frequency (i.e. the number of dimer sites on a given plasmid molecule) in plasmid DNA as a function of time during repair. Our results demonstrate that the overall process of plasmid DNA repair initiated by T4 endonuclease V (expressed from a recombinant plasmid within repair-deficient E. coli) occurs by a processive mechanism. Furthermore, by reducing the temperature of the repair incubation, the endonuclease V-catalyzed incision step has been effectively decoupled from the subsequent steps including repair patch synthesis, ligation, and supercoiling. By this manipulation, it was determined that the overall processive mechanism is composed of two phases: a rapid processive endonuclease V-catalyzed incision reaction, followed by a slower processive mechanism, the ultimate product of which is the dimer-free supercoiled plasmid molecule

  16. Neil3-dependent base excision repair regulates lipid metabolism and prevents atherosclerosis in Apoe-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarpengland, Tonje; Holm, Sverre; Scheffler, Katja;

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative DNA damage accumulates in atherosclerosis. Recently, we showed that a genetic variant in the human DNA repair enzyme NEIL3 was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction. Here, we explored the role of Neil3/NEIL3 in atherogenesis by both cl...

  17. Linking active DNA demethylation by Thymine DNA Glycosylase with epigenetic regulation of gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Wirz, Annika

    2014-01-01

    The correct regulation of epigenetic modifications is crucial for cell plasticity and the establishment of cell identity. The underlying molecular mechanisms are not clear, but a role for DNA repair proteins has been implicated in this context, the investigation of which was the overall aim of my PhD thesis. The Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG) was described to excise the deamination products of cytosine (C) and 5-methylcytosine (5-mC), thereby initiating base excision repair (BER; Nedderman...

  18. Histone displacement during nucleotide excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinant, C.; Bartek, J.; Bekker-Jensen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important DNA repair mechanism required for cellular resistance against UV light and toxic chemicals such as those found in tobacco smoke. In living cells, NER efficiently detects and removes DNA lesions within the large nuclear macromolecular complex called......, thus allowing repair proteins to efficiently access DNA. On the other hand, after completion of the repair, the chromatin must be returned to its previous undamaged state. Chromatin remodeling can refer to three separate but interconnected processes, histone post-translational modifications, insertion...

  19. Reduced nucleotide excision repair and GSTM1-null genotypes influence anti-B(a)PDE-DNA adduct levels in mononuclear white blood cells of highly PAH-exposed coke oven workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofia Pavanello; Alessandra Pulliero; Ewa Siwinska; Danuta Mielzynska; Erminio Clonfero [University of Padova, Padova (Italy). Occupational Health Section, Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health

    2005-07-01

    It is important to identify the potential genetic-susceptible factors that are able to modulate individual responses to exposure to carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In the present study we evaluated the influence of four polymorphisms of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes and that of glutathione S-transferase {mu}1 (GSTM1-active or -null) on benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide (B(a)PDE)-DNA adduct levels from the lympho-monocyte fraction (LMF) of highly PAH benzo(a)pyrene -exposed Polish coke oven workers with individual urinary post-shift excretion of 1-pyrenol exceeding the proposed biological exposure index. The bulky {+-}-r-7,t-8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrene (anti-B(a)PDE)-DNA adduct levels were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography fluorescence analysis and genotypes by polymerase chain reaction. We found that workers with the low DNA repair capacity of XPC-PAT+/+ and XPA-A23A genotypes had increased anti-B(a)PDE-DNA adduct levels, DNA adducts were also raised in workers without GSTM1 activity. Workers with unfavourable XPC-PAT+/+ and XPA-A23A NER genotypes, alone or combined with GSTM1-null genotype were in the tertile with the highest adduct level. The increase in anti-B(a)PDE-DNA adduct levels was related in a multiple linear regression analysis to PAH exposure lack of GSTM1 activity and to low DNA repair capacity of the XPC-PAT+/+ genotype. The influence of the XPA-A23A genotype was not evident in this statistical analysis, and no associations with XPD polymorphisms, dietary habits or tobacco smoking were found. The modulation of anti-B(a)PDE-DNA adducts in the LMF by GSTM1-null and some low-activity NER genotypes may be considered as a potential genetic susceptibility factor capable of modulating individual responses to PAH genotoxic exposure and the consequent risk of cancer in coke oven workers.

  20. DNA-based control of protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, W; Janssen, B M G; Merkx, M

    2016-03-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  1. PCR-Based Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number, Mitochondrial DNA Damage, and Nuclear DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P; Rooney, John P; Ryde, Ian T; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role that DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit, we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  2. Active destabilization of base pairs by a DNA glycosylase wedge initiates damage recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Bergonzo, Christina; Campbell, Arthur J.; Li, Haoquan; Mechetin, Grigory V.; de los Santos, Carlos; Grollman, Arthur P.; Fedorova, Olga S.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Simmerling, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) excises 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) from DNA but ignores normal guanine. We combined molecular dynamics simulation and stopped-flow kinetics with fluorescence detection to track the events in the recognition of oxoG by Fpg and its mutants with a key phenylalanine residue, which intercalates next to the damaged base, changed to either alanine (F110A) or fluorescent reporter tryptophan (F110W). Guanine was sampled by Fpg, as evident from the F110W stopped-flow traces, but less extensively than oxoG. The wedgeless F110A enzyme could bend DNA but failed to proceed further in oxoG recognition. Modeling of the base eversion with energy decomposition suggested that the wedge destabilizes the intrahelical base primarily through buckling both surrounding base pairs. Replacement of oxoG with abasic (AP) site rescued the activity, and calculations suggested that wedge insertion is not required for AP site destabilization and eversion. Our results suggest that Fpg, and possibly other DNA glycosylases, convert part of the binding energy into active destabilization of their substrates, using the energy differences between normal and damaged bases for fast substrate discrimination. PMID:25520195

  3. Communication: Electron ionization of DNA bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M A; Krishnakumar, E

    2016-04-28

    No reliable experimental data exist for the partial and total electron ionization cross sections for DNA bases, which are very crucial for modeling radiation damage in genetic material of living cell. We have measured a complete set of absolute partial electron ionization cross sections up to 500 eV for DNA bases for the first time by using the relative flow technique. These partial cross sections are summed to obtain total ion cross sections for all the four bases and are compared with the existing theoretical calculations and the only set of measured absolute cross sections. Our measurements clearly resolve the existing discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental results, thereby providing for the first time reliable numbers for partial and total ion cross sections for these molecules. The results on fragmentation analysis of adenine supports the theory of its formation in space. PMID:27131520

  4. A Gold Nanoparticle Based Approach for Screening Triplex DNA Binders

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Min Su; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K. R.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2006-01-01

    Nanoparticle assemblies interconnected with DNA triple helixes can be used to colorimetrically screen for triplex DNA binding molecules and simultaneously determine their relative binding affinities based on melting temperatures. Nanoparticles assemble only when DNA triple helixes form between DNA from two different particles and a third strand of free DNA. In addition, the triple helix structure is unstable at room temperature and only forms in the presence of triplex DNA binding molecules w...

  5. DNA-mediated charge transport for DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Boon, Elizabeth M; Livingston, Alison L.; Chmiel, Nikolas H.; David, Sheila S.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2003-01-01

    MutY, like many DNA base excision repair enzymes, contains a [4Fe4S](2+) cluster of undetermined function. Electrochemical studies of MutY bound to a DNA-modified gold electrode demonstrate that the [4Fe4S] cluster of MutY can be accessed in a DNA-mediated redox reaction. Although not detectable without DNA, the redox potential of DNA-bound MutY is approximate to275 mV versus NHE, which is characteristic of HiPiP iron proteins. Binding to DNA is thus associated with a change in [4Fe4S](3+/2+)...

  6. Relationship inference based on DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Navreet; Bouzga, Mariam M; Dørum, Guro; Egeland, Thore

    2016-03-01

    Today, there exists a number of tools for solving kinship cases. But what happens when information comes from a mixture? DNA mixtures are in general rarely seen in kinship cases, but in a case presented to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, sample DNA was obtained after a rape case that resulted in an unwanted pregnancy and abortion. The only available DNA from the fetus came in form of a mixture with the mother, and it was of interest to find the father of the fetus. The mother (the victim), however, refused to give her reference data and so commonly used methods for paternity testing were no longer applicable. As this case illustrates, kinship cases involving mixtures and missing reference profiles do occur and make the use of existing methods rather inconvenient. We here present statistical methods that may handle general relationship inference based on DNA mixtures. The basic idea is that likelihood calculations for mixtures can be decomposed into a series of kinship problems. This formulation of the problem facilitates the use of kinship software. We present the freely available R package relMix which extends on the R version of Familias. Complicating factors like mutations, silent alleles, and θ-correction are then easily handled for quite general family relationships, and are included in the statistical methods we develop in this paper. The methods and their implementations are exemplified on the data from the rape case. PMID:26541994

  7. DNA based computing for understanding complex shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, A M M Sharif; D'Addona, Doriana; Arai, Nobuyuki

    2014-03-01

    This study deals with a computing method called DNA based computing (DBC) that takes inspiration from the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology. The proposed DBC uses a set of user-defined rules to create a DNA-like sequence from a given piece of problem-relevant information (e.g., image data) in a dry-media (i.e., in an ordinary computer). It then uses another set of user-defined rules to create an mRNA-like sequence from the DNA. Finally, it uses the genetic code to translate the mRNA (or directly the DNA) to a protein-like sequence (a sequence of amino acids). The informational characteristics of the protein (entropy, absence, presence, abundance of some selected amino acids, and relationships among their likelihoods) can be used to solve problems (e.g., to understand complex shapes from their image data). Two case studies ((1) fractal geometry generated shape of a fern-leaf and (2) machining experiment generated shape of the worn-zones of a cutting tool) are presented elucidating the shape understanding ability of the proposed DBC in the presence of a great deal of variability in the image data of the respective shapes. The implication of the proposed DBC from the context of Internet-aided manufacturing system is also described. Further study can be carried out in solving other complex computational problems by using the proposed DBC and its derivatives. PMID:24447435

  8. Dark repair of UV-induced lesions in bacterial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of photochemical reaction resulting in the formation of pyrimidine base dimers in DNA is briefly described. Many bacterial species are able to excise the fragments of singlestranded DNA containing pyrimidine dimers, and to rebuild the lacking oligonucleotide fragment. Enzyme system acting in the restitution of damaged DNA to its native form is reviewed. (author)

  9. A DNA Structure-Based Bionic Wavelet Transform and Its Application to DNA Sequence Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Chen; Yuan-Ting Zhang

    2003-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis is of great significance for increasing our understanding of genomic functions. An important task facing us is the exploration of hidden structural information stored in the DNA sequence. This paper introduces a DNA structure-based adaptive wavelet transform (WT) – the bionic wavelet transform (BWT) – for DNA sequence analysis. The symbolic DNA sequence can be separated into four channels of indicator sequences. An adaptive symbol-to-number mapping, determined from the s...

  10. DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I in the initiation of plasmid DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Sweasy, J B; Chen, M.; Loeb, L A

    1995-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mammalian DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli in DNA replication and in base excision repair. We have now obtained genetic evidence suggesting that DNA polymerase beta can substitute for E. coli DNA polymerase I in the initiation of replication of a plasmid containing a pMB1 origin of DNA replication. Specifically, we demonstrate that a plasmid with a pMB1 origin of replication can be maintained in an E. coli polA mutant ...

  11. Value of histopathologic analysis of subcutis excisions by general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verweij Wim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only around 60% of skin lesions excised by GPs are referred to a pathologist. Clinical diagnoses of skin excisions by GPs may not be very accurate. Subcutis excisions are rarely done by GPs, and there is hence little information in the literature on the histopathological yield of subcutis excisions by GPs with regard to malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the yield of histopathological investigation of a relatively large group of subcutis excisions by GPs, with special emphasis on discrepancies between clinical and histopathological diagnoses of malignancy. Methods We investigated a series of 90 subcutis excisions, which was derived from a database of consecutive GP submissions from the years 1999–2000 where in the same time period 4595 skin excisions were performed by the same group of GPs. This underlines the apparent reluctance of GPs to perform subcutis excisions. Results The final diagnosis was benign in 88 cases (97.8% and malignant in 2 cases (2.2%. Seven cases had no clinical diagnosis, all of which were benign. Of the 83 clinically benign cases, 81 (97.6% were indeed benign and 2 (2.4% were malignant: one Merkel cell carcinoma and one dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. The former was clinically thought to be a lipoma, and the latter a trichilemmal cyst. The dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans presented at the age of 27, and the Merkel cell carcinoma at the age of 60. Both were incompletely removed and required re-excision by a surgical oncologist. Conclusion Histopathological investigation of subcutis excisions by GPs yields unexpected and rare malignancies in about 2% of cases that may initially be excised inadequately. Based on these data, and because of the relatively rareness of these type of excisions, it could be argued that it may be worthwhile to have all subcutis excisions by GPs routinely investigated by histopathology.

  12. Characteristics of thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) chromatin in the cell-free reconstruction system. The normal-cell extract performed specific dimer excision from native chromatin and DNA isolated from 100 J/m2-irradiated cells. Such an excision in vitro was rapid and required high concentrations of extract. The extracts of XP group A, C and G cells were unable to excise from their own native-chromatin, but capable of excising from chromatin deprived of loosely bound nonhistone proteins with 0.35 M NaCl, as were from purified DNA. Thus, group A, C and G cells are most likely to be defective in the specific XP factors facilitating the excising activity under multicomponent regulation at the chromatin level. Further, either of group A, C and G extracts successfully complemented the native chromatin of the alternative groups. Uniquely, the XP group D extract excised dimers from native chromatin in the normal fashion under the condition. These results suggest that XP group A, C, D and G cells examined may not be defective in the dimer specific endonuclease and exonuclease per se. 19 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  13. DNA based arithmetic function: a half adder based on DNA strand displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Biomolecular programming utilizes the reactions and information stored in biological molecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, for computational purposes. DNA has proven itself an excellent candidate for building logic operating systems due to its highly predictable molecular behavior. In this work we designed and realized an XOR logic gate and an AND logic gate based on DNA strand displacement reactions. These logic gates utilize ssDNA as input and output signals. The XOR gate and the AND gate were used as building blocks for constructing a half adder logic circuit, which is a primary step in constructing a full adder, a basic arithmetic unit in computing. This work provides the field of DNA molecular programming with a potential universal arithmetic tool.Biomolecular programming utilizes the reactions and information stored in biological molecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, for computational purposes. DNA has proven itself an excellent candidate for building logic operating systems due to its highly predictable molecular behavior. In this work we designed and realized an XOR logic gate and an AND logic gate based on DNA strand displacement reactions. These logic gates utilize ssDNA as input and output signals. The XOR gate and the AND gate were used as building blocks for constructing a half adder logic circuit, which is a primary step in constructing a full adder, a basic arithmetic unit in computing. This work provides the field of DNA molecular programming with a potential universal arithmetic tool. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed descriptions of DNA logic gate design, materials and methods, and additional data analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08497k

  14. [Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells]. Progress report, [April 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The excision of radiation-induced lesions in DNA by a DNA repair enzyme complex, namely the UvrABC nuclease complex, has been investigated. Irradiated DNA was treated with the enzyme complex. DNA fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. The results showed that a number pyrimidine- and purine-derived lesions in DNA were excised by the UvrABC nuclease complex and that the enzyme complex does not act on radiation-induced DNA lesions as a glycosylase. This means that it does not excise individual base products, but it excises oligomers containing these lesions. A number of pyrimidine-derived lesions that were no substrates for other DNA repair enzymes investigated in our laboratory were substrates for the UvrABC nuclease complex.

  15. Yields of strand breaks and base lesions induced by soft X-rays in plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The yields of soft-X-ray-induced DNA damages have been measured by using closed-circular plasmid DNA. Several DNA solutions with three kinds of radical scavenger capacity and also fully hydrated DNA samples were irradiated to compare the contribution by indirect reaction of diffusible water radicals, such as OH., with those by direct action of secondary electrons. The yields of prompt single- (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) decrease with increasing scavenging capacity. The SSB yields for soft X-rays are approximately midway those between gamma-ray and ultrasoft X-ray data previously reported. Heat labile sites are observed only in the low scavenger condition. The yields of the base lesions revealed by post irradiation treatment with base excision repair enzymes showed a similar value for Nth and Fpg protein except in the hydrated sample. These results indicate that the direct effect of soft X-rays induces the damages with different efficiency from those by indirect effect. (authors)

  16. Polyethylene glycol derivatives of base and sequence specific DNA ligands: DNA interaction and application for base specific separation of DNA fragments by gel electrophoresis.

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Werner; Hattesohl, Iolanda; Schuetz, Hans-Jürgen; Meyer, Georg

    1981-01-01

    Various base pair specific DNA ligands comprising a phenyl phenazinium dye, a triphenylmethan dye and Hoechst 33258 were covalently bound to polyethylene glycol (PEG) via ester or ether bonds. The DNA interactions of the PEG derivatives formed were shown to exhibit the same base pair specificity as the parent compounds. Since the PEG chains thus bound to the DNA could be expected to increase drastically the frictional coefficient of the DNA, the PEG derivatives were used for base specific DNA...

  17. DNA & Protein detection based on microbead agglutination

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2012-06-06

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microparticles in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Agglutination-based tests are most often used to explore the antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for mode protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin two-component system, as well as a hybridization based two-component assay; however, as our work shows, two-component systems are prone to self-termination of the linking analyte and thus have a lower sensitivity. Three component systems have also been used with DNA hybridization, as in our work; however, their assay requires 48 hours for incubation, while our assay is performed in 5 minutes making it a real candidate for POC testing. We demonstrate three assays: a two-component biotin/streptavidin assay, a three-component hybridization assay using single stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules and a stepped three-component hybridization assay. The comparison of these three assays shows our simple stepped three-component agglutination assay to be rapid at room temperature and more sensitive than the two-component version by an order of magnitude. An agglutination assay was also performed in a PDMS microfluidic chip where agglutinated beads were trapped by filter columns for easy observation. We developed a rapid (5 minute) room temperature assay, which is based on microbead agglutination. Our three-component assay solves the linker self-termination issue allowing an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity over two–component assays. Our stepped version of the three-component assay solves the issue with probe site saturation thus enabling a wider range of detection. Detection of the agglutinated beads with the naked eye by trapping in microfluidic channels has been shown.

  18. Radiation-induced degradation of DNA bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douki, T.; Delatour, T.; Martini, R.; Cadet, J.

    1999-01-01

    Radio-induced degradation of DNA involves radical processes. A series of lesions among the major bases degradation products has been measured in isolated DNA exposed to gamma radiation in aerated aqueous solution. Degradation can be accounted for by the formation of hydroxyl radicals upon radiolysis of water (indirect effect). The four bases are degraded in high yield. Direct effect has been mimicked by photo-induced electron abstraction from the bases producing their radical cation. Quantification of the modified bases showed that guanine is the preferential target. This can be explained by its lower oxidation potential and charge transfer phenomena. La décomposition radio-induite de l'ADN fait intervenir des processus radicalaires. Une série de lésions choisies parmi les produits majeurs de dégradation des bases a été mesurée dans de l'ADN isolé exposé au rayonnement en solution aqueuse aérée. Les modifications sont alors dues aux radicaux hydroxyles produits par la radiolyse de l'eau (effet indirect) et les quatre bases sont efficacement dégradées. L'arrachement d'électrons aux bases par photosensibilisation pour produire leur radical cation, a été utilisé comme modèle de l'effet direct. La quantification des bases modifiées montre que la guanine est préférentiellement dégradée. Cette observation peut s'expliquer par le plus faible potentiel d'oxydation de cette base ainsi que par les phénomènes de transfert de charge vers les guanines.

  19. DNA based arithmetic function: a half adder based on DNA strand displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2016-02-14

    Biomolecular programming utilizes the reactions and information stored in biological molecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, for computational purposes. DNA has proven itself an excellent candidate for building logic operating systems due to its highly predictable molecular behavior. In this work we designed and realized an XOR logic gate and an AND logic gate based on DNA strand displacement reactions. These logic gates utilize ssDNA as input and output signals. The XOR gate and the AND gate were used as building blocks for constructing a half adder logic circuit, which is a primary step in constructing a full adder, a basic arithmetic unit in computing. This work provides the field of DNA molecular programming with a potential universal arithmetic tool. PMID:26814628

  20. [A Nobel Prize for DNA repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry recognizes the seminal contributions of three researchers who discovered the existence and the basic mechanisms of DNA repair: base excision repair, mismatch repair, and nucleotide excision repair. They have since been joined by many scientists elucidating diverse aspects of these complex mechanisms that now constitute a thriving research field with many applications, notably for understanding oncogenesis and devising more effective therapies. PMID:26850617

  1. Excited state dynamics of DNA bases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kleinermanns, K.; Nachtigallová, Dana; de Vries, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 2 (2013), s. 308-342. ISSN 0144-235X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/12/1318 Grant ostatní: National Science Foundation(US) CHE-0911564; NASA(US) NNX12AG77G; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SFB 663; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) KI 531-29 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA bases * nucleobases * excited state * dynamics * computations * gas phase * conical intersections Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.920, year: 2013

  2. DNA Polymorphism Among American Watermelon Cultivars Based on DNA Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    American watermelon heirlooms are diverse in their growth habits, fruit qualities and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Wide ranging DNA marker tools resolved a narrow molecular diversity among these collections. The current research explored additional insights such as extent of diversity a...

  3. Tissue-specific accelerated aging in nucleotide excision repair deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Laura J. Niedernhofer

    2008-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multi-step DNA repair mechanism that removes helix-distorting modified nucleotides from the genome. NER is divided into two subpathways depending on the location of DNA damage in the genome and how it is first detected. Global genome NER identifies and repairs DNA lesions throughout the genome. This subpathway of NER primarily protects against the accumulation of mutations in the genome. Transcription-coupled (TC) NER rapidly repairs lesions in the transc...

  4. Chloroethyinitrosourea-derived ethano cytosine and adenine adducts are substrates for escherichia coli glycosylases excising analogous etheno adducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guliaev, Anton B.; Singer, B.; Hang, Bo

    2004-05-05

    Exocyclic ethano DNA adducts are saturated etheno ring derivatives formed mainly by therapeutic chloroethylnitrosoureas (CNUs), which are also mutagenic and carcinogenic. In this work, we report that two of the ethano adducts, 3,N{sup 4}-ethanocytosine (EC) and 1,N{sup 6}-ethanoadenine (EA), are novel substrates for the Escherichia coli mismatch-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase (Mug) and 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA), respectively. It has been shown previously that Mug excises 3,N{sup 4}-ethenocytosine ({var_epsilon}C) and AlkA releases 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A). Using synthetic oligonucleotides containing a single ethano or etheno adduct, we found that both glycosylases had a {approx}20-fold lower excision activity toward EC or EA than that toward their structurally analogous {var_epsilon}C or {var_epsilon}A adduct. Both enzymes were capable of excising the ethano base paired with any of the four natural bases, but with varying efficiencies. The Mug activity toward EC could be stimulated by E. coli endonuclease IV and, more efficiently, by exonuclease III. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed similar structural features of the etheno and ethano derivatives when present in DNA duplexes. However, also as shown by MD, the stacking interaction between the EC base and Phe 30 in the Mug active site is reduced as compared to the {var_epsilon}C base, which could account for the lower EC activity observed in this study.

  5. Excision repair in MUT-mutants of Proteus mirabilis after UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of MUT-mutants of P.mirabilis to perform certain steps of excision repair after U.V.-irradiation is described. MUT-mutants introduce single-strand breaks in the DNA immediately after U.V.-irradiation, but their ability to excise pyrimidine dimers from the DNA is very diminished. Moreover, they are not able to accomplish the excision repair by rejoining of the single-strand breaks. The connection between the incomplete excision repair and the mutator phenotype of these mutants is discussed. (author)

  6. Functional redundancy between DNA ligases I and III in DNA replication in vertebrate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Bednar, Theresa; Wang, Minli; Paul, Katja; Mladenov, Emil; Bencsik-Theilen, Alena A.; Iliakis, George

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the three families of ATP-dependent DNA ligases are associated with specific functions in DNA metabolism. DNA ligase I (LigI) catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the replication fork and nucleotide excision repair (NER). DNA ligase IV (LigIV) mediates repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) via the canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The evolutionary younger DNA ligase III (LigIII) is restricted to higher eukaryotes and has been associated with base excision (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR). Here, using conditional knockout strategies for LIG3 and concomitant inactivation of the LIG1 and LIG4 genes, we show that in DT40 cells LigIII efficiently supports semi-conservative DNA replication. Our observations demonstrate a high functional versatility for the evolutionary new LigIII in DNA replication and mitochondrial metabolism, and suggest the presence of an alternative pathway for Okazaki fragment ligation. PMID:22127868

  7. Defective thymine dimer excision by cell-free extracts of xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crude extracts of normal human diploid fibroblasts and of human peripheral blood lymphocytes excise thymine dimers from purified ultraviolet-irradiated DNA, or from the DNA presumably present as chromatin in unfractionated cell-free preparations of cells that had been labeled with [3H]thymidine. Extracts of xeroderma pigmentosum cells from complementation groups A, C, and D also excise thymine dimers from purified DNA, but extracts of group A cells do not excise dimers from the DNA of radioactively labeled unfractionated cell-free preparations

  8. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...... base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby...

  9. Single-base mismatch detection based on charge transduction through DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, S O; Boon, E M; Barton, J K; Jackson, N M; Hill, M. G.

    1999-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sensors capable of detecting single-base mismatches are required for the routine screening of genetic mutations and disease. A new strategy for the electrochemical detection of single-base mismatches in DNA has been developed based upon charge transport through DNA films. Double-helical DNA films on gold surfaces have been prepared and used to detect DNA mismatches electrochemically. The signals obtained from redox-active intercalators bound to DNA-modified gold surfaces d...

  10. A DNA Structure-Based Bionic Wavelet Transform and Its Application to DNA Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence analysis is of great significance for increasing our understanding of genomic functions. An important task facing us is the exploration of hidden structural information stored in the DNA sequence. This paper introduces a DNA structure-based adaptive wavelet transform (WT – the bionic wavelet transform (BWT – for DNA sequence analysis. The symbolic DNA sequence can be separated into four channels of indicator sequences. An adaptive symbol-to-number mapping, determined from the structural feature of the DNA sequence, was introduced into WT. It can adjust the weight value of each channel to maximise the useful energy distribution of the whole BWT output. The performance of the proposed BWT was examined by analysing synthetic and real DNA sequences. Results show that BWT performs better than traditional WT in presenting greater energy distribution. This new BWT method should be useful for the detection of the latent structural features in future DNA sequence analysis.

  11. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, and double strand break genes as markers for response to radiotherapy in patients with Stage I to II head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes can influence response to radiotherapy. We analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in nine DNA repair genes in 108 patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNSCC) who had received radiotherapy only. Methods and Materials: From May 1993 to December 2004, patients with Stage I and II histopathologically confirmed HNSCC underwent radiotherapy. DNA was obtained from paraffin-embedded tissue, and SNP analysis was performed using a real-time polymerase chain reaction allelic discrimination TaqMan assay with minor modifications. Results: Patients were 101 men (93.5%) and 7 (6.5%) women, with a median age of 64 years (range, 40 to 89 years). Of the patients, 76 (70.4%) patients were Stage I and 32 (29.6%) were Stage II. The XPF/ERCC1 SNP at codon 259 and XPG/ERCC5 at codon 46 emerged as significant predictors of progression (p 0.00005 and 0.049, respectively) and survival (p = 0.0089 and 0.0066, respectively). Similarly, when variant alleles of XPF/ERCC1, XPG/ERCC5 and XPA were examined in combination, a greater number of variant alleles was associated with shorter time to progression (p = 0.0003) and survival (p 0.0002). Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms in XPF/ERCC1, XPG/ERCC5, and XPA may significantly influence response to radiotherapy; large studies are warranted to confirm their role in HNSCC

  12. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Lans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER plays an essential role in many organisms across life domains to preserve and faithfully transmit DNA to the next generation. In humans, NER is essential to prevent DNA damage-induced mutation accumulation and cell death leading to cancer and aging. NER is a versatile DNA repair pathway that repairs many types of DNA damage which distort the DNA helix, such as those induced by solar UV light. A detailed molecular model of the NER pathway has emerged from in vitro and live cell experiments, particularly using model systems such as bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cell cultures. In recent years, the versatility of the nematode C. elegans to study DNA damage response (DDR mechanisms including NER has become increasingly clear. In particular, C. elegans seems to be a convenient tool to study NER during the UV response in vivo, to analyze this process in the context of a developing and multicellular organism, and to perform genetic screening. Here, we will discuss current knowledge gained from the use of C. elegans to study NER and the response to UV-induced DNA damage.

