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Sample records for basaltic lava flows

  1. The Influence of Topographic Obstacles on Basaltic Lava Flow Morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Meerscheidt, H. C.; Brand, B. D.; deWet, A. P.; Bleacher, J. E.; Hamilton, C. W.; Samuels, R.

    2014-12-01

    Smooth pāhoehoe and jagged ´áā represent two end-members of a textural spectrum that reflects the emplacement characteristics of basaltic lava flows. However, many additional textures (e.g., rubbly and slabby pāhoehoe) reflect a range of different process due to lava flow dynamics or interaction with topography. Unfortunately the influence of topography on the distribution of textures in basaltic lava flows is not well-understood. The 18 ± 1.0 ka Twin Craters lava flow in the Zuni-Bandera field (New Mexico, USA) provides an excellent site to study the morphological changes of a lava flow that encountered topographic obstacles. The flow field is 0.2-3.8 km wide with a prominent central tube system that intersects and wraps around a 1000 m long ridge, oriented perpendicular to flow. Upstream of the ridge, the flow has low-relief inflation features extending out and around the ridge. This area includes mildly to heavily disrupted pāhoehoe with interdispersed agglutinated masses, irregularly shaped rubble and lava balls. Breakouts of ´áā and collapse features are also common. These observations suggest crustal disruption due to flow-thickening upstream from the ridge and the movement of lava out and around the obstacle. While the ridge influenced the path of the tube, which wraps around the southern end of the ridge, the series of collapse features and breakouts of ´áā along the tube system are more likely a result of changes in flux throughout the tube system because these features are found both upstream and downstream of the obstacle. This work demonstrates that topography can significantly influence the formation history and surface disruption of a flow field, and in some cases the influence of topography can be separated from the influences of changes in flux along a tube system.

  2. The Disruption of Tephra Fall Deposits by Basaltic Lava Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. J.; Thordarson, T.; Self, S.; Blake, S.

    2010-12-01

    Complex physical and stratigraphic relationships between lava and proximal tephra fall deposits around vents of the Roza Member in the Columbia River Basalt Province, (CRBP), USA, illustrate how basaltic lavas can disrupt, dissect (spatially and temporally) and alter tephra fall deposits. Thin pahoehoe lobes and sheet lobes occur intercalated with tephra deposits and provide evidence for synchronous effusive and explosive activity. Tephra that accumulated on the tops of inflating pahoehoe flows became disrupted by tumuli, which dissected the overlying sheet into a series of mounds. During inflation of subjacent tumuli tephra percolated down into the clefts and rubble at the top of the lava, and in some cases came into contact with lava hot enough to thermally alter it. Lava breakouts from the tumuli intruded up through the overlying tephra deposit and fed pahoehoe flows that spread across the surface of the aggrading tephra fall deposit. Non-welded scoria fall deposits were compacted and welded to a depth of ~50 cm underneath thick sheet lobes. These processes, deduced from the field relationships, have resulted in considerable stratigraphic complexity in proximal regions. We also demonstrate that, when the advance of lava and the fallout of tephra are synchronous, the contacts of some tephra sheets can be diachronous across their extent. The net effect is to reduce the usefulness of pyroclastic deposits in reconstructing eruption dynamics.

  3. Rubbly Pahoehoe Lavas: An Important Component of Icelandic Basaltic Lava Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbaud, M.; Self, S.; Blake, S.; Thordarson, T.; Keyzthelyi, L.

    2003-12-01

    Eruptions at rift zones often produce basaltic lava flows. Structural and textural study of historic and prehistoric flows gives important clues about emplacement processes. The 1783-4 eruption of Laki produced 14.7 km3 of lava from a fissure that opened along the Eastern Volcanic Zone of Iceland. The resulting 600 km2 lava flow-field presents a wide range of surface morphologies that we explored to study emplacement mechanisms. We present results from preliminary field, macroscopic, and microscopic analysis. Field observations show that along a single flow surface morphologies change from (1) flat (with a coherent continuous, pahoehoe(phh)-like crust), to (2) slabby (with a disrupted surface made of phh-like slabs), to (3) rubbly (with a rough surface covered by loose vesicular blocks), and then to (4) folded rubbly (with ridges of rubble several meters high). Features characteristic of flow growth by inflation are abundant. The changes are unidirectional in the above order but the sequence can be repeated. This occurred if the fluid lava stored within the core of the flow broke through the front. Field relationships indicate that the majority of the flows were initially emplaced as small lobes of phh-type lava that gradually changed into slabby phh and then rubbly phh through progressive disruption, shearing and compression of the surface. During its entire advance, the lava flow never reached the point of incessant surface renewal with formation of aa-type clinker, neither did it extensively develop the smooth filamentous surface common in Hawaiian phh flows. Thus, Laki lavas are intermediate flows. Microtexture analysis of samples collected along single flows will tell us what caused this evolution, such as crystallinity due to degassing or viscosity change. This flow type has been recognized on Reykjanes Peninsula in young fissure-fed lava flow-fields and in the Columbia River Basalts and Kerguelen Plateau flows. It is therefore an important component of many

  4. Disruption of tephra fall deposits caused by lava flows during basaltic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. J.; Thordarson, T.; Self, S.; Blake, S.

    2015-10-01

    Observations in the USA, Iceland and Tenerife, Canary Islands reveal how processes occurring during basaltic eruptions can result in complex physical and stratigraphic relationships between lava and proximal tephra fall deposits around vents. Observations illustrate how basaltic lavas can disrupt, dissect (spatially and temporally) and alter sheet-form fall deposits. Complexity arises through synchronous and alternating effusive and explosive activity that results in intercalated lavas and tephra deposits. Tephra deposits can become disrupted into mounds and ridges by lateral and vertical displacement caused by movement (including inflation) of underlying pāhoehoe lavas and clastogenic lavas. Mounds of tephra can be rafted away over distances of 100 s to 1,000 s m from proximal pyroclastic constructs on top of lava flows. Draping of irregular topography by fall deposits and subsequent partial burial of topographic depressions by later lavas can result in apparent complexity of tephra layers. These processes, deduced from field relationships, have resulted in considerable stratigraphic complexity in the studied proximal regions where fallout was synchronous or alternated with inflation of subjacent lava sheets. These mechanisms may lead to diachronous contact relationships between fall deposits and lava flows. Such complexities may remain cryptic due to textural and geochemical quasi-homogeneity within sequences of interbedded basaltic fall deposits and lavas. The net effect of these processes may be to reduce the usefulness of data collected from proximal fall deposits for reconstructing basaltic eruption dynamics.

  5. Investigating lava-substrate interactions through flow experiments with syrup, wax, and molten basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, M. E.; Lev, E.

    2015-12-01

    Among the many factors influencing the complex process of lava flow emplacement, the interaction with the substrate onto which flow is emplaced plays a central role. Lava flows are rarely emplaced onto smooth or regular surfaces. For example, at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, lava flows regularly flow over solid rock, vegetation, basaltic or silica sand, and man-made materials, including asphalt and concrete. In situ studies of lava-substrate interactions are inherently difficult, and often dangerous, to carry-out, requiring the design of controllable laboratory experiments. We investigate the effects of substrate grain size, cohesion, and roughness on flow mobility and morphology through a series of flow experiments using analog materials and molten basalt. We have developed a series of experiments that allow for adjustable substrate parameters and analyze their effects on lava flow emplacement. The first set of experiments are performed at the Fluids Mechanics Laboratory at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and focus on two analog materials: polyethylene glycol (PEG), a commercially available wax, and corn syrup. The fluids were each extruded onto a series of scaled substrate beds to replicate the emplacement of lava in a natural environment. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that irregular topography, particularly topography with a height amplitude similar to that of the flow itself, can affect flow morphology, width, and velocity by acting as local barriers or culverts to the fluid. This is expected from observations of fluid flow in natural environments. A follow-up set of experiments will be conducted in Fall 2015 at the Syracuse University (SU) Lava Project Lab. In this set, we will pour molten basalt directly onto a series of substrates representing natural environments found on the Earth and other rocky bodies in the Solar System. These experiments will allow for analysis of the effects of basaltic composition and high temperatures on lava-substrate heat

  6. Emplacement history and inflation evidence of a long basaltic lava flow located in Southern Payenia Volcanic Province, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Mauro I.; Bertotto, Gustavo W.; Jalowitzki, Tiago L. R.; Orihashi, Yuji; Ponce, Alexis D.

    2015-02-01

    The El Corcovo lava flow, from the Huanul shield volcano in the southern Mendoza province (central-western Argentina) traveled a distance of 70 km and covered a minimum area of ~ 415 km2. The flow emplacement was controlled both by extrinsic (e.g., topography) and intrinsic (e.g., lava supply rate, lava physicochemical characteristics) factors. The distal portion of the lava flow reached the Colorado River Valley, in La Pampa Province, where it spread and then was confined by earlier river channels. Cross-sections through the flow surveyed at several localities show two vesicular layers surrounding a dense central section, where vesicles are absent or clustered in sheet-shaped and cylindrical-shaped structures. Lavas of the El Corcovo flow are alkaline basalts with low values of viscosity. The morphological and structural characteristics of the flow and the presence of landforms associated with lava accumulation are the evidence of inflation. This process involved the formation of a tabular sheet flow up to 4 m of thick with a large areal extent in the proximal sectors, while at terminal sectors frontal lobes reached inflation values up to 10 m. The numerous swelling structures present at these portions of the flow suggest the movement of lava in lava tubes. We propose that this aspect and the low viscosity of the lava allowed the flow travel to a great distance on a gentle slope relief.

  7. Physical Volcanological and Petrogenetic Implications of Intra-lava Flow Geochemical Heterogeneity in the Columbia River Flood Basalt Province, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vye, C. L.; Barry, T. L.; Self, S.; Gannoun, A.; Burton, K. W.

    2007-12-01

    Continental flood basalt lava flows are widely assumed to represent compositionally uniform and rapidly erupted products of large well-mixed magma reservoirs. However, this study presents new data to illustrate systematic element and isotope variations within the flow field formed by an individual flood basalt eruption, both vertically within each sheet lobe and laterally between the constituent lobes. Such variation is significant in chemostratigraphic correlation of flood basalt lava units, in identifying source variability during one eruption, and in petrogenetic modeling. We investigate the extent and cause of compositional variation through tracing lava sheet lobes in a 2,660 cubic kilometer pahoehoe flow field formed during a single eruption in the Columbia River Basalt Province, USA. This is based on features related to emplacement by the inflation mechanism. This method of emplacement is supported by small but statistically significant and systematic major and trace element variation e.g. MgO 3.09- 4.55 wt%, Ni 17.5-25.6 ppm, indicative of fractional crystallisation. Re-Os isotopes indicate progressive crustal contamination of the magma over the timescale of a single flood basalt eruption. By establishing this physical volcanological framework, we determine a temporal link with the supply of lava from the vent(s) and apply it to investigate sequential magmatic evolution during the timescale of one eruption.

  8. Osmium isotope variations accompanying the eruption of a single lava flow field in the Columbia River Flood Basalt Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vye-Brown, C.; Gannoun, A.; Barry, T. L.; Self, S.; Burton, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Geochemical interpretations of continental flood basalts usually assume that individual lava flows represent compositionally homogenous and rapidly erupted products of large well-mixed magma reservoirs. However, inflated pāhoehoe lavas may develop over considerable periods of time and preserve chemical variations that can be temporally linked through flow formation to eruption sequence thus providing an understanding of magma evolution over the timescale of a single eruption. This study presents comprehensive major, trace element and Re-Os isotope data for a single eruption that formed the 2660 km3 Sand Hollow flow field in the Columbia River Basalt Province, USA. Major and trace element variations accompanying flow emplacement (e.g. MgO 3.09-4.55 wt%, Ni 17.5-25.6 ppm) are consistent with fractional crystallisation, but other petrogenetic processes or variable sources cannot be distinguished. However, there is a systematic shift in the initial 187Os/188Os isotope composition of the magma (age corrected to 15.27 Ma), from 0.174 (lava core) to 1.444 (lava crust) within a single 35 m thick sheet lobe. Lava crust values are more radiogenic than any known mantle source, consistent with previous data indicating that neither an enriched reservoir nor the sub-continental lithospheric mantle are likely to have sourced these basalts. Rather, these data indicate that lavas emplaced during the earliest stages of eruption have higher degrees of crustal contamination. These results highlight the limitations of applying chemostratigraphic correlation across continental flood basalt provinces, the use of single data points to define melt sources and magmatic processes, and the dangers of using conventional isochron techniques in such basalt sequences for absolute chronology.

  9. Thermal Modeling of the Cooling History of a Basalt Lava Flow: Effect of Flow Shape and Thermal Perturbations Induced by Inflation Fissures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, C. J.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    Thermal modeling of cooling basalt lava flows has typically been undertaken using 1-D analytical heat flow models for an infinite plane. In such models, flows are conceptualized as having a finite thickness, but are infinitely wide and infinitely long (i.e., "sheet flows"). These analytical models typically accounted only for conductive heat loss, or attempted to approximate the effect of a sudden convective heat loss by redefining the conduction boundary conditions at some point during the cooling history. Although such models have proven useful for the examination of sheet flows such as those of the Columbia River flood basalts, they are inadequate for considering the cooling history of low-volume flows having small (meters to a few 10s of meters) in-plane dimensions (i.e., small aspect ratios, or width/thickness). In such flows, cross-sectional flow shape exerts a strong control on the thermal evolution of the flow during cooling, and hence on the cooling fracture patterns that develop in response to thermal stresses. The advent of numerical thermal models has recently enabled other researchers to predict isotherm patterns in lava flows with in-plane lateral peripheries. We build on these numerical modeling efforts by examining the effect of variable flow shape on lava flow cooling history. We also explicitly model the effects of convective heat loss through inflation fissures that develop in response to inflation of the lava flow during extrusion. This choice of controlling factors is predicated by observations of flow shapes and fracture characteristics of low-volume basalt flows of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), Idaho. We use the finite element code ABAQUS to model the thermal evolution of small aspect ratio flows, both with and without an inflation fissure. The program accounts for radiation of heat and convection at exposed boundaries, latent heat of crystallization, and conduction of heat into the underlying substrate. In models that do not include

  10. Basalt models for the Mars penetrator mission: Geology of the Amboy Lava Field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, R.; Bunch, T. E.

    1976-01-01

    Amboy lava field (San Bernardino County, California) is a Holocene basalt flow selected as a test site for potential Mars Penetrators. A discussion is presented of (1) the general relations of basalt flow features and textures to styles of eruptions on earth, (2) the types of basalt flows likely to be encountered on Mars and the rationale for selection of the Amboy lava field as a test site, (3) the general geology of the Amboy lava field, and (4) detailed descriptions of the target sites at Amboy lava field.

  11. The morphology and evolution of the Stromboli 2002-2003 lava flow field--An example of a basaltic flow field emplaced on a steep slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodato, Luigi; Harris, A.; Spampinato, L.; Calvari, Sonia; Dehn, J.; Patrick, M.

    2007-01-01

    The use of a hand-held thermal camera during the 2002–2003 Stromboli effusive eruption proved essential in tracking the development of flow field structures and in measuring related eruption parameters, such as the number of active vents and flow lengths. The steep underlying slope on which the flow field was emplaced resulted in a characteristic flow field morphology. This comprised a proximal shield, where flow stacking and inflation caused piling up of lava on the relatively flat ground of the vent zone, that fed a medial–distal lava flow field. This zone was characterized by the formation of lava tubes and tumuli forming a complex network of tumuli and flows linked by tubes. Most of the flow field was emplaced on extremely steep slopes and this had two effects. It caused flows to slide, as well as flow, and flow fronts to fail frequently, persistent flow front crumbling resulted in the production of an extensive debris field. Channel-fed flows were also characterized by development of excavated debris levees in this zone (Calvari et al. 2005). Collapse of lava flow fronts and inflation of the upper proximal lava shield made volume calculation very difficult. Comparison of the final field volume with that expecta by integrating the lava effusion rates through time suggests a loss of ~70% erupted lava by flow front crumbling and accumulation as debris flows below sea level. Derived relationships between effusion rate, flow length, and number of active vents showed systematic and correlated variations with time where spreading of volume between numerous flows caused an otherwise good correlation between effusion rate, flow length to break down. Observations collected during this eruption are useful in helping to understand lava flow processes on steep slopes, as well as in interpreting old lava–debris sequences found in other steep-sided volcanoes subject to effusive activity.

  12. Lava flows are fractals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; Taylor, G. J.; Rowland, S. K.; Lucey, P. G.; Self, S.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of a preliminary investigation of the fractal nature of the plan-view shapes of lava flows in Hawaii (based on field measurements and aerial photographs), as well as in Idaho and the Galapagos Islands (using aerial photographs only). The shapes of the lava flow margins are found to be fractals: lava flow shape is scale-invariant. This observation suggests that nonlinear forces are operating in them because nonlinear systems frequently produce fractals. A'a and pahoehoe flows can be distinguished by their fractal dimensions (D). The majority of the a'a flows measured have D between 1.05 and 1.09, whereas the pahoehoe flows generally have higher D (1.14-1.23). The analysis is extended to other planetary bodies by measuring flows from orbital images of Venus, Mars, and the moon. All are fractal and have D consistent with the range of terrestrial a'a and have D consistent with the range of terrestrial a'a and pahoehoe values.

  13. Diverting lava flows in the lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Cashman, Katharine V.; Rust, Alison C.; Lev, Einat

    2015-01-01

    Recent volcanic eruptions in Hawai'i, Iceland and Cape Verde highlight the challenges of mitigating hazards when lava flows threaten infrastructure. Diversion barriers are the most common form of intervention, but historical attempts to divert lava flows have met with mixed success and there has been little systematic analysis of optimal barrier design. We examine the interaction of viscous flows of syrup and molten basalt with barriers in the laboratory. We find that flows thicken immediately upslope of an obstacle, forming a localized bow wave that can overtop barriers. Larger bow waves are generated by faster flows and by obstacles oriented at a high angle to the flow direction. The geometry of barriers also influences flow behaviour. Barriers designed to split or dam flows will slow flow advance, but cause the flow to widen, whereas oblique barriers can effectively divert flows, but may also accelerate flow advance. We argue that to be successful, mitigation of lava-flow hazards must incorporate the dynamics of lava flow–obstacle interactions into barrier design. The same generalizations apply to the effect of natural topographic features on flow geometry and advance rates.

  14. Stratigraphical framework of basaltic lavas in Torres Syncline main valley, southern Parana-Etendeka Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Lucas M.; Lima, Evandro F.; Waichel, Breno L.; Scherer, Claiton M.; Barreto, Carla J.

    2014-12-01

    The Paraná-Etendeka Volcanic Province records the volcanism of the Early Cretaceous that precedes the fragmentation of the South-Gondwana supercontinent. Traditionally, investigations of these rocks prioritized the acquisition of geochemical and isotopic data, considering the volcanic stack as a monotonous succession of tabular flows. Torres Syncline is a tectonic structure located in southern Brazil and where the Parana-Etendeka basalts are well preserved. This work provides a detailed analysis of lithofacies and facies architecture, integrated to petrographic and geochemical data. We identified seven distinct lithofacies grouped into four facies associations related to different flow morphologies. The basaltic lava flows in the area can be divided into two contrasting units: Unit I - pahoehoe flow fields; and Unit II - simple rubbly flows. The first unit is build up by innumerous pahoehoe lava flows that cover the sandstones of Botucatu Formation. These flows occur as sheet pahoehoe, compound pahoehoe, and ponded lavas morphologies. Compound lavas are olivine-phyric basalts with intergranular pyroxenes. In ponded lavas and cores of sheet flows coarse plagioclase-phyric basalts are common. The first pahoehoe lavas are more primitive with higher contents of MgO. The emplacement of compound pahoehoe flows is related to low volume eruptions, while sheet lavas were emplaced during sustained eruptions. In contrast, Unit II is formed by thick simple rubbly lavas, characterized by a massive core and a brecciated/rubbly top. Petrographically these flows are characterized by plagioclase-phyric to aphyric basalts with high density of plagioclase crystals in the matrix. Chemically they are more differentiated lavas, and the emplacement is related to sustained high effusion rate eruptions. Both units are low TiO2 and have geochemical characteristics of Gramado magma type. The Torres Syncline main valley has a similar evolution when compared to other Large Igneous Provinces

  15. Tachylyte in Cenozoic basaltic lavas from the Czech Republic and Iceland: contrasting compositional trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrych, Jaromír; Krmíček, Lukáš; Teschner, Claudia; Řanda, Zdeněk; Skála, Roman; Jonášová, Šárka; Fediuk, Ferry; Adamovič, Jiří; Pokorný, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Tachylytes from rift-related volcanic rocks were recognized as: (i) irregular veinlets in host alkaline lava flows of the Kozákov volcano, Czech Republic, (ii) (sub)angular xenoliths in alkaline lava of the feeding channel of the Bukovec volcano, Czech Republic, and (iii) paleosurface of a tholeiitic lava flow from Hafrafell, Iceland. The tachylyte from Kozákov is phonotephrite to tephriphonolite in composition while that from Bukovec corresponds to trachyandesite to tephriphonolite. Both glass and host rock from Hafrafell are of tholeiitic basalt composition. The tachylyte from Kozákov, compared with the host rock, revealed a substantial enrichment in major elements such as Si, Al and alkalis along with Rb, Sr, Ba, Nb, Zr, REE, Th and U. The tachylyte from Bukovec displays contrasting trends in the incompatible element contents. The similarity in composition of the Hafrafell tachylyte paleosurface layer and parental tholeiitic basalt is characteristic for lavas. The host/parent rocks and tachylytes have similar initial Sr-Nd characteristics testifying for their co-magmatic sources. The initial ɛNd values of host/parent rocks and tachylytes from the Bohemian Massif (+3.4 to +3.9) and those from Iceland (+6.3) are interpreted as primary magma values. Only the tachylyte from Bukovec shows a different ɛNd value of -2.1, corresponding to a xenolith of primarily sedimentary/metamorphic origin. The tachylyte from Kozákov is a product of an additional late magmatic portion of fluids penetrating through an irregular fissure system of basaltic lava. The Bukovec tachylyte is represented by xenoliths originated during the interaction of ascending basaltic melt with granitoids or orthogneisses, whereas the Hafrafell tachylyte is a product of a rapid cooling on the surface of a basalt flow.

  16. Mineral chemistry of lava flows from Linga area of the Eastern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Several basaltic lava flows have been identified in the study area in and around Linga, in the Eastern Deccan Volcanic Province (EDVP) on the basis of distinctly developed structural zones defined by primary volcanic structures such as columnar joints and vesicles. These basaltic lava flows are spatially distributed in four ...

  17. Phreatic explosions during basaltic fissure eruptions: Kings Bowl lava field, Snake River Plain, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Scott S.; Kobs Nawotniak, Shannon E.; Sears, Derek W. G.; Borg, Christian; Garry, William Brent; Christiansen, Eric H.; Haberle, Christopher W.; Lim, Darlene S. S.; Heldmann, Jennifer L.

    2018-02-01

    Physical and compositional measurements are made at the 7 km-long ( 2200 years B.P.) Kings Bowl basaltic fissure system and surrounding lava field in order to further understand the interaction of fissure-fed lavas with phreatic explosive events. These assessments are intended to elucidate the cause and potential for hazards associated with phreatic phases that occur during basaltic fissure eruptions. In the present paper we focus on a general understanding of the geological history of the site. We utilize geospatial analysis of lava surfaces, lithologic and geochemical signatures of lava flows and explosively ejected blocks, and surveys via ground observation and remote sensing. Lithologic and geochemical signatures readily distinguish between Kings Bowl and underlying pre-Kings Bowl lava flows, both of which comprise phreatic ejecta from the Kings Bowl fissure. These basalt types, as well as neighboring lava flows from the contemporaneous Wapi lava field and the older Inferno Chasm vent and outflow channel, fall compositionally within the framework of eastern Snake River Plain olivine tholeiites. Total volume of lava in the Kings Bowl field is estimated to be 0.0125 km3, compared to a previous estimate of 0.005 km3. The main (central) lava lake lost a total of 0.0018 km3 of magma by either drain-back into the fissure system or breakout flows from breached levees. Phreatic explosions along the Kings Bowl fissure system occurred after magma supply was cut off, leading to fissure evacuation, and were triggered by magma withdrawal. The fissure system produced multiple phreatic explosions and the main pit is accompanied by others that occur as subordinate pits and linear blast corridors along the fissure. The drop in magma supply and the concomitant influx of groundwater were necessary processes that led to the formation of Kings Bowl and other pits along the fissure. A conceptual model is presented that has relevance to the broader range of low-volume, monogenetic

  18. Petrogenesis of basalt-trachyte lavas from Olmoti Crater, Tanzania

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    Mollel, Godwin F.; Swisher, Carl C., III; McHenry, Lindsay J.; Feigenson, Mark D.; Carr, Michael J.

    2009-08-01

    Olmoti Crater is part of the Plio-Pleistocene Ngorongoro Volcanic Highland (NVH) in northern Tanzania to the south of Gregory Rift. The Gregory Rift is part of the eastern branch of the East African Rift System (EARS) that stretches some 4000 km from the Read Sea and Gulf of Aden in the north to the Zambezi River in Mozambique. Here, we (1) characterize the chemistry and mineral compositions of lavas from Olmoti Crater, (2) determine the age and duration of Olmoti volcanic activity through 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of Olmoti Crater wall lavas and (3) determine the genesis of Olmoti lavas and the relationship to other NVH and EARS volcanics and (4) their correlation with volcanics in the Olduvai and Laetoli stratigraphic sequences. Olmoti lavas collected from the lower part of the exposed crater wall section (OLS) range from basalt to trachyandesite whereas the upper part of the section (OUS) is trachytic. Petrography and major and trace element data reflect a very low degree partial melt origin for the Olmoti lavas, presumably of peridotite, followed by extensive fractionation. The 87Sr/ 86Sr data overlap whereas Nd and Pb isotope data are distinct between OLS and OUS samples. Interpretation of the isotope data suggests mixing of enriched mantle (EM I) with high-μ-like reservoirs, consistent with the model of Bell and Blenkinsop [Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J., 1987. Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of East African carbonatites: implications for mantle heterogeneity. Geology 5, 99-102] for East African carbonatite lavas. The isotope ratios are within the range of values defined by Oceanic Island Basalt (OIB) globally and moderate normalized Tb/Yb ratios (2.3-1.6) in these lavas suggest melting in the lithospheric mantle consistent with other studies in the region. 40Ar/ 39Ar incremental-heating analyses of matrix and anorthoclase separates from Olmoti OLS and OUS lavas indicate that volcanic activity was short in duration, lasting ˜200 kyr from 2.01 ± 0.03 Ma to 1.80 ± 0

  19. Intracanyon basalt lavas of the Debed River (northern Armenia), part of a Pliocene-Pleistocene continental flood basalt province in the South Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Hetu; Meliksetian, Khachatur; Gevorgyan, Hripsime; Israyelyan, Arsen; Navasardyan, Gevorg

    2015-03-01

    Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene (~ 3.25-2.05 Ma), 200-400 m thick basalt lavas outcrop in the South Caucasus region, including the Kars-Erzurum Plateau (northeastern Turkey), the Javakheti Plateau (Georgia-Armenia), and the Lori Plateau (northern Armenia). These fissure-fed, rapidly erupted fluid lavas filled pre-existing river valleys over many tens of kilometres. The basalts exposed in the Debed River canyon, northern Armenia, are ~ 200 m thick and of three morphological types: (1) basal pillow basalts and hyaloclastites, overlain by (2) columnar-jointed pahoehoe sheet flows, in turn overlain by (3) slabby pahoehoe and rubbly pahoehoe flows. The lower and middle lavas show evidence for damming of river drainage, like many lavas of the Columbia River flood basalt province, Scotland, Ireland, and Iceland. There is also evidence for syn-volcanic faulting of the early lavas. Related basalts also outcrop in the Gegham Uplands and the Hrazdan River basin in Armenia. This 3.25-2.05 Ma South Caucasus basalt province, covering parts of Turkey, Georgia and Armenia, has an estimated areal extent of ~ 15,000 km2 and volume of ~ 2250 km3. Because its main geological features are remarkably like those of many continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces, we consider it a true, albeit small, CFB province. It is the smallest and youngest CFB in the world. An analogue closely similar in major features is the Late Miocene Altos de Jalisco CFB province in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Both provinces formed during lithospheric pull-apart and transtensional faulting. Their broader significance is in showing flood basalt size distribution to be a continuum without natural breaks, with implications for geodynamic models.

  20. Newberry Volcano's youngest lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joel E.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of Newberry Volcano's youngest lava flows are found within the Newberry National Volcanic Monument in central Oregon. Established November 5, 1990, the monument is managed by the U.S. Forest Service as part of the Deschutes National Forest. Since 2011, a series of aerial surveys over the monument collected elevation data using lidar (light detection and ranging) technology, which uses lasers to directly measure the ground surface. These data record previously unseen detail in the volcano’s numerous lava flows and vents. On average, a laser return was collected from the ground’s surface every 2.17 feet (ft) with ±1.3 inches vertical precision.

  1. Transition of basaltic lava from pahoehoe to aa, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: Field observations and key factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Donald W.; Tilling, Robert I.

    1980-01-01

    Nearly all Hawaiian basaltic lava erupts as pahoehoe, and some changes to aa during flowage and cooling; factors governing the transition involve certain critical relations between viscosity and rate of shear strain. If the lava slows, cools, and stops in direct response to concomitant increase in viscosity before these critical relations are reached, it remains pahoehoe. But, if flow mechanics (flow rate, flow dimensions, slope, momentum, etc.) impel the lava to continue to move and deform even after it has become highly viscous, the critical relations may be reached and the lava changes to aa.Typical modes of transition from pahoehoe to aa include: (1) spontaneous formation of relatively stiff clots in parts of the flowing lava where shear rate is highest; these clots grow into discrete, rough, sticky masses to which the remaining fluid lava incrementally adheres; (2) fragmentation and immersion of solid or semi-solid surface crusts of pahoehoe by roiling movements of the flow, forming cores of discrete, tacky masses; (3) sudden renewed movement of lava stored and cooled within surface reservoirs to form clots. The masses, fragments, and clots in these transition modes are characterized by spinose, granulated surfaces; as flow movement continues, the masses and fragments aggregate, fracture, and grind together, completing the transition to aa.Observations show that the critical relation between viscosity and rate of shear strain is inverse: if viscosity is low, a high rate of shear is required to begin the transition to aa; conversely, if viscosity is high, a much lower rate of shear will induce the transition. These relations can be demonstrated qualitatively with simple graphs, which can be used to examine the flow history of any selected finite lava element by tracing the path represented by its changing viscosity and shear rate. A broad, diffuse “transition threshold zone” in these graphs portrays the inverse critical relation between viscosity and shear

  2. The Payun-Matru lava field: a source of analogues for Martian long lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, L.; Pasquarè, G.; Massironi, M.; Frigeri, A.; Bistacchi, A.; Frederico, C.

    2007-08-01

    The Payun Matru Volcanic complex is a Quaternary fissural structure belonging to the back-arc extensional area of the Andes in the Mendoza Province (Argentina). The eastern portion of the volcanic structure is covered by a basaltic field of pahoehoe lava flows advanced over more than 180 km from the fissural feeding vents that are aligned with a E-W fault system (Carbonilla fault). Thanks to their widespread extension, these flows represent some of the largest lava flows in the world and the Pampas Onduladas flow can be considered the longest sub-aerial individual lava flow on the Earth surface [1,2]. These gigantic flows propagated over the nearly flat surface of the Pampean foreland, moving on a 0.3 degree slope. The very low viscosity of the olivine basalt lavas, coupled with the inflation process and an extensive system of lava tubes are the most probable explanation for their considerable length. The inflation process likely develop under a steady flow rate sustained for a long time [3]. A thin viscoelastic crust, built up at an early stage, is later inflated by the underlying fluid core, which remains hot and fluid thanks to the thermal-shield effect of the crust. The crust is progressively thickened by accretion from below and spreading is due to the continuous creation of new inflated lobes, which develop at the front of the flow. Certain morphological features are considered to be "fingerprints" of inflation [4, 5, 6]; these include tumuli, lava rises, lava lobes and ridges. All these morphologies are present in the more widespread Payun Matru lava flows that, where they form extensive sheetflows, can reach a maximum thickness of more than 20 meters. After the emplacement of the major flows, a second eruptive cycle involved the Payun Matru volcanic structure. During this stage thick and channelized flows of andesitic and dacitic lavas, accompanied the formation of two trachitic and trachiandesitic strato-volcanoes (Payun Matru and Payun Liso) culminated

  3. A flexible open-source toolkit for lava flow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossoux, Sophie; Feltz, Adelin; Poppe, Sam; Canters, Frank; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2014-05-01

    Lava flow hazard modeling is a useful tool for scientists and stakeholders confronted with imminent or long term hazard from basaltic volcanoes. It can improve their understanding of the spatial distribution of volcanic hazard, influence their land use decisions and improve the city evacuation during a volcanic crisis. Although a range of empirical, stochastic and physically-based lava flow models exists, these models are rarely available or require a large amount of physical constraints. We present a GIS toolkit which models lava flow propagation from one or multiple eruptive vents, defined interactively on a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). It combines existing probabilistic (VORIS) and deterministic (FLOWGO) models in order to improve the simulation of lava flow spatial spread and terminal length. Not only is this toolkit open-source, running in Python, which allows users to adapt the code to their needs, but it also allows users to combine the models included in different ways. The lava flow paths are determined based on the probabilistic steepest slope (VORIS model - Felpeto et al., 2001) which can be constrained in order to favour concentrated or dispersed flow fields. Moreover, the toolkit allows including a corrective factor in order for the lava to overcome small topographical obstacles or pits. The lava flow terminal length can be constrained using a fixed length value, a Gaussian probability density function or can be calculated based on the thermo-rheological properties of the open-channel lava flow (FLOWGO model - Harris and Rowland, 2001). These slope-constrained properties allow estimating the velocity of the flow and its heat losses. The lava flow stops when its velocity is zero or the lava temperature reaches the solidus. Recent lava flows of Karthala volcano (Comoros islands) are here used to demonstrate the quality of lava flow simulations with the toolkit, using a quantitative assessment of the match of the simulation with the real lava flows. The

  4. Crystallization of tholeiitic basalt in Alae Lava Lake, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, D.L.; Wright, T.L.; Moore, J.G.

    1966-01-01

    The eruption of Kilauea Volcano August 21-23, 1963, left 600,000 cubic meters of basaltic lava in a lava lake as much as 15 meters deep in Alae pit crater. Field studies of the lake began August 27 and include repeated core drilling, measurements of temperature in the crust and melt, and precise level surveys of the lake surface. The last interstitial melt in the lake solidified late in September 1964; by mid August 1965 the maximum temperature was 690??C at a depth of 11.5 meters. Pumice air-quenched from about 1140??C contains only 5 percent crystals - clinopyroxene, cuhedral olivine (Fo 80), and a trace of plagioclase, (An 70). Drill cores taken from the zone of crystallization in the lake show that olivine continued crystallizing to about 1070??C; below that it reacts with the melt, becoming corroded and mantled by pyroxene and plagioclase. Below 1070??C, pyroxene and plagioclase crystallized at a constant ratio. Ilmenite first appeared at about 1070??C and was joined by magnetite at about 1050??C; both increased rapidly in abundance to 1000??C. Apatite first appeared as minute needles in interstitial glass at 1000??C. Both the abundance and index of refraction of glass quenched from melt decreased nearly linearly with falling temperature. At 1070??C the quenched lava contains about 65 percent dark-brown glass with an index of 1.61; at 980??C it contains about 8 percent colorless glass with an index of 1.49. Below 980??C, the percentage of glass remained constant. Progressive crystallization forced exsolution of gases from the melt fraction; these formed vesicles and angular pores, causing expansion of the crystallizing lava and lifting the surface of the central part of the lake an average of 19.5 cm. The solidified basalt underwent pneumatolitic alteration, including deposition of cristobalite at 800??C, reddish alteration of olivine at 700??C, tarnishing of ilmenite at 550??C, deposition of anhydrite at 250??C, and deposition of native sulfur at 100??C

  5. Gigantic self-confined pahoehoe inflated lava flows in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquare', G.; Bistacchi, A.

    2007-05-01

    The largest lava flows on Earth are pahoehoe basalts emplaced by inflation, a process which can change lava lobes initially a few decimetres thick into large lava sheets several metres thick. Inflation involves the initial formation of a thin, solidified, viscoelastic crust, under which liquid lava is continually added. This thermally efficient endogenous growth process explains the spread of huge volumes of lava over large, almost flat areas, as in the sheet flows which characterise the distal portions of Hawaiian volcanoes or some continental flood basalt provinces. Long, narrow, inflated pahoehoe flows have occasionally been described, either emplaced along pre-existing river channels or confined within topographic barriers. In this contribution we present previously unknown inflated pahoehoe lava flows following very long, narrow pathways over an almost flat surface, with no topographic confinement. Lava, which erupted in Late Quaternary times from the eastern tip of a 60 km long volcanic fissure in Argentina, formed several discrete flows extending as far as 180 km from the source. This fissure was characterized by a long-lasting and complex activity. Alkali-basaltic lava flows were emitted at the two extremities of the fissure system. In the intermediate section of the fissure, the Payun Matru, a great trachitic composite volcano, developed, giving rise to a large caldera which produced large pyroclastic flows. Alkali-basalts predate and postdate the trachitic activity, in fact at the end of the trachitic activity, new basaltic lava flows (mainly aa) were emitted from both ends of the fissure. We studied in details the youngest of the gigantic flows (Pampas Onduladas lava flow), which progressively develops through differing thermally-efficient flow mechanisms. The flow created a large shield volcanic structure at the eastern tip of the E-W fissure and spread to the E forming a very large and thick inflated pahoehoe sheet flow. Leaving the flanks of the

  6. Episodic soil succession on basaltic lava fields in a cool, dry environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, K.L.; McDaniel, P.A.; Phillips, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Holocene- to late Pleistocene-aged lava flows at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve provide an ideal setting to examine the early stages of soil formation under cool, dry conditions. Transects were used to characterize the amount and nature of soil cover on across basaltic lava flows ranging in age from 2.1 to 18.4 ka. Results indicate that on flows soils (Folists in Soil Taxonomy) are the dominant soil type, providing an areal coverage of up to ∼25%. On flows ≥13.9 ka, deeper mineral soils including Entisols, Aridisols, and Mollisols become dominant and the areal extent increases to ≥95% on flows older than 18.4 ka. These data suggest there are two distinct pedogenic pathways associated with lava flows of the region. The first pathway is illustrated by the younger flows, where Folists dominate. In the absence of a major source of loess, relatively little mineral material accumulates and soils provide only minor coverage of the lava flows. Our results indicate that this pathway of soil development has not changed appreciably over the past ∼10 ka. The second pedogenic pathway is illustrated by the flows older than 13.9 ka. These flows have been subject to deposition of large quantities of loess during and after the last regional glaciation, resulting in almost complete coverage. Subsequent pedogenesis has given rise to Aridisols and Mollisols with calcic and cambic horizons and mollic epipedons. This research highlights the importance of regional climate change on the evolution of Craters of the Moon soilscapes.

  7. The role of porosity in thermal inertia variations on basaltic lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, James R.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal inertia, defined as the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat, has been noted to vary in inverse proportion to porosity in Hawaiian basalts. It is presently suggested that porosities of the order of more than 80 percent are required if the low thermal inertias observed in Martian shield volcanoes are the result of pristine lava flow surface properties. An aeolian origin is held to be most likely in view of thermal measurements on Mars; the volcanic surfaces in question are anticipated to have a short lifetime in their environment.

  8. Pressure grouting of fractured basalt flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, P.; Weidner, J.; Phillips, S.; Alexander, J.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes a field trial of pressure grouting in basalt and the results of subsequent coring and permeability measurement activities. The objective was to show that the hydraulic conductivity of fractured basalt bedrock can be significantly reduced by pressure injection of cementitious materials. The effectiveness of the pressure grout procedure was evaluated by measuring the change in the hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock. The extent of grout penetration was established by analyzing postgrout injection drilling chips for the presence of a tracer in the grout and also by examining cores of the treated basalt. Downhole radar mapping was used to establish major lava flow patterns and follow water movement during a surface infiltration test. A site called Box Canyon, which is located northwest of the INEL, was chosen for this study due to the similarity of this surface outcrop geology to that of the underlying bedrock fracture system found at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. This study showed that hydraulic conductivity of basalt can be reduced through pressure grouting of cementitious material.

  9. Architecture and emplacement of flood basalt flow fields: case studies from the Columbia River Basalt Group, NW USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vye-Brown, C.; Self, S.; Barry, T. L.

    2013-03-01

    The physical features and morphologies of collections of lava bodies emplaced during single eruptions (known as flow fields) can be used to understand flood basalt emplacement mechanisms. Characteristics and internal features of lava lobes and whole flow field morphologies result from the forward propagation, radial spread, and cooling of individual lobes and are used as a tool to understand the architecture of extensive flood basalt lavas. The features of three flood basalt flow fields from the Columbia River Basalt Group are presented, including the Palouse Falls flow field, a small (8,890 km2, ˜190 km3) unit by common flood basalt proportions, and visualized in three dimensions. The architecture of the Palouse Falls flow field is compared to the complex Ginkgo and more extensive Sand Hollow flow fields to investigate the degree to which simple emplacement models represent the style, as well as the spatial and temporal developments, of flow fields. Evidence from each flow field supports emplacement by inflation as the predominant mechanism producing thick lobes. Inflation enables existing lobes to transmit lava to form new lobes, thus extending the advance and spread of lava flow fields. Minimum emplacement timescales calculated for each flow field are 19.3 years for Palouse Falls, 8.3 years for Ginkgo, and 16.9 years for Sand Hollow. Simple flow fields can be traced from vent to distal areas and an emplacement sequence visualized, but those with multiple-layered lobes present a degree of complexity that make lava pathways and emplacement sequences more difficult to identify.

  10. Morphology of the 1984 open-channel lava flow at Krafla volcano, northern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Matti J.

    1997-09-01

    An open-channel lava flow of olivine tholeiite basalt, 9 km long and 1-2 km wide, formed in a volcanic eruption that took place in the Krafla volcano, Iceland, on the 4-18 September 1984. The eruption started with emplacement of a pahoehoe sheet which was fed by a 8.5-km-long fissure. After two days of eruption, lava effusion from the fissure ceased but one crater at the northern end of the fissure continued to release lava for another twelve days. That crater supplied an open-channel flow that moved toward the north along the rift valley. The lava was emplaced on a slope of 1°. The final lava flow is composed of five flow facies: (1) the initial pahoehoe sheet; (2) proximal slab pahoehoe and aa; (3) shelly-type overflows from the channel; (4) distal rubbly aa lava; and (5) secondary outbreaks of toothpaste lava and cauliflower aa. The main lava channel within the flow is 6.4 km long. The mean width of this channel is 189 m (103 m S.D.). An initial lava channel that forms in a Bingham plastic substance is fairly constant in width. This channel, however, varies in width especially in the proximal part indicating channel erosion. Large drifted blocks of channel walls are found throughout the flow front area and on the top of overflow levees. This suggests that the channel erosion was mainly mechanical. The lava flow has a mean height of 6 m above its surroundings, measured at the flow margins. However, a study of the pre-flow topography indicates that the lava filled a considerable topographic depression. Combined surface and pre-flow profiles give an average lava-flow thickness of 11 m; the thickness of the initial sheet-flow is estimated as 2 m. The volume of the lava flow calculated from these figures is 0.11 km 3. The mean effusion rate was 91 m 3/s. When lava flow models are used to deduce the rheological properties of this type of lava flow, the following points must be considered: (1) when a lava flow is emplaced along tectonic lineaments, its depth and

  11. Extended SO2 outgassing from the 2014-2015 Holuhraun lava flow field, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Isla C.; Pfeffer, Melissa A.; Calder, Eliza S.; Galle, Bo; Arellano, Santiago; Coppola, Diego; Barsotti, Sara

    2017-11-01

    The 2014-2015 Holuhraun eruption was the largest fissure eruption in Iceland in the last 200 years. This flood basalt eruption produced 1.6 km3 of lava, forming a lava flow field covering an area of 84 km2. Over the 6-month course of the eruption, 11 Mt of SO2 were released from the eruptive vents as well as from the cooling lava flow field. This work examines the post-eruption SO2 flux emitted by the Holuhraun lava flow field, providing the first study of the extent and relative importance of the outgassing of a lava flow field after emplacement. We use data from a scanning differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument installed at the eruption site to monitor the flux of SO2. In this study, we propose a new method to estimate the SO2 emissions from the lava flow field, based on the characteristic shape of the scanned column density distribution of a homogenous source close to the ground. Post-eruption outgassing of the lava flow field continued for at least 3 months after the end of the eruption, with SO2 flux between < 1 and 9 kg/s. The lava flow field post-eruption emissions were not a significant contributor to the total SO2 released during the eruption; however, the lava flow field was still an important polluter and caused high concentrations of SO2 at ground level after lava effusion ceased.

  12. Rheology Of Natural Dacitic Rocks: Lava Dome Versus Lava Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avard, G.; Whittington, A. G.

    2009-12-01

    Dacitic volcanoes are not only known for their blasts that decapitate the edifice - Bezymianny 1956, Mount Saint Helens 1980 or Pinatubo 1996 - but also for growing large lava domes after the main explosion, which corresponds to the “effusive” stage of their activity. In this range of composition and temperature, the magma is too viscous to flow very far, and therefore a dome forms. Santa-Maria volcano, Guatemala, experienced a cataclysmic eruption in 1902, and since 1922 has grown a complex of four dacitic domes, called Santiaguito. However, Caliente, the currently active dome, extruded a 4-km long lava flow between 1999 and 2004. Several shorter lava flows have been observed on other domes, particularly on Brujo, another dome of the Santiaguito complex, and at Bezymianny, in Kamchatka. One important question is whether the change in eruption style is due in part to changes in the rheology of the lavas, which depends on composition, crystal fraction, temperature, volatile content and strain rate. We studied 5 different natural rocks collected on Santiaguito (1 dome spine and 1 flow), Mount Saint Helens (2004 dome) and Bezymianny (1 bomb and 1 flow). All are crystal-rich dacites composed of up to 30% plagioclase and pyroxene phenocrysts in a rhyolitic matrix that ranges between 72 and 77 wt.% silica, and they contain up to 30 vol.% bubble fraction. Their apparent viscosity was measured using a parallel plate viscometer on cylindrical cores under uniaxial compression, at atmospheric pressure and in the temperature range 880 to 1040°C. Applied stresses were between 0.13 MPa and 0.43 MPa, and resulting strain rates were between 6×10-8 and 2×10-2 s-1. More than thirty experiments were performed, at durations up to ten days, and the amount of shortening varied from 1.8% to over 35%. We were particularly aiming to quantify the yield strength of these natural rocks and the effect of temperature, stress, strain rate, compaction and vesicle content on the apparent

  13. New Insights to the Mid Miocene Calc-alkaline Lavas of the Strawberry Volcanics, NE Oregon Surrounded by the Coeval Tholeiitic Columbia River Basalt Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Strawberry Volcanics (SV) of NE Oregon were distributed over 3,400 km2 during the mid-Miocene and comprise a diverse volcanic suite, which span the range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite. The predominant composition of this volcanic suite is calc-alkaline (CA) basaltic andesite and andesite, although tholeiitic (TH) lavas of basalt to andesite occur as well. The coeval flood basalts of the Columbia River province surround the SV. Here we will discuss new ages and geochemical data, and present a new geologic map and stratigraphy of the SV. The SV are emplaced on top of pre-Tertiary accreted terranes of the Blue Mountain Province, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and older Tertiary volcanic rocks thought to be mostly Oligocene of age. Massive rhyolites (~300 m thick) are exposed mainly along the western flank and underlie the intermediate composition lavas. In the southern portion of this study area, alkali basaltic lavas, thought to be late Miocene to early Pliocene in age, erupted and overlie the SV. In addition, several regional ignimbrites reach into the area. The 9.7 Ma Devine Canyon Tuff and the 7.1 Ma Rattlesnake Tuff also overlie the SV. The 15.9-15.4 Ma Dinner Creek Tuff is mid-Miocene, and clear stratigraphic relationships are found in areas where the tuff is intercalated between thick SV lava flows. All of the basalts of the SV are TH and are dominated by phenocryst-poor (≤2%) lithologies. These basalts have an ophitic texture dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine (often weathered to iddingsite). Basalts and basaltic andesites have olivine Fo #'s ranging from 44 at the rims (where weathered to iddingsite) and as high as 88 at cores. Pyroxene Mg #'s range from 65 to 85. Andesites of the SV are sub-alkaline, and like the basalts, are exceedingly phenocryst-poor (≤3%) with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and lesser pyroxene and olivine, which occasionally occur as crystal clots of ~1-3 mm instead of single crystals. In addition, minimal

  14. Thermophysical Modeling of Recent Lava Flows in Daedalia Planum, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, M. S.; Simurda, C.; Crown, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Mantling by eolian-derived material (i.e., dust and sand) can hinder compositional analysis of the Martian surface by obscuring the spectral signature of underlying coarser grained materials and bedrock. However, checkboard style mixing of larger lava outcrops plus fine-grained material in low-lying regions can also result in a spectrum similar to that of a continuous, optically-thin layer of fine material. Multiple datasets with either high spatial or spectral resolution were used to identify these mixing relationships on the flow surfaces in Daedalia Planum in hope of discerning the spectral signature of the lava. Daedalia Planum contains a flow apron originating from the SW flank of Arsia Mons, the southernmost Tharsis shield volcano, and was selected for its coverage by multiple datasets and extensive basaltic lava flow fields. CTX and HiRISE images were used to visually identify flow boundaries, superposition relationships, and surface morphology. THEMIS derived thermal inertia (TI) was compared with THEMIS infrared (IR) day and night brightness temperature (PBT) to determine the thermophysical response of individual flows. Statistical analysis (including ANOVA) of regions of interest (ROIs) in the TI and PBT data was performed to also assess the variability across the entire flow field. Four categories were defined based on these results. Finally, these THEMIS-defined categories, TI, and surface morphology were compared to identify possible unmantled outcrops. Analyses of thermophysical properties and flow morphology reveal that individual flows respond differently to diurnal heating, suggesting the presence of different roughness distributions or mixing relationships between the mantling material and lava outcrops. Statistical analysis reveals that flows with rugged surfaces are most likely to have a checkboard mixing distribution. The identification of the flows with minimally-mantled lava outcrops will next be used with TI modeling to determine its

  15. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models of lava flow simulation for hazard assessment, forecasting, and risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi; Richardson, Jacob A.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, designing flow mitigation measures, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, COMSOL, and MOLASSES. We model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal planes, sloping surfaces, and into topographic obstacles. We compare model results to physical observations made during well-controlled analogue and molten basalt experiments, and to analytical theory when available. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and OpenFOAM and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We assess the goodness-of-fit of the simulation results and the computational cost. Our results guide the selection of numerical simulation codes for different applications, including inferring emplacement conditions of past lava flows, modeling the temporal evolution of ongoing flows during eruption, and probabilistic assessment of lava flow hazard prior to eruption. Finally, we outline potential experiments and desired key observational data from future flows that would extend existing benchmarking data sets.

  16. Studies of fluid instabilities in flows of lava and debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    At least two instabilities have been identified and utilized in lava flow studies: surface folding and gravity instability. Both lead to the development of regularly spaced structures on the surfaces of lava flows. The geometry of surface folds have been used to estimate the rheology of lava flows on other planets. One investigation's analysis assumed that lava flows have a temperature-dependent Newtonian rheology, and that the lava's viscosity decreased exponentially inward from the upper surface. The author reviews studies by other investigators on the analysis of surface folding, the analysis of Taylor instability in lava flows, and the effect of surface folding on debris flows

  17. Rheology of lava flows on Mercury: An analog experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehlke, A.; Whittington, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally determined the rheological evolution of three basaltic analog compositions appropriate to Mercury's surface, during cooling, and crystallization. Investigated compositions are an enstatite basalt, and two magnesian basalts representing the compositional end-members of the northern volcanic plains with 0.19 wt % (NVP) and 6.26 wt % Na2O (NVP-Na). The viscosity-strain rate dependence of lava was quantified using concentric cylinder viscometry. We measured the viscosities of the crystal-free liquids from 1600°C down to the first detection of crystals. Liquidus temperatures of the three compositions studied are around 1360°C, and all three compositions are more viscous than Hawaiian basalt at the same temperature. The onset of pseudoplastic behavior was observed at crystal fractions ~0.05 to 0.10, which is consistent with previous studies on mafic lavas. We show that all lavas develop detectable yield strengths at crystal fractions around 0.20, beyond which the two-phase suspensions are better described as Herschel-Bulkley fluids. By analogy with the viscosity-strain rate conditions at which the pahoehoe to `a`a transition occurs in Kilauea basalt, this transition is predicted to occur at ~1260 ± 10°C for the enstatite basalt, at ~1285 ± 20°C for the NVP, and at ~1240 ± 40°C for the NVP-Na lavas. Our results indicate that Mercury lavas are broadly similar to terrestrial ones, which suggests that the extensive smooth lava plains of Mercury could be due to large effusion rates (flood basalts) and not to unusually fluid lavas.

  18. Observing Lava Flows with Spaceborne Microwave Radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2017-12-01

    The interpretation of infrared observations of lava flows is well-established, both on Earth and Io, to establish flow areas and temperatures, and thereby constrain eruption rates. However, the detection of such radiation from space requires lava temperatures that are high enough to be incandescent, and a relatively clear atmosphere. The former condition is met only for a short period after eruption as the top millimeters of lava cool quickly. The latter condition may fail due to ash or water clouds on Earth, or the persistent thick clouds on Venus. Microwave radiometry, which in principle probes to depths of centimeters to decimeters, offers the prospect of detecting older flows. It furthermore is minimally sensitive to cloud.The challenge, however, is that spaceborne microwave instruments have relatively large footprints (sometimes 100km) such that the emission from relatively small flows is heavily diluted and therefore difficult to detect. Here we describe models of microwave remote sensing of recent volcanics on Earth, Venus and Titan, and present some preliminary observational studies of terrestrial volcanoes with the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) radiometer. This spacecraft has a large antenna to yield a relatively narrow observation footprint, and a long wavelength to penetrate into volcanic rock, and thus offers the best prospects yet for volcano surveillance in microwave radiometry.

  19. Rheology and thermal budget of lunar basalts: an experimental study and its implications for rille formation of non-Newtonian lavas on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehlke, A.; Whittington, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    Sinuous lava channels are a characteristic feature observed on the Moon. Their formation is assumed to be due to a combination of mechanical and thermal erosion of the lava into the substrate during emplacement as surface channels, or due to collapsed subsurface lava tubes after the lava has evacuated. The viscosity (η) of the lava plays an important role, because it controls the volume flux of the emplaced lava that governs the mechanical and thermal erosion potential of the lava flow. Thermal properties, such as heat capacity (Cp) and latent heat of crystallization (ΔHcryst) are important parameters in order for the substrate to melt and causing thermal buffering during crystallization of the flowing lava. We experimentally studied the rheological evolution of analog lavas representing the KREEP terrain and high-Ti mare basalts during cooling and crystallization. We find that the two lavas behave very differently. High-Ti mare lava begins to crystallize around 1300 ºC with a viscosity of 8.6±0.6 Pa s and crystal content around 2 vol%. On cooling to 1169 ºC, the effective viscosity of the crystal-melt suspension is increased to only 538±33 Pa s (at a strain rate of 1 s-1) due to crystallization of 14±1 vol% blocky magnetite and acicular ulvöspinel-rich magnetite. The flow behavior of these suspensions depends on the strain rate, where flow curves below strain rates of 10 s-1show shear-thinning character, but resemble Bingham behavior at greater strain rates. In contrast, the KREEP lava crystallizes rapidly over a narrow temperature interval of ~ 30 degrees. The first crystals detected were ulvospinel-rich magnetites at 1204 ºC with ~2 vol% and a viscosity of 90±2 Pa s. On cooling to 1178 ºC, anorthite and enstatite appears, so that the crystal-melt suspension has become strongly pseudoplastic at a crystal content of 22±2 vol% with a flow index (n) of 0.63 and an effective viscosity of 1600±222 Pa s at a strain rate of 1 s-1. We are currently measuring

  20. Geochemical models of melting and magma storage conditions for basalt lava from Santorini Volcano, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baziotis, Ioannis; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Pantazidis, Avgoustinos; Klemme, Stephan; Berndt, Jasper; Asimow, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Santorini volcano sits ˜150 km above the Wadati-Benioff zone of the Aegean arc, where the African plate subducts northward beneath the Eurasian continent (Papazachos et al. 2000). Santorini volcano has a long history: activity started ca. 650 ka (mainly rhyolites and rhyodacites), with active pulses following ca. 550 ka (basalt to rhyodacite) and ca. 360 ka (large explosive eruptions of andesite to rhyodacite and minor basalt), culminating in the caldera-forming Bronze-age Minoan event (Druitt et al. 1999). As in many arc volcanoes, scenarios of fractional crystallization with or without mixing between felsic and mafic magmas have been proposed to explain the compositions, textures, and eruptive styles of Santorini products (e.g., Huijsmans & Barton 1989; Montazavi & Sparks 2004; Andújar et al. 2015). Here we focus on a basalt lava from the southern part of Santorini volcano (Balos cove, 36˚ 21.7'N, 25˚ 23.8'E), one of the few basaltic localities in the Aegean arc. The goals are to infer constraints on the magma chamber conditions which lead to mafic eruption at Santorini Volcano and to evaluate the slab and mantle wedge conditions via geochemical and petrological mass balance modelling. We collected and characterised 20 samples for texture (SEM), mineral chemistry (FE-EPMA) and whole-rock chemistry (XRF). The basalts contain phenocrystic olivine (Ol) and clinopyroxene (Cpx) (<600 μm diameter) in a fine groundmass (<100 μm diameter) of Ol, Cpx, plagioclase (Pl) and magnetite (Mt) with minor glass and rare xenocrystic quartz. Santorini basalts exhibit a pilotaxitic to trachytic texture defined by randomly to flow-oriented tabular Pl, respectively. The predominant minerals are calcic Pl (core An78-85 and rim An60-76; 45-50 vol.%), Cpx (En36-48Wo41-44Fs11-21; 10-15 vol.%) and Ol (Fo74-88; 10-12 vol.%). Idiomorphic to subidiomorphic Mt (<10μm diameter) with variable TiO2 contents (1.9-16.5 wt%) is a minor constituent (˜1-2 vol.%) in the less mafic samples

  1. Measuring effusion rates of obsidian lava flows by means of satellite thermal data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, D.; Laiolo, M.; Franchi, A.; Massimetti, F.; Cigolini, C.; Lara, L. E.

    2017-11-01

    Space-based thermal data are increasingly used for monitoring effusive eruptions, especially for calculating lava discharge rates and forecasting hazards related to basaltic lava flows. The application of this methodology to silicic, more viscous lava bodies (such as obsidian lava flows) is much less frequent, with only few examples documented in the last decades. The 2011-2012 eruption of Cordón Caulle volcano (Chile) produced a voluminous obsidian lava flow ( 0.6 km3) and offers an exceptional opportunity to analyze the relationship between heat and volumetric flux for such type of viscous lava bodies. Based on a retrospective analysis of MODIS infrared data (MIROVA system), we found that the energy radiated by the active lava flow is robustly correlated with the erupted lava volume, measured independently. We found that after a transient time of about 15 days, the coefficient of proportionality between radiant and volumetric flux becomes almost steady, and stabilizes around a value of 5 × 106 J m- 3. This coefficient (i.e. radiant density) is much lower than those found for basalts ( 1 × 108 J m- 3) and likely reflects the appropriate spreading and cooling properties of the highly-insulated, viscous flows. The effusion rates trend inferred from MODIS data correlates well with the tremor amplitude and with the plume elevation recorded throughout the eruption, thus suggesting a link between the effusive and the coeval explosive activity. Modelling of the eruptive trend indicates that the Cordón Caulle eruption occurred in two stages, either incompletely draining a single magma reservoir or more probably tapping multiple interconnected magmatic compartments.

  2. Paleomagnetism of Holocene lava flows from the Reykjanes Peninsula and the Tungnaá lava sequence (Iceland): implications for flow correlation and ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Annamaria; Giordano, Guido; Speranza, Fabio; Þórðarson, Þorvaldur

    2018-01-01

    The impact of Holocene eruptive events from hot spots like Iceland may have had significant global implications; thus, dating and knowledge of past eruptions chronology is important. However, at high-latitude volcanic islands, the paucity of soils severely limits 14C dating, while the poor K content of basalts strongly restricts the use of K/Ar and Ar/Ar methods. Even tephrochronology, based on 14C age determinations, refers to layers that rarely lie directly above lava flows to be dated. We report on the paleomagnetic dating of 25 sites from the Reykjanes Peninsula and the Tungnaá lava sequence of Iceland. The gathered paleomagnetic directions were compared with the available reference paleosecular variation curves of the Earth magnetic field to obtain the possible emplacement age intervals. To test the method's validity, we sampled the precisely dated Laki (1783-1784 AD) and Eldgjà (934-938 AD) lavas. The age windows obtained for these events encompass the true flow ages. For sites from the Reykjanes peninsula and the Tugnaá lava sequence, we derived multiple possible eruption events and ages. In the Reykjanes peninsula, we propose an older emplacement age (immediately following the 870 AD Iceland Settlement age) for Ogmundarhraun and Kapelluhraun lava fields. For pre-historical (older than the settlement age) Tugnaá eruptions, the method has a dating precision of 300-400 years which allows an increase of the detail in the chronostratigraphy and distribution of lavas in the Tugnaá sequence.

  3. 40Ar-39Ar age of a lava flow from the Bhimashankar Formation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report here a 40Ar-39Ar age of 66.0 ± 0.9Ma (2 ) for a reversely magnetised tholeiitic lava flow from the Bhimashankar Formation (Fm.), Giravali Ghat, western Deccan province, India. This age is consistent with the view that the 1.8–2km thick bottom part of the exposed basalt flow sequence in the Western Ghats was ...

  4. 40Ar-39Ar age of a lava flow from the Bhimashankar Formation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Ar age of 66.0 ± 0.9 Ma (2σ) for a reversely magnetised tholeiitic lava flow from the Bhimashankar Formation (Fm.), Giravali Ghat, western Deccan province, India. This age is consistent with the view that the 1.8–2 km thick bottom part of the exposed basalt flow sequence in the Western Ghats was extruded very close to 67.4 ...