  13. Structural basis of HIV-1 resistance to AZT by excision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Xiongying; Das, Kalyan; Han, Qianwei; Bauman, Joseph D.; Clark, Jr., Arthur D.; Hou, Xiaorong; Frenkel, Yulia V.; Gaffney, Barbara L.; Jones, Roger A.; Boyer, Paul L.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Arnold, Eddy (Rutgers); (Clark); (NCI)

    2011-11-23

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) develops resistance to 3'-azido-2',3'-deoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine) by acquiring mutations in reverse transcriptase that enhance the ATP-mediated excision of AZT monophosphate from the 3' end of the primer. The excision reaction occurs at the dNTP-binding site, uses ATP as a pyrophosphate donor, unblocks the primer terminus and allows reverse transcriptase to continue viral DNA synthesis. The excision product is AZT adenosine dinucleoside tetraphosphate (AZTppppA). We determined five crystal structures: wild-type reverse transcriptase-double-stranded DNA (RT-dsDNA)-AZTppppA; AZT-resistant (AZTr; M41L D67N K70R T215Y K219Q) RT-dsDNA-AZTppppA; AZTr RT-dsDNA terminated with AZT at dNTP- and primer-binding sites; and AZTr apo reverse transcriptase. The AMP part of AZTppppA bound differently to wild-type and AZTr reverse transcriptases, whereas the AZT triphosphate part bound the two enzymes similarly. Thus, the resistance mutations create a high-affinity ATP-binding site. The structure of the site provides an opportunity to design inhibitors of AZT-monophosphate excision.

  14. DNA Cryptography Based on Symmetric Key Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Tausif Anwar; Abhishek Kumar; Sanchita Paul

    2015-01-01

    DNA cryptography is a technology of bio science to encrypt large message in compact volume. Now a day, researchers are going to research in the field of secure data transmission. Hiding the encrypted message is important part of Cryptography. Hidden message is in the form of DNA sequence, image, audio and video, which is used to prevent important data from the intruders. In this paper, a new cryptography technique is proposed using Symmetric Key Exchange, one-time pad scheme and DNA hyb...

  15. Charge Transport in DNA-Based Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Porath, Danny; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Di Felice, Rosa

    2004-01-01

    Charge migration along DNA molecules has attracted scientific interest for over half a century. Reports on possible high rates of charge transfer between donor and acceptor through the DNA, obtained in the last decade from solution chemistry experiments on large numbers of molecules, triggered a series of direct electrical transport measurements through DNA single molecules, bundles and networks. These measurements are reviewed and presented here. From these experiments we conclude that elect...

  16. Charge transport in DNA-based devices

    OpenAIRE

    Porath, Danny; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Felice, Rosa di

    2004-01-01

    Charge migration along DNA molecules attracted scientific interest for over half a century. Reports on possible high rates of charge transfer between donor and acceptor through the DNA, obtained in the last decade from solution chemistry experiments on large numbers of molecules, triggered a series of direct electrical transport measurements through DNA single molecules, bundles and networks. These measurements are reviewed and presented here. From these experiments we conclude that electrica...

  17. ATP–stimulated DNA–mediated Redox Signaling by XPD, a DNA Repair and Transcription Helicase

    OpenAIRE

    Mui, Timothy P.; Fuss, Jill O.; Ishida, Justin P.; Tainer, John A.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-01-01

    Using DNA-modified electrodes, we show DNA-mediated signaling by XPD, a helicase that contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster and is critical for nucleotide excision repair and transcription. The DNA-mediated redox signal resembles that of base excision repair proteins, with a DNA-bound redox potential of ~80 mV versus NHE. Significantly, this signal increases with ATP hydrolysis. Moreover, the redox signal is substrate-dependent, reports on the DNA conformational changes associated with enzymatic functi...

  18. A novel bio-sensor based on DNA strand displacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Shi

    Full Text Available DNA strand displacement technology performs well in sensing and programming DNA segments. In this work, we construct DNA molecular systems based on DNA strand displacement performing computation of logic gates. Specifically, a class of so-called "DNA neurons" are achieved, in which a "smart" way inspired by biological neurons encoding information is developed to encode and deliver information using DNA molecules. The "DNA neuron" is bistable, that is, it can sense DNA molecules as input signals, and release "negative" or "positive" signals DNA molecules. We design intelligent DNA molecular systems that are constructed by cascading some particularly organized "DNA neurons", which could perform logic computation, including AND, OR, XOR logic gates, automatically. Both simulation results using visual DSD (DNA strand displacement software and experimental results are obtained, which shows that the proposed systems can detect DNA signals with high sensitivity and accretion; moreover, the systems can process input signals automatically with complex nonlinear logic. The method proposed in this work may provide a new way to construct a sensitive molecular signal detection system with neurons spiking behavior in vitro, and can be used to develop intelligent molecular processing systems in vivo.

  19. Multidirectional Vector Excision Leads to Better Outcomes than Traditional Elliptical Excision of Facial Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Il Oh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The elliptical excision is the standard method of removing benign skin lesions,such as congenital melanocytic nevi. This technique allows for primary closure, with little to nodog-ear deformity, but may sacrifice normal tissue adjacent to the lesion, resulting in scarswhich are unnecessarily long. This study was designed to compare the predicted results ofelliptical excision with those resulting from our excision technique.Methods Eighty-two patients with congenital melanocytic nevus on the face were prospectivelystudied. Each lesion was examined and an optimal ellipse was designed and marked onthe skin. After an incision on one side of the nevus margin, subcutaneous undermining wasperformed in the appropriate direction. The skin flap was pulled up and approximated alongseveral vectors to minimize the occurrence of dog-ear deformity.Results Overall, the final wound length was 21.1% shorter than that achieved by ellipticalexcision. Only 8.5% of the patients required dog-ear repair. There was no significant distortionof critical facial structures. All of the scars were deemed aesthetically acceptable based ontheir Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale scores.Conclusions When compared to elliptical excision, our technique appears to minimize dogeardeformity and decrease the final wound length. This technique should be considered analternative method for excision of facial nevi.

  20. Synthesis of furan-based DNA binders and their interaction with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, many substances, based on naturally occurring DNA-binding molecules have been developed for the use in cancer therapy and as virostatica. Most of these substances are binding specifically to A-T rich sequences in the DNA minor groove. Neutral and positively charged DNA-binders are known. BNCT is most effective, which the boron is directly located in the cellular nucleus, so that the intercation with thermal neutrons can directly damage the DNA. To reach this aim, we have connected ammonioundecahydrododecaborate(1-) to DNA-binding structures such as 2,5-bis(4-formylphenyl)furan via a Schiff-Base reaction followed by a reduction of the imine to a secondary amine. In a following step the amine can be alkylated to insert positive charges to prevent repulsion between the compounds and the negatively charged sugar-phosphate-backbone of the DNA. (author)

  1. A Modified SDS-Based DNA Extraction Method for High Quality Environmental DNA from Seafloor Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Vengadesh Perumal; Zhang, Xinxu; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Recovering high quality genomic DNA from environmental samples is a crucial primary step to understand the genetic, metabolic, and evolutionary characteristics of microbial communities through molecular ecological approaches. However, it is often challenging because of the difficulty of effective cell lysis without fragmenting the genomic DNA. This work aims to improve the previous SDS-based DNA extraction methods for high-biomass seafloor samples, such as pelagic sediments and metal sulfide chimney, to obtain high quality and high molecular weight of the genomic DNA applicable for the subsequent molecular ecological analyses. In this regard, we standardized a modified SDS-based DNA extraction method (M-SDS), and its performance was then compared to those extracted by a recently developed hot-alkaline DNA extraction method (HA) and a commercial DNA extraction kit. Consequently, the M-SDS method resulted in higher DNA yield and cell lysis efficiency, lower DNA shearing, and higher diversity scores than other two methods, providing a comprehensive DNA assemblage of the microbial community on the seafloor depositional environment. PMID:27446026

  2. Electroporation-based DNA delivery technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, A; Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    DNA delivery to for example skin and muscle can easily be performed with electroporation. The method is efficient, feasible, and inexpensive and the future possibilities are numerous. Here we present our protocol for gene transfection to mouse skin using naked plasmid DNA and electric pulses....

  3. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair through ubiquitination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Li; Audesh Bhat; Wei Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the most versatile DNA-repair pathway in all organisms.While bacteria require only three proteins to complete the incision step of NER,eukaryotes employ about 30 proteins to complete the same step.Here we summarize recent studies demonstrating that ubiquitination,a post-translational modification,plays critical roles in regulating the NER activity either dependent on or independent of ubiquitin-proteolysis.Several NER components have been shown as targets of ubiquitination while others are actively involved in the ubiquitination process.We argue through this analysis that ubiquitination serves to coordinate various steps of NER and meanwhile connect NER with other related pathways to achieve the efficient global DNA-damage response.

  4. Charge-transport-mediated recruitment of DNA repair enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Fok, Pak-Wing; Guo, Chin-Lin; Chou, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Damaged or mismatched bases in DNA can be repaired by base excision repair enzymes (BER) that replace the defective base. Although the detailed molecular structures of many BER enzymes are known, how they colocalize to lesions remains unclear. One hypothesis involves charge transport (CT) along DNA [Yavin et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102, 3546 (2005)]. In this CT mechanism, electrons are released by recently adsorbed BER enzymes and travel along the DNA. The electrons can scatter (by...

  5. DNA Sequence Representation and Comparison Based on Quaternion Number System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-T. Chang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional schemes for DNA sequence representation, storage, and processing areusually developed based on the character-based formats.We propose the quaternion number system for numerical representation and further processing on DNA sequences.In the proposed method, the quaternion cross-correlation operation can be used to obtain both the global and local matching/mismatching information between two DNA sequences from the depicted one-dimensional curve and two-dimensional pattern, respectively.Simulation results on various DNA sequences and the comparison result with the wellknown BLAST method are obtained to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Functional redundancy between DNA ligases I and III in DNA replication in vertebrate cells

    OpenAIRE

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Bednar, Theresa; Wang, Minli; Paul, Katja; Mladenov, Emil; Bencsik-Theilen, Alena A.; Iliakis, George

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the three families of ATP-dependent DNA ligases are associated with specific functions in DNA metabolism. DNA ligase I (LigI) catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the replication fork and nucleotide excision repair (NER). DNA ligase IV (LigIV) mediates repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) via the canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The evolutionary younger DNA ligase III (LigIII) is restricted to higher eukaryotes and has been associated with base excisio...

  7. Protein–DNA charge transport: Redox activation of a DNA repair protein by guanine radical

    OpenAIRE

    Yavin, Eylon; Boal, Amie K.; Stemp, Eric D. A.; Boon, Elizabeth M; Livingston, Alison L.; O'Shea, Valerie L.; David, Sheila S.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2005-01-01

    DNA charge transport (CT) chemistry provides a route to carry out oxidative DNA damage from a distance in a reaction that is sensitive to DNA mismatches and lesions. Here, DNA-mediated CT also leads to oxidation of a DNA-bound base excision repair enzyme, MutY. DNA-bound Ru(III), generated through a flash/quench technique, is found to promote oxidation of the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster of MutY to [4Fe-4S](3+) and its decomposition product [3Fe-4S](1+). Flash/quench experiments monitored by EPR spec...

  8. New design of nucleotide excision repair (NER) inhibitors for combination cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Francesco; Tuszynski, Jack A; Barakat, Khaled H

    2016-04-01

    Many cancer chemotherapy agents act by targeting the DNA of cancer cells, causing substantial damage within their genome and causing them to undergo apoptosis. An effective DNA repair pathway in cancer cells can act in a reverse way by removing these drug-induced DNA lesions, allowing cancer cells to survive, grow and proliferate. In this context, DNA repair inhibitors opened a new avenue in cancer treatment, by blocking the DNA repair mechanisms from removing the chemotherapy-mediated DNA damage. In particular, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) involves more than thirty protein-protein interactions and removes DNA adducts caused by platinum-based chemotherapy. The excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1)-xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA) protein (XPA-ERCC1) complex seems to be one of the most promising targets in this pathway. ERCC1 is over expressed in cancer cells and the only known cellular function so far for XPA is to recruit ERCC1 to the damaged point. Here, we build upon our recent advances in identifying inhibitors for this interaction and continue our efforts to rationally design more effective and potent regulators for the NER pathway. We employed in silico drug design techniques to: (1) identify compounds similar to the recently discovered inhibitors, but more effective at inhibiting the XPA-ERCC1 interactions, and (2) identify different scaffolds to develop novel lead compounds. Two known inhibitor structures have been used as starting points for two ligand/structure-hybrid virtual screening approaches. The findings described here form a milestone in discovering novel inhibitors for the NER pathway aiming at improving the efficacy of current platinum-based therapy, by modulating the XPA-ERCC1 interaction. PMID:26939044

  9. A lipase-based electrochemical biosensor for target DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lipase-based electrochemical biosensor has been fabricated for the quantitative determination of target DNA. It is based on a stem-loop nucleic acid probe labeled with ferrocene containing a butanoate ester that is hydrolyzed by lipase. The other end of the probe DNA is linked, via carboxy groups, to magnetic nanoparticles. The binding of target DNA transforms the hairpin structure of the probe DNA and causes the exposure of ester bonds. This results in the release of electro-active ferrocene after hydrolysis of the ester bonds, and in an observable electrochemical response. The quantity of target DNA in the concentration range between 1 × 10−12 mol·L−1 and 1 × 10−8 mol·L−1 can be determined by measuring the electrochemical current. The method can detect target DNA with rapid response (30 min) and low interference. (author)

  10. Repair of oxidative DNA base damage in the host genome influences the HIV integration site sequence preference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey R Bennett

    Full Text Available Host base excision repair (BER proteins that repair oxidative damage enhance HIV infection. These proteins include the oxidative DNA damage glycosylases 8-oxo-guanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1 and mutY homolog (MYH as well as DNA polymerase beta (Polβ. While deletion of oxidative BER genes leads to decreased HIV infection and integration efficiency, the mechanism remains unknown. One hypothesis is that BER proteins repair the DNA gapped integration intermediate. An alternative hypothesis considers that the most common oxidative DNA base damages occur on guanines. The subtle consensus sequence preference at HIV integration sites includes multiple G:C base pairs surrounding the points of joining. These observations suggest a role for oxidative BER during integration targeting at the nucleotide level. We examined the hypothesis that BER repairs a gapped integration intermediate by measuring HIV infection efficiency in Polβ null cell lines complemented with active site point mutants of Polβ. A DNA synthesis defective mutant, but not a 5'dRP lyase mutant, rescued HIV infection efficiency to wild type levels; this suggested Polβ DNA synthesis activity is not necessary while 5'dRP lyase activity is required for efficient HIV infection. An alternate hypothesis that BER events in the host genome influence HIV integration site selection was examined by sequencing integration sites in OGG1 and MYH null cells. In the absence of these 8-oxo-guanine specific glycosylases the chromatin elements of HIV integration site selection remain the same as in wild type cells. However, the HIV integration site sequence preference at G:C base pairs is altered at several positions in OGG1 and MYH null cells. Inefficient HIV infection in the absence of oxidative BER proteins does not appear related to repair of the gapped integration intermediate; instead oxidative damage repair may participate in HIV integration site preference at the sequence level.

  11. Improving specificity of DNA hybridization-based methods

    OpenAIRE

    Chalaya, Tatyana; Gogvadze, Elena; Buzdin, Anton; Kovalskaya, Elena; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2004-01-01

    Methods based on DNA reassociation in solution with the subsequent PCR amplification of certain hybrid molecules, such as coincidence cloning and subtractive hybridization, all suffer from a common imperfection: cross-hybridization between various types of paralogous repetitive DNA fragments. Although the situation can be slightly improved by the addition of repeat-specific competitor DNA into the hybridization mixture, the cross-hybridization outcome is a significant number of background chi...

  12. Faulty DNA-polymerase δ/ε-mediated excision-repair in response to gamma-radiation or ultraviolet-light in P53-deficient fibroblast strains from affected members of a cancer-prone family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermal fibroblast strains cultured from affected members of a cancer-prone family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) harbor a point mutation in one allele of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, resulting in loss of normal p53-deficient strains to carry out the long-patch mode of excision repair, mediated by DNA polymerases delta and epsilon, after exposure to Co-60 gamma radiation or far ultraviolet (UV) (chiefly 254 mm) light. Repair was monitored by incubation of the irradiated cultures in the presence of aphidicolin (ape) or 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (araC), each a specific inhibitor of long-patch repair, followed by measurement of drug-induced DNA strand breaks (reflecting non-ligated strand incision events) by alkaline surcrose velocity sedimentation. The LFS strains displayed deficient repair capacity in response to both gamma rays and UV light. The repair anomaly in UV-irradiated LFS cultures was manifested not only in the overall genome, but also in the transcriptionally active, preferentially repaired c-myc gene. Using autoradiography we also assessed unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) after UV irradiation and found this conventional measure of repair replication to be deficient in LFS strains. Moreover, both ape and araC decreased the level of UV-induced UDS by similar to 75% in normal cells, but each had only a marginal effect on LFS cells. We further demonstrated that the LFS strains are impaired in the recovery of both RNA and replicative DNA syntheses after UV treatment, two molecular anomalies of the DNA repair deficiency disorders xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne's syndrome. Together these results imply a critical role for wild-type p53 protein in DNA polymerase delta/epsilon-mediated excision repair, both the mechanism operating on the entire genome and that acting on expressed genes. (Author)

  13. Ultrasensitive FRET-based DNA sensor using PNA/DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lan-Hee; Ahn, Dong June; Koo, Eunhae

    2016-12-01

    In the diagnosis of genetic diseases, rapid and highly sensitive DNA detection is crucial. Therefore, many strategies for detecting target DNA have been developed, including electrical, optical, and mechanical methods. Herein, a highly sensitive FRET based sensor was developed by using PNA (Peptide Nucleic Acid) probe and QD, in which red color QDs are hybridized with capture probes, reporter probes and target DNAs by EDC-NHS coupling. The hybridized probe with target DNA gives off fluorescent signal due to the energy transfer from QD to Cy5 dye in the reporter probe. Compared to the conventional DNA sensor using DNA probes, the DNA sensor using PNA probes shows higher FRET factor and efficiency due to the higher reactivity between PNA and target DNA. In addition, to elicit the effect of the distance between the donor and the acceptor, we have investigated two types of the reporter probes having Cy5 dyes attached at the different positions of the reporter probes. Results show that the shorter the distance between QDs and Cy5s, the stronger the signal intensity. Furthermore, based on the fluorescence microscopy images using microcapillary chips, the FRET signal is enhanced to be up to 276% times stronger than the signal obtained using the cuvette by the fluorescence spectrometer. These results suggest that the PNA probe system conjugated with QDs can be used as ultrasensitive DNA nanosensors. PMID:27612755

  14. The effect of base pair mismatch on DNA strand displacement

    CERN Document Server

    Broadwater, Bo

    2016-01-01

    DNA strand displacement is a key reaction in DNA homologous recombination and DNA mismatch repair and is also heavily utilized in DNA-based computation and locomotion. Despite its ubiquity in science and engineering, sequence-dependent effects of displacement kinetics have not been extensively characterized. Here, we measured toehold-mediated strand displacement kinetics using single-molecule fluorescence in the presence of a single base pair mismatch. The apparent displacement rate varied significantly when the mismatch was introduced in the invading DNA strand. The rate generally decreased as the mismatch in the invader was encountered earlier in displacement. Our data indicate that a single base pair mismatch in the invader stalls branch migration, and displacement occurs via direct dissociation of the destabilized incumbent strand from the substrate strand. We combined both branch migration and direct dissociation into a model, which we term, the concurrent displacement model, and used the first passage t...

  15. Effect of base mismatch on the electronic properties of DNA-DNA and LNA-DNA double strands: Density-functional theoretical calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Natsume, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Dedachi, Kenichi; Tsukamoto, Takayuki; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2007-01-01

    The electronic properties of double-stranded octametric DNA-DNA and LNA-DNA with a single-base mismatch were compared with those having fully complementary base pairs to quantify the effect of the base mismatch on hybridization energies (HE). A single T-G mismatch in the LNA-DNA gives rise to a significant reduction in HE, which is consistent with a significant lowering of the melting temperature for mismatched LNA-DNA. By contrast, the hybridization strength of the mismatched DNA-DNA depends...

  16. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Christopher B., E-mail: Christopher.jackson@insel.ch [Division of Human Genetics, Departements of Pediatrics and Clinical Research, Inselspital, University of Berne, Freiburgstrasse, CH-3010 Berne (Switzerland); Gallati, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.gallati@insel.ch [Division of Human Genetics, Departements of Pediatrics and Clinical Research, Inselspital, University of Berne, Freiburgstrasse, CH-3010 Berne (Switzerland); Schaller, Andre, E-mail: andre.schaller@insel.ch [Division of Human Genetics, Departements of Pediatrics and Clinical Research, Inselspital, University of Berne, Freiburgstrasse, CH-3010 Berne (Switzerland)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA ({lambda}{sub nDNA}) and mtDNA ({lambda}{sub mtDNA}) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in

  17. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. ► Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. ► Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. ► Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze–thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA (λnDNA) and mtDNA (λmtDNA) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in degraded samples in the future. To our knowledge this is the first time different degradation impact of the two genomes is

  18. Osmium-Based Pyrimidine Contrast Tags for Enhanced Nanopore-Based DNA Base Discrimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Y Henley

    Full Text Available Nanopores are a promising platform in next generation DNA sequencing. In this platform, an individual DNA strand is threaded into nanopore using an electric field, and enzyme-based ratcheting is used to move the strand through the detector. During this process the residual ion current through the pore is measured, which exhibits unique levels for different base combinations inside the pore. While this approach has shown great promise, accuracy is not optimal because the four bases are chemically comparable to one another, leading to small differences in current obstruction. Nucleobase-specific chemical tagging can be a viable approach to enhancing the contrast between different bases in the sequence. Herein we show that covalent modification of one or both of the pyrimidine bases by an osmium bipyridine complex leads to measureable differences in the blockade amplitudes of DNA molecules. We qualitatively determine the degree of osmylation of a DNA strand by passing it through a solid-state nanopore, and are thus able to gauge T and C base content. In addition, we show that osmium bipyridine reacts with dsDNA, leading to substantially different current blockade levels than exhibited for bare dsDNA. This work serves as a proof of principle for nanopore sequencing and mapping via base-specific DNA osmylation.

  19. DNA nanostructures based biosensor for the determination of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, S Baby; Kamaraj, P; Arthanareeswari, M; Devikala, S

    2015-10-15

    Graphite electrode was modified using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), chitosan (CS), glutaraldehyde (GTA) and DNA nanostructures (nsDNA). DNA nanostructures of 50 nm in size were produced from single DNA template sequence using a simple two step procedure and were confirmed using TEM and AFM analysis. The modified electrode was applied to the electrochemical detection of aromatic compounds using EIS. The modified electrode was characterized using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). For comparison, electrochemical results derived from single stranded (50 bp length) and double stranded (50 bp length) DNA based biosensors were used. The results indicate that the modified electrode prior to nsDNA immobilization provides a viable platform that effectively promotes electron transfer between nsDNA and the electrode. The mode of binding between the nsDNA and aromatic compounds was investigated using EIS, indicating that the dominant interaction is non-covalent. nsDNA based biosensor was observed to act as an efficient biosensor in selective and sensitive identification of aromatic compounds. PMID:25982727

  20. Role of polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase in mitochondrial DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Tahbaz, Nasser; Subedi, Sudip; Weinfeld, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are implicated in a broad range of human diseases and in aging. Compared to nuclear DNA, mtDNA is more highly exposed to oxidative damage due to its proximity to the respiratory chain and the lack of protection afforded by chromatin-associated proteins. While repair of oxidative damage to the bases in mtDNA through the base excision repair pathway has been well studied, the repair of oxidatively induced strand breaks in mtDNA has been less thoroughly exa...

  1. A novel DNA computing model based on RecA-mediated triple-stranded DNA structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Gang; Zhang Shemin; Dong Yafei; Xu Jin

    2007-01-01

    The field of DNA computing emerged in 1994 after Adleman's paper was published. Henceforth, a few scholars solved some noted NP-complete problems in this way. And all these methods of DNA computing are based on conventional Watson-Crick hydrogen bond of doublehelical DNA molecule. In this paper, we show that the triple-stranded DNA structure mediated by RecA protein can be used for solving computational problems. Sequence-specific recognition of double-stranded DNA by oligonucleotide-directed triple helix (triplex) formation is used to carry out the algorithm. We present procedure for the 3-vertex-colorability problems. In our proposed procedure, it is suggested that it is possible to solve more complicated problems with more variables by this model.

  2. DNA-based tunable THz oscillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malyshev, A. V.; Malyshev, V. A.; Dominguez-Adame, F.

    2009-01-01

    The intrinsic helix conformation of the DNA strands is known to be the key ingredient of control of the electric current through the molecule by the perpendicular (gate) electric field. We show theoretically that Bloch oscillations in periodic systems with helical conformation are also strongly affe

  3. Different organization of base excision repair of uracil in DNA in nuclei and mitochondria and selective upregulation of mitochondrial uracil-DNA glycosylase after oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, M; Otterlei, M; Pena Diaz, Javier; Krokan, H E

    2007-01-01

    proteins also remove the oxidized cytosine derivatives isodialuric acid, alloxan and 5-hydroxyuracil. UNG1 and UNG2 have identical catalytic domain, but different N-terminal regions required for subcellular sorting. We demonstrate that mRNA for UNG1, but not UNG2, is increased after hydrogen peroxide......, indicating regulatory effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial BER. To examine the overall organization of uracil-BER in nuclei and mitochondria, we constructed cell lines expressing EYFP (enhanced yellow fluorescent protein) fused to UNG1 or UNG2. These were used to investigate the possible presence of...... BER processes are differently organized. Furthermore, the upregulation of mRNA for mitochondrial UNG1 after oxidative stress indicates that it may have an important role in repair of oxidized pyrimidines....

  4. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-03-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection.

  5. Multiple Base Substitution Corrections in DNA Sequence Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczuk, M.; Mackiewicz, P.; Szczepanik, D.; Nowicka, A.; Dudkiewicz, M.; Dudek, M. R.; Cebrat, S.

    We discuss the Jukes and Cantor's one-parameter model and Kimura's two-parameter model unability to describe evolution of asymmetric DNA molecules. The standard distance measure between two DNA sequences, which is the number of substitutions per site, should include the effect of multiple base substitutions separately for each type of the base. Otherwise, the respective tables of substitutions cannot reconstruct the asymmetric DNA molecule with respect to the composition. Basing on Kimura's neutral theory, we have derived a linear law for the correlation of the mean survival time of nucleotides under constant mutation pressure and their fraction in the genome. According to the law, the corrections to Kimura's theory have been discussed to describe evolution of genomes with asymmetric nucleotide composition. We consider the particular case of the strongly asymmetric Borrelia burgdorferi genome and we discuss in detail the corrections, which should be introduced into the distance measure between two DNA sequences to include multiple base substitutions.

  6. A DNA based model for addition computation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Lin; YANG Xiao; LIU Wenbin; XU Jin

    2004-01-01

    Much effort has been made to solve computing problems by using DNA-an organic simulating method, which in some cases is preferable to the current electronic computer. However, No one at present has proposed an effective and applicable method to solve addition problem with molecular algorithm due to the difficulty in solving the carry problem which can be easily solved by hardware of an electronic computer. In this article, we solved this problem by employing two kinds of DNA strings, one is called result and operation string while the other is named carrier. The result and operation string contains some carry information by its own and denotes the ultimate result while the carrier is just for carrying use. The significance of this algorithm is the original code, the fairly easy steps to follow and the feasibility under current molecular biological technology.

  7. Introduction to DNA-Based Genetic Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Glickman, Richard M.; Phillips, M. Ann; Glickman, Barry W.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular biology and recombinant DNA technology are beginning to have an effect on the medical health care field, particularly in the area of clinical genetics. Dramatic improvements in the prerequisite technology are in the process of being transferred from the research lab to routine clinical laboratories. The general practitioner, along with his genetic diagnostic colleagues, can soon expect to have access to accurate and reliable diagnostic assays for a wide variety of genetic disorders....

  8. DNA sequence analysis with droplet-based microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Adam R.; Hung, Tony; Sperling, Ralph A.; Mary, Pascaline; Rotem, Assaf; Agresti, Jeremy J.; Weiner, Michael A.; Weitz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidic techniques can form and process micrometer scale droplets at thousands per second. Each droplet can house an individual biochemical reaction, allowing millions of reactions to be performed in minutes with small amounts of total reagent. This versatile approach has been used for engineering enzymes, quantifying concentrations of DNA in solution, and screening protein crystallization conditions. Here, we use it to read the sequences of DNA molecules with a FRET-based assay. Using probes of different sequences, we interrogate a target DNA molecule for polymorphisms. With a larger probe set, additional polymorphisms can be interrogated as well as targets of arbitrary sequence. PMID:24185402

  9. The R46Q, R131Q and R154H Polymorphs of Human DNA Glycosylase/β-Lyase hOgg1 Severely Distort the Active Site and DNA Recognition Site but do not Cause Unfolding†

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Peter C.; Daggett, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species can cause widespread cellular damage, including base alterations and strand breaks in DNA. An array of DNA-repair enzymes constitutes an essential part of the line of defense that cells use against oxidative damage to the genome. A DNA glycosylase/β-lyase enzyme, Ogg1, scavenges the genome for 8-oxoguanine, a major mutagenic DNA adduct induced by reactive oxygen species, and catalyzes its excision and subsequent cleavage of the DNA phosphate backbone. Several polymorph...

  10. Evaluation of enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B virus DNA based on anti-double-stranded DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    F. Garcia(Helsinki U); Bernal, M.C.; Leyva, A.; Piedrola, G.; Maroto, M C

    1995-01-01

    We have evaluated a new enzyme immunoassay technology to detect the products of PCR-based amplification that may be applicable to routine testing of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA. Two hundred eight serum samples were studied: 73 were basal samples and 135 were sequential serum samples from patients with chronic hepatitis, some of whom were being treated with alpha interferon. We compared the new detection method (PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay [DEIA]) with dot blot hybridization performed without p...

  11. DNA sequence analysis with droplet-based microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Abate, Adam R.; Hung, Tony; Sperling, Ralph A.; Mary, Pascaline; Rotem, Assaf; Agresti, Jeremy J.; Weiner, Michael A.; Weitz, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidic techniques can form and process micrometer scale droplets at thousands per second. Each droplet can house an individual biochemical reaction, allowing millions of reactions to be performed in minutes with small amounts of total reagent. This versatile approach has been used for engineering enzymes, quantifying concentrations of DNA in solution, and screening protein crystallization conditions. Here, we use it to read the sequences of DNA molecules with a FRET-based ...

  12. Detection Tuna and Processed Products Based Protein and DNA Barcoding

    OpenAIRE

    Nuring Wulansari; Mala Nurilamala; Nurjanah

    2015-01-01

    Tuna is the second largest fishery commodity in Indonesia after the shrimp. Since the high demand and the limited stock of tuna resulted in fraudulent chance. Authentication is required to meassure consumers regarding the accuracy of its labeling and food safety. In this study, the authentication was based on protein and DNA barcoding using cytochrome-b gene (cyt-b) of the mitochondrial DNA as the target of gene. Primer of cyt b gene was designed based on the tuna species. This...

  13. NMR Assignment of Polymerase β labeled with 2H, 13C, and 15N in complex with substrate DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Geoffrey A.; DeRose, Eugene F.; Kirby, Thomas W.; London, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    DNA Polymerase β is a multifunctional enzyme involved in base excision repair of nuclear DNA in vertebrate cells. It has been extensively studied as a model for mechanistic studies of the nucleotidyl transferase reaction, DNA synthesis fidelity, and protein-DNA interactions. Previous studies of 13C-methyl-methionine labeled Rat pol β revealed extensive dynamics in response to various DNA repair substrates (Bose-Basu et. al, 2004). We present here the first assignments of the full-length prote...

  14. Crystal structure of the FeS cluster-containing nucleotide excision repair helicase XPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie C Wolski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage recognition by the nucleotide excision repair pathway requires an initial step identifying helical distortions in the DNA and a proofreading step verifying the presence of a lesion. This proofreading step is accomplished in eukaryotes by the TFIIH complex. The critical damage recognition component of TFIIH is the XPD protein, a DNA helicase that unwinds DNA and identifies the damage. Here, we describe the crystal structure of an archaeal XPD protein with high sequence identity to the human XPD protein that reveals how the structural helicase framework is combined with additional elements for strand separation and DNA scanning. Two RecA-like helicase domains are complemented by a 4Fe4S cluster domain, which has been implicated in damage recognition, and an alpha-helical domain. The first helicase domain together with the helical and 4Fe4S-cluster-containing domains form a central hole with a diameter sufficient in size to allow passage of a single stranded DNA. Based on our results, we suggest a model of how DNA is bound to the XPD protein, and can rationalize several of the mutations in the human XPD gene that lead to one of three severe diseases, xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome, and trichothiodystrophy.

  15. Oxidative DNA base modifications as factors in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactive oxygen species can cause extensive DNA modifications including modified bases. Some of the DNA base damage has been found to possess premutagenic properties. Therefore, if not repaired, it can contribute to carcinogenesis. We have found elevated amounts of modified bases in cancerous and precancerous tissues as compared with normal tissues. Most of the agents used in anticancer therapy are paradoxically responsible for induction of secondary malignancies and some of them may generate free radicals. The results of our experiments provide evidence that exposure of cancer patients to therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation and anticancer drugs cause base modifications in genomic DNA of lymphocytes. Some of these base damages could lead to mutagenesis in critical genes and ultimately to secondary cancers such as leukemias. This may point to an important role of oxidative base damage in cancer initiation. Alternatively, the increased level of the modified base products may contribute to genetic instability and metastatic potential of tumor cells. (author)

  16. Application of a Pattern-based Classification System for Invasive Endocervical Adenocarcinoma in Cervical Biopsy, Cone and Loop Electrosurgical Excision (LEEP) Material: Pattern on Cone and LEEP is Predictive of Pattern in the Overall Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Bojana; Parra-Herran, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    A pattern-based classification system has been recently proposed for invasive endocervical adenocarcinoma, which is predictive of the risk of nodal metastases. Identifying cases at risk of nodal involvement is most relevant at the time of biopsy and loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) to allow for optimal surgical planning, and, most importantly, consideration of lymphadenectomy. This study aims to determine the topography of patterns of stromal invasion in invasive endocervical adenocarcinoma with emphasis on patterns in biopsy, cone, and LEEP. Invasive pattern was assessed following the pattern-based classification (Patterns A, B, and C) in 47 invasive endocervical adenocarcinomas treated with hysterectomy or trachelectomy and correlated with pattern of invasion at the tumor surface (2 mm of tumor depth) and on preoperative biopsy and cone/LEEP. Patterns A, B, and C were present in 21.3%, 36.2%, and 42.5% of cases, respectively. Most pattern A cases were Stage IA (90%), whereas most Pattern B and C cases were Stage IB (76.5% and 80%, respectively). Horizontal spread was on average larger in Pattern C (24.1 mm) than in Patterns A and B (7.7 and 12.3 mm, respectively). Pattern at the tumor surface correlated with the overall pattern in 95.7% of cases. Concordance between patterns at cone/LEEP and hysterectomy was 92.8%; the only discrepant case was upgraded from Pattern A on LEEP to C on final excision. Agreement between patterns in biopsy and the overall tumor, however, was only 37.5%. In all discrepant cases, biopsy failed to reveal destructive invasion, which was evident on excision. All discrepant biopsies with pattern A showed glandular complexity resembling exophytic papillary growth but did not meet criteria for destructive invasion. On excision, marked gland confluence with papillary architecture was evident. We conclude that the pattern of invasion on cone/LEEP is a good predictor of pattern of invasion on hysterectomy, particularly if there is

  17. A CLIQUE algorithm using DNA computing techniques based on closed-circle DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Xiyu

    2011-07-01

    DNA computing has been applied in broad fields such as graph theory, finite state problems, and combinatorial problem. DNA computing approaches are more suitable used to solve many combinatorial problems because of the vast parallelism and high-density storage. The CLIQUE algorithm is one of the gird-based clustering techniques for spatial data. It is the combinatorial problem of the density cells. Therefore we utilize DNA computing using the closed-circle DNA sequences to execute the CLIQUE algorithm for the two-dimensional data. In our study, the process of clustering becomes a parallel bio-chemical reaction and the DNA sequences representing the marked cells can be combined to form a closed-circle DNA sequences. This strategy is a new application of DNA computing. Although the strategy is only for the two-dimensional data, it provides a new idea to consider the grids to be vertexes in a graph and transform the search problem into a combinatorial problem. PMID:21511001

  18. Nanobiodevices for fast DNA separation and detection toward nanopore-based DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Noritada; Yasui, Takao; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for using micro- and nanofabricated structures as tools for separation, manipulation, detection and analysis of biomolecules such as DNA and proteins. So far, we have developed fabrication techniques for constructing several types of nanostructures on quartz substrate for biomolecules separation, e.g., nanopillar and nanowall array structures, and demonstrated their analytical performances. Some important findings were that the nanopillar array pattern could control the DNA separation mode and electroosmotic flows in the nanopillar array structures were reduced according to the nanopillar spacing. Since these small confined nanospaces are suitable for manipulating biomolecules at a single molecule level, several approaches have been tried to analyze DNA denaturation and DNA-protein interactions in parallel. However, it is difficult to say that the observed phenomena reflect an intrinsic DNA property or DNA-protein interaction manner because all these approaches requires fluorescently labeled DNA molecules for observation. To address these issues, we are trying to develop a novel nanostructure-based and label-free detection system to integrate a biomolecule separation media and a detection system on a single chip.

  19. How stable are the mutagenic tautomers of DNA bases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brovarets’ O. O.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the lifetime of the mutagenic tautomers of DNA base pairs through the investigation of the physicochemical mechanisms of their intramolecular proton transfer. Methods. Non-empirical quantum chemistry, the analysis of the electron density by means of Bader’s atom in molecules (AIM theory and physicochemical kinetics were used. Results. Physicochemical character of the transition state of the intramolecular tautomerisation of DNA bases was investigated, the lifetime of mutagenic tautomers was calculated. Conclusions. The lifetime of the DNA bases mutagenic tautomers by 3–10 orders exceeds typical time of DNA replication in the cell (~103 s. This fact confirms that the postulate, on which the Watson-Crick tautomeric hypothesis of spontaneous transitions grounds, is adequate. The absence of intramolecular H-bonds in the canonical and mutagenic tautomeric forms determine their high stability

  20. Charge Transport across DNA-Based Three-Way Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ryan M; Singh, Arunoday P N; Thazhathveetil, Arun K; Cho, Vincent Y; Zhang, Yuqi; Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Beratan, David N; Ratner, Mark A; Schatz, George C; Berlin, Yuri A; Lewis, Frederick D; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2015-04-22

    DNA-based molecular electronics will require charges to be transported from one site within a 2D or 3D architecture to another. While this has been shown previously in linear, π-stacked DNA sequences, the dynamics and efficiency of charge transport across DNA three-way junction (3WJ) have yet to be determined. Here, we present an investigation of hole transport and trapping across a DNA-based three-way junction systems by a combination of femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Hole transport across the junction is proposed to be gated by conformational fluctuations in the ground state which bring the transiently populated hole carrier nucleobases into better aligned geometries on the nanosecond time scale, thus modulating the π-π electronic coupling along the base pair sequence. PMID:25822073

  1. Spectroscopic investigation on the telomeric DNA base sequence repeat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Telomeres are protein-DNA complexes at the terminals of linear chromosomes, which protect chromosomal integrity and maintain cellular replicative capacity.From single-cell organisms to advanced animals and plants,structures and functions of telomeres are both very conservative. In cells of human and vertebral animals, telomeric DNA base sequences all are (TTAGGG)n. In the present work, we have obtained absorption and fluorescence spectra measured from seven synthesized oligonucleotides to simulate the telomeric DNA system and calculated their relative fluorescence quantum yields on which not only telomeric DNA characteristics are predicted but also possibly the shortened telomeric sequences during cell division are imrelative fluorescence quantum yield and remarkable excitation energy innerconversion, which tallies with the telomeric sequence of (TTAGGG)n. This result shows that telomeric DNA has a strong non-radiative or innerconvertible capability.``

  2. Human longevity and variation in DNA damage response and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike;

    2014-01-01

    others. Data were applied on 592 SNPs from 77 genes involved in nine sub-processes: DNA-damage response, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombinational repair (HRR), RecQ helicase activities (RECQ), telomere functioning...... and mitochondrial DNA processes. The study population was 1089 long-lived and 736 middle-aged Danes. A self-contained set-based test of all SNPs displayed association with longevity (P-value=9.9 × 10-5), supporting that the overall pathway could affect longevity. Investigation of the nine sub-processes using...

  3. Incomplete excision repair process after UV-irradiation in MUT-mutants of Proteus mirabillis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MUT-mutants of P. mirabilis seem to be able to perform the incision step in the course of excision repair. In contrast to the corresponding wildtype strains with MUT-mutants the number of single-strand breaks formed after UV-irradiation is independent of the UV-dose up to about 720 erg/mm2. Incubation in minimal medium over a longer time does not result in completion of excision repair; about 3-6 single-strand breaks in the DNA of these mutants remain open. Likewise, the low molecular weight of the newly synthesized daughter DNA confirms an incompletely proceeding or delayed repair process. As a possible reason for the mutator phenotype an alteration of the DNA-polymerase playing a role in excision and resynthesis steps of excision repair is discussed. (author)

  4. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting

  5. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A., E-mail: sarah.martin@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-05

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting.

  6. Functional roles of DNA polymerases β and γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physiological functions of DNA polymerases (deoxynucleosidetriphosphate:DNA deoxynucleotidyltransferase, EC2.7.7.7)β and γ were investigated by using neuronal nuclei and synaptosomes isolated from rat brain. uv irradiation of neuronal nuclei from 60-day-old rats resulted in a 7- to 10-fold stimulation of DNA repair synthesis attributable to DNA polymerase β which, at this developmental stage, is virtually the only DNA polymerase present in the nuclei. No repair synthesis could be elicited by treating the nuclei with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, but this was probably due to the inability of brain tissue to excise alkylated bases from DNA. The role of DNA polymerase γ was studied in synaptosomes by using a system mimicking in vivo mitochondrial DNA synthesis. By showing that under these conditions, DNA replication occurs in miatochondria, and exploiting the fact that DNA polymerase γ is the only DNA polymerase present in mitochondria, evidence was obtained for a role of DNA polymerase γ in mitochondrial DNA replication. Based on these results and on the wealth of literature on DNA polymerase α, we conclude that DNA polymerase α is mainly responsible for DNA replication in nuclei, DNA polymerase β is involved in nuclear DNA repair, and DNA polymerase γ is the mitochondrial replicating enzyme. However, minor roles for DNA polymerase α in DNA repair or for DNA polymerase β in DNA replication cannot be excluded

  7. Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) in platinum-based treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with special emphasis on carboplatin: a review of current literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, A.; Sorensen, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients diagnosed with advanced non-small cell lung cancer have a dismal prognosis and are often relative resistant to chemotherapy. A need for markers has emerged based on tumour biology in order to predict which patients will respond to treatment. Excision repair cross-complementat......BACKGROUND: Patients diagnosed with advanced non-small cell lung cancer have a dismal prognosis and are often relative resistant to chemotherapy. A need for markers has emerged based on tumour biology in order to predict which patients will respond to treatment. Excision repair cross......-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) has shown potential as a predictive marker in patients with NSCLC treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Carboplatin has gained widespread use in the treatment of advanced NSCLC and its mechanisms of action are likely similar to that of cisplatin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A literature...... articles and 1 clinical abstract were identified. Laboratory methods were mainly RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction) or immunohistochemistry (IHC) for expression of ERCC1. Preclinical studies pointed towards similar mechanisms of chemotherapy-resistance among platinum compounds. A...

  8. A Novel Image Encryption Algorithm Based on DNA Subsequence Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Xue, Xianglian; Wei, Xiaopeng

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel image encryption algorithm based on DNA subsequence operation. Different from the traditional DNA encryption methods, our algorithm does not use complex biological operation but just uses the idea of DNA subsequence operations (such as elongation operation, truncation operation, deletion operation, etc.) combining with the logistic chaotic map to scramble the location and the value of pixel points from the image. The experimental results and security analysis show that the proposed algorithm is easy to be implemented, can get good encryption effect, has a wide secret key's space, strong sensitivity to secret key, and has the abilities of resisting exhaustive attack and statistic attack. PMID:23093912

  9. A Rewritable, Random-Access DNA-Based Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei Yazdi, S. M. Hossein; Yuan, Yongbo; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Huimin; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2015-09-01

    We describe the first DNA-based storage architecture that enables random access to data blocks and rewriting of information stored at arbitrary locations within the blocks. The newly developed architecture overcomes drawbacks of existing read-only methods that require decoding the whole file in order to read one data fragment. Our system is based on new constrained coding techniques and accompanying DNA editing methods that ensure data reliability, specificity and sensitivity of access, and at the same time provide exceptionally high data storage capacity. As a proof of concept, we encoded parts of the Wikipedia pages of six universities in the USA, and selected and edited parts of the text written in DNA corresponding to three of these schools. The results suggest that DNA is a versatile media suitable for both ultrahigh density archival and rewritable storage applications.

  10. Age dependency of base modification in rabbit liver DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, O.; Fuji, I.; Yoshida, T.; Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    Age-related modifications of DNA bases have been observed in the liver of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a lagomorph with a median life span in captivity of 5-7 yr. The ages of the animals studied ranged from 6 wk to 9 yr. After the DNA had been extracted from the liver cell nuclei and hydrolyzed with acid, the bases were analyzed by column chromatography with Cellulofine gels (GC-15-m). Two peaks in the chromatogram, which eluted before the four DNA bases, contained modified bases. Those materials, which were obtained in relatively large amounts from old animals, were highly fluorescent, and were shown to be crosslinked base products by mass spectrometry. The yield of crosslinked products versus rabbit age (greater than 0.5 yr) can be fitted by an exponential function (correlation coefficient: 0.76 +/- 0.09).

  11. Moving black holes via singularity excision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a singularity excision algorithm appropriate for numerical simulations of black holes moving throughout the computational domain. The method is an extension of the excision procedure previously used to obtain stable simulations of single, non-moving black holes. The excision procedure also shares elements used in recent work to study the dynamics of a scalar field in the background of a single, boosted black hole. The excision method is tested with single black-hole evolutions using a coordinate system in which the coordinate location of the black hole, and thus the excision boundary, moves throughout the computational domain

  12. Tunable thermal switching via DNA-based nano-devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA has a well-defined structural transition—the denaturation of its double-stranded form into two single strands—that strongly affects its thermal transport properties. We show that, according to a widely implemented model for DNA denaturation, one can engineer DNA ‘heattronic’ devices that have a rapidly increasing thermal conductance over a narrow temperature range across the denaturation transition (∼350 K). The origin of this rapid increase of conductance, or ‘switching’, is the softening of the lattice and suppression of nonlinear effects as the temperature crosses the transition temperature and DNA denatures. Most importantly, we demonstrate that DNA nano-junctions have a broad range of thermal tunability by varying the sequence and length, and exploiting the underlying nonlinear behavior. We discuss the role of disorder in the base sequence, as well as the relation to genomic DNA. These results set the basis for developing thermal devices out of materials with nonlinear structural dynamics, as well as understanding the underlying mechanisms of DNA denaturation. (paper)

  13. Direct visualization of a DNA glycosylase searching for damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liwei; Haushalter, Karl A; Lieber, Charles M; Verdine, Gregory L

    2002-03-01

    DNA glycosylases preserve the integrity of genetic information by recognizing damaged bases in the genome and catalyzing their excision. It is unknown how DNA glycosylases locate covalently modified bases hidden in the DNA helix amongst vast numbers of normal bases. Here we employ atomic-force microscopy (AFM) with carbon nanotube probes to image search intermediates of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) scanning DNA. We show that hOGG1 interrogates DNA at undamaged sites by inducing drastic kinks. The sharp DNA bending angle of these non-lesion-specific search intermediates closely matches that observed in the specific complex of 8-oxoguanine-containing DNA bound to hOGG1. These findings indicate that hOGG1 actively distorts DNA while searching for damaged bases. PMID:11927259

  14. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Alexander M; Weig, Cornelius; Oswald, Peter; Frey, Erwin; Fischer, Peer; Liedl, Tim

    2016-02-10

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  15. Effect of radiotherapy on survival of women with locally excised ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian GW

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Guo-Wei Qian,1,* Xiao-Jian Ni,1,* Zheng Wang,2 Yi-Zhou Jiang,1 Ke-Da Yu,1 Zhi-Ming Shao1 1Department of Breast Surgery, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Center and Cancer Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Although it has been previously reported that radiotherapy (RT effectively reduced the incidence of local recurrence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS following breast-conserving surgery (BCS, little is known about the effect of RT on survival of patients with locally excised DCIS. Patients and methods: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry data, we selected 56,968 female DCIS patients treated with BCS between 1998 and 2007. Overall survival (OS and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS were compared among patients who received RT or no RT using the Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results: Median follow-up was 91 months. In the multivariable model, patients receiving postoperative RT had better OS than those undergoing BCS alone (hazard ratio [HR] 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53–0.67, P<0.001. This pattern remained after stratification by estrogen receptor (ER status and age. In contrast, RT delivery was not significantly associated with improved BCSS (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.48–1.03, P=0.073. However, after stratifying by the above two variables, RT contributed to better BCSS in ER-negative/borderline patients (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19–0.88, P=0.023 and younger patients (≤50 years old; HR 0.37, 95% CI 0.15–0.91, P=0.030. Conclusion: Our analysis confirms the beneficial effect of RT on OS in women with locally excised DCIS and reveals the specific protective effect of RT on BCSS in ER-negative/borderline and younger patients. Keywords: ductal carcinoma in situ, breast cancer, breast-conserving surgery, radiotherapy, survival

  16. Solid-State Nanopore-Based DNA Sequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewen Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing technology is becoming more and more attractive for its brand new future in gene detection field. The challenges that need to be addressed are diverse: the effective methods to detect base-specific signatures, the control of the nanopore’s size and surface properties, and the modulation of translocation velocity and behavior of the DNA molecules. Among these challenges, the realization of the high-quality nanopores with the help of modern micro/nanofabrication technologies is a crucial one. In this paper, typical technologies applied in the field of solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing have been reviewed.

  17. Ab initio Study of Naptho-Homologated DNA Bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro [ORNL; Huertas, Oscar [Universitat de Barcelona; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A [ORNL; Orozco, Modesto [Institut de Recerca Biomedica, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Luque, Javier [Universitat de Barcelona

    2008-01-01

    Naptho-homologated DNA bases have been recently used to build a new type of size expanded DNA known as yyDNA. We have used theoretical techniques to investigate the structure, tautomeric preferences, base-pairing ability, stacking interactions, and HOMO-LUMO gaps of the naptho-bases. The structure of these bases is found to be similar to that of the benzo-fused predecessors (y-bases) with respect to the planarity of the aromatic rings and amino groups. Tautomeric studies reveal that the canonical-like form of naptho-thymine (yyT) and naptho-adenine (yyA) are the most stable tautomers, leading to hydrogen-bonded dimers with the corresponding natural nucleobases that mimic the Watson-Crick pairing. However, the canonical-like species of naptho-guanine (yyG) and naptho-cytosine (yyC) are not the most stable tautomers, and the most favorable hydrogen-bonded dimers involve wobble-like pairings. The expanded size of the naphto-bases leads to stacking interactions notably larger than those found for the natural bases, and they should presumably play a dominant contribution in modulating the structure of yyDNA duplexes. Finally, the HOMO-LUMO gap of the naptho-bases is smaller than that of their benzo-base counterparts, indicating that size-expansion of DNA bases is an efficient way of reducing their HOMO-LUMO gap. These results are examined in light of the available experimental evidence reported for yyT and yyC.

  18. Efficient replication bypass of size-expanded DNA base pairs in bacterial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Delaney, James C.; GAO, JIANMIN; Liu, Haibo; Shrivastav, Nidhi; Essigmann, John M.; Kool, Eric T.

    2009-01-01

    Supersize me! Size-expanded DNA bases (xDNA) are able to encode natural DNA sequences in replication. In vitro experiments with a DNA polymerase show nucleotide incorporation opposite the xDNA bases with correct pairing. In vivo experiments using E. coli show that two xDNA bases (xA and xC, see picture) encode the correct replication partners.

  19. Regulation of DNA repair in serum-stimulated xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The regulation of DNA repair during serum stimulation of quiescent cells was examined in normal human cells, in fibroblasts from three xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups (A, C, and D), in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, and in ataxia telangiectasia cells. The regulation of nucleotide excision repair was examined by exposing cells to ultraviolet irradiation at discrete intervals after cell stimulation. Similarly, base excision repair was quantitated after exposure to methylmetha...

  20. Electrochemical DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Conducting Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mahbubur Rahman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymers (CPs are a group of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable attention because of their unique electronic, chemical, and biochemical properties. This is reflected in their use in a wide range of potential applications, including light-emitting diodes, anti-static coating, electrochromic materials, solar cells, chemical sensors, biosensors, and drug-release systems. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on CPs can be used in numerous areas related to human health. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the development and use of CP-based electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors. We discuss the distinct properties of CPs with respect to their use in the immobilization of probe DNA on electrode surfaces, and we describe the immobilization techniques used for developing DNA hybridization sensors together with the various transduction methods employed. In the concluding part of this review, we present some of the challenges faced in the use of CP-based DNA hybridization sensors, as well as a future perspective.

  1. Nucleotide excision repair by dual incisions in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canturk, Fazile; Karaman, Muhammet; Selby, Christopher P; Kemp, Michael G; Kulaksiz-Erkmen, Gulnihal; Hu, Jinchuan; Li, Wentao; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-04-26

    Plants use light for photosynthesis and for various signaling purposes. The UV wavelengths in sunlight also introduce DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts [(6-4)PPs] that must be repaired for the survival of the plant. Genome sequencing has revealed the presence of genes for both CPD and (6-4)PP photolyases, as well as genes for nucleotide excision repair in plants, such as Arabidopsis and rice. Plant photolyases have been purified, characterized, and have been shown to play an important role in plant survival. In contrast, even though nucleotide excision repair gene homologs have been found in plants, the mechanism of nucleotide excision repair has not been investigated. Here we used the in vivo excision repair assay developed in our laboratory to demonstrate that Arabidopsis removes CPDs and (6-4)PPs by a dual-incision mechanism that is essentially identical to the mechanism of dual incisions in humans and other eukaryotes, in which oligonucleotides with a mean length of 26-27 nucleotides are removed by incising ∼20 phosphodiester bonds 5' and 5 phosphodiester bonds 3' to the photoproduct. PMID:27071131

  2. Duplex-Selective Ruthenium-based DNA Intercalators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, Chad M.; Kennedy, Robert D.; Rouge, Jessica L.; Rosen, Mari S.; Wang, Mary X.; Seo, Soyoung E.; Clingerman, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and synthesis of small molecules that exhibit enhanced luminescence in the presence of duplex rather than single-stranded DNA. The local environment presented by a well-known [Ru(dipyrido[2,3-a:3',2'-c]phenazine)L2]2+-based DNA intercalator was modified by functionalizing the bipyridine ligands with esters and carboxylic acids. By systematically varying the number and charge of the pendant groups, it was determined that decreasing the electrostatic interaction between the intercalator and the anionic DNA backbone reduced single-strand interactions and translated to better duplex specificity. In studying this class of complexes, a single RuII complex emerged that selectively luminesces in the presence of duplex DNA with little to no background from interacting with single stranded DNA. This complex shows promise as a new dye capable of selectively staining double versus single-stranded DNA in gel electrophoresis, which cannot be done with conventional SYBR dyes. PMID:26119581

  3. Randomly Amplified DNA Fingerprinting: A Culmination of DNA Marker Technologies Based on Arbitrarily-Primed PCR Amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Waldron Julie; Peace Cameron P.; Searle Iain R.; Furtado Agnelo; Wade Nick; Findlay Ian; Graham Michael W.; Carroll Bernard J.

    2002-01-01

    Arbitrarily-primed DNA markers can be very useful for genetic fingerprinting and for facilitating positional cloning of genes. This class of technologies is particularly important for less studied species, for which genome sequence information is generally not known. The technologies include Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), DNA Amplification Fingerprinting (DAF), and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP). We have modified the DAF protocol to produce a robust PCR-based DNA ma...

  4. A cell-free system for DNA repair synthesis using purified enzymes from the Novikoff hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikoff DNA polymerase-β and Novikoff DNase V have been used in a cell-free DNA excision repair system for UV-irradiated substrates to determine their DNA repair capabilities. The repair system was shown to depend upon UV-irradiated DNA, incision by phage T4 UV-endonuclease, excision by DNase V and synthesis by DNA polymerase-β; ligation was not included. Highly purified calf thymus DNA was UV-irradiated at 500-750 J/m2 and incised by T4 UV-endonuclease. The repair system was used to follow the purification of DNase V and DNA polymerase-β. For increased specificity, the parameters of UV-irradiation, incision, excision and synthesis were confirmed on highly supercoiled, covalently closed, phage PM2 DNA. Optimal DNA and Mg2+ concentrations were determined for the repair assay, which was shown to be linear with respect to time. Excision of the 3'-apyrimidinic site and the 5'-pyrimidine dimer by bidirectional DNase V, presumed to occur from the above experiments, was studied more thoroughly using lightly UV-irradiated [3H]poly(dT)poly (dA), labeled in both the base and the sugar, and incised with T4 UV-endonuclease

  5. Finding human promoter groups based on DNA physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jia; Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zhao, Hongya; Yan, Hong

    2009-10-01

    DNA rigidity is an important physical property originating from the DNA three-dimensional structure. Although the general DNA rigidity patterns in human promoters have been investigated, their distinct roles in transcription are largely unknown. In this paper, we discover four highly distinct human promoter groups based on similarity of their rigidity profiles. First, we find that all promoter groups conserve relatively rigid DNAs at the canonical TATA box [a consensus TATA(A/T)A(A/T) sequence] position, which are important physical signals in binding transcription factors. Second, we find that the genes activated by each group of promoters share significant biological functions based on their gene ontology annotations. Finally, we find that these human promoter groups correlate with the tissue-specific gene expression.