  5. Dielectric properties of lava flows west of Ascraeus Mons, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, L.M.; Campbell, B.A.; Holt, J.W.; Phillips, R.J.; Putzig, N.E.; Mattei, S.; Seu, R.; Okubo, C.H.; Egan, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    The SHARAD instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter detects subsurface interfaces beneath lava flow fields northwest of Ascraeus Mons. The interfaces occur in two locations; a northern flow that originates south of Alba Patera, and a southern flow that originates at the rift zone between Ascraeus and Pavonis Montes. The northern flow has permittivity values, estimated from the time delay of echoes from the basal interface, between 6.2 and 17.3, with an average of 12.2. The southern flow has permittivity values of 7.0 to 14.0, with an average of 9.8. The average permittivity values for the northern and southern flows imply densities of 3.7 and 3.4 g cm-3, respectively. Loss tangent values for both flows range from 0.01 to 0.03. The measured bulk permittivity and loss tangent values are consistent with those of terrestrial and lunar basalts, and represent the first measurement of these properties for dense rock on Mars. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. 182W evidence from flood basalt lavas for the long-term survival of primordial mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo Garza, H. L.; Walker, R. J.; Carlson, R.; Horan, M. F.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Francis, D.; Jackson, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    How much of the chemical heterogeneity present in mantle today dates to processes that occurred during Earth's planetary formation stage remains an unanswered question. Geochemical observations obtained from short-lived radiogenic isotope systems, however, provide important insights. Tungsten isotope data for flood basalt lavas from two large igneous provinces, the North Atlantic Igneous Province ( 60 Ma) and the Ontong Java Plateau ( 120 Ma), show well resolved 182W excesses, compared with terrestrial standards that are presumed to be representative of the present bulk mantle. These W isotope results, thus, indicate that one or more mantle domains formed very early in Earth history and have been preserved well into the Phanerozoic eon. The flood basalts from Baffin Bay contain among the highest 3He/4He ratios ever measured, as well as Pb and 143Nd isotopic compositions, and D/H ratios consistent with a chemically primitive, un-degassed mantle source. Ontong Java is the Earth's largest known volcanic province and shares chemical and isotopic similarities with the Baffin Bay lavas, indicative of a similarly primitive mantle source. The 182W-enriched nature of the mantle sources of rocks from both locations indicates that their primitive characteristics were likely isolated in a deep mantle reservoir within the first 50 Ma of Solar System history. The correlation between large low seismic shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) and the distribution of reconstructed eruption sites of these large igneous provinces makes the LLSVPs possible candidate domains for the required primitive and un-degassed reservoirs.

  7. The role of unsteady effusion rates on inflation in long-lived lava flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, E.; Vanderkluysen, L.; Clarke, A.

    2017-11-01

    The emission of volcanic gases and particles can have global and lasting environmental effects, but their timing, tempo, and duration can be problematic to quantify for ancient eruptions where real-time measurements are absent. Lava flows, for example, may be long-lasting, and their impact is controlled by the rate, tempo, and vigor of effusion. These factors are currently difficult to derive from the geologic record but can have large implications for the atmospheric impact of an eruption. We conducted a set of analogue experiments on lava flow inflation aiming at connecting lava morphologies preserved in the rock record to eruption tempo and dynamics through pulsating effusion rates. Inflation, a process where molten material is injected beneath the crust of an active lava flow and lifts it upwards, is a common phenomenon in basaltic volcanic systems. This mechanism requires three components: a) a coherent, insulating crust; b) a wide-spread molten core; and c) pressure built up beneath the crust from a sustained supply of molten material. Inflation can result in a lava flow growing tens of meters thick, even in flow fields that expand hundreds of square kilometers. It has been documented that rapid effusion rates tend to create channels and tubes, isolating the active part of the flow from the stagnant part, while slow effusion rates may cause crust to form quickly and seize up, forcing lava to overtop the crust. However, the conditions that allow for inflation of large flow fields have not previously been evaluated in terms of effusion rate. By using PEG 600 wax and a programmable pump, we observe how, by pulsating effusion rate, inflation occurs even in very low viscosity basaltic eruptions. We show that observations from inflating Hawaiian lava flows correlate well with experimental data and indicate that instantaneous effusion rates may have been 3 times higher than average effusion rates during the emplacement of the 23 January 1988 flow at Kīlauea (Hawai

  8. Evolution of - and Core-Dominated Lava Flows Using Scaling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castruccio, A.; Rust, A.; Sparks, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the front evolution of simple lava flows on a slope using scaling arguments. For the retarding force acting against gravity, we analyzed three different cases: a flow controlled by a Newtonian viscosity, a flow controlled by the yield strength of a diffusively growing crust and a flow controlled by its core yield strength. These models were tested using previously published data of front evolution and volume discharge of 10 lava flow eruptions from 6 different volcanoes. Our analysis suggests that for basaltic eruptions with high effusion rate and low crystal content, (Hawaiian eruptions), the best fit of the data is with a Newtonian viscosity. For basaltic eruptions with lower effusion rates (Etna eruptions) or long duration andesitic eruptions (Lonquimay eruption, Chile) the flow is controlled by the yield strength of a growing crust. Finally, for very high crystalline lavas (Colima, Santiaguito) the flow is controlled by its core yield strength. The order of magnitude of the viscosities from our analysis is in the same range as previous studies using field measurements on the same lavas. The yield strength values for the growing crust and core of the flow are similar and with an order of magnitude of 10^5 Pa. This number is similar to yield strength values found in lava domes by different authors. The consistency of yield strength ~10^5 Pa is because larger stresses cause fracturing of very crystalline magma, which drastically reduces its effective strength. Furthermore, we used a 2-D analysis of a Bingham fluid flow on a slope to conclude that, for lower yield strength values, the flow is controlled mainly by its plastic viscosity and the lava can be effectively modelled as Newtonian. Our analysis provides a simple tool to evaluate the main controlling forces in the evolution of a lava flow, as well as the magnitude of its rheological properties, for eruptions of different compositions and conditions and may be useful to predict the evolution of

  9. Iron Moessbauer spectra of lava from Jeju Island and its similarities to moon basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S.R.; Haley, G.; Mullen, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    We report the result of measurements of the 57 Fe Moessbauer spectrum for powder samples of lava taken from four widely separated sites on Jeju island. The spectra consist of well defined quadrupole doublets having a 2+ charge state and indicate the presence of olivine, clinopyroxene and ilmenite. In addition we find a six line magnetically split hyperfine pattern characteristic of impure hematite, with considerable line broadening and reduced internal field. The observed spectra have a remarkable similarity to those found for moon basalts. A recently popularized ''collision ejection'' model for the moon formation would be consistent with our observations. The data is a particularly simple and direct illustration of the well-known fact that the iron silicates and ilmenite found on the moon are very similar in composition and relative abundance to that found on earth. (orig.)

  10. Observations on basaltic lava streams in tubes from Kilauea Volcano, island of Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauahikaua, J.; Cashman, K.V.; Mattox, T.N.; Christina, Heliker C.; Hon, K.A.; Mangan, M.T.; Thornber, C.R.

    1998-01-01

    From 1986 to 1997, the Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption of Kilauea produced a vast pahoehoe flow field fed by lava tubes that extended 10-12 km from vents on the volcano's east rift zone to the ocean. Within a kilometer of the vent, tubes were as much as 20 m high and 10-25 m wide. On steep slopes (4-10??) a little farther away from the vent, some tubes formed by roofing over of lava channels. Lava streams were typically 1-2 m deep flowing within a tube that here was typically 5 m high and 3 m wide. On the coastal plain (core. The tubes start out with nearly elliptical cross-sectional shapes, many times wider than high. Broad, flat sheet flows evolve into elongate tumuli with an axial crack as the flanks of the original flow were progressively buried by breakouts. Temperature measurements and the presence of stalactites in active tubes confirmed that the tube walls were above the solidus and subject to melting. Sometimes, the tubes began downcutting. Progressive downcutting was frequently observed through skylights; a rate of 10 cm/d was measured at one skylight for nearly 2 months.

  11. Constraining Eruptive Conditions From Lava Flow Morphometry: A Case Study With Field Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Z. R.; Clarke, A.; Greeley, R.

    2007-12-01

    Volcanism is widely recognized as one of the primary factors affecting the surfaces of solid planets and satellites throughout the solar system. Basaltic lava is thought to be the most common composition based on observed features typical of basaltic eruptions found on Earth. Lava flows are one of the most easily recognizable landforms on planetary surfaces and their features may provide information about eruption dynamics, lava rheology, and potential hazards. More recently, researchers have taken a multi-faceted approach to combine remote sensing, field observations and quantitative modeling to constrain volcanic activity on Earth and other planets. Here we test a number of published models, including empirically derived relationships from Mt. Etna and Kilauea, models derived from laboratory experiments, and theoretical models previously applied to remote sensing of planetary surfaces, against well-documented eruptions from the literature and field observations. We find that the Graetz (Hulme and Felder, 1977, Phil.Trans., 285, 227 - 234) method for estimating effusion rates compares favorably with published eruption data, while, on the other hand, inverting lava flow length prediction models to estimate effusion rates leads to several orders of magnitude in error. The Graetz method also better constrains eruption duration. Simple radial spreading laws predict Hawaiian lava flow lengths quite well, as do using the thickness of the lava flow front and chilled crust. There was no observed difference between results from models thought to be exclusive to aa or pahoehoe flow fields. Interpreting historic conditions should therefore follow simple relationships to observable morphologies no matter the composition or surface texture. We have applied the most robust models to understand the eruptive conditions and lava rheology of the Batamote Mountains near Ajo, AZ, an eroded shield volcano in southern Arizona. We find effusion rates on the order of 100 - 200 cubic

  12. The Active Lava Flows of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . After erupting from the crater at the top of the cone, the lava flows downslope and towards the ocean, just as normal rivers (of water) would do. The lava mixing with sea water immediately quenches and shatters, and makes new land.

  13. Improvement of a 2D numerical model of lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimine, Y.

    2013-12-01

    I propose an improved procedure that reduces an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in two-dimensional simulations based on Ishihara et al. (in Lava Flows and Domes, Fink, JH eds., 1990). The numerical model for lava flow simulations proposed by Ishihara et al. (1990) is based on two-dimensional shallow water model combined with a constitutive equation for a Bingham fluid. It is simple but useful because it properly reproduces distributions of actual lava flows. Thus, it has been regarded as one of pioneer work of numerical simulations of lava flows and it is still now widely used in practical hazard prediction map for civil defense officials in Japan. However, the model include an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of DEM because the model separately assigns the condition for the lava flow to stop due to yield stress for each of two orthogonal axes of rectangular calculating grid based on DEM. This procedure brings a diamond-shaped distribution as shown in Fig. 1 when calculating a lava flow supplied from a point source on a virtual flat plane although the distribution should be circle-shaped. To improve the drawback, I proposed a modified procedure that uses the absolute value of yield stress derived from both components of two orthogonal directions of the slope steepness to assign the condition for lava flows to stop. This brings a better result as shown in Fig. 2. Fig. 1. (a) Contour plots calculated with the original model of Ishihara et al. (1990). (b) Contour plots calculated with a proposed model.

  14. Petrogenesis of Rinjani Post-1257-Caldera-Forming-Eruption Lava Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heryadi Rachmat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.3.2.107-126After the catastrophic 1257 caldera-forming eruption, a new chapter of Old Rinjani volcanic activity beganwith the appearance of Rombongan and Barujari Volcanoes within the caldera. However, no published petrogeneticstudy focuses mainly on these products. The Rombongan eruption in 1944 and Barujari eruptions in pre-1944, 1966,1994, 2004, and 2009 produced basaltic andesite pyroclastic materials and lava flows. A total of thirty-one sampleswere analyzed, including six samples for each period of eruption except from 2004 (only one sample. The sampleswere used for petrography, whole-rock geochemistry, and trace and rare earth element analyses. The Rombonganand Barujari lavas are composed of calc-alkaline and high K calc-alkaline porphyritic basaltic andesite. The magmashows narrow variation of SiO2 content that implies small changes during its generation. The magma that formedRombongan and Barujari lavas is island-arc alkaline basalt. Generally, data show that the rocks are enriched in LargeIon Lithophile Elements (LILE: K, Rb, Ba, Sr, and Ba and depleted in High Field Strength Elements (HFSE: Y, Ti,and Nb which are typically a suite from a subduction zone. The pattern shows a medium enrichment in Light REEand relatively depleted in Heavy REE. The processes are dominantly controlled by fractional crystallization andmagma mixing. All of the Barujari and Rombongan lavas would have been produced by the same source of magmawith little variation in composition caused by host rock filter process. New flux of magma would likely have occurredfrom pre-1944 until 2009 period that indicates slightly decrease and increase of SiO2 content. The Rombongan andBarujari lava generations show an arc magma differentiation trend.

  15. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility Studies in Lava Flows of the Eastern Anatolia Region, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Hakan; Cengiz Cinku, Mualla

    2017-04-01

    Eastern Anatolia comprises one of the high plateaus of the Alpine-Himalaya mountain belt with an average elevation of 2 km above the sea level. Available geochronologic data indicate that the volcanism started in the south of the region around the north of Lake Van and continued towards the norths in a age interval of 15.0 Ma to 0.4 Ma. The products are exposed as stratovolcanoes like Agri, Tendurek, Suphan and Girekol with the eruption of andesitic to rhyolitic lavas, ignimbrites and basaltic lava flows. In this study, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility measurements were carried out on different lava flows (Tendurek, Girekol and Suphan) to determine the flow direction of lavas. It has been shown that the direction of maximum susceptibility is associated with magma flow direction in the vertical direction, while a horizontal flow direction is predicted for the volcano structure of Suphan. Anisotropy of magnetic measurements show a trend of lineation towards the center of the projection and shallow-dipping foliations which are largely scattered.

  16. InSAR observations of ground surface deformation and lava flow emplacement at Pacaya volcano, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, L. N.; Lu, Z.; Oommen, T.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a persistently active basaltic cone complex located in the Central American Volcanic Arc in Guatemala. In May, 2010, violent VEI-3 eruptions caused significant topographic changes to the edifice, including the dispersion of ~20 cm of tephra and ash on the cone, the emplacement of a ~5.4 km long lava flow, and 3 m of co-eruptive movement of the southwest flank. For this study, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) images (interferograms) processed from both spaceborne Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) and aerial Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data were used to measure post-eruptive deformation events. Interferograms suggest four distinct deformation processes after the May 2010 eruption: (1) magma intrusion near the vents of the 2010 lava flow; (2) subsidence of the 2010 lava flow; (3) slow deflation of an elongated magma source near the summit, and; (4) settlement of the material involved in the co-eruptive slope movement. Our results provide insights into Pacaya's complex magmatic plumbing system and the postemplacement behavior of lava flows. The detection of several different deformation events emphasizes the utility of measuring volcanic deformation using high-resolution remote sensing techniques with broad spatial coverage.

  17. The Influence of Slope Breaks on Lava Flow Surface Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Wright, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the underlying slope of a lava flow impart a significant fraction of rotational energy beyond the slope break. The eddies, circulation and vortices caused by this rotational energy can disrupt the flow surface, having a significant impact on heat loss and thus the distance the flow can travel. A basic mechanics model is used to compute the rotational energy caused by a slope change. The gain in rotational energy is deposited into an eddy of radius R whose energy is dissipated as it travels downstream. A model of eddy friction with the ambient lava is used to compute the time-rate of energy dissipation. The key parameter of the dissipation rate is shown to be rho R(sup 2/)mu, where ? is the lava density and mu is the viscosity, which can vary by orders of magnitude for different flows. The potential spatial disruption of the lava flow surface is investigated by introducing steady-state models for the main flow beyond the steepening slope break. One model applies to slow-moving flows with both gravity and pressure as the driving forces. The other model applies to fast-moving, low-viscosity, turbulent flows. These models provide the flow velocity that establishes the downstream transport distance of disrupting eddies before they dissipate. The potential influence of slope breaks is discussed in connection with field studies of lava flows from the 1801 Hualalai and 1823 Keaiwa Kilauea, Hawaii, and 2004 Etna eruptions.

  18. Fractal analysis: A new remote sensing tool for lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; Taylor, G. J.; Rowland, S. K.; Lucey, P. G.; Self, S.

    1992-01-01

    Many important quantitative parameters have been developed that relate to the rheology and eruption and emplacement mechanics of lavas. This research centers on developing additional, unique parameters, namely the fractal properties of lava flows, to add to this matrix of properties. There are several methods of calculating the fractal dimension of a lava flow margin. We use the 'structured walk' or 'divider' method. In this method, we measure the length of a given lava flow margin by walking rods of different lengths along the margin. Since smaller rod lengths transverse more smaller-scaled features in the flow margin, the apparent length of the flow outline will increase as the length of the measuring rod decreases. By plotting the apparent length of the flow outline as a function of the length of the measuring rod on a log-log plot, fractal behavior can be determined. A linear trend on a log-log plot indicates that the data are fractal. The fractal dimension can then be calculated from the slope of the linear least squares fit line to the data. We use this 'structured walk' method to calculate the fractal dimension of many lava flows using a wide range of rod lengths, from 1/8 to 16 meters, in field studies of the Hawaiian islands. We also use this method to calculate fractal dimensions from aerial photographs of lava flows, using lengths ranging from 20 meters to over 2 kilometers. Finally, we applied this method to orbital images of extraterrestrial lava flows on Venus, Mars, and the Moon, using rod lengths up to 60 kilometers.

  19. Possible lava tube system in a hummocky lava flow at Daund ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Keywords. Pahoehoe; lava tube; inflation; emplacement; Deccan Volcanic Province. Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. (Earth Planet. Sci.), 113, No. 4, December 2004, pp. 819–829 ... vesicles and a core with numerous vesicle cylin- ders. ..... Figure 4. Primitive mantle normalized Rare Earth Element concentration of the Daund flow.

  20. Possible lava tube system in a hummocky lava flow at Daund ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Swanson 1973). This indicates that at least the local transport of lava in the Deccan may have been affected by tubes. Hum- mocky pahoehoe flows are also known from other parts of the DVP i.e., from Saurashtra, Malwa and. Amarkantak areas.

  1. The Anatomy of the Blue Dragon: Changes in Lava Flow Morphology and Physical Properties Observed in an Open Channel Lava Flow as a Planetary Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehlke, A.; Kobs Nawotniak, S. E.; Hughes, S. S.; Sears, D. W.; Downs, M. T.; Whittington, A. G.; Lim, D. S. S.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2017-10-01

    We present the relationship of lava flow morphology and the physical properties of the rocks based on terrestrial field work, and how this can be applied to infer physical properties of lunar lava flows.

  2. Lava Flow Lengths and Historic Eruptive Parameters: Implications for the Volcanic History of the Batamote Mountains, Ajo, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Z. R.; Clarke, A.; Greeley, R.

    2006-12-01

    Lava flow lengths and morphology depend on (1) initial viscocity, (2) rate of effusion, (3) total volume of lava extruded, (4) duration of extrusion, (5) slope of underlying surface, (6) topography, (7) rate of cooling, (8) formation of crust, and (9) other special circumstances such as ponding and flowing into water. Lava flow lengths and assumptions on lava type contain all the information needed to make educated constraints on the eruptive history of a particular volcano. By no means is this a definitive claim of eruptive histories based on present day observations, but an approximation of what might have occurred may be obtained. Lava flow lengths were measured in the Batamote Mountains in Ajo, Arizona and it was determined that this 18 million year old shield volcano erupted with effusion rates of 5 to 10 cubic meters per second, volumes of 0.00001 cubic kilometers, eruption durations on the order of days, lava yield strengths of 5000 Pa, and flow thicknesses of approximately 3 to 6 meters. These calculations add to the body of knowledge covering Arizona historical volcanism and related Basin and Range extension, but conflict with observations of basaltic volcanic fields in this region.

  3. Memories of Earth Formation in the Modern Mantle: W Isotopic Composition of Flood Basalt Lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo Garza, H. L.; Walker, R. J.; Carlson, R.; Horan, M. F.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Francis, D.; Jackson, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Four and a half billion years of geologic activity has overprinted much of the direct evidence for processes involved in Earth's formation and its initial chemical differentiation. Xenon isotopic ratios [1] and 3He/22Ne ratios [2] suggest that heterogeneities formed during Earth's accretion have been preserved to the present time. New opportunities to learn about early Earth history have opened up with the development of analytical techniques that allow high precision analysis of short-lived isotopic systems. The Hf-W system (t½ = 8.9 Ma) is particularly valuable for studying events that occurred during the first ~50 Ma of Solar System history. Here we report new data for ~ 60 Ma Baffin Bay and ~ 120 Ma Ontong Java Plateau lava samples. Both are large igneous provinces that may have sampled a primitive, less degassed deep mantle reservoir that has remained isolated since shortly after Earth formation [3,4]. Three samples analyzed have 182W/184W ratios that are 10 to 48 ppm higher than our terrestrial standard. These excesses in 182W are the highest ever measured in terrestrial rocks, and may reflect 182W ingrowth in an early-formed high Hf/W mantle domain that was produced by magma ocean differentiation [5]. Long and short-lived Sm-Nd systematics in these samples, however, are inconsistent with this hypothesis. The 182W excessses could rather reflect the derivation of these lavas from a mantle reservoir that was isolated from late accretionary additions [6]. The chondritic initial Os isotopic compositions and highly siderophile element abundances of these samples, however, are inconsistent with this interpretation. Tungsten concentrations for the Baffin Bay and Ontong Java Plateau samples range from 23 ppb to 62 ppb, and are negatively correlated with their 182W/184W ratios. We propose that the source reservoirs for these flood basalts likely formed through Hf/W fractionation caused by core-forming events occuring over a protacted time interval during Earth

  4. Submarine Flood Basalt Eruptions and Flows of Ontong Java Plateau, Nauru Basin and East Mariana Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, P. J.; Trowbridge, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Johnson, A. L.

    2016-12-01

    The preservation of fresh basalt glasses from the submarine Cretaceous Ontong Java Plateau (OJP), Earth's largest LIP, has allowed correlation of precise lava compositions over 100s of km, as well as determination of eruption depths using dissolved H2O and CO2 contents. Low dissolved H2O in glasses shows that H2O in the mantle source is low [1,2], suggesting mantle temperatures are high. Very high dissolved Cl indicates that magmas interacted extensively with brines. The near total absence of vesicles in OJP glasses contrasts sharply with MORB, and suggests that OJP lavas were saturated or undersaturated with CO2 when they were emplaced, in contrast to MORB that are often oversaturated. The lavas likely remained liquid for a longer period of time so that they degassed to equilibrium levels of dissolved CO2 andlost all bubbles. Very precise major and trace element analyses of glasses, uncomplicated by crystals or alteration, show how lavas within and between widely-spaced drill holes could be related. For example, glasses from Sites 1185B and 1186A, which are about 200 km apart, are compositionally identical within precise limits and must have erupted from the same well-mixed magma chamber. They erupted at about the same depth, but 1186A has a corrected basement depth that is >700m deeper. With a slope of 0.3°, this suggests a flow distance >130km. The eruption depths for glasses from East Mariana and Nauru Basins are similar to those of 1185B and 1186A on OJP, even though their reconstructed basement depths are about 2000 m deeper. It suggests that the plateau lavas flowed into the basins. Similarly, eruption depths in Hole 807C are 3040m for Kwaimbaita lavas but are 1110m [1,2] for Singgalo lavas that directly overlie them. It is unlikely that plateau uplift and subsidence accounts for the observed eruption depths. All of these observations are best explained by very large-volume eruptions whose lavas traveled for long distances, up to 100s of km, into deeper

  5. Lava flow materials in the Tharsis region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, G. G.; Horstman, K. C.; Dial, A. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Lava-flow materials in the Tharsis region of Mars were studied from moderate-resolution (100-280 m/pixel) Viking Orbiter imagery. Individual eruptive sequences were recognized primarily by stratigraphic relations, density of superimposed impact craters, flow morphology, flow trend, and variations in surface albedo. Nine detailed maps of lava flows based on delineation of flow scarps were compiled for a total area of 7.25 million sq km. Two thirds of this area was covered by mappable flows representing at least 14 distinct eruptive sequences. Assuming a rate of crater production twice that of the moon, the observed range of superimposed crater densities (90 to 3200 craters at least 1 km in diameter per sq km) indicates an age range of 100 m.y. to several billion years for these flows. The youngest lavas are associated with flood lavas filling the depression surrounding the Olympus Mons shield. Flow thicknesses range from less than 5 meters to 20 meters on steeper shield slopes (0.5 to 4.5 deg) and from 20 to 65 meters on relatively flat (less than 0.5 deg slope) terrain.

  6. High-resolution Digital Mapping of Historical Lava Flows as a Test-bed for Lava Flow Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, D. M.; Parks, M.; Nomikou, P.; Mather, T. A.; Simou, E.; Kalnins, L. M.; Paulatto, M.; Watts, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of high-resolution lava flow morphology can improve our understanding of past effusive eruptions by providing insight into eruptive processes and the rheological properties of erupted magmas. We report the results of an ongoing investigation into the young dacite lava flows of the Kameni islands, Santorini volcano, Greece, which were emplaced during both subaerial and shallow submarine eruptions over the past 3000 years. Historical eruptions of the Kameni islands since 1866 have been very carefully documented in contemporaneous scientific reports. Eruptions since 1573 appear to be time-predictable, with a close relationship between eruption length, the size of extruded lava domes, and the time elapsed since the previous eruption. A new NERC - Airborne Survey and Research Facility LiDAR survey of the Kameni islands was completed in May 2012, using a Leica ALS50 Airborne Laser Scanner mounted on a Dornier 228 aircraft. The topographic surface was mapped at an average point density of 2.1 points per square metre, and covers the entire extent of the youngest subaerial lava flow fields on Santorini. A 2-m DEM derived from the 2012 LiDAR dataset was merged with a 5-m resolution bathymetric grid, based on multibeam surveys carried out by the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, during cruises in 2001 and 2006, using a SEABEAM 2120 hull-mounted swath system. The resultant grid provides the first high resolution map of both subaerial and submarine historic lava flows emplaced in the centre of the Santorini caldera, and includes several previously unidentified submarine flows and cones. Attribute maps were used to delineate and identify discrete lava flows both onshore and offshore; and morphometric profiles were used to compute accurate volumetric estimates for each of the historic flows, and to determine bulk rheological properties of the lavas, assuming a Bingham rheology. This ongoing work will improve our analysis of the relationship between

  7. Gas bubble dimensions in Archean lava flows indicate low air pressure at 2.7 Ga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, S. M.; Buick, R.; Hagadorn, J.; Blake, T.; Perreault, J.; Harnmeijer, J.; Catling, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Air pressure constrains atmospheric composition, which, in turn, is linked to the Earth system through biogeochemical cycles and fluxes of volatiles from and to the Earth's interior. Previous studies have only placed maximum levels on surface air pressure for the early Earth [1]. Here, we calculate an absolute value for Archean barometric pressure using gas bubble size (vesicle) distributions in uninflated basaltic lava flows that solidified at sea level 2.7 billion years ago in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. These vesicles have been filled in by secondary minerals deposited during metasomatism and so are now amydules, but thin sections show that infilling did not change vesicle dimensions. Amygdule dimensions are measured using high-resolution X-ray tomography from core samples obtained from the top and bottom of the lava flows. The modal size expressed at the top and at the bottom of an uninflated flow can be linked to atmospheric pressure using the ideal gas law. Such a technique has been verified as a paleoaltimeter using Hawaiian Quaternary lava flows [2]. We use statistical methods to estimate the mean and standard deviation of the volumetric size of the amygdules by applying 'bootstrap'resampling and the Central Limit Theorem. Our data indicate a surprisingly low atmospheric pressure. Greater nitrogen burial under anaerobic conditions likely explains lower pressure. Refs: [1] Som et al. (2012) Nature 484, 359-262. D. L. Sahagian et al. (2002) J. Geol., 110, 671-685.

  8. Depleted basaltic lavas from the proto-Iceland plume, Central East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Baker, Joel A.

    2012-01-01

    New geochemical and isotopic data are presented for volumetrically minor, depleted low-Ti basalts that occur in the Plateau Basalt succession of central East Greenland (CEG), formed during the initial stages of opening of the North Atlantic at 55 Ma. The basalts have MORB-like geochemistry (e.g. ...

  9. Lava Flow Emplacement Processes and Eruptive Characteristics of the Ontong Java Plateau: Inferences from High-Precision Glass Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, S. R.; Michael, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    High-precision major and volatile element analyses were performed on natural basaltic glass from ODP Leg 192 Sites 1185 and 1187 of the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) as a way to correlate lava flows within and between ODP drill sites. The ultimate goal is to estimate the dimensions, emplacement style, and eruption characteristics of the high-MgO Kroenke-type lavas: the youngest known flows at the two sites. The 122-Ma Ontong Java Plateau is the largest known magmatic event in Earth's history, yet little is known of the emplacement style (e.g. flow dimensions and durations) of OJP lavas due to its submarine nature and burial beneath hundreds of meters of sediment. Basalt samples were recovered from 110- and 130-m thick core sections from Sites 1185B and 1187A, respectively. Total Kroenke-type lava thickness is 125 m at 1185B and >136 m at 1187. Site 1187A is located 146 km north of Site 1185B and lies ≈50 m shallower than Site 1187. Remarkably, all of the glass compositions from both sites fall on a common liquid line of descent, suggesting that all lavas were the product of a single eruption from a common magma chamber. The range of MgO compositions reflects a 20ºC range in temperature, representing ~1.9% crystallization of olivine + spinel. Using measured phenocryst abundance, we examine whether this crystallization occurred within the magma chamber or during long transport of lavas on the seafloor. More primitive lavas are present in the upper 30 m of Site 1185B (average of ~9.54 wt. % MgO), overlying more fractionated lavas (average of ~9.06 wt. % MgO). Lavas from Site 1187A bridge the gap between the high- and low-MgO groups of 1185B. In contrast to MORB, OJP glasses have no vesicles, suggesting they remained liquid for much longer during flow. Paleoeruption depths calculated from H2O and CO2 contents of glasses show no systematic variation with depth in Core 1185B, and range from ~2130-2650 mbsl, while Site 1187 shows deeper eruption depths of ~2410-3040 mbsl

  10. Ultramafic lavas and pyroxene-spinifex high-Mg basaltic dykes from the Othris ophiolite complex, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baziotis, Ioannis; Economou-Eliopoulos, Maria; Asimow, Paul

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to constrain the physico-chemical conditions and processes associated with the origin of ultramafic lavas of the Agrilia formation and high-Mg basaltic dykes in the Pournari area within the Othris ophiolite complex, a supra-subduction zone ophiolite of Mesozoic age (Paraskevopoulos & Economou, 1986; Barth et al., 2008). Hand-sample-scale spinifex texture is lacking from the ultramafic lavas and, despite whole-rock MgO contents greater than 31 wt.%, we infer an upper bound of 17 wt.% MgO for the erupted liquid, and thus identify these lavas as picrites containing accumulated olivine. We use textural and compositional criteria to divide the crystals within the Agrilia lavas between pre-eruptive and post-eruptive growth phases. The high-Mg basaltic dyke margins display a distinctive thin-section-scale micro-spinifex texture of skeletal and plumose Al- and Fe-rich clinopyroxene surrounded by large crystals of orthopyroxene. Normally zoned clinopyroxene in the Agrilia lavas and clinopyroxene of various textures (skeletal, needle- and dendritic-like) and sizes in the Pournari dykes display anomalous enrichment in Al2O3 and FeO* with decreasing MgO that require rapid, disequilibrium growth. Quantitative characteristics of the micro-spinifex pyroxene textures (Elements and related metals are Pd/Ir=11.5-13.0, Cu/Pd=6000-7210, Ti/Pd=22.78-31.97×103 for Agrilia lavas and Pd/Ir=4.5-14.0, Cu/Pd=3140-5550, Ti/Pd=4.66-17.32×103 for Pournari dykes; all are very close to those reported for typical komatiites (Barnes et al., 1988). Despite the absence of true komatiite lavas, a number of geochemical features of the Othris suite, including the PGE contents and ratios and the micro-spinifex, disequilibrium cpx growth, are similar to Mesozoic and Archaean komatiites. References Barnes et al., 1988. Journal of Petrology 29, 305-331. Barth et al., 2008. Lithos, 100(1), 234-254. Faure et al., 2006. Journal of Petrology 47, 1591- 1610. Paraskevopoulos, G., Economou, M

  11. The Active Lava Flows of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 6. The Active Lava Flows of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Hetu Sheth. General Article Volume 8 Issue 6 June 2003 pp 24-33. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/06/0024-0033. Keywords.

  12. Remote sensing evidence of lava-ground ice interactions associated with the Lost Jim Lava Flow, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Emma C.; Hamilton, Christopher W.; Herrick, Robert R.

    2017-12-01

    Thermokarst terrains develop when ice-bearing permafrost melts and causes the overlying surface to subside or collapse. This process occurs widely throughout Arctic regions due to environmental and climatological factors, but can also be induced by localized melting of ground ice by active lava flows. The Lost Jim Lava Flow (LJLF) on the Seward Peninsula of Alaska provides evidence of former lava-ground ice interactions. Associated geomorphic features, on the scale of meters to tens of meters, were identified using satellite orthoimages and stereo-derived digital terrain models. The flow exhibits positive- and mixed-relief features, including tumuli ( N = 26) and shatter rings ( N = 4), as well as negative-relief features, such as lava tube skylights ( N = 100) and irregularly shaped topographic depressions ( N = 1188) that are interpreted to include lava-rise pits and lava-induced thermokarst terrain. Along the margins of the flow, there are also clusters of small peripheral pits that may be the products of meltwater or steam escape. On Mars, we observed morphologically similar pits near lava flow margins in northeastern Elysium Planitia, which suggests a common formation mechanism. Investigating the LJLF may therefore help to elucidate processes of lava-ground ice interaction on both Earth and Mars.

  13. MrLavaLoba: A new probabilistic model for the simulation of lava flows as a settling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Tarquini, Simone

    2018-01-01

    A new code to simulate lava flow spread, MrLavaLoba, is presented. In the code, erupted lava is itemized in parcels having an elliptical shape and prescribed volume. New parcels bud from existing ones according to a probabilistic law influenced by the local steepest slope direction and by tunable input settings. MrLavaLoba must be accounted among the probabilistic codes for the simulation of lava flows, because it is not intended to mimic the actual process of flowing or to provide directly the progression with time of the flow field, but rather to guess the most probable inundated area and final thickness of the lava deposit. The code's flexibility allows it to produce variable lava flow spread and emplacement according to different dynamics (e.g. pahoehoe or channelized-'a'ā). For a given scenario, it is shown that model outputs converge, in probabilistic terms, towards a single solution. The code is applied to real cases in Hawaii and Mt. Etna, and the obtained maps are shown. The model is written in Python and the source code is available at http://demichie.github.io/MrLavaLoba/.

  14. New Constraints on Martian Lava Flow Rheologies From MOLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.; Stofan, E. R.; McColley, S. M.

    2001-12-01

    The field of physical lava flow modeling (terrestrial and planetary) has long suffered from the paucity of data on flow dimensions. Even Earth lacks high resolution digital topographic information. Data for planetary flows are traditionally even more meager than terrestrial data. We generally have only the planimetric view to work with and crude estimates of slope. Now, with the tremendous volume of Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data available (and due to be available in the near future), we are presented with the first opportunity to measure the full three-dimensional character of lava flows on the surface of Mars. The 3-D character of a lava flow is comprised of both longitudinal and transverse profiles, and is influenced by estimates of underlying slope. All of these can be measured with very fine precision and accuracy from the raw MOLA profile data. From such data, we can determine how a lava flow thickens and spreads laterally with distance. This is a very exciting prospect because, for the first time, the high quality dimensional data should allow us to distinguish between differing physics models for lava flow emplacement. This information can be used to assess rheologic changes along the path of the flow and to distinguish between changes due to rheology and slope. We have already begun analysis of several Martian lava flows, through comparison of dimensional data with predicted profiles from physics models in the literature. Based on flow morphology, we can choose from models that describe rapid emplacement (Baloga et al., 1995), loss of material to levees (Baloga et al., 1998; Glaze and Baloga, 1998), degassing (Baloga et al., 2001), lateral spreading (Bruno et al., 1996), cumulative topographic effects, and others. Refs: Baloga, SM, PD Spudis, and JE Guest (1995) JGR 100:24,509-24,519. Baloga, SM, LS Glaze, JA Crisp, and SA Stockman (1998) JGR 103:5133-5142. Baloga, SM, LS Glaze, MN Peitersen, and JA Crisp (2001) JGR 106:13,395-13,405. Bruno, BC

  15. Homogeneity of lava flows - Chemical data for historic Mauna Loan eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical analyses of basalts collected from the major historic eruptions of Mauna Loa volcano show that many of the flow fields are remarkably homogeneous in composition. Despite their large size (lengths 9-85 km), large areal extents (13-114 sq km), and various durations of eruption (1-450 days), many of the flow fields have compositional variability that is within, or close to, the analytical error for most elements. The flow fields that are not homogeneous vary mainly in olivine content in an otherwise homogeneous melt. Some are composite flow fields made up of several, apparently homogeneous subunits erupted at different elevations along the active volcanic rifts. Not all volcanoes produce lavas that are homogeneous like those of Mauna Loa. If studies such as this are to be used to evaluate compositional diversity in lavas where there is a lack of sampling control, such as on other planets, it is necessary to understand why some flow units and flow fields are compositionally homogeneous and others are not, and to develop criteria for distinguishing between them.

  16. A brief comparison of lava flows from the Deccan Volcanic Province ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nature and style of emplacement of Continental Flood Basalt (CFB) lava flows has been a atter of great interest as well as considerable controversy in the recent past. However, even a cursory review of published literature reveals that the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and Hawaiian volcanoes provide most of ...

  17. Mineral chemistry of Pangidi basalt flows from Andhra Pradesh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pangidi basalts follow the QFM buffer curve which indicates the more evolved tholeiitic composition. This suggests the parent tholeiitic magma suffered limited fractionation at high temperature under increasing oxygen fugacity in lower basalt flow and more fractionation at medium to lower temperatures under decreasing ...

  18. Geology of the Tyrrhenus Mons Lava Flow Field, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, David A.; Mest, Scott C.

    2014-11-01

    The ancient, eroded Martian volcano Tyrrhenus Mons exhibits a central caldera complex, layered flank deposits dissected by radial valleys, and a 1000+ km-long flow field extending to the southwest toward Hellas Planitia. Past studies suggested an early phase of volcanism dominated by large explosive eruptions followed by subsequent effusive activity at the summit and to the southwest. As part of a new geologic mapping study of northeast Hellas, we are examining the volcanic landforms and geologic evolution of the Tyrrhenus Mons flow field, including the timing and nature of fluvial activity and effects on volcanic units. New digital geologic mapping incorporates THEMIS IR (100 m/pixel) and CTX (5 m/pixel) images as well as constraints from MOLA topography.Mapping results to-date include delineation of the boundaries of the flow field, identification and mapping of volcanic and erosional channels within the flow field, and mapping and analysis of lava flow lobes. THEMIS IR and CTX images allow improved discrimination of the numerous flow lobes that are observed in the flow field, including refinement of the margins of previously known flows and identification of additional and smaller lobes. A prominent sinuous rille extending from Tyrrhenus Mons’ summit caldera is a major feature that supplied lava to the flow field. Smaller volcanic channels are common throughout the flow field; some occur in segments along crests of local topographic highs and may delineate lava tubes. In addition to volcanic channels, the flow field surface is characterized by several types of erosional channels, including wide troughs with scour marks, elongate sinuous channels, and discontinuous chains of elongate pits and troughs. High-resolution images reveal the widespread and significant effects of fluvial activity in the region, and further mapping studies will examine spatial and temporal interactions between volcanism and fluvial processes.

  19. Thermal history of Hawaiian pāhoehoe lava crusts at the glass transition: implications for flow rheology and emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Joachim; Harris, Andrew J. L.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2004-12-01

    We have investigated the thermal history of glassy pāhoehoe crusts across their glass transition. Ten different samples obtained between 1993 and 2003 from the active flow field of the Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption on Hawaii (USA) have been analysed using relaxation geospeedometry. This method employs differential scanning calorimetry to quantify the enthalpic relaxation of the glass to monitor the natural time-temperature (t-T) path followed by the melt during cooling across its glass transition. Cooling rates across the glass transition interval (at 1000- 900 K) have been found to vary between 8 and 140 K/min. The associated glass transition temperatures are up to 400 K, lower than previously anticipated by others. Melt viscosities at the glass transition for these crusts range from 10 9.4 to 10 10.7 Pa s. We have compared the t-T paths quantified via relaxation geospeedometry with those obtained from direct measurements on the active flow field. The calorimetrically determined cooling rates are consistent with either simple cooling from eruption temperatures to temperatures below the glass transition or more complex cooling paths, including periods of reheating and short-term annealing within the glass transition interval. By quantifying the relaxation times associated with these contrasting cooling histories, we show that secondary vesiculation of pāhoehoe flow crusts may be favoured by complex, nonlinear t-T paths within the glass transition. These constraints also allow us to evaluate the time scales associated with the crystallisation and inflation of flow lobes at the glass transition for different pāhoehoe lava flow types. Our results provide important quantifications of rheological parameters at the lower temperature range of viscoelastic deformation in basaltic lava flows. As such, the results may be helpful in refining models for the generation of continental flood basalt flows, as well as models of basaltic lava flow propagation for hazard

  20. Topographic influence on thermo-rheologic modeling of the lava flows of Daedalia Planum, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, N.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Modeling of lava flow length relies on many factors including the relationship between the rheologic properties (e.g., yield strength, viscosity), mass eruption rate, erupted volume, and the topography over which it flows. In general, numerical modeling assumes that flows are either governed by the amount of erupted material (volume limited) or by the rate of heat loss (cooling limited), which determines their rheologic properties. One such cooling-limited model is FLOWGO, a 1-D thermo-rheologic approach developed to model open-channel lava flows. It uses the time averaged discharge rate (TADR) plus measurements of thickness and path slope to forecast the final flow length, defined as the point where the predicted velocity is equal to zero or the core temperature reaches the solidus. We have modified several of the model's input variables and assumed the rheologic properties of large basaltic flows on Earth, to make FLOWGO applicable to the Mars environment. The underlying slope of the flow path is one critical variable that is unknown for this older flow field, however the regional slope can be used as a proxy for pre-existing topography. Topographic data for Mars is provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument, which measured elevation with a vertical accuracy of 37.5 cm and horizontal accuracy of 100 m. Daedalia Planum, the region of Mars containing the flow field, is a plain that extends to the south of Arisa Mons volcano with an average slope of less than 0.5°. Results show that, in addition to the average slope, small variations in topography play an important role in the final flow length. For example, using the average slope of an assumed flow path produces modeled flows that are at least 10% longer than results using the measured slope variations. This work shows that interpolated gridded digital topographic data tend to smooth smaller-scale features, thus decreasing the final model accuracy.

  1. Numerical simulation of lava flow using a GPU SPH model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Rustico

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH method for lava-flow modeling was implemented on a graphical processing unit (GPU using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA developed by NVIDIA. This resulted in speed-ups of up to two orders of magnitude. The three-dimensional model can simulate lava flow on a real topography with free-surface, non-Newtonian fluids, and with phase change. The entire SPH code has three main components, neighbor list construction, force computation, and integration of the equation of motion, and it is computed on the GPU, fully exploiting the computational power. The simulation speed achieved is one to two orders of magnitude faster than the equivalent central processing unit (CPU code. This GPU implementation of SPH allows high resolution SPH modeling in hours and days, rather than in weeks and months, on inexpensive and readily available hardware.

  2. The Summer 1997 Eruption at Pillan Patera on Io: Implications for Ultrabasic Lava Flow Emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A.; Davies, Ashley G.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Greeley, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Galileo data and numerical modeling were used to investigate the summer 1977 eruption at Pillan Patera on Io. This event, now defined as "Pillanian" eruption style, included a high-temperature (greater than 1600 C), possible ultrabasic , 140-km-high plume eruption that deposited dark, orthopyroxene-rich pyroclastic material over greater than 125,000 sq km, followed by emplacement of dark flow-like material over greater than 3100 sq km to the north of the caldera. We estimate that the high-temperature, energetic episode of this eruption had a duration of 52 - 167 days between May and September 1997, with peak eruption temperatures around June 28, 1997. Galileo 20 m/pixel images of part of the Pillan flow field show a wide-spread, rough, pitted surface that is unlike any flow surface we have seen before. We suggest that this surface may have resulted from: 1. A fractured lava crust formed during rapid, low-viscosity lava surging, perhaps including turbulent flow emplacement. 2. Disruption of the lava flow by explosive interaction with a volatile-rich substrate. or 3. A combination of 1 and 2 with or without accumulation of pyroclastic material on the surface. Well-developed flow lobes are observed, suggesting that this is a relatively distant part of the flow field.Shadow measurements at flow margins indicate a thickness of-8 - 10 m. We have modeled the emplacement of putative ultrabasic flow from the summer 1997 Pillan eruption using constraints from new Galileo data. Results suggest that either laminar sheet flows or turbulent channelized flows could have traveled 50 - 150 km on a flat, unobstructed surface, which is consistent with the estimated length of the Pillan flow field (approx. 60 km). Our modeling suggests low thermal erosion rates (less than 4.1 m/d), and that the formation of deep (greater than 20 m) erosion channels was unlikely, especially distal to the source. We calculate a volumetric flow rate of approx. 2 - 7 x 10(exp 3)cu m/s, which is greater

  3. Secular variation of the Earth magnetic field recorded in Holocene lava flows from Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperch, Pierrick; Chauvin, Annick; Lara, Luis; Moreno, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    The recent secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field is mainly characterized by the large growth of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly during the last three centuries, first documented in the geomagnetic field model GUFM (Jackson et al., 2000). This present-day magnetic anomaly is characterized in Chile by low magnetic inclinations and low intensities of the geomagnetic field (-40° and 25.7µT at 40°S). In order to better describe the secular variation during the Holocene, we sampled 21 dated lava flows or pyroclastic flows from several Chilean volcanoes (Lonquimay, Llaima, Solipulli, Villarrica, Mocho-Choshuenco, Osorno, Calbuco). Juvenile clasts from basaltic-andesitic pyroclastic flow deposits provide reliable paleomagnetic results (Roperch et al, 2014). We also sampled 56 sites in Holocene lava flows with only relative ages with respect of the dated units. Paleomagnetic results were obtained from several sites in two well-dated historic lava flows; 9 sites and 11 paleointensity results (PI) from the 1835AD eruption of the Osorno volcano and 8 sites and 23 PIs from the 1751AD eruption of the Llaima volcano. In addition, 14 PIs were obtained in bricks from shelters built along the main path across the Andes from Santiago (Chile) to Mendoza (Argentina) in 1768AD. These results confirm the high reliability of the global geomagnetic model GUFM for the last three centuries. At Villarrica, results from 10 sites in lava flows (calibrated age 1440AD±30) provide paleomagnetic directions that are different from the CALS3k.4 model (Korte et al., 2011) indicating that more paleomagnetic results in well dated lava flows are necessary to improve the robustness of global geomagnetic models prior to 1700AD. The steepest inclination of the geomagnetic field (-71.6°) and the highest intensity (70µT±5) are found in the time range 850-900AD. This observation is made from paleomagnetic results from a pyroclastic flow from the Osorno volcano (calibrated age range of 782

  4. Dynamics of lava flow - Thickness growth characteristics of steady two-dimensional flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S.; Iversen, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The thickness growth characteristics of flowing lava are investigated using a heat balance model and a two-dimensional model for flow of a Bingham plastic fluid down an inclined plane. It is found that yield strength plays a crucial role in the thickening of a lava flow of given flow rate. To illustrate this point, downstream thickness profiles and yield strength distributions were calculated for flows with mass flow rates of 10,000 and 100,000 kg/m-sec. Higher flow rates led to slow cooling rates which resulted in slow rate of increase of yield strength and thus greater flow lengths.

  5. A brief comparison of lava flows from the Deccan Volcanic Province ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    effects of cooling. The possibility of an insulating mode of transport was not considered. Such a mode of transport, however, was well characterised for young lava flows, especially in Hawaii. The growth of pahoehoe lava flows by endogenous growth or inflation, and thermally efficient transport through lava tubes had been ...

  6. Mineral chemistry of Pangidi basalt flows from Andhra Pradesh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    temperature is the approximate eruption temperature of the present lava flows. The wide range of tem- peratures ... of middle and upper flow are caused by vesicular nature which contain larger content of gases and humid to semi-arid conditions during ... mometry of CFB from DVP (Deccan Volcanic. Province) have been ...

  7. Dynamics and viscosity of `a'a and pahoehoe lava flows of the 2012-2013 eruption of Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka (Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousov, Alexander; Belousova, Marina

    2018-01-01

    The 2012-2013 flank eruption of Tolbachik volcano (Kamchatka) lasted 9 months and produced 0.54 km3 of basaltic trachyandesite lava, thus becoming one of the most voluminous historical lava effusions of basic composition in subduction-related environments globally. From March to July 2013, the volcano monotonously erupted lava of constant composition (SiO2 = 52 wt%) with a nearly stable effusion rate of 18 m3/s. Despite the uniform eruptive and emplacement conditions, the dominant style of lava propagation throughout that time gradually changed from `a'a to pahoehoe. We report results of instrumental field measurements of the `a'a and pahoehoe flow dynamics (documented with time-lapse cameras) as well as the lava viscosity determined by flow rate and shear stress (using penetrometer) methods. Maximal propagation velocities of the `a'a fronts ranged from 2 to 25 mm/s, and those of the pahoehoe from 0.5 to 6 mm/s. The flow front velocities of both lava types experienced short-period fluctuations that were caused by complex flow mechanics of the advancing flow lobes. Minimal viscosities of lava of the `a'a lobes ranged from 1.3 × 105 to 3.3 × 107 Pa s (flow rate method), and those of the pahoehoe from to 5 × 103 to 5 × 104 Pa s (shear stress method). Our data include the first ever measured profiles of viscosity through the entire thickness of actively advancing pahoehoe lava lobes. We have found that both the `a'a and pahoehoe flows were fed by identical parental lava, which then developed contrasting rheological properties, owing to differences in the process of lava transport over the ground surface. The observed transition from the dominant `a'a to the dominant pahoehoe propagation styles occurred due to gradual elongation and branching of the lava tube system throughout the course of the eruption. Such evolution became possible because the growing lava field, composed of semisolidified flows, provided an environment for shallow subsurface intrusions and

  8. Detection of high-silica lava flows and lava morphology at the Alarcon Rise, Gulf of California, Mexico using automated classification of the morphological-compositional relationship in AUV multibeam bathymetry and sonar backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschmeyer, C.; White, S. M.; Dreyer, B. M.; Clague, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    An automated compositional classification by adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was developed to study volcanic processes that create high-silica lava at oceanic ridges. The objective of this research is to determine the existence of a relationship between lava morphology and composition. Researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) recorded morphologic observations and collected samples for geochemical analysis during ROV dives at the Alarcon Rise in 2012 and 2015. The Alarcon Rise is a unique spreading ridge environment where composition ranges from basaltic to rhyolitic, making it an ideal location to examine the compositional-morphologic relationship of lava flows. Preliminary interpretation of field data indicates that high-silica lavas are typically associated with 3-5 m, blocky pillows at the heavily faulted north end of the Alarcon. Visual analysis of multibeam bathymetry and side-scan sonar backscatter from MBARI AUV D. Allen B. and gridded at 1 m suggests that lava flow morphology (pillow, lobate, sheet) can be distinguished by seafloor roughness. Bathymetric products used by ANFIS to quantify the morphologic-compositional relationship were slope, aspect, and bathymetric position index (BPI, a measure of local height relative to the adjacent terrain). Sonar backscatter intensity is influenced by surface roughness and previously used to distinguish lava morphology. Gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were applied to backscatter to create edge-detection filters that recognized faults and fissures. Input data are slope, aspect, bathymetric value, BPI at 100 m scale, BPI at 500 m scale, backscatter intensity, and the first principle component of backscatter GLCM. After lava morphology was classified on the Alarcon Rise map, another classification was completed to detect locations of high-silica lava. Application of an expert classifier like ANFIS to distinguish lava composition may become an important tool in oceanic

  9. Tachylyte in Cenozoic basaltic lavas from the Czech Republic and Iceland: contrasting compositional trends

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ulrych, Jaromír; Krmíček, Lukáš; Teschner, C.; Řanda, Zdeněk; Skála, Roman; Jonášová, Šárka; Fediuk, F.; Adamovič, Jiří; Pokorný, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 5 (2017), s. 761-775 ISSN 0930-0708 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : basaltic glass * chemical composition * major genetic types * mineral composition * rift-related volcanites * Sr-Nd isotopes Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy; CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation (UJF-V) OBOR OECD: Mineralogy; Analytical chemistry (UJF-V) Impact factor: 1.236, year: 2016

  10. Cyclic pressurisation of Mount St Helens dacites and basalt. Laboratory results and implications for lava dome monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie; Dainty, Matthew; Smith, Rosanna; Sammonds, Peter; Pallister, John; Meredith, Phillip

    2010-05-01

    Lava domes are frequently subjected to cyclic heating and pressurisation, which may weaken the dome rocks, leading to renewed extrusion, explosions or collapse. These heating and loading cycles can be recreated in the laboratory, allowing the level of crack damage caused by these cycles to be established through analysing elastic moduli. Acoustic emissions (AEs) indicate the timing of cracking, and can also be used to interpret precursory seismicity for eruption prediction. Experiment samples are from Mount St. Helens, USA: 3 dacites from the Pine Creek eruptive period (2.9-2.55 ka), a Castle Creek age basalt (2.55-1.895 ka), and 4 dacites from the 2004-2008 eruption. Each sample was cut into several cylindrical cores (25 mm diameter and 62.5-70 mm long). Some samples were then heated and cooled at 1˚C/ minute to a target temperature of 600o C or 900o C, and held for 2 hours to achieve thermal equilibrium. This heating can cause cracking due to contrasts in thermal expansion of different minerals. Dynamic elastic moduli were calculated for each sample using ultrasonic wave velocity, density and porosity for later comparison to static elastic moduli gathered during deformation. One core of each sample was loaded to failure in uniaxial compression in order to find the short term strength of the sample. For all cyclic loading tests, conducted on pre-heated and unheated cores, samples were loaded at 10-5 s-1 strain rate then unloaded to 5MPa. Subsequent cycles had an increasing peak load. Most had the same rate for unloading, with a few samples unloaded instantaneously. Axial, radial and volumetric strain were determined from the recorded displacement throughout the experiment and used with the axial stress measurements to calculate static elastic moduli. Samples loaded to failure with no cycling generally failed at higher stresses than their cyclically loaded counter-parts, whilst rapid unloading increased their strength. Failure stresses of the dacite lava dome

  11. Dynamics of a fluid flow on Mars: Lava or mud?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lionel; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2014-05-01

    A distinctive flow deposit southwest of Cerberus Fossae on Mars is analyzed. The flow source is a ∼20 m deep, ∼12 × 1.5 km wide depression within a yardang associated with the Medusae Fossae Formation. The flow traveled for ∼40 km following topographic lows to leave a deposit on average 3-4 km wide. The surface morphology of the deposit suggests that it was produced by the emplacement of a fluid flowing in a laminar fashion and possessing a finite yield strength. We use topographic data from a digital elevation model (DEM) to model the dynamics of the motion and infer that the fluid had a Bingham rheology with a plastic viscosity of ∼1 Pa s and a yield strength of ∼185 Pa. Although the low viscosity is consistent with the properties of komatiite-like lava, the combination of values of viscosity and yield strength, as well as the surface morphology of the flow, suggests that this was a mud flow. Comparison with published experimental data implies a solids content close to 60% by volume and a grain size dominated by silt-size particles. Comparison of the ∼1.5 km3 deposit volume with the ∼0.03 km3 volume of the source depression implies that ∼98% of the flow material was derived from depth in the crust. There are similarities between the deposit studied here, which we infer to be mud, and other flow deposits on Mars currently widely held to be lavas. This suggests that a re-appraisal of many of these deposits is now in order.

  12. Similarities in Chemistry of North Gorda Ridge basalts with Ultra-slow Spreading Ridge Lavas Due to Decreasing Magma Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. S.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.

    2006-12-01

    Chemical variability of MORB has been reported from ultra-fast to ultra-slow spreading ridges. Despite the large number of studies, high density of precisely located samples is still rare for most ridge segments. Using MBARI's ROV Tiburon and a rock corer, we collected 71 basalt glasses along the axial valley of the 65 km- long, northern Gorda Ridge segment. To explore the temporal variability at the central part of the segment, we collected an additional twenty samples over a distance of 4 km up the eastern valley wall, corresponding to a maximum age of about 150, 000 years. Lava compositions along the ridge axis show considerable major-and minor element diversity (MgO 8.4-4.4%, K2O 0.07-0.36%) for lavas erupted in close proximity. Although they form a near-continuum, the compositions can be separated into two groups, one is typical N-MORB (K2O/TiO2 0.09). The chondrite-normalized REE patterns also reflect this grouping with Ce/YbN 20 for N- MORB and Ce/YbN >1 and Zr/Nb ridge segment, nearly as much diversity exists at the deepest part (>3,800 m) near the non-transform offset at the southern end. Except for two more enriched compositions, off-axis samples are LREE-depleted N-MORB with a narrow compositional range (MgO 7.7±0.3%, Zr/Nb=38-50). In comparison, basalts from the southern Cleft segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, which has a comparable spreading rate but different ridge morphology, all plot on the N-MORB trend with high Zr/Nb (30-40) and slight LREE depletion (Smith et al. 1994). In contrast, ultra-slow spreading ridges like Knipovich, Gakkel, and Mohns, with ridge morphologies similar to North Gorda although reaching even greater depth (>4000m), have erupted predominantly E-MORB. Their least enriched compositions overlap with the most LREE-enriched North Gorda lava although most have Zr/Nb1.0 and up to 3.2 (e.g. Haase et al., 1996; Muhe et al., 1997, Hellevang and Pedersen, 2005). On a Zr/Nb versus K2O /TiO2 plot, the basalts from the ultra-slow ridges

  13. Mafic Spatter-Rich and Lava-Like Welded Ignimbrites Linked With Collapse of a Basaltic Caldera: The Halarauður Eruption, Krafla, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooyakkers, S. M.; Stix, J.; Berlo, K.; Tuffen, H.

    2017-12-01

    Large, explosive basaltic or basalt-dominated eruptions linked with caldera collapse are uncommon and poorly understood, and collapse of basaltic calderas is more commonly driven by subsurface magma drainage and/or lava effusion. To better understand these rare events, we present field observations and interpretations of the Halarauður sequence, a complex series of pyroclastic deposits previously linked with formation of the Krafla caldera [1]. Basal units are locally dispersed and vary in both composition and mode of emplacement, reflecting tapping of discrete magma batches at widely-spaced vents. Very localised (t1/2 transition into two volumetrically dominant, regionally dispersed units. A remarkably heterogeneous, basaltic to hybrid intermediate spatter-rich welded tuff overlies the early-phase deposits, with a maximum thickness of 15 m. Welding intensity varies at the dm-scale both vertically and laterally, and is influenced by the local abundance of lithics. Lithic-rich horizons reflect periods of conduit instability, likely coincident with caldera collapse. This unit has previously been interpreted as a welded airfall [1], but features more consistent with lateral emplacement, including lithic concentration zones, dense welding > 7 km from probable vent sites, and rapid local thickness changes influenced by paleotopography suggest emplacement as a spatter-rich PDC. The unit grades up into a basaltic lava-like tuff with similar dispersal, interpreted as a lava-like ignimbrite deposited during the climactic phase. The Halarauður eruption is unusual for a basalt-dominated event in its complexity, explosivity, and the generation of welded ignimbrites. This event represents an endmember style of basaltic volcanism, and a worst-case scenario for eruptions at Icelandic calderas. [1] Calderone GM, Grunvold K, Oskarsson N (1990). J Volcanol Geotherm Res 44:303-314

  14. Pioneer microbial communities of the Fimmvörðuháls lava flow, Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Laura C; Cockell, Charles S; Thorsteinsson, Thorsteinn; Marteinsson, Viggó; Stevenson, John

    2014-10-01

    Little is understood regarding the phylogeny and metabolic capabilities of the earliest colonists of volcanic rocks, yet these data are essential for understanding how life becomes established in and interacts with the planetary crust, ultimately contributing to critical zone processes and soil formation. Here, we report the use of molecular and culture-dependent methods to determine the composition of pioneer microbial communities colonising the basaltic Fimmvörðuháls lava flow at Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, formed in 2010. Our data show that 3 to 5 months post eruption, the lava was colonised by a low-diversity microbial community dominated by Betaproteobacteria, primarily taxa related to non-phototrophic diazotrophs such as Herbaspirillum spp. and chemolithotrophs such as Thiobacillus. Although successfully cultured following enrichment, phototrophs were not abundant members of the Fimmvörðuháls communities, as revealed by molecular analysis, and phototrophy is therefore not likely to be a dominant biogeochemical process in these early successional basalt communities. These results contrast with older Icelandic lava of comparable mineralogy, in which phototrophs comprised a significant fraction of microbial communities, and the non-phototrophic community fractions were dominated by Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria.

  15. Possible lava tube system in a hummocky lava flow at Daund ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jess/113/04/0819-0829. Keywords. Pahoehoe; lava tube; inflation; emplacement; Deccan Volcanic Province. Abstract. A hummocky flow characterised by the presence of toes, lobes, tumuli and possible lava tube system is exposed near Daund, western Deccan Volcanic Province, India.

  16. RIS4E at Kilauea's December 1974 Flow: Lava Flow Texture LiDAR Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelley, P.; Garry, W. B.; Scheidt, S. P.; Bleacher, J. E.; Hamilton, C.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution point clouds and digital terrain models (DTMs) are used to investigate lava textures on the Big Island of Hawaii. Lava texture (e.g., ´áā and pāhoehoe) depends significantly on eruption conditions, and it is therefore instructive, if accurately determined. In places where field investigations are prohibitive (e.g., on other planets and remote regions of Earth) lava texture must be assessed from remote sensing data. A reliable method for doing so remains elusive. The December 1974 flow from Kilauea, in the Kau desert, presents an excellent field site to develop techniques for identifying lava texture. The eruption is young and the textures are well preserved. We present results comparing properties of lava textures observed in Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) data. The authors collected the TLS data during May 2014 and June 2015 field seasons. Scans are a quantitative representation of what a geologist, or robotic system, sees "on the ground" and provides "ground truth" for airborne or orbital remote sensing analysis by enabling key parameters of lava morphology to be quantified. While individual scans have a heterogeneous point density, multiple scans are merged such that sub-cm lava textures can be quantified. Results indicate that TLS-derived surface roughness (i.e., de-trended RMS roughness) is useful for differentiating lava textures and assists volcanologic interpretations. As many lava types are quite rough, it is not simply roughness that is the most advantageous parameter for differentiating lava textures; rather co-occurrence patterns in surface roughness are used. Gradually forming textures (e.g., pāhoehoe) are elevated in statistics that measure smoothness (e.g., homogeneity) while lava with disrupted crusts (e.g., slabby and platy flow) have more random distributions of roughness (i.e., high entropy). A similar technique will be used to analyze high-resolution DTMs of martian lava flows using High Resolution Imaging Science

  17. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Stefano; Morgavi, Daniele; Namur, Olivier; Vetere, Francesco; Perugini, Diego; Mancinelli, Paolo; Pauselli, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    After more than four years of orbiting Mercury, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft came to an end in late April 2015. MESSENGER has provided many new and surprising results. This session will again highlight the latest results on Mercury based on MESSENGER observations or updated modelling. The session will further address instrument calibration and science performance both retrospective on MESSENGER and on the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission. Papers covering additional themes related to Mercury are also welcomed. Please be aware that this session will be held as a PICO session. This will allow an intensive exchange of expertise and experience between the individual instruments and mission. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows S. Rossi1, D. Morgavi1, O. Namur2, D. Perugini1, F.Vetere1, P. Mancinelli1 and C. Pauselli1 1 Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, piazza Università 1, 06123 Perugia, Italy 2 Uni Hannover Institut für Mineralogie, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Callinstraβe 3, 30167 Hannover, Germany In this contribution we report new measurements of viscosity of synthetic komatitic melts, used the behaviour of silicate melts erupted at the surface of Mercury. Composition of Mercurian surface magmas was calculated using the most recent maps produced from MESSENGER XRS data (Weider et al., 2015). We focused on the northern hemisphere (Northern Volcanic Province, NVP, the largest lava flow on Mercury and possibly in the Solar System) for which the spatial resolution of MESSENGER measurements is high and individual maps of Mg/Si, Ca/Si, Al/Si and S/Si were combined. The experimental starting material contains high Na2O content (≈7 wt.%) that strongly influences viscosity. High temperature viscosity measurements were carried out at 1 atm using a concentric cylinder apparatus equipped with an Anton Paar RheolabQC viscometer head at the Department of Physics and Geology (PVRG_lab) at the University of Perugia (Perugia, Italy

  18. The Anatomy of the Blue Dragon: Changes in Lava Flow Morphology and Physical Properties Observed in an Open Channel Lava Flow as a Planetary Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehlke, A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Hughes, S. S.; Sears, D. W. G.; Downs, M.; Whittington, A. G.; Lim, D. S. S.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Lava terrains on other planets and moons exhibit morphologies similar to those found on Earth, such as smooth pāhoehoe transitioning to rough `a`ā terrains based on the viscosity - strain rate relationship of the lava. Therefore, the morphology of lava flows is governed by eruptive conditions such as effusion rate, underlying slope, and the fundamental thermo-physical properties of the lava, including temperature (T), composition (X), viscosity (η), fraction of crystals (φc) and vesicles (φb), as well as bulk density (ρ). These textural and rheological changes were previously studied for Hawaiian lava, where the lava flow started as channelized pāhoehoe and transitioned into `a`ā, demonstrating a systematic trend in T, X, η, φc, φb, and ρ. NASA's FINESSE focuses on Science and Exploration through analogue research. One of the field sites is Craters of the Moon, Idaho. We present field work done at a 3.0 km long lava flow belonging to the Blue Dragon lavas erupted from a chain of spatter cones, which then coalesced into channelized flows. We acquired UAV imagery along the entire length of the flow, and generated a high resolution DTM of 5 cm/pixel, from which we derived height profiles and surface roughness values. Field work included mapping the change in surface morphology and sample collection every 150 meters. In the laboratory, we measured φc, φb, and ρ for all collected samples. Viscosity measurements were carried out by concentric cylinder viscometry at subliquidus temperatures between 1310ºC to 1160ºC to study the rheology of the lava, enabling us to relate changes in flow behavior to T and φc. Our results are consistent with observations made for Hawaiian lava, including increasing bulk density downflow, and porosity changing from connected to isolated pore space. Crystallinity increases downflow, and the transition from pāhoehoe to `a`ā occurs between 1230ºC to 1150ºC, which is prompted by nucleation and growth of plagioclase

  19. Mineral chemistry of Pangidi basalt flows from Andhra Pradesh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The equilibration temperatures of clinopyroxene (1110–1190°C) and titaniferous magnetite and ilmenite coexisting mineral phases (1063–1103°C) are almost similar in lower basalt flow and it is higher for clinopyroxene (900–1110°C) when compared to titaniferous magnetite and ilmenite coexisting mineral phases ...

  20. Emplacement and inflation of natrocarbonatitic lava flows during the March-April 2006 eruption of Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Hannes B.; Vuorinen, Jaana

    2009-04-01

    The most voluminous eruption of natrocarbonatite lava hitherto recorded on Earth occurred at Oldoinyo Lengai in March-April 2006. The lava flows produced in this eruption range from blocky 'a'a type to smooth-surfaced inflated pahoehoe. We measured lava inflation features (i.e. one tumulus and three pressure ridges) that formed in the various pahoehoe flows emplaced in this event. The inflation features within the main crater of Oldoinyo Lengai are relatively small-scale, measuring 1-5 m in width, 2.5-24.4 m in length and with inflation clefts less than 0.4 m deep. Their small sizes are in contrast to a tumulus that formed on the northwestern slope of the volcano (situated ~1140 m below the crater floor). The tumulus is roughly circular, measures 17.5 × 16.0 m, and is cut by a 4.4 m deep axial inflation cleft exposing two separate flow units. We measured the elastic properties (i.e. shear- and bulk moduli) of natrocarbonatitic crust and find that these are similar to those reported for basaltic crust, and that there is no direct correlation between magmastatic head and pressure required to form tumuli. All inflated flows in the 2006 event were confined by lateral barriers (main crater, erosional channel or erosional gully) suggesting that the two most important factors for endogenous growth in natrocarbonatitic lava flows are (1) lateral barriers that prevent widening of the flow, and (2) influx of new material beneath the viscoelastic and brittle crust.

  1. SHARAD Constrains on Lava Flow Properties at Southeastern Utopia Planitia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    with the middle to upper range of permittivities for basalt, and, therefore, porosity does not dominate the volume of the lobate flow, and supports the morphologic interpretation of the flow and geologic history of this area offered by Russell and Head [2003] and Tanaka et al. [2003]. Russell P. S. and Head J. W. [2003] JGR, 108, 5064. Tanaka K. L. et al. [2005], USGS Sci. Invest. Maps, 2888. Werner S. C. et al. [2011], PSS, 59, 1143-1165.

  2. Channelled flow of lava with temperature dependent pseudoplastic rheology: condition for tube formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippucci, Marilena; Tallarico, Andrea; Dragoni, Michele

    2010-05-01

    Conditions for crust and tube formation are studied assuming for lava a pseudoplastic rheology dependent on temperature (Sonder, pers. Comm.). The pseudoplasticity is the rheological model which, from recent laboratory studies, better describes the behaviour of basaltic lava (e.g. Sonder et al., 2006). The pseudoplastic rheology belongs to the power law rheology and the constitutive equation for a power law fluid is the following: σij = 2kdot en-1dot eij (1) where k is the fluid consistency, n is the power law exponent and e depends on the second invariant of the deformation rate tensor. For a pseudoplastic fluid we have that n

  3. Role of heat advection in a channeled lava flow with power law, temperature-dependent rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippucci, Marilena; Tallarico, Andrea; Dragoni, Michele

    2013-06-01

    The cooling of a lava flow, both in the transient and the steady state, is investigated considering that lava rheology is pseudoplastic and dependent on temperature. Lava exits from the vent with constant velocity and flows down a slope under the effect of gravity force inside a channel of rectangular cross section. We consider that cooling of lava is caused by thermal radiation into the atmosphere and thermal conduction at the channel walls and at the ground. The heat equation is solved numerically in a 3-D computational domain, and the solution is tested to evaluate the numerical errors. We study the steady state and the initial transient period of lava cooling. Results indicate that the advective heat transport significantly modifies the cooling rate of lava, slowing down the cooling process. Since the lava velocity depends on temperature, the cooling rate depends on the effusion temperature. Velocity profiles are modified during cooling showing two marginal static zones where the crust can form and remain stable. The fraction of crust coverage is calculated under the assumption that the solid lava is a plastic body with temperature-dependent yield strength. We numerically confirm that heat advection cannot be neglected in the mechanism of formation of lava tubes.

  4. Basalt features observed in outcrops, cores, borehole video imagery and geophysical logs, and basalt hydrogeologic study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Eastern Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennecke, William M. [Boise State Univ., ID (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A study was undertaken to examine permeable zones identified in boreholes open to the underlying basalt and to describe the vertical cross flows present in the boreholes. To understand the permeable zones in the boreholes detailed descriptions and measurements of three outcrops in the Snake River Plain, three cores at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the INEL, and over fifty borehole TV logs from the INEL were carried out. Based on the observations made on the three outcrops an idealized basalt lava flow model was generated that used a set of nomenclature that would be standard for the basalt lava flows studied. An upper vesicular zone, a sometimes absent columnar zone, central zone, and lower vesicular zone make up the basalt lava flow model. The overall distinction between the different zones are based on the vesicle shape size, vesicularity, and fractures present. The results of the studies also indicated that the basalt lava flows at the INEL are distal to medial facies pahoehoe lava flows with close fitting contacts. The most permeable zones identified in these basalts are fractured vesiculated portions of the top of the lava flow, the columnar areas, and basalt-flow contacts in order of importance. This was determined from impeller flowmeter logging at the INEL. Having this information a detailed stratigraphy of individual basalt lava flows and the corresponding permeable units were generated. From this it was concluded that groundwater flow at the ICPP prefers to travel along thin basalt lava flows or flow-units. Flow direction and velocity of intrawell flows detected by flowmeter is controlled by a nearby pumping well.

  5. Basalt features observed in outcrops, cores, borehole video imagery and geophysical logs, and basalt hydrogeologic study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Eastern Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennecke, W.M.

    1996-10-01

    A study was undertaken to examine permeable zones identified in boreholes open to the underlying basalt and to describe the vertical cross flows present in the boreholes. To understand the permeable zones in the boreholes detailed descriptions and measurements of three outcrops in the Snake River Plain, three cores at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the INEL, and over fifty borehole TV logs from the INEL were carried out. Based on the observations made on the three outcrops an idealized basalt lava flow model was generated that used a set of nomenclature that would be standard for the basalt lava flows studied. An upper vesicular zone, a sometimes absent columnar zone, central zone, and lower vesicular zone make up the basalt lava flow model. The overall distinction between the different zones are based on the vesicle shape size, vesicularity, and fractures present. The results of the studies also indicated that the basalt lava flows at the INEL are distal to medial facies pahoehoe lava flows with close fitting contacts. The most permeable zones identified in these basalts are fractured vesiculated portions of the top of the lava flow, the columnar areas, and basalt-flow contacts in order of importance. This was determined from impeller flowmeter logging at the INEL. Having this information a detailed stratigraphy of individual basalt lava flows and the corresponding permeable units were generated. From this it was concluded that groundwater flow at the ICPP prefers to travel along thin basalt lava flows or flow-units. Flow direction and velocity of intrawell flows detected by flowmeter is controlled by a nearby pumping well

  6. Morphologic and thermophysical characteristics of lava flows southwest of Arsia Mons, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, David A.; Ramsey, Michael S.

    2017-08-01

    The morphologic and thermophysical characteristics of part of the extensive lava flow fields southwest of Arsia Mons (22.5-27.5°S, 120-130°W) have been examined using a combination of orbital VNIR and TIR datasets. THEMIS images provide context for the regional geology and record diurnal temperature variability that is diverse and unusual for flow surfaces in such close proximity. CTX images were used to distinguish dominant flow types and assess local age relationships between individual lava flows. CTX and HiRISE images provide detailed information on flow surface textures and document aeolian effects as they reveal fine-grained deposits in many low-lying areas of the flow surfaces as well as small patches of transverse aeolian ridges. Although this region is generally dust-covered and has a lower overall thermal inertia, the THEMIS data indicate subtle spectral variations within the population of lava flows studied. These variations could be due to compositional differences among the flows or related to mixing of flow and aeolian materials. Specific results regarding flow morphology include: a) Two main lava flow types (bright, rugged and dark, smooth as observed in CTX images) dominate the southwest Arsia Mons/NE Daedalia Planum region; b) the bright, rugged flows have knobby, ridged, and/or platy surface textures, commonly have medial channel/levee systems, and may have broad distal lobes; c) the dark, smooth flows extend from distributary systems that consist of combinations of lava channels, lava tubes, and/or sinuous ridges and plateaus; and d) steep-sided, terraced margins, digitate breakout lobes, and smooth-surfaced plateaus along lava channel/tube systems are interpreted as signatures of flow inflation within the dark, smooth flow type. These flows exhibit smoother upper surfaces, are thinner, and have more numerous, smaller lobes, which, along with their the channel-/tube-fed nature, indicate a lower viscosity lava than for the bright, rugged flows

  7. Satellite-driven modeling approach for monitoring lava flow hazards during the 2017 Etna eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Negro, C.; Bilotta, G.; Cappello, A.; Ganci, G.; Herault, A.; Zago, V.

    2017-12-01

    The integration of satellite data and modeling represents an efficient strategy that may provide immediate answers to the main issues raised at the onset of a new effusive eruption. Satellite-based thermal remote sensing of hotspots related to effusive activity can effectively provide a variety of products suited to timing, locating, and tracking the radiant character of lava flows. Hotspots show the location and occurrence of eruptive events (vents). Discharge rate estimates may indicate the current intensity (effusion rate) and potential magnitude (volume). High-spatial resolution multispectral satellite data can complement field observations for monitoring the front position (length) and extension of flows (area). Physics-based models driven, or validated, by satellite-derived parameters are now capable of fast and accurate forecast of lava flow inundation scenarios (hazard). Here, we demonstrate the potential of the integrated application of satellite remote-sensing techniques and lava flow models during the 2017 effusive eruption at Mount Etna in Italy. This combined approach provided insights into lava flow field evolution by supplying detailed views of flow field construction (e.g., the opening of ephemeral vents) that were useful for more accurate and reliable forecasts of eruptive activity. Moreover, we gave a detailed chronology of the lava flow activity based on field observations and satellite images, assessed the potential extent of impacted areas, mapped the evolution of lava flow field, and executed hazard projections. The underside of this combination is the high sensitivity of lava flow inundation scenarios to uncertainties in vent location, discharge rate, and other parameters, which can make interpreting hazard forecasts difficult during an effusive crisis. However, such integration at last makes timely forecasts of lava flow hazards during effusive crises possible at the great majority of volcanoes for which no monitoring exists.

  8. Modeling the 2012-2013 lava flows of Tolbachik, Russia using thermal infrared satellite data and PyFLOWGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, M. S.; Chevrel, O.; Harris, A. J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Satellite-based thermal infrared (TIR) observations of new volcanic activity and ongoing lava flow emplacement become increasingly more detailed with improved spatial, spectral and/or temporal resolution data. The cooling of the glassy surface is directly imaged by TIR instruments in order to determine temperature, which is then used to initiate thermo-rheological-based models. Higher temporal resolution data (i.e., minutes to hours), are used to detect new eruptions and determine the time-averaged discharge rate (TADR). Calculation of the TADR along with new observations later in time and accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) enable modeling of the advancing flow's down-slope inundation area. Better spectral and spatial resolution data, on the other hand, allow the flow's composition, small-scale morphological changes and real-time DEMs to be determined, in addition to confirming prior model predictions. Combined, these data help improve the accuracy of models such as FLOWGO. A new adaptation of this model in python (PyFLOWGO) has been used to produce the best fit eruptive conditions to the final flow morphology for the 2012-2013 eruption of Tolbachik volcano, Russia. This was the largest and most thermally-intense flow-forming eruption in the past 50 years, producing longer lava flows than that of typical Kilauea or Etna eruptions. The progress of these flows were imaged by a multiple TIR sensors at various spatial, spectral and temporal scales throughout the flow field emplacement. We have refined the model based on the high resolution data to determine the TADR and make improved estimates of cooling, viscosity, velocity and crystallinity with distance. Understanding the cooling and dynamics of basaltic surfaces ultimately produces an improved hazard forecast capability. In addition, the direct connection of the final flow morphology to the specific eruption conditions that produced it allows the eruptive conditions of older flows to be estimated.

  9. Surface degassing and modifications to vesicle size distributions in active basalt flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, K.V.; Mangan, M.T.; Newman, S.

    1994-01-01

    The character of the vesicle population in lava flows includes several measurable parameters that may provide important constraints on lava flow dynamics and rheology. Interpretation of vesicle size distributions (VSDs), however, requires an understanding of vesiculation processes in feeder conduits, and of post-eruption modifications to VSDs during transport and emplacement. To this end we collected samples from active basalt flows at Kilauea Volcano: (1) near the effusive Kupaianaha vent; (2) through skylights in the approximately isothermal Wahaula and Kamoamoa tube systems transporting lava to the coast; (3) from surface breakouts at different locations along the lava tubes; and (4) from different locations in a single breakout from a lava tube 1 km from the 51 vent at Pu'u 'O'o. Near-vent samples are characterized by VSDs that show exponentially decreasing numbers of vesicles with increasing vesicle size. These size distributions suggest that nucleation and growth of bubbles were continuous during ascent in the conduit, with minor associated bubble coalescence resulting from differential bubble rise. The entire vesicle population can be attributed to shallow exsolution of H2O-dominated gases at rates consistent with those predicted by simple diffusion models. Measurements of H2O, CO2 and S in the matrix glass show that the melt equilibrated rapidly at atmospheric pressure. Down-tube samples maintain similar VSD forms but show a progressive decrease in both overall vesicularity and mean vesicle size. We attribute this change to open system, "passive" rise and escape of larger bubbles to the surface. Such gas loss from the tube system results in the output of 1.2 ?? 106 g/day SO2, an output representing an addition of approximately 1% to overall volatile budget calculations. A steady increase in bubble number density with downstream distance is best explained by continued bubble nucleation at rates of 7-8/cm3s. Rates are ???25% of those estimated from the vent

  10. Geomorphology and petrography of the Angeles lava flow and the Monte de la Cruz cinder cone, Barva Volcano, Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Vanessa; Barahona, Dione; Alvarado, Guillermo E

    2017-01-01

    A geomorphological and pretrographic study was carried out at the lava flow Angeles and the Monte de la Cruz cone in the foothills of the Volcan Barva in Costa Rica. The 1967 aerial photographs at scale 1: 17,000 and 1: 13,000, 1992 at scale 1: 60,000 and TERRA 1997 at scale 1: 40,000 were used for the photogeological study, supplemented with the analysis of the eastern sector of the Hoja Topografica Barva (1: 50 000) of the Instituto Geografico Nacional (IGN) and other topographic maps at different scales (1: 25 000 and 1: 10 000), in addition to the digital elevation models developed through Sistemas de Informacion Geografica (SIG). The information extracted from the wells of the Sistema Nacional de Aguas Subterraneas, Riego y Avenamiento (SENARA) for underground control was reinterpreted. In the field work thicknesses were measured and an estimation of the volumes, dimensions of the cast and other associated geoforms was made. Likewise, 9 samples of rock were selected for the elaboration of thin sections and for their respective petrographic analysis, which allowed to define the main lava flow units and their possible flows. As a result of the volcanic activity of the cone, two flow units of the Angeles wash were identified, the Lower Angels unit and the Superior Angels unit. Petrographically, Angeles Inferior was reciprocated with an andesitic vesical basaltic lava with a porphyritic to slightly glomeroporphyric hypocrystalline texture, with plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, olivine and opaque phenocrysts. On the other hand, Superior Angeles has been vesicular andesitic with a hypocrystalline texture, glomeroporfiritica to serial glomeroporfiritica, with plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, olivine and opaque phenocrysts. Morphologically, kipukas and levees were observed. Regionally, it was observed that the Monte de la Cruz cone, along with other smaller satellite cones, are aligned N19 O W along 8.5 km, evidencing an origin associated with a

  11. Extensive young silicic volcanism produces large deep submarine lava flows in the NE Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embley, Robert W.; Rubin, Kenneth H.

    2018-04-01

    New field observations reveal that extensive (up to 402 km2) aphyric, glassy dacite lavas were erupted at multiple sites in the recent past in the NE Lau basin, located about 200 km southwest of Samoa. This discovery of volumetrically significant and widespread submarine dacite lava flows extends the domain for siliceous effusive volcanism into the deep seafloor. Although several lava flow fields were discovered on the flank of a large silicic seamount, Niuatahi, two of the largest lava fields and several smaller ones ("northern lava flow fields") were found well north of the seamount. The most distal portion of the northernmost of these fields is 60 km north of the center of Niuatahi caldera. We estimate that lava flow lengths from probable eruptive vents to the distal ends of flows range from a few km to more than 10 km. Camera tows on the shallower, near-vent areas show complex lava morphology that includes anastomosing tube-like pillow flows and ropey surfaces, endogenous domes and/or ridges, some with "crease-like" extrusion ridges, and inflated lobes with extrusion structures. A 2 × 1.5 km, 30-m deep depression could be an eruption center for one of the lava flow fields. The Lau lava flow fields appear to have erupted at presumptive high effusion rates and possibly reduced viscosity induced by presumptive high magmatic water content and/or a high eruption temperature, consistent with both erupted composition ( 66% SiO2) and glassy low crystallinity groundmass textures. The large areal extent (236 km2) and relatively small range of compositional variation ( σ = 0.60 for wt% Si02%) within the northern lava flow fields imply the existence of large, eruptible batches of differentiated melt in the upper mantle or lower crust of the NE Lau basin. At this site, the volcanism could be controlled by deep crustal fractures caused by the long-term extension in this rear-arc region. Submarine dacite flows exhibiting similar morphology have been described in ancient

  12. UAV-based remote sensing surveys of lava flow fields: a case study from Etna's 1974 channel-fed lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, Massimiliano; Fornaciai, Alessandro; Nannipieri, Luca; Harris, Andrew; Calvari, Sonia; Lormand, Charline

    2018-03-01

    During an eruption, time scales of topographic change are fast and involve vertical and planimetric evolution of millimeters to meters as the event progresses. Repeat production of high spatial resolution terrain models of lava flow fields over time scales of a few hours is thus a high-value capability in tracking the buildup of the deposit. Among the wide range of terrestrial and aerial methods available to collect such topographic data, the use of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) as an acquisition platform, together with structure from motion (SfM) photogrammetry, has become especially useful. This approach allows high-frequency production of centimeter-scale terrain models over kilometer-scale areas, including dangerous and inaccessible zones, with low cost and minimal hazard to personnel. This study presents the application of such an integrated UAV-SfM method to generate a high spatial resolution digital terrain model and orthomosaic of Mount Etna's January-February 1974 lava flow field. The SfM method, applied to images acquired using a UAV platform, enabled the extraction of a very high spatial resolution (20 cm) digital elevation model and the generation of a 3-cm orthomosaic covering an area of 1.35 km2. This spatial resolution enabled us to analyze the morphology of sub-meter-scale features, such as folds, blocks, and cracks, over kilometer-scale areas. The 3-cm orthomosaic allowed us to further push the analysis to centimeter-scale grain size distribution of the lava surface. Using these data, we define three types of crust structure and relate them to positions within a channel-fed ´áā flow system. These crust structures are (i) flow parallel shear lines, (ii) raft zones, and (iii) folded zones. Flow parallel shear lines are found at the channel edges, and are 2-m-wide and 0.25-m-deep zones running along the levee base and in which cracking is intense. They result from intense shearing between the moving channel lava and the static levee lava. In

  13. Flow dynamics of dacite lava flow - AMS, microstructure and porosity case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Závada, Prokop; Kusbach, Vladimír; Machek, Matěj; Staněk, Martin; Špičák, Aleš

    2017-04-01

    Pyroclastic flows derived from flow frontal collapse of highly viscous "block lavas" formed by andesite or dacite belong to the most serious volcano-related hazards for surrounding populations. The threat results from abrupt transition of lava flow from ductile flow to gravitational failure of the front, which exposes their overpressurized interior and triggers devastating pyroclastic flows. The goal of the study is to quantify the microfabrics and dynamic porosity in a lava flow to constrain the cavitation process (development and coalescence of dynamic porosity). Pleistocene dacite flow body situated on the slope of Middle Sister Volcano (OR, USA) was studied by means of field-based structural analysis, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), microstructural analysis and mercury injection porosimetry (MIP). The 500 m exposure of the flow is associated with a vertical feeding dyke at the beginning of the flow, 40 m upslope. The flow shows occasional layers, 5-15 cm thick, marked by evenly spaced and up to 10 cm long, lenticular to sigmoidal cracks often developed in the vicinity of the clasts/phenocrysts. These cracks frequently dip against the slope of the flow and show 15-50° difference with the layering. At the feeding dyke, highly oblate magnetic fabric shows subvertical foliations with horizontal lineations oriented parallel to the dyke walls. Middle part of the flow revealed highly prolate fabrics with subhorizontal magnetic foliations and lineations parallel to the flow direction. At the downslope limit of the flow, magnetic foliations are perpendicular to the flow direction. The dynamic porosity was studied in detail on larger sample from the central part of the flow. The sample contains three layers with different density of porosity and average crack length. All the cracks were oriented about 45° to the layer boundaries and alignment of the groundmass crystals. MIP data revealed total connected porosities between 11 and 15 %. Throat

  14. Eruption and emplacement dynamics of a thick trachytic lava flow of the Sancy volcano (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latutrie, Benjamin; Harris, Andrew; Médard, Etienne; Gurioli, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    A 70-m-thick, 2200-m-long (51 × 106 m3) trachytic lava flow unit underlies the Puy de Cliergue (Mt. Dore, France). Excellent exposure along a 400-m-long and 60- to 85-m-high section allows the flow interior to be accessed on two sides of a glacial valley that cuts through the unit. We completed an integrated morphological, structural, textural, and chemical analysis of the unit to gain insights into eruption and flow processes during emplacement of this thick silicic lava flow, so as to elucidate the chamber and flow dynamic processed that operate during the emplacement of such systems. The unit is characterized by an inverse chemical stratification, where there is primitive lava beneath the evolved lava. The interior is plug dominated with a thin basal shear zone overlying a thick basal breccia, with ramping affecting the entire flow thickness. To understand these characteristics, we propose an eruption model that first involves processes operating in the magma chamber whereby a primitive melt is injected into an evolved magma to create a mixed zone at the chamber base. The eruption triggered by this event first emplaced a trachytic dome, into which banded lava from the chamber base was injected. Subsequent endogenous dome growth led to flow down the shallow slope to the east on which the highly viscous (1012 Pa s) coulée was emplaced. The flow likely moved extremely slowly, being emplaced over a period of 4-10 years in a glacial manner, where a thick (>60-m) plug slid over a thin (5-m-thick) basal shear zone. Excellent exposure means that the Puy de Cliergue complex can be viewed as a case type location for understanding and defining the eruption and emplacement of thick, high-viscosity, silicic lava flow systems.

  15. Application of Bistatic TanDEM-X Interferometry to Measure Lava Flow Volume and Lava Extrusion Rates During the 2012-13 Tolbachik, Kamchatka Fissure Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubanek, J.; Westerhaus, M.; Heck, B.

    2015-12-01

    Aerial imaging methods are a well approved source for mapping lava flows during eruptions and can serve as a base to assess the eruption dynamics and to determine the affected area. However, clouds and smoke often hinder optical systems like the Earth Observation Advanced Land Imager (EO-1-ALI, operated by NASA) to map lava flows properly, which hence affects its reliability. Furthermore, the amount of lava that is extruded during an eruption cannot be determined from optical images - however, it can significantly contribute to assess the accompanying hazard and risk. One way to monitor active lava flows is to quantify the topographic changes over time while using up-to-date high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs). Whereas photogrammetric methods still fail when clouds and fume obstruct the sight, innovative radar satellite missions have the potential to generate high-resolution DEMs at any time. The innovative bistatic TanDEM-X (TerraSAR-X Add-on for Digital Elevation Measurements) satellite mission enables for the first time generating high-resolution DEMs from synthetic aperture radar satellite data repeatedly with reasonable costs and high resolution. The satellite mission consists of the two nearly identical satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X that build a large synthetic aperture radar interferometer with adaptable across- and along-track baselines aiming to generate topographic information globally. In the present study, we apply the TanDEM-X data to study the lava flows that were emplaced during the 2012-13 Tolbachik, Kamchatka fissure eruption. The eruption was composed of very fluid lava flows that effused along a northeast-southwest trending fissure. We used about fifteen bistatic data pairs to generate DEMs prior to, during, and after the eruption. The differencing of the DEMs enables mapping the lava flow field at different times. This allows measuring the extruded volume and to derive the changes in lava extrusion over time.

  16. Eruptive history of the Karoo lava flows and their impact on early Jurassic environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, M.; Fluteau, F.; Courtillot, V.; Marsh, J.; Delpech, G.; Quidelleur, X.; Gérard, M.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports new paleomagnetic and geochronologic data from a 1500 m thick composite section belonging to the Drakensberg group, the thickest remnant of the Karoo lavas in Northern Lesotho. Flow-by-flow analysis of paleomagnetic directions reveals 21 magnetic directional groups, corresponding to single eruptive events, and 16 individual lava flows. The new age determinations of lava flows range from 180.1 ± 1.4 to 182.8 ± 2.6 Ma. These data, combined with previous results, allow us to propose that the main part of the Drakensberg group and the Karoo intrusive complex dated around 181-183 Ma may have been erupted over a period as short as 250 kyr and may have coincided with the two main phases of extinction in the Early Toarcian. This scenario agrees well with the discontinuous rhythm of environmental and biotic perturbations in the Late Pliensbachian-Toarcian interval.

  17. Influence of conduit flow mechanics on magma rheology and the growth style of lava domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Taha; Elsworth, Derek; Voight, Barry; Mattioli, Glen; Jansma, Pamela

    2018-02-01

    We develop a two-dimensional particle-mechanics model to explore different lava-dome growth styles. These range from endogenous lava dome growth comprising expansion of a ductile dome core to the exogenous extrusion of a degassed lava plug resulting in generation of a lava spine. We couple conduit flow dynamics with surface growth of the evolving lava dome, fueled by an open-system magma chamber undergoing continuous replenishment. The conduit flow model accounts for the variation in rheology of ascending magma that results from degassing-induced crystallization. A period of reduced effusive flow rates promote enhanced degassing-induced crystallization. A degassed lava plug extrudes exogenously for magmas with crystal contents (ϕ) of 78 per cent, yield strength > 1.62 MPa, and at flow rates of 3 m3/s) for magma with lower relative yield strengths ( 1980-1983). Endogenous growth initiates in the simulated lava dome with the extrusion of low yield strength magma (ϕ = 0.63 and τp = 0.76 MPa) after the crystallized viscous plug (ϕ = 0.87 and τp = 3 MPa) at the conduit exit is forced out by the high discharge rate pulse (2 volume, which control the periodicity of the effusion. Our simulations generate dome morphologies similar to those observed at Mount St Helens, and demonstrate the degree to which domes can sag and spread during and following extrusion pulses. This process, which has been observed at Mount St. Helens and other locations, largely reflects gravitational loading of dome with a viscous core, with retardation by yield strength and talus friction.

  18. A three-dimensional dynamical model for channeled lava flow with nonlinear rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippucci, Marilena; Tallarico, Andrea; Dragoni, Michele

    2010-05-01

    Recent laboratory studies on the rheology of lava samples from different volcanic areas have highlighted that the apparent viscosity depends on a power of the strain rate. Several authors agree in attributing this dependence to the crystal content of the sample and to temperature. Starting from these results, in this paper we studied the effect of a power law rheology on a gravity-driven lava flow. The equation of motion is nonlinear in the diffusion term, and an analytical solution does not seem to be possible. The finite-volume method has been applied to solve numerically the equation governing the fully developed laminar flow of a power law non-Newtonian fluid in an inclined rectangular channel. The convergence, the stability, and the order of approximation were tested for the Newtonian rheology case, comparing the numerical solution with the available analytical solution. Results indicate that the assumption on the rheology, whether linear or nonlinear, strongly affects the velocity and/or the thickness of the lava channel both for channels with fixed geometry and for channels with constant flow rate. Results on channels with fixed geometry are confirmed by some simulations for real lava channels. Finally, the study of the Reynolds number indicates that gravity-driven lava channel flows are always in laminar regime, except for strongly nonlinear pseudoplastic fluids with low fluid consistency and at high slopes.

  19. Constraining Controls on the Emplacement of Long Lava Flows on Earth and Mars Through Modeling in ArcGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golder, K.; Burr, D. M.; Tran, L.

    2017-12-01

    Regional volcanic processes shaped many planetary surfaces in the Solar System, often through the emplacement of long, voluminous lava flows. Terrestrial examples of this type of lava flow have been used as analogues for extensive martian flows, including those within the circum-Cerberus outflow channels. This analogy is based on similarities in morphology, extent, and inferred eruptive style between terrestrial and martian flows, which raises the question of how these lava flows appear comparable in size and morphology on different planets. The parameters that influence the areal extent of silicate lavas during emplacement may be categorized as either inherent or external to the lava. The inherent parameters include the lava yield strength, density, composition, water content, crystallinity, exsolved gas content, pressure, and temperature. Each inherent parameter affects the overall viscosity of the lava, and for this work can be considered a subset of the viscosity parameter. External parameters include the effusion rate, total erupted volume, regional slope, and gravity. To investigate which parameter(s) may control(s) the development of long lava flows on Mars, we are applying a computational numerical-modelling to reproduce the observed lava flow morphologies. Using a matrix of boundary conditions in the model enables us to investigate the possible range of emplacement conditions that can yield the observed morphologies. We have constructed the basic model framework in Model Builder within ArcMap, including all governing equations and parameters that we seek to test, and initial implementation and calibration has been performed. The base model is currently capable of generating a lava flow that propagates along a pathway governed by the local topography. At AGU, the results of model calibration using the Eldgá and Laki lava flows in Iceland will be presented, along with the application of the model to lava flows within the Cerberus plains on Mars. We then

  20. Structural Analysis of Silicic Lavas Reveals the Importance of Endogenous Flow During Emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, G. D.; Martens, A.; Isom, S.; Maxwell, A.; Brown, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    Recent observations of silicic lava flows in Chile strongly suggest sustained, endogeneous flow beneath an insulating carapace, where the flow advances through breakouts at the flow margin. New mapping of vertical exposures around the margin of Obsidian Dome, California, has identified discreet lobe structures in cross-section, suggesting that flow-front breakouts occured there during emplacement. The flow lobes are identified through structural measurements of flow-banding orientation and the stretching directions of vesicles. Newly acquired lidar of the Inyo Domes, including Obsidian Dome, is being analyzed to better understand the patterns of folding on the upper surface of the lavas, and to test for fold vergence patterns that may distinguish between endogenous and exogenous flow.

  1. Rheological evolution of planetary basalts during cooling and crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehlke, Alexander

    Basaltic lavas cover large portions of the surface of the Earth and other planets and moons. Planetary basalts are compositionally different from terrestrial basalts, and show a variety of unique large-scale lava flow morphologies unobserved on Earth. They are usually assumed to be much more fluid than basalts on Earth, such as Hawaiian basalt, but their rheology is largely unknown. I synthesized several synthetic silicate melts representing igneous rock compositions of Mars, Mercury, the Moon, Io and Vesta. I measured their viscosity, as well as several terrestrial lavas including Hawaiian basalt, by concentric cylinder and parallel plate viscometry. Planetary melts cover a wide range of viscosity at their liquidus, overlapping with terrestrial basaltic melts. I derived a new viscosity model that is based on the Adam-Gibbs theory of structural relaxation, predicting these viscosities much more accurately than previously published viscosity models. During crystallization, the rheological behavior changes from Newtonian to pseudoplastic. Combining rheology experiments with field observations, the rheological conditions of the pahoehoe to `a`a morphological transition for Hawaiian basalt were determined in strain rate-viscosity space. This transition occurs at temperatures around 1185+/-15°C. For Mercurian lavas, this transition is predicted to occur at higher temperatures around 1250+/-30°C. We find that the rheology of these lavas is broadly similar to terrestrial ones, suggesting that the large smooth volcanic plains observed on Mercury's northern hemisphere are due to flood basalt volcanism rather than unusually fluid lavas. We also show that KREEP lavas, a type of basalt associated with sinuous rilles on the lunar surface, is more likely to form rilles through levee construction, as the high and rapidly increasing viscosity prohibits sufficient thermo-mechanical erosion.

  2. Dating Young Lava Flows with Cosmogenic 36Cl: AN Example from the Late Pleistocene - Early Holocene ERCİYES Monogenetic Lava Domes in Central Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akif Sarıkaya, M.; Çiner, Attila; Şen, Erdal; Ersoy, Orkun; Zreda, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Precise dating of young lava flows is generally problematic because of the limiting factors of the applied technique. In-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides can be used to date very young lava flows if they show simple exposure histories and proper geochemistries. The Erciyes stratovolcano in the central Turkey has several dacite-rhyodacite monogenic parasitic lava domes that show clear exposure histories. Four young volcanic domes on the flanks of Erciyes Volcano have fresh-looking surfaces that are datable by cosmogenic surface exposure dating. We collected 36 cosmogenic samples from four lava flows namely Karagüllü, Perikartını, Dikkartın and Çarık, and obtained 36Cl exposure ages, all around Early Holocene, except for Çarık Lava flow which gave much older ages. Karagüllü, Perikartını and Dikkartın eruptions yielded average exposure ages at around 7.2±0.9 ka (n=11), 7.7±0.4 ka (n=6) and 8.8±0.6 ka (n=9), respectively. Two different eruption histories were determined from the Çarık Lava flow. They were centred at around 98.4±3.6 ka (n=7) and 36.1±1.1 ka (n=3). We also tested our results by an independent dating method. The Perikartını eruption generated a pyroclastic flow that buried trees that were converted to charcoal. Two charcoal samples found in this flow were dated using the 14C method, and yielded an average age of 9735±155 years BP (calibrated using Calib 7.1). Our results show that the cosmogenic 36Cl ages from Perikartını flow (7.7±0.4 ka) are younger than the radiocarbon ages (9.7±0.2 ka). This discrepancy might be related either to the high Cl content (963 ppm) of the lava flow or high nucleogenic production of 36Cl due to the above average U (5.1 ppm) and Th (15.6 ppm) concentrations. The high Cl content of the samples may result erroneously (>20%) underestimated the low-energy neutron capture (epithermal and thermal) production rates. On the other hand, the calculated nucleogenic 36Cl makes up almost one-third of the

  3. Volcanic risk: mitigation of lava flow invasion hazard through optimized barrier configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scifoni, S.; Coltelli, M.; Marsella, M.; Napoleoni, Q.; Del Negro, C.; Proietti, C.; Vicari, A.

    2009-04-01

    In order to mitigate the destructive effects of lava flows along volcanic slopes, the building of artificial barriers is a fundamental action for controlling and slowing down the lava flow advance, as experienced during a few recent eruptions of Etna. The simulated lava path can be used to define an optimize project to locate the work but for a timely action it is also necessary to quickly construct a barrier. Therefore this work investigates different type of engineering work that can be adopted to build up a lava containing barrier for improving the efficiency of the structure. From the analysis of historical cases it is clear that barriers were generally constructed by building up earth, lava blocks and incoherent, low density material. This solution implies complex operational constraints and logistical problems that justify the effort of looking for alternative design. Moreover for optimizing the barrier construction an alternative project of gabion-made barrier was here proposed. In this way the volume of mobilized material is lower than that for a earth barrier, thus reducing the time needed for build up the structure. A second crucial aspect to be considered is the geometry of the barrier which, is one of the few parameters that can be modulated, the others being linked to the morphological and topographical characteristics of the ground. Once the walls have been realized, it may be necessary to be able to expand the structure vertically. The use of gabion has many advantages over loose riprap (earthen walls) owing to their modularity and capability to be stacked in various shapes. Furthermore, the elements which are not inundated by lava can be removed and rapidly used for other barriers. The combination between numerical simulations and gabions will allow a quicker mitigation of risk on lava flows and this is an important aspect for a civil protection intervention in emergency cases.

  4. Cooling of a channeled lava flow with non-Newtonian rheology: crust formation and surface radiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Santini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present here the results from dynamical and thermal models that describe a channeled lava flow as it cools by radiation. In particular, the effects of power-law rheology and of the presence of bends in the flow are considered, as well as the formation of surface crust and lava tubes. On the basis of the thermal models, we analyze the assumptions implicit in the currently used formulae for evaluation of lava flow rates from satellite thermal imagery. Assuming a steady flow down an inclined rectangular channel, we solve numerically the equation of motion by the finite-volume method and a classical iterative solution. Our results show that the use of power-law rheology results in relevant differences in the average velocity and volume flow rate with respect to Newtonian rheology. Crust formation is strongly influenced by power-law rheology; in particular, the growth rate and the velocity profile inside the channel are strongly modified. In addition, channel curvature affects the flow dynamics and surface morphology. The size and shape of surface solid plates are controlled by competition between the shear stress and the crust yield strength: the degree of crust cover of the channel is studied as a function of the curvature. Simple formulae are currently used to relate the lava flow rate to the energy radiated by the lava flow as inferred from satellite thermal imagery. Such formulae are based on a specific model, and consequently, their validity is subject to the model assumptions. An analysis of these assumptions reveals that the current use of such formulae is not consistent with the model.

  5. A rock- and paleomagnetic study of a Holocene lava flow in Central Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlag, P.; Alva-Valdivia, L.; Boer, C.B. de; Gonzalez, S.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic measurements of the Tres Cruces lava flow (ca. 8500 years BP, Central Mexico) show the presence of two remanence carriers, a Ti-rich titanomagnetite with a Curie temperature between 350 and 400 °C and a Ti-poor magnetite with a Curie temperature close to 580°C. Magnetic changes after

  6. A brief comparison of lava flows from the Deccan Volcanic Province ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    scenarios may hence not be pragmatic. If this is the case, then it has important implications for emplacement of planetary lava flows and for mass extinctions. The link between CFB provinces and mass extinctions hinges on catastrophic effects of volatile release during individual CFB eruptions. (Courtillot and Renne 2003).

  7. Perception of Lava Flow Hazards and Risk at Mauna Loa and Hualalai Volcanoes, Kona, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, C. E.; Houghton, B. F.; Johnston, D. M.; Paton, D.; Swanson, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    The island of Hawaii is composed of five sub-aerially exposed volcanoes, three of which have been active since 1801 (Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai). Hawaii has the fastest population growth in the state and the local economy in the Kona districts (i.e., western portion of the island) is driven by tourism. Kona is directly vulnerable to future lava flows from Mauna Loa and Hualalai volcanoes, as well as indirectly from the effects of lava flows elsewhere that may sever the few roads that connect Kona to other vital areas on the island. A number of factors such as steep slopes, high volume eruptions, and high effusion rates, combine to mean that lava flows from Hualalai and Mauna Loa can be fast-moving and hence unusually hazardous. The proximity of lifelines and structures to potential eruptive sources exacerbates societies' risk to future lava flows. Approximately \\$2.3 billion has been invested on the flanks of Mauna Loa since its last eruption in 1984 (Trusdell 1995). An equivalent figure has not yet been determined for Hualalai, but an international airport, several large resort complexes, and Kailua-Kona, the second largest town on the island, are down-slope and within 15km of potential eruptive Hualalai vents. Public and perhaps official understanding of specific lava flow hazards and the perceptions of risk from renewed volcanism at each volcano are proportional to the time lapsed since the most recent eruption that impacted Kona, rather than a quantitative assessment of risk that takes into account recent growth patterns. Lava flows from Mauna Loa and Hualalai last directly impacted upon Kona during the notorious 1950 and circa 1801 eruptions, respectively. Various non-profit organizations; local, state and federal government entities; and academic institutions have disseminated natural hazard information in Kona but despite the intuitive appeal that increased hazard understanding and risk perception results in increased hazard adjustment adoption, this

  8. Tracking lava flow emplacement on the east rift zone of Kilauea, Hawai’i with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietterich, Hannah R.; Poland, Michael P.; Schmidt, David; Cashman, Katharine V.; Sherrod, David R.; Espinosa, Arkin Tapia

    2012-01-01

    Lava flow mapping is both an essential component of volcano monitoring and a valuable tool for investigating lava flow behavior. Although maps are traditionally created through field surveys, remote sensing allows an extraordinary view of active lava flows while avoiding the difficulties of mapping on location. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, in particular, can detect changes in a flow field by comparing two images collected at different times with SAR coherence. New lava flows radically alter the scattering properties of the surface, making the radar signal decorrelated in SAR coherence images. We describe a new technique, SAR Coherence Mapping (SCM), to map lava flows automatically from coherence images independent of look angle or satellite path. We use this approach to map lava flow emplacement during the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō-Kupaianaha eruption at Kīlauea, Hawai‘i. The resulting flow maps correspond well with field mapping and better resolve the internal structure of surface flows, as well as the locations of active flow paths. However, the SCM technique is only moderately successful at mapping flows that enter vegetation, which is also often decorrelated between successive SAR images. Along with measurements of planform morphology, we are able to show that the length of time a flow stays decorrelated after initial emplacement is linearly related to the flow thickness. Finally, we use interferograms obtained after flow surfaces become correlated to show that persistent decorrelation is caused by post-emplacement flow subsidence.

  9. Risk from lava flow inundations in densely populated areas: the case of Etna volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Negro, C.; Cappello, A.; Bilotta, G.; Ganci, G.; Herault, A.

    2016-12-01

    The ever-expanding use of areas near the volcano increases the potential impact of future eruptions on the regional economy and on the health and safety of the inhabitants. The increasing exposure of a larger population, which has almost tripled in the area around Mt. Etna during the last 150 years, is often derived from a poor assessment of the volcanic hazard, allowing inappropriate land use in vulnerable areas. Therefore, a correct assessment is an essential component in reducing the losses due to volcanic disasters. A detailed map showing areas that are likely to be inundated by future lava flows is extremely useful, allowing people living nearby to judge for themselves the relation between potentially dangerous areas and their daily lives. Here we quantify the lava flow risk at Etna volcano using a GIS-based methodology that integrates the hazard with the exposure of elements at stake. The hazard, showing the long-term probability related to lava flow inundation, is obtained combining three different kinds of information: the spatiotemporal probability for the future opening of new eruptive vents, the event probability associated with classes of expected eruptions, and the overlapping of lava flow paths simulated by the MAGFLOW model. Data including all elements at stake were gathered from different web portals and organized in four thematic layers: population, strategic buildings, other buildings and networks, and land use. The total exposure is given by a weighted linear combination of the four thematic layers, where weights are calculated using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). The resulting risk map shows the likely damage caused by a lava flow eruption, allowing rapidly visualizing the areas in which there would be the greatest amount of losses in case of a flank eruption occurs at Etna.

  10. Communicating Science to Officials and People at Risk During a Slow-Motion Lava Flow Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, C. A.; Babb, J.; Brantley, S.; Kauahikaua, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    From June 2014 through March 2015, Kīlauea Volcano's Púu ´Ō´ō vent on the East Rift Zone produced a tube-fed pāhoehoe lava flow -the "June 27th flow" - that extended 20 km downslope. Within 2 months of onset, flow trajectory towards populated areas in the Puna District caused much concern. The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) issued a news release of increased hazard on August 22 and began participating in public meetings organized by Hawai`i County Mayor and Civil Defense two days later. On September 4, HVO upgraded the volcano alert level to WARNING based on an increased potential for lava to reach homes and infrastructure. Ultimately, direct impacts were modest: lava destroyed one unoccupied home and one utility pole, crossed a rural roadway, and partially inundated a waste transfer station, a cemetery, and agricultural land. Anticipation that lava could reach Pāhoa Village and cross the only major access highway, however, caused significant disruption. HVO scientists employed numerous methods to communicate science and hazard information to officials and the at-risk public: daily (or more frequent) written updates of the lava activity, flow front locations and advance rates; frequent updates of web-hosted maps and images; use of the 'lines of steepest descent' method to indicate likely lava flow paths; consistent participation in well-attended community meetings; bi-weekly briefings to County, State, and Federal officials; correspondence with the public via email and recorded phone messages; participation in press conferences and congressional briefings; and weekly newspaper articles (Volcano Watch). Communication lessons both learned and reinforced include: (1) direct, frequent interaction between scientists and officials and at-risk public builds critical trust and understanding; (2) images, maps, and presentations must be tailored to audience needs; (3) many people are unfamiliar with maps (oblique aerial photographs were more effective); (4

  11. Inflation Features of the Distal Pahoehoe Portion of the 1859 Mauna Loa Flow, Hawaii; Implications for Evaluating Planetary Lava Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Crumpler, L S.

    2011-01-01

    The 1859 eruption of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, resulted in the longest subaerial lava flow on the Big Island. Detailed descriptions were made of the eruption both from ships and following hikes by groups of observers; the first three weeks of the eruption produced an `a`a flow that reached the ocean, and the following 10 months produced a pahoehoe flow that also eventually reached the ocean. The distal portion of the 1859 pahoehoe flow component includes many distinctive features indicative of flow inflation. Field work was conducted on the distal 1859 pahoehoe flow during 2/09 and 3/10, which allowed us to document several inflation features, in or-der evaluate how well inflated landforms might be detected in remote sensing data of lava flows on other planets.

  12. Basaltic cannibalism at Thrihnukagigur volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, M. R.; Feineman, M. D.; La Femina, P. C.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic assimilation of felsic continental crust is a well-documented, relatively common phenomenon. The extent to which basaltic crust is assimilated by magmas, on the other hand, is not well known. Basaltic cannibalism, or the wholesale incorporation of basaltic crustal material into a basaltic magma, is thought to be uncommon because basalt requires more energy than higher silica rocks to melt. Basaltic materials that are unconsolidated, poorly crystalline, or palagonitized may be more easily ingested than fully crystallized massive basalt, thus allowing basaltic cannibalism to occur. Thrihnukagigur volcano, SW Iceland, offers a unique exposure of a buried cinder cone within its evacuated conduit, 100 m below the main vent. The unconsolidated tephra is cross-cut by a NNE-trending dike, which runs across the ceiling of this cave to a vent that produced lava and tephra during the ~4 Ka fissure eruption. Preliminary petrographic and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses indicate that there are two populations of plagioclase present in the system - Population One is stubby (aspect ratio 2.1), subhedral to euhedral, and has much higher Ba/Sr ratios. Population One crystals are observed in the cinder cone, dike, and surface lavas, whereas Population Two crystals are observed only in the dike and surface lavas. This suggests that a magma crystallizing a single elongate population of plagioclase intruded the cinder cone and rapidly assimilated the tephra, incorporating the stubbier population of phenocrysts. This conceptual model for basaltic cannibalism is supported by field observations of large-scale erosion upward into the tephra, which is coated by magma flow-back indicating that magma was involved in the thermal etching. While the unique exposure at Thrihnukagigur makes it an exceptional place to investigate basaltic cannibalism, we suggest that it is not limited to this volcanic system. Rather it is a process that likely

  13. Role of viscous dissipation in the dynamics of lava flows with power-law rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piombo, A.; Dragoni, M.

    2011-09-01

    We model a lava flow as a one-dimensional flow of a pseudoplastic fluid with viscous dissipation. The flow is horizontally unbounded and is driven downslope by the gravity force. We consider a power-law constitutive equation and we take into account the temperature dependence of the rheological parameters. Given an effusion rate and an initial temperature at the eruption vent, the flow is assumed to cool down by heat radiation. We calculate the heat produced by viscous dissipation as a function of lava temperature and effusion rate. The cooling rate is calculated as a function of the surface temperature and flow rate. Viscous dissipation reduces the cooling rate by an amount which is independent of flow rate. We evaluate the effect of viscous dissipation on the flow thickness and velocity. The effect of dissipation is to decrease the flow thickness and to increase the flow velocity. The effect on flow thickness is greater for smaller flow rates, while the effect on velocity is greater for larger effusion rates. In principle, the model provides a method for estimating the flow rate from in-field measurements of distances and temperatures.

  14. Controls on Lava Flow Morphology and Propagation: Using Laboratory Analogue Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S.; Clarke, A. B.

    2017-12-01

    The morphology of lava flows is controlled by eruption rate, composition, cooling rate, and topography [Fink and Griffiths, 1990; Gregg and Fink, 2000, 2006]. Lava flows are used to understand how volcanoes, volcanic fields, and igneous provinces formed and evolved [Gregg and Fink., 1996; Sheth, 2006]. This is particularly important for other planets where compositional data is limited and historical context is nonexistent. Numerical modeling of lava flows remains challenging, but has been aided by laboratory analog experiments [Gregg and Keszrthelyi, 2004; Soule and Cashman, 2004]. Experiments using polyethylene glycol (PEG) 600 wax have been performed to understand lava flow emplacement [Fink and Griffiths, 1990, 1992; Gregg and Fink, 2000]. These experiments established psi (hereafter denoted by Ψ), a dimensionless parameter that relates crust formation and advection timescales of a viscous gravity current. Four primary flow morphologies corresponding to discreet Ψ ranges were observed. Gregg and Fink [2000] also investigated flows on slopes and found that steeper slopes increase the effective effusion rate producing predicted morphologies at lower Ψ values. Additional work is needed to constrain the Ψ parameter space, evaluate the predictive capability of Ψ, and determine if the preserved flow morphology can be used to indicate the initial flow conditions. We performed 514 experiments to address the following controls on lava flow morphology: slope (n = 282), unsteadiness/pulsations (n = 58), slope & unsteadiness/pulsations (n = 174), distal processes, and emplacement vs. post-emplacement morphologies. Our slope experiments reveal a similar trend to Gregg and Fink [2000] with the caveat that very high and very low local & source eruption rates can reduce the apparent predictive capability of Ψ. Predicted Ψ morphologies were often produced halfway through the eruption. Our pulse experiments are expected to produce morphologies unique to each eruption rate

  15. Thermal models for basaltic volcanism on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyil, L.; McEwen, A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new model for the thermal emissions from active basaltic eruptions on Io. While our methodology shares many similarities with previous work, it is significantly different in that (1) it uses a field tested cooling model and (2) the model is more applicable to pahoehoe flows and lava lakes than fountain-fed, channelized, 'a'a flows. This model demonstrates the large effect lava porosity has on the surface cooling rate (with denser flows cooling more slowly) and provides a preliminary tool for examining some of the hot spots on Io. The model infrared signature of a basaltic eruption is largely controlled by a single parameter, ??, the average survival time for a lava surface. During an active eruption surfaces are quickly covered or otherwise destroyed and typical values of ?? for a basaltic eruption are expected to be on the order of 10 seconds to 10 minutes. Our model suggests that the Galileo SSI eclipse data are consistent with moderately active to quiescent basaltic lava lakes but are not diagnostic of such activity. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Extensive lava flow fields on Venus: Preliminary investigation of source elevation and regional slope variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee-Roberts, K.; Head, James W., III; Lancaster, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    Large-volume lava flow fields have been identified on Venus, the most areally extensive of which are known as fluctus and have been subdivided into six morphologic types. Sheetlike flow fields (Type 1) lack the numerous, closely spaced, discrete lava flow lobes that characterize digitate flow fields. Transitional flow fields (Type 2) are similar to sheetlike flow fields but contain one or more broad flow lobes. Digitate flow fields are divided further into divergent (Types 3-5) and subparallel (Type 6) classes on the basis of variations in the amount of downstream flow divergence. As a result of our previous analysis of the detailed morphology, stratigraphy, and tectonic associations of Mylitta Fluctus, we have formulated a number of questions to apply to all large flow fields on Venus. In particular, we would like to address the following: (1) eruption conditions and style of flow emplacement (effusion rate, eruption duration), (2) the nature of magma storage zones (presence of neutral buoyancy zones, deep or shallow crustal magma chambers), (3) the origin of melt and possible link to mantle plumes, and (4) the importance of large flow fields in plains evolution. To answer these questions we have begun to examine variations in flow field dimension and morphology; the distribution of large flow fields in terms of elevation above the mean planetary radius; links to regional tectonic or volcanic structures (e.g., associations with large shield edifices, coronae, or rift zones); statigraphic relationships between large flow fields, volcanic plains, shields, and coronae; and various models of flow emplacement in order to estimate eruption parameters. In this particular study, we have examined the proximal elevations and topographic slopes of 16 of the most distinctive flow fields that represent each of the 6 morphologic types.

  17. Thermobarometry of Whangarei volcanic field lavas, New Zealand: Constraints on plumbing systems of small monogenetic basalt volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Phil; Coote, Alisha

    2018-04-01

    The intra-plate, basaltic Whangarei volcanic field (WVF) is a little-studied cluster of Quaternary monogenetic volcanoes in northern New Zealand. Clinopyroxene-melt equilibria provides an insight to the ascent and storage of the magmas that is not evident from whole-rock-scale geochemistry. Basalts from two of the younger volcanoes contain a population of equilibrium and disequilibrium clinopyroxene phenocrysts. Many of the crystals are resorbed, and are characterised by diffuse, patchy zoning, and low MgO (Mg#70-80) and Cr2O3 contents. Such crystals also occur as relic cores in other phenocrysts. These grew in a magma that was more evolved than that of the host rock composition. Equilibrium clinopyroxenes are enriched in MgO (Mg#83-88) and Cr2O3 ( 0.4-0.9 wt%), and occur as reverse-zoned crystals, and rim/mantle overgrowths on relic cores of other crystals. These crystals and rim/mantles zones nucleated in magma with a composition similar to that of the host rock. The textural relationships demonstrate that a mafic magma intruded a more silicic resident magma, resulting in crystal-exchange and entrainment of antecrysts. Clinopyroxene-melt equilibria indicate that the crystallisation occurred at temperatures in the range 1135-1195 °C, and pressures in the range 290-680 MPa. The dominant pressure mode (400-550 MPa) equates to depths of about 15-19 km which coincides with a present-day body of partial melt in the crust. Higher pressures indicated by subordinate crystal populations indicate staged ascent and crystallisation above the Moho ( 26 km depth). Thus, the magmatic system is envisaged as a crystal mush column through the lower and mid crust. Such crystallisation histories are perhaps not expected in low flux, monogenetic magma systems, and reflect the importance of the crustal density structure beneath the volcanoes. Future activity could be preceded by seismic events in the lower crust as the magmas intrude localised crystal mush bodies.

  18. Geology, geochronology, and geochemistry of basaltic flows of the Cat Hills, Cat Mesa, Wind Mesa, Cerro Verde, and Mesita Negra, central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, F.; Budahn, J.R.; Peters, L.; Unruh, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    The geochronology, geochemistry, and isotopic compositions of basaltic flows erupted from the Cat Hills, Cat Mesa, Wind Mesa, Cerro Verde, and Mesita Negra volcanic centres in central New Mexico indicate that each of these lavas had unique origins and that the predominant mantle involved in their production was an ocean-island basalt type. The basalts from Cat Hills (0.11 Ma) and Cat Mesa (3.0 Ma) are similar in major and trace element composition, but differences in MgO contents and Pb isotopic values are attributed to a small involvement of a lower crustal component in the genesis of the Cat Mesa rocks. The Cerro Verde rock is comparable in age (0.32 Ma) to the Cat Hills lavas, but it is more radiogenic in Sr and Nd, has higher MgO contents, and has a lower La/Yb ratio. This composition is explained by the melting of an enriched mantle source, but the involvement of another crustal component cannot be disregarded. The Wind Mesa rock is characterized by similar age (4.01 Ma) and MgO contents, but it has enriched rare-earth element contents compared with the Cat Mesa samples. These are attributed to a difference in the degree of partial melting of the Cat Mesa source. The Mesita Negra rock (8.11 Ma) has distinctive geochemical and isotopic compositions that suggest a different enriched mantle and that large amounts of a crustal component were involved in generating this magma. These data imply a temporal shift in magma source regions and crustal involvement, and have been previously proposed for Rio Grande rift lavas. ?? 2006 NRC Canada.

  19. Recent advances in the GPUSPH model for the thermal and rheological evolution of lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Vito; Bilotta, Giuseppe; Cappello, Annalisa; Dalrymple, Robert A.; Fortuna, Luigi; Ganci, Gaetana; Herault, Alexis; Del Negro, Ciro

    2016-04-01

    GPUSPH is a fully three-dimensional model for the simulation of the thermal and rheological evolution of lava flows that relies on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) numerical method. Thanks to the Lagrangian, meshless nature of SPH, the model incorporates a more complete physical description of the emplacement process and rheology of lava that considers the free surface, the irregular boundaries represented by the topography, the solidification fronts and the non-Newtonian rheology. Because of the very high degree of parallelism, GPUSPH is implemented very efficiently on high-performance graphics processing units (GPUs) employing the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), a parallel programming language developed by NVIDIA for GPU computing. GPUSPH follows the very general Herschel-Bulkley rheological model, which encompasses Newtonian, power-law and Bingham flow behaviour and can thus be used to explore in detail the impact of rheology on the behaviour of lava flows and on their emplacement. We present here the first validation tests of the GPUSPH model against well known analytical problems, considering the different rheological models, heat exchanges by thermal conduction and radiation, and providing the relative error estimates.

  20. Testing random forest classification for identifying lava flows and mapping age groups on a single Landsat 8 image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Solana, Carmen; Canters, Frank; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2017-10-01

    Mapping lava flows using satellite images is an important application of remote sensing in volcanology. Several volcanoes have been mapped through remote sensing using a wide range of data, from optical to thermal infrared and radar images, using techniques such as manual mapping, supervised/unsupervised classification, and elevation subtraction. So far, spectral-based mapping applications mainly focus on the use of traditional pixel-based classifiers, without much investigation into the added value of object-based approaches and into advantages of using machine learning algorithms. In this study, Nyamuragira, characterized by a series of > 20 overlapping lava flows erupted over the last century, was used as a case study. The random forest classifier was tested to map lava flows based on pixels and objects. Image classification was conducted for the 20 individual flows and for 8 groups of flows of similar age using a Landsat 8 image and a DEM of the volcano, both at 30-meter spatial resolution. Results show that object-based classification produces maps with continuous and homogeneous lava surfaces, in agreement with the physical characteristics of lava flows, while lava flows mapped through the pixel-based classification are heterogeneous and fragmented including much "salt and pepper noise". In terms of accuracy, both pixel-based and object-based classification performs well but the former results in higher accuracies than the latter except for mapping lava flow age groups without using topographic features. It is concluded that despite spectral similarity, lava flows of contrasting age can be well discriminated and mapped by means of image classification. The classification approach demonstrated in this study only requires easily accessible image data and can be applied to other volcanoes as well if there is sufficient information to calibrate the mapping.