  6. Molecular cloning and biological characterization of the human excision repair gene ERCC-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we present the cloning, partial characterization, and preliminary studies of the biological activity of a human gene, designated ERCC-3, involved in early steps of the nucleotide excision repair pathway. The gene was cloned after genomic DNA transfection of human (HeLa) chromosomal DNA together with dominant marker pSV3gptH to the UV-sensitive, incision-defective Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant 27-1. This mutant belongs to complementation group 3 of repair-deficient rodent mutants. After selection of UV-resistant primary and secondary 27-1 transformants, human sequences associated with the induced UV resistance were rescued in cosmids from the DNA of a secondary transformant by using a linked dominant marker copy and human repetitive DNA as probes. From coinheritance analysis of the ERCC-3 region in independent transformants, we deduce that the gene has a size of 35 to 45 kilobases, of which one essential segment has so far been refractory to cloning. Conserved unique human sequences hybridizing to a 3.0-kilobase mRNA were used to isolate apparently full-length cDNA clones. Upon transfection to 27-1 cells, the ERCC-3 cDNA, inserted in a mammalian expression vector, induced specific and (virtually) complete correction of the UV sensitivity and unscheduled DNA synthesis of mutants of complementation group 3 with very high efficiency. Mutant 27-1 is, unlike other mutants of complementation group 3, also very sensitive toward small alkylating agents. This unique property of the mutant is not corrected by introduction of the ERCC-3 cDNA, indicating that it may be caused by an independent second mutation in another repair function. By hybridization to DNA of a human x rodent hybrid cell panel, the ERCC-3 gene was assigned to chromosome 2, in agreement with data based on cell fusion

  7. Density functional calculations of planar DNA base-pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, M V T; Artacho, E; Sánchez-Portál, D; Soler, J M; Machado, Maider; Ordejon, Pablo; Artacho, Emilio; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Soler, Jose M.

    1999-01-01

    We present a systematic Density Functional Theory (DFT) study of geometries and energies of the nucleic acid DNA bases (guanine, adenine, cytosine and thymine) and 30 different DNA base-pairs. We use a recently developed linear-scaling DFT scheme, which is specially suited for systems with large numbers of atoms. As a first step towards the study of large DNA systems, in this work: (i) We establish the reliability of the approximations of our method (including pseudopotentials and basis sets) for the description of the hydrogen-bonded base pairs, by comparing our results with those of former calculations. We show that the interaction energies at Hartree-Fock geometries are in very good agreement with those of second order M{ø}ller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory (the most accurate technique that can be applied at present for system of the sizes of the base-pairs). (ii) We perform DFT structural optimizations for the 30 different DNA base-pairs, only three of which had been previously studied with DFT. Our ...

  8. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4.

    OpenAIRE

    Yarosh, D B; Rosenstein, B S; Setlow, R B

    1981-01-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control experiments with the denV1 excision-deficient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  9. DNA methylation detection based on difference of base content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinobu; Ohtsuka, Keiichi; Honda, Satoshi; Sato, Yusuke; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2016-04-01

    Methylation frequently occurs in cytosines of CpG sites to regulate gene expression. The identification of aberrant methylation of certain genes is important for cancer marker analysis. The aim of this study was to determine the methylation frequency in DNA samples of unknown length and/or concentration. Unmethylated cytosine is known to be converted to thymine following bisulfite treatment and subsequent PCR. For this reason, the AT content in DNA increases with an increasing number of methylation sites. In this study, the fluorescein-carrying bis-acridinyl peptide (FKA) molecule was used for the detection of methylation frequency. FKA contains fluorescein and two acridine moieties, which together allow for the determination of the AT content of double-stranded DNA fragments. Methylated and unmethylated human genomes were subjected to bisulfide treatment and subsequent PCR using primers specific for the CFTR, CDH4, DBC1, and NPY genes. The AT content in the resulting PCR products was estimated by FKA, and AT content estimations were found to be in good agreement with those determined by DNA sequencing. This newly developed method may be useful for determining methylation frequencies of many PCR products by measuring the fluorescence in samples excited at two different wavelengths.

  10. Quantum interference in DNA bases probed by graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heejeong; Seul Kim, Han; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Dongho; Hoon Kim, Yong; Huh, Nam

    2013-07-01

    Based on first-principles nonequilibrium Green's function calculations, we demonstrate quantum interference (QI) effects on the tunneling conductance of deoxyribonucleic acid bases placed between zigzag graphene nanoribbon electrodes. With the analogy of QI in hydrocarbon ring structures, we hypothesize that QI can be well preserved in the π-π coupling between the carbon-based electrode and a single DNA base. We demonstrate indications of QI, such as destructively interfered anti-resonance or Fano-resonance, that affect the variation of tunneling conductance depending on the orientation of a base. We find that guanine, with a 10-fold higher transverse conductance, can be singled out from the other bases.

  11. Functional evaluation of DNA repair in human biopsies and their relation to other cellular biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Slyskova, Jana; Langie, Sabine A. S.; Collins, Andrew R.; Vodicka, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of DNA lesions are estimated to occur in each cell every day and almost all are recognized and repaired. DNA repair is an essential system that prevents accumulation of mutations which can lead to serious cellular malfunctions. Phenotypic evaluation of DNA repair activity of individuals is a relatively new approach. Methods to assess base and nucleotide excision repair pathways (BER and NER) in peripheral blood cells based on modified comet assay protocols have been widely applied i...

  12. Excision repair cross complementation group 1 is a chemotherapy-tolerating gene in cisplatin-based treatment for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shoufeng; Pan, Hong; Liu, Desen; Mao, Naiquan; Zuo, Chuantian; Li, Li; Xie, Tong; Huang, Dingming; Huang, Yaoyuan; Pan, Qi; Yang, Li; Wu, Junwei

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the biological functions of excision repair cross complementation goup 1 (ERCC1) in cell proliferation, cell cycle, invasion and cisplatin response of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Firstly, ERCC1 gene was successfully transfected into H1299 cells by gene cloning and transfection techniques. Then, cell proliferation was determined with the cell growth curve and colony-forming assays. Flow cytometry (FCM) was employed to investigate the cell cycle distribution. The ability of cell invasion was estimated by means of Matrigel invasion assays. Response of NSCLC cells to cisplatin was detected utilizing MTT assays, and the intracellular drug concentrations were determined by the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Expression of the two cell membrane proteins, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), was also evaluated utilizing FCM technique. By contrast, ERCC1 expression in the NSCLC A549 cells was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) through RNAi technique. In addition, the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin on A549 cells was detected by MTT assays. In the present study, the results demonstrated that ERCC1 had no effect on cell proliferation, cell cycle and the ability of invasion, but showed significant impact on cisplatin response of the NSCLC H1299 cells. Furthermore, siRNA-induced suppression of ERCC1 evidently enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin of NSCLC A549 cells. Therefore, it is confirmed that ERCC1 is a chemotherapy-tolerating gene and a promising predictor in tailoring chemotherapy of NSCLC. PMID:25434755

  13. PCR synthesis of base-modified DNA templates for transcription

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raindlová, Veronika; Hocek, Michal

    Praha : Czech Chemical Society, 2015. s. 132. [Liblice 2015. Advances in Organic , Bioorganic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry /50./. 06.11.2015-08.11.2015, Olomouc] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-04289S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : base-modified DNA * polymerase chain reaction * RNA polymerase Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  14. Local excision for selected colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, M A; Goldberg, S M

    1989-07-01

    In summary, local excision is a useful tool in the management of selected colorectal carcinomas. The advent of the fibreoptic colonoscope has revised the concept of local excision when dealing with carcinoma-containing polyps of the colon. The clinician now has the means of locally excising certain carcinomas which would have required laparotomy in the not so distant past. In dealing with carcinoma of the rectum, local excision is not advocated for all rectal carcinomas. In fact, when the previously discussed tumour related factors are considered, local excision should be the ultimate procedure in less than 5% of operations performed for rectal carcinomas. However, when appropriately used, local excision provides a less morbid alternative to more radical procedures without compromising patient survival rates or local recurrence rates. PMID:2692739

  15. Karyotyping of Brassica oleracea L.based on rDNA and Cot-1 DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Taixia; WU Chunhong; HUANG Jinyong; WEI Wenhui

    2007-01-01

    To explore an effective and reliable karyotyping method in Brassica crop plants,Cot-1 DNA was isolated from Brassica oleracea genome,labeled as probe with Biotin-Nick Translation Mix kit,in situ hybridized to mitotic spreads,and where specific fluorescent bands showed on each chromosome pair.25S and 5S rDNA were labeled as probes with DIG-Nick Translation Mix kit and Biotin-Nick Translation Mix kit,respectively,in situ hybridized to mitotic preparations,where 25S rDNA could be detected on two chromosome pairs and 5S rDNA on only one.Cot-1 DNA contains rDNA and chromosome sites identity between Cot-1 DNA and 25S rDNA was determined by dual-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization.All these showed that the karyotyping technique based on a combination of rDNA and Cot-1 DNA chromosome landmarks is superior to all but one.A more exact karyotype ofB.oleracea has been analyzed based on a combination of rDNA sites,Cot-1 DNA fluorescent bands,chromosome lengths and arm ratios.

  16. Nanopore-based Fourth-generation DNA Sequencing Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanxiao Feng; Yuechuan Zhang; Cuifeng Ying; Deqiang Wang; Chunlei Du

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore-based sequencers, as the fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology, have the potential to quickly and reliably sequence the entire human genome for less than $1000, and possibly for even less than$100. The single-molecule techniques used by this technology allow us to further study the interaction between DNA and protein, as well as between protein and protein. Nanopore analysis opens a new door to molecular biology investigation at the single-molecule scale. In this article, we have reviewed academic achievements in nanopore technology from the past as well as the latest advances, including both biological and solid-state nanopores, and discussed their recent and potential applications.

  17. DNA methylation based biomarkers: Practical considerations and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; How Kit, Alexandre; Tost, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    biochemical molecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA or lipids, whereby protein biomarkers have been the most extensively studied and used, notably in blood-based protein quantification tests or immunohistochemistry. The rise of interest in epigenetic mechanisms has allowed the identification of a new type of...... specific and sensitive than commonly used protein biomarkers, which could clearly justify their use in clinics. However, very few of them are at the moment used in clinics and even less commercial tests are currently available. The objective of this review is to discuss the advantages of DNA methylation as...... biomarker, DNA methylation, which is of great potential for many applications. This stable and heritable covalent modification mostly affects cytosines in the context of a CpG dinucleotide in humans. It can be detected and quantified by a number of technologies including genome-wide screening methods as...

  18. Decrease in Abundance of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease Causes Failure of Base Excision Repair in Culture-Adapted Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krutá, M.; Bálek, L.; Hejnová, R.; Dobšáková, Z.; Eiselleová, L.; Matulka, K.; Bárta, T.; Fojtík, P.; Fajkus, Jiří; Hampl, A.; Dvořák, P.; Rotrekl, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2013), s. 693-702. ISSN 1066-5099 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.100/02/0123 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA-DAMAGE * GENOMIC INSTABILITY * HETEROZYGOUS MICE Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 7.133, year: 2013

  19. Numerical Characterization of DNA Sequence Based on Dinucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Xingqin Qi; Edgar Fuller; Qin Wu; Cun-Quan Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Sequence comparison is a primary technique for the analysis of DNA sequences. In order to make quantitative comparisons, one devises mathematical descriptors that capture the essence of the base composition and distribution of the sequence. Alignment methods and graphical techniques (where each sequence is represented by a curve in high-dimension Euclidean space) have been used popularly for a long time. In this contribution we will introduce a new nongraphical and nonalignment approach based...

  20. Base-sequence-dependent sliding of proteins on DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Barbi, M; Place, C.; Popkov, V.; Salerno, M.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility that the sliding motion of proteins on DNA is influenced by the base sequence through a base pair reading interaction, is considered. Referring to the case of the T7 RNA-polymerase, we show that the protein should follow a noise-influenced sequence-dependent motion which deviate from the standard random walk usually assumed. The general validity and the implications of the results are discussed.

  1. Oligonucleotide-based systems: DNA, microRNAs, DNA/RNA aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Pawan; Estrela, Pedro; Ladomery, Michael

    2016-06-30

    There are an increasing number of applications that have been developed for oligonucleotide-based biosensing systems in genetics and biomedicine. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors are those where the probe to capture the analyte is a strand of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA) or a synthetic analogue of naturally occurring nucleic acids. This review will shed light on various types of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA (particularly microRNAs), their role and their application in biosensing. It will also cover DNA/RNA aptamers, which can be used as bioreceptors for a wide range of targets such as proteins, small molecules, bacteria and even cells. It will also highlight how the invention of synthetic oligonucleotides such as peptide nucleic acid (PNA) or locked nucleic acid (LNA) has pushed the limits of molecular biology and biosensor development to new perspectives. These technologies are very promising albeit still in need of development in order to bridge the gap between the laboratory-based status and the reality of biomedical applications. PMID:27365033

  2. DNA Extraction Procedures Meaningfully Influence qPCR-Based mtDNA Copy Number Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Wen; Jiang, Lan; Bhasin, Shalender; Khan, Shaharyar M.; Russell H. Swerdlow

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) is commonly used to determine cell mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number. This technique involves obtaining the ratio of an unknown variable (number of copies of an mtDNA gene) to a known parameter (number of copies of a nuclear DNA gene) within a genomic DNA sample. We considered the possibility that mtDNA: nuclear DNA (nDNA) ratio determinations could vary depending on the method of genomic DNA extraction used, and that these differences could substantively...

  3. The properties of small Ag clusters bound to DNA bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Verdugo, Víctor; Metiu, Horia; Gwinn, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    We study the binding of neutral silver clusters, Agn (n=1-6), to the DNA bases adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T) and the absorption spectra of the silver cluster-base complexes. Using density functional theory (DFT), we find that the clusters prefer to bind to the doubly bonded ring nitrogens and that binding to T is generally much weaker than to C, G, and A. Ag3 and Ag4 make the stronger bonds. Bader charge analysis indicates a mild electron transfer from the base to the clusters for all bases, except T. The donor bases (C, G, and A) bind to the sites on the cluster where the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital has a pronounced protrusion. The site where cluster binds to the base is controlled by the shape of the higher occupied states of the base. Time-dependent DFT calculations show that different base-cluster isomers may have very different absorption spectra. In particular, we find new excitations in base-cluster molecules, at energies well below those of the isolated components, and with strengths that depend strongly on the orientations of planar clusters with respect to the base planes. Our results suggest that geometric constraints on binding, imposed by designed DNA structures, may be a feasible route to engineering the selection of specific cluster-base assemblies.

  4. Recovery Based Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor Detection of Pathogenic Avian Influenza DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Chu, Chia-Jung; Teng, Kang-Ning; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Chii-Dong; Tsai, Li-Chu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-02-01

    Fast and accurate diagnosis is critical in infectious disease surveillance and management. We proposed a DNA recovery system that can easily be adapted to DNA chip or DNA biosensor for fast identification and confirmation of target DNA. This method was based on the re-hybridization of DNA target with a recovery DNA to free the DNA probe. Functionalized silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) was demonstrated to monitor such specific DNA-DNA interaction using high pathogenic strain virus hemagglutinin 1 (H1) DNA of avian influenza (AI) as target. Specific electric changes were observed in real-time for AI virus DNA sensing and device recovery when nanowire surface of SiNW FET was modified with complementary captured DNA probe. The recovery based SiNW FET biosensor can be further developed for fast identification and further confirmation of a variety of influenza virus strains and other infectious diseases.

  5. DNA sequence analysis using hierarchical ART-based classification networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBlanc, C.; Hruska, S.I. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Katholi, C.R.; Unnasch, T.R. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Adaptive resonance theory (ART) describes a class of artificial neural network architectures that act as classification tools which self-organize, work in real-time, and require no retraining to classify novel sequences. We have adapted ART networks to provide support to scientists attempting to categorize tandem repeat DNA fragments from Onchocerca volvulus. In this approach, sequences of DNA fragments are presented to multiple ART-based networks which are linked together into two (or more) tiers; the first provides coarse sequence classification while the sub- sequent tiers refine the classifications as needed. The overall rating of the resulting classification of fragments is measured using statistical techniques based on those introduced to validate results from traditional phylogenetic analysis. Tests of the Hierarchical ART-based Classification Network, or HABclass network, indicate its value as a fast, easy-to-use classification tool which adapts to new data without retraining on previously classified data.

  6. Fingerprints, Iris and DNA Features based Multimodal Systems: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Chandra Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biometric systems are alternates to the traditional identification systems. This paper provides an overview of single feature and multiple features based biometric systems, including the performance of physiological characteristics (such as fingerprint, hand geometry, head recognition, iris, retina, face recognition, DNA recognition, palm prints, heartbeat, finger veins, palates etc and behavioral characteristics (such as body language, facial expression, signature verification, speech recognition, Gait Signature etc.. The fingerprints, iris image, and DNA features based multimodal systems and their performances are analyzed in terms of security, reliability, accuracy, and long-term stability. The strengths and weaknesses of various multiple features based biometric approaches published so far are analyzed. The directions of future research work for robust personal identification is outlined.

  7. Fluorescence-based DNA minisequence analysis for detection of known single-base changes in genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M; Rappaport, E; Blasband, A; Semeraro, A; Sartore, M; Surrey, S; Fortina, P

    1995-06-01

    We describe a rapid, automated method for direct detection of known single-base changes in genomic DNA. Fluorescence-based DNA minisequence analysis is employed in a template-dependent reaction which involves a single nucleotide extension of an oligonucleotide primer by the correct fluorescently-tagged dideoxynucleotide chain terminator. Detection following electrophoresis on denaturing acrylamide gels is facilitated by alkaline phosphatase treatment of reaction products after extension followed by isopropanol precipitation of the dye-tagged, single-base-extended primer to remove unincorporated deoxynucleotides. Fluorescence analysis of the incorporated dye tag reveals the identity of the template nucleotide immediately 3' to the primer site. This technique does not require radioactivity or biotinylated PCR product, relies on the incorporation of a single dideoxynucleotide terminator to extend the primer by one nucleotide and takes advantage of the sensitivity of fluorescent terminators developed for automated DNA sequence analysis. As a demonstration, we have applied the assay to human genomic DNA for detection of the sickle mutation in the beta-globin gene, and have also examined feasibility for simultaneous delineation using a multiplex-like strategy in a single gel-lane of some of the most common beta-thalassemia mutations in the Mediterranean basin. PMID:7477010

  8. Excision-repair of γ-ray damaged thymine in bacterial and mammalian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selective excision of products of the 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine type (t') for γ-irradiated or OsO4-oxidized DNA or synthetic poly [d(A-T)] was observed with crude extracts of Escherichia coli and isolated nuclei from human carcinoma HeLa S-3 cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells. The results with E. coli extracts allow the following conclusion: The uvrA-gene product is not required for t' excision; radiation-induced strand breakage is not required for product excision; experiments with extracts of E. coli polAexl showed that the 5' → 3' exonuclease associated with polymerase I is responsible for the removal of t'; experiments with extracts of E. coli endo I lig 4 and the ligase inhibitor nicotinamide mononucleotide showed that polynucleotide ligase accomplishes the last strand resealing step in the excision-repair of t'. Isolated nuclei from HeLa and Chinese hamster ovary cells possess the necessary enzymes for the selective excision of t' from γ-irradiated or osmium tetroxide oxidized DNA. Approximately 25 to 35 percent of the products were removed from DNA within 60 min. Unspecific DNA degradation was very low. Radiation-induced strand breakage is not required for product removal

  9. DNA repair initiated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia lymphocytes by 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide is inhibited by fludarabine and clofarabine.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamauchi, Takahiro; Nowak, Billie J.; Michael J Keating; Plunkett, William

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) lymphocytes respond to DNA alkylation by excision repair, with the extent of repair increasing as the cells acquire resistance to alkylating agents. Because incorporation of nucleotide analogues into the repair patches elicits death signals in quiescent cells, the increased capacity for excision repair in alkylator-resistant cells could facilitate incorporation of nucleotide analogues. We hypothesized that the mechanism-based interaction of nucleosi...

  10. Genetic diversity of sago palm in Indonesia based on chloroplast DNA (cpDNA markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEMEN SURAHMAN

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abbas B, Renwarin Y, Bintoro MH, Sudarsono, Surahman M, Ehara H (2010 Genetic diversity of sago palm in Indonesia based on chloroplast DNA (cpDNA markers. Biodiversitas 11: 112-117. Sago palm (Metroxylon sagu Rottb. was believed capable to accumulate high carbohydrate content in its trunk. The capability of sago palm producing high carbohydrate should be an appropriate criterion for defining alternative crops in anticipating food crisis. The objective of this research was to study genetic diversity of sago palm in Indonesia based on cpDNA markers. Total genome extraction was done following the Qiagen DNA isolation protocols 2003. Single Nucleotide Fragments (SNF analyses were performed by using ABI Prism GeneScanR 3.7. SNF analyses detected polymorphism revealing eleven alleles and ten haplotypes from total 97 individual samples of sago palm. Specific haplotypes were found in the population from Papua, Sulawesi, and Kalimantan. Therefore, the three islands will be considered as origin of sago palm diversities in Indonesia. The highest haplotype numbers and the highest specific haplotypes were found in the population from Papua suggesting this islands as the centre and the origin of sago palm diversities in Indonesia. The research had however no sufficient data yet to conclude the Papua origin of sago palm. Genetic hierarchies and differentiations of sago palm samples were observed significantly different within populations (P=0.04574, among populations (P=0.04772, and among populations within the island (P=0.03366, but among islands no significant differentiations were observed (P= 0.63069.

  11. 27 CFR 26.30 - Excise taxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excise taxes. 26.30 Section 26.30 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Into the United States From Areas Other Than Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands § 26.30 Excise...

  12. 27 CFR 70.412 - Excise taxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excise taxes. 70.412 Section 70.412 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Beer § 70.412 Excise taxes. (a) Collection. Taxes on distilled spirits, wines, and beer are paid...

  13. Detection Tuna and Processed Products Based Protein and DNA Barcoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuring Wulansari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tuna is the second largest fishery commodity in Indonesia after the shrimp. Since the high demand and the limited stock of tuna resulted in fraudulent chance. Authentication is required to meassure consumers regarding the accuracy of its labeling and food safety. In this study, the authentication was based on protein and DNA barcoding using cytochrome-b gene (cyt-b of the mitochondrial DNA as the target of gene. Primer of cyt b gene was designed based on the tuna species. This study aimed to identify the authenticity of tuna fresh and its processed products through protein using SDS-PAGE and DNA barcoding techniques. The phases of this research were protein electrophoresis by SDS-PAGE, DNA extraction, PCR amplification, electrophoresis and sequencing. Samples of fresh fish (Tu1, Tu2, Tu3, Tu4, and Tu5 and processed tuna (canned and steak were successfully extracted. Result showed that SDS-PAGE proved the damage of proteins in the processed tuna, so this method was not appropriate if it is used to identify the authenticity of tuna. PCR electrophoresis results showed that the samples of tuna, tuna steak, sushi, meat ball, abon, and caned tuna were successfully amplified in the range of 500-750 bp except Ka3, which was in line with the target of DNA (620 bp. Resulted sequences of Tu2, Tu3, Tu4 and Tu5 were identified according the results of morphometric namely T. albacares, while Tu1 was identified as T. obesus with homology level of 99%. Processed tunas (steak and canned tuna were identified as T. albacares, as stated on the labels.

  14. Nanoparticles based DNA conjugates for detection of pathogenic microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamdagni, Pragati; Khatri, Poonam; Rana, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases have been on rise in the recent past. Early diagnosis plays a role as important as proper treatment and prophylaxis. The current practices of detection are time consuming which may result in unnecessary delays in treatment. Advances in nanodiagnostic approaches have been in focus lately. The rising interest and better understanding of nanoparticles have led to opening up of new frontiers in the concerned area. Optical properties of nanoparticles are being exploited to design detection systems that can provide fast, one-step and reliable results. Based on conserved DNA sequences unique to the target organism, the results offer accuracy comparable to conventional tests. Further, visual or spectrophotometric analysis omits the need of costly apparatus for result interpretation. The present review aims at putting together the information on nanoparticles based DNA conjugate systems for detection of pathogenic microorganisms.

  15. Highly selective DNA biosensor based on the long-range electron transfer of indigo carmine through DNA duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a highly selective DNA biosensor. It was based on the long-range electron transfer (LRET) from the electroactive dye indigo carmine (IC) through the DNA duplex on a glassy carbon electrode. Voltammetric experiments showed that IC interacts with dsDNA through a typical intercalative mode with a relatively strong affinity of 2.3(±0.6) x 106 M-1. If incubated with DNA in IC solution, no response was observed with the ssDNA-modified probe electrode. However, a pair of well-defined redox peak was observed with a DNA-hybridized electrode, proving the presence of LRET on the biosensor. The biosensor also can differentiate complementary sequences, non-complementary sequences, and even the mutated sequences with single-base mismatches at different sites. (author)

  16. An Uncompressed Image Encryption Algorithm Based on DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Ramesh Maniyath

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth of the Internet and digitized content made image and video distribution simpler. Hence the need for image and video data protection is on the rise. In this paper, we propose a secure and computationally feasible image and video encryption/decryption algorithm based on DNA sequences. The main purpose of this algorithm is to reduce the big image encryption time. This algorithm is implemented by using the natural DNA sequences as main keys. The first part is the process of pixel scrambling. The original image is confused in the light of the scrambling sequence which is generated by the DNA sequence. The second part is the process of pixel replacement. The pixel gray values of the new image and the one of the three encryption templates generated by the other DNA sequence are XORed bit-by-bit in turn. The main scope of this paper is to propose an extension of this algorithm to videos and making it secure using modern Biological technology. A security analysis for the proposed system is performed and presented.

  17. Inter-base Electronic Coupling for transport through DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Anantram, H M M P

    2005-01-01

    We develop a new approach to derive single state tight binding (SSTB) model for electron transport in the vicinity of valence-conduction bands of poly(G)-poly(C) and poly(A)-poly(T) DNA. The SSTB parameters are derived from {\\it first principles} and are used to model charge transport through finite length DNA. We investigate the rigor of reducing the full DNA Hamiltonian to SSTB model to represent charge transport in the vicinity of valence-conduction band. While the transmission coefficient spectrum is preserved, its position shifts in energy. Thymine is poorly represented and its peak height is substantially reduced. This is attributed to the abstraction of the HOMO-LUMO coupling to other eigen-states in the nearest neighbor DNA bases, and can be corrected within $2^{nd}$ order time independent perturbation theory. Inter-strand charge transport has also been analyzed and it is found that hopping to the nearest neighbor in the complementary strand is the most important process except in the valence band of ...

  18. MitBASE: a comprehensive and integrated mitochondrial DNA database

    OpenAIRE

    Antimonelli, M.; Altamura, N.; Benne, R.; Boyen, C; Brennicke, A; Carone, A; Cooper, J. M.; D'Elia, D.; Montalvo, de, A.; Pinto, de, B.; Robertis, De, M.; Golik, P.; Grienenberger, J M; Knoop, V.; Lanave, C.

    1999-01-01

    MitBASE is an integrated and comprehensive database of mitochondrial DNA data which collects all available information from different organisms and from intraspecie variants and mutants. Research institutions from different countries are involved, each in charge of developing, collecting and annotating data for the organisms they are specialised in. The design of the actual structure of the database and its implementation in a user-friendly format are the care of the European Bioinformatics I...

  19. DNA Based Carbon Nanotube Porphyrin Nanohybrids Molecular Recognization and Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Riccitelli, Molly M; Zhang, Hanyu; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    In the search to improve solar cells, scientists are exploring new materials that will provide better current transfer. One material that has emerged as a strong contender is the single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). Current DNA-SWNT based films combined with chromophores have poor operational lifetimes compared to commercial solar cells. Once exposed to light the chromophore begins to degrade, eventually rendering the solar cell unusable. To solve this problem, we used a method involving mul...

  20. Progress of DNA-based Methods for Species Identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zhen; ZHANG Su-hua; WANG Zheng; BIAN Ying-nan; LI Cheng-tao

    2015-01-01

    Species identification of biological samples is widely used in such fields as forensic science and food industry. A variety of accurate and reliable methods have been developed in recent years. The cur-rent reviewshows common target genes and screening criteria suitable for species identification, and de-scribed various DNA-based molecular biology methods about species identification. Additionally, it dis-cusses the future development of species identification combined with real-time PCR and sequencing technologies.

  1. Femtosecond direct observation of charge transfer between bases in DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Chaozhi; Fiebig, Torsten; Schiemann, Olav; Barton, Jacqueline K.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2000-01-01

    Charge transfer in supramolecular assemblies of DNA is unique because of the notion that the π-stacked bases within the duplex may mediate the transport, possibly leading to damage and/or repair. The phenomenon of transport through π-stacked arrays over a long distance has an analogy to conduction in molecular electronics, but the mechanism still needs to be determined. To decipher the elementary steps and the mechanism, one has to directly measure the dynamics in ...

  2. Base excision repair efficiency and mechanism in nuclear extracts are influenced by the ratio between volume of nuclear extraction buffer and nuclei-Implications for comparative studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Krokan, Hans E

    using purified proteins essentially mirror properties of the proteins used, and does not necessarily reflect the mechanism as it occurs in the cell. Nuclear extracts from cultured cells have the capacity to carry out complete BER and can give important information on the mechanism. Furthermore......, candidate proteins in extracts can be inhibited or depleted in a controlled way, making defined extracts an important source for mechanistic studies. The major drawback is that there is no standardized method of preparing nuclear extract for BER studies, and it does not appear to be a topic given much...... attention. Here we have examined BER activity of nuclear cell extracts from HeLa cells, using as substrate a circular DNA molecule with either uracil or an AP-site in a defined position. We show that BER activity of nuclear extracts from the same batch of cells varies inversely with the volume of nuclear...