  1. Lava tube shatter rings and their correlation with lava flux increases at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Shatter rings are circular to elliptical volcanic features, typically tens of meters in diameter, which form over active lava tubes. They are typified by an upraised rim of blocky rubble and a central depression. Prior to this study, shatter rings had not been observed forming, and, thus, were interpreted in many ways. This paper describes the process of formation for shatter rings observed at Kīlauea Volcano during November 2005–July 2006. During this period, tilt data, time-lapse images, and field observations showed that episodic tilt changes at the nearby Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone, the shallow magmatic source reservoir, were directly related to fluctuations in the level of lava in the active lava tube, with periods of deflation at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō correlating with increases in the level of the lava stream surface. Increases in lava level are interpreted as increases in lava flux, and were coincident with lava breakouts from shatter rings constructed over the lava tube. The repetitive behavior of the lava flux changes, inferred from the nearly continuous tilt oscillations, suggests that shatter rings form from the repeated rise and fall of a portion of a lava tube roof. The locations of shatter rings along the active lava tube suggest that they form where there is an abrupt decrease in flow velocity through the tube, e.g., large increase in tube width, abrupt decrease in tube slope, and (or) sudden change in tube direction. To conserve volume, this necessitates an abrupt increase in lava stream depth and causes over-pressurization of the tube. More than a hundred shatter rings have been identified on volcanoes on Hawai‘i and Maui, and dozens have been reported from basaltic lava fields in Iceland, Australia, Italy, Samoa, and the mainland United States. A quick study of other basaltic lava fields worldwide, using freely available satellite imagery, suggests that they might be even more common than previously thought. If so, this confirms that episodic

  2. Misalignment of Lava Flows from Topographic Slope Directions Reveals Late Amazonian Deformation at Arsia Mons, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, B. A.; Chadwick, J.; McGovern, P. J., Jr.; Tucker, W.

    2017-12-01

    Arsia Mons is the southernmost of the three large Tharsis Montes near the equator of Mars and one of the largest volcanoes in the solar system. The main edifice of Arsia is about 440 km in diameter, the summit is over 9 km above the surrounding plains and has a pronounced 110 km caldera. Like the other Tharsis volcanoes, Arsia has a large, Late Amazonian glacial deposit on its NW flank. Previous crater retention studies for lava flows on Arsia have shown that the volcano experienced significant volcanic activity in the past 200 Ma. In this study, numerous long (>25 km), thin lava flows on the plains surrounding Arsia were mapped and used as indicators of the topographic slope direction at the time of their emplacement. The azimuthal orientation of each flow was compared with the present-day slope directions on the surrounding plains, derived from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topographic data. The results reveal regions around Arsia where the flows no longer conform to the topography, indicating deformation in the time since the flows where emplaced. In a region of Daedalia Planum to the SE of Arsia, modern slope directions adjacent to 40 long lava flows are consistently misaligned from the paleo-slopes indicated by the lava flow orientations, with an angular offset that averages 7.2° in the clockwise direction. Crater size-frequency measurements for these tilted plains using CraterStats software indicate that the deformation responsible for the misaligned flows took place since 330 ± 10 Ma. Conversely, part of Daedalia Planum to the southwest of Arsia is younger, with a crater retention age of 160 ± 6 Ma, and this area shows no consistent flow-topography misalignments. These observations suggest that extensive regional deformation occurred between the two dates, consistent with other evidence for significant volcanism at Arsia in the Late Amazonian at about 200 Ma. Geophysical modelling using the finite element program COMSOL Multiphysics is planned to

  3. Nature and extent of lava-flow aquifers beneath Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prothro, L.B.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    Work is currently underway within the Underground Test Area subproject of the US Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office Environmental Restoration Program to develop corrective action plans in support of the overall corrective action strategy for the Nevada Test Site as established in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). A closure plan is currently being developed for Pahute Mesa, which has been identified in the FFACO as consisting of the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units. Part of this effort requires that hydrogeologic data be compiled for inclusion in a regional model that will be used to predict a contaminant boundary for these Corrective Action Units. Hydrogeologic maps have been prepared for use in the model to define the nature and extent of aquifers and confining units that might influence the flow of contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear tests conducted at Pahute Mesa. Much of the groundwater flow beneath Pahute Mesa occurs within lava-flow aquifers. An understanding of the distribution and hydraulic character of these important hydrogeologic units is necessary to accurately model groundwater flow beneath Pahute Mesa. This report summarizes the results of a study by Bechtel Nevada geologists to better define the hydrogeology of lava-flow aquifers at Pahute Mesa. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) aid in the development of the hydrostratigraphic framework for Pahute Mesa, and (2) provide information on the distribution and hydraulic character of lava-flow aquifers beneath Pahute Mesa for more accurate computer modeling of the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

  4. Investigating lava flows at Quizapu Volcano, on the ground and in the air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, E.; Ruprecht, P.; Moon, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    The emplacement of silicic and intermediate lava flows is not often witnessed directly, and thus quantitative assessment of existing flows is a critical step in the interpretation of flow dynamics and eruption conditions. Two key parameters - lava rheology and effusion rate - are both difficult to assess many years after the eruption ended. Yet both are reflected in observables such as flow morphology (including roughness, folding and inflation structures), and micro-texture (including vesicularity, crystallinity, and microlite content). Therefore, it is important to collect data sets of high spatial resolution of both samples and topography of a target flow. We present a case study from Quizapu volcano (Chile), where an 1846 effusive eruption emplaced a suite of large lava flows, spanning composition from silicis andesitic to dacite. We focus on two major flow lobes, which, despite originating from the same eruption, and traversing similar topography, exhibit different large-scale structure: The southern flow (SF) has a uniform, smooth, almost straight geometry, while the northern flow (NF) has undulating boundaries and irregular width and thickness. We collected and utilized two sets of data: 1) thousands of aerial photos collected during 12 UAV flights, and 2) 68 hand samples which covered both the main channels and the levees of both flows in a systematic grid pattern. We present outcomes from analysis of samples for 3D structure, crystallinity, and vesicularity using X-ray microtomography, for micrstructure using thin sections and SEM, and for major and trace element composition using XRF. The aerial photographs were used to construct high-resolution (few cm) digital elevation models (DEMs) of several segments of each flow. From the DEMs we extracted along- and across-flow profiles which reveal morphological differences between NF and SF, with pressure ridges at NF wider and taller than those of SF. However, both flows share a common trend line in the

  5. Primary succession of Hawaiian montane rain forest on a chronosequence of eight lava flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitayama, K.; Mueller-Dombois, D. [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, (United States) Dept. of Botany; Vitousek, P.M. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States) Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1995-04-01

    The primary-successional sere of a Hawaiian montane rain forest was inferred from an age sequence of eight closely located `a`a flows (clinker type lava); 8, 50, 140, ca. 300, ca. 400, ca. 1400, ca. 3000 and ca.9000 yr, on a windward slope of Mauna Loa, Hawaii. All study sites (0.2 ha each) were at 1120-1250 m a.s.l. with 4000 mm mean annual rainfall. The 400-yr, 1400-yr, and 9000-yr flows had younger volcanic ash deposits, while the others were pure lava. Comparisons of tree size and foliar nutrients suggested that ash increased the availability of nitrogen, and subsequently standing biomass. An Unweighted Pair Group Cluster Analysis on the samples (flows) using quantitative vascular species composition revealed that clusters were correlated with age regardless of the substrate types (pure lava vs. ash), and an indirect ordination on the samples suggested that the sequence of sample scores along axis 1 was perfectly correlated with the age sequence. Although ash deposits increased biomass, they did not affect the sequence of the successional sere. Both pubescent and glabrous varieties of Metrosideros polymorpha (Myrtaceae) dominated upper canopy layers on all flows {>=} 50 yr and {<=} 1400 yr, but the pubescent variety was replaced by the glabrous on the flows {>=} 3000 yr. Lower layers were dominated initially by a mated fern, Dicranopteris linearis, up to 300 yr, and subsequently by tree ferns, Cibotium spp., to 9000 yr. The cover of Cibotium declined sightly after 3000 yr, while other native herb and shrub species increased. 43 refs, 7 figs, 4 tabs

  6. Remotely Characterizing the Topographic and Thermal Evolution of Kīlauea's Lava Flow Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, M. E.; Vaughan, R. G.; Poland, M. P.

    2017-12-01

    New technologies in satellite data acquisition and the continuous development of analysis software capabilities are greatly improving the ability of scientists to monitor volcanoes in near-real-time. Satellite-based thermal infrared (TIR) data are used to monitor and analyze new and ongoing volcanic activity by identifying and quantifying surface thermal characteristics and lava flow discharge rates. Improved detector sensitivities provide unprecedented spatial detail in visible to shortwave infrared (VSWIR) satellite imagery. The acquisition of stereo and tri-stereo visible imagery, as well as SAR, by an increasing number of satellite systems enables the creation of digital elevation models (DEMs) at higher temporal frequencies and resolutions than in the past. Free, user-friendly software programs, such as NASA's Ames Stereo Pipeline and Google Earth Engine, ease the accessibility and usability of satellite data to users unfamiliar with traditional analysis techniques. An effective and efficient integration of these technologies can be utilized towards volcano monitoring.Here, we use the active lava flows from the East Rift Zone vents of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i as a testing ground for developing new techniques in multi-sensor volcano remote sensing. We use DEMs generated from stereo and tri-stereo images captured by the WorldView3 and Pleiades satellite systems to assess topographic changes over time at the active flow fields. Time-series data of lava flow area, thickness, and discharge rate developed from thermal emission measurements collected by ASTER, Landsat 8, and WorldView3 are compared to satellite-detected topographic changes and to ground observations of flow development to identify behavioral patterns and to monitor flow field evolution. We explore methods of combining these visual and TIR data sets collected by multiple satellite systems with a variety of resolutions and repeat times. Our ultimate goal is to develop integrative tools for near

  7. Yield strengths of flows on the earth, Mars, and moon. [application of Bingham plastic model to lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, H. J.; Arthur, D. W. G.; Schaber, G. G.

    1978-01-01

    Dimensions of flows on the earth, Mars, and moon and their topographic gradients obtained from remote measurements are used to calculate yield strengths with a view to explore the validity of the Bingham plastic model and determine whether there is a relation between yield strengths and silica contents. Other factors are considered such as the vagaries of natural phenomena that might contribute to erroneous interpretations and measurements. Comparison of yield strengths of Martian and lunar flows with terrestrial flows suggests that the Martian and lunar flows are more akin to terrestrial basalts than they are to terrestrial andesites, trachytes, and rhyolites.

  8. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  9. Microtopographic evolution of lava flows at Cima volcanic field, Mojave Desert, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Tom G.

    1992-01-01

    Microtopographic profiles were measured and power spectra calculated for dated lava flow surfaces at Cima volcanic field in the eastern Mojave Desert of California in order to quantify changes in centimeter- to meter-scale roughness as a function of age. For lava flows younger than about 0.8 m.y., roughness over all spatial scales decreases with age, with meter-scale roughness decreasing slightly more than centimeter scales. Flows older than about 0.8 m.y. show a reversal of this trend, becoming as rough as young flows at these scales. Modeling indicates that eolian deposition can explain most of the change observed in the offset, or roughness amplitude, of power spectra of flow surface profiles up to 0.8 m.y. Other processes, such as rubbing and stone pavement development, appear to have a minor effect in this age range. Changes in power spectra of surfaces older than about 0.8 m.y. are consistent with roughening due to fluvial dissection. These results agree qualitatively with a process-response model that attributes systematic changes in flow surface morphology to cyclic changes in the rates of eolian, soil formation, and fluvial processes. Identification of active surficial processes and estimation of the extent of their effects, or stage of surficial evolution, through measurement of surface roughness will help put the correlation of surficial units on a quantitative basis. This may form the basis for the use of radar remote sensing data to help in regional correlations of surficial units.

  10. Terrestrial analogs and thermal models for Martian flood lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, L.; McEwen, A. S.; Thordarson, T.

    2000-06-01

    The recent flood lavas on Mars appear to have a characteristic ``platy-ridged'' surface morphology different from that inferred for most terrestrial continental flood basalt flows. The closest analog we have found is a portion of the 1783-1784 Laki lava flow in Iceland that has a surface that was broken up and transported on top of moving lava during major surges in the eruption rate. We suggest that a similar process formed the Martian flood lava surfaces and attempt to place constraints on the eruption parameters using thermal modeling. Our conclusions from this modeling are (1) in order to produce flows >1000 km long with flow thicknesses of a few tens of meters, the thermophysical properties of the lava should be similar to fluid basalt, and (2) the average eruption rates were probably of the order of 104m3/s, with the flood-like surges having flow rates of the order of 105-106m3/s. We also suggest that these high eruption rates should have formed huge volumes of pyroclastic deposits which may be preserved in the Medusae Fossae Formation, the radar ``stealth'' region, or even the polar layered terrains.

  11. Difficulties in Forecasting Flow Paths During the 2014-2015 Lava Flow Crisis at Kīlauea Volcano (Hawaíi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Trusdell, F.; Llewellin, E. W.; Kauahikaua, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Kīlauea's East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruptive activity at Púu ´Ō´ō shifted to a new vent in June 2014, sparking a lava flow crisis that threatened critical infrastructure near the town of Pāhoa in east Hawaíi. The lava flow proved to be challenging to forecast because of the influence of ground cracks on flow direction, frequent fluctuations in lava supply, and the subtle interplay between ground slope and confining topography that prevented the flow from spreading laterally. After its onset, the "June 27th" flow, named informally for its start date, advanced northeast at up to several hundred m/day. The flow's path through heavy forest was forecast using steepest-descent paths derived from a digital elevation model (DEM). Flow path uncertainties were minimized using a multiple-run technique and built-in random DEM errors (modified from Favalli et al., 2005). In mid-August, the flow encountered and entered one of many deep, discontinuous ground cracks along Kīlauea's middle ERZ. The flow continued to advance out of sight in the crack, as inferred from a forward-progressing line of steam. A week later, lava spilled from the crack 1.3 km downslope, advancing along a different flow path than was forecast. By early September, the flow had entered and exited three more cracks sequentially, carrying the flow across slope, thus making flow path forecasts unreliable. Moreover, lava-occupied cracks dilated by up to 3 m. The lava accumulating in the ground cracks forced immense, but apparently mobile, blocks to shift. Thus, while an open crack was required to capture the lava, the lava was able to force its way beyond where the crack closed. In this way, the lava flow acted as an intruding dike. The flow eventually advanced beyond the area of cracks and onto a steepest-descent path that guided the flow toward the town of Pāhoa, where it destroyed one house, reached to within ~155 m of the main street in Pāhoa, and threatened the main highway and shopping center serving

  12. Geochemistry and magnetostratigraphy of Deccan flows at Anjar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan, Krishtel eMaging Solutions

    In their major and trace element composition, the alkali basalts resemble Ocean ... carbonatitic lavas form only minor components. It. Keywords. Anjar flows; K/T boundary; alkali basalts; magnetostratigraphy; geochemistry; ocean island basalts; Réunion plume. Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. (Earth Planet. Sci.), 110, No. 2, June ...

  13. Monitoring Inflation and Emplacement During the 2014-2015 Kilauea Lava Flow With an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perroy, R. L.; Turner, N.; Hon, K. A.; Rasgado, V.

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) provide a powerful new tool for collecting high resolution on-demand spatial data over volcanic eruptions and other active geomorphic processes. These data can be used to improve hazard forecasts and emergency response efforts, and also allow users to economically and safely observe and quantify lava flow inflation and emplacement on spatially and temporally useful scales. We used a small fixed-wing UAV with a modified point-and-shoot camera to repeatedly map the active front of the 2014-2015 Kīlauea lava flow over a one-month period in late 2014, at times with a two-hour repeat interval. An additional subsequent flight was added in July, 2015. We used the imagery from these flights to generate a time-series of 5-cm resolution RGB and near-infrared orthoimagery mosaics and associated digital surface models using structure from motion. Survey-grade positional control was provided by ground control points with differential GPS. Two topographic transects were repeatedly surveyed across the flow surface, contemporaneously with UAV flights, to independently confirm topographic changes observed in the UAV-derived surface models. Vertical errors were generally 10 cm. Inside our 50 hectare study site, the flow advanced at a rate of 0.47 hectares/day during the first three weeks of observations before abruptly stalling out 4 m. New outbreak areas, both on the existing flow surface and along the flow margins, were readily mapped across the study area. We detected sinuous growing inflation ridges within the flow surface that correlated with subsequent outbreaks of new lava, suggesting that repeat UAV flights can provide a means of better predicting pahoehoe lava flow behavior over flat or uneven topography. Our results show that UAVs can generate accurate and digital surface models quickly and inexpensively over rapidly changing active pahoehoe lava flows.

  14. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd chronology and genealogy of mare basalts from the Sea of Tranquility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.; Depaolo, D. J.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages of two Apollo 11 mare basalts, high-K basalt 10072 and low-K basalt 10062, are reported. Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Ar-40-Ar-39 ages are in good agreement and indicate an extensive time interval for filling of the Sea of Tranquility, presumably by thin lava flows, in agreement with similar observations for the Ocean of Storms. Initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions on Apollo 11 basalts reveal at least two parent sources producing basalts. The Sm-Nd isotopic data demonstrate that low-K and high-Ti basalts from Apollo 11 and 17 derived from distinct reservoirs, while low-Ti Apollo 15 mare basalt sources have Sm/Nd similar to the sources of Apollo 11 basalts. Groupings of mare basalt based on Ti content and on isotopic data do not coincide.

  15. Early Jurassic Carbon and Sodium Sequestration in a CAMP basalt flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, K. A.; Puffer, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    The initial HTQ-type CAMP Orange Mountain Basalt flow, as well as related pillowed flows and the overlying Preakness flows, locally underwent substantial and well documented albitization, chloritization, and sulphate, carbonate, and zeolite mineralization. Layers representing at least 25 vol % of the Orange Mountain Basalt have undergone a major net increase in sodium and carbon content and a major redistribution of magnesium and calcium. Most alteration occurred during the development of a widespread early Jurassic geothermal system similar to the active system of Iceland. In both cases alteration was controlled by active circulation of basin brines through vesicular layers during rapid burial at temperatures that were kept elevated by recurring magmatism. Whole rock Na2O levels typically increased from 2.2 wt. % in unaltered layers to 3.2 wt. % in vesicular layers, and commonly reached levels exceeding 5 wt. %. The environmental implications of the removal of such massive amounts of sodium from the geothermal system on the chlorine budget and the salt content of Early Jurassic lakes are currently being evaluated. Massive amounts of carbon sequestration from the geothermal system may have mitigated an increased burden on the early Jurassic atmosphere where geothermal CO2 may have otherwise been vented at hot springs or solfataras. Calcite amygdules typically account for 5 to 10 vol. % of the vesiculated layers amounting to 66 to 132 kg of CO2 per m3 of basalt. If 25 vol. % of the 160 thick Orange Mountain Basalt is vesiculated that would equate to about 2640 to 5280 kg of CO2 per m2 of basalt. The full extent of calcite enrichment across the entire CAMP province, however, has not yet been determined.

  16. Plateaus and sinuous ridges as the fingerprints of lava flow inflation in the Eastern Tharsis Plains of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Orr, Tim R.; de Wet, Andrew P.; Zimbelman, James R.; Hamilton, Christopher W.; Brent Garry, W.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Williams, David A.

    2017-08-01

    The Tharsis Montes rift aprons are composed of outpourings of lava from chaotic terrains to the northeast and southwest flank of each volcano. Sinuous and branching channel networks that are present on the rift aprons suggest the possibility of fluvial processes in their development, or erosion by rapidly emplaced lavas, but the style of lava flow emplacement throughout rift apron development is not clearly understood. To better characterize the style of lava emplacement and role of fluvial processes in rift apron development, we conducted morphological mapping of the Pavonis Mons southwest rift apron and the eastern Tharsis plains using images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), Context Camera (CTX), Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) along with the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Precision Experiment Data Records (PEDRs) and gridded data. Our approach was to: (1) search for depositional fans at the slope break between the rift apron and adjacent low slope plains; (2) determine if there is evidence that previously formed deposits might have been buried by plains units; (3) characterize the Tharsis plains morphologies east of Pavonis Mons; and (4) assess their relationship to the rift apron units. We have not identified topographically significant depositional fans, nor did we observe evidence to suggest that plains units have buried older rift apron units. Flow features associated with the rift apron are observed to continue across the slope break onto the plains. In this area, the plains are composed of a variety of small fissures and low shield vents around which broad channel-fed and tube-fed flows have been identified. We also find broad, flat-topped plateaus and sinuous ridges mixed among the channels, tubes and vents. Flat-topped plateaus and sinuous ridges are morphologies that are analogous to those observed on the coastal plain of Hawai'i, where lava

  17. Controls on lava-snow interactions from propogation styles during the 2012-13 Tolbachik eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Benjamin; Belousov, Alexander; Belousov, Marina

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of how volcanism interacts with hydrosphere/cryosphere is critical for understanding the functioning and evolution of the Earth, establishing volcanism-climate linkages, and estimations of related hazards. Until now, no special studies have been focused on interactions between snowpack and advancing incandescent lava during volcanic eruptions, even though snow is the most widely distributed form of solid H2O on the planet. It was thought a priori that snow might melt rapidly in front of active lava flows producing vigorous floods. Here we present results of unique field observations made in the snowpack in front of advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations in the first time demonstrate that in reality heat transfer through lava/snow boundary occurs relatively slowly, so that melting of the majority of the snow pack occurs over the span of several hours-days after emplacement of the lava flows, producing only local and sporadic meltwater floods. Two fundamentally different styles of lava propagation result in two strikingly different responses of snowpack: i) 'a'a lava advancing in a rolling caterpillar-track motion propagates on top of snowpack; the melt water accumulates in (saturates) the layer of snow buried underneath the lava flow and does not interact notably with the lava material, and ii) pahoehoe lava advancing as inflating lobes propagates beneath/inside snowpack, locally generating slowly growing 'snow-domes'; the melt water precipitates down into incandescent lava producing chilling and local thermal shock/quench fragmentation (minor hyaloclastite production). Our observations show that lava-snow interactions can vary significantly depending on styles of flow front advance. Lava flows emplaced over areas covered with snow bear features that can be distinguished in old stratigraphic sequences and used for paleoclimatic reconstructions on Earth, Mars and other planets.

  18. The influence of cooling on the advance of lava flows: insights from analogue experiments on the feedbacks between flow dynamics and thermal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2012-12-01

    During an effusive volcanic eruption, the crisis management is mainly based on the prediction of lava flows advance and its velocity. The spreading of a lava flow, seen as a gravity current, depends on its "effective rheology" and the eruptive mass flux. These two parameters are not known a priori during an eruption and a key question is how to evaluate them in near real-time (rather than afterwards.) There is no generic macroscopic model for the rheology of an advancing lava flow, and analogue modelling is a precious tool to empirically estimate the rheology of a complex flow. We investigate through laboratory experiments the simultaneous spreading and cooling of horizontal currents fed at constant rate from a point source. The materials used are silicone oil (isoviscous), and poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) wax injected in liquid state and solidiying during its advance. In the isoviscous case, the temperature field is a passive tracer of the flow dynamics, whereas in the PEG experiments there is a feedback between the cooling of the flow and its effective rheology. We focus on the evolution of the current area and of the surface thermal structure, imaged with an infrared camera, to assess how the thermal structure can be related to the flow rate. The flow advance is continuous in the viscous case, and follows the predictions of Huppert (1982); in that case the surface temperature become steady after a transient time and the radiated heat flux is shown to be proportional to the input rate. For the PEG experiments, the spreading occurs through an alternation of stagnation and overflow phases, with a mean spreading rate decreasing as the experiment goes on. As in the case of lava flows, these experiments can exhibit a compound flow field, solid levees, thermal erosion, liquid overflows and channelization. A key observation is that the effective rheology of the solifying PEG material depends on the input flow rate, with high input rates yielding a rheology closer to the

  19. New and revised 14C dates for Hawaiian surface lava flows: Paleomagnetic and geomagnetic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressline, N.; Trusdell, F.A.; Gubbins, David

    2009-01-01

    Radiocarbon dates have been obtained for 30 charcoal samples corresponding to 27 surface lava flows from the Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii. The submitted charcoal was a mixture of fresh and archived material. Preparation and analysis was undertaken at the NERC Radiocarbon Laboratory in Glasgow, Scotland, and the associated SUERC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility. The resulting dates range from 390 years B.P. to 12,910 years B.P. with corresponding error bars an order of magnitude smaller than previously obtained using the gas-counting method. The new and revised 14C data set can aid hazard and risk assessment on the island. The data presented here also have implications for geomagnetic modelling, which at present is limited by large dating errors. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Parallel Genetic Algorithms for calibrating Cellular Automata models: Application to lava flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosio, D.; Spataro, W.; Di Gregorio, S.; Calabria Univ., Cosenza; Crisci, G.M.; Rongo, R.; Calabria Univ., Cosenza

    2005-01-01

    Cellular Automata are highly nonlinear dynamical systems which are suitable far simulating natural phenomena whose behaviour may be specified in terms of local interactions. The Cellular Automata model SCIARA, developed far the simulation of lava flows, demonstrated to be able to reproduce the behaviour of Etnean events. However, in order to apply the model far the prediction of future scenarios, a thorough calibrating phase is required. This work presents the application of Genetic Algorithms, general-purpose search algorithms inspired to natural selection and genetics, far the parameters optimisation of the model SCIARA. Difficulties due to the elevated computational time suggested the adoption a Master-Slave Parallel Genetic Algorithm far the calibration of the model with respect to the 2001 Mt. Etna eruption. Results demonstrated the usefulness of the approach, both in terms of computing time and quality of performed simulations

  1. Paleomagnetic study of an historical lava flow from the Llaima volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Chiara, A.; Moncinhatto, T.; Hernandez Moreno, C.; Pavón-Carrasco, F. J.; Trindade, R. I. F.

    2017-08-01

    The understanding of the paleosecular variations (PSV) of the geomagnetic field in South America is still biased by the scarcity of data. Especially, the recent geomagnetic PSV is characterized by the large growth of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA) during the last centuries, first documented by the geomagnetic model gufm1 (Jackson et al., 2000). A large amount of data is required to understand the time and geographic distribution of this primary feature, and the Andean Pleistocene and Holocene volcanoes are an excellent recorder of instant local changes in SV. Here we present a preliminary study from 18 paleomagnetic samples collected during 2015 on what it was supposed to be the 1750 or the 1957-58 AD lava flow on the Llaima Volcano (38.692° S; 71.729° W), one of the most active centers of the Chilean Andes, in the Southern Volcanic Zone. A detailed paleomagnetic study was performed in order to recover the Declination and Inclination of the geomagnetic field, obtain the paleointensity and define the magnetic mineralogy. AF demagnetization until 1 T yielded an average vector at Dec/Inc 2.3°/-33.1° with α95 of 2.4°. This direction is carried by titanomagnetite grains with 40-45% ulvospinel as revealed by thermomagnetic curves. Paleointensity estimates were obtained following the IZZI-Thellier protocol. Seven specimens from 5 samples provided reliable results (success rate of 35%), giving an average paleointensity for these specimens of 30.88 ± 2.39 μT. The full magnetic vector obtained here was compared to archaeomagnetic reference curves and the IGRF suggest that the lava flow has the age of 1957-58 AD.

  2. Correlation between basalt flows and radiochemical and chemical constituents in selected wells in the southwestern part of the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K. V.; Champion, Duane E.

    2017-12-21

    Wastewater discharged to wells and ponds and wastes buried in shallow pits and trenches at facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have contributed contaminants to the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer in the southwestern part of the INL. This report describes the correlation between subsurface stratigraphy in the southwestern part of the INL with information on the presence or absence of wastewater constituents to better understand how flow pathways in the aquifer control the movement of wastewater discharged at INL facilities. Paleomagnetic inclination was used to identify subsurface basalt flows based on similar inclination measurements, polarity, and stratigraphic position. Tritium concentrations, along with other chemical information for wells where tritium concentrations were lacking, were used as an indicator of which wells were influenced by wastewater disposal.The basalt lava flows in the upper 150 feet of the ESRP aquifer where wastewater was discharged at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) consisted of the Central Facilities Area (CFA) Buried Vent flow and the AEC Butte flow. At the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex, where wastewater would presumably pond on the surface of the water table, the CFA Buried Vent flow probably occurs as the primary stratigraphic unit present; however, AEC Butte flow also could be present at some of the locations. At the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), where contamination from buried wastes would presumably move down through the unsaturated zone and pond on the surface of the water table, the CFA Buried Vent; Late Basal Brunhes; or Early Basal Brunhes basalt flows are the flow unit at or near the water table in different cores.In the wells closer to where wastewater disposal occurred at INTEC and the ATR-Complex, almost all the wells show wastewater influence in the upper part of the ESRP aquifer and wastewater is present in both the CFA Buried Vent flow and AEC Butte

  3. Surface exposure dating of Holocene basalt flows and cinder cones in the Kula volcanic field (western Turkey) using cosmogenic 3He and 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Caroline; Niedermann, Samuel; Hetzel, Ralf; Akal, Cüneyt

    2015-04-01

    The Kula volcanic field is the youngest volcanic province in western Anatolia and covers an area of about 600 km2 around the town Kula (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996). Its alkali basalts formed by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle in a region of long-lived continental extension and asthenospheric upwelling (Prelevic et al., 2012). Based on morphological criteria and 40Ar/39Ar dating, four phases of Quaternary activity have been distinguished in the Kula volcanic field (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996; Westaway et al., 2006). The youngest lava flows are thought to be Holocene in age, but so far only one sample from this group was dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 7±2 ka (Westaway et al., 2006). In this study, we analysed cosmogenic 3He in olivine phenocrysts from three basalt flows and one cinder cone to resolve the Holocene history of volcanic eruptions in more detail. In addition, we applied 10Be exposure dating to two quartz-bearing xenoliths found at the surface of one flow and at the top of one cinder cone. The exposure ages fall in the range between ~500 and ~3000 years, demonstrating that the youngest volcanic activity is Late Holocene in age and therefore distinctly younger than previously envisaged. Our results show that the Late Holocene lava flows are not coeval but formed over a period of a few thousand years. We conclude that surface exposure dating of very young volcanic rocks provides a powerful alternative to 40Ar/39Ar dating. References Prelevic, D., Akal, C. Foley, S.F., Romer, R.L., Stracke, A. and van den Bogaard, P. (2012). Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post-collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Petrology, 53, 1019-1055. Richardson-Bunbury, J.M. (1996). The Kula Volcanic Field, western Turkey: the development of a Holocene alkali basalt province and the adjacent normal-faulting graben. Geological Magazine, 133, 275-283. Westaway, R., Guillou, H., Yurtmen, S., Beck, A

  4. Comparative analysis between Payen and Daedalia Planum lava fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Massironi, Matteo; Pasquarè, Giorgio; Carli, Cristian; Martellato, Elena; Frigeri, Alessandro; Cremonese, Gabriele; Bistacchi, Andrea; Federico, Costanzo

    The Payen volcanic complex is a large Quaternary fissural structure belonging to the back-arc extensional area of the Andes in the Mendoza Province (Argentina). From the eastern portion of this volcanic structure huge pahoehoe lava flows were emitted, extending more than 180 km from the feeding vents. These huge flows propagated over the nearly flat surface of the Pampean foreland (ca 0.3° slope). The very low viscosity of the olivine basalt lavas, coupled with the inflation process are the most probable explanation for their considerable length. In an inflation process a thin viscoelastic crust, produced at an early stage, is later inflated by the underlying fluid core, which remains hot and fluid thanks to the thermal-shield effect of the crust. The inflation shows some typical morphological fingerprints like tumuli, lava lobes, lava rises and lava ridges. In order to compare the morphology of the Argentinean Payen flows with lava flows on Mars, MOLA, THEMIS, MOC, MRO/HIRISE, and MEX/OMEGA data have been analysed, providing a multi-scale characterisation of Martian flows. Mars Global Surveyor/MOLA data were used to investigate the topographic environment over which flows propagated on Mars in order to detect very low angle slopes where possibly inflation processes could have developed. Then Mars Odyssey/THEMIS and Mars Global Surveyor's MOC data were used to detect Martian lava flows with inflation "fingerprints", whereas OMEGA data were used to obtain some inferences about their composition. Finally the MRO/HIRISE images recently acquired, can provide further details and constraints on surface morphologies and lava fronts. All these data were used to analyze Daedalia Planum lava field, at about 300 km southwest of Arsia Mons, and clear morphological similarities with the longest flows of the Payen lava fields were found. These striking morphological analogies suggest that inflation process is quite common also for the Daedalia field. This is also supported by

  5. Tracking lava flow emplacement on the east rift zone of Kīlauea, Hawai‘i, with synthetic aperture radar coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietterich, Hannah R.; Poland, Michael P.; Schmidt, David A.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Sherrod, David R.; Espinosa, Arkin Tapia

    2012-05-01

    Lava flow mapping is both an essential component of volcano monitoring and a valuable tool for investigating lava flow behavior. Although maps are traditionally created through field surveys, remote sensing allows an extraordinary view of active lava flows while avoiding the difficulties of mapping on location. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, in particular, can detect changes in a flow field by comparing two images collected at different times with SAR coherence. New lava flows radically alter the scattering properties of the surface, making the radar signal decorrelated in SAR coherence images. We describe a new technique, SAR Coherence Mapping (SCM), to map lava flows automatically from coherence images independent of look angle or satellite path. We use this approach to map lava flow emplacement during the Pu`u `Ō`ō-Kupaianaha eruption at Kīlauea, Hawai`i. The resulting flow maps correspond well with field mapping and better resolve the internal structure of surface flows, as well as the locations of active flow paths. However, the SCM technique is only moderately successful at mapping flows that enter vegetation, which is also often decorrelated between successive SAR images. Along with measurements of planform morphology, we are able to show that the length of time a flow stays decorrelated after initial emplacement is linearly related to the flow thickness. Finally, we use interferograms obtained after flow surfaces become correlated to show that persistent decorrelation is caused by post-emplacement flow subsidence.

  6. Flow-by-flow chemical stratigraphy and evolution of thirteen Serra Geral Group basalt flows from Vista Alegre, southernmost Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viter M Pinto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The geochemical characterization of thirteen Serra Geral Group flows in the Vista Alegre region (RS-SC, southern Brazil, displays the homogeneous basaltic composition near 50 wt.% SiO2. Each of the five basal flows (Pitanga-type, high-Ti/Y ~600, TiO2 > 3 wt.% and eight upper flows (Paranapanema-type, medium Ti/Y ~400, TiO2 > 2 wt.% can be identified from their chemical composition; sets of flows have parallel variation in chemical composition. The flow-by-flowcorrelation in four sections shows the horizontal position of the flows in three profiles and an approximately 200-m downdrop of the Itapiranga block with respect to the Frederico Westphalen block. The world-class amethyst geode mineralization and the systematic presence of native copper in the basalts make the correlation of great geological and economic significance.A caracterização geoquímica de treze derrames do Grupo Serra Geral na região de Vista Alegre (RS e SC, sul do Brasil, exibe uma composição basáltica homogênea próxima a 50% de SiO2. Os cinco derrames basais são classificados quimicamente como tipo Pitanga (alto Ti/Y ~600 e TiO2 > 3 em peso percentual, os demais oito derrames possuem médio Ti/Y ~400 com TiO2 ~2.5 em peso percentual, sendo classificados como magma tipo Paranapanema. Cada derrame pode ser identificado através de sua composição química e correlacionado, com variação paralela entre os perfis estudados. A correlação derrame a derrame nos quatro perfis demonstra uma posição horizontal em três perfis e um rejeito vertical de aproximadamente 200 m do bloco Itapiranga em relação ao bloco Frederico Westphalen. A presença de jazidas de ametista em geodos e a sistemática ocorrência de cobre nativo nos basaltos da região tornam a correlação de grande significado geológico e econômico.

  7. Emplacement of inflated Pāhoehoe flows in the Naude's Nek Pass, Lesotho remnant, Karoo continental flood basalt province: use of flow-lobe tumuli in understanding flood basalt emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Anne E.; Marsh, Julian S.; Fluteau, Frédéric; Courtillot, Vincent

    2018-02-01

    Physical volcanological features are presented for a 710-m-thick section, of the Naude's Nek Pass, within the lower part of the Lesotho remnant of the Karoo Large Igneous Province. The section consists of inflated pāhoehoe lava with thin, impersistent sedimentary interbeds towards the base. There are seven discreet packages of compound and hummocky pāhoehoe lobes containing flow-lobe tumuli, making up approximately 50% of the section. Approximately 45% of the sequence consists of 14 sheet lobes, between 10 and 52-m-thick. The majority of the sheet lobes are in two packages indicating prolonged periods of lava supply capable of producing thick sheet lobes. The other sheet lobes are as individual lobes or pairs, within compound flows, suggesting brief increases in lava supply rate. We suggest, contrary to current belief, that there is no evidence that compound flows are proximal to source and sheet lobes (simple flows) are distal to source and we propose that the presence of flow-lobe tumuli in compound flows could be an indicator that a flow is distal to source. We use detailed, previously published, studies of the Thakurvadi Formation (Deccan Traps) as an example. We show that the length of a lobe and therefore the sections that are `medial or distal to source' are specific to each individual lobe and are dependent on the lava supply of each eruptive event, and as such flow lobe tumuli can be used as an indicator of relative distance from source.

  8. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (3-D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin. Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy. The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks. As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography to identify rocks and

  9. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (False Color)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin. Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy. The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks. As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography to identify rocks and

  10. Rate of deformation in the Pasco Basin during the Miocene as determined by distribution of Columbia River basalt flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reidel, S.P.; Ledgerwood, R.K.; Myers, C.W.; Jones, M.G.; Landon, R.D.

    1980-03-01

    Detailed mapping of over 8000 square kilometers and logs from 20 core holes were used to determine the distribution and thickness of basalt flows and interbeds in the Pasco Basin. The data indicate the high-MgO Grande Ronde Basalt and Wanapum Basalt thicken from the northeast to the southwest. Deformation began in late Frenchman Springs time in the Saddle Mountains along a northwest-southeast trend and in Roza time along an east-west trend. By late Wanapum time, basalt flows were more restricted on the east side. Saddle Mountains Basalt flows spread out in the basin from narrow channels to the east. The Umatilla Member entered from the southeast and is confined to the south-central basin, while the Wilbur Creek, Asotin, Esquatzel, Pomona, and Elephant Mountain Members entered from the east and northeast. The distribution of these members is controlled by flow volume, boundaries of other flows, and developing ridges. The Wilbur Creek, Asotin, and Esquatzel flows exited from the basin in a channel along the northern margin of the Umatilla flow, while the Pomona and Elephant Mountain flows exited between Umtanum Ridge and Wallula Gap. The thickness of sedimentary interbeds and basalt flows indicated subsidence and/or uplift began in post-Grande Ronde time (14.5 million years before present) and continued through Saddle Mountains time (10.5 million years before present). Maximum subsidence occurred 40 kilometers (24 miles) north of Richland, Washington with an approximate rate of 25 meters (81 feet) per million years during the eruption of the basalt. Maximum uplift along the developing ridges was 70 meters (230 feet) per million years

  11. Topographic Constraints on Lava Flow Patterns: the December 2010 Eruption of Piton de La Fournaise (La Réunion)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, A.; Harris, A. J. L.; Gurioli, L.; Villeneuve, N.; Whittington, A. G.; Rhéty, M.

    2016-12-01

    The December 2010 lava flow of Piton de La Fournaise consists of four separate branches, all fed by the same fissure over about 15 hours, but then flowing in slightly different directions. This provided us a unique chance to address the long-standing question of how pre-existing topography controls lava flow patterns. Each flow branch was mapped and sampled from vent to toe. The morphology of all branches can be described using a combination of three basic cross-section types (perpendicular to flow direction): (1) single, stable channel; (2) unstable, braided channels; and (3) dispersed flow. These flow morphologies depend on pre-existing underlying topography, so that a steep slope results in a stable channel, while a gentle slope results in a braided channel. Downflow slope variations can drive the flow morphology to switch back and forth between a single stable channel and multiple braided channels several times along its length. However, in our volume-limited study case, if slope falls below a critical threshold the flow becomes dispersed and stops shortly thereafter. The exact transition values from stable to braided channel and vice-versa depend on parameters other than topography, such as magma effusion rate, as illustrated by the comparative analyses of the different flow branches. The findings of this study allow us to interpret and explain the observed flow patterns on the basis of pre-existing volcano topography and effusion rates estimates.

  12. Emplacement of subaerial pahoehoe lava sheet flows into water: 1990 Kūpaianaha flow of Kilauea volcano at Kaimū Bay, Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umino, Susumu; Nonaka, Miyuki; Kauahikaua, James P.

    2006-01-01

    Episode 48 of the ongoing eruption of Kilauea, Hawai`i, began in July 1986 and continuously extruded lava for the next 5.5 years from a low shield, Kūpaianaha. The flows in March 1990 headed for Kalapana and inundated the entire town under 15–25 m of lava by the end of August. As the flows advanced eastward, they entered into Kaimū Bay, replacing it with a plain of lava that extends 300 m beyond the original shoreline. The focus of our study is the period from August 1 to October 31, 1990, when the lava buried almost 406,820 m2 of the 5-m deep bay. When lava encountered the sea, it flowed along the shoreline as a narrow primary lobe up to 400 m long and 100 m wide, which in turn inflated to a thickness of 5–6 m. The flow direction of the primary lobes was controlled by the submerged delta below the lavas and by damming up lavas fed at low extrusion rates. Breakout flows through circumferential and axial inflation cracks on the inflating primary lobes formed smaller secondary lobes, burying the lows between the primary lobes and hiding their original outlines. Inflated flow lobes eventually ruptured at proximal and/or distal ends as well as mid-points between the two ends, feeding new primary lobes which were emplaced along and on the shore side of the previously inflated lobes. The flow lobes mapped with the aid of aerial photographs were correlated with daily observations of the growing flow field, and 30 primary flow lobes were dated. Excluding the two repose periods that intervened while the bay was filled, enlargement of the flow field took place at a rate of 2,440–22,640 square meters per day in the bay. Lobe thickness was estimated to be up to 11 m on the basis of cross sections of selected lobes measured using optical measurement tools, measuring tape and hand level. The total flow-lobe volume added in the bay during August 1–October 31 was approximately 3.95 million m3, giving an average supply rate of 0.86 m3/s.

  13. Investigating the reasons for the failure of palaeointensity experiments: a study on historical lava flows from Mt. Etna (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Manuel; Prévot, Michel; Perrin, Mireille; Riisager, Janna

    2002-04-01

    A refined palaeointensity experiment, accompanied by rock-magnetic studies, has been carried out on six lava flows from 1910 and 1928 from Mt. Etna. The purpose of the study was to try to understand why these very young basaltic flows are generally unable to provide a correct estimate of the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field during flow cooling. Susceptibility versus temperature curves and ore microscopic studies show that 3 types of magnetic minerals (phases `h ', `m ' and `l') are present in these flows, some samples containing a single largely dominant magnetic phase while others contain a mixture of several phases. Phase `h ' is a thermally stable, near magnetite phase resulting from titanomagnetite oxyexsolution. Phase `l' is a thermally stable titanomagnetite with a Curie temperature of approximately 200°C. Phase `m ' is a titanomagnetite phase of Curie temperature between 450-490°C which is unstable at temperatures above 400°C. In addition to the usual reliability checks of the Thellier method (NRM-TRM linearity, pTRM checks), our palaeointensity experiments included additional heating allowing determination of the MD or PSD-SD character of each pTRM and determination of CRM or transdomain remanences possibly acquired during heating. From the 28 samples studied 20 provide a linear NRM-TRM plot over about 1/4 or more of total NRM. However, only six of them, all containing near-magnetite as a single phase, display positive pTRM checks. Nevertheless, these six samples yield a mean palaeointensity of about 52 μT, which exceeds the real field palaeomagnitude (42 μT) by some 25 per cent. The reasons for this almost-total failure of palaeointensity experiments are diverse. For samples with a dominant `l' phase, pTRMs present a behaviour typical of large MD grains, with as much as 1/3 of remanence with unblocking temperatures exceeding the blocking range. No CRM is acquired. Yet a remanence does develop during heating in a field (followed by cooling in

  14. Channel overflows of the Pōhue Bay flow, Mauna Loa, Hawai'i: examples of the contrast between surface and interior lava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado-Chichay, Zinzuni; Rowland, Scott K.

    1995-04-01

    A number of overflows from a large lava channel and tube system on the southwest rift zone of Mauna Loa were studied. Initial overflows were very low viscosity gas-rich pāhoehoe evidenced by flow-unit aspect ratios and vesicle sizes and contents. Calculated volumetric flow-rates in the channel range between 80 and 890 m3/s, and those of the overflows between 35 and 110 m3/s. After traveling tens to hundreds of meters the tops of these sheet-like overflows were disrupted into a surface composed of clinker and pāhoehoe fragments. After these 'a'ā overflows came to rest, lava from the interiors was able to break out on to the surface as pāhoehoe. The surface structure of a lava flow records the interaction between the differential shear rate (usually correlated with the volumetric flow-rate) and viscosity-induced resistance to flow. However, the interior of a flow, being better insulated, may react differently or record a later set of emplacement conditions. Clefts of toothpaste lava occurring within fields of clinker on proximal-type 'a'ā flows also record different shear rates during different times of flow emplacement. The interplay between viscosity and shear rate determines the final morphological lava type, and although no specific portion of lava ever makes a transition from 'a'ā back to pāhoehoe, parts of a flow can appear to do so.

  15. Insights on the 2010 Lava Flows of Piton de la Fournaise Using Cosmo-SkyMed and TanDEM-X Data: Lava Displacement Rates, Thicknesses, and Volume Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bato, M. G.; Froger, J. L.; Harris, A. J. L.; Villeneuve, N.

    2014-12-01

    Characterization of lava flow after its emplacement provides volume and constraints for lava flow emplacement simulations that help assess pending volcanic hazards. Additionally, it gives us better insights in understanding the dynamics of the underlying magmatic plumbing system and the possible mechanism of the eruption. In this work, we developed a technique using monostatic Cosmo-SkyMed and bistatic TanDEM-X data to calculate the volume, measure the thickness, and the horizontal and vertical displacements immediately after the emplacement of the October 2010 lava flow at Piton de la Fournaise. Results show that the thickest part of the October 2010 lava flow is about 13 to 16 m and the DRE volume is estimated to fall within the range of 1.71 to 3.00 x 106 m3 (±1σ), depending on which InSAR database was used. We also observe that the October 2010 lava flow is subsiding at a maximum rate of 14 cm yr-1. Apart from the vertical displacement, joint sliding and centripetal displacement were also identified with a maximum rate of 4.0 cm yr-1. We cross-validated our InSAR results with the mixed-pixel technique of Harris [1997] in terms of the estimated volumes. Our analysis shows that the volume derived using a few TanDEM-X interferograms fitted well within the range of volume given by the mixed-pixel technique as compared to the huge monostatic Cosmo-SkyMed database. In addition to the October 2010 lava flow, we also characterized the thin lava flow deposit of the December 2010 eruption, however using only bistatic TanDEM-X data. In this case of thin lava deposits, we expect that TanDEM-X are best to use in deriving the thickness and estimating the volume as these type of data are more sensitive to topographic change. Reference: Harris AJL, Blake S, Rothery DA, Stevens NF., 1997. A chronology of the 1991 to 1993 Mount Etna eruption using advanced very high resolution radiometer data: implications for real-time thermal volcano monitoring. Geophys. Res. Lett. 102:7985-8003.

  16. Emplacement of Holocene silicic lava flows and domes at Newberry, South Sister, and Medicine Lake volcanoes, California and Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Jonathan H.; Anderson, Steven W.

    2017-07-19

    This field guide for the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) Scientific Assembly 2017 focuses on Holocene glassy silicic lava flows and domes on three volcanoes in the Cascade Range in Oregon and California: Newberry, South Sister, and Medicine Lake volcanoes. Although obsidian-rich lava flows have been of interest to geologists, archaeologists, pumice miners, and rock hounds for more than a century, many of their emplacement characteristics had not been scientifically observed until two very recent eruptions in Chile. Even with the new observations, several eruptive processes discussed in this field trip guide can only be inferred from their final products. This makes for lively debates at outcrops, just as there have been in the literature for the past 30 years.Of the three volcanoes discussed in this field guide, one (South Sister) lies along the main axis defined by major peaks of the Cascade Range, whereas the other two lie in extensional tectonic settings east of the axis. These two tectonic environments influence volcano morphology and the magmatic and volcanic processes that form silicic lava flows and domes. The geomorphic and textural features of glass-rich extrusions provide many clues about their emplacement and the magma bodies that fed them.The scope of this field guide does not include a full geologic history or comprehensive explanation of hazards associated with a particular volcano or volcanic field. The geochemistry, petrology, tectonics, and eruption history of Newberry, South Sister, and Medicine Lake volcanic centers have been extensively studied and are discussed on other field excursions. Instead, we seek to explore the structural, textural, and geochemical evolution of well-preserved individual lava flows—the goal is to understand the geologic processes, rather than the development, of a specific volcano.

  17. The Thickness and Volume of Young Basalts Within Mare Imbrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Li, Chunlai; Ren, Xin; Liu, Jianjun; Wu, Yunzhao; Lu, Yu; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Xunyu

    2018-02-01

    Basaltic volcanism is one of the most important geologic processes of the Moon. Research on the thickness and volume of late-stage basalts of Mare Imbrium helps better understand the source of lunar volcanism and eruption styles. Based on whether apparent flow fronts exist or not, the late-stage basalts within Mare Imbrium were divided into two groups, namely, Upper Eratosthenian basalts (UEm) and Lower Eratosthenian basalts (LEm). Employing the topographic profile analysis method for UEm and the crater excavation technique for LEm, we studied the thickness and distribution of Eratosthenian basalts in Mare Imbrium. For the UEm units, their thicknesses were estimated to be 16-34 (±2) m with several layers of individual lava ( 8-13 m) inside. The estimated thickness of LEm units was 14-45(±1) m, with a trend of reducing thickness from north to south. The measured thickness of late-stage basalts around the Chang'E-3 landing site ( 37 ± 1 m) was quite close to the results acquired by the lunar penetrating radar carried on board the Yutu Rover ( 35 m). The total volume of the late-stage basalts in Mare Imbrium was calculated to be 8,671 (±320) km3, which is 4 times lower than that of Schaber's estimation ( 4 × 104 km3). Our results indicate that the actual volume is much lower than previous estimates of the final stage of the late basaltic eruption of Mare Imbrium. Together, the area flux and transport distance of the lava flows gradually decreased with time. These results suggest that late-stage volcanic evolution of the Moon might be revised.

  18. Lava flow field emplacement studies of Manua Ulu (Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, United States) and Venus, using field and remote sensing analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Jeffrey Myer

    2002-04-01

    This work examines lava emplacement processes by characterizing surface units using field and remote sensing analyses in order to understand the development of lava flow fields. Specific study areas are the 1969--1974 Mauna Ulu compound flow field, (Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, USA), and five lava flow fields on Venus: Turgmam Fluctus, Zipaltonal Fluctus, the Tuli Mons/Uilata Fluctus flow complex, the Var Mons flow field, and Mylitta Fluctus. Lava surface units have been examined in the field and with visible-, thermal-, and radar-wavelength remote sensing datasets for Mauna Ulu, and with radar data for the Venusian study areas. For the Mauna Ulu flow field, visible characteristics are related to color, glass abundance, and dm- to m-scale surface irregularities, which reflect the lava flow regime, cooling, and modification due to processes such as coalescence and inflation. Thermal characteristics are primarily affected by the abundance of glass and small-scale roughness elements (such as vesicles), and reflect the history of cooling, vesiculation and degassing, and crystallization of the lava. Radar characteristics are primarily affected by unit topography and fracturing, which are related to flow inflation, remobilization, and collapse, and reflect the local supply of lava during and after unit emplacement. Mauna Ulu surface units are correlated with pre-eruption topography, lack a simple relationship to the main feeder lava tubes, and are distributed with respect to their position within compound flow lobes and with distance from the vent. The Venusian lava flow fields appear to have developed through emplacement of numerous, thin, simple and compound flows, presumably over extended periods of time, and show a wider range of radar roughness than is observed at Mauna Ulu. A potential correlation is suggested between flow rheology and surface roughness. Distributary flow morphologies may result from tube-fed flows, and flow inflation is consistent with observed

  19. Coevolution of hydrology and topography on a basalt landscape in the Oregon Cascade Range, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Jefferson; G.E. Grant; S.L. Lewis; S.T. Lancaster

    2010-01-01

    Young basalt terrains offer an exceptional opportunity to study landscape and hydrologic evolution through time, as the age of the landscape itself can be determined by dating lava flows. These constructional terrains are also highly permeable, allowing one to examine timescales and process of geomorphic evolution as they relate to the partitioning of hydrologic...

  20. Rubbly Pahoehoe: Implication for Flood Basalt Eruptions and their Atmospheric Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, L.; Keszthelyi, L.; Thordarson, T.; Self, S.

    2001-12-01

    Rubbly pahoehoe flows consist of a brecciated flow top, a pahoehoe base, and an interior similar to inflated pahoehoe flows. Rubbly pahoehoe flows can be found in many localities, making up ~20% of the Columbia River Basalt Group, ~50% of the lavas drilled on the Kerguelen Plateau, and a substantial fraction of the Icelandic lava flows. They are rare in the tholeiitic shield portions of the Hawaiian volcanoes, but are more common in the alkalic flows. They also appear to be the dominant type of Martian flood lava flow. Based primarily on observations from the 1873-1874 Laki Flow Field in Iceland, we suggest that rubbly pahoehoe flows form when the flux of lava within an inflating pahoehoe flow is so large that it rafts away the upper crust. This crust is then broken into large slabs and fragmented lobes, intruded by liquid lava from below, and folded into pressure ridges. This brecciation process quickly builds an insulating crust; for the Laki case a crust >4 m thick developed in less than a week. This rapid formation of a thick insulating crust allows lava to be transported over great distances with minimal cooling in eruptions lasting only weeks-months. Flood basalt flows emplaced in this manner could have had eruption rates on the order of 104 - 105 m^{3}s^{-1}. If active fissure segments were of the order of 10 km long, the volcanic plumes should have risen 9-16 km -- penetrating the stratosphere in most cases. The injection of \\sim10 Gt of SO_{2}$, F, and Cl into the stratosphere could have had serious climatic effects, thus further strengthening the plausible link between flood basalt eruptions and mass extinctions.

  1. The eruptive history of the Trous Blancs pit craters, La Réunion Island: The origin of a 24 km long lava flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Georg; Frese, Ingmar; Di Muro, Andrea; Kueppers, Ulrich; Michon, Laurent; Métrich, Nicole

    2015-04-01

    The assessment of volcanic hazards is strongly based on the past eruptive behaviour of volcanoes and its morphological parameters. Since past eruption characteristics and their frequency provide the best probabilities of such eruptions for the future, understanding the complete eruptive history of a volcano is one of the most powerful tools in assessing the potential hazards or eruptions. At Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) volcano (La Réunion, Indian Ocean), the most frequent style of activity is the effusion of lava flows, which pose the greatest hazard by invasion of inhabited areas and destruction of human property. Here we examined the eruptive history of a previously uninvestigated area, believed to be the origin of a 24 km long lava flow. The eruptions recurrence time of PdF is about one eruption every 9 months in the central caldera. Besides this central activity, eruptive vents have been built along three main rift zones cutting the edifice during the last 50 kyrs. In this study we focused on the largest rift zone of about 15 km width and 20 km length, which extends in a north westerly direction between PdF and the nearby Piton des Neiges volcanic complex. This rift zone is typified by deep seismicity (up to 30 km), emitting mostly primitive magmas, indicative of high fluid pressures (up to 5 kbar) and large volume eruptions. Our area of investigation focused on four consecutively aligned pit craters called the Trous Blancs. These have been identified [1] as the source area of one of the youngest (ca. 6 kyrs) and largest lava field, which extends for 24 km from a height of 1800m asl, passing Le Tampon and Saint Pierre city, until it reaches the coast. To gain insight into the development of this eruption and possible future similar activity, we collected new field data (including stratigraphic logs, a geological map of the area, C-14 dating and geochemical analyses of the eruptive products). Fieldwork revealed that the eruption initiated with intense

  2. Hawaii Volcanism: Lava Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Over the last several million years the Hawaiian Islands have been built of successive lava flows. They are the most recent additions in a long line of volcanoes...

  3. L-Band Polarimetric SAR Signatures of Lava Flows in the Northern Volcanic Zone, Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierking, Wolfgang; Haack, Henning

    1998-01-01

    Studies of radar scattering signatures typical for lava surfaces are needed in order to interprete SAR images of volcanic terrain on the Earth and on other planets, and to establish a physical basis for the choice of optimal radar configurations for geological mapping. The authors focus on a study...... with a comparatively large fraction of multiple scattering. Other scattering mechanisms can not be recognized...

  4. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    South, D.L.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-10-01

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists.

  5. A Sinuous Tumulus over an Active Lava Tube at Klauea Volcano: Evolution, Analogs, and Hazard Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Tim R.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Patrick, Matthew R.; Wooten, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflation of narrow tube-fed basaltic lava flows (tens of meters across), such as those confined by topography, can be focused predominantly along the roof of a lava tube. This can lead to the development of an unusually long tumulus, its shape matching the sinuosity of the underlying lava tube. Such a situation occurred during Klauea Volcanos (Hawaii, USA) ongoing East Rift Zone eruption on a lava tube active from July through November 2010. Short-lived breakouts from the tube buried the flanks of the sinuous, ridge-like tumulus, while the tumulus crest, its surface composed of lava formed very early in the flows emplacement history, remained poised above the surrounding younger flows. At least several of these breakouts resulted in irrecoverable uplift of the tube roof. Confined sections of the prehistoric Carrizozo and McCartys flows (New Mexico, USA) display similar sinuous, ridge-like features with comparable surface age relationships. We contend that these distinct features formed in a fashion equivalent to that of the sinuous tumulus that formed at Kilauea in 2010. Moreover, these sinuous tumuli may be analogs for some sinuous ridges evident in orbital images of the Tharsis volcanic province on Mars. The short-lived breakouts from the sinuous tumulus at Kilauea were caused by surges in discharge through the lava tube, in response to cycles of deflation and inflation (DI events) at Kilauea's summit. The correlation between DI events and subsequent breakouts aided in lava flow forecasting. Breakouts from the sinuous tumulus advanced repeatedly toward the sparsely populated Kalapana Gardens subdivision, destroying two homes and threatening others. Hazard assessments, including flow occurrence and advance forecasts, were relayed regularly to the Hawai?i County Civil Defense to aid their lava flow hazard mitigation efforts while this lava tube was active.

  6. New Evidence for the Low-Pressure Origin of Lava-Hyaloclastite Sequences in South Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, T.; Hoskuldsson, A.; Miller, C. F.; Furbish, D. J.; Wallace, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    In the Sida-Fljotshverfi District of south Iceland, Pleistocene basaltic lava forms flame-like apophyses, dikes, and disaggregation structures (cf. Bergh and Sigvaldason, 1991; Smellie, 2008) that invade overlying hyaloclastite. These features are exposed in valley walls composed of at least 14 (Bergh and Sigvaldason, 1991) paired basalt-hyaloclastite +/- diamictite depositional units. These units are dominated by hyaloclastite deposits that reach over 100 m in thickness, with underlying lava up to 50 m thick. Apophyses as well as underlying lavas show "kubbaberg" or cube jointing, indicating rapid cooling due to formation in a wet environment and suggesting that hyaloclastite and lava were emplaced virtually concurrently, while hyaloclastite was wet and weak. Dissolved volatile concentrations in glass give an indication of ambient pressure on quenching and cessation of degassing. Sulfur contents in basaltic glasses from chilled margins of lava and from hyaloclastite glasses obtained by electron microprobe (lava glasses range from 0-525 ppm with the majority of samples less than 300 ppm; hyaloclastite glasses have 0-900 ppm S) suggest degassing at shallow depths (pressures for over half of both the lava and the hyaloclastite samples were near atmospheric P. These data support an eruption that occurred under significantly lower-pressure conditions than previously proposed (Smellie, 2008). The presence of a large volume of hyaloclastite as well as extensive lava suggests the possibility of eruptions with both subglacial and subaerial phases. In one possible scenario, a subglacial eruption under a shallow glacier may have produced hyaloclastite that was incorporated into a meltwater lake-draining jökulhlaup. Ensuing subaerial lava from the ongoing eruption flowed onto still-plastic hyaloclastite and sank to its base. Thermal modeling suggests that influx of heat from the underlying lava resulted in increased fluid pressure in the hyaloclastite matrix. Fracturing of

  7. 40Ar-39Ar age of a lava flow from the Bhimashankar Formation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    taceous/Tertiary boundary? Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 80. 361–374. Courtillot V, Feraud G, Maluski H, Vandamme D, Moreau. M G and Besse J 1988 Deccan flood basalts and the Cre- taceous/Tertiary boundary; Nature 333 842–846. Dalrymple G B, Alexander E C Jr., Lanphere M A and. Kraker G P 1981 Irradiation of samples ...

  8. Field-trip guide to Columbia River flood basalts, associated rhyolites, and diverse post-plume volcanism in eastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferns, Mark L.; Streck, Martin J.; McClaughry, Jason D.

    2017-08-09

    The Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) is the youngest and best preserved continental flood basalt province on Earth, linked in space and time with a compositionally diverse succession of volcanic rocks that partially record the apparent emergence and passage of the Yellowstone plume head through eastern Oregon during the late Cenozoic. This compositionally diverse suite of volcanic rocks are considered part of the La Grande-Owyhee eruptive axis (LOEA), an approximately 300-kilometer-long (185 mile), north-northwest-trending, middle Miocene to Pliocene volcanic belt located along the eastern margin of the Columbia River flood basalt province. Volcanic rocks erupted from and preserved within the LOEA form an important regional stratigraphic link between the (1) flood basalt-dominated Columbia Plateau on the north, (2) bimodal basalt-rhyolite vent complexes of the Owyhee Plateau on the south, (3) bimodal basalt-rhyolite and time-transgressive rhyolitic volcanic fields of the Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Plateau, and (4) the High Lava Plains of central Oregon.This field-trip guide describes a 4-day geologic excursion that will explore the stratigraphic and geochemical relationships among mafic rocks of the Columbia River Basalt Group and coeval and compositionally diverse volcanic rocks associated with the early “Yellowstone track” and High Lava Plains in eastern Oregon. Beginning in Portland, the Day 1 log traverses the Columbia River gorge eastward to Baker City, focusing on prominent outcrops that reveal a distal succession of laterally extensive, large-volume tholeiitic flood lavas of the Grande Ronde, Wanapum, and Saddle Mountains Basalt formations of the CRBG. These “great flows” are typical of the well-studied flood basalt-dominated Columbia Plateau, where interbedded silicic and calc-alkaline lavas are conspicuously absent. The latter part of Day 1 will highlight exposures of middle to late Miocene silicic ash-flow tuffs, rhyolite domes, and

  9. Simulating the lava flow formed during the 2014-2015 Holuhraun eruption (Bardarbunga volcanic system, Iceland) by using the new F-L probabilistic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarquini, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Jensen, Esther H.; Barsotti, Sara; Pedersen, Gro B. M.; Coppola, Diego

    2015-04-01

    The 2014-2015 fissure eruption in Holuhraun started when a new code (named F-L) was being developed. The availability of several digital Elevation Models of the area inundated by the lava and the availability of continuously updated maps of the flow (collected in the field and through remote sensing imagery) provided an excellent opportunity for testing and calibrating the new code against an evolving flow field. Remote sensing data also provided a constrain on the effusion rate. Existing numerical codes for the simulation of lava flow emplacement are based either on the solution of some simplification of the physical governing equations of this phenomenon (the so-called "deterministic codes" - e.g. Hidaka et al. 2005; Crisci et al. 2010), or, instead, on the evidence that lava flows tend to follow the steepest descent path from the vent downhill (the so-called "probabilistic codes" - e.g. Favalli et al. 2005). F-L is a new code for the simulation of lava flows, which rests on an approach similar to the one introduced by Glaze and Baloga (2013), and can be ascribed to the "probabilistic family" of lava flow simulation codes. Nevertheless, in contrast with other probabilistic codes (e.g. Favalli et al. 2005), this code explicitly tackles not only the direction of expansion of the growing flow and the area covered, but also the volume of the emplaced lava over time, and hence the supply rate. As a result, this approach bridges the stochastic point of view of a plain probabilistic code with one of the most critical among the input parameters considered by deterministic codes, which is the effusion rate during the course of an eruption. As such, a similar code, in principle, can tackle several aspects which were previously not addressed within the probabilistic approach, which are: (i) the 3D morphology of the flow field (i.e. thickness), (ii) the implications of the effusion rate in the growth of the flow field, and (iii) the evolution of the lava coverage over time

  10. Evidence for trench-parallel mantle flow in the northern Cascade Arc from basalt geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Emily K.; Weis, Dominique

    2015-03-01

    Geochemical data for basalts from the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt (northern segment of the Cascade Arc) define arc-parallel gradients in trace elements and isotope ratios that extend at least 150 km into the arc from the northern margin of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. Southerly increases in Zr/Nb, Ba/Nb, Th/La, Pb/Ce, 208Pb/204Pb and 176Hf/177Hf indicate greater mantle depletion and higher slab-derived contributions with distance from the slab edge. Temperatures and pressures of mantle melt segregation also decrease to the south. The gradients are most plausibly explained as a consequence of slab rollback-induced toroidal flow at the northern slab edge (Nootka fault zone), whereby enriched (OIB-type) NE Pacific asthenospheric mantle from beneath the slab is drawn into the mantle wedge in a trench-parallel southerly flow pattern. Melts of the enriched asthenosphere are progressively diluted to the south by melts of the slab-modified, depleted mantle wedge. Arc-parallel changes in slab thermal conditions cannot account for these gradients. Trench parallel geochemical gradients in the northern Cascade Arc are consistent with shear wave splitting data, numerical modeling, and experimental studies showing that trench-parallel mantle flow may be a common phenomenon near slab edges and slab gaps.

  11. The mechanism of flow and fabric development in mechanically anisotropic trachyte lava

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Závada, Prokop; Schulmann, K.; Lexa, O.; Hrouda, F.; Haloda, J.; Týcová, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 11 (2009), s. 1295-1307 ISSN 0191-8141 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB301110703 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA205/03/0204 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : trachyte * anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility * fibre-slip mechanism * lava dome * mechanical anisotropy * sanidine Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.732, year: 2009

  12. The Kilauea 1974 Flow: Quantitative Morphometry of Lava Flows using Low Altitude Aerial Image Data using a Kite-based Platform in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt, S. P.; Whelley, P.; Hamilton, C.; Bleacher, J. E.; Garry, W. B.

    2015-12-01

    The December 31, 1974 lava flow from Kilauea Caldera, Hawaii within the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park was selected for field campaigns as a terrestrial analog for Mars in support of NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics (PGG) research and the Remote, In Situ and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration (RIS4E) node of the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) program). The lava flow was a rapidly emplaced unit that was strongly influenced by existing topography, which favored the formation of a tributary lava flow system. The unit includes a diverse range of surface textures (e.g., pāhoehoe, ´áā, and transitional lavas), and structural features (e.g., streamlined islands, pits, and interactions with older tumuli). However, these features are generally below the threshold of visibility within previously acquired airborne and spacecraft data. In this study, we have generated unique, high-resolution digital images using low-altitude Kite Aerial Photography (KAP) system during field campaigns in 2014 and 2015 (National Park Service permit #HAVO-2012-SCI-0025). The kite-based mapping platform (nadir-viewing) and a radio-controlled gimbal (allowing pointing) provided similar data as from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), but with longer flight time, larger total data volumes per sortie, and fewer regulatory challenges and cost. Images acquired from KAP and UAVs are used to create orthomosaics and DEMs using Multi-View Stereo-Photogrammetry (MVSP) software. The 3-Dimensional point clouds are extremely dense, resulting in a grid resolution of < 2 cm. Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) / Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) data have been collected for these areas and provide a basis of comparison or "ground truth" for the photogrammetric data. Our results show a good comparison with LiDAR/TLS data, each offering their own unique advantages and potential for data fusion.

  13. Mapping the vegetation colonization on recent lava flows using spectral unmixing of moderate spatial resolution satellite images: Nyamuragira volcano, D. R. Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Kervyn, Matthieu; Canters, Frank

    2014-05-01

    In volcanic areas, vegetation colonizes recently erupted lava flows and expands over time. The fraction of vegetation is therefore likely to provide information on lava flows' age. Individual lava flows are usually not well resolved on satellite imagery due to the coarse spatial resolution: one pixel on the imagery is a mixture of mainly lava and vegetation. In order to solve the mixed pixel problem, many different methods have been proposed among which linear spectral unmixing is the most widely-used. It assumes that the reflectance of the mixed pixel is the sum of the reflectance of each pure end members multiplied by their proportion in the pixel. It has been frequently used in urban area studies, but no efforts have yet been made to apply it to volcanic areas. Here, we demonstrate the application of linear spectral unmixing for the lava flows of Nyamuragira volcano, in the Virunga Volcanic province. Nyamuragira is an active volcano, emitting over 30 lava flows in the last 100 years. The limited access to the volcano due to social unrest in D. R. Congo justifies the value of remote sensing techniques. This shield volcano is exposed to tropical climate and thus vegetation colonizes lava flows rapidly. An EO-1 ALI image (Advanced land imager mounted on Earth Observing -1 Satellite) acquired over Nyamuragira on January 3, 2012 at spatial resolution of 30 m was processed with minimum noise fraction transform and end member extraction, and spectrally unmixed by linear mixture modelling technique into two types of lava, and one or two types of vegetation. The three end member model is better in terms of the RMSE and the expected spatial distribution of end members. A 2 m resolution Pleiades image acquired on January 21, 2013 and partly overlapping with the ALI image was taken as the reference image for validation. It was first classified using a supervised pixel-based classification technique and then compared to the proportion image derived from the ALI image

  14. Length Scales of Reactive Transport in Basalt: Hydrothermal Flow-through Experiments and Anhydrite Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, C.; Kahl, W. A.; Bach, W.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrothermal circulation is a large contributor to mass and heat exchange between oceanic lithosphere and hydrosphere. Cold, unaltered seawater infiltrates in the shallow basaltic crust, leading to sulfate precipitation and clogging of fluid pathways. Anhydrite (CaSO4) veins are common in hydrothermal discharge zones, where entrained seawater is heated and anhydrite quickly forms. Anhydrite is also found in hydrothermal recharge zones, but questions regarding time and length scale in this setting remain. To investigate element transport and anhydrite precipitation we have conducted flow-through experiments using a gypsum-undersaturated CaSO4 solution in pre-fractured basalt at 95, 110 and 140°C. Each run was terminated upon clogging of the input tubes, which took 2-8 weeks. The rock core was scanned before the run and weekly during the experiment using X-ray tomography. Fluid major element chemistry was analyzed using ICP-OES. Geochemical modeling with the software package EQ3/6 showed that the starting solution became supersaturated in anhydrite (SI=IAP/K of 2.5 or higher) in all cases upon heating to the experimental temperature. The software CRUNCH FLOW was used to analyze chemical effects over the length of the core (3cm). The 95°C run and a first run at 110°C did not show any anhydrite. Instead, hematite rosettes and sulfur-bearing (maximum of 1 wt.%) globular Fe-rich structures were present. Tomography images showed that fractures and pores were slightly thinned over the whole core length. Single pores in a second 110°C run and fractures in the 140°C run did show formation of anhydrite and quartz close to the outlet. CRUNCH FLOW modeling predicts the observed release of Mg, Fe, Si, Al, Na and K due to silicate dissolution close to the inlet, while the outlet area should contain some anhydrite. No other sulfur-bearing phases were predicted. The results of this study show that anhydrite needs a large supersaturation (SI>2.5) to precipitate at temperatures

  15. ELEMENTAL AND TOPOGRAPHIC MAPPING OF LAVA FLOWSTRUCTURES IN MARE SERENITATIS ON THE MOON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wöhler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The detection of lunar lava flows based on local morphology highly depends on the available images. The thickness of lava flows, however, has been studied by many researchers and lunar lava flows are shown to be as thick as 200 m. Lunar lava flows are supposed to be concentrated on the northwestern lunar nearside. In this study we present elemental abundance maps, a petrological map and a digital terrain model (DTM of a lava flow structure in northern Mare Serenitatis at (18.0° E, 32.4° N and two possible volcanic vents at (11.2° E, 24.6° N and (13.5° E, 37.5° N, respectively. Our abundance maps of the refractory elements Ca, Mg and our petrological map were obtained based on hyperspectral image data of the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3 instrument. Our DTM was constructed using GLD100 data in combination with a shape from shading based method to M3 and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO Narrow Angle Camera (NAC image data. The obtained NAC-based DEM has a very high effective resolution of about 1–2 m which comes close to the resolution of the utilized NAC images without requiring intricate processing of NAC stereo image pairs. As revealed by our elemental maps and DEM, the examined lava flow structure occurs on a boundary between basalts consisting of low-Ca/high-Mg pyroxene and high-Ca/low-Mg pyroxene, respectively. The total thickness of the lava flow is about 100 m, which is a relatively large value, but according to our DEM the lava flow may also be composed of two or more layers.

  16. Textures of Pyroclasts From Explosive Basaltic Eruptions at Soputan Volcano, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, H. M. N.; Kunrat, S. L.; Pallister, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Soputan volcano, Indonesia has produced relatively frequent explosive eruptions; over the past 35 years, the average repose interval is just two years. Eruptions over that interval have included effusion of basaltic lava domes and flows, production of high-altitude (up to 13 km) explosive ash columns, and production of pyroclastic flows with up to 5.5 km runout distances. The ascent history and degassing structure is explored here using textural observations of pyroclasts within pyroclastic flows, ash grains from tephra fall, and lava flow samples. Lava flows and pyroclastic flow deposits are highly crystalline, with 40-50% phenocrysts and up to 35% microlites, suggesting a highly viscous rheology of basaltic lava (50-51% SiO2). Vesicularities are exceptionally low; clasts in pyroclastic flow deposits have vesicularities ranging from 12-30%. Pyroclasts in pyroclastic flow deposits are highly spherical in shape across a broad grain size distribution. In cross section, these clasts display moderate alignment of phenocrysts parallel to the clast margins, suggesting relaxation of the melt after fragmentation into spherical shapes and not abrasion or milling of clasts during transport. This observation lies in apparent contrast to high inferred viscosities based on crystallinity and vesicularity measurements.

  17. Geomagnetic field for the past 5 Myr recorded in lava flows from British Columbia, Patagonia, and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Victoria

    2005-11-01

    Paleosecular variation (PSV) and time averaged field (TAF) results recorded in lava flows younger than 5 million years are presented. The targeted areas of studies are several volcanic fields from British Columbia (mainly the Silverthrone, Garibaldi, and Wells Park volcanic fields), Southern Patagonia (the Pali-Aike volcanic field and Meseta Viscachas lavas), and Mexico (the Trans-Mexican volcanic belt and several volcanic areas in San Luis Potosi). The purpose of this investigation was to obtain high quality paleomagetic data suitable to test the presence or absence of permanent non dipolar components of the field that have been interpreted from studies carried out with less rigor. The mean directions in the areas of British Columbia and Patagonia (roughly at 50° N and 50° S latitude) coincide with the expected geocentric axial dipole (GAD) at these areas. The presence of a quadrupolar component of the field is difficult to discard because it is expected to produce only about 1° shallower inclinations. The mean direction in the area of Mexico coincides with a GAD plus a 5% quadrupole. The VGP scatter in the three areas of study coincides with Model G. The asymmetry between the northern and southern hemisphere of the present magnetic field and particularly the 20° inclination anomaly relative to GAD in Patagonia, are not observed in the paleomagnetic data obtained, implying that the present field configuration is relatively recent. The results confirm that axial components prevail in the time-averaged field.

  18. Lava Flow Morphologies and Structural Features Along the Axis of the South Rift Zone of Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deemer, J. L.; Kurz, M. D.; Fornari, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    In an effort to document the morphology of the deep South Rift Zone of the Loihi Seamount, we report new observations collected in 2008 using ROV Jason2 on the R/V Thomas G. Thompson (C. Moyer and K. Edwards, chief scientists). The South Rift Zone extends more than 20 kilometers from 4950 meters depth at its base to Loihi’s summit at 980 meters. To date, there are few studies of the deep Loihi South Rift Zone and this work provides important geologic context for ongoing microbiological studies of Loihi (Fe-Oxidizing Microbial Observatory Project). Existing EM300 multibeam bathymetry provides the broader context necessary for interpreting smaller-scale Loihi South Rift features mapped using Jason2. Three Jason2 dives included continuous low-altitude (indicated by the ubiquitous presence of glassy flows and a complete absence of sediment cover, with the exception of microbial mats in the deepest section (FeMO Deep). Flows are predominantly lobate and pillow types. Pyroclastic deposits are expressed as loose volcanic sand in localized depressions, and are found at depths as great as 4909 meters. Distinct meter-scale flow morphologies were identified and constrained, and this information can be used to determine rudimentary stratigraphic relationships of individual flows. The compilation of lava flow morphologies from the ROV data, in conjunction with along-axis structure, bathymetry, and distribution of talus and pyroclastic deposits, will be presented.

  19. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (Approximate True Color)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin. Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy. The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks. As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography to identify rocks and

  20. Morphometric study of pillow-size spectrum among pillow lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, George P. L.

    1992-08-01

    Measurements of H and V (dimensions in the horizontal and vertical directions of pillows exposed in vertical cross-section) were made on 19 pillow lavas from the Azores, Cyprus, Iceland, New Zealand, Tasmania, the western USA and Wales. The median values of H and V plot on a straight line that defines a spectrum of pillow sizes, having linear dimensions five times greater at one end than at the other, basaltic toward the small-size end and andesitic toward the large-size end. The pillow median size is interpreted to reflect a control exercised by lava viscosity. Pillows erupted on a steep flow-foot slope in lava deltas can, however, have a significantly smaller size than pillows in tabular pillowed flows (inferred to have been erupted on a small depositonal slope), indicating that the slope angle also exercised a control. Pipe vesicles, generally abundant in the tabular pillowed flows and absent from the flow-foot pillows, have potential as a paleoslope indicator. Pillows toward the small-size end of the spectrum are smooth-surfaced and grew mainly by stretching of their skin, whereas disruption of the skin and spreading were important toward the large-size end. Disruption involved increasing skin thicknesses with increasing pillow size, and pillows toward the large-size end are more analogous with toothpaste lava than with pahoehoe and are inferred from their thick multiple selvages to have taken hours to grow. Pseudo-pillow structure is also locally developed. An example of endogenous pillow-lava growth, that formed intrusive pillows between ‘normal’ pillows, is described from Sicily. Isolated pillow-like bodies in certain andesitic breccias described from Iceland were previously interpreted to be pillows but have anomalously small sizes for their compositions; it is now proposed that they may lack an essential attribute of pillows, namely, the development of bulbous forms by the inflation of a chilled skin, and are hence not true pillows. Para-pillow lava is

  1. Lava tubes and aquifer vulnerability in the upper Actopan River basin, Veracruz, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinasa-Pereña, R.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2011-12-01

    Rapid infiltration leads to very dry conditions on the surface of some volcanic terrains, with large allogenic streams sometimes sinking underground upon reaching a lava flow. Aquifers in lava flows tend to be heterogeneous and discontinuous, generally unconfined and fissured, and have high transmissivity. Springs associated with basalts may be very large but are typically restricted to lava-flow margins. Concern has been expressed regarding the potential for lava-tube caves to facilitate groundwater contamination similar to that afflicting some karst aquifers (Kempe et al., 2003; Kiernan et al., 2002; Halliday 2003). The upper Actopan River basin is a series of narrow valleys excavated in Tertiary volcanic brechias. Several extensive Holocene basaltic tube-fed lava flows have partially filled these valleys. The youngest and longest flow originates at El Volcancillo, a 780 ybP monogenetic volcano. It is over 50 km long, and was fed through a major master tube, the remains of which form several lava-tube caves (Gassos and Espinasa-Pereña, 2008). Another tube-fed flow initiates at a vent at the bottom of Barranca Huichila and can be followed for 7 km to where it is covered by the Volcancillo flow. The Huichila River is captured by this system of lava tubes and can be followed through several underground sections. In dry weather the stream disappears at a sump in one of these caves, although during hurricanes it overflows the tube, floods the Tengonapa plain, and finally sinks through a series of skylights into the master tube of the Volcancillo flow. Near villages, the cave entrances are used as trash dumps, which are mobilized during floods. These include household garbage, organic materials associated with agriculture and even medical supplies. This is a relatively recent phenomenon, caused by population growth and the building of houses above the lava flows. The water resurges at El Descabezadero, gushing from fractures in the lava above the underlying brechias

  2. BASALT A: Basaltic Terrains in Idaho and Hawaii as Planetary Analogs for Mars Geology and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Scott S.; Haberle, Christopher W.; Nawotniak, Shannon E. Kobs; Sehlke, Alexander; Garry, W. Brent; Elphic, Richard C.; Payler, Sam J.; Stevens, Adam H.; Cockell, Charles S.; Brady, Allyson L.; hide

    2018-01-01

    Assessments of field research target regions are described within two notably basaltic geologic provinces as Earth analogs to Mars. Regions within the eastern Snake River Plain of Idaho and the Big Island of Hawaii, USA, provinces that represent analogs of present-day and early Mars, respectively, were evaluated on the basis of geologic settings, rock lithology and geochemistry, rock alteration, and climate. Each of these factors provide rationale for the selection of specific targets for field research in five analog target regions: (1) Big Craters and (2) Highway lava flows at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve, Idaho; and (3) Mauna Ulu low shield, (4) Kilauea Iki lava lake and (5) Kilauea caldera in the Kilauea Volcano summit region and the East Rift Zone of Hawaii. Our evaluation of compositional and textural differences, as well as the effects of syn- and post-eruptive rock alteration, shows that the basaltic terrains in Idaho and Hawaii provide a way to characterize the geology and major geologic substrates that host biological activity of relevance to Mars exploration. This work provides the foundation to better understand the scientific questions related to the habitability of basaltic terrains, the rationale behind selecting analog field targets, and their applicability as analogs to Mars.

  3. A sinuous tumulus over an active lava tube at Kīlauea Volcano: Evolution, analogs, and hazard forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Tim R.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Patrick, Matthew R.; Wooten, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflation of narrow tube-fed basaltic lava flows (tens of meters across), such as those confined by topography, can be focused predominantly along the roof of a lava tube. This can lead to the development of an unusually long tumulus, its shape matching the sinuosity of the underlying lava tube. Such a situation occurred during Kīlauea Volcano's (Hawai'i, USA) ongoing East Rift Zone eruption on a lava tube active from July through November 2010. Short-lived breakouts from the tube buried the flanks of the sinuous, ridge-like tumulus, while the tumulus crest, its surface composed of lava formed very early in the flow's emplacement history, remained poised above the surrounding younger flows. At least several of these breakouts resulted in irrecoverable uplift of the tube roof. Confined sections of the prehistoric Carrizozo and McCartys flows (New Mexico, USA) display similar sinuous, ridge-like features with comparable surface age relationships. We contend that these distinct features formed in a fashion equivalent to that of the sinuous tumulus that formed at Kīlauea in 2010. Moreover, these sinuous tumuli may be analogs for some sinuous ridges evident in orbital images of the Tharsis volcanic province on Mars. The short-lived breakouts from the sinuous tumulus at Kīlauea were caused by surges in discharge through the lava tube, in response to cycles of deflation and inflation (DI events) at Kīlauea's summit. The correlation between DI events and subsequent breakouts aided in lava flow forecasting. Breakouts from the sinuous tumulus advanced repeatedly toward the sparsely populated Kalapana Gardens subdivision, destroying two homes and threatening others. Hazard assessments, including flow occurrence and advance forecasts, were relayed regularly to the Hawai'i County Civil Defense to aid their lava flow hazard mitigation efforts while this lava tube was active.

  4. Middle Triassic back-arc basalts from the blocks in the Mersin Mélange, southern Turkey: Implications for the geodynamic evolution of the Northern Neotethys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayit, Kaan; Bedi, Yavuz; Tekin, U. Kagan; Göncüoglu, M. Cemal; Okuyucu, Cengiz

    2017-01-01

    The Mersin Mélange is a tectonostratigraphic unit within the allochthonous Mersin Ophiolitic Complex in the Taurides, southern Turkey. This chaotic structure consists of blocks and tectonic slices of diverse origins and ages set in a clastic matrix of Upper Cretaceous age. In this study, we examine two blocks at two different sections characterized by basaltic lava flows alternating with radiolarian-bearing pelagic sediments. The radiolarian assemblage extracted from the mudstone-chert alternation overlying the lavas yields an upper Anisian age (Middle Triassic). The immobile element geochemistry suggests that the lava flows are predominantly characterized by sub-alkaline basalts. All lavas display pronounced negative Nb anomalies largely coupled with normal mid-ocean basalt (N-MORB)-like high field strength element (HFSE) patterns. On the basis of geochemical modelling, the basalts appear to have dominantly derived from spinel-peridotite and pre-depleted spinel-peridotite sources, while some enriched compositions can be explained by contribution of garnet-facies melts from enriched domains. The overall geochemical characteristics suggest generation of these Middle Triassic lavas at an intra-oceanic back-arc basin within the northern branch of Neotethys. This finding is of significant importance, since these rocks may represent the presence of the oldest subduction zone found thus far from the Neotethyan branches. This, in turn, suggests that the rupturing of the Gondwanan lithosphere responsible for the opening of the northern branch of Neotethys should have occurred during the Lower Triassic or earlier.

  5. The Influence of Shear-Thinning and Crustal Yield Strength on Lava Flow Evolution: a Case Study from Volcanoes of the Southern Andes of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castruccio, A.; Contreras, M.; Gho, R.

    2013-12-01

    Lava flow modeling is a complex challenge as the advance and emplacement of these flows is controlled by parameters that are constantly evolving such as the effusion rate, topography, rheology and cooling effects. Current models of lava flows use a Bingham rheology and assume that the main retarding force is the internal rheology that is changing downstream and trough time due to cooling effects. However, field evidence from active lava flows and the resulting deposits indicates that an external crust forms due to cooling processes. Very few works have addressed the influence of the crust on the dynamics and advance rate of lava flows but increasing evidence suggests that it cannot be neglected. On the other hand, numerous works during the last decade has shown that crystal-bearing magmas have a complex rheology with a strain-rate dependence on viscosity and consequently, the Bingham model can represent accurately the rheology of lava only over a limited range of conditions. In this work we studied the lava flow evolution and deposits of several historical eruptions from Villarrica (2 cases), Llaima, Mirador, Calbuco and Lonquimay volcanoes in the Southern Andes of Chile. We used a simple 2-D model that simulates the evolution of the front of the flow that is being fed by lava pouring down from a fixed-wall channel at the back of the frontal zone. We used a Herschel-Bulkley rheology as it captures yield strength and shear-thinning behavior. We also included in the analysis the evolution of a set of well-documented eruptions from Hawaii and Etna using published data. Our results indicate that short-lived eruptions, with effusion rates greater than 100 m^3/s that last only a couple of days are controlled by an almost constant rheology of the front as the apparent increasing in viscosity through time can be explained by the shear-thinning behavior, because when effusion rate decreases, the velocity and consequently the strain-rate of the flow decreases, implying an

  6. Palaeomagnetic intensities from 14C-dated lava flows on the Big Island, Hawaii: 0-21 kyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressling, Nicola; Laj, Carlo; Kissel, Catherie; Champion, Duane E.; Gubbins, David

    2006-01-01

    Thellier–Thellier experiments were carried out on 216 lava samples collected by the USGS on the Big Island. 35 individual flows from the Kilauea, Mauna Loa and Hualalai volcanoes are represented and independent radiocarbon dating of the flows yields absolute ages ranging from 290 to 20,240 yrs old. The palaeomagnetic analysis was carried out at the Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement in Gif-sur-Yvette, France, in two custom built, large capacity furnaces that have been specifically designed to minimise oxidation. The temperature steps were adapted to accommodate the characteristic loss of magnetisation at low temperatures seen in the Curie balance results and the use of half-size samples allowed secondary experiments to be carried out where necessary. The strict PICRIT-03 selection criteria were rigorously applied to the data and a high success rate of 53% has been achieved on a sample level. The flow averaged results almost double the existing 14C-dated palaeointensity dataset for this time window and confirm a period of high intensity over the past 4 kyr preceded by a period in which the dipole moment was weaker. However, the values attained in this study are on average higher than previously published data; reliability of these values is discussed.

  7. Fracture patterns at lava-ice contacts on Kokostick Butte, OR, and Mazama Ridge, Mount Rainier, WA: Implications for flow emplacement and cooling histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, Robert W. D.; Lescinsky, David T.

    2009-09-01

    Cooling lava commonly develop polygonal joints that form equant hexagonal columns. Such fractures are formed by thermal contraction resulting in an isotropic tensional stress regime. However, certain linear cooling fracture patterns observed at some lava-ice contacts do not appear to fit the model for formation of cooling fractures and columns because of their preferred orientations. These fracture types include sheet-like (ladder-like rectangular fracture pattern), intermediate (pseudo-aligned individual column-bounding fractures), and pseudopillow (straight to arcuate fractures with perpendicular secondary fractures caused by water infiltration) fractures that form the edges of multiple columns along a single linear fracture. Despite the relatively common occurrence of these types of fractures at lava-ice contacts, their significance and mode of formation have not been fully explored. This study investigates the stress regimes responsible for producing these unique fractures and their significance for interpreting cooling histories at lava-ice contacts. Data was collected at Kokostick Butte dacite flow at South Sister, OR, and Mazama Ridge andesite flow at Mount Rainier, WA. Both of these lava flows have been interpreted as being emplaced into contact with ice and linear fracture types have been observed on their ice-contacted margins. Two different mechanisms are proposed for the formation of linear fracture networks. One possible mechanism for the formation of linear fracture patterns is marginal bulging. Melting of confining ice walls will create voids into which flowing lava can deform resulting in margin-parallel tension causing margin-perpendicular fractures. If viewed from the ice-wall, these fractures would be steeply dipping, linear fractures. Another possible mechanism for the formation of linear fracture types is gravitational settling. Pure shear during compression and settling can result in a tensional environment with similar consequences as

  8. Magnesium-rich Basalts on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2013-05-01

    X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers on NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft are making key measurements regarding the composition and properties of the surface of Mercury, allowing researchers to more clearly decipher the planet's formation and geologic history. The origin of the igneous rocks in the crust of Mercury is the focus of recent research by Karen Stockstill-Cahill and Tim McCoy (National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution), along with Larry Nittler and Shoshana Weider (Carnegie Institution of Washington) and Steven Hauck II (Case Western Reserve University). Using the well-known MELTS computer code Stockstill-Cahill and coauthors worked with MESSENGER-derived and rock-analog compositions to constrain petrologic models of the lavas that erupted on the surface of Mercury. Rock analogs included a partial melt of the Indarch meteorite and a range of Mg-rich terrestrial rocks. Their work shows the lavas on Mercury are most similar to terrestrial magnesian basalt (with lowered FeO content). The implications of the modeling are that Mg-rich lavas came from high-temperature sources in Mercury's mantle and erupted at high temperature with exceptionally low viscosity into thinly bedded and laterally extensive flows, concepts open to further evaluation by laboratory experiments and by geologic mapping of Mercury's surface using MESSENGER's imaging system and laser altimeter to document flow features and dimensions.

  9. Degassing driving crystallization of plagioclase phenocrysts in lava tube stalactites on Mount Etna (Sicily, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzafame, Gabriele; Ferlito, Carmelo

    2014-10-01

    Basaltic lava flows can form tubes in response to the cooling of the outer surface. We collected lava stalactites (frozen lava tears) and sampled lava from the ceilings of three lava tubes on Mount Etna. Comparison of the petrographic characters between ceiling lavas and relative stalactites reveals surprising differences in the groundmass textures and crystal compositions. Major and trace element contents in stalactites show only a slight increase in alkali and SiO2 compared to ceiling lava, whereas significant differences exist in composition and textures between plagioclases within the ceiling lava and those within the stalactites, being in the last case definitively more An-rich. We advance the hypothesis that the high temperature reached in the cave caused the exsolution of the volatiles still trapped in the dripping melt. The volatiles, mainly H2O, formed bubbles and escaped from the melt; such a water-loss might have promoted the silicate polymerization in the stalactites resulting in the growth of An-rich plagioclase phenocrysts. Our results have important implications: in fact plagioclase phenocrysts are usually associated with intratelluric growth and are often considered as the main petrologic evidence for the existence of a magma chamber. The textural and chemical features of plagioclases in stalactites prove that phenocryst growth in syn to post-eruptive conditions is plausible and clearly explains the relatively low viscosity of many phenocryst-rich lava flows on Mount Etna, as well as on many other volcanoes around the world. Therefore, we can conclude that plagioclase phenocrysts cannot exclusively be considered as having originated within a magma chamber.

  10. Factors controlling permeability and fluid flow within the 2004-2008 Mount St Helens lava dome complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, H. E.; Meredith, P. G.; Sammonds, P.; Smith, R.; Kilburn, C.

    2011-12-01

    Magma degassing is an important control on whether an eruption will be explosive or effusive. Although the process of gas exsolution has been well-studied, the factors that determine how gases subsequently escape are still poorly understood, especially from high-viscosity magmas with evolved compositions, such as dacite. A preferred model for viscous magmas is that shear fracturing during ascent can occur along conduit margins and lead to the development of a permeable fracture network. Such fracture networks facilitate gas escape and the effusion of magma as a lava dome or flow. The model, however, has yet to be tested against direct laboratory measurements on the potential for magma to develop permeable networks of fractures. Between 2004 and 2008, dacite magma was extruded almost continuously from Mount St Helens (Cascade Range, USA) as a succession of gas-poor and solidified lava spines. The dacite is thought to have solidified about 1 km below the vent and to have experienced intense strain localisation at the conduit margins during ascent. The most prominent of all the spines, Spine 4, formed a smooth 'whaleback' feature and had a distinct internal structure analogous to that of a tectonic fault zone. Extruded dacite lava was coated with a thick (~1m) layer of fault gouge, containing multiple sets of sub-parallel slickensides and shear bands orientated preferentially in the direction of spine growth. To investigate the controls on degassing processes, we have measured how permeability varied progressively with increasing temperature and deformation on samples from the 2004-2008 dome at Mount St Helens. Permeability was measured on cylindrical samples, 25 mm in diameter, in a hydrostatic permeameter at confining pressures up to 30 MPa (a depth of c.1.2 km) and, also, in a high temperature deformation apparatus at temperatures up to 900oC, confining pressures of 12 MPa and pore fluid pressures of 4 MPa. Samples of intact dacite from the interior of Spine 4 were

  11. The geomagnetic field intensity in New Zealand: palaeointensities from Holocene lava flows of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Annika; Hill, Mimi J.; Turner, Gillian M.; Nilsson, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Very few absolute palaeointensity data exist from Holocene-aged rocks in New Zealand. Here we present a new suite of high-quality palaeointensities, supported by detailed rock magnetic investigations. Samples from 23 sites representing 10 distinct eruptive units of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, were studied. Both traditional double heating and microwave palaeointensity methods were employed. The reliability of the palaeointensity data varies with rock magnetic properties of the samples, corresponding, in particular, to their positions within the lava flows. The highest success rates are from samples obtained from near the flow tops where a significant proportion of the remanence unblocked at intermediate temperatures (200-350 °C). By contrast, samples from flow centres, particularly the parts showing platey fracturing, have the lowest success rates. Reliable, high-quality palaeointensity results ranging from 32.4 ± 5.1 μT to 72.1 ± 4.7 μT were obtained from six flows with ages between c. 12 800 yr BP and the present. These correspond to virtual dipole moments that increase from 52 ± 10 ZAm2 in the early Holocene and peak at 112 ± 14 ZAm2 about 300 yr ago. The data agree well with calibrated relative palaeointensities from New Zealand lake sediments. The volcanic and sedimentary data together yield a Holocene virtual axial dipole moment curve that fits the global average variation well in the early Holocene, but which differs significantly in recent millennia. This difference is associated with recent migration of the southern high latitude core-mantle boundary flux lobe towards New Zealand, as is seen in global field models.

  12. Voluminous lava flow from Axial Seamount's south rift constrains extension rate on northern Vance Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Saout, M.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    Axial Seamount is characterized by a robust magma supply resulting from the interaction between the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge. During the last two decades, magmatic activity was focused within the summit caldera and upper and middle portions of the two rift zones, with eruptions in 1998, 2011, and 2015. However, the distal ends of both rift zones have experienced numerous eruptions in the past. The most voluminous flows are located near the extreme ends, greater than 40 kilometers from the caldera. Where Axial's South Rift Zone overlaps with the Vance Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the 2015 MBARI expedition mapped 16 km2 of the seafloor with our AUV, and collected 33 rocks and 33 sediment cores during two ROV dives. The data were used to confirm the boundaries of an extensive flow tentatively identified using modern ship based bathymetry. This flow is 18 km wide and 6 km long for a total surface area of 63 km2. The flow is modified by superficial ( 5 m deep) and deep (25 to 45 m deep) subsidence pits, with the deepest pits giving an indication of the minimum thickness of the flow. The maximum thickness of 100 m is measured at the margins of the flow. We thus estimate a volume between 2.5 and 6 km3, making this flow the most voluminous known on the global mid ocean ridge system. The minimum volume is equivalent to the present volume of the summit caldera. Radiocarbon ages of foraminifera from the basal sections of sediment cores suggest that this flow is 1000 years old. This flow travelled east and partially filled the axial valley of the adjacent Vance Segment. Since emplacement, this part of the flow has experienced deformation by fissures and faults aligned with the trend of the Vance Segment. The horizontal extension across these features allows us to estimate a local deformation rate of 3 cm/yr of tectonic extension on the northern end of Vance Segment during the last 1000 years.

  13. The mode of emplacement of Neogene flood basalts in eastern Iceland: Facies architecture and structure of simple aphyric basalt groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Óskarsson, Birgir V.; Riishuus, Morten S.

    2014-12-01

    Simple flows (tabular) in the Neogene flood basalt sections of Iceland are described and their mode of emplacement assessed. The flows belong to three aphyric basalt groups: the Kumlafell group, the Hólmatindur group and the Hjálmadalur group. The groups can be traced over 50 km and originate in the Breiðdalur-Thingmuli volcanic zone. The groups have flow fields that display mixed volcanic facies architecture and can be classified after dominating type morphology. The Kumlafell and the Hólmatindur groups have predominantly simple flows of pāhoehoe and rubbly pāhoehoe morphologies with minor compound or lobate pāhoehoe flows. The Hjálmadalur group has simple flows of rubbly pāhoehoe, but also includes minor compound or lobate flows of rubble and 'a'ā. Simple flows are most common in the distal and medial areas from the vents, while more lobate flows in proximal areas. The simple flows are formed by extensive sheet lobes that are several kilometers long with plane-parallel contacts, some reaching thicknesses of ~ 40 m (aspect ratios structures. Their internal structure consists generally of a simple upper vesicular crust, a dense core and a thin basal vesicular zone. The brecciated flow-top is formed by clinker and crustal rubble, the clinker often welded or agglutinated. The simple flows erupted from seemingly short-lived fissures and have the characteristics of cooling-limited flows. We estimate the effusion rates to be ~ 105 m3/s for the simple flows of the Kumlafell and Hólmatindur groups and ~ 104 m3/s for the Hjálmadalur group. The longest flows advanced 15-20 km from the fissures, with lava streams of fast propagating flows inducing tearing and brecciation of the chilled crust. Compound or lobate areas appear to reflect areas of low effusion rates or the interaction of the lava with topographic barriers or wetlands, resulting in chaotic flowage. Slowing lobes with brecciated flow-tops developed into 'a'ā flows. The groups interdigitated with lava

  14. Hydrologic test results for the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed and Pomona basalt flow top at Borehole DB-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, S.R.; Brown, W.R.

    1983-07-01

    This report presents results and description of hydrologic test activities for the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed and Pomona basalt flow top at Borehole DB-15. Hydrologic tests conducted include constant discharge air-lift and constant discharge submersible pumping tests. An observed hydraulic head for the test interval was 409 ± 1 feet above mean sea level. Transmissivity values determined from hydrologic tests performed, ranged between 493 and 469 ft 2 /day. The best estimate of transmissivity is 480 ft 2 /day. The best estimate of equivalent hydraulic conductivity, based on an effective test thickness of 56 feet is 8.6 ft/day. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Axial Seamount 2015 Eruption: A 127 m Thick, Microbially-Covered Lava Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Chadwick, W.; Philip, B. T.; Merle, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    On April 24th, Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge erupted. This site now hosts the most advanced submarine volcanic observatory with a diverse, multidisciplinary array of 48 cabled instruments at its summit and base, and an instrumented state-of-the-art shallow profiling mooring providing real-time data to shore as part of NSF's Ocean Observatory Initiative (Delaney et al., AGU-2015). The onset of the eruption was marked by more than 8000 earthquakes (Wilcock et al., AGU-2015; Garcia et al., AGU-2015) and a drop in the seafloor of 2.4 m (Nooner et al., AGU-2015). Follow-on analyses of hydrophone data (Tolstoy et al., AGU-2015) pointed to the location of the eruption as the Northern Rift zone. During the OOI-NSF-UW Cabled Array maintenance cruise, the Northern Rift and eastern side of the caldera was mapped using the R/V Thompson's EM302 system at. Differencing of 2007 (Hydrosweep) and 2013 EM302 bathymetric data indicated that the flow was ~ 7 km in length and up to 127 m thick, where it filled in a preexisting small depression. On July 26th, the ROV ROPOS dove near the toe of the northeastern lobe of the flow, the location of the highest bathymetric difference. The steep north face of this lobe is composed of glassy pillow flows: ROPOS ascended ~ 85 m before reaching the summit. Immediately upon reaching the summit, the vehicle was engulfed in a blizzard of biologically-produced 'snowblower' material issuing from distributed small sites of diffuse flow that reached 18°C. These areas hosted white filamentous bacteria, presumably methane metabolizers. Extensive areas of the flow summit were covered with orange microbial mats that completely masked the underlying pillows flows. Particle-poor diffuse fluids issued from microbially-covered collapse features along the summit, assumed to mark the main feeder channels. This eruption was markedly different than the Axial April 2011 eruption, which was characterized by vast sheet flows and extensive collapse zones.

  16. Heat and Groundwater Flow through Continental Flood Basalt Provinces: Insights Gained from Alternative Models of Permeability/Depth Relationships for the Columbia Plateau, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E. R.; Williams, C. F.; Ingebritsen, S.; Voss, C. I.; Spane, F.; DeAngelo, J.

    2014-12-01

    Heat-flow mapping of the western USA has identified an apparent low-heat-flow anomaly coincident with the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, a thick sequence of basalt aquifers within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). A heat and mass transport model (SUTRA) was used to evaluate the potential impact of groundwater flow on heat flow along two different regional groundwater flow paths. Limited in situ permeability (k) data from the CRBG are compatible with a steep permeability decrease (~3.5 orders of magnitude) at 600-900 m depth and ~40oC. Numerical simulations incorporating this permeability decrease demonstrate that regional groundwater flow can explain lower-than-expected heat flow in these highly anisotropic (kx/kz ~104) continental flood basalts. Simulation results indicate that the abrupt reduction in permeability at ~600 m depth results in an equivalently abrupt transition from a shallow region where heat flow is affected by groundwater flow to a deeper region of conduction-dominated heat flow. Abrupt k decreases at similar temperatures have also been observed in the volcanic rocks of the adjacent Cascade Range volcanic arc and at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, where they result from low-temperature hydrothermal alteration. Because pore filling hydrothermal minerals are largely controlled by the major mineral assemblages of the volcanic rocks, other continental flood basalt provinces may also have large permeability changes at depths corresponding to ~40oC.

  17. Geomagnetic field secular variation in Pacific Ocean: A Bayesian reference curve based on Holocene Hawaiian lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tema, E.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Lanos, Ph.

    2017-11-01

    Hawaii is an ideal place for reconstructing the past variations of the Earth's magnetic field in the Pacific Ocean thanks to the almost continuous volcanic activity during the last 10 000 yrs. We present here an updated compilation of palaeomagnetic data from historic and radiocarbon dated Hawaiian lava flows available for the last ten millennia. A total of 278 directional and 66 intensity reference data have been used for the calculation of the first full geomagnetic field reference secular variation (SV) curves for central Pacific covering the last ten millennia. The obtained SV curves are calculated following recent advances on curve building based on the Bayesian statistics and are well constrained for the last five millennia while for older periods their error envelopes are wide due to the scarce number of reference data. The new Bayesian SV curves show three clear intensity maxima during the last 3000 yrs that are accompanied by sharp directional changes. Such short-term variations of the geomagnetic field could be interpreted as archaeomagnetic jerks and could be an interesting feature of the geomagnetic field variation in the Pacific Ocean that should be further explored by new data.

  18. Naming Lunar Mare Basalts: Quo Vadimus Redux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, G.

    1999-01-01

    Nearly a decade ago, I noted that the nomenclature of lunar mare basalts was inconsistent, complicated, and arcane. I suggested that this reflected both the limitations of our understanding of the basalts, and the piecemeal progression made in lunar science by the nature of the Apollo missions. Although the word "classification" is commonly attached to various schemes of mare basalt nomenclature, there is still no classification of mare basalts that has any fundamental grounding. We remain basically at a classification of the first kind in the terms of Shand; that is, things have names. Quoting John Stuart Mill, Shand discussed classification of the second kind: "The ends of scientific classification are best answered when the objects are formed into groups respecting which a greater number of propositions can be made, and those propositions more important than could be made respecting any other groups into which the same things could be distributed." Here I repeat some of the main contents of my discussion from a decade ago, and add a further discussion based on events of the last decade. A necessary first step of sample studies that aims to understand lunar mare basalt processes is to associate samples with one another as members of the same igneous event, such as a single eruption lava flow, or differentiation event. This has been fairly successful, and discrete suites have been identified at all mare sites, members that are eruptively related to each other but not to members of other suites. These eruptive members have been given site-specific labels, e.g., Luna24 VLT, Apollo 11 hi-K, A12 olivine basalts, and Apollo 15 Green Glass C. This is classification of the first kind, but is not a useful classification of any other kind. At a minimum, a classification is inclusive (all objects have a place) and exclusive (all objects have only one place). The answer to "How should rocks be classified?" is far from trivial, for it demands a fundamental choice about nature

  19. A field investigation of the basaltic ring structures of the Channeled Scabland and the relevance to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestay, Laszlo P.; Jaeger, Windy L.

    2015-01-01

    The basaltic ring structure (BRS) is a class of peculiar features only reported in the Channeled Scabland of eastern Washington State. They have been suggested to be good analogs, however, for some circular features on Mars. BRSs are found where Pleistocene floods scoured the Columbia River Basin, stripping off the uppermost part of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group and exposing structures that were previously embedded in the lava. The “Odessa Craters,” near Odessa, WA, are 50–500-m-wide BRSs that are comprised of discontinuous, concentric outcrops of subvertically-jointed basalt and autointrusive dikes. Detailed field investigation of the Odessa Craters in planform and a cross-sectional exposure of a similar structure above Banks Lake, WA, lead us to propose that BRSs formed by concurrent phreatovolcanism and lava flow inflation. In this model, phreatovolcanic (a.k.a., “rootless”) cones formed on a relatively thin, active lava flow; the lava flow inflated around the cones, locally inverting topography; tensile stresses caused concentric fracturing of the lava crust; lava from within the molten interior of the flow exploited the fractures and buried the phreatovolcanic cones; and subsequent erosive floods excavated the structures. Another population of BRSs near Tokio Station, WA, consists of single-ringed, raised-rimmed structures that are smaller and more randomly distributed than the Odessa Craters. We find evidence for a phreatovolcanic component to the origin as well, and hypothesize that they are either flood-eroded phreatovolcanic cones or Odessa Crater-like BRSs. This work indicates that BRSs are not good analogs to the features on Mars because the martian features are found on the uneroded surfaces. Despite this, the now superseded concepts for BRS formation are useful for understanding the formation of the martian features.

  20. Understanding heat and groundwater flow through continental flood basalt provinces: insights gained from alternative models of permeability/depth relationships for the Columbia Plateau, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Erick R.; Williams, Colin F.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Voss, Clifford I.; Spane, Frank A.; DeAngelo, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Heat-flow mapping of the western USA has identified an apparent low-heat-flow anomaly coincident with the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, a thick sequence of basalt aquifers within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). A heat and mass transport model (SUTRA) was used to evaluate the potential impact of groundwater flow on heat flow along two different regional groundwater flow paths. Limited in situ permeability (k) data from the CRBG are compatible with a steep permeability decrease (approximately 3.5 orders of magnitude) at 600–900 m depth and approximately 40°C. Numerical simulations incorporating this permeability decrease demonstrate that regional groundwater flow can explain lower-than-expected heat flow in these highly anisotropic (kx/kz ~ 104) continental flood basalts. Simulation results indicate that the abrupt reduction in permeability at approximately 600 m depth results in an equivalently abrupt transition from a shallow region where heat flow is affected by groundwater flow to a deeper region of conduction-dominated heat flow. Most existing heat-flow measurements within the CRBG are from shallower than 600 m depth or near regional groundwater discharge zones, so that heat-flow maps generated using these data are likely influenced by groundwater flow. Substantial k decreases at similar temperatures have also been observed in the volcanic rocks of the adjacent Cascade Range volcanic arc and at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, where they result from low-temperature hydrothermal alteration.

  1. Simulating the development of basaltic volcanic fields for long-term hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Germa, A.; Richardson, J. A.; Molisee, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    An important application of lava flow simulation is to model topography and surface geology in volcanic terrains with the goal of improving hazard assessments. We use a lava flow simulator, MOLASSES, coupled with codes modeling vent distribution, tephra dispersion and erosion to simulate the development of the surface geology and topography of basaltic volcanic fields. The simulation workflow begins by modeling the potential distribution of vents as a stochastic process using kernel density estimation, informed by geophysical models of the crust. Scoria cone dimensions, lava flow volume and thickness are then used to model multi-vent structures, breached scoria cones, and spatter cones. Tephra2, a tephra dispersion simulator is used to model medial deposition of tephra. MOLASSES is a cellular automata code that forecasts the dimensions of lava flows erupted at a point source on a digital elevation model. Lava and tephra are accumulated to construct topography, updating digital elevation models of the terrain. This topography is modified by erosion using the diffusion-advection equation and variable diffusivity for tephra, spatter and lava. Output from the simulator shows how the map geology of volcanic fields depends on vent density, volume of eruptive products, and the recurrence rate of volcanic activity. The potential for vent burial, which potentially biases hazard models, depends strongly on these factors. The erosion of scoria cones with time depends on vent density, and the likelihood of the scoria cone being re-surfaced by tephra fallout from younger adjacent cones. Our results suggest that quantitative treatment of geologic maps of volcanic fields using computer simulation will improve our understanding of the development of these basaltic volcanic fields and long-term hazard models.

  2. A Strongly Calc-alkaline Suite in the Midst of the Tholeiitic Columbia River Basalt Province: Implications for Generating the Calc-alkaline Trend Without Subduction Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The mid-Miocene lavas of the Strawberry Volcanics (SV), distributed over 3,400 km2 in NE Oregon, comprise a diverse volcanic suite, which span the range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite. The volcanic suite is mainly composed of calc-alkaline (CA) basaltic andesite and andesite, yet tholeiitic (TH) lavas of basalt to andesite occur as well. The SV lies in the heart of nearly coeval flood basalts of the Columbia River province of the Pacific Northwest. The unique combination of strongly CA rocks of the SV in a non-subduction setting provide an excellent opportunity to study controls on inducing CA evolution in the midst of a TH province and independent of processes taking places at an active subduction zone. New 40Ar/39Ar ages indicate CA basaltic andesites to andesites of the SV erupted at least from 14.78±0.13 Ma to 12.44±0.12 Ma demonstrating that CA magmatism of the SV was ongoing during the eruptions of the tholeiitic Wanapum Basalt member of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). This range will likely be extended to even older ages in the future because existent age dates did not include samples from near the base of the SV. Thickness of intermediate lavas flows of the SV range from 15 m to as thin as 2 m and lavas are characterized by mostly phenocryst poor lithologies. When phenocrysts are abundant they are very small suggesting growth late during eruption. Single lava flow sections can include on the order of 30 conformable flows, testifying to a vigorous eruption history. The thickest andesitic sections are located in the glacially carved mountains of the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness (i.e. Strawberry Mountain, High Lake, and Slide Lake) where several vent complexes are exposed, which are delineated by dikes and plugs with finely interlocking plutonic textures, cross-cutting SV lava flows. Dikes generally strike NW-SE. Subtle variations in major and trace element compositions exist between TH and CA lavas of the SV. The CA lavas of the SV are

  3. THE AESTHETICS AND DYNAMICS OF LAVA: An interdisciplinary course in which the volcano is brought to the students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, R.; Karson, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    The power, fury, and nearly indescribably beauty of flowing lava has permeated the entirety of human existence. Being in the presence of flowing lava redefines the educational experience magnitudes beyond that of the classroom, online and/or an analog experiment. For the last 8 years the Syracuse University Lava Project (SULP) has presented this unique immersive experience nearly weekly year-round. It is through this intensely direct education experience that Pre-K to Post Doc students are exposed to a fundamental geomorphic mechanism: flowing lava. The SULP facility is located in the Syracuse Sculpture Studio and 1.1 Ga basalt is turned into 1200°C molten lava flowing from a reconfigured bronze furnace. Originally conceived as a means to find art material via scientific experiment the project has evolved into a truly one-of-a-kind interdisciplinary course "The Aesthetics and Dynamics of Lava," a course populated by students from across the academic spectrum. Students in this cross-listed course design their own investigations with lava- art or science or some combination - in the context of our background presentations as a launching point. Key benefits include interacting with faculty from very different backgrounds and with very different scholarly/funding systems and students with different outlooks, to engage in multiple modes of learning. Students use scientific tools and processes (FLIR camera, microprobe, thin sections, etc.) as well as those from art and design to produce reports in a variety of formats: traditional written reports, video projects, computer modeling, online presentations, sculpture, photography, etc. Our collaboration has truly blurred the lines between science and art, creating a learning environment in which students from across all academic disciplines work together to share their diverse impressions of lava flow events through shared projects, broadening their perspectives and enabling them to see one another's worlds from new points

  4. Lava inundation zone maps for Mauna Loa, Island of Hawaiʻi, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusdell, Frank A.; Zoeller, Michael H.

    2017-10-12

    Lava flows from Mauna Loa volcano, on the Island of Hawaiʻi, constitute a significant hazard to people and property. This report addresses those lava flow hazards, mapping 18 potential lava inundation zones on the island.

  5. Lava penetrating water: the different behaviours of pāhoehoe and `a`ā at the Nesjahraun, Þingvellir, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, John Alexander; Mitchell, Neil Charles; Mochrie, Fiona; Cassidy, Michael; Pinkerton, Harry

    2012-01-01

    The Nesjahraun is a basaltic lava flow erupted from a subaerial fissure, extending NE along the Þingvellir graben from the Hengill central volcano that produced pāhoehoe lava followed by `a`ā. The Nesjahraun entered Iceland's largest lake, Þingvallavatn, along its southern shore during both phases of the eruption and exemplifies lava flowing into water in a lacustrine environment in the absence of powerful wave action. This study combines airborne light detection and ranging, sidescan sonar and Chirp seismic data with field observations to investigate the behaviour of the lava as it entered the water. Pāhoehoe sheet lava was formed during the early stages of the eruption. Along the shoreline, stacks of thin (5-20 cm thick), vesicular, flows rest upon and surround low (piles of coarse, unconsolidated, variably oxidised spatter. Clefts within the lava run inland from the lake. These are 2-5 m wide, >2 m deep, ˜50 m long, spaced ˜50 m apart and have sub-horizontal striations on the walls. They likely represent channels or collapsed tubes along which lava was delivered into the water. A circular rootless cone, Eldborg, formed when water infiltrated a lava tube. Offshore from the pāhoehoe lavas, the gradient of the flow surface steepens, suggesting a change in flow regime and the development of a talus ramp. Later, the flow was focused into a channel of `a`ā lava, ˜200-350 m wide. This split into individual flow lobes 20-50 m wide along the shore. `A`ā clinker is exposed on the water's edge, as well as glassy sand and gravel, which has been locally intruded by small (<1 m), irregularly shaped, lava bodies. The cores of the flow lobes contain coherent, but hackly fractured lava. Mounds consisting predominantly of scoria lapilli and the large paired half-cone of Grámelur were formed in phreatomagmatic explosions. The `a`ā flow can be identified underwater over 1 km offshore, and the sidescan data suggest that the flow lobes remained coherent flowing down a

  6. Thermal infrared data of active lava surfaces using a newly-developed camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. O.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Our ability to acquire accurate data during lava flow emplacement greatly improves models designed to predict their dynamics and down-flow hazard potential. For example, better constraint on the physical property of emissivity as a lava cools improves the accuracy of the derived temperature, a critical parameter for flow models that estimate at-vent eruption rate, flow length, and distribution. Thermal infrared (TIR) data are increasingly used as a tool to determine eruption styles and cooling regimes by measuring temperatures at high temporal resolutions. Factors that control the accurate measurement of surface temperatures include both material properties (e.g., emissivity and surface texture) as well as external factors (e.g., camera geometry and the intervening atmosphere). We present a newly-developed, field-portable miniature multispectral thermal infrared camera (MMT-Cam) to measure both temperature and emissivity of basaltic lava surfaces at up to 7 Hz. The MMT-Cam acquires emitted radiance in six wavelength channels in addition to the broadband temperature. The instrument was laboratory calibrated for systematic errors and fully field tested at the Overlook Crater lava lake (Kilauea, HI) in January 2017. The data show that the major emissivity absorption feature (around 8.5 to 9.0 µm) transitions to higher wavelengths and the depth of the feature decreases as a lava surface cools, forming a progressively thicker crust. This transition occurs over a temperature range of 758 to 518 K. Constraining the relationship between this spectral change and temperature derived from this data will provide more accurate temperatures and therefore, more accurate modeling results. This is the first time that emissivity and its link to temperature has been measured in situ on active lava surfaces, which will improve input parameters of flow propagation models and possibly improve flow forecasting.

  7. Satellite-Based Thermophysical Analysis of Volcaniclastic Deposits: A Terrestrial Analog for Mantled Lava Flows on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Price

    2016-02-01

    example. Accurate identification of non-mantled lava surfaces within an apparently well-mantled flow field on either planet provides locations to extract important mineralogical constraints on the individual flows using TIR data.

  8. Temperature profile around a basaltic sill intruded into wet sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Leslie; Bernard, Andrew; Rember, William C.; Milazzo, Moses; Dundas, Colin M.; Abramov, Oleg; Kestay, Laszlo P.

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of heat into wet sediments from magmatic intrusions or lava flows is not well constrained from field data. Such field constraints on numerical models of heat transfer could significantly improve our understanding of water–lava interactions. We use experimentally calibrated pollen darkening to measure the temperature profile around a basaltic sill emplaced into wet lakebed sediments. It is well known that, upon heating, initially transparent palynomorphs darken progressively through golden, brown, and black shades before being destroyed; however, this approach to measuring temperature has not been applied to volcanological questions. We collected sediment samples from established Miocene fossil localities at Clarkia, Idaho. Fossils in the sediments include pollen from numerous tree and shrub species. We experimentally calibrated changes in the color of Clarkia sediment pollen and used this calibration to determine sediment temperatures around a Miocene basaltic sill emplaced in the sediments. Results indicated a flat temperature profile above and below the sill, with T > 325 °C within 1 cm of the basalt-sediment contact, near 300 °C at 1–2 cm from the contact, and ~ 250 °C at 1 m from the sill contact. This profile suggests that heat transport in the sediments was hydrothermally rather than conductively controlled. This information will be used to test numerical models of heat transfer in wet sediments on Earth and Mars.

  9. Constructing the volcanic architecture of Kalkarindji, an ancient flood basalt province, using a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P.; Widdowson, M.; Kelley, S. P.; Mac Niocaill, C.; Murphy, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Kalkarindji Continental Flood Basalt Province (CFBP) is the oldest igneous province in the Phanerozoic. Erupted in the mid-Cambrian (505-510 Ma) [1], it is estimated volumes of lava up to 1.5 x 105 km3could have been erupted, making this similar in size to the better known Columbia River Basalts, USA. Relatively little is known about the province, due in part to its remote location, though large swathes remain well preserved (c. 50,000 km2). This study, based on rigorous field investigations, utilises 4 different analytical techniques to construct a volcanic architecture for the Kalkarindji basalts, drawing together these complimentary datasets to generate a series of detailed stratigraphies from around the province. Mineralogy and petrography form the basis while geochemical data aides in defining lava flow stratigraphies and distinguishing individual flow packages in disparate locations around the province. 40Ar/39Ar dating of key stratigraphic marker horizons support stratigraphical correlation across the province whilst the use of palaeomagnetism and magnetostratigraphy has allowed for correlation on a broader scale. Indications from this study point towards an unusual eruption among CFBPs in the Phanerozoic; a lack of tumescence, immediate subsidence of the lava pile following cessation of eruption; and, in the main sub-province, we map a simple volcanic structure thinning to the east from a single source. 1. L. M. Glass, D. Phillips, (2006). Geology. 34, 461-464.

  10. Effets thermique et hydrothermal de la coulée de basalte triasico-liasique sur les argiles du bassin d'Argana (Maroc)Thermal and hydrothermal effects of Triassic Liassic basalt flow deposition on clays (Agana Basin, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoudi, Lahcen; Pot de Vin, Jean-Luc

    Thermal and hydrothermal effects of Triassic-Liassic basalt flow deposition on sedimentary series of the Argana Basin are responsible for major modifications in detrital clays, until 20 m in depth. It expressed by transformation of detrital smectite to corrensite and moreover to chlorite, and by increasing illite crystallinity. On the 2 m of sediments located immediately under the flow, magnesium-rich hydrothermal fluids have caused precipitation of new mineral phases. To cite this article: L. Daoudi, J.-L. Pot de Vin, C. R. Geoscience 334 (2002) 463-468.

  11. Facies architecture of the Etjo Sandstone Formation and its interaction with the Basal Etendeka Flood Basalts of northwest Namibia: implications for offshore prospectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerram, D.A. [Institut fur Geologie, Universitat Wuerzburg (Germany); University of Durham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Mountney, N. [University of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Stollhofen, H. [Institut fur Geologie, Universitat Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    The Basal Etendeka Flood Basalt stratigraphy in the Huab Basin of northwest Namibia comprises a series of lava flows interleaved with aeolian sandstone bodies of the Etjo Sandstone Formation. The sandstone units are characterized by three main types: (1) the major erg - a mixed aeolian and fluvian facies up to 150 m thick ; (2) minor ergs - aeolian facies which occur directly above the first volcanic units and are up to 60 m thick; (3) isolated bodies - multidune, single dune and lava topography infills. A variety of bypass surfaces identified by sand-filled cracks and sediment - lava breccias occur on lava top surfaces. Preserved ripples and pahoehoe lava imprints indicate that the aeolian sand dunes were actively migrating during basalt emplacement. Observations recorded in the Basal Etendeka Flood Basalts which may be of relevance to offshore hydrocarbon exploration include: a major-minor erg relationship resulting in large sandbodies up to 60 m thick which occur directly after the first volcanic units; the occurrence of sand-filled fissures up to 36 m in depth which would greatly influence connectivity in an offshore setting; the identification of bypass surfaces as marker horizons which may laterally correlate with isolated sandbodies.

  12. Environmental implication of subaqueous lava flows from a continental Large Igneous Province: Examples from the Moroccan Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghilani, S.; Youbi, N.; Madeira, J.; Chellai, E. H.; López-Galindo, A.; Martins, L.; Mata, J.