  3. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile. PMID:26409535

  4. DNA Repair Glycosylases with a [4Fe-4S] Cluster: A Redox Cofactor for DNA-mediated Charge Transport?

    OpenAIRE

    Boal, Amie K.; Yavin, Eylon; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2007-01-01

    The [4Fe-4S] cluster is ubiquitous to a class of base excision repair enzymes, in organisms ranging from bacteria to man, and was first considered as a structural element, owing to its redox stability under physiological conditions. When studied bound to DNA, two of these repair proteins (MutY and Endonuclease III from Escherichia coli) display DNA-dependent reversible electron transfer with characteristics typical of high potential iron proteins. These results have inspired a reexamination o...

  5. Diagnostic markers of urothelial cancer based on DNA methylation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early detection and risk assessment are crucial for treating urothelial cancer (UC), which is characterized by a high recurrence rate, and necessitates frequent and invasive monitoring. We aimed to establish diagnostic markers for UC based on DNA methylation. In this multi-center study, three independent sample sets were prepared. First, DNA methylation levels at CpG loci were measured in the training sets (tumor samples from 91 UC patients, corresponding normal-appearing tissue from these patients, and 12 normal tissues from age-matched bladder cancer-free patients) using the Illumina Golden Gate methylation assay to identify differentially methylated loci. Next, these methylated loci were validated by quantitative DNA methylation by pyrosequencing, using another cohort of tissue samples (Tissue validation set). Lastly, methylation of these markers was analyzed in the independent urine samples (Urine validation set). ROC analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these 12 selected markers. Of the 1303 CpG sites, 158 were hyper ethylated and 356 were hypo ethylated in tumor tissues compared to normal tissues. In the panel analysis, 12 loci showed remarkable alterations between tumor and normal samples, with 94.3% sensitivity and 97.8% specificity. Similarly, corresponding normal tissue could be distinguished from normal tissues with 76.0% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Furthermore, the diagnostic accuracy for UC of these markers determined in urine samples was high, with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Based on these preliminary findings, diagnostic markers based on differential DNA methylation at specific loci can be useful for non-invasive and reliable detection of UC and epigenetic field defect

  6. In vivo repair of alkylating and oxidative DNA damage in the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of wild-type and glycosylase-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Senyene E.; Gustafson, Margaret A; Margillo, Kathleen M; Lee, Sean A; Ryde, Ian T.; Meyer, Joel N.

    2012-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is an evolutionarily conserved DNA repair pathway that is critical for repair of many of the most common types of DNA damage generated both by endogenous metabolic pathways and exposure to exogenous stressors such as pollutants. C. elegans is an increasingly important model organism for the study of DNA damage-related processes including DNA repair, genotoxicity, and apoptosis, but BER is not well understood in this organism, and has not previously been measured in ...

  7. ICE Afe 1, an actively excising genetic element from the biomining bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Paula; Covarrubias, Paulo C; Levicán, Gloria; Katz, Assaf; Tapia, Pablo; Holmes, David; Quatrini, Raquel; Orellana, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) are self-transferred mobile genetic elements that contribute to horizontal gene transfer. An ICE (ICEAfe1) was identified in the genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270. Excision of the element and expression of relevant genes under normal and DNA-damaging growth conditions was analyzed. Bioinformatic tools and DNA amplification methods were used to identify and to assess the excision and expression of genes related to the mobility of the element. Both basal and mitomycin C-inducible excision as well as expression and induction of the genes for integration/excision are demonstrated, suggesting that ICEAfe1 is an actively excising SOS-regulated mobile genetic element. The presence of a complete set of genes encoding self-transfer functions that are induced in response to DNA damage caused by mitomycin C additionally suggests that this element is capable of conjugative transfer to suitable recipient strains. Transfer of ICEAfe1 may provide selective advantages to other acidophiles in this ecological niche through dissemination of gene clusters expressing transfer RNAs, CRISPRs, and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis enzymes, probably by modification of translation efficiency, resistance to bacteriophage infection and biofilm formation, respectively. These data open novel avenues of research on conjugative transformation of biotechnologically relevant microorganisms recalcitrant to genetic manipulation. PMID:23486178

  8. The ING1b tumor suppressor facilitates nucleotide excision repair by promoting chromatin accessibility to XPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ING1b is the most studied ING family protein and perhaps the most ubiquitously and abundantly expressed. This protein is involved in the regulation of various biological functions ranging from senescence, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, to DNA repair. ING1b is upregulated by UV irradiation and enhances the removal of bulky nucleic acid photoproducts. In this study, we provide evidence that ING1b mediates nucleotide excision repair by facilitating the access to damaged nucleosomal DNA. We demonstrate that ING1b is not recruited to UV-induced DNA lesions but enhances nucleotide excision repair only in XPC-proficient cells, implying an essential role in early steps of the 'access, repair, restore' model. We also find that ING1b alters histone acetylation dynamics upon exposure to UV radiation and induces chromatin relaxation in microccocal nuclease digestion assay, revealing that ING1b may allow better access to nucleotide excision repair machinery. More importantly, ING1b associates with chromatin in a UV-inducible manner and facilitates DNA access to nucleotide excision repair factor XPA. Furthermore, depletion of the endogenous ING1b results to the sensitization of cells at S-phase to UV irradiation. Taken together, these observations establish a role of ING1b acting as a chromatin accessibility factor for DNA damage recognition proteins upon genotoxic injury

  9. Efficient Repair of Abasic Sites in DNA by Mitochondrial Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Pinz, Kevin G.; Bogenhagen, Daniel F.

    1998-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cause a variety of relatively rare human diseases and may contribute to the pathogenesis of other, more common degenerative diseases. This stimulates interest in the capacity of mitochondria to repair damage to mtDNA. Several recent studies have shown that some types of damage to mtDNA may be repaired, particularly if the lesions can be processed through a base excision mechanism that employs an abasic site as a common intermediate. In this paper, we dem...

  10. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on avidin-biotin conjugation for influenza virus (type A) detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Da-Jung; Kim, Ki-Chul; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2011-09-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor (E-DNA biosensor) was fabricated by avidin-biotin conjugation of a biotinylated probe DNA, 5'-biotin-ATG AGT CTT CTA ACC GAG GTC GAA-3', and an avidin-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to detect the influenza virus (type A). An avidin-modified GCE was prepared by the reaction of avidin and a carboxylic acid-modified GCE, which was synthesized by the electrochemical reduction of 4-carboxyphenyl diazonium salt. The current value of the E-DNA biosensor was evaluated after hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The current value decreased after the hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA. The DNA that was used follows: complementary target DNA, 5'-TTC GAC CTC GGT TAG AAG ACT CAT-3' and two-base mismatched DNA, 5'-TTC GAC AGC GGT TAT AAG ACT CAT-3'.

  11. Developing a biological dosimeter based on mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct measurement of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage from ionizing radiation may be advantageous in determining radiation radiation exposures and assessing their effects on atomic radiation workers. The mitochondrial DNA molecule is one potential cellular DNA target which is: fully defined and sequenced; present in many copies per cell; not vital to cellular survival; and less subject to DNA repair than nuclear DNA. A method is described to isolate and analyse normal mitochondrial DNA. We describe the developments needed to determine DNA damage in mitochondrial DNA. The target is to make a biological dosimeter. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs

  12. Base-Displaced Intercalated Structure of the N-(2'-Deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone DNA Adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politica, Dustin A; Malik, Chanchal K; Basu, Ashis K; Stone, Michael P

    2015-12-21

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), an environmental mutagen found in diesel exhaust and a suspected carcinogen, undergoes metabolic reduction followed by reaction with DNA to form aminobenzanthrone (ABA) adducts, with the major alkylation product being N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone (C8-dG-ABA). Site-specific synthesis of the C8-dG-ABA adduct in the oligodeoxynucleotide 5'-d(GTGCXTGTTTGT)-3':5'-d(ACAAACACGCAC)-3'; X = C8-dG-ABA adduct, including codons 272-275 of the p53 gene, has allowed for investigation into the structural and thermodynamic properties of this adduct. The conformation of the C8-dG-ABA adduct was determined using NMR spectroscopy and was refined using molecular dynamics (MD) calculations restrained by experimentally determined interproton distance restraints obtained from NOE experiments. The refined structure revealed that the C8-dG-ABA adduct formed a base-displaced intercalated conformation. The adducted guanine was shifted into the syn conformation about the glycosidic bond. The 5'- and 3'-neighboring base pairs remained intact. While this facilitated π-stacking interactions between the ABA moiety and neighboring bases, the thermal melting temperature (Tm) of the adduct-containing duplex showed a decrease of 11 °C as compared to the corresponding unmodified oligodeoxynucleotide duplex. Overall, in this sequence, the base-displaced intercalated conformation of the C8-dG-ABA lesion bears similarity to structures of other arylamine C8-dG adducts. However, in this sequence, the base-displaced intercalated conformation for the C8-dG-ABA adduct differs from the conformation of the N(2)-dG-ABA adduct reported by de los Santos and co-workers, in which it is oriented in the minor groove toward the 5' end of the duplex, with the modified guanine remaining in the anti conformation about the glyosidic torsion angle, and the complementary base remaining within the duplex. The results are discussed in relationship to differences between the C8-d

  13. Physics of base-pairing dynamics in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghi, Manoel; Destainville, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    As a key molecule of life, Deoxyribo-Nucleic Acid (DNA) is the focus of numbers of investigations with the help of biological, chemical and physical techniques. From a physical point of view, both experimental and theoretical works have brought quantitative insights into DNA base-pairing dynamics that we review in this Report, putting emphasis on theoretical developments. We discuss the dynamics at the base-pair scale and its pivotal coupling with the polymer one, with a polymerization index running from a few nucleotides to tens of kilo-bases. This includes opening and closure of short hairpins and oligomers as well as zipping and unwinding of long macromolecules. We review how different physical mechanisms are either used by Nature or utilized in biotechnological processes to separate the two intertwined DNA strands, by insisting on quantitative results. They go from thermally-assisted denaturation bubble nucleation to force- or torque-driven mechanisms. We show that the helical character of the molecule, possibly supercoiled, can play a key role in many denaturation and renaturation processes. We categorize the mechanisms according to the relative timescales associated with base-pairing and chain orientational degrees of freedom such as bending and torsional elastic ones. In some specific situations, these chain orientational degrees of freedom can be integrated out, and the quasi-static approximation is valid. The complex dynamics then reduces to the diffusion in a low-dimensional free-energy landscape. In contrast, some important cases of experimental interest necessarily appeal to far-from-equilibrium statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics.

  14. Humidity Dependence of Charge Transport through DNA Revealed by Silicon-Based Nanotweezers Manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yamahata, Christophe; Collard, Dominique; Takekawa, Tetsuya; Kumemura, Momoko; Hashiguchi, Gen; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    The study of the electrical properties of DNA has aroused increasing interest since the last decade. So far, controversial arguments have been put forward to explain the electrical charge transport through DNA. Our experiments on DNA bundles manipulated with silicon-based actuated tweezers demonstrate undoubtedly that humidity is the main factor affecting the electrical conduction in DNA. We explain the quasi-Ohmic behavior of DNA and the exponential dependence of its conductivity with relati...

  15. Eukaryotic nucleotide excision repair: from understanding mechanisms to influencing biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah C Shuck; Emily A Short; John J Turchi

    2008-01-01

    Repair of bulky DNA adducts by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway is one of the more versatile DNA repair pathways for the removal of DNA lesions. There are two subsets of the NER pathway, global genomic-NER (GG-NER) and transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER), which differ only in the step involving recognition of the DNA lesion. Following recognition of the damage, the sub-pathways then converge for the incision/excision steps and subsequent gap filling and ligation steps. This review will focus on the GGR sub-pathway of NER while the TCR sub-pathway will be covered in another article in this issue. The ability of the NER pathway to repair a wide array of adducts stems, in part, from the mechanisms involved in the initial recognition step of the damaged DNA and results in NER impacting an equally wide array of human physiological responses and events. In this review, the impact of NER on carcinogenesis, neurological function, sensitivity to environmental factors and sensitivity to cancer therapeutics will be discussed. The knowledge generated in our understanding of the NER pathway over the past 40 years has resulted from advances in the fields of animal model systems, mammalian genetics and in vitro biochemistry, as well as from reconstitution studies and structural analyses of the proteins and enzymes that participate in this pathway. Each of these avenues of research has contributed significantly to our understanding of how the NER pathway works and how alterations in NER activity, both positive and negative, influence human biology.

  16. Applications of nanoparticles for DNA based rabies vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Muhammad Ali A; Khan, Sajid Umar; Ali, Zeeshan; Yang, Haowen; Liu, Keke; Mao, Lanlan

    2014-01-01

    Rabies is a fatal encephalomyelitis. Most cases occur in developing countries and are transmitted by dogs. The cell culture vaccines as associated with high cost; therefore, have not replaced the unsafe brain-derived vaccines. In the developing countries these brain-derived rabies vaccines still can be seen in action. Moreover, there will be a need for vaccines against rabies-related viruses against which classical vaccines are not always effective. The worldwide incidence of rabies and the inability of currently used vaccination strategies to provide highly potent and cost-effective therapy indicate the need for alternate control strategies. DNA vaccines have emerged as the safest vaccines and best remedy for complicated diseases like hepatitis, HIV, and rabies. A number of recombinant DNA vaccines are now being developed against several diseases such as AIDS and malaria. Therefore, it can be a valuable alternative for the production of cheaper rabies vaccines against its larger spectrum of viruses. In this review we report published data on DNA-based immunization with sequences encoding rabies with special reference to nanotechnology. PMID:24730305

  17. Intraoral excision of large submental dermoid

    OpenAIRE

    Ankur Bhatnagar; Vinay Kumar Verma; Pankaj Kumar Patel

    2013-01-01

    Sublingual dermoids are the rarest forms of craniofacial dermoids mostly seen in young individuals. Excision of large and deep submental dermoid is generally done via extraoral approach scarring the most prominent part of the face, which can lead to post operative scar hypertrophy and hyperpigmentation especially in non-Caucasian races. Presence of such scars leads to adverse psychological effects in young individuals. Excision via intraoral route, although technically demanding, can be simpl...

  18. Giant rhinophyma: Excision with coblation assisted surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Caner Sahin; Mesut Turker; Bulent Celasun

    2014-01-01

    An 83-year-old man presented with an unusually severe case of rhinophyma. Giant rhinopyhma is very rare in literature. The giant lesion was widely excised using sharp surgical incision and coblation assisted surgery. Using direct coblation to the nasal dorsum may cause edema in the surrounding tissue. There was minimal edema in surrounding tissue using this technique. A full thickness-skin graft was applied after excision. Cosmetic and functional postoperative results were satisfactory.

  19. Efficient Excise Taxation: The Evidence from Cigarettes.

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin, Daniel K; William R. Dougan

    1997-01-01

    The authors develop a model in which optimizing policy makers in adjacent government jurisdictions levy excise taxes on a commodity that has a unique point of production from which all shipments emanate. From this model the authors derive an unusually specific predicted geographical pattern of those excise taxes in which these taxes rise at specific decreasing rate as one moves outward from the point of production. The authors compare these predictions to the observed pattern of cigarette tax...

  20. DNA-energetics-based analyses suggest additional genes in prokaryotes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Garima Khandelwal; Jalaj Gupta; B Jayaram

    2012-07-01

    We present here a novel methodology for predicting new genes in prokaryotic genomes on the basis of inherent energetics of DNA. Regions of higher thermodynamic stability were identified, which were filtered based on already known annotations to yield a set of potentially new genes. These were then processed for their compatibility with the stereo-chemical properties of proteins and tripeptide frequencies of proteins in Swissprot data, which results in a reliable set of new genes in a genome. Quite surprisingly, the methodology identifies new genes even in well-annotated genomes. Also, the methodology can handle genomes of any GC-content, size and number of annotated genes.

  1. Phylogeny of Korean Opuntia spp. based on multiple DNA regions

    OpenAIRE

    Srikanth, Krishnamoorthy; WHANG, SUNG SOO

    2015-01-01

    Although Opuntia species are of high agronomic value in Korea, the taxonomic position of Korean Opuntia species has never been investigated. The taxonomic position of Korean Opuntia spp. Within the tribe Opuntieae was examined based on DNA sequence analysis of matK, trnL-F, atpB-rbcl, and ITS regions. The total amplified sequence length was 2977 bp; only 18 parsimonious informative sites were present, even though they belonged to different species. A phylogenetic tree using both the maximum l...

  2. Benchmarking DNA Metabarcoding for Biodiversity-Based Monitoring and Assessment

    KAUST Repository

    Aylagas, Eva

    2016-06-10

    Characterization of biodiversity has been extensively used to confidently monitor and assess environmental status. Yet, visual morphology, traditionally and widely used for species identification in coastal and marine ecosystem communities, is tedious and entails limitations. Metabarcoding coupled with high-throughput sequencing (HTS) represents an alternative to rapidly, accurately, and cost-effectively analyze thousands of environmental samples simultaneously, and this method is increasingly used to characterize the metazoan taxonomic composition of a wide variety of environments. However, a comprehensive study benchmarking visual and metabarcoding-based taxonomic inferences that validates this technique for environmental monitoring is still lacking. Here, we compare taxonomic inferences of benthic macroinvertebrate samples of known taxonomic composition obtained using alternative metabarcoding protocols based on a combination of different DNA sources, barcodes of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene and amplification conditions. Our results highlight the influence of the metabarcoding protocol in the obtained taxonomic composition and suggest the better performance of an alternative 313 bp length barcode to the traditionally 658 bp length one used for metazoan metabarcoding. Additionally, we show that a biotic index inferred from the list of macroinvertebrate taxa obtained using DNA-based taxonomic assignments is comparable to that inferred using morphological identification. Thus, our analyses prove metabarcoding valid for environmental status assessment and will contribute to accelerating the implementation of this technique to regular monitoring programs.

  3. G-quadruplex DNA structures can interfere with uracil glycosylase activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Nate W; Larson, Erik D

    2016-07-01

    Genome sequences that contain tandem repeats of guanine can form stable four-stranded structures known as G-quadruplex, or G4 DNA. While the molecular mechanisms are not fully defined, such guanine-rich loci are prone to mutagenesis and recombination. Various repair pathways function to reduce the potential for genome instability by correcting base damage and replication errors; however, it is not yet fully defined how well these processes function at G4 DNA. One frequent form of base damage occurs from cytidine deamination, resulting in deoxyuracil and UG mismatches. In duplex and single-stranded DNA, uracil bases are recognised and excised by uracil glycosylases. Here, we tested the efficiency of uracil glycosylase activity in vitro on uracil bases located directly adjacent to guanine repeats and G4 DNA. We show that uracil excision by bacterial UDG and human hUNG2 is reduced at uracils positioned directly 5' or 3' of a guanine tetrad. Control reactions using oligonucleotides disrupted for G4 formation or reaction conditions that do not favour G4 formation resulted in full uracil excision activity. Based on these in vitro results, we suggest that folding of guanine-rich DNA into G4 DNA results in a DNA conformation that is resistant to uracil glycosylase-initiated repair and this has the potential to increase the risk of instability at guanine repeats in the genome. PMID:26671821

  4. Regulation and function of DNA methylation in plants and animals

    KAUST Repository

    He, Xinjian

    2011-02-15

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark involved in diverse biological processes. In plants, DNA methylation can be established through the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, an RNA interference pathway for transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), which requires 24-nt small interfering RNAs. In mammals, de novo DNA methylation occurs primarily at two developmental stages: during early embryogenesis and during gametogenesis. While it is not clear whether establishment of DNA methylation patterns in mammals involves RNA interference in general, de novo DNA methylation and suppression of transposons in germ cells require 24-32-nt piwi-interacting small RNAs. DNA methylation status is dynamically regulated by DNA methylation and demethylation reactions. In plants, active DNA demethylation relies on the repressor of silencing 1 family of bifunctional DNA glycosylases, which remove the 5-methylcytosine base and then cleave the DNA backbone at the abasic site, initiating a base excision repair (BER) pathway. In animals, multiple mechanisms of active DNA demethylation have been proposed, including a deaminase- and DNA glycosylase-initiated BER pathway. New information concerning the effects of various histone modifications on the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation has broadened our understanding of the regulation of DNA methylation. The function of DNA methylation in plants and animals is also discussed in this review. © 2011 IBCB, SIBS, CAS All rights reserved.

  5. DNA stabilization is critical for maximizing performance of fecal DNA-based colorectal cancer tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jeff; Whitney, Duncan H; Durkee, Kristine; Shuber, Anthony P

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a multitarget, fecal DNA screening assay that detects the presence of gene-specific mutations and long DNA fragments associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). We continue to investigate methods that may be used to optimize clinical sensitivity. The goals of this investigation are to establish how sample handling conditions affect the stability of DNA in stool, thereby potentially limiting clinical sensitivity, and to determine conditions to ameliorate DNA degradation. A study was run comparing paired sample aliquots. Quantitative PCR data for matched aliquots was used to determine first the effect of sample incubation on total recovery and integrity of DNA, then the effect of stabilization buffer addition to stool on recoverable DNA, and finally the impact of buffer addition on assay sensitivity. Comparison of quantitative PCR data for paired aliquots shows that the amount of recoverable human DNA is negatively affected by storing stool samples (N = 43) at room temperature for > or =36 hours (P = 0.0018). However, the addition of stabilization buffer leads to a significant increase in recovery of DNA (P = 0.010), compared with samples incubated without buffer. Whereas the DNA Integrity Assay (DIA) is found to be sensitive to DNA degradation (sensitivity was reduced by 82%; P = 0.0002), point mutation marker sensitivity is more refractory. Overall, DNA can be stabilized by addition of buffer to the sample, leading to increased assay sensitivity. PMID:16106201

  6. A pressure cooking-based DNA extraction from archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Joon-Yong; Yi, Joo Mi; Xie, Ran; Brown, Victoria; Lee, Olivia; Ahuja, Nita; Braunschweig, Till; Hewitt, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    As emerging novel DNA-based methodologies are adopted, nucleic acid-based assays depend critically on the quality and quantity of extracted DNA. Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples provide an invaluable resource for subsequent molecular studies of clinical phenotypes, but high quality DNA extraction from archival FFPE tissue specimen remains complex and time consuming. To address this challenge, we have developed a reliable rapid DNA extraction method for FFPE tissue speci...

  7. Genomic fingerprints of Staphylococcus aureus of bovine origin by polymerase chain reaction-based DNA fingerprinting.

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, K R; Kumar, S. J.; O'Conner, S. A.; Harmon, R J; Pankey, J W; Fox, L. K.; Oliver, S P

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (n = 75) isolated from mammary secretions of cows with subclinical and clinical mastitis from several geographic locations in the USA were examined using polymerase chain reaction-based DNA fingerprinting. DNA fingerprints were produced using a synthetic oligonucleotide primer (5'GTAACGCC3') to produce a distinct spectrum of amplified DNA fragments facilitating a high degree of resolution for differentiating S. aureus strains. PCR-based DNA fingerprinting grouped the 75 ...

  8. DNA-based nanoparticle composite materials for EMI shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, De Yu; Grote, James

    2012-03-01

    Composite materials, such as polymer-matrix containing conductive fillers, are very attractive for shielding electromagnetic interference (EMI) due to their high shielding efficiency and seamlessness, processability, flexibility, light-weight and low-cost. Here, we report a development of novel, DNA-based EMI-shielding materials (DESM), consisting of DNA and metal nanoparticles. It has been shown that a thin DESM layer (typically ~30 - 50 μm) could block EMI radiations up to 60 dB effectively over an RF frequency range from KHz to tens GHz, exhibiting excellent EMI shielding efficiency. A wide selection of metal nanoparticle fillers for DESM has been tested for their performance in EMI shielding efficiency. Among them, silver and carbon-based nanoparticles have demonstrated the best performance and were selected for further investigation. The silver-doped DESM films could be also non-conductive while their EMI shielding efficiency is still well-preserved. The nonconductive DESM could have a great potential in the microelectronics industries for EMI shielding on electronic devices and circuit boards.

  9. Intelligent DNA-based molecular diagnostics using linked genetic markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system for molecular diagnostics, and its application to fully automated diagnosis of X-linked genetic disorders. Molecular diagnostic information is used in clinical practice for determining genetic risks, such as carrier determination and prenatal diagnosis. Initially, blood samples are obtained from related individuals, and PCR amplification is performed. Linkage-based molecular diagnosis then entails three data analysis steps. First, for every individual, the alleles (i.e., DNA composition) are determined at specified chromosomal locations. Second, the flow of genetic material among the individuals is established. Third, the probability that a given individual is either a carrier of the disease or affected by the disease is determined. The current practice is to perform each of these three steps manually, which is costly, time consuming, labor-intensive, and error-prone. As such, the knowledge-intensive data analysis and interpretation supersede the actual experimentation effort as the major bottleneck in molecular diagnostics. By examining the human problem solving for the task, we have designed and implemented a prototype knowledge-based system capable of fully automating linkage-based molecular diagnostics in X-linked genetic disorders, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Our system uses knowledge-based interpretation of gel electrophoresis images to determine individual DNA marker labels, a constraint satisfaction search for consistent genetic flow among individuals, and a blackboard-style problem solver for risk assessment. We describe the system`s successful diagnosis of DMD carrier and affected individuals from raw clinical data.

  10. Impact of Age-Associated Cyclopurine Lesions on DNA Repair Helicases

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Irfan; Suhasini, Avvaru N.; Banerjee, Taraswi; Sommers, Joshua A.; Kaplan, Daniel L.; Kuper, Jochen; Kisker, Caroline; Brosh, Jr, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    8,5' cyclopurine deoxynucleosides (cPu) are locally distorting DNA base lesions corrected by nucleotide excision repair (NER) and proposed to play a role in neurodegeneration prevalent in genetically defined Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients. In the current study, purified recombinant helicases from different classifications based on sequence homology were examined for their ability to unwind partial duplex DNA substrates harboring a single site-specific cPu adduct. Superfamily (SF) 2 RecQ ...

  11. Ultrafast dynamics in DNA base pairs following ultraviolet excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr-Ewing, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Photo-protective mechanisms in DNA are essential to maintain the integrity of the genetic code by preventing damage from absorption of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We have used time-resolved infra-red (TRIR) spectroscopy to observe the dynamics of Watson-Crick nucleobase pairs following absorption of femtosecond UV laser pulses. The base pairs are prepared as nucleosides in solution, and photo-induced dynamics are probed in the carbonyl and N-H bond stretching regions using broadband IR pulses with picosecond time resolution. Results will be presented for the guanine-cytosine (G-C) base pair, contrasting the rapid recovery of ground-state products (the photo-protection pathway) with formation of other photoproducts which might represent photo-damage mechanisms. This work is a collaboration with the group of Prof F. Temps (Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel). This research is supported by ERC Advanced Grant 290966 CAPRI.

  12. DNA based identification of medicinal materials in Chinese patent medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Dong, Juan; Cui, Xin; Wang, Wei; Yasmeen, Afshan; Deng, Yun; Zeng, Xiaomao; Tang, Zhuo

    2012-12-01

    Chinese patent medicines (CPM) are highly processed and easy to use Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The market for CPM in China alone is tens of billions US dollars annually and some of the CPM are also used as dietary supplements for health augmentation in the western countries. But concerns continue to be raised about the legality, safety and efficacy of many popular CPM. Here we report a pioneer work of applying molecular biotechnology to the identification of CPM, particularly well refined oral liquids and injections. What's more, this PCR based method can also be developed to an easy to use and cost-effective visual chip by taking advantage of G-quadruplex based Hybridization Chain Reaction. This study demonstrates that DNA identification of specific Medicinal materials is an efficient and cost-effective way to audit highly processed CPM and will assist in monitoring their quality and legality.

  13. European Union Harmonized Excise Taxation : Occasional Importation Process

    OpenAIRE

    Tanhua, Taina

    2013-01-01

    This thesis was written with the intent to compile the information related to occasional importation process and European Union harmonized taxation into a single package. The process is based on European Union legislation and the aim of it is to unify the taxation within the internal market area. The national excise duties are not part of the occasional importation process but are partly linked to it. The first part of the thesis discusses the occasional importation of goods subject to ha...

  14. Terahertz pulsed imaging of freshly excised human colonic tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, C. B.; Fitzgerald, A; Reese, G.; Goldin, R; Tekkis, P; O Kelly, P. S.; Pickwell-MacPherson, E.; Gibson, A. P.; Wallace, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results from a feasibility study which measures properties in the terahertz frequency range of excised cancerous, dysplastic and healthy colonic tissues from 30 patients. We compare their absorption and refractive index spectra to identify trends which may enable different tissue types to be distinguished. In addition, we present statistical models based on variations between up to 17 parameters calculated from the reflected time and frequency domain signals of all the measured...

  15. 29 CFR 794.121 - Exclusion of excise taxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exclusion of excise taxes. 794.121 Section 794.121 Labor... Exclusion of excise taxes. The computation of the annual gross volume of sales of the enterprise for purposes of section 7(b)(3) is made “exclusive of excise taxes.” It will be noted that the excise...

  16. SUMO and ubiquitin-dependent XPC exchange drives nucleotide excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Cuijk, Loes; Van Belle, Gijsbert J.; Turkyilmaz, Yasemin;

    2015-01-01

    XPC recognizes UV-induced DNA lesions and initiates their removal by nucleotide excision repair (NER). Damage recognition in NER is tightly controlled by ubiquitin and SUMO modifications. Recent studies have shown that the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF111 promotes K63-linked ubiquitylation of...... SUMOylated XPC after DNA damage. However, the exact regulatory function of these modifications in vivo remains elusive. Here we show that RNF111 is required for efficient repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA lesions. RNF111-mediated ubiquitylation promotes the release of XPC from damaged DNA after NER...