    2017-03-01

    The Late Triassic-Early Jurassic volcanic sequence of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) of Morocco is classically subdivided into four stratigraphic units: the Lower, Middle, Upper and Recurrent Formations separated by intercalated sediments deposited during short hiatuses in volcanic activity. Although corresponding to a Large Igneous Province formed in continental environment, it contains subaqueous lava flows, including dominant pillowed flows but also occasional sheet flows. We present a study of the morphology, structure and morphometry of subaqueous lava flows from three sections located at the Marrakech High-Atlas (regions of Aït-Ourir, Jbel Imzar and Oued Lhar-Herissane), as well as an analysis of the sediments, in order to characterize them and to understand their environmental meaning. The analysis of clays by the diffraction method X-ray revealed the presence of illite, mica, phengite, céladonite, talc and small amounts of quartz, hematite, calcite and feldspar, as well as two pairs of interbedded irregular (chlorite Smectite/chlorite-Mica). Fibrous minerals such as sepiolite and palygorskite were not detected. The peperite of Herissane region (Central High Atlas) provided an excellent overview on the factors favoring the magma-sediment interaction. These are the products of a mixture of unconsolidated or poorly consolidated sediments, low permeability with a low viscosity magma. The attempt of dating palynology proved unfortunately without results.

  13. Did the massive magnetite "lava flows" of El Laco (Chile) form by magmatic or hydrothermal processes? New constraints from magnetite composition by LA-ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Sarah A. S.; Barnes, Sarah-Jane; Beaudoin, Georges

    2015-06-01

    The El Laco magnetite deposits consist of more than 98 % magnetite but show field textures remarkably similar to mafic lava flows. Therefore, it has long been suggested that they represent a rare example of an effusive Fe oxide liquid. Field and petrographic evidence, however, suggest that the magnetite deposits represent replacement of andesite flows and that the textures are pseudomorphs. We determined the trace element content of magnetite by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) from various settings at El Laco and compared them with magnetite from both igneous and hydrothermal environments. This new technique allows us to place constraints on the conditions under which magnetite in these supposed magnetite "lava flows" formed. The trace element content of magnetite from the massive magnetite samples is different to any known magmatic magnetite, including primary magnetite phenocrysts from the unaltered andesite host rocks at El Laco. Instead, the El Laco magnetite is most similar in composition to hydrothermal magnetite from high-temperature environments (>500 °C), such as iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) and porphyry-Cu deposits. The magnetite trace elements from massive magnetite are characterised by (1) depletion in elements considered relatively immobile in hydrothermal fluids (e.g. Ti, Al, Cr, Zr, Hf and Sc); (2) enrichment in elements that are highly incompatible with magmatic magnetite (rare earth elements (REE), Si, Ca, Na and P) and normally present in very low abundance in magmatic magnetite; (3) high Ni/Cr ratios which are typical of magnetite from hydrothermal environments; and (4) oscillatory zoning of Si, Ca, Mg, REE and most high field strength elements, and zoning truncations indicating dissolution, similar to that formed in hydrothermal Fe skarn deposits. In addition, secondary magnetite in altered, brecciated host rock, forming disseminations and veins, has the same composition as magnetite from the massive

  14. Discrete Fracture Network Modeling and Simulation of Subsurface Transport for the Topopah Springs and Lava Flow Aquifers at Pahute Mesa, FY 15 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Birdsell, Kay Hanson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harrod, Jeremy Ashcraft [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-18

    This progress report for fiscal year 2015 (FY15) describes the development of discrete fracture network (DFN) models for Pahute Mesa. DFN models will be used to upscale parameters for simulations of subsurface flow and transport in fractured media in Pahute Mesa. The research focuses on modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport using DFNs generated according to fracture characteristics observed in the Topopah Spring Aquifer (TSA) and the Lava Flow Aquifer (LFA). This work will improve the representation of radionuclide transport processes in large-scale, regulatory-focused models with a view to reduce pessimistic bounding approximations and provide more realistic contaminant boundary calculations that can be used to describe the future extent of contaminated groundwater. Our goal is to refine a modeling approach that can translate parameters to larger-scale models that account for local-scale flow and transport processes, which tend to attenuate migration.

  15. Lava entering water: the different behaviour of aa and pahoehoe at the Nesjahraun, Thingvellir, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J. A.; Mitchell, N.; Mochrie, F.; Cassidy, M.; Pinkerton, H.

    2009-12-01

    The Nesjahraun is a basaltic lava flow that erupted 1800 years ago from a subaerial fissure extending NE from the Hengill central volcano along the Thingvellir graben. The Nesjahraun entered the lake "Thingvallavatn" on its southern shore and exemplifies lava flowing into water in a relatively sheltered, lacustrine environment. This study combines airborne LiDAR, sidescan sonar, and CHIRP seismic data with field observations to investigate the behaviour of the lava as it entered the water. The early stages of the eruption produced pahoehoe sheet lava that is exposed as stacks of thin, vesicular, flows (5-20 cm thick) resting upon and surrounding low (piles of coarse, unconsolidated, variably-oxidised spatter. Clefts, 2-5 m wide, spaced ~50 m apart, and with subhorizontal striations on the walls, extend <50 m inland from the lake. They likely represent channels or collapsed tubes along which lava was delivered into the water. A circular littoral cone, Eldborg, formed when water infiltrated a lava tube. Offshore, the water deepens quickly, suggesting that this part of the flow ends as a steep talus ramp. Later, the flow focussed into an aa channel that split along the shore into individual flow lobes 1-50 m wide. Aa clinker is exposed on the water's edge, as well as glassy sand and gravel containing irregularly-shaped intrusions. The cores of the flow lobes contain coherent, but hackly-fractured lava. Mounds of lapilli-sized scoria and the large double cone of Grámelur were formed in littoral explosions. The aa flow can be identified over 1 km offshore in the CHIRP and sidescan data, the latter suggesting that the flow lobes remained coherent while flowing down a gradient of <10 degrees. The Nesjahraun demonstrates that, even in the absence of ocean waves, littoral explosions are ubiquitous, that pahoehoe flows advance by construction of a talus ramp, and that with a high flux and shallow gradient, it is possible for aa flows to penetrate water and to remain

  16. Stratigraphy of amethyst geode-bearing lavas and fault-block structures of the Entre Rios mining district, Paraná volcanic province, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LÉO A. HARTMANN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Entre Rios mining district produces a large volume of amethyst geodes in underground mines and is part of the world class deposits in the Paraná volcanic province of South America. Two producing basalt flows are numbered 4 and 5 in the lava stratigraphy. A total of seven basalt flows and one rhyodacite flow are present in the district. At the base of the stratigraphy, beginning at the Chapecó river bed, two basalt flows are Esmeralda, low-Ti type. The third flow in the sequence is a rhyodacite, Chapecó type, Guarapuava subtype. Above the rhyodacite flow, four basalt flows are Pitanga, high-Ti type including the two mineralized flows; only the topmost basalt in the stratigraphy is a Paranapanema, intermediate-Ti type. Each individual flow is uniquely identified from its geochemical and gamma-spectrometric properties. The study of several sections in the district allowed for the identification of a fault-block structure. Blocks are elongated NW and the block on the west side of the fault was downthrown. This important structural characterization of the mining district will have significant consequences in the search for new amethyst geode deposits and in the understanding of the evolution of the Paraná volcanic province.

  17. Textural variations and fragmentation processes in peperite formed between felsic lava flow and wet substrate: An example from the Cretaceous Buan Volcanics, southwest Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gihm, Yong Sik; Kwon, Chang Woo

    2017-02-01

    Multiple exposures of peperite within the Cretaceous Buan Volcanics, southwest Korea, have been examined in order to determine variations in their textural characteristics and to investigate their mode of formation. Along undulating boundaries between rhyolite (lava flow) and deformed host sediment expressed as a series of load and flame structures, exposures commonly contain two distinct types of peperite. Type-1 peperites are composed mostly of rounded juvenile clasts at their base and polyhedral juvenile clasts at their upper levels, interpreted to have formed via a two-stage process. Firstly, abrasion of juvenile clasts occurred after their fragmentation due to shear stress imparted by the overlying and still-moving lava flow, forming rounded juvenile clasts. Subsequent in situ quenching fragmentation of the lava flow produced clasts with platy to polyhedral shapes immediately after emplacement of the lava flow. Type-2 peperites laterally extend into the interior of featureless rhyolite as layers that decrease in thickness with increasing distance away from the flame zone. These layers exhibit horizontal textural variations, ranging from poorly sorted mixtures of ash- to block-sized angular juvenile clasts in the proximal zone, to closely packed polyhedral and tabular juvenile clasts with jigsaw-crack textures in the middle and distal zones. Type-2 peperite are inferred to have formed due to internal steam explosions that resulted from an expansion of heated pore water (leading to an increase in pore fluid pressure) that had been vertically injected into the interior of the rhyolite from the flame zone. The proximal zone, composed mainly of poorly sorted mixtures of juvenile clasts, represents the explosion sites. Juvenile clasts in the middle and distal zones are interpreted to have formed due to three separate processes: the development of fractures in the rhyolite during the internal steam explosions, injection of the host sediment through the fractures, and

  18. Additive Construction using Basalt Regolith Fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Lippitt, Thomas C.; Mantovani, James G.; Nugent, Matthew W.; Townsend, Ivan I.

    2014-01-01

    Planetary surfaces are often covered in regolith (crushed rock), whose geologic origin is largely basalt. The lunar surface is made of small-particulate regolith and areas of boulders located in the vicinity of craters. Regolith composition also varies with location, reflecting the local bedrock geology and the nature and efficiency of the micrometeorite-impact processes. In the lowland mare areas (suitable for habitation), the regolith is composed of small granules (20 - 100 microns average size) of mare basalt and volcanic glass. Impacting micrometeorites may cause local melting, and the formation of larger glassy particles, and this regolith may contain 10-80% glass. Studies of lunar regolith are traditionally conducted with lunar regolith simulant (reconstructed soil with compositions patterned after the lunar samples returned by Apollo). The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Granular Mechanics & Regolith Operations (GMRO) lab has identified a low fidelity but economical geo-technical simulant designated as Black Point-1 (BP-1). It was found at the site of the Arizona Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) analog field test site at the Black Point lava flow in adjacent basalt quarry spoil mounds. This paper summarizes activities at KSC regarding the utilization of BP-1 basalt regolith and comparative work with lunar basalt simulant JSC-1A as a building material for robotic additive construction of large structures. In an effort to reduce the import or in-situ fabrication of binder additives, we focused this work on in-situ processing of regolith for construction in a single-step process after its excavation. High-temperature melting of regolith involves techniques used in glassmaking and casting (with melts of lower density and higher viscosity than those of metals), producing basaltic glass with high durability and low abrasive wear. Most Lunar simulants melt at temperatures above 1100 C, although melt processing of terrestrial regolith at 1500 C is not

  19. King's Bowl Pit Crater, Lava Field and Eruptive Fissure, Idaho - A Multipurpose Volcanic Planetary Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S. S.; Garry, B.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Sears, D. W. G.; Borg, C.; Elphic, R. C.; Haberle, C. W.; Kobayashi, L.; Lim, D. S. S.; Sears, H.; Skok, J. R.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    King's Bowl (KB) and its associated eruptive fissure and lava field on the eastern Snake River Plain, is being investigated by the NASA SSERVI FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team as a planetary analog to similar pits on the Moon, Mars and Vesta. The 2,220 ± 100 BP basaltic eruption in Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve represents early stages of low shield growth, which was aborted when magma supply was cut off. Compared to mature shields, KB is miniscule, with ~0.02 km3 of lava over ~3 km2, yet the ~6 km long series of fissures, cracks and pits are well-preserved for analog studies of volcanic processes. The termination of eruption was likely related to proximity of the 2,270 ± 50 BP eruption of the much larger Wapi lava field (~5.5 km3 over 325 km2 area) on the same rift. Our investigation extends early work by R. Greeley and colleagues, focusing on imagery, compositional variations, ejecta distribution, dGPS profiles and LiDAR scans of features related to: (1) fissure eruptions - spatter ramparts, cones, feeder dikes, extension cracks; (2) lava lake formation - surface morphology, squeeze-ups, slab pahoehoe lava mounds, lava drain-back, flow lobe overlaps; and (3) phreatic steam blasts - explosion pits, ejecta blankets of ash and blocks. Preliminary results indicate multiple fissure eruptions and growth of a basin-filled lava lake up to ~ 10 m thick with outflow sheet lava flows. Remnant mounds of original lake crust reveal an early high lava lake level, which subsided as much as 5 m as the molten interior drained back into the fissure system. Rapid loss of magma supply led to the collapse of fissure walls allowing groundwater influx that triggered multiple steam blasts along at least 500 m. Early blasts occurred while lake magma pressure was still high enough to produce squeeze-ups when penetrated by ejecta blocks. The King's Bowl pit crater exemplifies processes of a small, but highly energetic

  20. Shallow Miocene basaltic magma reservoirs in the Bahia de Los Angeles basin, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Argote, Luis A.; García-Abdeslem, Juan

    1999-01-01

    The basement in the Bahía de Los Angeles basin consists of Paleozoic metamorphic rocks and Cretaceous granitoids. The Neogene stratigraphy overlying the basement is formed, from the base to the top, by andesitic lava flows and plugs, sandstone and conglomeratic horizons, and Miocene pyroclastic flow units and basaltic flows. Basaltic dikes also intrude the whole section. To further define its structure, a detailed gravimetric survey was conducted across the basin about 1 km north of the Sierra Las Flores. In spite of the rough and lineal topography along the foothills of the Sierra La Libertad, we found no evidence for large-scale faulting. Gravity data indicates that the basin has a maximum depth of 120 m in the Valle Las Tinajas and averages 75 m along the gravimetric profile. High density bodies below the northern part of the Sierra Las Flores and Valle Las Tinajas are interpreted to be part of basaltic dikes. The intrusive body located north of the Sierra Las Flores is 2.5 km wide and its top is about 500 m deep. The lava flows of the top of the Sierra Las Flores, together with the distribution of basaltic activity north of this sierra, suggests that this intrusive body continues for 20 km along a NNW-trending strike. Between the sierras Las Flores and Las Animas, a 0.5-km-wide, 300-m-thick intrusive body is interpreted at a depth of about 100 m. This dike could be part of the basaltic activity of the Cerro Las Tinajas and the small mounds along the foothills of western Sierra Las Animas. The observed local normal faulting in the basin is inferred to be mostly associated with the emplacement of the shallow magma reservoirs below Las Flores and Las Tinajas.

  1. Rangitoto Volcano Drilling Project: Life of a Small 'Monogenetic' Basaltic Shield in the Auckland Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, P. A. R.; Linnell, T.; Lindsay, J. M.; Smith, I. E.; Augustinus, P. M.; Cronin, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Rangitoto is a small basaltic shield volcano representing the most recent and most voluminous episode of volcanism in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand. Auckland City is built on the field, and hence, Rangitoto's importance in hazard-risk modelling. The symmetrical edifice, ~6 km wide and 260 m high, has volume of 1.78 km3. It comprises summit scoria cones and a lava field. However, the lack of deep erosion dissection has prevented the development of an eruptive stratigraphy. Previous studies suggested construction in a relatively short interval at 550-500 yrs BP. However, microscopic tephra have been interpreted as evidence of intermittent activity from 1498 +/- 140 to 504 +/- 6 yrs BP, a longevity of 1000 years. A 150-m-deep hole was drilled through the edifice in February 2014 to obtain a continuous core record. The result is an unparalleled stratigraphy of the evolution of a small shield volcano. The upper 128 m of core comprises at least 27 lava flows with thicknesses in the range 0.3-15 m, representing the main shield-building phase. Underlying marine sediments are interbedded with 8 m of pyroclastic lapilli, and a thin lava flow, representing the explosive phreatomagmatic birth of the volcano. Preliminary geochemical analyses reveal suite of relatively uniform transitional basalts (MgO = 8.1 to 9.7 wt %). However, 4 compositional groups are distinguished that were erupted in sequential order. High-MgO magmas were erupted first, followed by a two more heterogeneous groups displaying differentiation trends with time. Finally, distinct low-MgO basalts were erupted. Each magma type appears to represent a new magma batch. The core places the magma types in a time series, which can be correlated to the surface lava field. Hence, allowing a geometrical reconstruction of the shield growth. Additional petrologic investigations are providing insight to magmatic ascent processes, while radiocarbon and paleomagnetic secular variation studies will reveal the

  2. Compositional diversity of Late Cenozoic basalts in a transect across the southern Washington Cascades: Implications for subduction zone magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, William P.; Smith, Diane R.; Hildreth, Wes; Palacz, Zen; Rogers, Nick

    1990-11-01

    Major volcanoes of the Southern Washington Cascades (SWC) include the large Quaternary stratovolcanoes of Mount St. Helens (MSH) and Mount Adams (MA) and the Indian Heaven (IH) and Simcoe Mountain (SIM) volcanic fields. There are significant differences among these volcanic centers in terms of their composition and evolutionary history. The stratovolcanoes consist largely of andesitic to dacitic lavas and pyroclastics with minor basalt flows. IH consists dominantly of basaltic with minor andesite lavas, all erupted from monogenetic rift and cinder cone vents. SIM has a poorly exposed andesite to rhyolite core but mainly consists of basaltic lavas erupted from numerous widely dispersed vents; it has the morphology of a shield volcano. Distribution of mafic lavas across the SWC is related to north-northwest trending faults and fissure zones that indicate a significant component of east-west extension within the area. There is overlap in eruptive history for the areas studied, but it appears that peak activity was progressively older (MSH (slab-metasomatized subarc mantle. The juxtaposition of such different mantle domains within the lithospheric mantle is viewed as a consequence of (1) tectonic mixing associated with accretion of oceanic and island arc terranes along the Pacific margin of North America prior to Neogene time, and possibly (2) a seaward jump in the locus of subduction at about 40 Ma. The Cascades arc is unusual in that the subducting oceanic plate is very young and hot. We suggest that slab dehydration outboard of the volcanic front resulted in a diminished role of aqueous fluids in generating or subsequently modifying SWC magmas compared to the situation at most convergent margins. Furthermore, with low fluid flux conditions, basalt generation is presumably triggered by other processes that increase the temperature of the mantle wedge (e.g., convective mantle flow, shear heating, etc.).

  3. Evidence for Cyclical Fractional Crystallization, Recharge, and Assimilation in Basalts of the Kimama Drill Core, Central Snake River Plain, Idaho: 5.5-Million-Years of Petrogenesis in a Mid-crustal Sill Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Potter

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Basalts erupted in the Snake River Plain of central Idaho and sampled in the Kimama drill core link eruptive processes to the construction of mafic intrusions over 5.5 Ma. Cyclic variations in basalt composition reveal temporal chemical heterogeneity related to fractional crystallization and the assimilation of previously-intruded mafic sills. A range of compositional types are identified within 1,912 m of continuous drill core: Snake River olivine tholeiite (SROT, low K SROT, high Fe-Ti, and evolved and high K-Fe lavas similar to those erupted at Craters of the Moon National Monument. Detailed lithologic and geophysical logs document 432 flow units comprising 183 distinct lava flows and 78 flow groups. Each lava flow represents a single eruptive episode, while flow groups document chemically and temporally related flows that formed over extended periods of time. Temporal chemical variation demonstrates the importance of source heterogeneity and magma processing in basalt petrogenesis. Low-K SROT and high Fe-Ti basalts are genetically related to SROT as, respectively, hydrothermally-altered and fractionated daughters. Cyclic variations in the chemical composition of Kimama flow groups are apparent as 21 upward fractionation cycles, six recharge cycles, eight recharge-fractionation cycles, and five fractionation-recharge cycles. We propose that most Kimama basalt flows represent typical fractionation and recharge patterns, consistent with the repeated influx of primitive SROT parental magmas and extensive fractional crystallization coupled with varying degrees of assimilation of gabbroic to ferrodioritic sills at shallow to intermediate depths over short durations. Trace element models show that parental SROT basalts were generated by 5–10% partial melting of enriched mantle at shallow depths above the garnet-spinel lherzolite transition. The distinctive evolved and high K-Fe lavas are rare. Found at four depths, 319, 1045, 1,078, and 1,189 m

  4. Petrography of basalts from the Carlsberg ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Petrographic characteristics of basalts collected from a segment of the Carlsberg Ridge (lat. 3 degrees 35'N to 3 degrees 41'N; long. 64 degrees 05'E to 64 degrees 09'E) show typical pillow lava zonations with variable concentrations of plagioclase...

  5. Measuring Lava Flows With ArcticDEM: Application to the 2012-2013 Eruption of Tolbachik, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chunli; Howat, Ian M.

    2017-12-01

    ArcticDEM is an open-access collection of high-resolution (2 m), repeat, digital surface models, created from submeter resolution, stereoscopic satellite imagery, covering the entire Arctic landmass. To demonstrate the application of this powerful new data source for measuring Earth surface change, we measure elevation changes resulting from the 2012-2013 eruption of Tolbachik volcano in Kamchatka, Russia, which reveals detailed variations in lava thickness. We estimate a total lava volume of 0.573 ± 0.007 km3 emplaced over an area of 45.8 km2 at a mean rate of 21 m3/s. Furthermore, the size and timing of eruptions over the past 2,000 years support the hypothesis that the combined eruptions of 1976-77 and 2012-2013 ejected much or all of the magma stored over the previous 1,000 years, so that a multicentury repose is expected. The approaches developed in this study will guide future, expanded applications of ArcticDEM to mapping terrain change.

  6. Multiphase Alkaline Basalts of Central Al-Haruj Al-Abyad of Libya: Petrological and Geochemical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Aal M. Abdel-Karim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Al-Haruj basalts that represent the largest volcanic province in Libya consist of four lava flow phases of varying thicknesses, extensions, and dating. Their eruption is generally controlled by the larger Afro-Arabian rift system. The flow phases range from olivine rich and/or olivine dolerites to olivine and/or normal basalts that consist mainly of variable olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, and glass. Olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene form abundant porphyritic crystals. In olivine-rich basalt and olivine basalt, these minerals occur as glomerophyric or seriate clusters of an individual mineral or group of minerals. Groundmass textures are variably intergranular, intersertal, vitrophyric, and flow. The pyroclastic, clastogenic flows and/or ejecta of the volcanic cones show porphyritic, vitrophric, pilotaxitic, and vesicular textures. They are classified into tholeiite, alkaline, and olivine basalts. Three main groups are recorded. Basalts of phase 1 are generated from tholeiitic to alkaline magma, while those of phases 3 and 4 are derived from alkaline magma. It is proposed that the tholeiitic basalts represent prerift stage magma generated by higher degree of partial melting (2.0–3.5% of garnet-peridotite asthenospheric mantle source, at shallow depth, whereas the dominant alkaline basalts may represent the rift stage magma formed by low degree of partial melting (0.7–1.5% and high fractionation of the same source, at greater depth in an intra-continental plate with OIB affinity. The melt generation could be also attributed to lithosphere extension associated with passive rise of variable enriched mantle.

  7. Compositionally Constraining Elysium Lava Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunatillake, S.; Button, N. E.; Skok, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical provinces of Mars defined recently [1-3] became possible with the maps of elemental mass fractions generated with Mars Odyssey Gamma and Neutron Spectrometer (GS) data [4,5]. These provide a unique perspective by representing compositional signatures distinctive of the regolith vertically at decimeter depths and laterally at hundreds of kilometer scale. Some provinces overlap compellingly with regions highlighted by other remote sensing observations, such as the Mars Radar Stealth area [3]. The spatial convergence of mutually independent data with the consequent highlight of a region provides a unique opportunity of insight not possible with a single type of remote sensing observation. Among such provinces, previous work [3] highlighted Elysium lava flows as a promising candidate on the basis of convergence with mapped geologic units identifying Elysium's lava fields generally, and Amazonian-aged lava flows specifically. The South Eastern lava flows of Elysium Mons, dating to the recent Amazonian epoch, overlap compellingly with a chemical province of K and Th depletion relative to the Martian midlatitudes. We characterize the composition, geology, and geomorphology of the SE Elysium province to constrain the confluence of geologic and alteration processes that may have contributed to its evolution. We compare this with the North Western lava fields, extending the discussion on chemical products from the thermal evolution of Martian volcanism as discussed by Baratoux et al. [6]. The chemical province, by regional proximity to Cerberus Fossae, may also reflect the influence of recently identified buried flood channels [7] in the vicinity of Orcus Patera. Despite the compelling chemical signature from γ spectra, fine grained unconsolidated sediment hampers regional VNTIR (Visible, Near, and Thermal Infrared) spectral analysis. But some observations near scarps and fresh craters allow a view of small scale mineral content. The judicious synthesis of

  8. Comparison of Inflation Processes at the 1859 Mauna Loa Flow, HI, and the McCartys Flow Field, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Garry, W. Brent; Zimbelman, James R.; Crumpler, Larry S.

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic lavas typically form channels or tubes during flow emplacement. However, the importance of sheet flow in the development of basalt ic terrains received recognition over the last 15 years. George Walke r?s research on the 1859 Mauna Loa Flow was published posthumously in 2009. In this paper he discusses the concept of endogenous growth, or inflation, for the distal portion of this otherwise channeldominated lava flow. We used this work as a guide when visiting the 1859 flow to help us better interpret the inflation history of the McCartys flow field in NM. Both well preserved flows display similar clues about the process of inflation. The McCartys lava flow field is among the you ngest (approx.3000 yrs) basaltic lava flows in the continental United States. It was emplaced over slopes of topographic plateaus and depressions. Some depressions display level floors with surfaces as described above, while some are bowl shaped with floors covered in broken lava slabs. Th e boundaries between plateaus and depressions are also typically smoo th, grooved surfaces that have been tilted to angles sometimes approaching vertical. The upper margin of these tilted surfaces displays lar ge cracks, sometimes containing squeeze-ups. The bottom boundary with smooth floored depressions typically shows embayment by younger lavas. It appears that this style of terrain represents the emplacement of an extensive sheet that experiences inflation episodes within prefer red regions where lateral spreading of the sheet is inhibited, thereby forming plateaus. Depressions are often the result of non-inflation and can be clearly identified by lateral squeeze-outs along the pit walls that form when the rising crust exposes the still liquid core of the sheet. Our current efforts are focused on.

  9. Geologic field-trip guide to Medicine Lake Volcano, northern California, including Lava Beds National Monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2017-08-17

    Medicine Lake volcano is among the very best places in the United States to see and walk on a variety of well-exposed young lava flows that range in composition from basalt to rhyolite. This field-trip guide to the volcano and to Lava Beds National Monument, which occupies part of the north flank, directs visitors to a wide range of lava flow compositions and volcanic phenomena, many of them well exposed and Holocene in age. The writing of the guide was prompted by a field trip to the California Cascades Arc organized in conjunction with the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) quadrennial meeting in Portland, Oregon, in August of 2017. This report is one of a group of three guides describing the three major volcanic centers of the southern Cascades Volcanic Arc. The guides describing the Mount Shasta and Lassen Volcanic Center parts of the trip share an introduction, written as an overview to the IAVCEI field trip. However, this guide to Medicine Lake volcano has descriptions of many more stops than are included in the 2017 field trip. The 23 stops described here feature a range of compositions and volcanic phenomena. Many other stops are possible and some have been previously described, but these 23 have been selected to highlight the variety of volcanic phenomena at this rear-arc center, the range of compositions, and for the practical reason that they are readily accessible. Open ground cracks, various vent features, tuffs, lava-tube caves, evidence for glaciation, and lava flows that contain inclusions and show visible evidence of compositional zonation are described and visited along the route.

  10. Lava flows and cinder cones at Barren Island volcano, India (2005-2017): a spatio-temporal analysis using satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha, Tapas R.; Roy, Priyom; Vinod Kumar, K.

    2018-02-01

    Barren Island volcano erupted during January-February 2017. Located near the Andaman trench and over a subduction zone, it is the only active volcano in India. It comprises a prominent caldera within which there is a polygenetic intra-caldera cinder cone system, with a record of eruptive events which date back to eighteenth century (1787-1832). Major eruptions occurred in 1991, 1994-1995, 2005 and, since 2008, the volcano has been showing near continuous activity with periodic eruptions. We used coarse spatial resolution "fire" products (Band I4) from Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite to detect days of eruption during the January-February 2017 period. Moderate spatial resolution (23.5 m) short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) data of Resourcesat-2 Linear Imaging Self Scanning Sensor-III available for specific days during this period were used to verify signatures of volcanic eruption. Thermal infrared band data from the Landsat series over the 2005-2017 periods were used to estimate the brightness temperature and location of the active vent within the polygenetic cinder cone field. High-spatial resolution images (1-5.8 m) in the visible bands (Resourcesat-2 LISS-IV, Cartosat-1 and 2) were used to delineate the changes in overall morphology of the volcano and to identify an inner crater ring fault, new paths of lava flow and the formation of a new cinder cone on the old crater. These multi-temporal data sets show significant changes in the paths of lava flows from 2005 to 2017. The observations also document periodic shifts in the location of effusive vents. Morphogenetic changes in recent eruptive phases of the Barren Island volcano were successfully delineated using a combination of multi-temporal and multi-resolution satellite images in visible, SWIR and thermal infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  11. The Jurassic-Cretaceous basaltic magmatism of the Oued El-Abid syncline (High Atlas, Morocco): Physical volcanology, geochemistry and geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensalah, Mohamed Khalil; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Mata, João; Madeira, José; Martins, Línia; El Hachimi, Hind; Bertrand, Hervé; Marzoli, Andrea; Bellieni, Giuliano; Doblas, Miguel; Font, Eric; Medina, Fida; Mahmoudi, Abdelkader; Beraâouz, El Hassane; Miranda, Rui; Verati, Chrystèle; De Min, Angelo; Ben Abbou, Mohamed; Zayane, Rachid

    2013-05-01

    Basaltic lava flows, dykes and sills, interbedded within red clastic continental sedimentary sequences (the so called "Couches Rouges") are widespread in the Oued El-Abid syncline. They represent the best candidates to study the Jurassic-Cretaceous magmatism in the Moroccan High Atlas. The volcanic successions were formed during two pulses of volcanic activity, represented by the Middle to Upper Jurassic basaltic sequence B1 (1-4 eruptions) and the Lower Cretaceous basaltic sequence B2 (three eruptions). Whether belonging to the B1 or B2, the lava flows present morphology and internal structures typical of inflated pahoehoe. Our geochemical data show that, at least for Jurassic magmatism, the dykes, and sills cannot be considered as strictly representing the feeders of the sampled lava flows. The Middle to Upper Jurassic pulse is moderately alkaline in character, while the Lower Cretaceous one is transitional. Crustal contamination plays a minor role in the petrogenesis of these magmas, which were generated by variable partial melting degrees of a garnet-bearing mantle source. Magmatism location was controlled by pre-existing Hercynian fault systems reactivated during a Middle to Upper Jurassic-Cretaceous rifting event. The associated lithospheric stretching induced melting, by adiabatic decompression, of enriched low-solidus infra-lithospheric domains.

  12. First Recovery of Submarine Basalts from the Chukchi Borderland and Alpha / Mendeleev Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronikov, A.; Mukasa, S.; Mayer, L. A.; Brumley, K.

    2008-12-01

    , suggesting fairly thin lava flows). These samples have a strongly altered glassy matrix with abundant plagioclase phenocrysts (up to 3 mm in length). Thin chilled basaltic crust on the lava surfaces displays pahoehoe structures, suggesting subaerial eruptions. Presence of subaerial basalts in this area supports the notion that the Chukchi Borderland has a continental origin. It is possible that further mapping using multibeam bathymetric methods and geochemical studies will show the high Arctic to possess a large igneous province built on both continental and oceanic crust.

  13. Petrological and geochemical characteristics of Palaeogene low-rank coal on the Faroe Islands: Restricted effects of alteration by basaltic lava flows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuboušková, S.; Krmíček, Lukáš; Coufalík, Pavel; Pokorný, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 165, AUG (2016), s. 157-172 ISSN 0166-5162 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-18482S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985831 Keywords : Faroe Island * coal composition * alteration Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 4.783, year: 2016

  14. Strontium isotopes as tracers to delineate aquifer interactions and the influence of rainfall in the basalt plains of southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiber, Matthias; Webb, John A.; Bennetts, Darren A.

    2009-04-01

    SummaryTo better understand the spatial distribution of groundwater salinisation in western Victoria, southeast Australia, the interactions between a surficial basalt aquifer and an underlying extensive palaeodrainage ('deep lead') system were studied using a multi-disciplinary approach, combining strontium isotope analyses with major ion chemistry and the interpretation of geological and hydrogeological data. The strontium isotopes proved particularly useful in delineating flow paths and hydraulic connections between the two aquifers, which have contrasting 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios. The freshest basalt groundwaters lie beneath volcanoes and have 87Sr/ 86Sr signatures close to the whole-rock strontium isotope ratios of the basalts (˜0.7045), indicating the strong influence of basalt weathering. With increasing distance from the eruption points, basalt groundwaters become progressively more saline and the strontium isotope ratios evolve towards the more radiogenic signatures of local rainfall (0.710-0.711), due to the slow addition of infiltration concentrated by evapotranspiration during its passage through the thick, clay-rich soils developed on the basalt lavas. Overall, the influence of rainwater on the strontium isotope signatures of the basalt groundwater is much greater than that of basaltic weathering, indicating that rainwater can play a greater role in determining groundwater strontium composition than is often realised. Most parts of the palaeodrainage system beneath the basalt are preferentially recharged through the volcanoes, as shown by strong downwards hydraulic gradients and groundwater 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios similar to the least radiogenic basalt groundwaters. However, in the northwestern part, groundwater 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios are closer to those of the source material of the sediments (Palaeozoic bedrock), indicating that here recharge occurs predominantly in the headwaters where the basalts are absent. In the southern and western sections of the palaeodrainage

  15. Magnetic links among lava flows, tuffs and the underground plumbing system in a monogenetic volcano, derived from magnetics and paleomagnetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Trigo-Huesca, Alfonso; Pérez-Cruz, Ligia

    2012-12-01

    A combined study using magnetics and paleomagnetism of the Toluquilla monogenetic volcano and associated lavas and tuffs from Valsequillo basin in Central Mexico provides evidence on a 'magnetic' link between the lavas, ash tuffs and the underground volcanic conduit system. Paleomagnetic analyses show that the lava and ash tuff carry reverse polarity magnetizations, which correlate with the inversely polarized dipolar magnetic anomaly over the volcano. The magnetizations in the lava and tuff show similar southward declinations and upward inclinations, supporting petrological inferences that the tuff was emplaced while still hot and indicating a temporal correlation for lava and tuff emplacement. Modeling of the dipolar anomaly gives a reverse polarity source magnetization associated with a vertical prismatic body with southward declination and upward inclination, which correlates with the reverse polarity magnetizations in the lava and tuff. The study documents a direct correlation of the paleomagnetic records with the underground magmatic conduit system of the monogenetic volcano. Time scale for cooling of the volcanic plumbing system involves a longer period than the one for the tuff and lava, suggesting that magnetization for the source of dipolar anomaly may represent a long time average as compared to the spot readings in the lava and tuff. The reverse polarity magnetizations in lava and tuff and in the underground source body for the magnetic anomaly are interpreted in terms of eruptive activity of Toluquilla volcano at about 1.3 Ma during the Matuyama reverse polarity C1r.2r chron.

  16. Using thermal remanent magnetisation (TRM) to distinguish block and ash flow and debris flow deposits, and to estimate their emplacement temperature: 1991-1995 lava dome eruption at Mt. Unzen Volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, D.; Cas, R. A. F.; Folkes, C.; Takarada, S.; Oda, H.; Porreca, M.

    2015-09-01

    The 1991-1995 Mt. Unzen eruption (Kyushu, Japan) produced 13 lava domes, approximately 9400 block and ash pyroclastic flows (BAF) resulting from lava dome collapse events and syn- and post-dome collapse debris flow (DF) events. In the field, it can be very difficult to distinguish from field facies characteristics which deposits are primary hot BAF, cold BAF or rock avalanche, or secondary DF deposits. In this study we use a combination of field observations and thermal remanent magnetisation (TRM) analysis of juvenile, lava dome derived clasts from seven deposits of the 1991-1995 Mt. Unzen eruption in order to distinguish between primary BAF deposits and secondary DF deposits and to determine their emplacement temperature. Four major TRM patterns were identified: (1) Type I: clasts with a single magnetic component oriented parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at time and site of emplacement. This indicates that these deposits were deposited at very high temperature, between the Curie temperature of magnetite (~ 540 °C) and the glass transition temperature of the lava dome (~ 745 °C). These clasts are found in high temperature BAF deposits. (2) Type II: clasts with two magnetic components of magnetisation. The lower temperature magnetic components are parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at time of the Unzen eruption. Temperature estimations for these deposits can range from 80 to 540 °C. We found this paleomagnetic behaviour in moderate temperature BAF or warm DF deposits. (3) Type III: clasts with three magnetic components, with a lower temperature component oriented parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at Unzen. The individual clast temperatures estimated for this kind of deposit are usually less than 300 °C. We interpret this paleomagnetic behaviour as the effect of different thermal events during their emplacement history. There are several interpretations for this paleomagnetic behaviour including remobilisation of moderate temperature BAF, warm DF

  17. Geochemical stratigraphy and correlation within large igneous provinces: The final preserved stages of the Faroe Islands Basalt Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, J. M.; Hole, M. J.; Jolley, D. W.; Passey, S. R.

    2017-08-01

    The Faroe Islands Basalt Group (FIBG) comprises a gross stratigraphic thickness of over 6.5 km of dominantly extrusive basaltic facies erupted during the Late Palaeocene to Early Eocene. In this study we present 140 major and trace element analyses from flow by flow field and borehole sample profiles, through the Enni Formation, which comprises the final phase of volcanism preserved on the Faroe Islands. The sample profiles target geographically spaced and overlapping stratigraphic sequences tied relative to a 3D ArcGIS surface for the regionally extensive volcaniclastic Argir Beds marker unit. From these profiles five geochemical groups including one low TiO2 (Low-Ti 1.5 wt%) groups differentiated by Nb, Zr, Y and V variations are identified in conjunction with previous studies. The spatial and stratigraphic distribution of these groups is mapped across the islands and demonstrates a complex inter-digitated flow field evolution. Within the finer scale variations, broad spatial and temporal development trends are identified demonstrating the potential for correlation within the volcanic succession at the local, tens of kilometers scale. Low-Ti lavas formed in association with lithospheric thinning and developed extensive flow fields between the Faroe Islands and East Greenland contemporaneous to the eruption of High-Ti smaller melt fraction lava flows in both locations. The progression of High-Ti lava groups preserved on either side of the developing rift zone is very similar, but is not, however, chronostratigraphic due to multiple inter-digitations of the chemical types. We tentatively suggest that a previously proposed rift-oblique transfer zone between the Faroe Islands and East Greenland enabled non-uniform lithospheric thinning and the preservation of a near-continuous High-Ti melting region between these areas beyond the onset of Low-Ti eruptions which were initially fed from the west. This study highlights the complex nature of late stage flood basalt

  18. Directional change during a Miocene R-N geomagnetic polarity reversal recorded by mafic lava flows, Sheep Creek Range, north central Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogue, S. W.; Glen, J. M. G.; Jarboe, N. A.

    2017-09-01

    Recurring transitional field directions during three Miocene geomagnetic reversals provide evidence that lateral inhomogeneity of the lower mantle affects flow in the outer core. We compare new paleomagnetic results from a composite sequence of 15.2 Ma lava flows in north central Nevada (Sheep Creek Range; 40.7°N, 243.2°E), erupted during a polarity reversal, to published data from Steens Mountain (250 km to the northwest in Oregon) and the Newberry Mountains (650 km to the south in California) that document reversals occurring millions of years and many polarity switches earlier. Alternating field demagnetization, followed by thermal demagnetization in half the samples, clearly isolated the primary thermoremanent magnetization of Sheep Creek Range flows. We correlated results from our three sampled sections to produce a composite record that begins with a single virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) at low latitude in the Atlantic, followed by two VGPs situated near latitude 30°N in NE Africa. After jumping to 83°N (one VGP), the pole moves to equatorial South America (one VGP), back to NE Africa (three VGPs), to high southern latitudes (two VGPs), back to equatorial South America (three VGPs), and finally to high northern latitudes (nine VGPs). The repeated visits of the transitional VGP to positions in South America and near NE Africa, as well as the similar behavior recorded at Steens Mountain and the Newberry Mountains, suggest that lower mantle or core-mantle boundary features localize core flow structures, thereby imparting a discernible regional structure on the transitional geomagnetic field that persists for millions of years.

  19. Photogrammetric and Global Positioning System Measurements of Active Pahoehoe Lava Lobe Emplacement on Kilauea, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Glaze, Lori S.; James, Mike R.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Fagents, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    Basalt is the most common rock type on the surface of terrestrial bodies throughout the solar system and -- by total volume and areal coverage -- pahoehoe flows are the most abundant form of basaltic lava in subaerial and submarine environments on Earth. A detailed understanding of pahoehoe emplacement processes is necessary for developing accurate models of flow field development, assessing hazards associated with active lava flows, and interpreting the significance of lava flow morphology on Earth and other planetary bodies. Here, we examine the active emplacement of pahoehoe lobes along the margins of the Hook Flow from Pu'u 'O'o on Kilauea, Hawaii. Topographic data were acquired between 21 and 23 February 2006 using stereo-imaging and differential global positing system (DGPS) measurements. During this time, the average discharge rate for the Hook Flow was 0.01-0.05 cubic m/s. Using stereogrammetric point clouds and interpolated digital terrain models (DTMs), active flow fronts were digitized at 1 minute intervals. These areal spreading maps show that the lava lobe grew by a series of breakouts tha t broadly fit into two categories: narrow (0.2-0.6 m-wide) toes that grew preferentially down-slope, and broad (1.4-3.5 m-wide) breakouts that formed along the sides of the lobe, nearly perpendicular to the down-flow axis. These lobes inflated to half of their final thickness within approx 5 minutes, with a rate of inflation that generally deceased with time. Through a combination of down-slope and cross-slope breakouts, lobes developed a parabolic cross-sectional shape within tens of minutes. We also observed that while the average local discharge rate for the lobe was generally constant at 0.0064 +/- 0.0019 cubic m/s, there was a 2 to 6 fold increase in the areal coverage rate every 4.1 +/- 0.6 minutes. We attribute this periodicity to the time required for the dynamic pressurization of the liquid core of the lava lobe to exceed the cooling-induced strength of the

  20. Porosity and permeability evolution of vesicular basalt reservoirs with increasing depth: constraints from the Big Island of Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, John; Haskins, Eric; Thomas, Donald; Jerram, Dougal; Planke, Sverre; Healy, Dave; Kück, Jochem; Rossetti, Lucas; Farrell, Natalie; Pierdominici, Simona

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic reservoirs are becoming increasingly important in the targeting of petroleum, geothermal and water resources globally. However, key areas of uncertainty in relation to volcanic reservoir properties during burial in different settings remain. In this contribution, we present results from borehole logging and sampling operations within two fully cored c. 1.5 km deep boreholes, PTA2 and KMA1, from the Humúula saddle region on the Big Island of Hawai'i. The boreholes were drilled as part of the Humu'ula Groundwater Research Project (HGRP) between 2013-2016 and provide unique insights into the evolution of pore structure with increasing burial in a basaltic dominated lava sequence. The boreholes encounter mixed sequences of 'a'ā, pāhoehoe and transitional lava flows along with subsidiary intrusions and sediments from the shield to post-shield phases of Mauna Kea. Borehole wireline data including sonic, spectral gamma and Televiewer imagery were collected along with density, porosity, permeability and ultrasonic velocity laboratory measurements from core samples. A range of intra-facies were sampled for analysis from various depths within the two boreholes. By comparison with core data, the potential for high resolution Televiewer imaging to reveal spectacular intra-facies features including individual vesicles, vesicle segregations, 'a'ā rubble zones, intrusive contacts, and intricate pāhoehoe lava flow lobe morphologies is demonstrated. High quality core data enables the calibration of Televiewer facies enabling improved interpretation of volcanic reservoir features in the more common exploration scenario where core is absent. Laboratory results record the ability of natural vesicular basalt samples to host very high porosity (>50%) and permeability (>10 darcies) within lava flow top facies which we demonstrate are associated with vesicle coalescence and not micro-fractures. These properties may be maintained to depths of c. 1.5 km in regions of limited

  1. Vapor deposition in basaltic stalactites, Kilauea, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, A. K.; Mohrig, D. C.; Welday, E. E.

    Basaltic stalacties suspended from the ceiling of a large lava tube at Kilauea, Hawaii, have totally enclosed vesicles whose walls are covered with euhedral FeTi oxide and silicate crystals. The walls of the vesicles and the exterior surfaces of stalactites are Fe and Ti enriched and Si depleted compared to common basalt. Minerals in vesicles have surface ornamentations on crystal faces which include alkali-enriched, aluminosilicate glass(?) hemispheres. No sulfide-, chloride-, fluoride-, phosphate- or carbonate-bearing minerals are present. Minerals in the stalactites must have formed by deposition from an iron oxide-rich vapor phase produced by the partial melting and vaporization of wall rocks in the tube.

  2. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distingushing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Lava Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts [1-3]. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  3. Review: Groundwater development and management in the Deccan Traps (basalts) of western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Shrikant Daji

    2010-05-01

    The Deccan Traps or the basalts of western India are the largest exposure of basic lava flows covering about 500,000 km2. Groundwater occurrence in the Deccan Traps is in phreatic condition in the weathered zone above the hard rock and in semi-confined condition in the fissures, fractures, joints, cooling cracks, lava flow junctions and in the inter-trappean beds between successive lava flows, within the hard rock. Dug wells, dug-cum-bored wells and boreholes or bore wells are commonly used for obtaining groundwater. The yield is small, usually in the range of 1-100 m3/day. The average land holding per farming family is only around 2 ha. Recently, due to the ever increasing number of dug wells and deep bore wells, the water table has been falling in several watersheds, especially in those lying in the semi-arid region of the traps, so that now the emphasis has shifted from development to sustainable management. Issues like climatic change, poverty mitigation in villages, sustainable development, rapid urbanization of the population, and resource pollution have invited the attention of politicians, policy makers, government agencies and non-governmental organizations towards watershed management, forestation, soil and water conservation, recharge augmentation and, above all, the voluntary control of groundwater abstraction in the Deccan Traps terrain.

  4. Age of the youngest Palaeogene flood basalts in East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann-Clausen, C.; Piasecki, Stefan; Abrahamsen, Niels

    2008-01-01

    results, this constrains the termination of the East Greenland Paleogene Igneous Province to the Early-Middle Eocene transition (nannoplankton chronozones NP13-NP14/earliest NP15). This is 6-8 Ma younger than according to previous biostratigraphic age assignments. The new data show that flood basalt......Intra-basaltic sediments 50 m below the top of the Paleogene lava succession at Kap Dalton, East Greenland, contain dinoflagellate cysts of late Ypresian-earliest Lutetian age, while sediments immediately above the lavas contain an assemblage of early Lutetian age. Combined with paleomagnetic...

  5. Hampton Butte, a 30-Ma rhyodacite basement high bounding the subsiding Miocene to Pliocene High Lava Plains of Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iademarco, M. J.; Grunder, A.

    2012-12-01

    Hampton Butte, a 30-Ma rhyodacite basement high bounding the subsiding Miocene to Pliocene High Lava Plains Michael J. Iademarco and Anita L. Grunder The Hampton Butte area of south central Oregon lies at the boundary between major volcanic and tectonic provinces. Hampton Butte is a large rhyodacite dome complex dated at 30.39 ± 0.13 Ma and is slightly older than the 28.63 ± 0.17 Ma dacite of Cougar Butte to the immediate southeast. They extend the known distribution of vent rocks of John Day age (~35-20 Ma) and are among the oldest rocks exposed in southeastern Oregon. Excepting a remnant of a Cretaceous pluton that intrudes metasedimentary rocks of uncertain age in southeasternmost Oregon, there are no pre-Oligocene basement rocks in the northwest corner of the Basin and Range. Hampton Butte is at least 70 km east of the inferred Oligocene arc indicating that, if it was part of early Cascade volcanism, the arc was much broader than today. Hampton Butte lies at the northern margin of the High Lava Plains, which extend from behind the Cascades arc ~300 km eastward and separate the northwest corner of the Basin a Range form relatively little extended Blue Mountains region to the north. Rocks of the High Lava Plains (HLP) range from ~10 to 0 Ma and are high alumina olivine tholeiites intercalated with tuffaceous sediments and thin widespread ash-flow tuffs; the HLP is punctuated by rhyolite dome complexes that are successively younger to the west. A stack of compound flows of HLP basalt are banked on the south flank of Hampton Butte and dip about 5 degrees south, toward the HLP. These basalts have an age of 7.75 ± 0.06 Ma and correlate with a tongue of basalt with an age of 7.81 ± 0.06, which is preserved in a paleovalley cut into Hampton Butte. These basalts are part of an HLP-wide episode of ~7.5-8 Ma basalt activity. The Hampton Tuff is also banked on the south flank of Hampton Butte, like the basalts dips 5-7 degrees south. The Hampton Tuff yields an age of 3

  6. Chemical trends in the Ice Springs basalt, Black Rock Desert, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, W.C.; Nash, W.P.

    1980-06-01

    The Holocene Ice Springs volcanic field of west-central Utah consists of 0.53 km/sup 3/ of tholeiitic basalts erupted as a sequence of nested cinder cones and associated lava flows. Whole rock x-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption analysis of ninety-six samples of known relative age document statistically significant inter- and intra-eruption chemical variations. Elemental trends include increases in Ti, Fe, Ca, P, and Sr and decreases in Si, K, Rb, Ni, Cr, and Zr with decreasing age. Microprobe analyses of microphenocrysts of olivine, plagioclase, and Fe-Ti oxides and of groundmass olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene indicate limited chemical variation between mineral assemblages of the eruptive events. Petrographic analyses have identified the presence of minor amounts of silicic xenoliths, orthopyroxene megacrysts, and plagioclase xenocrysts. Potassium-argon determinations establish the existence of excess argon in the basaltic cinder (30.05 x 10/sup -12/ moles/gm) and in distal lava flows (8.29 x 10/sup -12/ moles/gm) which suggest apparent ages of 16 and 4.3 million years respectively. Strontium isotopic data (Puskar and Condie, 1973) show systematic variations from oldest eruptions (87Sr/86Sr=0.7052) to youngest eruptions (87Sr/86Sr=0.7059).

  7. The Origin and Evolution of a Diverse Suite of Late Pleistocene Andesitic to Dacitic Lavas From the Northern Cascade arc at Mt. Baker, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggerman, T. D.; Debari, S.

    2007-12-01

    Mt. Baker, a dominantly andesitic stratovolcano, is located in the northernmost segment of the Cascade magmatic arc. The origin and evolution of andesites in the northern Cascades has thus far not been explored in any systematic way. This study highlights the geochemical diversity of andesites erupted from Mt. Baker and describes processes that are responsible for the generation of this dominant intermediate lava type. Presented here are petrographic observations, mineral chemistry, major oxide concentrations, and the largest trace and REE data set to date for three Late Pleistocene and Holocene lava flows from Mt. Baker: the basaltic andesite of Sulphur Creek (52.5-57.6 wt.% SiO2, 4.7-5.5 wt.% MgO), the andesite of Glacier Creek (59.5-63.3 wt.% SiO2, 4.7-5.0 wt.% MgO), and the andesite and dacite of Boulder Glacier (60.5-64.1 wt.% SiO2, 2.1-3.5 wt.% MgO). The data are used to characterize and asses the relationship between the three flows. The three lava flows are classified as medium K, and to a lesser degree, high K, calc-alkaline basalts through dacites. Major oxide concentrations for Sulphur Creek and Boulder Glacier lavas form curvilinear trends with increasing SiO2. The andesite of Glacier Creek has distinct major oxide chemistry, with elevated concentrations of MgO and CaO and lower concentrations of Na2O and K2O for a given wt.% SiO2 relative to the major oxide trends of the other lavas. Glacier Creek lavas also show enrichment of Ni, Cr, and Sr and depletion in La, Nb, Ta, Zr and Y. REE patterns and slopes are distinct for each flow, but are not correlated with degree of differentiation. The mafic lavas of Sulphur Creek have the highest REE abundances relative to the other lavas, with the lowest La/Yb (~4.5). The Glacier Creek andesites have the lowest REE abundances and the largest La/Yb (~6.7). The Boulder Glacier andesites and dacites have intermediate REE abundances relative to the other lavas with intermediate La/Yb (~6.4). All lavas display

  8. Secondary Sulfate Mineralization and Basaltic Chemistry of Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho: Potential Martian Analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Lindsay J. McHenry; J. Michelle Kotler; Jill R. Scott

    2012-05-01

    Secondary deposits associated with the basaltic caves of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM) in southern Idaho were examined using X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). The secondary mineral assemblages are dominated by Na-sulfate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) with a small fraction of the deposits containing minor concentrations of Na-carbonate minerals. The assemblages are found as white, efflorescent deposits in small cavities along the cave walls and ceilings and as localized mounds on the cave floors. Formation of the deposits is likely due to direct and indirect physiochemical leaching of meteoritic water through the overlying basalts. Whole rock data from the overlying basaltic flows are characterized by their extremely high iron concentrations, making them good analogs for martian basalts. Understanding the physiochemical pathways leading to secondary mineralization at COM is also important because lava tubes and basaltic caves are present on Mars. The ability of FTICR-MS to consistently and accurately identify mineral species within these heterogeneous mineral assemblages proves its validity as a valuable technique for the direct fingerprinting of mineral species by deductive reasoning or by comparison with reference spectra.

  9. SMALL-VOLUME BASALTIC VOLCANOES: ERUPTIVE PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES, AND POST-ERUPTIVE GEOMORPHIC EVOLUTION IN CRATER FLAT (PLEISTOCENE), SOUTHERN NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.A. Valentine; F.V. Perry; D. Krier; G.N. Keating; R.E. Kelley; A.H. Cogbill

    2006-04-04

    Five Pleistocene basaltic volcanoes in Crater Flat (southern Nevada) demonstrate the complexity of eruption processes associated with small-volume basalts and the effects of initial emplacement characteristics on post-eruptive geomorphic evolution of the volcanic surfaces. The volcanoes record eruptive processes in their pyroclastic facies ranging from ''classical'' Strombolian mechanisms to, potentially, violent Strombolian mechanisms. Cone growth was accompanied, and sometimes disrupted, by effusion of lavas from the bases of cones. Pyroclastic cones were built upon a gently southward-sloping surface and were prone to failure of their down-slope (southern) flanks. Early lavas flowed primarily southward and, at Red and Black Cone volcanoes, carried abundant rafts of cone material on the tops of the flows. These resulting early lava fields eventually built platforms such that later flows erupted from the eastern (at Red Cone) and northern (at Black Cone) bases of the cones. Three major surface features--scoria cones, lava fields with abundant rafts of pyroclastic material, and lava fields with little or no pyroclastic material--experienced different post-eruptive surficial processes. Contrary to previous interpretations, we argue that the Pleistocene Crater Flat volcanoes are monogenetic, each having formed in a single eruptive episode lasting months to a few years, and with all eruptive products having emanated from the area of the volcanoes main cones rather than from scattered vents. Geochemical variations within the volcanoes must be interpreted within a monogenetic framework, which implies preservation of magma source heterogeneities through ascent and eruption of the magmas.

  10. Hydrogen isotope systematics of submarine basalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyser, T.K. (Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences); O' Neil, J.R. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1984-10-01

    The D/H ratios and water contents in fresh submarine basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the East Pacific Rise, and Hawaii indicate that the primary D/H ratios of many submarine lavas have been altered by processes including (1) outgassing, (2) addition of seawater at magmatic temperature, and (3) low-temperature hydration of glass. Decreases in deltaD and H/sub 2/O/sup +/ from exteriors to interiors of pillows are explained by outgassing of water whereas inverse relations between deltaD and H/sub 2/O/sup +/ in basalts from the Galapagos Rise and the FAMOUS Area are attributed to outgassing of CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/. A good correlation between deltaD values and H/sub 2/O is observed in a suite of submarine tholeiites dredged from the Kilauea East Rift Zone where seawater (added directly to the magma), affected only the isotopic compositions of hydrogen and argon. Analyses of some glassy rims indicate that the outer millimeter of the glass can undergo low-temperature hydration by hydroxyl groups having deltaD values as low as -100. deltaD values vary with H/sub 2/O contents of subaerial transitional basalts from Molokai, Hawaii, and subaerial alkali basalts from the Society Islands, indicating that the primary deltaD values were similar to those of submarine lavas. The results are discussed.

  11. Geology, geochemistry and petrology of basalts from Paraná Continental Magmatic Province in the Araguari, Uberlândia, Uberaba and Sacramento regions, Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Castanheira de Moraes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study covers the region between the cities of Sacramento and Araguari/Uberlândia (Minas Gerais State, Brazil, where basalt flows from the Paraná Continental Magmatic Province outcrop. The investigated rocks present tholeiitic signature, with high titanium content, and are classified as Pitanga magma-type. The preserved basalt thickness is between 10 and 200 meters and individual flows do not exceed 15 meters thick. Flows were identified as sheet lobes, smaller and thinner flows units - stacked laterally and vertically forming compound lavas -, or frontal, centimetric lobes. The basalt flows show decimetric to metric intercalations of clastic sedimentary rock, with depositional characteristics that can vary from aeolian to lacustrine, and are important markers on prevailing environmental conditions. The plagioclases are dominantly labradorite and pyroxene is augite, whereas olivine can be hyalosiderite or hortonolite/ferrohortonolite. The behavior of the major, minor and trace elements is compatible with the presence of at least two parental magmas, which were subjected to fractional crystallization mainly of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, ilmenite and magnetite. There is a chemistry distinction between basalts from Sacramento to those from Araguari/Uberlândia region, the former one showing more evolved than the last one. The high (La/LuN values are indicative of partial melting of a garnet peridotite, while the Rare Earth Elements (REE values are indicative of fractional crystallization.

  12. Primitive off-rift basalts from Iceland and Jan Mayen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debaille, Vinciane; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Brandon, Alan D.

    2009-01-01

    New measurements of Os, He, Sr and Nd isotopes, along with major and trace elements, are presented for basalts from the three volcanic flank zones in Iceland and from Jan Mayen Island. The 187Os/188Os ratios in lavas with <30 ppt Os (n = 4) are elevated compared to ratios in coexisting olivine an...

  13. Ultrasonic P- and S-Wave Attenuation and Petrophysical Properties of Deccan Flood Basalts, India, as Revealed by Borehole Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedanti, Nimisha; Malkoti, Ajay; Pandey, O. P.; Shrivastava, J. P.

    2018-03-01

    Petrophysical properties and ultrasonic P- and S-wave attenuation measurements on 35 Deccan basalt core specimens, recovered from Killari borehole site in western India, provide unique reference data-sets for a lesser studied Deccan Volcanic Province. These samples represent 338-m-thick basaltic column, consisting four lava flows each of Ambenali and Poladpur Formations, belonging to Wai Subgroup of the Deccan volcanic sequence. These basalt samples are found to be iron-rich (average FeOT: 13.4 wt%), but relatively poor in silica content (average SiO2: 47.8 wt%). The saturated massive basalt cores are characterized by a mean density of 2.91 g/cm3 (range 2.80-3.01 g/cm3) and mean P- and S-wave velocities of 5.89 km/s (range 5.01-6.50 km/s) and 3.43 km/s (range 2.84-3.69 km/s), respectively. In comparison, saturated vesicular basalt cores show a wide range in density (2.40-2.79 g/cm3) as well as P-wave (3.28-4.78 km/s) and S-wave (1.70-2.95 km/s) velocities. Based on the present study, the Deccan volcanic sequence can be assigned a weighted mean density of 2.74 g/cm3 and a low V p and V s of 5.00 and 3.00 km/s, respectively. Such low velocities in Deccan basalts can be attributed mainly to the presence of fine-grained glassy material, high iron contents, and hydrothermally altered secondary mineral products, besides higher porosity in vesicular samples. The measured Q values in saturated massive basalt cores vary enormously (Q p: 33-1960 and Q s: 35-506), while saturated vesicular basalt samples exhibit somewhat lesser variation in Q p (6-46) as well as Q s (5-49). In general, high-porosity rocks exhibit high attenuation, but we observed the high value of attenuation in some of the massive basalt core samples also. In such cases, energy loss is mainly due to the presence of fine-grained glassy material as well as secondary alteration products like chlorophaeite, that could contribute to intrinsic attenuation. Dominance of weekly bound secondary minerals might also be

  14. Study of Mururoa's basaltic massif alteration (French Polynesia): solid and fluid phases analysis and thermodynamical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destrigneville, Christine

    1991-01-01

    The alteration processes occurring in the volcanics of Mururoa have been studied using petrological data on secondary minerals, chemical analyses of the interstitial fluids and isotopic analyses on both minerals and fluids. Chemical and isotopic exchanges were first modelled, then thermodynamical modeling characterized the chemical evolution during the alteration of the secondary assemblage and of the fluid. The main secondary sequences which have been observed in Mururoa volcanics result from the alteration occurring during the lavas setting. Two different processes have been evidenced. The first one is the deuteric alteration with the CO 2 -rich magmatic fluid exsolved from the magma and trapped in the vesicles and the olivine microcracks of the lava intrusions. This alteration in a closed system is dominated by the solid phases when the CO 2 molar fraction in the fluid is higher than 0.25. The second process is the alteration of the lavas by seawater or a meteoric fluid. The basaltic flows present alteration assemblages composed of clay minerals and zeolites whose chemical composition has been forced by the fluid composition. Shallowness emissions of lavas result in completely argillized levels. The present interstitial fluids chemistry result from the percolation of seawater in the volcano. In the argillized levels the fluids have interacted with the clay minerals and their chemical compositions have been modified. The important chemical changes in the present interstitial fluids show that the present alteration in the volcano is higher than the fluids circulation. (author) [fr

  15. A trachyte-syenite core within a basaltic nest: filtering of primitive injections by a multi-stage magma plumbing system (Oki-Dōzen, south-west Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenna, Marco; Nakada, Setsuya; Miura, Daisuke; Toshida, Kiyoshi; Ito, Hisatoshi; Hokanishi, Natsumi; Nakai, Shun'ichi

    2015-08-01

    Oki-Dōzen (Japan) is a Late Miocene (7-5 Ma) intraplate alkalic volcano composed of a central trachytic pyroclastic complex surrounded by a ring-shaped succession of basaltic to trachybasaltic lavas and pyroclastic rocks and dispersed trachytic bodies. The central trachytic complex is in contact with a syenite that was intruded into the basement early Miocene volcano-sedimentary succession. In the centre of the system there are no alkalic basaltic rocks that are correlative of the outer flank ring. We present whole-rock major and trace element chemistry, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions and petrological data from the central trachytic volcanic complex and the intrusive syenite body, as well as from the outer ring basaltic succession. We also present and discuss a new set of zircon U/Pb ages collected from the central trachyte and syenite bodies. All the eruptive products of Oki-Dōzen, as well as the syenite, plot on a single liquid line of descent initiated from a mantle-derived alkalic basaltic parent. A younger (2.8 Ma) basaltic eruption (Uzuka basalt) has isotopic compositions that distinguish it from the rest of the system. Geochemical modelling indicates that magmatic differentiation through crystal fractionation and minor crustal assimilation occurred in crustal and shallow sub-volcanic magma reservoirs. In the central part of the system, a number of vertically spaced reservoirs acted as a filter, capturing basaltic dykes and hindering their ascent. In the outer region, dykes either reached the surface unhindered and erupted to form the basaltic/trachybasaltic succession or stalled at crustal levels and differentiated to trachyte before forming dispersed domes/flows. The central plumbing system "filter" resulted in a nest-shaped volcano, with a trachytic core surrounded by basaltic products, and stopped direct injection of basaltic magmas into the shallow syenitic magma reservoir, likely preventing its destabilization and explosive eruption.

  16. Visualization of space competition and plume formation with complex potentials for multiple source flows : Some examples and novel application to Chao lava flow (Chile)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijermars, R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid displacement in a continuum pressured by a variable constellation of source flows can be visualized as solutions of line integrals. The algorithms are based on complex potentials that provide exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation and allow users to specify both the location and flux

  17. High-resolution topography of 1974 Mount Etna lava flow based on Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) surveys and Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaciai, Alessandro; Favalli, Massimiliano; Nannipieri, Luca; Harris, Andrew; Calvari, Sonia; Lormand, Charline

    2017-04-01

    The production of high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of lava is of increasing interest in volcanology because the time scales of change are fast and involve vertical and planimetric changes of millimeters to meters. Among the wide range of terrestrial and aerial methods available to collect topographic data, the use of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) acquiring platform and structure from motion (SfM) photogrammetric technique is especially useful because it allow collecting data of inaccessible, kilometer scale areas, with low cost and minimal hazard to personnel. This study presents the application of UAV-SfM method to generate a high-resolution DEMs and orthomosaic of the 1974 Mount Etna lava field. The UAV was flown over lava field at flight altitude to about 70 m above ground level (AGL) and acquired 2781 photographs. SfM-photogrammetry applied to these images enabled the extraction of very (20 cm) high-resolution DEMs and 3 cm orthomosaic for a total area of 1.35 square kilometers. The data produced by the UAV-SfM was compared with airborne LiDAR data. Such comparison gives a root mean squared error between the two DEMs of 0.24 m. The unprecedented topographic resolution obtained with UAV-SfM methods enabled us to derive morphometry of sub-meter-scale lava features, such as folds, blocks, and cracks, over kilometric scale areas. The 3 cm orthomosaic allowed us to further push the analysis to dm-scale grain distribution of the lava surface. This study shows that SfM and UAV platforms can be effectively used for mapping volcanic features producing topographic data in a manner not possible with the 1-m LiDAR-derived DEM. The spectral analysis of surface folding support this analysis showing a much larger spectrum of frequencies of the SfM-derived DEM than the LiDAR DEM.

  18. Pyroxene thermometry of rhyolite lavas of the Bruneau-Jarbidge eruptive center, Central Snake River Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathey, Henrietta E.; Nash, Barbara P.

    2009-11-01

    The Bruneau-Jarbidge eruptive center of the central Snake River Plain in southern Idaho, USA produced multiple rhyolite lava flows with volumes of center of the Yellowstone hotspot track. Here we provide pyroxene compositions and thermometry results from several lavas that demonstrate that the demise of the silicic volcanic system was characterized by sustained, high pre-eruptive magma temperatures (mostly ≥950 °C) prior to the onset of exclusively basaltic volcanism at the eruptive center. Pyroxenes display a variety of textures in single samples, including solitary euhedral crystals as well as glomerocrysts, crystal clots and annealed microgranular inclusions of pyroxene ± magnetite ± plagioclase. Pigeonite and augite crystals are unzoned, and there are no detectable differences in major and minor element compositions according to textural variety — mineral compositions in the microgranular inclusions and crystal clots are identical to those of phenocrysts in the host lavas. In contrast to members of the preceding Cougar Point Tuff that host polymodal glass and mineral populations, pyroxene compositions in each of the lavas are characterized by single rather than multiple discrete compositional modes. Collectively, the lavas reproduce and extend the range of Fe-Mg pyroxene compositional modes observed in the Cougar Point Tuff to more Mg-rich varieties. The compositionally homogeneous populations of pyroxene in each of the lavas, as well as the lack of core-to-rim zonation in individual crystals suggest that individual eruptions each were fed by compositionally homogeneous magma reservoirs, and similarities with the Cougar Point Tuff suggest consanguinity of such reservoirs to those that supplied the polymodal Cougar Point Tuff. Pyroxene thermometry results obtained using QUILF equilibria yield pre-eruptive magma temperatures of 905 to 980 °C, and individual modes consistently record higher Ca content and higher temperatures than pyroxenes with equivalent

  19. The First Paleomagnetic data from the Cambrian basalts of Henrietta Island (De Long Archipelago, Arctic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelkin, D. V.; Zhdanova, A.; Vernikovskiy, V. A.; Matushkin, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Henrietta Island in De Long archipelago (East-Siberian sea) still remains poorly studied geologically but last investigations show that its volcano-sedimentary sequences can help reconstruct tectonic evolution of East Russian Arctic in Early Paleozoic stage. The deposits lying on Precambrian basements are deformed to varying degrees and intruded by mafic dykes.The study was carried out on two basaltic lava flows whose 40Ar/39Ar age is 520.6±9.5 Ma. Previously the age of these basalts was assumed Cretaceous. According to available data the underlaying sediments contain zircons with Cambrian and Ordovician ages but all boundaries between these basalts and other strata are tectonic. So we suppose the age of basalts as Middle Cambrian but more precise geochronological data are required. All magnetic measurements were performed at the Laboratory of Geodynamics and Paleomagnetism of Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics (Novosibirsk). Basalt samples has relatively high magnetic susceptibility values varying from 5x10-4 to 180x10-4SI units. NRM values range is from 3 to 170 mA/m. Petromagnetic parameters including also coercive characteristics point at the good potentially preserving primary magnetization. Stepwise thermal demagnetization permits to isolate characteristic components of magnetization and calculate mean directions in two lava flows: 1. Ds=294.3°, Is=29.1°, K=81.1, α95=5.1; 2. Ds=301.0°, Is=28.3°, K=34.4, α95=7.9). The mean paleomagnetic pole has coordinates: Plat=20.9°, Plong = 42.6°, dp/dm=14.3/7.9. Paleolatitude was defined as 15.3° but the question of the hemisphere for De Long Islands is open yet. In case of south hemisphere in Middle Cambrian according to available paleomagnetic data De Long islands could be placed close to Taimyr margin of Siberia and in case of northern hemisphere they may be located near south (in present-day coordinates) margin of Siberia. The work was supported by grant RFBR 14-05-31399 and Russian Research Fund

  20. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Golden Trout Volcanic Field, southern Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Brandon L.; Becerra, Raul; Campbell, Colin; Saleen, Phillip; Wille, Frank R.

    2017-09-01

    The Golden Trout Volcanic Field (GTVF) produced the only Quaternary eruptions of mafic magma within the southern Sierra Nevada block. Approximately 38 × 106 m3 of basalt, trachy-basalt, basaltic trachy-andesite, and basaltic andesite (50.1-56.1% SiO2, 1.1-1.9% K2O, and 5.4-9.1% MgO) was erupted from four vents within a 10 km2 portion of the GTVF, which also includes rhyolite domes that are not considered in this study. The vents include, from oldest to youngest: Little Whitney Cone, South Fork Cone, Tunnel Cone, and unglaciated Groundhog Cone. Little Whitney Cone is a 120 m-high pile of olivine-CPX-phyric scoria produced during a Strombolian-style eruption overlying two columnar jointed lava flows. Tunnel Cone formed through a Hawaiian-style eruption along a 400 m-long north-south trending fissure that excavated at least three 25-65 m-wide craters. Crater walls up to 12 m high are composed of plagioclase-olivine-phyric spatter-fed flows that dip radially away from the crater center and crumble to form Tunnel Cone's steep unconsolidated flanks. South Fork Cone is a 170 m-high pile of plagioclase-olivine-phyric scoria that formed during Strombolian to violent Strombolian eruptions. South Fork Cone overlies the South Fork Cone lava, a 9.5 km-long flow ( 12 × 106 km3) that reached the Kern River Canyon to the west. Scoria and airfall deposits originating from South Fork Cone are located up to 2 km from the vent. Groundhog Cone is a 140 m-tall cinder and spatter cone breached on the north flank by a 13 × 106 m3 lava flow that partially buried the South Fork Cone lava and extends 7.5 km west to Kern River Canyon. Incompatible trace element concentrations and ratios show vent-specific trends but are unsystematic when plotted in terms of all mafic GTVF vents, implying that GTVF basalts were derived from a lithospheric mantle source and ascended through thick granitic Sierra Nevada crust as discrete batches that underwent different degrees of crustal contamination

  1. Magmatic inclusions in rhyolites, contaminated basalts, and compositional zonation beneath the Coso volcanic field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, C.R.; Metz, J.

    1984-01-01

    Basaltic lava flows and high-silica rhyolite domes form the Pleistocene part of the Coso volcanic field in southeastern California. The distribution of vents maps the areal zonation inferred for the upper parts of the Coso magmatic system. Subalkalic basalts (Coso volcanic field contain sparse andesitic inclusions (55-61% SiO2). Pillow-like forms, intricate commingling and local diffusive mixing of andesite and rhyolite at contacts, concentric vesicle distribution, and crystal morphologies indicative of undercooling show that inclusions were incorporated in their rhyolitic hosts as blobs of magma. Inclusions were probably dispersed throughout small volumes of rhyolitic magma by convective (mechanical) mixing. Inclusion magma was formed by mixing (hybridization) at the interface between basaltic and rhyolitic magmas that coexisted in vertically zoned igneous systems. Relict phenocrysts and the bulk compositions of inclusions suggest that silicic endmembers were less differentiated than erupted high-silica rhyolite. Changes in inferred endmembers of magma mixtures with time suggest that the steepness of chemical gradients near the silicic/mafic interface in the zoned reservoir may have decreased as the system matured, although a high-silica rhyolitic cap persisted. The Coso example is an extreme case of large thermal and compositional contrast between inclusion and host magmas; lesser differences between intermediate composition magmas and inclusions lead to undercooling phenomena that suggest smaller ??T. Vertical compositional zonation in magma chambers has been documented through study of products of voluminous pyroclastic eruptions. Magmatic inclusions in volcanic rocks provide evidence for compositional zonation and mixing processes in igneous systems when only lava is erupted. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Volcanism on Mercury (dikes, lava flows, pyroclastics): Crust/mantle density contrasts, the evolution of compressive stress and the presence of mantle volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L.; Head, J. W., III

    2008-09-01

    Background. There is great uncertainty about the internal structure of Mercury and the composition of the mantle [e.g., 1, 2]. The high mean density of the body suggests that it may have lost parts of its crust and mantle in a giant impact at some stage after most of its initial accretion was sufficiently complete that at least partial separation of a core had occurred. It is the uncertainty about the timing of the giant impact, and hence the physico-chemical state of proto-Mercury at the time that it occurred, that leads to difficulties in predicting the interior structure and mantle composition. However, it seems reasonable to assume that the Mercury we see today has some combination of a relatively low-density crust and a relatively highdensity mantle; uncertainty remains about the presence and types of volatiles [2]. The second uncertainty is the nature of the surface plains units, specifically, are these lava flows and pyroclastics erupted from the interior, or impact-reworked earlier crust [3-5] (Figs. 1-2)? The detection of candidate pyroclastic deposits [4] has very important implications for mantle volatiles. Furthermore, whatever the surface composition, the presence of planet-wide systems of wrinkle ridges and thrust faults implies that a compressive crustal stress regime became dominant at some stage in the planet's history [3, 6]. If the plains units are indeed lava flows, then the fact that the products of the compressive regime deform many plains units suggests that the development of the compressive stresses may have played a vital role in determining when and if surface eruptions of mantle-derived magmas could occur. This would be analogous to the way in which the change with time from extensional to compressive global stresses in the lithosphere of the Moon influenced the viability of erupting magmas from deep mantle sources [7-9]. Analysis: To investigate the relationship between lithospheric stresses and magma eruption conditions [e.g., 9-11] we

  3. Detecting short period variations in lava flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, M. R.; Pinkerton, H.

    2009-04-01

    Although the underpinning processes that govern the flow of lava have been recognized for some time, modeling the evolution of lava flow fields remains problematic due to the difficulties in fully constraining inputs to flow models. One of the main parameters controlling the evolution of individual flows is effusion rate, and long period effusion rate changes, such as flow-waning prior to the cessation of an eruption, can now be routinely incorporated in simulations. However, effusion rates commonly vary over a wide range of timescales (from years to minutes) and, for short period changes, neither the cause nor the effects are well understood. Nevertheless, short period changes can result in inaccuracies in the input data for simulations and can be responsible for altering flow directions by either building or breaching flow levees. Hence, understanding the processes involved in such changes is important for flow modeling and, furthermore, could eventually provide insight into flow instabilities within the conduit or variability within degassing processes. Observations of short period (e.g. identified in effusion rate data because of the generally low sampling frequency of such data. During the last week of July 2008, trail cameras were used to obtain dense time series imagery of the active lava flow at Mount Etna, Sicily. The trail cameras were modified to capture timelapse imagery by adding an interval timer which triggered image capture every 10 minutes. During daylight, the cameras collected 5 M-pixel colour images and, during nighttime, they automatically switched to a 2 M-pixel camera which collected (uncalibrated) black and white infrared images. For the color images, haze, cloud and sunglare combined with the low contrast between the active lava and its surroundings, prevented useful analysis. However, the infrared images captured at night clearly indicated the active flow areas and nighttime sequences covering the two main proximal lava channels detected

  4. Geology and petrology of the basalts of Crater Flat: applications to volcanic risk assessment for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, D.; Crowe, B.

    1981-06-01

    Volcanic hazard studies of the south-central Great Basin, Nevada, are being conducted for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This report presents the results of field and petrologic studies of the basalts of Crater Flat, a sequence of Pliocene to Quaternary-age volcanic centers located near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site. Crater Flat is one of several basaltic fields constituting a north-northeast-trending volcanic belt of Late Cenozoic age extending from southern Death Valley, California, through the Nevada Test Site region to central Nevada. The basalts of Crater Flat are divided into three distinct volcanic cycles. The cycles are characterized by eruption of basalt magma of hawaiite composition that formed cinder cone clusters and associated lava flows. Total volume of erupted magma for respective cycles is given. The basalts of Crater Flat are sparsely to moderately porphyritic; the major phenocryst phase is olivine, with lesser amounts of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and rare amphibole. The consistent recurrence of evolved hawaiite magmas in all three cycles points to crystal fractionation from more primitive magmas at depth. A possible major transition in mantle source regions through time may be indicated by a transition from normal to Rb-depleted, Sr-enriched hawaiites in the younger basaltic cycles. The recurrence of small volumes of hawaiite magma at Crater Flat supports assumptions required for probability modeling of future volcanic activity and provides a basis for estimating the effects of volcanic disruption of a repository site in the southwestern Nevada Test Site region. Preliminary data suggest that successive basalt cycles at Crater Flat may be of decreasing volume but recurring more frequently

  5. Late Miocene adakites and Nb-enriched basalts from Vizcaino Peninsula, Mexico: Indicators of East Pacific Rise subduction below southern Baja California?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguillón-Robles, Alfredo; Calmus, Thierry; Benoit, Mathieu; Bellon, Hervé; Maury, René C.; Cotten, Joseph; Bourgois, Jacques; Michaud, François

    2001-06-01

    A typical slab melt association was emplaced from 11 to 8 Ma in the Santa Clara volcanic field, Vizcaino Peninsula, Baja California Sur. It includes adakitic domes and associated pyroclastic flow deposits, together with lava flows of niobium-enriched basalts. The trace element and isotopic (Sr-Nd-Pb) signatures of adakites are consistent with melting of altered mid-ocean ridge basalts, and the sources of the Nb-enriched basalts contain an enriched mantle wedge component. Such associations commonly form at depths of 70 80 km during low-dip subduction of very young oceanic crust. However, the Santa Clara field is relatively close (100 km) to the paleotrench, which suggests that the genesis of its adakites and Nb- enriched basalts occurred in a very high thermal regime linked to the subduction of the then-active Guadalupe spreading center of the East Pacific Rise. Our data suggest that the asthenospheric window documented below northern Baja California also developed beneath the south of the peninsula during the Neogene. This hypothesis is consistent with the spatial distribution and the ages of adakites and magnesian andesites from this region.

  6. Transient processes in Stromboli's shallow basaltic system inferred from dolerite and magmatic breccia blocks erupted during the 5 April 2003 paroxysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzulli, Alberto; Del Moro, Stefano; Menna, Michele; Landi, Patrizia; Piermattei, Marco

    2009-09-01

    We describe the mineralogy, geochemistry, and mesomicrostructure of fresh subvolcanic blocks erupted during the 5 April 2003 paroxysm of Stromboli (Aeolian Islands, Italy). These blocks represent ˜50 vol.% of the total erupted ejecta and consist of fine- to medium-grained basaltic lithotypes ranging from relatively homogeneous dolerites to strongly or poorly welded magmatic breccias. The breccia components are represented by angular fragments of dolerites entrapped in a matrix of vesiculated (lava-like to scoriae) crystal-rich (CR) basalt. All of the studied blocks are cognates with the CR basalt of the normal Strombolian activity or lavas and they are often coated by a few-centimeter thick layer of crystal-poor (CP) basaltic pumice erupted during the paroxysm. We suggest that they result from the rapid increase of pressure and related subvolcanic rock failure that occurred shortly before the 5 April 2003 explosion, when the uppermost portion of the edifice inflated and suffered brecciation as the result of the sudden rise of the gas-rich CP basalt that triggered the eruption. Dolerites and magmatic matrix of the breccias show major and trace element compositions that match those of the CR basalts erupted during normal Strombolian activity and effusive events at Stromboli volcano. Dolerites consist of (a) phenocrysts normally found in the CR basalts and (b) late-stage magmatic minerals such as sanidine, An60-28 plagioclase, Fe-Mn-rich olivines (Fo68-48), phlogopite, apatite, and opaque mineral pairs (magnetite and ilmenite), most of which are never found both in lava flows and scoriae erupted during the persistent explosive activity that characterizes typical Strombolian behavior. Subvolcanic crystallization of the Stromboli CR magma, leading to slowly cooled equivalents of basalts, could result from transient drainage of the magma from the summit craters to lower levels. Fingering and engulfing of the material that collapsed from the summit crater floor into the

  7. The petrology and geochemistry of high cascade volcanics in southern Washington: Mount Saint Helens volcano and the Indian Heaven basalt field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. R.

    1984-06-01

    Mount St. Helens volcano (Washington, USA) was characterized by four eruptive periods during the last 2200 years. Eruptive products include a wide spectrum of rock types including basaltic to andesitic lavas, andesitic to dacitic pyroclastic flows and tephra, and dacite domes. The major and trace element compositions of some andesites and dacites are broadly consistent with their derivation from a basaltic andesite parental magma by fractional crystallization processes involving the observed phenocryst assemblages. However, the strontium and oxygen isotopic compositions of representative samples of the Mount St. Helens suite indicate that closed system processes cannot explain the isotopic variations. The isotopic ratios are positively correlated with one another and with bulk composition (SiO2, Mg number, etc.). The isotopic variations and trace element data support an origin of some intermediate and silicic rock types by combined processes of assimilation and fractional crystallization.

  8. Evidence for komatiite-type lavas on Mars from Phobos ISM data and other observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, David P.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1994-01-01

    Data from the Phobos 2 Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (ISM), compiled by Mustard et al. (1993), and other observations support the existence of komatiitic lavas on Mars. Mustard et al. (1993) determined from ISM data that the composition of the low-albedo materials covering the Syrtis Major plateau originally consisted of augite-bearing basalt containing both augite and pigeonite, with no appreciable amount of olivine. This description is consistent with a komatiitic basalt. Komatiite is significant for the Earth because it contains a high amount of MgO, implying generation under unique circumstances compared to more typical basaltic compositions and may be similarly important for Mars.

  9. Vapor segregation and loss in basaltic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of volcanic gases at Pu'u'O??'o??, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, reveal distinct degassing regimes with respect to vapor segregation and loss during effusive activity in 2004-2005. Three styles of vapor loss are distinguished by the chemical character of the emitted volcanic gases, measured by open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: 1 persistent continuous gas emission, 2 gas piston events, and 3 lava spattering. Persistent continuous gas emission is associated with magma ascent and degassing beneath the crater vents, then eruption of the degassed magma from flank vents. Gas piston events are the result of static gas accumulation at depths of 400-900 m beneath Pu'u'O??'o??. A CO2-rich gas slug travels up the conduit at a few meters per second, displacing magma as it expands. Lava spattering occurs due to dynamic bubble coalescence in a column of relatively stagnant magma. The Large gas bubbles are H2O rich and are generated by open-system degassing at depths of gas accumulation and dynamic bubble coalescence are both manifestations of vapor segregation in basaltic melts, but their implications differ. Accumulation and segregation of CO2-rich vapor at depth does not deplete the melt of H2O (required to drive lava fountains near to the surface) and therefore gas piston events can occur interspersed with lava fountaining activity. Lava spattering, however, efficiently strips H2O-rich vapor from magma beneath the crater vents; the magma must then erupt effusively from vents on the flank of the cone. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  10. Ascent and eruption of basaltic magma on the earth and moon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, L.; Head, J.W. III.

    1981-01-01

    Geological and physical observations and constraints are applied to the development of a model of the ascent and emplacement of basaltic magma on the earth and moon. Mathematical models of the nature and motion of gas/liquid mixtures are developed and show that gas exsolution from terrestrial and lunar magmas commonly only occurs at shallow depths (less than 2 km); thus the ascent of bubble-free magma at depth can be treated separately from the complex motions caused by gas exsolution near the surface. Magma ascent is related to dike or conduit width. For terestrial basalts with negligible yield strengths and viscosities greater than 10 2 Ps s, widths in the range 0.2--0.6 m are needed to allow eruptions from between depths of 0.5--20 km. Fissure widths of about 4 m would be needed to account for output rates estimated for the Columbia River flood basalt eruptions. As the magma nears the surface, bubble coalescence will tend to occur, leading to intermittent explosive strombolian-style activity. For commonly occuring lunar and terrestrial basalts the magma rise speed must be greater than 0.5-1 m/s if strombolian activity is to be avoided and relatively steady fire fountaining is to take place. Terrestrial fire fountain heights are dictated by the vertical velocity of the magma/gas dispersion emerging through the vent, increasing with increasing magma gas content and mass eruption rate, and decreasing with increasing magma viscosity. Terrestrial fire fountain heights up to 500 m imply the release of up to 0.4 wt % water from the magma, corresponding to initial water contents up to 0.6 wt %. The presence of extremely long lava flows and sinuous rilles on the moon has often been cited as evidence for very high extrusion rates and thus a basic difference between terrestrial and lunar magmas and crustal environments

  11. Submarine basaltic fountain eruptions in a back-arc basin during the opening of the Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Jun; Amano, Kazuo

    2017-11-01

    Basaltic rock generated during the middle Miocene opening of the Japan Sea, is widely distributed on the back-arc side of the Japanese archipelago. Few studies have investigated on submarine volcanism related to opening of the Japan Sea. The present study aimed to reconstruct details of the subaqueous volcanism that formed the back-arc basin basalts (BABB) during this event, and to discuss the relationship between volcanism and the tectonics of back-arc opening, using facies analyses based on field investigation. The study area of the southern Dewa Hills contains well-exposed basalt related to the opening of the Japan Sea. Five types of basaltic rock facies are recognized: (1) coherent basalt, (2) massive platy basalt, (3) jigsaw-fit monomictic basaltic breccia, (4) massive or stratified coarse monomictic basaltic breccia with fluidal clasts, and (5) massive or stratified fine monomictic basaltic breccia. The basaltic rocks are mainly hyaloclastite. Based on facies distributions, we infer that volcanism occurred along fissures developed mainly at the center of the study area. Given that the rocks contain many fluidal clasts, submarine lava fountaining is inferred to have been the dominant eruption style. The basaltic rocks are interpreted as the products of back-arc volcanism that occurred by tensional stress related to opening of the Japan Sea, which drove strong tectonic subsidence and active lava fountain volcanism.

  12. Holuhraun 2014-2015 Eruption Site on Iceland: A Flood Lava Analogue for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, J.; Hamilton, C. W.; Scheidt, S. P.; Bonnefoy, L. E.; Jónsdóttir, I.; Höskuldsson, A.; Thordarson, T.

    2017-09-01

    The Holuhraun eruption 2014-2015 is the largest flood lava flow in Iceland since the Laki eruption in 1783-1784. We here present the first facies map of the whole Holuhraun lava flow, which we linked to the chronological emplacement history. Furthermore the facies we identify at Holuhraun are common on the Martian surface, especially at Marte Vallis and Rahway Valles. It therefore provides unique insights into the emplacement of flood lavas on Earth and other planetary bodies.

  13. Geochemical characterization of basalts from west of Khash (SE Iran: an approach to the nature of the mantle source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Firouzkouhi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Monogenic basaltic cinder cones and lava flows from west of Khash are part of volcanic arc of northern Makran, formed as a result of subduction of Oman oceanic lithosphere beneath the Eurasian plate. The basalts belong to medium-K calc-alkaline series as they contain high Al2O3 (16.5- 19.04 wt. % and CaO (8.4- 12.0 wt. % and moderate amounts of K2O (0.5- 1.1 wt. %. They share arc geochemical features such as high LILE/HFSE ([Rb/Zr]N-MORB up to 19 LILE/LREE ([Ba/La]N-MORB up to 4.86 and LREE/HREE ([La/Yb]N-MORB up to 10, and depletion of Ta, Nb, Zr, and Ti relative to N-MORB. Partial melting models indicate that near-primary basalts were derived from an enriched source type mantle wedge peridotite after low to medium degrees (2-10% of partial melting. This source peridotite was enriched in LREE and LILE, by subduction derived fluids in the supra-subduction zone. Negative correlation of Th/La vs. Sm/La, and relationships between Pb/Ce and Th/Nb values of the studied basalts which are between two end compositions of global subducting sediment (GLOSS and N-MORB are indicative of significant contribution of subducting sediments to the genesis of the basaltic rocks. Estimates made using binary mixing model are indicative of about 16% of sediment participation in the magma genesis. Low Pb/Ce ratio (1.6 - 11.1, compared to OIB (>20 may be a signature of participation of fluids resulted from dehydration of the subducting slab

  14. Drainage development and incision rates in an Upper Pleistocene Basalt-Limestone Boundary Channel: The Sa'ar Stream, Golan Heights, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtober-Zisu, N.; Inbar, M.; Mor, D.; Jicha, B. R.; Singer, B. S.

    2018-02-01

    Long-term fluvial incision processes and corresponding geomorphic evolution are difficult to quantify, especially in complex systems affected by lithological and tectonic factors. Volcanic landscapes offer the most appropriate environment for the study of landscape evolution, as there is a clear starting time of formation and the lithology is homogenous. In the present study we aim to: (1) analyse the interplay of construction and incision processes throughout eruptive activity; (2) study fluvial erosion processes; (3) analyse sedimentary and volcanic lithological responses to channel erosion; and (4) calculate the incision rates in young basaltic bedrock. We have integrated existing and new 40Ar/39Ar ages of lava flows with estimates of channel geometry and tectonic activity, and considered process geomorphology concepts, to fully understand evolution of a bedrock channel incised at the boundary between basalts and sedimentary rocks with coeval active volcanic processes forcing drainage evolution. Our findings indicate that the Sa'ar basin evolution is controlled by: (1) rock strength of the mixed lithology; (2) alternating cycles of volcanic activity followed by erosion and incision; and (3) the Plio-Pleistocene uplift of Mt. Hermon. The carbonate slopes composing the southern flank of Mt. Hermon are moderate (18-26%) while the basalt slopes deriving from the Golan Heights are much steeper (26-51%). The highly erodible sedimentary rocks at Mt. Hermon's piedmont accelerated river incision, shaping a 650 m wide by 100 m deep canyon. Inside the canyon, the steep channel slope (8.6%) enables downstream movement of large boulders, including autochthonous mega-blocks (D90 size > 2.5 m); 24 knickpoints were identified using DS plots, developed within a knick zone over a distance of 6 km. The brittle and porous structure of the rubbly and blocky interflow layers (clinkers), interbedded between two massive basalt flows, enhances erosion and accelerates scouring of the

  15. Stability of Basalt plus Anhydrite plus Calcite at HP-HT: Implications for Venus, the Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Treiman, A. H.

    2010-01-01

    "Canali" observed at Venus surface by Magellan are evidence for very long melt flows, but their composition and origin remain uncertain. The hypothesis of water-rich flow is not reasonable regarding the temperature at Venus surface. The length of these channels could not be explained by a silicate melt composition but more likely, by a carbonate-sulfate melt which has a much lower viscosity (Kargel et al 1994). One hypothesis is that calcite CaCO3 and anhydrite CaSO4 which are alteration products of basalts melted during meteorite impacts. A famous example recorded on the Earth (Chicxulub) produced melt and gas rich in carbon and sulfur. Calcite and sulfate evaporites are also present on Mars surface, associated with basalts. An impact on these materials might release C- and S-rich melt or fluid. Another type of planetary phenomenon (affecting only the Earth) might provoke a high pressure destabilization of basalt+anhydrite+calcite. Very high contents of C and S are measured in some Earth s magmas, either dissolved or in the form of crystals (Luhr 2008). As shown by the high H content and high fO2 of primary igneous anhydrite-bearing lavas, the high S content in their source may be explained by subduction of an anhydrite-bearing oceanic crust, either directly (by melting followed by eruption) or indirectly (by release of S-rich melt or fluid that metasomatize the mantle) . Calcite is a major product of oceanic sedimentation and alteration of the crust. Therefore, sulfate- and calcite-rich material may be subducted to high pressures and high temperatures (HP-HT) and release S- and C-rich melts or fluids which could influence the composition of subduction zone lavas or gases. Both phenomena - meteorite impact and subduction - imply HP-HT conditions - although the P-T-time paths are different. Some HP experimental/theoretical studies have been performed on basalt/eclogite, calcite and anhydrite separately or on a combination of two. In this study we performed piston

  16. Extremely magnetized abyssal lavas erupted in active back-arc of the Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, M.; Sato, H.; Okino, K.

    2017-12-01

    Although high-amplitude of marine magnetic anomalies have been utilized for understanding for seafloor dynamics, the causal link between intensity of natural remanent magnetization and physical and chemical processes of extrusive rocks are still unclear. In addition, we essentially lack rock magnetic data of arc-back-arc lavas, which potentially provide strong constraints for understanding time- and spatial-dependent diversity of lava magnetization including mid-ocean ridge basalts. Here, we present new rock magnetic data of strongly magnetized basaltic rocks, which rank among the most magnetized in known oceanic basaltic rocks, from active back-arc region of the Okinawa Trough. We analyzed 27 non-oxidized (fresh) basaltic rock samples obtained from the active back-arc volcanoes, located at the segment boundary along back-arc rift. Their natural remanent magnetization ranges 7 A/m to >200 A/m, and has clear nonlinear relationship with both magnetic hysteresis signatures and titanomagnetite amount. The strongly magnetized lavas show large contribution of appropriate amount of SD titanomagnetite grains formed in proper crystal growth environments. The high-temperature thermomagnetic experiments demonstrate reversible curves in both heating and cooling with single Curie temperature. The Curie temperature shows up to 480°C for strongly magnetized lavas, which is much higher than that of mid-ocean ridge basalts mainly containing TM60, indicating that rich Fe and low Ti contents of titanomagnetite grains are main magnetic carrier. These observations clearly demonstrate that intensity of natural remanent magnetization is primarily controlled by cooling rate of lavas and ratio of Fe to Ti of titanomagnetite grains as well as bulk iron contents, with important implications towards marine magnetic anomalies and arc-back-arc volcanism.

  17. Preliminary feasibility study on storage of radioactive wastes in Columbia River basalts. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    1976-11-01

    Volume II comprises four appendices: analytical data and sample locations for basalt flow type localities; Analytical data and sample locations for measured field sections in Yakima basalts; core hole lithology and analytical data; and geophysical logs. (LK)

  18. Historical volcanic eruptions in the Canary Islands, tephra composition, and insights into the crystal cargo of basaltic magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longpre, M. A.; Muller, J.; Beaudry, P.; Andronikides, A.; Felpeto, A.

    2017-12-01

    Since the 16th century, at least 13 volcanic eruptions have occurred in the Canary Islands that formed monogenetic cinder cones and lava flow fields: 2 on Lanzarote, 4 on Tenerife, 6 on La Palma, and 1 on the submarine flank of El Hierro. Here we present a comprehensive new dataset of tephra composition for all 13 eruptions, comprising major and trace element data for bulk rocks and matrix glasses, as well as vesicularity and crystallinity measurements. In addition, we compile available volcanological and petrological information for specific eruptions, including estimates of lava flow area and volume. All lapilli samples show a vesicularity of 40-50 vol% and a vesicle-free crystallinity (crystals ≥ 250 µm) of 5-15 vol%. Modal mineralogy varies significantly between samples, typically consisting of olivine ± clinopyroxene ± Fe-Ti oxide ± plagioclase ± amphibole in different proportions. All but 2 tephras have basanite-tephrite bulk rock compositions. Lapilli from vents of the AD 1730-1736 Timanfaya eruption, Lanzarote, largely are basaltic, whereas the AD 1798 Chahorra eruption, Tenerife, produced phonotephrite tephra. These results are in agreement with published bulk lava flow data. Unsurprisingly, glass compositions are more evolved than bulk rocks and MgOglass is weakly positively correlated to MgObulk (MgOglass = 0.30*MgObulk + 2.11, R2 = 0.54). Both bulk rocks and glasses show strikingly similar multi-element diagram patterns, with strong enrichment relative to the bulk-silicate Earth and marked positive Nb and Ta and negative Pb anomalies — typical for ocean island basalts. Glass/bulk rock elemental ratios reveal systematic differences between samples that relate to their mineralogy; for example, Lanzarote tephras that lack significant clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxide crystals have higher Scglass/Scbulk and Vglass/Vbulk than Tenerife, La Palma and El Hierro samples that typically contain these minerals. Among all elements, K and P display the greatest

  19. Thermophysical properties of the Lipari lavas (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Russo

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of thermophysical investigations into the lavas of the island of Lipari (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea are presented. Samples selected for laboratory measurements belong to four main magmatic cycles, which produced basaltic-andesitic, andesitic and rhyolitic lavas. The wet-bulk density and the thermal conductivity measured on 69 specimens range from 1900 to 2760 kg m-3 and from 1.02 to 2.88 W m-1 K-1, respectively. Porosity is never negligible and its influence on density is maximum in rhyolites of the third cycle. The thermal conductivity is also influenced by the amount of glass. Rhyolitic obsidians show values lower than other rhyolites, although the latter rocks have a larger average porosity. The radioactive heat production determined on 36 specimens varies with the rock type, depending on the amount of U, Th and K. In basic lavas of the first cycle its value is 0.95°± 0.30 mW m-3, while in rhyolites of the fourth cycle it attains 6.68°±0.61 mW m-3. A comparison between results of g-ray spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence points out that the assumption of equilibrium in the decay series of the isotopic elements seems fulfilled. The information obtained is useful not only for the interpretation of geophysical surveys but also for the understanding of the geochemical characteristics of lavas.

  20. Potential for microbial oxidation of ferrous iron in basaltic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mai Yia; Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Roden, Eric E

    2015-05-01

    Basaltic glass (BG) is an amorphous ferrous iron [Fe(II)]-containing material present in basaltic rocks, which are abundant on rocky planets such as Earth and Mars. Previous research has suggested that Fe(II) in BG can serve as an energy source for chemolithotrophic microbial metabolism, which has important ramifications for potential past and present microbial life on Mars. However, to date there has been no direct demonstration of microbially catalyzed oxidation of Fe(II) in BG. In this study, three different culture systems were used to investigate the potential for microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in BG, including (1) the chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing "Straub culture"; (2) the mixotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing organism Desulfitobacterium frappieri strain G2; and (3) indigenous microorganisms from a streambed Fe seep in Wisconsin. The BG employed consisted of clay and silt-sized particles of freshly quenched lava from the TEB flow in Kilauea, Hawaii. Soluble Fe(II) or chemically reduced NAu-2 smectite (RS) were employed as positive controls to verify Fe(II) oxidation activity in the culture systems. All three systems demonstrated oxidation of soluble Fe(II) and/or structural Fe(II) in RS, whereas no oxidation of Fe(II) in BG material was observed. The inability of the Straub culture to oxidize Fe(II) in BG was particularly surprising, as this culture can oxidize other insoluble Fe(II)-bearing minerals such as biotite, magnetite, and siderite. Although the reason for the resistance of the BG toward enzymatic oxidation remains unknown, it seems possible that the absence of distinct crystal faces or edge sites in the amorphous glass renders the material resistant to such attack. These findings have implications with regard to the idea that Fe(II)-Si-rich phases in basalt rocks could provide a basis for chemolithotrophic microbial life on Mars, specifically in neutral-pH environments where acid-promoted mineral dissolution and

  1. Lava lake level as a gauge of magma reservoir pressure and eruptive hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Anderson, Kyle R.; Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.; Swanson, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Forecasting volcanic activity relies fundamentally on tracking magma pressure through the use of proxies, such as ground surface deformation and earthquake rates. Lava lakes at open-vent basaltic volcanoes provide a window into the uppermost magma system for gauging reservoir pressure changes more directly. At Kīlauea Volcano (Hawaiʻi, USA) the surface height of the summit lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater fluctuates with surface deformation over short (hours to days) and long (weeks to months) time scales. This correlation implies that the lake behaves as a simple piezometer of the subsurface magma reservoir. Changes in lava level and summit deformation scale with (and shortly precede) changes in eruption rate from Kīlauea's East Rift Zone, indicating that summit lava level can be used for short-term forecasting of rift zone activity and associated hazards at Kīlauea.

  2. The Roles of the Yellowstone Hotspot and Crustal Assimilation in Generating Pleistocene-Holocene Basalts on the Eastern Snake River Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, H.; Chadwick, J.

    2017-12-01

    The southwest motion of the North American plate across the Yellowstone hotspot created a chain of age-progressive rhyolitic calderas over the past 16 myr. in southern Idaho, U.S. The focus of Yellowstone activity now resides in northwest Wyoming, but basaltic volcanism has continued in its wake in southern Idaho on the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). These younger basaltic lavas are not age progressive and have buried the Yellowstone rhyolites on the ESRP. The ultimate source of the basalts is commonly ascribed to the passage or presence of the hotspot. However, the mechanisms involved, and the relative roles of the hotspot, other mantle sources, and the North American crust in generating the ESRP basalts remain unclear and have been the subject of recent geochemical and isotopic studies. In this study, the role of crustal assimilation is addressed by analyzing the chemical and isotopic characteristics of some of the youngest Pleistocene-Holocene tholeiitic volcanic fields on the ESRP, which were erupted through varying thicknesses of continental crust. Samples were analyzed from the Hell's Half Acre flow (5,200 years old; all dates Kuntz et al., 1986, 1994), Cerro Grande flow (13,380 years), and Black Butte Crater (a.k.a. Shoshone) flow (10,130 years), which were erupted at distances from between about 200 to 300 km from the current location of the hotspot. The crust of the ESRP thins from northeast to southwest, from about 47 km at the Hells Half Acre flow to 40 km at the Black Butte Crater flow, a thickness difference of about 15%. The apparently similar tectonic and magmatic environments of the three sampled flows suggest the crustal thickness variation may be a primary influence on the magnitude of assimilation and therefore the isotopic characteristics of the lavas. The goal of this work is to constrain the relative role of assimilation and to understand the source(s) of the magmas and the Yellowstone hotspot contribution. Major elements, trace elements

  3. Giant Plagioclase Basalts, eruption rate versus time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R.Narasimhan(krishtel emaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    tion rate is expressed in terms of some sort of unit volume as a function of time. I did not do this because I am not sure that we know the volumes of individual lava flows all that well. It is clearly something that we need to know by mapping out individual flows in the field. That is why I chose to estimate a “one dimensional.

  4. Pb isotope evidence for contributions from different Iceland mantle components to Palaeogene East Greenland flood basalts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peate, David; Stecher, Ole

    2003-01-01

    to the most radiogenic values found in recent Icelandic basalts. Furthermore, the main volume of lavas in East Greenland is displaced away from the NAEM towards this radiogenic Pb component. Thus, this ‘Iceland radiogenic Pb end-member’ component was a significant contributor to the break-up-related magmatism...

  5. Eruption History and Geochemical Evolution of Servilleta Basalt Along the Rio Grande Gorge, Colorado and New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosca, M. A.; Thompson, R. A.; Turner, K. J.; Morgan, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Subalkaline basalt to basaltic andesite lava flows formally known as Servilleta Basalt (SB) are the most voluminous rock type forming the Pliocene Taos Plateau volcanic field. Pleistocene incision by the Rio Grande into the bedrock-floored plateau has resulted in spectacular exposures of occasionally thick ( 240 m) accumulations of SB within the Rio Grande gorge. Incremental CO2 laser heating of individual rock fragments, the SB within and along the length of the Rio Grande gorge has been precisely dated by 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to between 5.3 Ma and 3.3 Ma. SB older than 4 Ma is restricted to some lava flows exposed between La Junta point, at the confluence of the Red River and Rio Grande, and the Gorge Bridge crossing northwest of Taos, NM. Vertical sampling through thick SB flow sequences within the gorge yields precise emplacement histories and also reveals small but systematic major and minor element concentration variations (including Si, Rb, Sr, Cu and Zn). 40Ar/39Ar data show that these trends developed over short (0-250 ka) timescales, and probably relate to partial assimilation of crust, possibly at multiple depths. Combined field, geochemical, and 40Ar/39Ar data consequently record short-lived changes in tholeiitic melt compositions in response to regional extension and development of the Rio Grande rift. The age, lateral extent, and thickness of exposed SB partially reflect the paleotopographic surface of the southern San Luis Basin prior to onset of Pliocene Taos Plateau volcanic field magmatism; paleotopographic highs diverted some flows while topographic lows were areas of infilling and accumulation. Heterogeneous basin paleotopography developed during contemporaneous or precursory andesitic to dacitic volcanism, extensional faulting and subsidence of sub-basins within the San Luis Basin, and deposition of prograding alluvial fans that originated in the Sangre de Cristo and Picuris Mountains. SB flowed into the southern San Luis Valley beginning 5

  6. Geochemistry of axial seamount lavas: Magmatic relationship between the Cobb Hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J. M.; Morgan, C.; Liias, R. A.

    1990-08-01

    Axial Seamount, located along the central portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and at the eastern end of the Cobb-Eickelberg Seamount Chain, is the current center of the Cobb Hotspot. The Axial Seamount lavas are transitional between N-type and E-type mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), characteristics that they share with lavas along the rest of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. There are, however, subtle, but distinct, differences between the seamount lavas and those of the adjoining ridge segments. These include higher Na2O, CaO, and Sr at a given MgO content and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas as compared with the ridge lavas. Lava chemistry and bathymetry indicate that Axial Seamount is a discrete volcanic unit, with a more productive shallow magmatic plumbing system separate from the adjacent ridge segments. These high magma supply rates have sustained a continuously replenished, steady state magma reservoir that has erupted remarkably homogeneous lavas over a long time period. Despite this classic association of spreading center and hotspot volcanic activity, there is no evidence in the lavas for geochemical or isotopic enrichment typical of hotspot or mantle plume activity. The differences in composition between the Axial Seamount lavas and the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas are attributed to melting processes rather than to any fundamental differences in their mantle source compositions. The higher magma production rates, higher Sr, and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas relative to the ridge lavas are thought to be a consequence of melt initiation at greater depths. The melting column producing the seamount lavas is thought to be initiated in the stability field of spinel peridotite, whereas the ridge lavas are produced from a melting column initiated at shallower levels, possibly within or close to the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. Implicit in this interpretation is the conclusion that the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas, and by analogy most

  7. Geologic history of quartz-normative and olivine-normative basalts in the vicinity of Hadley Rille (Apollo 15)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grove, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    The geologic history of the quartz normative (QNB) and olivine normative (ONB) basalt types at Hadley Rille are discussed. A model for the geology of the mare basalts was constructed from a combination of field observations, sample chemistry, sample petrology and personal bias from terrestrial experience. The model proposes that the QNBs are the only mare lava type that is present as outcrop in the area traversed by the astronauts during the Apollo 15 mission. The returned QNB samples formed during a single eruptive phase of the Hadley Rille lava tube system. The ONB lavas are an exotic component transported to the site by a cratering event, or the ONBs are samples excavated from older are bedrock that was partly covered by the QNB lavas

  8. Vesiculation of basaltic magma during eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Margaret T.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Newman, Sally

    1993-01-01

    Vesicle size distributions in vent lavas from the Pu'u'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption of Kilauea volcano are used to estimate nucleation and growth rates of H2O-rich gas bubbles in basaltic magma nearing the earth's surface (≤120 m depth). By using well-constrained estimates for the depth of volatile exsolution and magma ascent rate, nucleation rates of 35.9 events ⋅ cm-3 ⋅ s-1 and growth rates of 3.2 x 10-4cm/s are determined directly from size-distribution data. The results are consistent with diffusion-controlled growth as predicted by a parabolic growth law. This empirical approach is not subject to the limitations inherent in classical nucleation and growth theory and provides the first direct measurement of vesiculation kinetics in natural settings. In addition, perturbations in the measured size distributions are used to examine bubble escape, accumulation, and coalescence prior to the eruption of magma.

  9. Helium Isotope Variations in Basalts Along Gakkel Ridge and Heterogeneity of the Arctic Upper Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D. W.; Lupton, J. E.; Goldstein, S. L.; Langmuir, C. H.; Michael, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    We report helium isotope compositions, determined by crushing in vacuum to release the gas trapped in vesicles, for 57 basalt glasses from the ultra-slow spreading Gakkel Ridge. Other geochemical data, especially radiogenic isotopes (Pb, Nd, Sr) reveal the presence of an isotopic boundary in the mid-section of this ridge that separates basalts in the west (west of 14°E longitude) having “Indian Ocean” (Dupal) isotopic signatures, from basalts in the east which resemble the North Atlantic/Pacific domain (Goldstein et al. 2008). This boundary reflects heterogeneity in the underlying mantle related to the tectonic history of continental land masses surrounding the Arctic Ocean. In the west there is a narrow range of 3He/4He with lower values (7.0-7.9 RA), while in the east there is a wider range of 3He/4He with higher values (7.9-9.3 RA) and effectively no overlap with the western group. Off-axis lavas do not fit this simple picture however, revealing some systematic temporal variability, perhaps associated with mantle flow beneath the ridge. All Gakkel Ridge basalts are deeply erupted and most have high helium contents, in some cases at the upper end of the MORB range (>50 μccSTP/g). The few exceptions, having He contents below 0.1 μccSTP/g, have the highest 3He/4He (>8.8 RA). This effect appears to reflect earlier (recent) melting of isotopically heterogeneous mantle, during which the initial melt fractions were slightly enriched in 4He, perhaps due to a larger modal contribution of clinopyroxene and/or garnet to those melts. The temporal variability and the melting effects, while significant, do not account for the large 3He/4He signal observed along the ridge axis. Overall, 3He/4He shows systematic covariation with other isotopic indicators of mantle heterogeneity (Pb, Nd, Sr and Hf), indicating that the helium isotope variations are a long-lived feature of the Arctic upper mantle. The 3He/4He ratio is as effective a discriminant of eastern and western

  10. Petrology and Geochemistry of Abandoned Spreading Center Lavas Off Baja California: Implications for Intraplate Magmatism in Eastern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, L.; Castillo, P. R.; Lonsdale, P. F.

    2008-12-01

    Abundant volcanism at active spreading centers is caused by adiabatic decompression melting of the upper mantle, but the origin of volcanism at abandoned spreading centers is an enigma. Guadalupe Island and Sara, Rosana, Rosa, and Nithya seamounts are volcanoes built on abandoned spreading centers between 26°N and 29°N in the eastern Pacific offshore Baja California. Lava samples from these volcanoes comprise predominantly of mildly to moderately alkalic basalts and their differentiates. Relative to mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) from the East Pacific Rise (EPR), they have higher abundances of incompatible elements and higher highly/moderately incompatible trace element ratios (e.g., Ba/Zr ~1.3). These lavas have enriched REECH patterns, with light REE enrichment up to 300X chondrites. These trace element characteristics combined with their moderately radiogenic Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions indicate they originated from a geochemically enriched mantle source. In detail, the lavas have a moderate range of composition that overlaps with those of lavas from another spreading center (Davidson Seamount) and nearby seamounts (e.g., Pioneer, Rodriguez) offshore southern California and tholeiitic to alkalic seamounts near the EPR. Together, these intraplate lavas define a compositional continuum ranging from MORB-like to ocean island basalt (OIB)-like. In the case of abandoned spreading centers, the 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd compositions of Sara, Rosana and Nithya seamount lavas greatly overlap with those of EPR seamount lavas, but those of Rosa seamount and Guadalupe Island lavas are within the HIMU field for OIB. Thus our results suggest that volcanism at abandoned spreading centers and intraplate volcanism in eastern Pacific as a whole result from a complex interplay between mantle melting dynamics and lithospheric tectonic processes.

  11. Lava and Life: New investigations into the Carson Volcanics, lower Kimberley Basin, north Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Karin; Phillips, Chris; Hollis, Julie

    2014-05-01

    The Carson Volcanics are the only volcanic unit in the Paleoproterozoic Kimberley Basin and are part of a poorly studied Large Igneous Province (LIP) that was active at 1790 Ma. New work focussing on this LIP in 2012 and 2013 involved helicopter-supported traverses and sampling of the Carson Volcanics in remote areas near Kalumburu in far north Western Australia's Kimberley region. The succession is widespread and flat lying to gently dipping. It consists of three to six basalt units with intercalated sandstone and siltstone. The basalts are 20-40 m thick, but can be traced up to 60 km along strike. The basalt can be massive or amygdaloidal and commonly display polygonal to subhorizontal and rare vertical columnar jointing. Features of the basalt include ropy lava tops and basal pipe vesicles consistent with pahoehoe lavas. The intercalated cross-bedded quartzofeldspathic sandstone and siltstone vary in thickness up to 40 m and can be traced up to 40 km along strike. Peperite is common and indicates interaction between wet, unconsolidated sediment and hot lava. Stromatolitic chert at the top of the formation represents the oldest life found within the Kimberley region. Mud cracks evident in the sedimentary rocks, and stromatolites suggest an emergent broad tidal flat environment. The volcanics were extruded onto a wide marginal margin setting subject to frequent flooding events. Thickening of the volcanic succession south and the palaeocurrents in the underlying King Leopold Sandstone and the overlying Warton Sandstone suggest that this shelf sloped to the south. The type of basalt and the basalt morphology indicate a low slope gradient of about 1°.

  12. The genesis of a lava cave in the Deccan Volcanic Province (Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil R. Pawar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lava tubes and channels forming lava distributaries have been recognized from different parts of western Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP. Openings of smaller dimension have been documented from the pāhoehoe flows around Pune, in the western DVP. A small lava cave is exposed in Ghoradeshwar hill, near Pune. Detailed field studies of the physical characteristics, structure and morphology of the flows hosting the lava tube has been carried out. This is the first detailed documentation of a lava cave from the DVP. The lava cave occurs in a compound pāhoehoe flow of Karla Formation, characterized by the presence of lobes, toes and small scale features like squeeze-ups. Field observations and measurements reveal that the dimensions of the cave are small, with low roof and a maximum width of 108 cm. The cave morphology along the 20 m passage varies from circular to semi-circular, with a twilight zone to the north. The gentle micro-topography at Ghoradeshwar controlled the advancement of pāhoehoe lobes and toes within the sheet lobe. The pre-flow gradients towards the north led to the progression of flow from the east, where the cave opening is presently seen. Dimensions and related morphology of the lava cave suggest that it can be best described as a small sub-crustal cave formed by draining of an inflated of pāhoehoe lava lobe. At Ghoradeshwar, besides the natural lava cave, Buddhist caves carved in pāhoehoe lava flows are also observed, indicating that early man took advantage of the existing openings in pāhoehoe flows and sculpted the caves to suit their requirements.

  13. Oxygen buffering of Kilauea volcanic gases and the oxygen fugacity of Kilauea basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    challenges the common assumption that volcanic gases are released from lava in a state of chemical equilibrium and then continue equilibrating homogeneously with falling temperature until reaction rates are unable to keep pace with cooling. No evidence is found, moreover, that certain gas species are kinetically more responsive and able to equilibrate down to lower temperatures than those of the last gas/lava oxygen exchange. Homogeneous reaction rates in the gas phase are apparently slow compared to the time it took for the gases to move from the last site of gas/lava equilibration to the site of collection. An earlier set of data for higher temperature CO2-rich Type I volcanic gases, which come from sustained summit lava lake eruptions supplied by magma that experienced substantially shorter periods of crustal storage, shows fO2 buffering by oxygen transfer up to 1185??C. Oxygen fugacity measurements in drill holes into ponded lava flows suggest that buffering by oxygen transfer may control the fO2 of residual gases down to several hundred degrees below the solidus in the early stages of cooling. Although the details of the fO2 buffering mechanisms for oxygen transfer are unknown, the fact that fO2 buffering is effective from molten to subsolidus conditions suggests that the reaction mechanisms must change with cooling as the reactants change from predominantly melt, to melt plus crystals, to glass plus crystals. Mass balance calculations suggest that redox reactions between the gas and ferrous/ferric iron in the lava are plausible mechanisms for the oxygen transfer and that the fO2 of the gases is buffered by sliding ferrous/ferric equilibria in the erupting lavas. Contrary to expectations based on models predicting the oxidation of basalt by H2 and CO escape during crustal storage, CO2-rich Type I gases and CO2-poor Type II gases have identical oxygen fugacities despite greatly different crustal storage and degassing histories. Volcanic gas data give a tightly co

  14. Volcano-sedimentary characteristics in the Abu Treifiya Basin, Cairo-Suez District, Egypt: Example of dynamics and fluidization over sedimentary and volcaniclastic beds by emplacement of syn-volcanic basaltic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, E. A.; Abdel Motelib, A.; Hammed, M. S.; El Manawi, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the Neogene lava-sediment mingling from the Abu Treifiya Basin, Cairo-Suez district, Egypt. The lava-sediment interactions as peperites have been identified for the first time at the study area and can be used as paleoenvironmental indicators. The identification of peperite reflects contemporaneous time relationship between volcanism and sedimentation and this finding is of primary importance to address the evolutional reconstruction of the Abu Treifiya Basin. Characterization of the facies architecture and textural framework of peperites was carried out through detailed description and interpretation of their outcrops. The peperites and sedimentary rocks are up to 350 m thick and form a distinct stratigraphic framework of diverse lithology that is widespread over several kilometers at the study area. Lateral and vertical facies of the peperites vary from sediment intercalated with the extrusive/intrusive basaltic rocks forming peperitic breccias to lava-sediment contacts at a large to small scales, respectively. Peperites encompass five main facies types ascribed to: (i) carbonate sediments-hosted fluidal and blocky peperites, (ii) lava flow-hosted blocky peperites, (iii) volcaniclastics-hosted fluidal and blocky peperites, (iv) sandstone/siltstone rocks-hosted blocky peperites, and (iv) debris-flows-hosted blocky peperites. Soft sediment deformation structures, vesiculated sediments, sediments filled-vesicles, and fractures in lava flows indicate that lava flows mingled with unconsolidated wet sediments. All the peperites in this study could be described as blocky or fluidal, but mixtures of different clast shapes occur regardless of the host sediment. The presence of fluidal and blocky juvenile clasts elucidates different eruptive styles, reflecting a ductile and brittle fragmentation. The gradual variation from fluidal to blocky peperite texture, producing the vertical grading is affected by influencing factors, e.g., the viscosity, magma

  15. Shallowly driven fluctuations in lava lake outgassing (gas pistoning), Kīlauea Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim; Sutton, A. J.; Lev, Einat; Thelen, Wes; Fee, David

    2016-01-01

    Lava lakes provide ideal venues for directly observing and understanding the nature of outgassing in basaltic magmatic systems. Kīlauea Volcano's summit lava lake has persisted for several years, during which seismic and infrasonic tremor amplitudes have exhibited episodic behavior associated with a rise and fall of the lava surface (;gas pistoning;). Since 2010, the outgassing regime of the lake has been tied to the presence or absence of gas pistoning. During normal behavior (no gas pistoning), the lake is in a ;spattering; regime, consisting of higher tremor amplitudes and gas emissions. In comparison, gas piston events are associated with an abrupt rise in lava level (up to 20 m), during which the lake enters a ;non-spattering; regime with greatly decreased tremor and gas emissions. We study this episodic behavior using long-term multidisciplinary monitoring of the lake, including seismicity, infrasound, gas emission and geochemistry, and time-lapse camera observations. The non-spattering regime (i.e. rise phase of a gas piston cycle) reflects gas bubbles accumulating near the top of the lake, perhaps as a shallow foam, while spattering regimes represent more efficient decoupling of gas from the lake. We speculate that the gas pistoning might be controlled by time-varying porosity and/or permeability in the upper portions of the lava lake, which may modulate foam formation and collapse. Competing models for gas pistoning, such as deeply sourced gas slugs, or dynamic pressure balances, are not consistent with our observations. Unlike other lava lakes which have cyclic behavior that is thought to be controlled by deeply sourced processes, external to the lake itself, we show an example of lava lake fluctuations driven by cycles of activity at shallow depth and close to the lake's surface. These observations highlight the complex and unsteady nature of outgassing from basaltic magmatic systems.

  16. Asthenospheric outflow from the shrinking Philippine Sea Plate: Evidence from Hf-Nd isotopes of southern Mariana lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Julia M.; Stern, Robert J.; Martinez, Fernando; Woodhead, Jon; Chen, Min; Ohara, Yasuhiko

    2017-11-01

    At subduction zones, sinking of the downgoing lithosphere is thought to enable a return flow of asthenospheric mantle around the slab edges, so that the asthenosphere from underneath the slab invades the ambient mantle flowing underneath the volcanic arc and the backarc basin. For instance at the northern end of the Lau Basin, trench retreat and slab rollback enable toroidal return flow of Samoan mantle beneath a transform margin to provide a supply of fresh, undepleted Indian mantle that feeds the backarc spreading center. Questions, however, arise about the sense of mantle flow when plate kinematics predict that the trench is advancing, as seen in the Mariana convergent margin. Does the mantle flow in or does it escape outward through slab tears or gaps? Here, we address the origin and sense of asthenospheric mantle flow supplying the southern Mariana convergent margin, a region of strong extension occurring above the subducting Pacific plate. Does the asthenosphere flow northward, from underneath the Pacific plate and Caroline hotspot through a slab tear or gap, or does it flow outward from the Mariana Trough, which possesses a characteristic Indian Ocean isotopic signature? To address these questions, we integrate geodetic data along with new Hf-Nd isotopic data for fresh basaltic lavas from three tectonic provinces in the southernmost Marianas: the Fina Nagu volcanic complex, the Malaguana-Gadao backarc spreading ridge and the SE Mariana forearc rift. Our results indicate that Indian mantle flows outward and likely escapes through slab tears or gaps to accommodate shrinking of the Philippine Sea plate. We thus predict that asthenospheric flow around the Pacific slab at the southern Mariana Trench is opposite to that predicted by most subduction-driven mantle flow models.

  17. Plagioclase Crystal Populations in Lavas from Calbuco Volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, T.; Hickey-Vargas, R.

    2005-12-01

    Calbuco Volcano in Southern Chile is regionally unique in that it is predominantly andesitic, whereas surrounding volcanic centers are basaltic in composition. Lava from Calbuco is also hornblende-bearing, phenocryst-rich, and it contains crystal clots that are interpreted as cumulate minerals entrained in the magma. The phenocryst assemblage of the lava, and the mineral assemblage of the crystal clots, is: plagioclase, hornblende, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, olivine and oxide minerals. Three different species of plagioclase crystals are found in Calbuco andesite: zoned phenocrysts in the lava, unzoned grains in the crystal clots, and high-An megacrysts. The phenocrysts are predominantly anhedral and normally zoned with An mol% in the core ranging from An68-91, and at the rim from An58-82. Most of these crystals range in size from 50 to 700 microns, with rare grains larger, and nearly all contain melt inclusions. Plagioclase grains within the crystal clots are not zoned and have An mol% of An70-93, which overlaps the An mol% of the zoned phenocryst cores. These grains range in size from 100 to 500 microns. Megacrysts are 2000 microns and larger in size, and are unzoned, except for the rim of the grains. They have very high An mol% of An88-92 in the core. The 10-60 micron rims are normally zoned. Based on the overlapping An mol% contents of zoned plagioclase cores and the plagioclase from crystal clots, it is probable these two populations of crystals have formed as phenocrysts, crystallizing directly from the basaltic andesite to andesite magma. The origin of the megacrysts is more puzzling. Periodic replenishment by a more mafic magma and magma mixing could introduce these large An-rich plagioclase crystals, or they could be cumulate crystals that formed from a more mafic magma and were later entrained in andesitic magma. In either case, the narrow rim of normal zoning suggests a relatively short time span between entrainment and eruption.