  17. Combination of Aβ Secretion and Oxidative Stress in an Alzheimer-Like Cell Line Leads to the Over-Expression of the Nucleotide Excision Repair Proteins DDB2 and XPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Forestier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Repair of oxidative DNA damage, particularly Base Excision Repair (BER, impairment is often associated with Alzheimer’s disease pathology. Here, we aimed at investigating the complete Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER, a DNA repair pathway involved in the removal of bulky DNA adducts, status in an Alzheimer-like cell line. The level of DNA damage was quantified using mass spectrometry, NER gene expression was assessed by qPCR, and the NER protein activity was analysed through a modified version of the COMET assay. Interestingly, we found that in the presence of the Amyloid β peptide (Aβ, NER factors were upregulated at the mRNA level and that NER capacities were also specifically increased following oxidative stress. Surprisingly, NER capacities were not differentially improved following a typical NER-triggering of ultraviolet C (UVC stress. Oxidative stress generates a differential and specific DNA damage response in the presence of Aβ. We hypothesized that the release of NER components such as DNA damage binding protein 2 (DDB2 and Xeroderma Pigmentosum complementation group C protein (XPC following oxidative stress might putatively involve their apoptotic role rather than DNA repair function.

  18. Cooperative cluster formation, DNA bending and base-flipping by O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Tessmer, Ingrid; Melikishvili, Manana; Fried, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) repairs mutagenic O6-alkylguanine and O4-alkylthymine adducts in DNA, protecting the genome and also contributing to the resistance of tumors to chemotherapeutic alkylating agents. AGT binds DNA cooperatively, and cooperative interactions are likely to be important in lesion search and repair. We examined morphologies of complexes on long, unmodified DNAs, using analytical ultracentrifugation and atomic force microscopy. AGT formed clusters of ≤11 pr...

  19. Association of DNA repair polymorphisms with DNA repair functional outcomes in healthy human subjects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vodička, Pavel; Štětina, R.; Poláková, Veronika; Tulupová, Elena; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Kumar, R.; Hánová, Monika; Pardini, Barbara; Slyšková, Jana; Musak, L.; De Palma, G.; Souček, P.; Hemminki, K.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 3 (2007), s. 657-664. ISSN 0143-3334 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8563; GA ČR GA310/05/2626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Base excision DNA * Single-strand breaks * Peripheral blood lymphocytes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.406, year: 2007

  20. Non-canonical uracil processing in DNA gives rise to double-strand breaks and deletions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregenhorn, Stephanie; Kallenberger, Lia; Artola-Borán, Mariela;

    2016-01-01

    , repetitive sequences flanking the CHloci, to uracils. Although U/G mispairs arising in this way are generally efficiently repaired to C/Gs by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG)-initiated base excision repair (BER), uracil processing in S-regions of activated B-cells occasionally gives rise to double strand breaks...

  1. DNA Source Selection for Downstream Applications Based on DNA Quality Indicators Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena-Aguilar, Gema; Sánchez-López, Ana María; Barberán-Aceituno, Cristina; Carrillo-Ávila, José Antonio; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Aguilar-Quesada, Rocío

    2016-08-01

    High-quality human DNA samples and associated information of individuals are necessary for biomedical research. Biobanks act as a support infrastructure for the scientific community by providing a large number of high-quality biological samples for specific downstream applications. For this purpose, biobank methods for sample preparation must ensure the usefulness and long-term functionality of the products obtained. Quality indicators are the tool to measure these parameters, the purity and integrity determination being those specifically used for DNA. This study analyzes the quality indicators in DNA samples derived from 118 frozen human tissues in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) reactive, 68 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, 119 frozen blood samples, and 26 saliva samples. The results obtained for DNA quality are discussed in association with the usefulness for downstream applications and availability of the DNA source in the target study. In brief, if any material is valid, blood is the most approachable option of prospective collection of samples providing high-quality DNA. However, if diseased tissue is a requisite or samples are available, the recommended source of DNA would be frozen tissue. These conclusions will determine the best source of DNA, according to the planned downstream application. Furthermore our results support the conclusion that a complete procedure of DNA quantification and qualification is necessary to guarantee the appropriate management of the samples, avoiding low confidence results, high costs, and a waste of samples. PMID:27158753

  2. The latest progress in single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) based on DNA damage detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA damage detection can detect DNA damage caused by the pesticide and irradiation. With the increasing demands of DNA damage detection, the development of a rapid, high throughput and straight forward DNA damage detecting technique has critical biological significance for Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) is a straight and accurate way to detect the DNA damage. In recent years, the throughput and accuracy of the detection SCGE method have been improved significantly by applying new materials and new technologies. This paper reviewed the most recently reported SCGE based DNA damage detection technique-microwell array method and conventional SCGE method, and the prospect were also discussed. (authors)

  3. Roles of the Amino Group of Purine Bases in the Thermodynamic Stability of DNA Base Pairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The energetic aspects of hydrogen-bonded base-pair interactions are important for the design of functional nucleotide analogs and for practical applications of oligonucleotides. The present study investigated the contribution of the 2-amino group of DNA purine bases to the thermodynamic stability of oligonucleotide duplexes under different salt and solvent conditions, using 2'-deoxyriboinosine (I and 2'-deoxyribo-2,6-diaminopurine (D as non-canonical nucleotides. The stability of DNA duplexes was changed by substitution of a single base pair in the following order: G•C > D•T ≈ I•C > A•T > G•T > I•T. The apparent stabilization energy due to the presence of the 2-amino group of G and D varied depending on the salt concentration, and decreased in the water-ethanol mixed solvent. The effects of salt concentration on the thermodynamics of DNA duplexes were found to be partially sequence-dependent, and the 2-amino group of the purine bases might have an influence on the binding of ions to DNA through the formation of a stable base-paired structure. Our results also showed that physiological salt conditions were energetically favorable for complementary base recognition, and conversely, low salt concentration media and ethanol-containing solvents were effective for low stringency oligonucleotide hybridization, in the context of conditions employed in this study.

  4. SPR imaging for label-free multiplexed analyses of DNA N-glycosylase interactions with damaged DNA duplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Base excision repair (BER) is the major mechanism for the correction of damaged nucleobases resulting from the alkylation and oxidation of DNA. The first step in the BER pathway consists of excision of the abnormal base by several specific DNA N-glycosylases. A decrease in BER activity was found to be related to an increased risk of carcinogenesis and aging. To investigate BER activities we set up a new device for DNA repair analysis based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). Oligonucleotides bearing an abnormal nucleoside, namely 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and (5'S)-5',8-cyclo-purine-2'-deoxy-nucleoside, were grafted by a pyrrole electro-copolymerization process on a glass prism coated with a gold layer. The latter label-free DNA sensor chip permits the detection of N-glycosylase/AP-lyase activity as well as the binding of repair proteins to DNA damage without cleavage activity. Thus, the Fapy DNA N-glycosylase (Fpg) protein is shown as expected to bind and then cleave its natural substrate, namely 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine, together with the resulting abasic site. Using the current SPR imaging-based DNA array we observed an original binding activity of Fpg towards the (5'S)-5',8-cyclod-Adenosine residue. These results altogether show that SPR imaging may be used to simultaneously and specifically detect recognition and excision of several damaged DNA nucleobases, and constitutes an interesting technique to screen inhibitors of DNA repair proteins. (authors)

  5. PCR-based detection of a rare linear DNA in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveliev Sergei V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The described method allows for detection of rare linear DNA fragments generated during genomic deletions. The predicted limit of the detection is one DNA molecule per 107 or more cells. The method is based on anchor PCR and involves gel separation of the linear DNA fragment and chromosomal DNA before amplification. The detailed chemical structure of the ends of the linear DNA can be defined with the use of additional PCR-based protocols. The method was applied to study the short-lived linear DNA generated during programmed genomic deletions in a ciliate. It can be useful in studies of spontaneous DNA deletions in cell culture or for tracking intracellular modifications at the ends of transfected DNA during gene therapy trials.

  6. The incision-excision technique in minor auricular deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppt, Werner J

    2004-11-01

    In 1972, in the search for a method to cope with all deformities in protruding ears and other common minor auricular deformities, Claus Walter published a surgical technique based on various incisions and excisions of the cartilage. The procedure consists of a complete separation of the auricle into two parts, combined with remodeling of antihelical, helical, and lobular structures without use of adjusting sutures. Thus, even in patients with stiff and unyielding cartilage and in revisional surgery, pleasing aesthetic results may be achieved. The recurrence rate has found to be reduced markedly. Considering all pros and cons and optional surgical modifications, the incision-excision technique can be adopted for every protruding ear as well as for lop ears, moderate cup ear deformities, and secondary revisions. Because of the extent of cartilage dissection, this technique is not recommended for beginners but should be restricted to experienced surgeons with profound knowledge of basic remodeling procedures. PMID:15778916

  7. A child with xeroderma pigmentosum for excision of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridevi M Mulimani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is characterized by hypersensitivity to sunlight, ocular involvement, and progressive neurological complications. These manifestations are due to a cellular hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation leading to a defect in repair of DNA by the process of nucleotide excision repair. Basal cell carcinoma which is rare in children can occur with XP. Though the XP induced changes are predominately dermatologic, pose several challenges in anaesthetic management. Hence, we are reporting a 9-year-old child with XP scheduled for excision of basal cell carcinoma under general anaesthesia.

  8. PARP-1 enhances the mismatch-dependence of 5′-directed excision in human mismatch repair in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yiyong; Kadyrov, Farid A; Modrich, Paul

    2011-01-01

    End-directed mismatch-provoked excision has been reconstituted in several purified systems. While 3′-directed excision displays a mismatch dependence similar to that observed in nuclear extracts (≈ 20-fold), the mismatch dependence of 5′-directed excision is only 3 to 4-fold, significantly less than that in extracts (8 to 10-fold). Utilizing a fractionation-based approach, we have isolated a single polypeptide that enhances mismatch dependence of reconstituted 5′-directed excision and have sh...

  9. Genomic island excisions in Bordetella petrii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levillain Erwan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the members of the genus Bordetella B. petrii is unique, since it is the only species isolated from the environment, while the pathogenic Bordetellae are obligately associated with host organisms. Another feature distinguishing B. petrii from the other sequenced Bordetellae is the presence of a large number of mobile genetic elements including several large genomic regions with typical characteristics of genomic islands collectively known as integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs. These elements mainly encode accessory metabolic factors enabling this bacterium to grow on a large repertoire of aromatic compounds. Results During in vitro culture of Bordetella petrii colony variants appear frequently. We show that this variability can be attributed to the presence of a large number of metastable mobile genetic elements on its chromosome. In fact, the genome sequence of B. petrii revealed the presence of at least seven large genomic islands mostly encoding accessory metabolic functions involved in the degradation of aromatic compounds and detoxification of heavy metals. Four of these islands (termed GI1 to GI3 and GI6 are highly related to ICEclc of Pseudomonas knackmussii sp. strain B13. Here we present first data about the molecular characterization of these islands. We defined the exact borders of each island and we show that during standard culture of the bacteria these islands get excised from the chromosome. For all but one of these islands (GI5 we could detect circular intermediates. For the clc-like elements GI1 to GI3 of B. petrii we provide evidence that tandem insertion of these islands which all encode highly related integrases and attachment sites may also lead to incorporation of genomic DNA which originally was not part of the island and to the formation of huge composite islands. By integration of a tetracycline resistance cassette into GI3 we found this island to be rather unstable and to be lost from

  10. First Principles Dynamics of Photoexcited DNA and RNA Bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction dynamics of excited electronic states in nucleic acid bases is a key process in DNA photodamage. Recent ultrafast spectroscopy experiments have shown multi-component decays of excited uracil and thymine, tentatively assigned to nonadiabatic transitions involving multiple electronic states. Using both quantum chemistry and first principles quantum molecular dynamics methods we show that a true minimum on the bright S2 electronic state is responsible for the first step which occurs on a femtosecond timescale. Thus the observed femtosecond decay does not correspond to surface crossing as previously thought. We suggest that subsequent barrier crossing to the minimal energy S2/S1 conical intersection is responsible for the picosecond decay

  11. Intraoral excision of large submental dermoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Bhatnagar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sublingual dermoids are the rarest forms of craniofacial dermoids mostly seen in young individuals. Excision of large and deep submental dermoid is generally done via extraoral approach scarring the most prominent part of the face, which can lead to post operative scar hypertrophy and hyperpigmentation especially in non-Caucasian races. Presence of such scars leads to adverse psychological effects in young individuals. Excision via intraoral route, although technically demanding, can be simplified using basic principles of plastic surgery leading to optimal aesthetic outcome with least downtime. We excised a large sublingual dermoid extending deep to the mylohyoid muscle through intraoral approach with excellent cosmetic results. Clinicians dealing with such lesions should keep these principals in their armamentarium when dealing with this rare subset of cases.

  12. Radical Gas-Based DNA Decontamination for Ultra-Sensitive Molecular Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Morono, Yuki; Yamamoto, Katsuhiro; Inagaki, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we tested a radical gas-based decontamination technique to prevent possible DNA contamination by the air and/or equipment used in molecular experiments. We prepared 104 molecules of model DNA contaminant and placed the dried DNA into test tubes, which were then exposed to radical gas. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that, even after a short exposure time of 30 minutes, 99.54% of the model DNA contaminant was effectively decomposed to undetectable levels. Our results demonstrat...

  13. Nanoparticle-based detection and quantification of DNA with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination selectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Wei Jie; Yung, Lin Yue Lanry

    2007-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA detection is important in various biomedical applications such as gene expression profiling, disease diagnosis and treatment, drug discovery and forensic analysis. Here we report a gold nanoparticle-based method that allows DNA detection and quantification and is capable of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination. The precise quantification of single-stranded DNA is due to the formation of defined nanoparticle-DNA conjugate groupings in the presence of target...

  14. Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet-based multicolour fluorescent nanoprobe for multiplexed analysis of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate that nanosheets composed of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) can serve as a low-cost and efficient fluorescent nanoprobe for the multiplexed detection of DNA in solution. The strategy is based on the finding that g-C3N4 is capable of binding dye-labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) which results in quenching of the fluorescence of the dye. If target DNA hybridizes with dye-labeled ssDNA, the interaction between dye-labeled ssDNA and g-C3N4 is weakened, and this results in desorption of the dsDNA from the surface of the g-C3N4 and in recovery of fluorescence. The large surface area of g-C3N4 nanosheets allows for simultaneous quenching of multicolor DNA probes labeled with different dyes, leading to the development of multiplexed DNA sensors for the detection of multiple DNA targets in a single solution. By using one 15-mer DNA fragment and one 18-mer DNA fragment as proof-of-principle analytes, the method displayed good analytical performance. The limits of detection are 75 and 62 pM, respectively. The method is simple and sensitive, and was used to detect DNA in serum samples. We perceive that this method represents a new approach towards multiplexed assays for applications in DNA monitoring, clinical diagnosis, and in the detection of genetic disorders. (author)

  15. Cobalt oxyhydroxide nanoflake based fluorescence sensing platform for label-free detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yaqing; Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Huiqing; Wang, Nan; Tang, Jilin

    2016-08-01

    Detection of specific DNA sequences is critical in life science. In this study, we investigated the interaction of cobalt oxyhydroxide (CoOOH) nanoflakes with DNA and their fluorescence quenching mechanism of a FAM-labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe. ssDNA could adsorb on the CoOOH surface via electrostatic interactions and therefore the fluorescence of FAM was quenched. However, upon addition of targets, ssDNA was hybridized with target DNA and the formed double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) had much weaker affinity to CoOOH, resulting in the retaining of fluorescence. Based on the affinity difference of CoOOH nanoflakes to ssDNA and dsDNA and fluorescence resonance energy transfer based fluorescence quenching, a mix-and-detect method was proposed for homogeneous detection of DNA. The proposed method is simple and can be finished in a few minutes with high sensitivity. Furthermore, it displays a wide linear range from 1 to 50 nM with a detection limit of 0.5 nM and is capable of detecting DNA in real biological samples. PMID:27251111

  16. Characterization of DNA repair phenotypes of Xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines by a paralleled in vitro test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA is constantly damaged modifying the genetic information for which it encodes. Several cellular mechanisms as the Base Excision Repair (BER) and the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) allow recovering the right DNA sequence. The Xeroderma pigmentosum is a disease characterised by a deficiency in the NER pathway. The aim of this study was to propose an efficient and fast test for the diagnosis of this disease as an alternative to the currently available UDS test. DNA repair activities of XP cell lines were quantified using in vitro miniaturized and paralleled tests in order to establish DNA repair phenotypes of XPA and XPC deficient cells. The main advantage of the tests used in this study is the simultaneous measurement of excision or excision synthesis (ES) of several lesions by only one cellular extract. We showed on one hand that the relative ES of the different lesions depend strongly on the protein concentration of the nuclear extract tested. Working at high protein concentration allowed discriminating the XP phenotype versus the control one, whereas it was impossible under a certain concentration's threshold. On the other hand, while the UVB irradiation of control cells stimulated their repair activities, this effect was not observed in XP cells. This study brings new information on the XPA and XPC protein roles during BER and NER and underlines the complexity of the regulations of DNA repair processes. (author)

  17. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebitz, Anett S.; Hoffman, Joel C.; Grant, George W.; Billehus, Tyler M.; Pilgrim, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections. PMID:26199185

  18. An arteriovenous fistula following chalazion excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias-Amborcar Yuri

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An arteriovenous fistula secondary to a chalazion is a rare occurrence. It may follow spontaneous necrosis or surgical trauma. Digital subtraction angiography and identification of the arterial feeders combined with direct puncture of the nidus and embolization is recommended, as surgical excision becomes much easier and results in a complete excision of the lesion. Conchal cartilage graft is a useful lining material for reconstruction of the tarsal plate due to its natural curvature. It restores lid integrity and ensures a stable and functional eyelid.

  19. Replicase-based plasmid DNA shows anti-tumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Richard

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Double stranded RNA (dsRNA has multiple anti-tumor mechanisms. Over the past several decades, there have been numerous attempts to utilize synthetic dsRNA to control tumor growth in animal models and clinical trials. Recently, it became clear that intracellular dsRNA is more effective than extracellular dsRNA on promoting apoptosis and orchestrating adaptive immune responses. To overcome the difficulty in delivering a large dose of synthetic dsRNA into tumors, we propose to deliver a RNA replicase-based plasmid DNA, hypothesizing that the dsRNA generated by the replicase-based plasmid in tumor cells will inhibit tumor growth. Methods The anti-tumor activity of a plasmid (pSIN-β that encodes the sindbis RNA replicase genes (nsp1-4 was evaluated in mice with model tumors (TC-1 lung cancer cells or B16 melanoma cells and compared to a traditional pCMV-β plasmid. Results In cell culture, transfection of tumor cells with pSIN-β generated dsRNA. In mice with model tumors, pSIN-β more effectively delayed tumor growth than pCMV-β, and in some cases, eradicated the tumors. Conclusion RNA replicase-based plasmid may be exploited to generate intracellular dsRNA to control tumor growth.

  20. Replicase-based plasmid DNA shows anti-tumor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double stranded RNA (dsRNA) has multiple anti-tumor mechanisms. Over the past several decades, there have been numerous attempts to utilize synthetic dsRNA to control tumor growth in animal models and clinical trials. Recently, it became clear that intracellular dsRNA is more effective than extracellular dsRNA on promoting apoptosis and orchestrating adaptive immune responses. To overcome the difficulty in delivering a large dose of synthetic dsRNA into tumors, we propose to deliver a RNA replicase-based plasmid DNA, hypothesizing that the dsRNA generated by the replicase-based plasmid in tumor cells will inhibit tumor growth. The anti-tumor activity of a plasmid (pSIN-β) that encodes the sindbis RNA replicase genes (nsp1-4) was evaluated in mice with model tumors (TC-1 lung cancer cells or B16 melanoma cells) and compared to a traditional pCMV-β plasmid. In cell culture, transfection of tumor cells with pSIN-β generated dsRNA. In mice with model tumors, pSIN-β more effectively delayed tumor growth than pCMV-β, and in some cases, eradicated the tumors. RNA replicase-based plasmid may be exploited to generate intracellular dsRNA to control tumor growth

  1. The use of gold nanoparticle aggregation for DNA computing and logic-based biomolecular detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In-Hee; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Zhang, Byoung-Tak [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji-Hoon [Center for Bioinformation Technology, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji-Yoon; Chai, Young Gyu [Division of Molecular and Life Sciences, Hanyang University, 1271 Sa-dong, Sangnok-gu, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Hoon [Fachgebiet Mikrobiologie und Genetik, Institut fuer Biotechnologie, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Gustav-Meyer Allee 25, D-13355 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: btzhang@bi.snu.ac.kr

    2008-10-01

    The use of DNA molecules as a physical computational material has attracted much interest, especially in the area of DNA computing. DNAs are also useful for logical control and analysis of biological systems if efficient visualization methods are available. Here we present a quick and simple visualization technique that displays the results of the DNA computing process based on a colorimetric change induced by gold nanoparticle aggregation, and we apply it to the logic-based detection of biomolecules. Our results demonstrate its effectiveness in both DNA-based logical computation and logic-based biomolecular detection.

  2. 碱基切除修复基因HOGG1特异性锤头状核酶表达载体的构建及其功能的初步研究%Constructing the Eukaryotic Expression Vector to Study Preliminarily the Functions of Hammerhead Ribozyme Targeting Base Excision Repair Gene HOGG1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张遵真; 张勤; 吴媚

    2006-01-01

    Objective Adriamycin is widely used as an effective anti-tumor drug clinically treating a number of human cancers, but the effect of adriamycin is limited by drug resistance. The various kinds of investigations indicated that the anti-tumor activity of adriamycin resulted from drug-induced free radical formation. The free radicals could lead to oxidative DNA damage, and the lesion would be repaired by base excision repair (BER) pathway. Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (HOGG1) is a key enzyme on BER pathway. To study the influence and biological mechanism of the HOGG1 to adriamycin drug-sensitivity, the eukaryotic expression vector with gene of hammerhead ribozyme targeting HOGG1 mRNA would be constructed and identified, and then the change of drug-sensitivity in lung cancer A549 cells would be investigated. Methods According to computer design, two specific restriction site BamHⅠ and EcoRⅠ were added to both ends of the ribozyme gene, then the modified ribozyme gene was synthesized and cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+). The positive recombinants were screened by ampicillin resistance, and plasmids were extracted from the positive recombinants and digested by BamH Ⅰ and EcoR Ⅰ, and then were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and DNA sequencing. The recombinants were transiently transfected into A549 cells. The positive recombinants were identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeting to NEO gene, which was a neomycin resistance gene for selection of stable cell lines and only existed in vectors. The changes of HOGG1 mRNA in A549 cells were detected by RT-PCR. Then the cellular sensitivity to adriamycin was tested by comparison between untransfected cells and transfected cells by MTT assay. The adriamycin-induced DNA damage was investigated by comet assay or single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) between untransfected and transfected cells. Results The recombinants containing the ribozyme gene

  3. Base pair dynamic assisted charge transport in DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Kats, E. I.; Lebedev, V. V.

    2002-01-01

    An 1d model with time-dependent random hopping is proposed to describe charge transport in DNA. It admits to investigate both diffusion of electrons and their tunneling between different sites in DNA. The tunneling appears to be strongly temperature-dependent. Observations of a strong (exponential) as well as a weak distance dependence of the charge transfer in DNA can be explained in the framework of our model.

  4. Job shop scheduling problem based on DNA computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Zhixiang; Cui Jianzhong; Yang Yan; Ma Ying

    2006-01-01

    To solve job shop scheduling problem, a new approach-DNA computing is used in solving job shop scheduling problem. The approach using DNA computing to solve job shop scheduling is divided into three stands. Finally, optimum solutions are obtained by sequencing. A small job shop scheduling problem is solved in DNA computing, and the "operations" of the computation were performed with standard protocols, as ligation, synthesis, electrophoresis etc. This work represents further evidence for the ability of DNA computing to solve NP-complete search problems.

  5. Ultrasensitive isolation, identification and quantification of DNA-protein adducts by ELISA-based RADAR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiianitsa, Kostantin; Maizels, Nancy

    2014-07-01

    Enzymes that form transient DNA-protein covalent complexes are targets for several potent classes of drugs used to treat infectious disease and cancer, making it important to establish robust and rapid procedures for analysis of these complexes. We report a method for isolation of DNA-protein adducts and their identification and quantification, using techniques compatible with high-throughput screening. This method is based on the RADAR assay for DNA adducts that we previously developed (Kiianitsa and Maizels (2013) A rapid and sensitive assay for DNA-protein covalent complexes in living cells. Nucleic Acids Res., 41:e104), but incorporates three key new steps of broad applicability. (i) Silica-assisted ethanol/isopropanol precipitation ensures reproducible and efficient recovery of DNA and DNA-protein adducts at low centrifugal forces, enabling cell culture and DNA precipitation to be carried out in a single microtiter plate. (ii) Rigorous purification of DNA-protein adducts by a procedure that eliminates free proteins and free nucleic acids, generating samples suitable for detection of novel protein adducts (e.g. by mass spectroscopy). (iii) Identification and quantification of DNA-protein adducts by direct ELISA assay. The ELISA-based RADAR assay can detect Top1-DNA and Top2a-DNA adducts in human cells, and gyrase-DNA adducts in Escherichia coli. This approach will be useful for discovery and characterization of new drugs to treat infectious disease and cancer, and for development of companion diagnostics assays for individualized medicine. PMID:24914050

  6. A novel function of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in regulating DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiswal, Aruna S.; Narayan, Satya

    2008-01-01

    Prevailing literature suggests diversified cellular functions for the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. Among them a recently discovered unique role of APC is in DNA repair. The APC gene can modulate the base excision repair (BER) pathway through an interaction with DNA polymerase β (Pol-β) and flap endonuclease 1 (Fen-1). Taken together with the transcriptional activation of APC gene by alkylating agents and modulation of BER activity, APC may play an important role in carcinogenesis an...

  7. Alkaline gel electrophoresis assay to detect DNA strand breaks and repair mechanisms in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    José Carlos Pelielo De Mattos; Ellen Serri da Motta; Márcia Betania Nunes de Oliveira; Flávio José da Silva Dantas; Adriano Caldeira de Araujo

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can induce lesions in different cellular targets, including DNA. Stannous chloride (SnCl2) is a ROS generator, leading to lethality in Escherichia coli (E. coli), with the base excision repair (BER) mechanism playing a role in this process. Many techniques have been developed to detect genotoxicity, as comet assay, in eukaryotic cells, and plasmid DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. In this study, an adaptation of the alkaline gel electrophoresis method was carried ...

  8. DNA repair genotype and lung cancer risk in the beta-carotene and retinol efficacy trial

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Jennifer A; Sakoda, Lori C.; Loomis, Melissa M; Barnett, Matt J.; Julianto, Liberto; Thornquist, Mark D; Neuhouser, Marian L; Weiss, Noel S.; Goodman, Gary E.; Chen, Chu

    2013-01-01

    Many carcinogens in tobacco smoke cause DNA damage, and some of that damage can be mitigated by the actions of DNA repair enzymes. In a case-control study nested within the Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial, a randomized chemoprevention trial in current and former heavy smokers, we examined whether lung cancer risk was associated with variation in 26 base excision repair, mismatch repair, and homologous recombination repair genes. Analyses were limited to Caucasians (744 cases, 1477 co...

  9. Substrate overlap and functional competition between human nucleotide excision repair and Escherichia coli photolyase and (A)BC excision nuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human cell free extract prepared by the method of Manley et al. carries out repair synthesis on UV-irradiated DNA. Removal of pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivation with DNA photolyase reduces repair synthesis by about 50%. With excess enzyme in the reaction mixture photolyase reduced the repair signal by the same amount even in the absence of photoreactivating light, presumably by binding to pyrimidine dimers and interfering with the binding of human damage recognition protein. Similarly, the UvrB subunit of Escherichia coli (A)BC excinuclease when loaded onto UV-irradiated or psoralen-adducted DNA inhibited repair synthesis by cell-free extract by 75-80%. The opposite was true also as HeLa cell free extract specifically inhibited the photorepair of a thymine dimer by DNA photolyase and its removal by (A)BC excinuclease. Cell-free extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups A and C were equally effective in blocking the E. coli repair proteins, while extracts from complementation groups D and E were ineffective in blocking the E. coli enzyme. These results suggest that XP-D and XP-E cells are defective in the damage recognition subunits(s) of human excision nuclease

  10. Rapid restriction enzyme free detection of DNA methyltransferase activity based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, Hanie Ahmadzade; Hosseini, Morteza; Dadmehr, Mehdi; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    DNA methylation has significant roles in gene regulation. DNA methyltransferase (MTase) enzyme characterizes DNA methylation and also induces an aberrant methylation pattern that is related to many diseases, especially cancers. Thus, it is required to develop a method to detect the DNA MTase activity. In this study, we developed a new sensitive and reliable method for methyltransferase activity assay by employing DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA/Ag NCs) without using restriction enzymes. The Ag NCs have been utilized for the determination of M.SssI MTase activity and its inhibition. We designed an oligonucleotide probe which contained an inserted six-cytosine loop as Ag NCs formation template. The changes in fluorescence intensity were monitored to quantify the M.SssI activity. The fluorescence spectra showed a linear decrease in the range of 0.4 to 20 U/ml with a detection limit of 0.1 U/ml, which was significant compared with previous reports. The proposed method was applied successfully for demonstrating the Gentamicin effect as MTase inhibitor. The proposed method showed convenient reproducibility and sensitivity indicating its potential for the determination of methyltransferase activity. PMID:27052776

  11. Extraction of genomic DNA from yeasts for PCR-based applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lõoke, Marko; Kristjuhan, Kersti; Kristjuhan, Arnold

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a quick and low-cost genomic DNA extraction protocol from yeast cells for PCR-based applications. This method does not require any enzymes, hazardous chemicals, or extreme temperatures, and is especially powerful for simultaneous analysis of a large number of samples. DNA can be efficiently extracted from different yeast species (Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Candida albicans, Pichia pastoris, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The protocol involves lysis of yeast colonies or cells from liquid culture in a lithium acetate (LiOAc)-SDS solution and subsequent precipitation of DNA with ethanol. Approximately 100 nanograms of total genomic DNA can be extracted from 1 × 10(7) cells. DNA extracted by this method is suitable for a variety of PCR-based applications (including colony PCR, real-time qPCR, and DNA sequencing) for amplification of DNA fragments of ≤ 3500 bp. PMID:21548894

  12. Mapping the λ Integrase bridges in the nucleoprotein Holliday junction intermediates of viral integrative and excisive recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Wenjun; Warren, David; Seah, Nicole E.; Laxmikanthan, Gurunathan; Van Duyne, Gregory D.; Landy, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The bacteriophage encoded λ Int protein is distinguished from other well-studied and widely exploited tyrosine recombinase family members as a heterobivalent DNA binding protein. With the help of accessory DNA bending proteins, Int bridges two different classes of DNA sites within the unique 400-kDa recombinogenic complexes of integrative and excisive recombination. The absence of any overarching investigations or structural models for these key complexes stems from the inability to determine...

  13. BACTERIAL DNA GYRASE IS NOT THE TARGET OF QUINOLINE-BASED ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Few quinoline-based synthetic compounds (2, 8 Dicyclopentyl-4-methyl quinoline and 2, 8 Dicyclohexyl-4-methyl quinoline, the synthesis of which have been already shown by our medicinal chemistry group, were found to be potent inhibitor of mycobacterial growth. Based on the results of cell culture-based cell killing assays using DNA gyrase positive E. coli strains, we presumed that bacterial DNA gyrase might be a probable target of quinolines. The resemblance of the basic skeletal structural moiety of quinolone and quinoline inspired us to hypothesize that these quinolines might inhibit DNA gyrase. While the non-gyrase inhibitors like ethambutol and isoniazid did not inhibit the growth of these strains. The genesis of the notion of using E. coli DNA gyrase as an alternative to DNA gyrase from the pathogenic Mycobacterium, stems from the fact that E. coli DNA gyrase is found to be about eighty times more sensitive to the action of quinolones than the Mycobacterium DNA gyrase. Therefore, we had used E. coli DNA gyrase as a model enzyme for studying the action of some synthetic quinoline compounds synthesized by us. In the present work, we have used cell killing assay, gel electrophoresis assay (for DNA supercoiling and UV spectroscopy-based coupled assay (for ATP hydrolysis for characterizing the activity of DNA gyrase. Quinolones exhibited low IC50 values as compared to the studied quinolines on DNA gyrase positive E. coli strains We found that although quinolones are the potent inhibitors of supercoiling activity of E. coli DNA gyrase, quinolines are not. We further found that ATPase activity of E. coli DNA gyrase (Non-specific inhibitor was inhibited to a very minor extent in the presence of very high concentration of these synthetic quinolines. DNA gyrase is not the primary target of these synthetic quinolines (2, 8 Dicyclopentyl-4-methyl quinoline and 2, 8 Dicyclohexyl-4-methyl quinoline.

  14. Rapid microbead-based DNA detection using dielectrophoresis and impedance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Kasahara, Hiromichi; Suehiro, Junya

    2014-10-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful tool for diagnostic procedures in bacterial and viral infections. The authors propose a new electrical technique for rapid detection of DNA amplified by PCR using dielectrophoresis (DEP) of microbeads. The method is based on dramatic alteration of DEP characteristics of microbeads caused by DNA labeling. DNA-labeled microbeads are trapped on a microelectrode under the action of positive DEP, whereas pristine ones are not. DEP-trapped microbeads are measured impedimetrically to realize rapid and quantitative detection of the amplified DNA. The validity of the proposed method was demonstrated by detection of PCR-amplified DNA of viruses.

  15. DNABINDPROT: fluctuation-based predictor of DNA-binding residues within a network of interacting residues

    OpenAIRE

    Ozbek, Pemra; Soner, Seren; Erman, Burak; Haliloglu, Turkan

    2010-01-01

    DNABINDPROT is designed to predict DNA-binding residues, based on the fluctuations of residues in high-frequency modes by the Gaussian network model. The residue pairs that display high mean-square distance fluctuations are analyzed with respect to DNA binding, which are then filtered with their evolutionary conservation profiles and ranked according to their DNA-binding propensities. If the analyses are based on the exact outcome of fluctuations in the highest mode, using a conservation thre...

  16. Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway Polymorphisms and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: Evidence for role of MMS19L

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Robert R.; Bamlet, William R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Rider, David N.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a vital response to DNA damage, including damage from tobacco exposure. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NER pathway may encode alterations that affect DNA repair function and therefore influence risk for pancreatic cancer development. Methods A clinic based case-control study in non-Hispanic white persons compared 1,143 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma with 1,097 healthy controls. Twenty-seven genes directly and indirectly involved in the NER pathway were identified and 236 tag-SNPs were selected from 26 of these (one had no SNPs identified). Association studies were performed at the gene level by principal components analysis, while recursive partitioning analysis was utilized to identify potential gene-gene and gene-environment interactions within the pathway. At the individual SNP level, adjusted additive, dominant, and recessive models were investigated, and gene-environment interactions were also assessed. Results Gene level analyses showed an association of MMS19L genotype (chromosome 10q24.1) with altered pancreatic cancer risk (p=0.023). Haplotype analysis of MMS19L also showed a significant association (p=0.0132). Analyses of 7 individual SNPs in this gene showed both protective and risk associations for minor alleles, broadly distributed across patient subgroups defined by smoking status, sex, and age. Conclusion In a candidate pathway SNP association study analysis, common variation in a NER gene, MMS19L, was associated with risk for pancreatic cancer. PMID:19318433

  17. Genetic Characterization of the Nucleotide Excision Repair System of Neisseria gonorrhoeae▿

    OpenAIRE

    LeCuyer, Brian E.; Criss, Alison K.; Seifert, H. Steven

    2009-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is universally used to recognize and remove many types of DNA damage. In eubacteria, the NER system typically consists of UvrA, UvrB, UvrC, the UvrD helicase, DNA polymerase I, and ligase. In addition, when DNA damage blocks transcription, transcription-repair coupling factor (TRCF), the product of the mfd gene, recruits the Uvr complex to repair the damage. Previous work using selected mutants and assays have indicated that pathogenic Neisseria spp. carry a f...

  18. Modeling kinetic rate variation in third generation DNA sequencing data to detect putative modifications to DNA bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadt, Eric E; Banerjee, Onureena; Fang, Gang; Feng, Zhixing; Wong, Wing H; Zhang, Xuegong; Kislyuk, Andrey; Clark, Tyson A; Luong, Khai; Keren-Paz, Alona; Chess, Andrew; Kumar, Vipin; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Sondheimer, Neal; Korlach, Jonas; Kasarskis, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Current generation DNA sequencing instruments are moving closer to seamlessly sequencing genomes of entire populations as a routine part of scientific investigation. However, while significant inroads have been made identifying small nucleotide variation and structural variations in DNA that impact phenotypes of interest, progress has not been as dramatic regarding epigenetic changes and base-level damage to DNA, largely due to technological limitations in assaying all known and unknown types of modifications at genome scale. Recently, single-molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing has been reported to identify kinetic variation (KV) events that have been demonstrated to reflect epigenetic changes of every known type, providing a path forward for detecting base modifications as a routine part of sequencing. However, to date no statistical framework has been proposed to enhance the power to detect these events while also controlling for false-positive events. By modeling enzyme kinetics in the neighborhood of an arbitrary location in a genomic region of interest as a conditional random field, we provide a statistical framework for incorporating kinetic information at a test position of interest as well as at neighboring sites that help enhance the power to detect KV events. The performance of this and related models is explored, with the best-performing model applied to plasmid DNA isolated from Escherichia coli and mitochondrial DNA isolated from human brain tissue. We highlight widespread kinetic variation events, some of which strongly associate with known modification events, while others represent putative chemically modified sites of unknown types. PMID:23093720

  19. Label-free nucleic acids detection based on DNA templated silver nanoclusters fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Jing; Wei, Haiping; Jiang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Based on DNA templated Ag NCs (DNA/Ag NCs) fluorescent probe, a label-free fluorescent method was developed for the detection of clinical significant DNA fragments from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA. Firstly, a hairpin probe, containing target DNA recognition sequence and guanine-rich sequence, was designed to hybridize with the target DNA and form a blunt 3'-terminus DNA duplex. Then, exonuclease III (Exo III) was employed to stepwise hydrolyze the mononucleotides from formed blunt 3'-terminus DNA duplex, releasing the target DNA and guanine-rich sequence. Finally, DNA/Ag NCs fluorescent probe was introduced to hybridize with the guanine-rich sequence, leading to an enhanced fluorescence signal for detection. The proposed method could detect as low as 2.9×10(-10) mol L(-1) HIV-1 DNA and exhibited excellent selectivity against mismatched target DNA. Furthermore, the method possessed perfect recoveries in cells lysate and human serum, showing potential to be used in biological samples. PMID:25863386

  20. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer. PMID:27183258

  1. Cockayne Syndrome group B protein stimulates NEIL2 DNA glycosylase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamann, Maria Diget; Hvitby, Christina Poulsen; Popuri, Venkateswarlu;

    2014-01-01

    excision repair and base excision repair. Here, we describe a new interaction partner for CSB, the DNA glycosylase NEIL2. Using both cell extracts and recombinant proteins, CSB and NEIL2 were found to physically interact independently of DNA. We further found that CSB is able to stimulate NEIL2 glycosylase......Cockayne Syndrome is a segmental premature aging syndrome, which can be caused by loss of function of the CSB protein. CSB is essential for genome maintenance and has numerous interaction partners with established roles in different DNA repair pathways including transcription coupled nucleotide...... activity on a 5-hydroxyl uracil lesion in a DNA bubble structure substrate in vitro. A novel 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyA) specific incision activity of NEIL2 was also stimulated by CSB. To further elucidate the biological role of the interaction, immunofluorescence studies were performed...

  2. Development of an optical biosensor based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering for DNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Tugce; Akdogan, Ebru; Karagoz, Isık. Didem; Kahraman, Mehmet

    2016-03-01

    Rapid, accurate and sensitive DNA analysis is critically important for the diagnostic of genetic diseases. The most common method preferred in practice is fluorescence based microarrays to analyze the DNA. However, there exist some disadvantages related to the above-mentioned method such as the overlapping of the fluorescence emission wavelengths that can diminish in the performance of multiplexing, needed to obtain fluorescence spectra from each dye and photo degradation. In this study, a novel SERS based DNA analysis approach, which is Raman active dye-free and independent of SERS substrate properties, is developed. First, the single strand DNA probe is attached to the SERS substrate and half of the complimentary DNA is attached to gold nanoparticles, as well. We hypothesize that in the presence of target DNA, the complimentary DNA coupled colloids will bind to the SERS substrate surface via hybridization of single strand target DNA. To test this hypothesis, we used UV/Vis spectroscopy, atomic for microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). DNA analysis is demonstrated by a peak shift of the certain peak of the small molecules attached to the SERS substrate surface instead of SERS spectrum obtained in the presence of target DNA from the Raman reporter molecules. The degree of peak shifting will be used for the quantification of the target DNA in the sample. Plasmonic properties of SERS substrates and reproducibility issues will not be considerable due to the use of peak shifting instead of peak intensity for the qualitative analysis.

  3. Effect of gamma-irradiation on rice seed DNA. Pt. 2. Determination of DNA base products in irradiated rice seeds using GC-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA base changes in irradiated rice seeds were studied. Rice seeds were irradiated at 1, 5, 10 and 30 kGy. Extracted DNA samples were hydrolyzed with formic acid, trimethylsilylated and then analyzed by GC-MS. DNA base products were identified as 5-hydroxycytosine, thymine glycol, 8-hydroxyadenine and 8-hydroxyguanine. They were detected in DNA extracted from both irradiated and unirradiated rice seeds, and their amounts showed no significant difference due to irradiation. It was presumed that the amount of radiation-induced base products in rice seed DNA were extremely low at these irradiation doses. (J.P.N.)

  4. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: Match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to biotic condition assessment and non-native species early-detection monitoring. However, the abi...

  5. DNAzyme-Based Logic Gate-Mediated DNA Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Shuoxing; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-13

    Controlling DNA self-assembly processes using rationally designed logic gates is a major goal of DNA-based nanotechnology and programming. Such controls could facilitate the hierarchical engineering of complex nanopatterns responding to various molecular triggers or inputs. Here, we demonstrate the use of a series of DNAzyme-based logic gates to control DNA tile self-assembly onto a prescribed DNA origami frame. Logic systems such as "YES," "OR," "AND," and "logic switch" are implemented based on DNAzyme-mediated tile recognition with the DNA origami frame. DNAzyme is designed to play two roles: (1) as an intermediate messenger to motivate downstream reactions and (2) as a final trigger to report fluorescent signals, enabling information relay between the DNA origami-framed tile assembly and fluorescent signaling. The results of this study demonstrate the plausibility of DNAzyme-mediated hierarchical self-assembly and provide new tools for generating dynamic and responsive self-assembly systems. PMID:26647640

  6. PARP-1 and Ku compete for repair of DNA double strand breaks by distinct NHEJ pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Minli; Wu, Weizhong; Wu, Wenqi; Rosidi, Bustanur; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Huichen; Iliakis, George

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1) recognizes DNA strand interruptions in vivo and triggers its own modification as well as that of other proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose to form polymers. This modification causes a release of PARP-1 from DNA ends and initiates a variety of responses including DNA repair. While PARP-1 has been firmly implicated in base excision and single strand break repair, its role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) remains unclear. Here, ...

  7. DNA-based identification of Calendula officinalis (Asteraceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiderer, Corinna; Lukas, Brigitte; Ruzicka, Joana; Novak, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: For the economically important species Calendula officinalis, a fast identification assay based on high-resolution melting curve analysis was designed. This assay was developed to distinguish C. officinalis from other species of the genus and other Asteraceae genera, and to detect C. officinalis as an adulterant of saffron samples. Methods and Results: For this study, five markers (ITS, rbcL, 5′ trnK-matK, psbA-trnH, trnL-trnF) of 10 Calendula species were sequenced and analyzed for species-specific mutations. With the application of two developed primer pairs located in the trnK 5′ intron and trnL-trnF, C. officinalis could be distinguished from other species of the genus and all outgroup samples tested. Adulterations of Calendula DNA in saffron could be detected down to 0.01%. Conclusions: With the developed assay, C. officinalis can be reliably identified and admixtures of this species as adulterant of saffron can be revealed at low levels. PMID:26649268

  8. A rapid wire-based sampling method for DNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Catcheside, David E A; Stephenson, Alice; Hefford, Chris; Kirkbride, K Paul; Burgoyne, Leigh A

    2012-03-01

    This paper reports the results of a commission to develop a field deployable rapid short tandem repeat (STR)-based DNA profiling system to enable discrimination between tissues derived from a small number of individuals. Speed was achieved by truncation of sample preparation and field deployability by use of an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyser(TM). Human blood and tissues were stabbed with heated stainless steel wire and the resulting sample dehydrated with isopropanol prior to direct addition to a PCR. Choice of a polymerase tolerant of tissue residues and cycles of amplification appropriate for the amount of template expected yielded useful profiles with a custom-designed quintuplex primer set suitable for use with the Bioanalyser(TM). Samples stored on wires remained amplifiable for months, allowing their transportation unrefrigerated from remote locations to a laboratory for analysis using AmpFlSTR(®) Profiler Plus(®) without further processing. The field system meets the requirements for discrimination of samples from small sets and retains access to full STR profiling when required. PMID:22211864

  9. Electron accommodation dynamics in the DNA base thymine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of electron attachment to the DNA base thymine are investigated using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging of the gas phase iodide-thymine (I−T) complex. An ultraviolet pump pulse ejects an electron from the iodide and prepares an iodine-thymine temporary negative ion that is photodetached with a near-IR probe pulse. The resulting photoelectrons are analyzed with velocity-map imaging. At excitation energies ranging from −120 meV to +90 meV with respect to the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 4.05 eV for I−T, both the dipole-bound and valence-bound negative ions of thymine are observed. A slightly longer rise time for the valence-bound state than the dipole-bound state suggests that some of the dipole-bound anions convert to valence-bound species. No evidence is seen for a dipole-bound anion of thymine at higher excitation energies, in the range of 0.6 eV above the I−T VDE, which suggests that if the dipole-bound anion acts as a “doorway” to the valence-bound anion, it only does so at excitation energies near the VDE of the complex

  10. Microcantilver-based DNA hybridization sensors for Salmonella identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ricciardi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The detection of pathogenic microorganisms in foods remains a challenging since the safety of foodstuffs has to be ensured by the food producing companies. Conventional methods for the detection and identification of bacteria mainly rely on specific microbiological and biochemical identification. Biomolecular methods, are commonly used as a support for traditional techniques, thanks to their high sensitivity, specificity and not excessive costs. However, new methods like biosensors for example, can be an exciting alternative to the more traditional tecniques for the detection of pathogens in food. In this study we report Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis DNA detection through a novel class of label-free biosensors: microcantilevers (MCs. In general, MCs can operate as a microbalance and is used to detect the mass of the entities anchored to the cantilever surface using the decrease in the resonant frequency. We use DNA hybridization as model reaction system and for this reason, specific single stranded probe DNA of the pathogen and three different DNA targets (single-stranded complementary DNA, PCR product and serial dilutions of DNA extracted from S. Enteritidis strains were applied. Two protocols were reported in order to allow the probe immobilization on cantilever surface: i MC surface was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and glutaraldehyde and an amino-modified DNA probe was used; ii gold-coated sensors and thiolated DNA probes were used in order to generate a covalent bonding (Th-Au. For the first one, measures after hybridization with the PCR product showed related frequency shift 10 times higher than hybridization with complementary probe and detectable signals were obtained at the concentrations of 103 and 106 cfu/mL after hybridization with bacterial DNA. There are currently optimizations of the second protocol, where preliminary results have shown to be more uniform and therefore more precise within each of the

  11. Solid phase based DNA solution of the coloring problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Linqiang; LIU Guangwu; XU Jin; LIU Yachun

    2004-01-01

    DNA computing has the potential to tackle computationally difficult problems that have real-world implications.The parallel search capabilities of DNA make it a valuable tool for approaching intractable computational problems,for which conventional computers have limited potentials.Up to now,many accomplishments have been achieved to improve its performance and increase its reliability.In this paper,the coloring problem has been solved by means of molecular biology techniques.The coloring problem is a well-known NP-complete problem.This work represents further evidence for the ability of DNA computing to solve NP-complete problems.

  12. Inter-base Electronic Coupling for transport through DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Anantram, H. Mehrez M. P.

    2005-01-01

    We develop a new approach to derive single state tight binding (SSTB) model for electron transport in the vicinity of valence-conduction bands of poly(G)-poly(C) and poly(A)-poly(T) DNA. The SSTB parameters are derived from {\\it first principles} and are used to model charge transport through finite length DNA. We investigate the rigor of reducing the full DNA Hamiltonian to SSTB model to represent charge transport in the vicinity of valence-conduction band. While the transmission coefficient...

  13. Silica-Based Solid Phase Extraction of DNA on a Microchip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓芳; 沈科跃; 刘鹏; 郭旻; 程京; 周玉祥

    2004-01-01

    Micro total analysis systems for chemical and biological analysis have attracted much attention.However,microchips for sample preparation and especially DNA purification are still underdeveloped.This work describes a solid phase extraction chip for purifying DNA from biological samples based on the adsorption of DNA on bare silica beads prepacked in a microchannel.The chip was fabricated with poly-dimethylsiloxane.The silica beads were packed in the channel on the chip with a tapered microchannel to form the packed bed.Fluorescence detection was used to evaluate the DNA adsorbing efficiency of the solid phase.The polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate the quality of the purified DNA for further use.The extraction efficiency for the DNA extraction chip is approximately 50% with a 150-nL extraction volume.Successful amplification of DNA extracted from human whole blood indicates that this method is compatible with the polymerase chain reaction.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA repair and association with aging--an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz, Ricardo Gredilla; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2010-01-01

    the aging process and to be particularly deleterious in post-mitotic cells. Thus, DNA repair is an important mechanism for maintenance of genomic integrity. Despite the importance of mitochondria in the aging process, it was thought for many years that mitochondria lacked an enzymatic DNA repair...... system comparable to that in the nuclear compartment. However, it is now well established that DNA repair actively takes place in mitochondria. Oxidative DNA damage processing, base excision repair mechanisms were the first to be described in these organelles, and consequently the best understood....... However, new proteins and novel DNA repair pathways, thought to be exclusively present in the nucleus, have recently been described also to be present in mitochondria. Here we review the main mitochondrial DNA repair pathways and their association with the aging process....

  15. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minko, Irina G; Jacobs, Aaron C; de Leon, Arnie R; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M; Rizzo, Carmelo J; McCullough, Amanda K; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  16. Architecture of high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers toward pharmaceutical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ken-ichiro Matsunaga; Michiko Kimoto; Charlotte Hanson; Michael Sanford; Young, Howard A.; Ichiro Hirao

    2015-01-01

    We present a remodeling method for high-affinity unnatural-base DNA aptamers to augment their thermal stability and nuclease resistance, for use as drug candidates targeting specific proteins. Introducing a unique mini-hairpin DNA provides robust stability to unnatural-base DNA aptamers generated by SELEX using genetic alphabet expansion, without reducing their high affinity. By this method, >80% of the remodeled DNA aptamer targeting interferon-γ (K D of 33 pM) survived in human serum at 37 ...

  17. The protein that binds to DNA base J in trypanosomatids has features of a thymidine hydroxylase

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Zhong; Genest, Paul-André; ter Riet, Bas; Sweeney, Kate; DiPaolo, Courtney; Kieft, Rudo; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Perrakis, Anastassis; Simmons, Jana M.; Hausinger, Robert P.; van Luenen, Henri G.A.M.; Daniel J Rigden; Sabatini, Robert; Borst, Piet

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosomatids contain an unusual DNA base J (β-d-glucosylhydroxymethyluracil), which replaces a fraction of thymine in telomeric and other DNA repeats. To determine the function of base J, we have searched for enzymes that catalyze J biosynthesis. We present evidence that a protein that binds to J in DNA, the J-binding protein 1 (JBP1), may also catalyze the first step in J biosynthesis, the conversion of thymine in DNA into hydroxymethyluracil. We show that JBP1 belongs to the family of Fe...

  18. Chaos-based image encryption using a hybrid genetic algorithm and a DNA sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enayatifar, Rasul; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Isnin, Ismail Fauzi

    2014-05-01

    The paper studies a recently developed evolutionary-based image encryption algorithm. A novel image encryption algorithm based on a hybrid model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) masking, a genetic algorithm (GA) and a logistic map is proposed. This study uses DNA and logistic map functions to create the number of initial DNA masks and applies GA to determine the best mask for encryption. The significant advantage of this approach is improving the quality of DNA masks to obtain the best mask that is compatible with plain images. The experimental results and computer simulations both confirm that the proposed scheme not only demonstrates excellent encryption but also resists various typical attacks.

  19. Biosynthesis of the human DNA repair enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anti-human uracil DNA glycosylase monoclonal antibodies have been used to study the in vitro and in vivo biosynthesis of this human base excision repair enzyme. The in vitro translation of poly(A+)uracil DNA glycosylase mRNA was examined by immunoprecipitation of the [35S]methionine-labeled translation products. As identified by sucrose density analysis, immunoreactive in vitro products of 37,000 daltons and 24,000 daltons were translated from 16S poly(A+)RNA and from 11S poly (A+)RNA, respectively. However, only the 37,000 Mr polypeptide could be detected by immunoblot analysis of crude human placental and fibroblast extracts or by immunoprecipitation of [35S] labeled normal human cell extracts. This relative molecular weight correspond to the molecular weight observed for homogeneous human placental uracil DNA glycosylase. A placental mRNA preparation was used to construct a cDNA library in pUC8. Immunological screening identified two recombinant DNA plasmids each containing a 340 base pair insert. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the insert hybridized to a 16S poly (A+)mRNA. These results suggest that immunoreactive uracil DNA glycosylase protein was synthesized at its enzymatically active molecular weight as the primary translation product of a 16S poly (A+)mRNA

  20. Creative Conceptual Design Based on Evolutionary DNA Computing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiyu; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Yangyang

    Creative conceptual design is an important area in computer aided innovation. Typical design methodology includes exploration and optimization by evolutionary techniques such as EC and swarm intelligence. Although there are many proposed algorithms and applications for creative design by these techniques, the computing models are implemented mostly by traditional von Neumann’s architecture. On the other hand, the possibility of using DNA as a computing technique arouses wide interests in recent years with huge built-in parallel computing nature and ability to solve NP complete problems. This new computing technique is performed by biological operations on DNA molecules rather than chips. The purpose of this paper is to propose a simulated evolutionary DNA computing model and integrate DNA computing with creative conceptual design. The proposed technique will apply for large scale, high parallel design problems potentially.

  1. Synthesis of Palladium Conductive DNA-based Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoa; Streiff, Stéphane; Lyonnais, Sébastien; Goux-Capes, Laurence; Filoramo, Arianna; Goffman, Marcelo; Bourgoin, Jean Philippe

    2006-09-01

    We present here a simple method to metallize DNA by Electroless Plating of palladium, a trusty metal for contacting SWNT devices. Indeed, DNA is a promising scaffolding candidate for molecular electronic bottom-up self-assembly approaches of SWNT devices. We report in this work the synthesis and characterization of individual Pd nanowires as thin as 30 nm showing ohmic behavior at room temperature.

  2. Dynamics of plant DNA replication based on PCNA visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Ryohei; Hirakawa, Takeshi; Hayashi, Seri; Sakamoto, Takuya; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is an essential process for the copying of genomic information in living organisms. Imaging of DNA replication in tissues and organs is mainly performed using fixed cells after incorporation of thymidine analogs. To establish a useful marker line to measure the duration of DNA replication and analyze the dynamics of DNA replication, we focused on the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), which functions as a DNA sliding clamp for replicative DNA polymerases and is an essential component of replisomes. In this study we produced an Arabidopsis thaliana line expressing PCNA1 fused with the green fluorescent protein under the control of its own promoter (pAtPCNA1::AtPCNA1-EGFP). The duration of the S phase measured using the expression line was consistent with that measured after incorporation of a thymidine analog. Live cell imaging revealed that three distinct nuclear localization patterns (whole, dotted, and speckled) were sequentially observable. These whole, dotted, and speckled patterns of subnuclear AtPCNA1 signals were indicative of the G1 or G2 phase, early S phase and late S phase, respectively. The results indicate that the pAtPCNA1::AtPCNA1-EGFP line is a useful marker line for visualization of S-phase progression in live plant organs. PMID:27417498

  3. Linearly programmed DNA-based molecular computer operated on magnetic particle surface in test-tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jian; ZHANG Zhizhou; SHI Yongyong; Li Xiuxia; HE Lin

    2004-01-01

    The postgenomic era has seen an emergence of new applications of DNA manipulation technologies, including DNA-based molecular computing. Surface DNA computing has already been reported in a number of studies that, however, all employ different mechanisms other than automaton functions. Here we describe a programmable DNA surface-computing device as a Turing machine-like finite automaton. The laboratory automaton is primarily composed of DNA (inputs, output-detectors, transition molecules as software), DNA manipulating enzymes and buffer system that solve artificial computational problems autonomously. When fluoresceins were labeled in the 5′ end of (-) strand of the input molecule, direct observation of all reaction intermediates along the time scale was made so that the dynamic process of DNA computing could be conveniently visualized. The features of this study are: (i) achievement of finite automaton functions by linearly programmed DNA computer operated on magnetic particle surface and (ii) direct detection of all DNA computing intermediates by capillary electrophoresis. Since DNA computing has the massive parallelism and feasibility for automation, this achievement sets a basis for large-scale implications of DNA computing for functional genomics in the near future.

  4. Label-free DNA biosensor based on resistance change of platinum nanoparticles assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotadis, Evangelos; Voutyras, Konstantinos; Chatzipetrou, Marianneza; Tsekenis, Georgios; Patsiouras, Lampros; Madianos, Leonidas; Chatzandroulis, Stavros; Zergioti, Ioanna; Tsoukalas, Dimitris

    2016-07-15

    A novel nanoparticle based biosensor for the fast and simple detection of DNA hybridization events is presented. The sensor utilizes hybridized DNA's charge transport properties, combining them with metallic nanoparticle networks that act as nano-gapped electrodes. The DNA hybridization events can be detected by a significant reduction in the sensor's resistance due to the conductive bridging offered by hybridized DNA. By modifying the nanoparticle surface coverage, which can be controlled experimentally being a function of deposition time, and the structural properties of the electrodes, an optimized biosensor for the in situ detection of DNA hybridization events is ultimately fabricated. The fabricated biosensor exhibits a wide response range, covering four orders of magnitude, a limit of detection of 1nM and can detect a single base pair mismatch between probe and complementary DNA. PMID:26995284

  5. 29 CFR 779.264 - Excise taxes separately stated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excise taxes separately stated. 779.264 Section 779.264... Coverage Excise Taxes § 779.264 Excise taxes separately stated. A tax is separately stated where it clearly... was no invoice or sales slip. In the absence of a sales slip or invoice, the amount of the tax...

  6. DNA Polymerases λ and β: The Double-Edged Swords of DNA Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentegari, Elisa; Kissova, Miroslava; Bavagnoli, Laura; Maga, Giovanni; Crespan, Emmanuele

    2016-01-01

    DNA is constantly exposed to both endogenous and exogenous damages. More than 10,000 DNA modifications are induced every day in each cell's genome. Maintenance of the integrity of the genome is accomplished by several DNA repair systems. The core enzymes for these pathways are the DNA polymerases. Out of 17 DNA polymerases present in a mammalian cell, at least 13 are specifically devoted to DNA repair and are often acting in different pathways. DNA polymerases β and λ are involved in base excision repair of modified DNA bases and translesion synthesis past DNA lesions. Polymerase λ also participates in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, recent data have revealed that, depending on their relative levels, the cell cycle phase, the ratio between deoxy- and ribo-nucleotide pools and the interaction with particular auxiliary proteins, the repair reactions carried out by these enzymes can be an important source of genetic instability, owing to repair mistakes. This review summarizes the most recent results on the ambivalent properties of these enzymes in limiting or promoting genetic instability in mammalian cells, as well as their potential use as targets for anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:27589807

  7. Synthesis, photochemical properties and DNA binding studies of dna cleaving agents based on chiral dipyridine dihydrodioxins salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamaev, Alexei

    activated by UV-light. The mechanism of o-quinone release and intramolecular ET was studied in detail by methods of Ultrafast Transient Absortion Spectroscopy and supported by high-level quantum mechanical calculations. The binding properties of chiral intercalators based on PDHD to various DNA oligonucleotides were studied by various methods and DNA cleavage properties indicating strong binding and cleaving ability of the synthesized PDHDs. Also, a new method for synthesis of cyclohexa[e]pyrenes which possibly capable of intramolecular ET and electron transfer-oxidative stress (ET-OS) DNA cleavage was developed and partially accomplished.

  8. Local excision carcinoma in early stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Dong Gao; Yong-Fu Shao; Jian-Jun Bi; Su-Sheng Shi; Jun Liang; Yu-Hua Hu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the validity of local excision for the early stage low rectal cancer as an effective treatment alternative to radical resection.METHODS: A retrospective medical chart review was done in 47 patients with early stage low rectal carcinoma who underwent local excision from November 1980 through November 1999 at Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS). The patients were treated by either transanal (40 cases), trans-sacral (5 cases), or trans-vaginal (2 cases) excision of tumors and no death was related to surgery. Sixteen patients received postoperative radiotherapy.RESULTS: T1 and T2 lesion was found in 36 (76.6 %) and 11 patients (23.4 %) respectively. The overall local tumor recurrence rate was 14.9 % (7/47), with an average recurrence time of 21 months. Among these 7 recurrent patients, there were 4 T1 and 3 T2 lesions. Microscopically,the surgical incisal margin was negative in 45 (95.7 %) and positive in 2 patients (4.3 %); Both of the later had developed local recurrence. The overall 5-year survival rate was 91.7 %,in which there were 94.4 % for T1 and 83.3 % for T2 tumors.T stage, intravessel tumor thrombosis, lymphocytic infiltration and histological grade were not found to be significant by related to the local recurrence and survival (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: Local tumor excision was a safe procedure for the treatment of early stage low rectal carcinoma with minimal morbidity and mortality, which might serves as one of the primary surgical treatment methods for the disease of this kind.

  9. Significant disparity in base and sugar damage in DNA resulting from neutron and electron irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Dalong; Nico, Jeffrey S.; Karam, Lisa; Timofeeva, Olga; Blakely, William F.; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Jaruga, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a comparison of the effects of neutron and electron irradiation of aqueous DNA solutions was investigated to characterize potential neutron signatures in DNA damage induction. Ionizing radiation generates numerous lesions in DNA, including base and sugar lesions, lesions involving base–sugar combinations (e.g. 8,5′-cyclopurine-2′-deoxynucleosides) and DNA–protein cross-links, as well as single- and double-strand breaks and clustered damage. The characteristics of damage depend ...

  10. Fate of Kaluza-Klein black holes: Evaporation or excision?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the evaporation process of black strings which are typical examples of Kaluza-Klein black holes. Taking into account the backreaction of the Hawking radiation, we deduce the evolution equation for the radion field. By solving the evolution equation, we find that the shape of the internal space is necked by the Hawking radiation and the amount of the deformation becomes large as the evaporation proceeds. Based on this analysis, we speculate that the Kaluza-Klein black holes would be excised from the Kaluza-Klein spacetime before the onset of the Gregory-Laflamme instability and therefore before the evaporation

  11. Differing levels of excision repair in human fetal dermis and brain cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, R.E. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (USA). Dept. of Radiology); D' Ambrosio, S.M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (USA). Dept. of Radiology; Ohio State Univ., Columbus (USA). Dept. of Pharmacology)

    1982-01-01

    The levels of DNA excision repair, as measured by unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and the UV-endonuclease sensitive site assay, were compared in cells derived from human fetal brain and dermal tissues. The level of UDS induced following ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was found to be lower (approx. 60%) in the fetal brain cells than in fetal dermal cells. It was determined, using the UV-endonuclease sensitive site assay to confirm the UDS observation, that 50% of the dimers induced by UV in fetal dermal cells were repaired in 8 h. while only 15% were removed in the fetal brain cells during the same period of time. Even after 24 h. only 44% of the dimers induced by UV in the fetal brain cells were repaired, while 65% were removed in the dermal cells. These data suggest that cultured human fetal brain cells exhibit lower levels of excision repair compared to cultured human fetal dermal cells.

  12. Synthesis and properties of defined DNA oligomers containing base mispairs involving 2-aminopurine.

    OpenAIRE

    Eritja, R.; Kaplan, B E; Mhaskar, D; Sowers, L C; Petruska, J; Goodman, M F

    1986-01-01

    DNA heptamers containing the mutagenic base analogue 2-aminopurine (AP) have been chemically synthesized and physically characterized. We report on the relative stabilities of base pairs between AP and each of the common DNA bases, as determined from heptamer duplex melts at 275 and 330 nm. Base pairs are ranked in order of decreasing stability: AP.T greater than AP.A greater than AP.C greater than AP.G. It is of interest that AP.A is more stable than AP.C even though DNA polymerase strongly ...

  13. Advancing DNA-based Nanotechnology Capabilities and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Alexandria N.

    Biological systems have inspired interest in developing artificial molecular self-assembly techniques that imitate nature's ability to harness chemical forces to specifically position atoms within intricate assemblies. Of the biomolecules used to mimic nature's abilities, nucleic acids have gained special attention. Specifically, deoxyribonucleic acid is a stable molecule with a readily accessible code that exhibits predictable and programmable intermolecular interactions. These properties are exploited in the revolutionary structural DNA nanotechnology method known as scaffolded DNA origami. For DNA origami to establish itself as a widely used method for creating self-assembling, complex, functional materials, current limitations need to be overcome and new methods need to be established to move forward with developing structures for diverse applications in many fields. The limitations discussed in this dissertation include 1) pushing the scale of well-formed, fully-addressable origami to two and seven times the size of conventional origami, 2) testing cost-effective staple strand synthesis methods for producing pools of oligos for a specified origami, and 3) engineering mechanical properties using non-natural nucleotides in DNA assemblies. After accomplishing the above, we're able to design complex DNA origami structures that incorporate many of the current developments in the field into a useful material with applicability in wide-ranging fields, namely cell biology and photonics.

  14. Theoretical modelling of radiolytic damage of free DNA bases and within DNA macromolecule

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Václav; Davídková, Marie

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 122, 1-4 (2007), s. 110-112. ISSN 0144-8420. [Symposium on Microdosimetry /14./. Venezia, 13.11.2005-18.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4048401 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : DNA damage * radiolysis * ionizing radiation * theoretical modeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.528, year: 2007

  15. A child with xeroderma pigmentosum for excision of basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mulimani, Sridevi M; Talikoti, Dayanand G

    2013-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by hypersensitivity to sunlight, ocular involvement, and progressive neurological complications. These manifestations are due to a cellular hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation leading to a defect in repair of DNA by the process of nucleotide excision repair. Basal cell carcinoma which is rare in children can occur with XP. Though the XP induced changes are predominately dermatologic, pose several challenges in anaesthetic management. Hence, we...

  16. Mutagenic specificity of solar UV light in nucleotide excision repair-deficient rodent cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sage, E.; Lamolet, B; Brulay, E; Moustacchi, E; Chteauneuf, A; Drobetsky, E A

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in the cellular processing of carcinogenic DNA photoproducts induced by defined, environmentally relevant portions of the solar wavelength spectrum, we have determined the mutagenic specificity of simulated sunlight (310-1100 nm), UVA (350-400 nm), and UVB (290-320 nm), as well as of the "nonsolar" model mutagen 254-nm UVC, at the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) locus in NER-deficient (ERCC1) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell...

  17. DNA origami-based nanoribbons: assembly, length distribution, and twist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungmann, Ralf; Scheible, Max; Kuzyk, Anton; Pardatscher, Guenther; Simmel, Friedrich C [Lehrstuhl fuer Bioelektronik, Physik-Department and ZNN/WSI, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4a, 85748 Garching (Germany); Castro, Carlos E, E-mail: simmel@ph.tum.de [Labor fuer Biomolekulare Nanotechnologie, Physik-Department and ZNN/WSI, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4a, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-07-08

    A variety of polymerization methods for the assembly of elongated nanoribbons from rectangular DNA origami structures are investigated. The most efficient method utilizes single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides to bridge an intermolecular scaffold seam between origami monomers. This approach allows the fabrication of origami ribbons with lengths of several micrometers, which can be used for long-range ordered arrangement of proteins. It is quantitatively shown that the length distribution of origami ribbons obtained with this technique follows the theoretical prediction for a simple linear polymerization reaction. The design of flat single layer origami structures with constant crossover spacing inevitably results in local underwinding of the DNA helix, which leads to a global twist of the origami structures that also translates to the nanoribbons.

  18. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  19. Phonatory characteristics of excised pig, sheep, and cow larynges

    OpenAIRE

    Alipour, Fariborz; Jaiswal, Sanyukta

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the phonatory characteristics of pig, sheep, and cow excised larynges and to find out which of these animal species is the best model for human phonation. Excised pig, sheep, and cow larynges were prepared and mounted over a tapered tube on the excised bench that supplied pressurized, heated, and humidified air in a manner similar to that for excised canine models. Each excised larynx was subjected to a series of pressure-flow experiments with adductio...

  20. Discrimination of Single Base Pair Differences Among Individual DNA Molecules Using a Nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; DeGuzman, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    The protein toxin alpha-hemolysin form nanometer scale channels across lipid membranes. Our lab uses a single channel in an artificial lipid bilayer in a patch clamp device to capture and examine individual DNA molecules. This nanopore detector used with a support vector machine (SVM) can analyze DNA hairpin molecules on the millisecond time scale. We distinguish duplex stem length, base pair mismatches, loop length, and single base pair differences. The residual current fluxes also reveal structural molecular dynamics elements. DNA end-fraying (terminal base pair dissociation) can be observed as near full blockades, or spikes, in current. This technique can be used to investigate other biological processes dependent on DNA end-fraying, such as the processing of HIV DNA by HIV integrase.

  1. Shock Wave Based Biolistic Device for DNA and Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Mutsumi; Menezes, Viren; Kanno, Akira; Hosseini, S. Hamid R.; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2008-03-01

    A shock wave assisted biolistic (biological ballistic) device has been developed to deliver DNA/drug-coated micro-projectiles into soft living targets. The device consists of an Nd:YAG laser, an optical setup to focus the laser beam and, a thin aluminum (Al) foil (typically 100 µm thick) which is a launch pad for the micro-projectiles. The DNA/drug-coated micro-particles to be delivered are deposited on the anterior surface of the foil and the posterior surface of the foil is ablated using the laser beam with an energy density of about 32×109 W/cm2. The ablation launches a shock wave through the foil that imparts an impulse to the foil surface, due to which the deposited particles accelerate and acquire sufficient momentum to penetrate soft targets. The device has been tested for particle delivery by delivering 1 µm size tungsten particles into liver tissues of experimental rats and in vitro test models made of gelatin. The penetration depths of about 90 and 800 µm have been observed in the liver and gelatin targets, respectively. The device has been tested for in vivo DNA [encoding β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene] transfer by delivering plasmid DNA-coated, 1-µm size gold (Au) particles into onion scale, tobacco leaf and soybean seed cells. The GUS activity was detected in the onion, tobacco and soybean cells after the DNA delivery. The present device is totally non-intrusive in nature and has a potential to get miniaturized to suit the existing medical procedures for DNA and/or drug delivery.

  2. Enhancing magnetic nanoparticle-based DNA transfection: Intracellular-active cassette features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Matthew Martin

    Efficient plasmid DNA transfection of embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, neural cell lines and the majority of primary cell lines is a current challenge in gene therapy research. Magnetic nanoparticle-based DNA transfection is a gene vectoring technique that is promising because it is capable of outperforming most other non-viral transfection methods in terms of both transfection efficiency and cell viability. The nature of the DNA vector implemented depends on the target cell phenotype, where the particle surface chemistry and DNA binding/unbinding kinetics of the DNA carrier molecule play a critical role in the many steps required for successful gene transfection. Accordingly, Neuromag, an iron oxide/polymer nanoparticle optimized for transfection of neural phenotypes, outperforms many other nanoparticles and lipidbased DNA carriers. Up to now, improvements to nanomagnetic transfection techniques have focused mostly on particle functionalization and transfection parameter optimization (cell confluence, growth media, serum starvation, magnet oscillation parameters, etc.). None of these parameters are capable of assisting the nuclear translocation of delivered plasmid DNA once the particle-DNA complex is released from the endosome and dissociates in the cell's cytoplasm. In this study, incorporation of a DNA targeting sequence (DTS) feature in the transfecting plasmid DNA confers improved nuclear translocation, demonstrating significant improvement in nanomagnetic transfection efficiency in differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Other parameters, such as days in vitro, are also found to play a role and represent potential targets for further optimization.

  3. Probing Conformational Changes of Human DNA Polymerase λ Using Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Footprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, Jason D.; Brown, Jessica A.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Suo, Zucai

    2009-01-01

    Crystallographic studies of the C-terminal, DNA polymerase β-like domain of human DNA polymerase lambda (fPolλ) suggested that the catalytic cycle might not involve a large protein domain rearrangement as observed with several replicative DNA polymerases and DNA polymerase β. To examine solution-phase protein conformation changes in fPolλ, which also contains a breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 C-terminal domain and a Proline-rich domain at its N-terminus, we used a mass spectrometry - base...

  4. A simple silica-based method for metagenomic DNA extraction from soil and sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Herrera, R; Narváez-Zapata, J; Zamudio-Maya, M; Mena-Martínez, M E

    2008-09-01

    A new method is described for extraction of metagenomic DNA from soil and sediments which is based on DNA adsorption to silica without the use of phenol, ethanol precipitation or a cesium chloride gradient. High-quality DNA was obtained, and PCR inhibition was overcome by adding bovine serum albumin and adjusting magnesium concentration. By using PCR-DGGE with Firmicutes and lactic acid bacteria-specific primers the extracted metagenomic DNA was shown to contain a mixture of bacterial genomes. This method can be used for screening bacterial diversity in soil and sediment samples. PMID:18373226

  5. Design and implementation of binary tree data structure based on DNA computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chun-de; WEI Guo-hui

    2009-01-01

    The designing,encodings and an instance of simulation of a binary tree for DNA computer were proposed,which utilizes the method of biology to complete inserting and deleting of the binary tree. Firstly,DNA encodings for storage and all elements of the binary tree were completely given out. Then, the implementations of all bio-operations in DNA computer were described. Finally, to prove the feasibility of this method, an actual binary tree with detailed nucleotide encodings was introduced. The process of an algorithm implemented on this binary tree was demonstrated. Based on this method, more other data structures in DNA computer can be developed.

  6. Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods Suitable for PCR-based Detection and Genotyping of Clostridium botulinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auricchio, Bruna; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fiore, Alfonsina;

    2013-01-01

    terms of cost, time, labor, and supplies. Eleven botulinum toxin–producing clostridia strains and 25 samples (10 food, 13 clinical, and 2 environmental samples) naturally contaminated with botulinum toxin–producing clostridia were used to compare 4 DNA extraction procedures: Chelex® 100 matrix, Phenol......Sufficient quality and quantity of extracted DNA is critical to detecting and performing genotyping of Clostridium botulinum by means of PCR-based methods. An ideal extraction method has to optimize DNA yield, minimize DNA degradation, allow multiple samples to be extracted, and be efficient in...

  7. What you always needed to know about electroporation based DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, Anita Birgitte; Gehl, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinations are increasingly used to fight infectious disease, and DNA vaccines offer considerable advantages, including broader possibilities for vaccination and lack of need for cold storage. It has been amply demonstrated, that electroporation augments uptake of DNA in both skin and muscle, and...... it is foreseen that future DNA vaccination may to a large extent be coupled with and dependent upon electroporation based delivery. Understanding the basic science of electroporation and exploiting knowledge obtained on optimization of DNA electrotransfer to muscle and skin, may greatly augment...

  8. Exploring the potential of novel multivalent DNA-based vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Fissolo, Nicolas Miguel

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation, we exploited the DNA vaccination approach to test in the mouse some aspects relevant for the design of optimal CTL-stimulating, multiepitope vaccines. We have used three different ways to prime multispecific CD8+ T cell responses: 1) We have cloned a polytope DNA vaccine that encodes 10 epitopes binding MHC class I molecules encoded by the K, D or L locus (of H-2d, H-2b and H-2k haplotype mice). Vaccination of different mouse strains showed that Ld-restricted CD8+ T cell...

  9. Base-resolution DNA methylation landscape of zebrafish brain and liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Chatterjee

    2014-12-01

    To our knowledge, these datasets are the only RRBS datasets and base-resolution DNA methylation data available at this time for zebrafish brain and liver. These datasets could serve as a resource for future studies to document the functional role of DNA methylation in zebrafish. In addition, these datasets could be used as controls while performing analysis on treated samples.

  10. Size-based molecular diagnostics using plasma DNA for noninvasive prenatal testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, S.C.; Chan, K.C.; Zheng, Y.W.; Jiang, P.; Liao, G.J.; Sun, H; Akolekar, R.; Leung, T.Y.; Go, A.T.; Vugt, J.M.G. van; Minekawa, R.; Oudejans, C.B.; Nicolaides, K.H.; Chiu, R.W.; Lo, Y.M.

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing using fetal DNA in maternal plasma is an actively researched area. The current generation of tests using massively parallel sequencing is based on counting plasma DNA sequences originating from different genomic regions. In this study, we explored a different approach th

  11. Application of DNA-based diagnostics in detection of schistosomal DNA in early infection and after drug treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Minjun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research is now focused on identification of sensitive and specific diagnostic tests for early identification of schistosomal infection and evaluation of chemotherapy in field situations in China. Results This study compared loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP with conventional PCR as DNA-based diagnostic techniques for the early detection of schistosomal DNA and the evaluation of chemotherapy. The results showed that both PCR and LAMP assays targeting a 301 base pair (bp sequence of the highly repetitive retrotransposon, SjR2, amplified DNA from schistosomes but were unable to distinguish between schistosome species. LAMP and conventional PCR were shown to amplify the target sequence of the SjR2-pCR2.1 recombinant plasmid template with limits of detection of 10-4 ng and 10-2 ng, respectively, thus demonstrating the superior sensitivity of the LAMP method. Schistosoma japonicum DNA was detected in all serum samples obtained from the three experimental groups at 1 week post-infection by LAMP assay, while the rate of detection by conventional PCR ranged from 50% to 66%. The potential application of PCR and LAMP assays for the evaluation of artesunate and praziquantel chemotherapy was investigated. PCR was shown to be less sensitive for detection of schistosomal DNA in drug-treated rabbit sera than the LAMP method. Conclusions The data presented here indicate that LAMP is suitable for the detection of early infection in the groups primarily infected with Schistosoma japonicum, such as migrants, travellers, military personnel and the younger age groups. However, it is less suitable for evaluation of the efficacy of chemotherapy in the early stages because of its high sensitivity.

  12. Real-time observation of DNA repair: 2-aminopurine as a molecular probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Rajagopal; Butcher, Christina E.; Oh, Dennis H.

    2008-02-01

    Triplex forming oligos (TFOs) that target psoralen photoadducts to specific DNA sequences have generated interest as a potential agent in gene therapy. TFOs also offer an opportunity to study the mechanism of DNA repair in detail. In an effort to understand the mechanism of DNA repair at a specific DNA sequence in real-time, we have designed a plasmid containing a psoralen reaction site adjacent to a TFO binding site corresponding to a sequence within the human interstitial collagenase gene. Two 2-aminopurine residues incorporated into the purine-rich strand of the TFO binding site and located within six nucleotides of the psoralen reaction site serve as molecular probes for excision repair events involving the psoralen photoadducts on that DNA strand. In duplex DNA, the 2-aminopurine fluorescence is quenched. However, upon thermal or formamide-induced denaturation of duplex DNA to single stranded DNA, the 2-aminopurine fluorescence increases by eight fold. These results suggest that monitoring 2-aminopurine fluorescence from plasmids damaged by psoralen TFOs may be a method for measuring excision of single-stranded damaged DNA from the plasmid in cells. A fluorescence-based molecular probe to the plasmid may significantly simplify the real-time observation of DNA repair in both populations of cells as well as single cells.

  13. Feasibility of using DNA-immobilized nanocellulose-based immunoadsorbent for systemic lupus erythematosus plasmapheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changgang; Carlsson, Daniel O; Mihranyan, Albert

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this project was to study the feasibility of using a DNA-immobilized nanocellulose-based immunoadsorbent for possible application in medical apheresis such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment. Calf thymus DNA was bound to high surface area nanocellulose membrane at varying concentrations using UV-irradiation. The DNA-immobilized samples were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and phosphorus elemental analysis. The anti-ds-DNA IgG binding was tested in vitro using ELISA. The produced sample showed high affinity in vitro to bind anti-ds-DNA-antibodies from mice, as much as 80% of added IgG was bound by the membrane. Furthermore, the binding efficiency was quantitatively dependent on the amount of immobilized DNA onto nanocellulose membrane. The described nanocellulose membranes are interesting immunoadsorbents for continued clinical studies. PMID:27011345

  14. Wavelet Based Lossless DNA Sequence Compression for Faster Detection of Eukaryotic Protein Coding Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Dash

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Discrimination of protein coding regions called exons from noncoding regions called introns or junk DNA in eukaryotic cell is a computationally intensive task. But the dimension of the DNA string is huge; hence it requires large computation time. Further the DNA sequences are inherently random and have vast redundancy, hidden regularities, long repeats and complementary palindromes and therefore cannot be compressed efficiently. The objective of this study is to present an integrated signal processing algorithm that considerably reduces the computational load by compressing the DNA sequence effectively and aids the problem of searching for coding regions in DNA sequences. The presented algorithm is based on the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT, a very fast and effective method used for data compression and followed by comb filter for effective prediction of protein coding period-3 regions in DNA sequences. This algorithm is validated using standard dataset such as HMR195, Burset and Guigo and KEGG.

  15. Coding and reimbursement of primary care debridement and excision procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, T J; Purvis, J R

    1992-12-01

    Current medical practice requires physicians to accurately report services provided to patients. Patient billing for debridement and excision procedures involves the selection of specific 1992 Physicians' Current Procedural Terminology codes. Although a site-specific surgical procedure code often yields higher reimbursement than a general procedure code, physicians should select the code that most accurately reflects the procedure performed. This review identifies the codes used to report destruction and excision procedures performed by primary care physicians. Included in this review are skin debridement, burn debridement, excision of benign and malignant lesions of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, cyst and ganglion excision, nail excision, anorectal lesion excision, shave, paring, and skin tag excision procedures, and foreign body removal. The Health Care Financing Administration's relative value units and one state's published Medicaid payment rates are included for each procedure code. Instructions are provided for selecting between multiple coding options when more than one code describes the service provided. PMID:1453151

  16. A universal DNA extraction and PCR amplification method for fungal rDNA sequence-based identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, A M; Fu, J; Herrera, M L; Wickes, B L

    2014-10-01

    Accurate identification of fungal pathogens using a sequence-based approach requires an extraction method that yields template DNA pure enough for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or other types of amplification. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop and standardise a rapid, inexpensive DNA extraction protocol applicable to the major fungal phyla, which would yield sufficient template DNA pure enough for PCR and sequencing. A total of 519 clinical and culture collection strains, comprised of both yeast and filamentous fungi, were prepared using our extraction method to determine its applicability for PCR, which targeted the ITS and D1/D2 regions in a single PCR amplicon. All templates were successfully amplified and found to yield the correct strain identification when sequenced. This protocol could be completed in approximately 30 min and utilised a combination of physical and chemical extraction methods but did not require organic solvents nor ethanol precipitation. The method reduces the number of tube manipulations and yielded suitable template DNA for PCR amplification from all phyla that were tested. PMID:24865530

  17. A New Revised DNA Cramp Tool Based Approach of Chopping DNA Repetitive and Non-Repetitive Genome Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Hari Prasad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In vogue tremendous amount of data generated day by day by the living organism of genetic sequences and its accumulation in database, their size is growing in an exponential manner. Due to excessive storage of DNA sequences in public databases like NCBI, EMBL and DDBJ archival maintenance is tedious task. Transmission of information from one place to another place in network management systems is also a critical task. So To improve the efficiency and to reduce the overhead of the database need of compression arises in database optimization. In this connection different techniques were bloomed, but achieved results are not bountiful. Many classical algorithms are fails to compress genetic sequences due to the specificity of text encoded in dna and few of the existing techniques achieved positive results. DNA is repetitive and non repetitive in nature. Our proposed technique DNACRAMP is applicable on repetitive and non repetitive sequences of dna and it yields better compression ratio in terms of bits per bases. This is compared with existing techniques and observed that our one is the optimum technique and compression results are on par with existing techniques.

  18. Biosensor for label-free DNA quantification based on functionalized LPGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Helena M R; Moreira, Luis; Pereira, Leonor; Jorge, Pedro; Gouveia, Carlos; Martins-Lopes, Paula; Fernandes, José R A

    2016-10-15

    A label-free fiber optic biosensor based on a long period grating (LPG) and a basic optical interrogation scheme using off the shelf components is used for the detection of in-situ DNA hybridization. A new methodology is proposed for the determination of the spectral position of the LPG mode resonance. The experimental limit of detection obtained for the DNA was 62±2nM and the limit of quantification was 209±7nM. The sample specificity was experimentally demonstrated using DNA targets with different base mismatches relatively to the probe and was found that the system has a single base mismatch selectivity. PMID:26456729

  19. Kr-86 Ion-Beam Irradiation of Hydrated DNA: Free Radical and Unaltered Base Yields

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, David; Adhikary, Amitava; Tetteh, Smedley T.; Bull, Arthur W.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This work reports an ESR and product analysis investigation of Kr-86 ion-beam irradiation of hydrated DNA at 77 K. The irradiation results in the formation and trapping of both base radicals and sugar phosphate radicals (DNA backbone radicals). The absolute yields (G, μmol/J) of the base radicals are smaller than the yields found in similarly prepared γ-irradiated DNA samples, and the relative yields of backbone radicals relative to base radicals are much higher than that found in γ-irradiate...

  20. DNA hybridization and phosphinothricin acetyltransferase gene sequence detection based on zirconia/nanogold film modified electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Chen; Jiao, Kui

    2008-05-01

    This study reports a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on zirconia (ZrO 2) and gold nanoparticles (NG) film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). NG was electrodeposited onto the glassy carbon electrode at 1.5 V, and then zirconia thin film on the NG/GCE was fabricated by cyclic voltammetric method (CV) in an aqueous electrolyte of ZrOCl 2 and KCl at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. DNA probes were attached onto the ZrO 2/NG/GCE due to the strong binding of the phosphate group of DNA with the zirconia film and the excellent biocompatibility of nanogold with DNA. CV and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to characterize the modification of the electrode and the probe DNA immobilization. The electrochemical response of the DNA hybridization was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using methylene blue (MB) as the electroactive indicator. After the hybridization of DNA probe (ssDNA) with the complementary DNA (cDNA), the cathodic peak current of MB decreased obviously. The difference of the cathodic peak currents of MB between before and after the hybridization of the probe DNA was used as the signal for the detection of the target DNA. The sequence-specific DNA of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) gene in the transgenic plants was detected with a detection range from 1.0 × 10 -10 to 1.0 × 10 -6 mol/L, and a detection limit of 3.1 × 10 -11 mol/L.