  18. Late Pleistocene geomagnetic excursion in Icelandic lavas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, S.; Audunsson, H.; Duncan, R.A.; Kristjansson, L.; Jakobsson, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    In 1980 Kristjansson and Gudmundsson reported a late glacial geomagnetic excursion in three hills in the Reykjanes peninsula, Iceland, with shallow negative inclinations and westerly declinations. They named it the Skalamaelifell excursion. More extensive field work has identified the same excursional paleomagnetic direction (declination = 258deg, inclination = -15deg) at four additional outcrops in a 10x10 km area in the Reykjanes peninsula. The excursion lavas are olivine tholeiites with similar petrography and chemical compositions. Paleointensity determinations by the Thellier method average 4.2±0.2 μT for 8 samples, more than an order of magnitude weaker than the present geomagnetic field in Iceland. Together, these results suggest extrusion of the excursion lavas in a very brief span of time, probably less than a few hundred years. K-Ar dating of the excursion lavas gives a mean age for 19 determinations of 42.9±7.8 ka (2σ). Compilation of thirty K-Ar ages of the Laschamp and Olby flows by three laboratories yield a new age for the Laschamp excursion in France of 46.6±2.4 ka (2σ). The age of the excursion in southwestern Iceland is statistically indistinguishable from the Laschamp excursion at the 95% confidence level, and both have very low paleointensities. Therefore, we suggest that the Laschamp and Olby flows in France and the Skalamaelifell units of Iceland recorded essentially the same geomagnetic excursion. Differences in the virtual paleomagnetic poles (VGPs) of these excursions may be due to (1) the probable non-dipole character of the geomagnetic field during the excursion, (2) rapid geomagnetic secular variation and possible small age differences of the extrusive rocks in France and Iceland, and/or (3) crustal magnetic anomalies which might dominate the local geomagnetic field during the excursion at either or both locations. (orig.)

  19. Emplacement and erosive effects of the south Kasei Valles lava on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2014-01-01

    Although it has generally been accepted that the Martian outflow channels were carved by floods of water, observations of large channels on Venus and Mercury demonstrate that lava flows can cause substantial erosion. Recent observations of large lava flows within outflow channels on Mars have revived discussion of the hypothesis that the Martian channels are also produced by lava. An excellent example is found in south Kasei Valles (SKV), where the most recent major event was emplacement of a large lava flow. Calculations using high-resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) demonstrate that this flow was locally turbulent, similar to a previously described flood lava flow in Athabasca Valles. The modeled peak local flux of approximately 106 m3 s−1 was approximately an order of magnitude lower than that in Athabasca, which may be due to distance from the vent. Fluxes close to 107 m3 s−1 are estimated in some reaches but these values are probably records of local surges caused by a dam-breach event within the flow. The SKV lava was locally erosive and likely caused significant (kilometer-scale) headwall retreat at several cataracts with tens to hundreds of meters of relief. However, in other places the net effect of the flow was unambiguously aggradational, and these are more representative of most of the flow. The larger outflow channels have lengths of thousands of kilometers and incision of a kilometer or more. Therefore, lava flows comparable to the SKV flow did not carve the major Martian outflow channels, although the SKV flow was among the largest and highest-flux lava flows known in the Solar System.

  20. Lava delta deformation as a proxy for submarine slope instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Traglia, Federico; Nolesini, Teresa; Solari, Lorenzo; Ciampalini, Andrea; Frodella, William; Steri, Damiano; Allotta, Benedetto; Rindi, Andrea; Marini, Lorenzo; Monni, Niccolò; Galardi, Emanuele; Casagli, Nicola

    2018-04-01

    the 30 December 2002 landslide, which involved the lava delta and its surrounding areas. InSAR data provided the post-effusive deformation field after the 2007 and 2014 flank eruptions, whereas LEM results highlighted that the accumulation of lava flows on the prone-to-failure SdF submarine slope is the main cause of the detected lava delta deformation. Lava delta instability, measured also at Pico Island (Azores) and Kilauea volcano (Hawaii), is evidence of the broader spectrum of instability phenomena that take place in the coastal or submarine area of the flanks of the volcanoes. At Kilauea, past lava deltas have moved faster than the surrounding slope and the recorded movements relate only to the collapses of the deltas themselves, producing rapid mass wasting near the coasts. In contrast, at Stromboli and Pico, lava deltas move at the same velocity as the surrounding slope. In these cases, the displacement at lava deltas can be considered as a proxy for the deformation of submarine slides. There are very few studies dealing with lava delta deformation, thus, the analysis presented in this work will benefit the monitoring of submarine slopes in other prone-to-failure coastal or island volcanic systems which have the potential to generate tsunamis.

  1. Deformation of poorly consolidated sediment during shallow emplacement of a basalt sill, Coso Range, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, W.A.; Bacon, C.R.; Delaney, P.T.

    1986-01-01

    A 150-m-long, wedge-shaped unit of folded and faulted marly siltstone crops out between undeformed sedimentary rocks on the north flank of the Coso Range, California. The several-meter-thick blunt end of this wedge abuts the north margin of a basaltic sill of comparable thickness. Chaotically deformed siltstone crops out locally at the margin of this sill, and at one locality breccia pipes about one meter in diameter crosscut the sill. The sill extends about 1 km south up the paleoslope, where it merges through continuous outcrop with a lava flow that in turn extends 1.4 km to a vent area marked by more than 100 m of agglutinate and scoria. Apparently, lava extruded at this vent flowed onto unconsolidated sediments, burrowed into them, and fed a sill at about 40 m depth within the sedimentary sequence. The sill initially propagated by wedging between sedimentary beds, but eventually began to push some beds ahead of itself, forming a remarkable train of folds in the process. The sediments apparently were wet at the time of sill emplacement, because hydrothermal alteration is common near the contact between the two rock types and because the breccia pipes that crosscut the sill apparently resulted from phreatic explosions of pore water heated at the base of the cooling sill. Comparison of deformation of the host material at the Coso locality with that reportedly caused by emplacement of sills elsewhere indicates that the character of deformation differs greatly among the various localities. The specific response of host material depends upon such parameters as initial properties of magma and host material, rate of sill growth and attendant rate of strain of host material, and depth of sill emplacement. Some properties may change considerably during an intrusive-deformational episode, thus complicating accurate reconstruction of such an event. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  2. LAVA Pressure Transducer Trade Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltman, Samuel B.

    2016-01-01

    The Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload will transport the (LAVA) subsystem to hydrogen-rich locations on the moon supporting NASA's in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) programs. There, the LAVA subsystem will analyze volatiles that evolve from heated regolith samples in order to quantify how much water is present. To do this, the system needs resilient pressure transducers (PTs) to calculate the moles in the gas samples. The PT trade study includes a comparison of newly-procured models to a baseline unit with prior flight history in order to determine the PT model with the best survivability in flight-forward conditions.

  3. The 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar dating of lavas from the Hilo 1-km core hole, Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, W.D.; Turrin, B.D.; Renne, P.R.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Mauna Kea lava flows cored in the HilIo hole range in age from based on 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating and K-Ar analyses of 16 groundmass samples and one coexisting plagioclase. The lavas, all subaerially deposited, include a lower section consisting only of tholeiitic basalts and an upper section of interbedded alkalic, transitional tholeiitic, and tholeiitic basalts. The lower section has yielded predominantly complex, discordant 40Ar/39Ar age spectra that result from mobility of 40Ar and perhaps K, the presence of excess 40Ar, and redistribution of 39Ar by recoil. Comparison of K-Ar ages with 40Ar/39Ar integrated ages indicates that some of these samples have also lost 39Ar. Nevertheless, two plateau ages of 391 ?? 40 and 400 ?? 26 ka from deep in the hole, combined with data from the upper section, show that the tholeiitic section accumulated at an average rate of about 7 to 8 m/kyr and has an mean recurrence interval of 0.5 kyr/flow unit. Samples from the upper section yield relatively precise 40Ar/39Ar plateau and isotope correlation ages of 326 ?? 23, 241 ?? 5, 232 ?? 4, and 199 ?? 9 ka for depths of -415.7 m to -299.2 m. Within their uncertainty, these ages define a linear relationship with depth, with an average accumulation rate of 0.9 m/kyr and an average recurrence interval of 4.8 kyr/flow unit. The top of the Mauna Kea sequence at -280 m must be older than the plateau age of 132 ?? 32 ka, obtained for the basal Mauna Loa flow in the corehole. The upward decrease in lava accumulation rate is a consequence of the decreasing magma supply available to Mauna Kea as it rode the Pacific plate away from its magma source, the Hawaiian mantle plume. The age-depth relation in the core hole may be used to test and refine models that relate the growth of Mauna Kea to the thermal and compositional structure of the mantle plume.

  4. The 23,500 y 14C BP White Pumice Plinian eruption and associated debris avalanche and Tochimilco lava flow of Popocatépetl volcano, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebe, Claus; Salinas, Sergio; Arana-Salinas, Lilia; Macías, José Luis; Gardner, James; Bonasia, Rosanna

    2017-03-01

    The White Pumice (WP) is one of the thickest and most voluminous Plinian fallouts produced by Popocatépetl volcano in central Mexico during the Late Pleistocene-Holocene. Its eruption 23,500 14C y BP (27,800 cal BP) was triggered by the catastrophic failure of the SW flank of the volcano. The resulting debris avalanche was highly mobile reaching 72 km from the cone with an apparent coefficient of friction (L/H) of 0.06. The deposit covers an area of 1200 km2, and has a volume of 10.4 km3. This gigantic landslide, characterized by exceptionally large proximal hummocks (> 400 m) provoked the sudden decompression of the hydrothermal and magmatic systems, which produced an initial blast followed by the rise of a Plinian column that reached an altitude of 33 km. The isopach map allows the recognition of a dispersal axis pointing toward the south, where an area of 2490 km2 was covered by > 10 cm of pumice and ash. The total volume of the pumice fallout was estimated at 1.9 km3 DRE (Dense Rock Equivalent). Pumice clasts are dacitic (62-66 wt.% SiO2, anhydrous basis), highly vesicular (55-88 vol.%) and display a seriate texture with phenocrysts of plagioclase + hornblende + augite + hypersthene + oxides (Ti-magnetite and ilmenite) + apatite. As the eruption advanced, discharge rates became more intermittent and the height of the column fluctuated and finally collapsed, generating pumice-and-ash flows that were emplaced around the volcano. This short but intense activity was followed during subsequent years by rain-induced lahars that reached great distances from the volcano. At the same time, more degassed andesitic-dacitic (61-65 wt.% SiO2) magma was erupted effusively (4.4 km3, DRE) in the new horseshoe-shaped 5 km-wide crater from which the Tochimilco lava flow descended toward the SSE, where it inundated an area of 68 km2 and reached as far as 22 km from its source. Since then, multiple eruptions have reconstructed the summit cone, almost completely obliterating the

  5. Influence of basalt/groundwater interactions on radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    The work presented here is a partial summary of the experimental results obtained in the Laboratory Analog Program. Two aspects of this effort are (1) the interaction between simulated basaltic groundwater and basalt fissures that were either freshly cleaved or laboratory altered by hydrothermal treatment with the simulated groundwater and (2) the effect of this interaction on radionuclide migration through these basalt fissures. The following conclusions of this study bear heavily on the predicted safety of a basalt repository: Sorption properties of freshly fissured basalt and naturally aged basalt are quite different for different chemical species. Analog experiments predict that aged basalt would be an effective retarder of cesium, but would be much less so for actinide elements. Distribution ratios measured from batch experiments with finely ground rock samples (presenting unaltered rock surfaces) are not a reliable means of predicting radionuclide migration in geological repositories. As the near-repository area is resaturated by groundwater, its ability to retard actinide migration will be degraded with time. Disturbing the natural flow of groundwater through the repository area by constructing and backfilling the repository will modify the composition of groundwater. This modified groundwater is likely to interact with and to modify naturally aged basalt surfaces downstream from the repository

  6. Ambient noise tomography reveals basalt and sub-basalt velocity structure beneath the Faroe Islands, North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammarco, Carmelo; Cornwell, David G.; Rawlinson, Nicholas

    2017-11-01

    Ambient noise tomography is applied to seismic data recorded by a portable array of seismographs deployed throughout the Faroe Islands in an effort to illuminate basalt sequences of the North Atlantic Igneous Province, as well as underlying sedimentary layers and Precambrian basement. Rayleigh wave empirical Green's functions between all station pairs are extracted from the data via cross-correlation of long-term recordings, with phase weighted stacking implemented to boost signal-to-noise ratio. Dispersion analysis is applied to extract inter-station group travel-times in the period range 0.5-15 s, followed by inversion for period-dependent group velocity maps. Subsequent inversion for 3-D shear wave velocity reveals the presence of significant lateral heterogeneity (up to 25%) in the crust. Main features of the final model include: (i) a near-surface low velocity layer, interpreted to be the Malinstindur Formation, which comprises subaerial compound lava flows with a weathered upper surface; (ii) a sharp velocity increase at the base of the Malinstindur Formation, which may mark a transition to the underlying Beinisvørð Formation, a thick laterally extensive layer of subaerial basalt sheet lobes; (iii) a low velocity layer at 2.5-7.0 km depth beneath the Beinisvørð Formation, which is consistent with hyaloclastites of the Lopra Formation; (iv) an upper basement layer between depths of 5-9 km and characterized by S wave velocities of approximately 3.2 km/s, consistent with low-grade metamorphosed sedimentary rocks; (v) a high velocity basement, with S wave velocities in excess of 3.6 km/s. This likely reflects the presence of a crystalline mid-lower crust of Archaean continental origin. Compared to previous interpretations of the geological structure beneath the Faroe Islands, our new results point to a more structurally complex and laterally heterogeneous crust, and provide constraints which may help to understand how continental fragments are rifted from the

  7. Primitive off-rift basalts from Iceland and Jan Mayen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debaille, Vinciane; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Brandon, Alan D.

    2009-01-01

    and appear to be contaminated at a shallow level. The 187Os/188Os ratios in the remaining lavas with >30 ppt Os (n = 17) range between 0.12117 and 0.13324. These values are surprisingly low for oceanic island basalts and include some samples that are less than putative present-day primitive upper mantle (PUM....... Material from the Iceland mantle plume likely migrates at depth until it reaches the tensional setting of the Jan Mayen Fracture Zone, where it undergoes low-degree partial melting. At a first-order, isotopic co-variations can be interpreted as broadly binary mixing curves between two primary end...

  8. Moonshot Laboratories' Lava Relief Google Mapping Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, B.; Tomita, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Moonshot Laboratories were conceived at the University Laboratory School (ULS) on Oahu, Hawaii as way to develop creative problem solvers able to resourcefully apply 21st century technologies to respond to the problems and needs of their communities. One example of this was involved students from ULS using modern mapping and imaging technologies to assist peers who had been displaced from their own school in Pahoe on the Big Island of Hawaii. During 2015, lava flows from the eruption of Kilauea Volcano were slowly encroaching into the district of Puna in 2015. The lava flow was cutting the main town of Pahoa in half, leaving no safe routes of passage into or out of the town. One elementary school in the path of the flow was closed entirely and a new one was erected north of the flow for students living on that side. Pahoa High School students and teachers living to the north were been forced to leave their school and transfer to Kea'au High School. These students were separated from friends, family and the community they grew up in and were being thrust into a foreign environment that until then had been their local rival. Using Google Mapping technologies, Moonshot Laboratories students created a dynamic map to introduce the incoming Pahoa students to their new school in Kea'au. Elements included a stylized My Maps basemap, YouTube video descriptions of the building, videos recorded by Google Glass showing first person experiences, and immersive images of classrooms were created using 360 cameras. During the first day of orientation at Kea'au for the 200 Pahoa students, each of them were given a tablet to view the map as they toured and got to know their new campus. The methods and technologies, and more importantly innovative thinking, used to create this map have enormous potential for how to educate all students about the world around us, and the issues facing it. http://www.moonshotincubator.com/

  9. Data Processing Methods for 3D Seismic Imaging of Subsurface Volcanoes: Applications to the Tarim Flood Basalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Tian, Wei; Shi, Yongmin

    2017-08-07

    The morphology and structure of plumbing systems can provide key information on the eruption rate and style of basalt lava fields. The most powerful way to study subsurface geo-bodies is to use industrial 3D reflection seismological imaging. However, strategies to image subsurface volcanoes are very different from that of oil and gas reservoirs. In this study, we process seismic data cubes from the Northern Tarim Basin, China, to illustrate how to visualize sills through opacity rendering techniques and how to image the conduits by time-slicing. In the first case, we isolated probes by the seismic horizons marking the contacts between sills and encasing strata, applying opacity rendering techniques to extract sills from the seismic cube. The resulting detailed sill morphology shows that the flow direction is from the dome center to the rim. In the second seismic cube, we use time-slices to image the conduits, which corresponds to marked discontinuities within the encasing rocks. A set of time-slices obtained at different depths show that the Tarim flood basalts erupted from central volcanoes, fed by separate pipe-like conduits.

  10. Petrological constraints on the high-Mg basalts from Capo Marargiu (Sardinia, Italy): Evidence of cryptic amphibole fractionation in polybaric environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecchiato, Vanni; Gaeta, Mario; Mollo, Silvio; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Bachmann, Olivier; Perinelli, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    This study deals with the textural and compositional characteristics of the calc-alkaline stratigraphic sequence from Capo Marargiu Volcanic District (CMVD; Sardinia island, Italy). The area is dominated by basaltic to intermediate hypabyssal (dikes and sills) and volcanic rocks (lava flows and pyroclastic deposits) emplaced during the Oligo-Miocene orogenic magmatism of Sardinia. Interestingly, a basaltic andesitic dome hosts dark-grey, crystal-rich enclaves containing up 50% of millimetre- to centimetre-sized clinopyroxene and amphibole crystals. This mineral assemblage is in equilibrium with a high-Mg basalt recognised as the parental magma of the entire stratigraphic succession at CMVD. Analogously, centimetre-sized clots of medium- and coarse-grained amphibole + plagioclase crystals are entrapped in andesitic dikes that ultimately intrude the stratigraphic sequence. Amphibole-plagioclase cosaturation occurs at equilibrium with a differentiated basaltic andesite. Major and trace element modelling indicates that the evolutionary path of magma is controlled by a two-step process driven by early olivine + clinopyroxene and late amphibole + plagioclase fractionation. In this context, enclaves represent parts of a cumulate horizon segregated at the early stage of differentiation of the precursory high-Mg basalt. This is denoted by i) resorption effects and sharp transitions between Mg-rich and Mg-poor clinopyroxenes, indicative of pervasive dissolution phenomena followed by crystal re-equilibration and overgrowth, and ii) reaction minerals found in amphibole coronas formed at the interface with more differentiated melts infiltrating within the cumulate horizon, and carrying the crystal-rich material with them upon eruption. Coherently, the mineral chemistry and phase relations of enclaves indicate crystallisation in a high-temperature, high-pressure environment under water-rich conditions. On the other hand, the upward migration and subsequent fractionation of the

  11. Surface Textures and Features Indicative of Endogenous Growth at the McCartys Flow Field, NM, as an Analog to Martian Volcanic Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Garry, W. B.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Self, S.; Aubele, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic lavas typically form channels or tubes, which are recognized on the Earth and Mars. Although largely unrecognized in the planetary community, terrestrial inflated sheet flows also display morphologies that share many commonalities with lava plains on Mars. The McCartys lava flow field is among the youngest (approx.3000 yrs) basaltic flows in the continental United States. The southwest sections of the flow displays smooth, flat-topped plateaus with irregularly shaped pits and hummocky inter-plateau units that form a polygonal surface. Plateaus are typically elongate in map view, up to 20 m high and display lineations within the glassy crust. Lineated surfaces occasionally display small < 1m diameter lava coils. Lineations are generally straight and parallel each other, sometimes for over 100 meters. The boundaries between plateaus and depressions are also lineated and tilted to angles sometimes approaching vertical. Plateau-parallel cracks, sometimes containing squeeze-ups, mark the boundary between tilted crust and plateau. Some plateau depressions display level floors with hummocky surfaces, while some are bowl shaped with floors covered in broken lava slabs. The lower walls of pits sometimes display lateral, sagged lava wedges. Infrequently, pit floors display the upper portion of a tumulus from an older flow. In some places the surface crust has been disrupted forming a slabby texture. Slabs are typically on the scale of a meter or less across and no less than 7-10 cm thick. The slabs preserve the lineated textures of the undisturbed plateau crust. It appears that this style of terrain represents the emplacement of an extensive sheet that experiences inflation episodes within preferred regions where lateral spreading of the sheet is inhibited, thereby forming plateaus. Rough surfaces represent inflation-related disruption of pahoehoe lava and not a a lava. Depressions are often the result of non-inflation and can be clearly identified by lateral

  12. The Deccan tholeiite lavas and dykes of Ghatkopar-Powai area, Mumbai, Panvel flexure zone: Geochemistry, stratigraphic status, and tectonic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Zellmer, Georg F.; Demonterova, Elena I.; Ivanov, Alexei V.; Kumar, Rohit; Patel, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Mumbai City, situated on the western Indian coast, is well known for exposures of late-stage Deccan pillow basalts and spilites, pyroclastic rocks, rhyolite lavas, and trachyte intrusions. These rock units, and a little-studied sequence of tholeiitic flows and dykes in the eastern part of Mumbai City, constitute the west-dipping limb of a regional tectonic structure called the Panvel flexure. Here we present field, petrographic, major and trace element and Sr-Nd isotopic data on these tholeiitic flows and dykes, best exposed in the Ghatkopar-Powai area. The flows closely resemble the Mahabaleshwar Formation of the thick Western Ghats sequence to the east, in Sr-Nd isotopic ratios and multielement patterns, but have other geochemical characteristics (e.g., incompatible trace element ratios) unlike the Mahabaleshwar or any other Formation. The flows may have originated from a nearby eruptive center, possibly offshore of Mumbai. Two dykes resemble the Ambenali Formation of the Western Ghats in all geochemical characteristics, though they may not represent feeders of the Ambenali Formation lavas. Most dykes are distinct from any of the Western Ghats stratigraphic units. Some show partial (e.g., Sr-Nd isotopic) similarities to the Mahabaleshwar Formation, and these include several dykes with unusual, concave-downward REE patterns suggesting residual amphibole and thus a lithospheric source. The flows and dykes are inferred to have undergone little or no contamination, by lower continental crust. Most dykes are almost vertical, suggesting emplacement after the formation of the Panvel flexure, and indicate considerable east-west lithospheric extension during this late but magmatically vigorous stage of Deccan volcanism.

  13. Emplacement Dynamics and Timescale of a Holocene Flow from the Cima Volcanic Field (CA): Insights from Rheology and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, A.; Beem, J. R.; Gomez, F.; Huntley, J. W.; Robertson, T.; Whittington, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    We present a rheological and morphological study of a Holocene lava flow emitted by a monogenetic cinder cone in the Cima Volcanic Field, eastern California. By combining field observations and experimental results, we reconstructed the few weeks-long emplacement timeline of the Cima flow. Sample textural analyses revealed that the near-vent portion of the flow is significantly more crystalline (fxtal=0.95±0.04) than the main flow body (fxtal=0.66±0.11), which reveals a multi-stage emplacement history. Airborne photogrammetry data were used to generate a digital elevation model, which allowed us to estimate the flow volume. The rheology of Cima lavas was determined experimentally by concentric cylinder viscometry between 1550 °C and 1160 °C, including the first subliquidus rheology measurements for a continental intraplate trachybasaltic lava. The experimentally determined effective viscosity increases from 54 Pa·s to 1,361 Pa·s during cooling from the liquidus ( 1230 ˚C) to 1160 ˚C, where crystal fraction is 0.11. Flow curves fitted to measurements at different strain rates indicate a Herschel-Bulkley rheological behavior, combining shear-thinning with a yield strength negligible at the higher measured temperatures but increasing up to 357±41 Pa at 1160˚C. The lava viscosity over this range is still lower than most basaltic melts, due to the high alkali content of Cima lavas ( 6 wt% Na2O+K2O). We determined that the morphological pahoehoe to `a'ā transition of this trachybasalt occurs at a temperature of 1160±10 ˚C, similar to that observed for Hawaiian tholeiitic lavas, but at higher apparent viscosity values. Monogenetic volcanism in the Western United States is typically characterized by low effusion rates and eruption on sub-horizontal desert plains. Under these low strain-rate conditions, the pahoehoe to `a'ā transition is likely to occur abruptly upon minimal cooling, i.e. very close to the vent, but lava tubes may transport fluid lava to flow

  14. Life development on the boundary lava-water (on the example of Palaeoproterozoic Ongeluk lavas of South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafieva, M.; Cornell, D.; Rozanov, A.

    2009-04-01

    . The elemental chemical composition of pseudomorphs and the host rocks is identical. As a rule silicon and iron (in variable ratios) predominate, there are also aluminium, calcium and magnesium. Solidifying Palaeoproterozoic Ongeluk lavas during underwater eruptions create rather favourable conditions for life development. On the boundary lava - water bacteria, including cyanobacteria, developed, cyanobacterial or bacterial mats formed and probably even such highly organized forms as eucaryots existed. Forms were also found which are not connected (from our point of view) with cyanobacterial mats. Thus solidifying basalt lava, being in contact with water could create rather favourable conditions for the development of multilayered cyanobacterial mats. The waters should contain sufficient amount of sulfates for bacterial sulfate reduction (sulfide framboid finds are the evidence). The study was executed within the framework of the complex program of basic research of the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences "Origin of Biosphere and Evolution of Geo-biological Systems" (subprogram II) and was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, projects 08-04-00484 and SS-4207.2008.5. References Furnes H., Banerjee N.R., Muehlenbachs K, Staudigel H., de Wit M. Early life recorded in Archean pillow lavas // Science, 2004, vol. 304, 578-581. Rasmussen B. Filamentous microfossils in a 3,235-million-year-old volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit // Nature, 2000, vol. 405, 676-679. Schopf J.W. Microfossils of the Early Archean Apex Chert: New Evidence of the Antiquity of Life // Science. 1993. Vol. 260. no. 5108, pp.640-646.

  15. Genesis of amethyst geodes in basaltic rocks of the Serra Geral Formation (Ametista do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil): a fluid inclusion, REE, oxygen, carbon, and Sr isotope study on basalt, quartz, and calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilg, H. Albert; Morteani, Giulio; Kostitsyn, Yuri; Preinfalk, Christine; Gatter, Istvan; Strieder, Adelir J.

    2003-12-01

    In the Ametista do Sul area, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, amethyst-bearing geodes are hosted by a ~40- to 50-m-thick subhorizontal high-Ti basaltic lava flow of the Lower Cretaceous Paraná Continental Flood Basalt Province. The typically spherical cap-shaped, sometimes vertically elongated geodes display an outer rim of celadonite followed inwards by agate and colorless and finally amethystine quartz. Calcite formed throughout the whole crystallization sequence, but most commonly as very late euhedral crystals, sometimes with gypsum, in the central cavity. Fluid inclusions in colorless quartz and amethyst are predominantly monophase and contain an aqueous liquid. Two-phase liquid-vapor inclusions are rare. Some with a consistent degree of fill homogenize into the liquid between 95 and 98 °C. Ice-melting temperatures in the absence of a vapor phase between -4 and +4 °C indicate low salinities. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns of calcites are highly variable and show generally no systematic correlation with the paragenetic sequence. The oxygen isotope composition of calcites is very homogeneous (δ18OVSMOW=24.9±1.1‰, n=34) indicating crystallization temperatures of less than 100 °C. Carbon isotope values of calcites show a considerable variation ranging from -18.7 to -2.9‰ (VPDB). The 87Sr/86Sr ratio of calcites varies between 0.706 and 0.708 and is more radiogenic than that of the host basalt (~0.705). The most likely source of silica, calcium, carbon, and minor elements in the infill of the geodes is the highly reactive interstitial glass of the host basalts leached by gas-poor aqueous solutions of meteoric origin ascending from the locally artesian Botucatú aquifer system in the footwall of the volcanic sequence. The genesis of amethyst geodes in basalts at Ametista do Sul, Brazil, is thus considered as a two-stage process with an early magmatic protogeode formation and a late, low temperature infill of the cavity.

  16. Heck and Heckle Seamounts, northeast Pacific Ocean: High extrusion rates of primitive and highly depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt on off-ridge seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leybourne, M. I.; van Wagoner, N. A.

    1991-09-01

    We analyzed, petrographically and chemically, basalt from eight dredge hauls from the Heck and Heckle seamounts, northeast Pacific Ocean. Major elements were determined for mineral, glass, and whole rock samples, and trace and rare earth elements were determined for glass and whole rock samples. The dredge hauls included hyaloclastites and fragments from sheet flows and pillows. The clinkery fragments are interpreted to be deformed sheet flow tops, characteristic of high effusion rates. The hyaloclastites recovered are reworked deposits, as indicated by the wide compositional range of the glass shards, abundance of clay and calcite matrix, and bedding. Most rocks are aphyric, but the analyzed plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts and microcrysts are equilibrium compositions and show minor compositional zonation (up to 7.5% An, chains have a limited range of incompatible element ratios, whereas the adjacent West Valley Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is highly heterogeneous. In contrast, lavas from the East Pacific near-ridge seamounts exhibit a wider range of incompatible element ratios than do the adjacent East Pacific Rise basalts. On the West Valley Segment, magma supply is less robust associated with lower spreading rates compared to the East Pacific Rise at 10°N. In contrast, at fast spreading centers robust melting produces a mixed mantle signature in axial lavas, while suppressed melting at the seamounts reveals the heterogeneities. We suggest that at some spreading ridges, more fertile portions of the mantle are preferentially melted such that the outwelled portions of the mantle tapped by the seamounts are more depleted.

  17. The origin of tubular lava stalactites and other related forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Allred

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubular lava stalactites are often found in lava tubes. Field observations, sample analysis, and comparative studies indicate that these are segregations extruded during cooling from partially crystallized lava al about 1,070 - 1,000 °C. Retrograde boiling (gas pressure within the lava provides a mechanism to expel the interstitial liquid. In addition to tubular lava stalactites, a variety of other lava features can also result, such as lava helictites, lava coralloids, barnacle-like stretched lava, runners, runner channels, and some lava blisters and squeeze-ups.

  18. Using Lava Tube Skylight Thermal Emission Spectra to Determine Lava Composition on Io: Quantitative Constraints for Observations by Future Missions to the Jovian System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A. G.

    2008-12-01

    Deriving the composition of Io's dominant lavas (mafic or ultramafic?) is a major objective of the next missions to the jovian system. The best opportunities for making this determination are from observations of thermal emission from skylights, holes in the roof of a lava tube through which incandescent lava radiates, and Io thermal outbursts, where lava fountaining is taking place [1]. Allowing for lava cooling across the skylight, the expected thermal emission spectra from skylights of different sizes have been calculated for laminar and turbulent tube flow and for mafic and ultramafic composition lavas. The difference between the resulting mafic and ultramafic lava spectra has been quantified, as has the instrument sensitivity needed to acquire the necessary data to determine lava eruption temperature, both from Europa orbit and during an Io flyby. A skylight is an excellent target to observe lava that has cooled very little since eruption (temperatures close to lava eruption temperature. Skylights are therefore easily discernible against a cool background, and are detectable from great distances at night or with Io in eclipse with imagers covering the range 0.4 to 5.0 μm. To distinguish between ultramafic and mafic lavas, multispectral (or hyperspectral) observations with precise exposure timing and knowledge of filter response are needed in the range 0.4 to 0.8 μm, with (minimally) an additional model-constraining measurement at ~4-5 μm. As with many lava tube systems on Earth, skylights should be common on Io (for example, at Prometheus, Culann and Amirani). The possible superheating of lava prior to eruption complicates the analysis [4], but is likely to be significant only for deep- seated, often explosive, eruptions. Effusive activity at the aforementioned three locations is likely fed from shallow reservoirs [5], minimising superheating effects. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under

  19. Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, C.R.; Kurasawa, H.; Delevaux, M.H.; Kistler, R.W.; Doe, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The 2 earliest rhyolites probably were tapped from short-lived silicic reservoirs, in contrast to the other 36 rhyolite domes and lava flows which the isotopic data suggest may have been leaked from the top of a single, long-lived magmatic system. Most Coso basalts show isotopic, geochemical, and mineralogic evidence of interaction with crustal rocks, but one analyzed flow has isotopic ratios that may represent mantle values (87Sr/86Sr=0.7036,206Pb/204Pb=19.05,207Pb/204Pb=15.62,208Pb/204Pb= 38.63). The (initial) isotopic composition of typical rhyolite (87Sr/86Sr=0.7053,206Pb/204Pb=19.29,207Pb/204Pb= 15.68,208Pb/204Pb=39.00) is representative of the middle or upper crust. Andesitic inclusions in the rhyolites are evidently samples of hybrid magmas from the silicic/mafic interface in vertically zoned magma reservoirs. Silicic end-member compositions inferred for these mixed magmas, however, are not those of erupted rhyolite but reflect the zonation within the silicic part of the magma reservoir. The compositional contrast at the interface between mafic and silicic parts of these systems apparently was greater for the earlier, smaller reservoirs. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Petrologic evaluation of Pliocene basaltic volcanism in Eastern Anatolian region, Turkey: Evidence for mixing of melts derived from both shallow and deep mantle sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyan, Vural; Özdemir, Yavuz; Keskin, Mehmet; Güleç, Nilgün

    2017-04-01

    Collision-related Neogene volcanism in the Eastern Anatolia region (EAR) began after the continent-continent collision between the Arabia and the Eurasia plates, and spreads in a wide zone from the Erzurum-Kars Plateau in the northeast to the Karacadaǧ in the south. Volcanic activity in the EAR started 15 Ma ago (Middle Miocene) in the south of the region. Voluminous basaltic lavas from local eruption centers formed basaltic lava plateaus and volcanic cones as a result of high production level of volcanism during the Pliocene time interval. Our dating results (Ar-Ar and K-Ar) indicate that age of this Late Miocene-Pliocene magmatic activity range between 6 and 3.5 Ma. Volcanic products contain alkaline and subalkaline lavas, ranging in composition from basalts to andesites and trachyandesites. Our EC-AFC and AFC modeling, based on trace element and Sr, Nd, Pb isotopic compositions, suggests about 2-7 % crustal contamination in the evolved andesites and trachyandesites. MORB and primitive mantle normalized patterns of the lavas and isotopic compositions imply that alkaline and subalkaline basalts erupted in Pliocene time interval in the EAR could have been derived from a mantle source that had previously been enriched by a clear subduction component. A partial melting model was conducted to evaluate partial melting processes in the mantle source of the Pliocene basalts. Our melting model calculations suggest that basaltic melts in the EAR could have been produced by melting of mantle sources containing spinel, garnet and amphibole with melting degree in the range of 0.7-7%. The products of mixing of these derivative melts are the Pliocene basaltic lavas of the Eastern Anatolian Region.

  1. Formation processes of the 1909 Tarumai and the 1944 Usu lava domesin Hokkaido, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yokoyama

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the two particular lava domes in Hokkaido, Japan is described and interpreted mainly from geophysical viewpoints. The 1909 eruption of Tarumai volcano was not violent but produced a lava dome over four days. The growth rate of the dome is discussed under the assumption that the lava flow was viscous and plastic fluid during its effusion. By Hagen-Poiseuille?s Law, the length of the conduit of the lava dome is rather ambiguously determined as a function of viscosity of the magma and diameter of the conduit. The 1944 Usu dome extruded as a parasitic cone of Usu volcano, not in the crater, but in a flat cornfield at the foot of the volcano. From the beginning to the end for more than 17 months, seismometric and geodetic observations of the dome activity were carried out by several pioneering geophysicists. Utilizing their data, pseudo growth curves of the dome at each stage can be drawn. The lava ascended rather uniformly, causing uplift of the ground surface until half-solidified lava reached the surface six months after the deformation began. Thereafter, the lava dome added lateral displacements and finally achieved its onion structure. These two lava domes are of contrasting character, one is andesitic and formed quickly while the other is dacitic and formed slowly, but both of them behaved as viscous and plastic flows during effusion. It is concluded that both the lava domes formed by uplift of magma forced to flow through the conduits, analogous to squeezing toothpaste out of a tube.

  2. Evidence for Late Amazonian explosive volcanism in the Tharsis Region of Mars: Photogeology of the "Stealth" radar feature and discovery of a dune field among the lava flows west of Arsia Mons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Butler, Bryan J.; Zimbelman, James R.; Hamilton, Victoria E.

    1996-10-01

    INTRODUCTION: Extensive volcanic ash deposits blanketing the youngest geomorphic units on Mars would imply that major explosive volcanic events occurred relatively late in martian history. Discovery of the radar "Stealth" region that extends westward of Arsia and Pavonis Montes has led to the conclusion that the surfaces with "Stealth" characteristics are mantled by fine-grained volcanic ash [1-3]. In our present study, we have examined data sets that further illuminate the nature and origin of "Stealth": maps of albedo, thermal inertia, and rock abundance derived from Viking Thermal Infrared Mapper (IRTM) data [4-6], plus Viking images that range in resolution from 15 to 200 m/pixel. RADAR STEALTH: The Stealth region was discovered in bistatic 3.5-cm radar observations [1]. It is defined as a region in which the backscatter cross section at normal incidence is very low (nearly zero, or below the 1-sigma noise value) [2]. "Stealth" is likely caused by the presence of an extremely underdense surface material containing no scatterers to some depth [1]. Stealth is at least 2 to 3 m thick, and might be 7 to 15 m thick [1-3]. The Stealth feature extends more than 2,000 km along the equator between Arsia Mons and Nicholson Crater, and it appears to be part of a region of generally low radar signal return that extends from Pavonis Mons westward to the Elysium Basin [2]. STEALTH IN RELATION TO GEOLOGIC FEATURES: To be observed from Earth, the radar Stealth area must consist of a material that is physically on top of (and therefore younger than) the lava flows, craters, and other features seen in the western equatorial Tharsis region. The youngest units overlain by Stealth are among the youngest on Mars (Late Amazonian). For example, Stealth overlies the Medusae Fossae Formation (units "Amu" and "Amm" in map by Scott and Tanaka [7]), which consists of gently undulating smooth and wind-sculpted (yardangs) surfaces interpreted by some to be volcanic ash deposits [8, 9

  3. Decreasing Magmatic Footprints of Individual Volcanos in a Waning Basaltic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.A> Valentine; F.V. Perry

    2006-06-06

    The distribution and characteristics of individual basaltic volcanoes in the waning Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field provide insight into the changing physical nature of magmatism and the controls on volcano location. During Pliocene-Pleistocene times the volumes of individual volcanoes have decreased by more than one order of magnitude, as have fissure lengths and inferred lava effusion rates. Eruptions evolved from Hawaiian-style eruptions with extensive lavas to eruptions characterized by small pulses of lava and Strombolian to violent Strombolian mechanisms. These trends indicate progressively decreasing partial melting and length scales, or magmatic footprints, of mantle source zones for individual volcanoes. The location of each volcano is determined by the location of its magmatic footprint at depth, and only by shallow structural and topographic features that are within that footprint. The locations of future volcanoes in a waning system are less likely to be determined by large-scale topography or structures than were older, larger volume volcanoes.

  4. What factors control superficial lava dome explosivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style and a major hazard on numerous volcanoes worldwide. Lava domes are built by slow extrusion of degassed, viscous magma and may be destroyed by gravitational collapse or explosion. The triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood: here we propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite precipitation. Both processes generate an impermeable and rigid carapace allowing overpressurisation of the inner parts of the lava dome by the rapid input of vesiculated magma batches. The relative thickness of the cristobalite-rich carapace is an inverse function of the external lava dome surface area. Explosive activity is thus more likely to occur at the onset of lava dome extrusion, in agreement with observations, as the likelihood of superficial lava dome explosions depends inversely on lava dome volume. This new result is of interest for the whole volcanological community and for risk management. PMID:26420069

  5. Moessbauer Studies of Volhynian Basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakun-Czubarow, N.; Milczarski, J.; Galazka-Friedman, J.; Szlachta, K.; Forder, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Volhynian basalts studied belong to the effusive-tuffogenic Volhynian Series (Slawatycze Series in Poland), being the large Ediacaran continental igneous province, that covers an area of 200 000 km 2 in the western margin of East European Craton. The series is underlain by the Cryogenian terrigenous Polesie Series with doleritic sills and dikes. The Volhynian Series consists of the rock beds belonging to the three volcanic cycles with different ratios of flood basalts to pyroclastics. The aim of the study was recognition of primary and secondary Fe-bearing minerals, particularly Fe- and Fe-Ti oxides as well as determination of iron oxidation state, that is an important tool in the search for native copper deposits in these rocks. For Moessbauer studies the following rock samples were chosen: the Polesie Series dolerites, the Volhynian Series basalts from the Ukrainian quarries and drill-holes, e.g. from the Volodymir Volhynskaya drilling hole; the Slawatycze Series basalts from Kaplonosy drill-hole in Poland. In the Kaplonosy basalts the content of magnetite decreases with depth, which may be caused by magma differentiation due to fractional crystallization, when Mg content decreases as Ti and Fe - increases in basic magma. In the Kaplonosy basalts the Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ ratio increases with depth, which points to the increase of iron oxidation with the progress of basaltic magma differentiation. (authors)

  6. Basaltic magmatism at the Juan de Fuca Ridge, NE Pacific ocean (ODP Leg 168): geological control on chemical zonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesogno, L.; Gaggero, L.; Marescotti, P.

    2003-04-01

    symmetric increase of incompatible elements in more evolved compositions is consistent with crystal fractionation processes. On the whole, a relative compositional homogeneity arises in most of the Sites but for a wide range at Site 1026 (Mg# = 66 - 57; Zr = 101 - 128 ppm). At Site 1025, the massive Fe-basalt flow (Mg# = 46-52; Zr = 151-163 ppm) begins with more evolved terms. At Site 1027 the lower pillow lavas (Mg#: 58-59, Zr: 28-35) are overlain by more primitive flows (Mg# 64-65, Zr = 65-66 ppm). The top of the sequence is represented by a diabase sill, interpreted as an off-axis diabase (Davis, Fisher, Firth et al., 1997) showing very high Mg# (69-79) and relatively higher Ti, Zr, P contents. References Davis, E.E., Fisher, A.T., Firth, J.V., et al., 1997. Proc. ODP, Init. Repts, 168: College Station, TX (Ocean Drilling Program). Pearce J.A. &Parkinson I.J. 1993 Trace element models for mantle melting: application to volcanic arc petrogenesis. In: Prochard, Alabaster, Harris, Neary eds. 1993 magmatic processes and plate tectonics, GSSP 76, 373-403

  7. Hydrologic modeling of the Columbia Plateau basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, F.H.; Cole, C.R.; Bond, F.W.; Zimmerman, D.A.

    1982-09-01

    The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) directed the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program to conduct a technology demonstration of current performance assessment techniques for the Department of Energy (DOE) as applied to a nuclear waste repository in the Columbia Plateau Basalts. Hypothetical repository coordinates were selected for an actual geographical setting on the Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. Published hydrologic and geologic data used in the analyses were gathered in 1979 or earlier. The hydrologic simulation was divided into three major parts: (1) aquifer recharge calculations, (2) a regional hydrologic model, and (3) a local hydrologic model of the Pasco Basin. The presentation discusses the regional model. An estimate of the amount of water transmitted through the groundwater system was required to bound the transmissivity values and to estimate the transmissivity distributions for the deeper basalts. The multiple layer two-dimensional Variable Thickness Transient (VTT) code was selected as appropriate for the amount of data available and for the conditions existing in the regional systems. This model uses a finite difference formulation to represent the partial differential flow equation. The regional study area as defined for the VTT model was divided into 55 by 55 square pattern with each grid 5 kilometers on a side. The regional system was modeled as a held potential surface layer and two underlying basalt layers. The regional model established the boundary conditions for the hydrologic model the Pasco Basin

  8. Low-Ti basalts from the Faroe Islands constrain the early Iceland depleted plume component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina; Holm, Paul Martin

    New Sr, Nd, Hf and high precision Pb isotope analyses of 46 Faroese low-Ti lavas erupted at the rifting of the proto-North Atlantic ~56-55 Ma ago are presented. The low-Ti lavas are depleted, MORB-like basalts erupted close to the riftzone at the same time as enriched high-Ti basalts were erupted...... of the magmas. However, 5 of the samples show signs of mixing with high-Ti melts. Although highly sensitive to crustal contamination, only little is detected in the low-Ti basalts. Isotopically the low-Ti basalts can be explained by mixing of the two end-members DM (the local depleted mantle as defined...... by the sample array) and NAEM (North Atlantic End-Member) (Ellam & Stuart 2000). The NAEM component is very similar to the Icelandic depleted plume component ID1 (Thirlwall et al. 2004) and both have negative ¿207Pb, low 206Pb/204Pb and eNd and high 87Sr/86Sr compared to MORB. Therefore the NAEM component could...

  9. Degassing-induced crystallization in silicate melt inclusion: evaluating the role of post-entrapment changes in melt inclusion from the SW volcanic flows of Deccan Large Igneous Province (Deccan LIP) lava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani Choudhary, Babita

    2017-04-01

    Melt inclusions represent sampling of magma during their growth in magma chambers and during ascent to the surface. Several studies of melt inclusions in Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) in different parts of the world have been documented in the literature (Sobolev et al. 2011; Kamenetsky et al. 2012). Melt inclusions study from Deccan LIP can provide new insights into the physio-chemical conditions and evolution of this important LIP. The Deccan LIP was fissure eruption mainly emplaced over a very short duration at 66 Ma (Schoene et al. 2015). To better characterize and explain the diversity in geochemical composition, petrogenesis and volatile degassing, melt inclusions studies have been carried out in clinopyroxene and plagioclase feldspar from a suite of samples in the Western Ghats section. Samples were obtained from the upper three formations (the Wai subgroup). The inclusions are primary and range in shape and size varies from a few microns, up to 100 microns. The inclusions are crystalline, and contain daughter phases. Some are glassy, with or without a shrinkage bubble. The melt inclusions show substantial variations in major element composition. Inclusions are significantly enriched in TiO2 (3.68 to 0.08 wt%) and FeO (18.3 to 2.63 wt%). SiO2 ranges from 43.4-66.8 wt% and classification diagrams of total alkali (Na2O+K2O) Vs. silica melt inclusions show that most inclusions are of sub-alkaline to mildly alkaline composition. Al2O3 ranges from 9.7- 22.4wt % and MgO 18.3-1.6. EPMA measurements demonstrated the presence of daughter crystals, such as magnetite and titanomagnetite, and high FeO, TiO2 and CaO within melt inclusions among the silicate daughter crystal clusters. Volatiles are determined have wide range in composition in both plagioclase- and pyroxene-hosted melt inclusions by using FTIR technique, values up to 2wt% H2Ototal and 1808 ppm CO2. Moreover the variability in composition and volatiles the melt from the samples in a single flow suggests

  10. Emplacement of the youngest flood lava on Mars: A short, turbulent story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Skinner, J.A.; Milazzo, M.P.; McEwen, A.S.; Titus, T.N.; Rosiek, M.R.; Galuszka, D.M.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Kirk, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    Recently acquired data from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), Context (CTX) imager, and Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft were used to investigate the emplacement of the youngest flood-lava flow on Mars. Careful mapping finds that the Athabasca Valles flood lava is the product of a single eruption, and it covers 250,000 km2 of western Elysium Planitia with an estimated 5000-7500 km3 of mafic or ultramafic lava. Calculations utilizing topographic data enhanced with MRO observations to refine the dimensions of the channel system show that this flood lava was emplaced turbulently over a period of only a few to several weeks. This is the first well-documented example of a turbulently emplaced flood lava anywhere in the Solar System. However, MRO data suggest that this same process may have operated in a number of martian channel systems. The magnitude and dynamics of these lava floods are similar to the aqueous floods that are generally believed to have eroded the channels, raising the intriguing possibility that mechanical erosion by lava could have played a role in their incision. ?? 2009.

  11. Open-path FTIR spectroscopy of magma degassing processes during eight lava fountains on Mount Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Spina, Alessandro; Burton, Mike; Allard, Patrick; Alparone, Salvatore; Murè, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    In June-July 2001 a series of 16 discrete lava fountain paroxysms occurred at the Southeast summit crater (SEC) of Mount Etna, preceding a 28-day long violent flank eruption. Each paroxysm was preceded by lava effusion, growing seismic tremor and a crescendo of Strombolian explosive activity culminating into powerful lava fountaining up to 500m in height. During 8 of these 16 events we could measure the chemical composition of the magmatic gas phase (H2O, CO2, SO2, HCl, HF and CO), using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometry at ˜1-2km distance from SEC and absorption spectra of the radiation emitted by hot lava fragments. We show that each fountaining episode was characterized by increasingly CO2-rich gas release, with CO2/SO2and CO2/HCl ratios peaking in coincidence with maxima in seismic tremor and fountain height, whilst the SO2/HCl ratio showed a weak inverse relationship with respect to eruption intensity. Moreover, peak values in both CO2/SO2ratio and seismic tremor amplitude for each paroxysm were found to increase linearly in proportion with the repose interval (2-6 days) between lava fountains. These observations, together with a model of volatile degassing at Etna, support the following driving process. Prior to and during the June-July 2001 lava fountain sequence, the shallow (˜2km) magma reservoir feeding SEC received an increasing influx of deeply derived carbon dioxide, likely promoted by the deep ascent of volatile-rich primitive basalt that produced the subsequent flank eruption. This CO2-rich gas supply led to gas accumulation and overpressure in SEC reservoir, generating a bubble foam layer whose periodical collapse powered the successive fountaining events. The anti-correlation between SO2/HCl and eruption intensity is best explained by enhanced syn-eruptive degassing of chlorine from finer particles produced during more intense magma fragmentation.

  12. Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.P. McGrail; E. C. Sullivan; F. A. Spane; D. H. Bacon; G. Hund; P. D. Thorne; C. J. Thompson; S. P. Reidel; F. S. Colwell

    2009-12-01

    The DOE's Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership has completed drilling the first continental flood basalt sequestration pilot borehole to a total depth (TD) of 4,110 feet on the Boise White Paper Mill property at Wallula, Washington. Site suitability was assessed prior to drilling by the 2007-2008 acquisition, processing and analysis of a four-mile, five-line three component seismic swath, which was processed as a single data-dense line. Analysis of the seismic survey data indicated a composite basalt formation thickness of {approx}8,000 feet and absence of major geologic structures (i.e., faults) along the line imaged by the seismic swath. Drilling of Wallula pilot borehole was initiated on January 13, 2009 and reached TD on April 6, 2009. Based on characterization results obtained during drilling, three basalt breccia zones were identified between the depth interval of 2,716 and 2,910 feet, as being suitable injection reservoir for a subsequent CO2 injection pilot study. The targeted injection reservoir lies stratigraphically below the massive Umtanum Member of the Grande Ronde Basalt, whose flow-interior section possesses regionally recognized low-permeability characteristics. The identified composite injection zone reservoir provides a unique and attractive opportunity to scientifically study the reservoir behavior of three inter-connected reservoir intervals below primary and secondary caprock confining zones. Drill cuttings, wireline geophysical logs, and 31one-inch diameter rotary sidewall cores provided geologic data for characterization of rock properties. XRF analyses of selected rock samples provided geochemical characterizations of the rocks and stratigraphic control for the basalt flows encountered by the Wallula pilot borehole. Based on the geochemical results, the pilot borehole was terminated in the Wapshilla Ridge 1 flow of the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation. Detailed hydrologic test characterizations of 12 basalt interflow

  13. Limited role for thermal erosion by turbulent lava in proximal Athabasca Valles, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Vincenzo; Williams, David A.; Dundas, Colin M.; Kestay, Laszlo P.

    2015-01-01

    The Athabasca Valles flood lava is among the most recent (Mars and was probably emplaced turbulently. The Williams et al. (2005) model of thermal erosion by lava has been applied to what we term “proximal Athabasca,” the 75 km long upstream portion of Athabasca Valles. For emplacement volumes of 5000 and 7500 km3and average flow thicknesses of 20 and 30 m, the duration of the eruption varies between ~11 and ~37 days. The erosion of the lava flow substrate is investigated for three eruption temperatures (1270°C, 1260°C, and 1250°C), and volatile contents equivalent to 0–65 vol % bubbles. The largest erosion depths of ~3.8–7.5 m are at the lava source, for 20 m thick and bubble-free flows that erupted at their liquidus temperature (1270°C). A substrate containing 25 vol % ice leads to maximum erosion. A lava temperature 20°C below liquidus reduces erosion depths by a factor of ~2.2. If flow viscosity increases with increasing bubble content in the lava, the presence of 30–50 vol % bubbles leads to erosion depths lower than those relative to bubble-free lava by a factor of ~2.4. The presence of 25 vol % ice in the substrate increases erosion depths by a factor of 1.3. Nevertheless, modeled erosion depths, consistent with the emplacement volume and flow duration constraints, are far less than the depth of the channel (~35–100 m). We conclude that thermal erosion does not appear to have had a major role in excavating Athabasca Valles.

  14. Mantle dynamics and basalt petrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwood, A. E.

    1985-03-01

    Differentiation at mid-ocean ridges generates a layered lithosphere consisting of a basaltic crust, immediately underlain by harzburgite and further underlain by pyrolite which has experienced depletion only of highly incompatible elements. The body forces driving subduction are concentrated mainly in the upper half of the lithosphere which is relatively cool and brittle. During subduction, the lower layer of relatively ductile, slightly depleted pyrolite is stripped off and resorbed into the upper mantle, thereby providing a future source region for MORB magmas. The slab which sinks to ~ 600 km is comprised mainly of differentiated former basalt and harzburgite which undergo a different series of phase transformations to those experienced by mantle pyrolite. In consequence, the former basaltic crust remains denser than surrounding mantle whereas former harzburgite becomes relatively buoyant below the 650 km seismic discontinuity. The resulting non-uniformity in stress distribution causes the slab to buckle at this depth and accrete to form a large, relatively cool ovoid "megalith" of mixed former harzburgite and basaltic crust. Heating of the megalith occurs over 1-2 b.y., leading to partial melting of the former basaltic crust. The resultant liquids contaminate regions of former harzburgite, rendering them fertile in the sense of future capacity to produce basaltic magmas. After thermal equilibration, the newly fertile, former harzburgite becomes buoyant, leading to the separation of diapirs which rise into the upper mantle. Such diapirs rising beneath sub-oceanic lithosphere experience small degrees of partial melting to produce ocean island basalts, mainly of the alkaline suite. Diapirs of fertile former harzburgite rising beneath continents become incorporated into the sub-continental lithosphere. This is a cumulative process and is ultimately responsible for the development of the chemical, physical and isotopic characteristics of the sub

  15. Discovery of modern (post-1850 CE) lavas in south-central British Columbia, Canada: Origin from coal fires or intraplate volcanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canil, Dante; Mihalynuk, Mitch; Lacourse, Terri

    2018-01-01

    We describe three unusual lavas in the Northern Cordillera in south-central British Columbia, Canada, occurring as spatter, scoria and blocks over small 400 m2 areas. The lavas coat and weld cobbles and pebbles in glacial till and are vesicular and glassy with microlites of clinopyroxene and plagioclase, and xenocrysts of quartz, feldspar or clinopyroxene. Chemically the lavas are basaltic trachyandesite (55-61 wt% SiO2) with trace element patterns similar to average British Columbia upper crust, except for having higher V and lower Zr, Hf, Nb, Th and U. Melting experiments and plagioclase-melt thermometry on the glasses, and phase equilibrium in simple systems, require liquidus temperatures of 1150-1300 °C. Interaction of the liquids with carbonaceous matter at low pressure formed Fe metal spherules and SiC. Radiocarbon ages of charcoal and dendrochronology show the lavas are modern, emplaced in the last 120 years. The similar bulk composition of these lavas to several other Quaternary-aged volcanic centers in the North American Cordillera, some of which show recent seismic activity, could suggest a possible tectonic origin, but the deposits are unusually small and show no central vent for emplacement. Conversely, the balance of evidence would suggest an origin from coal fires or hot gas venting, but is less consistent with the observed calc- and per-alkaline lava compositions, and the lack of known local coal-bearing strata as a heat source. Other anthropogenic origins for the lavas are considered less plausible.

  16. Tholeitic basalts and ophiolitic complexes of the Mesorif Zone (External Rif, Morocco) at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary and the importance of the Ouerrha Accident in the palaeogeographic and geodynamic evolution of the Rif Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzaggagh, M.

    2016-10-01

    The stratigraphical series around the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary of the External Rif Mountains, in particular those in the Mesorif Zone, exhibits many outcrops with volcanic materials spread westwards over 200 km. These materials show diverse aspects: basalt lithoclasts reworked into calcareous breccia beds or in marly matrix breccia, interstratified lava flows and volcanoclastic complexes incorporated within the Berriasian marls. In the Central Rif, several magmatic blocks outcrop, usually regarded as granite scales from the Paleozoic basement or as intrusive gabbros of Barremian age. Actually these magmatic massifs display typical ophiolitic sequences and they are overlaid by mega-olistoliths of Jurassic materials and locally by radiolarite layers. Geochemical analysis of several basalt and gabbro samples belonging to the Mesorif Zone evidenced that both display a typical E-MORB magma indicating at least partial oceanization of the Mesorif basement. Concerning geodynamics, the Mesorif Zone had undergone, at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary interval, two successive palaeogeographic phases: an uplift, close to emersion during the Kimmeridgian-Early Tithonian interval, stressed by important submarine volcanic activities and intense brecciation of the carbonate formations, followed by a general collapse at the Late Tithonian, underlined by lava flows, slumping as mega-olistoliths and the formation of an oceanic crust, at least in the Central Rif. These magmatic materials, distributed on both sides of the Ouerrha Valley, evidence that this westwards extending valley (the Nekor Accident), may correspond in the Central Rif, to two palaeo-subduction planes which become two major overlapping thrusts in the western part of the Rif Mountains. (Author)

  17. Flood basalt volcanism on the Moon and Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, K.

    1979-01-01

    Comparative studies of the surfaces of the terrestrial planets reveal that processes of flood basalt volcanism were common to all of them, irrespective of their stages of evolution either primitive, intermediate or progressive. On the Moon manifestations of flood basalt volcanism have been recognized in basins (maria); on the planet Mars both in basins (planitiae) and in higher topographic (continental) levels. The mare-epoch of the less developed planets led to significant changes in their relief and in the crustal structure. Examples of volcanic flows from the lunar and martian surface are introduced. Some crustal uplifts on Mars can be interpreted in terms of Van Bemmelen's undations. (Auth.)

  18. Hydrogeological and quantitative groundwater assessment of the Basaltic Aquifer, Northern Harrat Rahat, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shaibani, A.; Abokhodair, Abdulwahab A.; Lloyd, J.W.; Al-Ahmari, A.

    2007-01-01

    The Northern Harrat Rahat consists of 300m basalt lavas covering some 2000 km2 to the south-east of Al-Madinah in western Saudi Arabia. Like many basalt sequences, the Rahat basalts form an important aquifer and groundwater resource. The aquifer has a saturated thickness of up to 60m and made up of the weathered upper part of underlying basement, pre-basalt sands and gravels and the fractured basalts. Since 1992, groundwater has been abstracted from the aquifer as part of the Al-Madinah water supply. To assess the potential of the aquifer an assessment has been made based on pumping tests of 70 wells. The hydraulic parameters have been shown to be highly variable typical of the fractured domain. The aquifer contains good-quality water in storage, but receives limited recharge. Groundwater temperature anomalies indicate remnant volcanic activity locally. A numerical groundwater model has been constructed, which has been calibrated using limited groundwater head measurements, but with good abstraction records. Prediction of groundwater heads and the examination of several abstraction scenarios indicate that the aquifer can continue to support part of the Al-Madinah demand for the next several years, if certain well distributions are adopted. The predictions also show that the aquifer can only support the total demand of the city for a few days as a contingency resource. (author)

  19. A combined basalt and peridotite perspective on 14 million years of melt generation at the Atlantis Bank segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge: Evidence for temporal changes in mantle dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, L.A.; Thompson, G.M.; MacLeod, C.J.; Dick, H.J.B.; Edwards, S.J.; Hosford, Scheirer A.; Barry, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about temporal variations in melt generation and extraction at midocean ridges largely due to the paucity of sampling along flow lines. Here we present new whole-rock major and trace element data, and mineral and glass major element data, for 71 basaltic samples (lavas and dykes) and 23 peridotites from the same ridge segment (the Atlantis Bank segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge). These samples span an age range of almost 14 My and, in combination with the large amount of published data from this area, allow temporal variations in melting processes to be investigated. Basalts show systematic changes in incompatible trace element ratios with the older samples (from ???8-14 Ma) having more depleted incompatible trace element ratios than the younger ones. There is, however, no corresponding change in peridotite compositions. Peridotites come from the top of the melting column, where the extent of melting is highest, suggesting that the maximum degree of melting did not change over this interval of time. New and published Nd isotopic ratios of basalts, dykes and gabbros from this segment suggest that the average source composition has been approximately constant over this time interval. These data are most readily explained by a model in which the average source composition and temperature have not changed over the last 14 My, but the dynamics of mantle flow (active-to-passive) or melt extraction (less-to-more efficient extraction from the 'wings' of the melting column) has changed significantly. This hypothesised change in mantle dynamics occurs at roughly the same time as a change from a period of detachment faulting to 'normal' crustal accretion. We speculate that active mantle flow may impart sufficient shear stress on the base of the lithosphere to rotate the regional stress field and promote the formation of low angle normal faults. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Internal fabric development in complex lava domes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Závada, Prokop; Kratinová, Zuzana; Kusbach, V.; Schulmann, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 466, č. 1-2 (2009), s. 101-113 ISSN 0040-1951 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB301110703; GA AV ČR KJB300120702 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA205/03/0204 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : analogue modeling * lava extrusion * exogenous growth * crystal-rich lava * AMS Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.935, year: 2009

  1. Changing compositions in the Iceland plume; Isotopic and elemental constraints from the Paleogene Faroe flood basalts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina; Holm, Paul Martin

    2011-01-01

    Elemental and Sr, Nd, Hf and high precision Pb isotopic data are presented from 59 low-Ti and high-Ti lavas from the syn-break up part of the Faroe Flood Basalt Province. The depleted MORB-like low-Ti lavas erupted in the rift zone between the Faroe Islands and central East Greenland around...... the time of break up of the North Atlantic have isotopic end-member compositions different from the depleted Iceland lavas. We suggest that the main low-Ti mantle component is NAEM (North Atlantic End-Member (Ellam and Stuart, 2000, J. Petrol. 41, 919) and that the 207Pb/204Pb value of the component should...... be 15.35 and eHf=+16.5. NAEM is the main depleted component in the early Iceland plume. This is supported by high mantle potential temperatures (up to 1550 °C) calculated for the source of the low-Ti basalts. The unique mantle isotopic composition of NAEM with low 206Pb/204Pb (17.5) and ¿7/4Pb (-3...

  2. Probability encoding of hydrologic parameters for basalt. Elicitation of expert opinions from a panel of three basalt waste isolation project staff hydrologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runchal, A.K.; Merkhofer, M.W.; Olmsted, E.; Davis, J.D.

    1984-11-01

    The present study implemented a probability encoding method to estimate the probability distributions of selected hydrologic variables for the Cohassett basalt flow top and flow interior, and the anisotropy ratio of the interior of the Cohassett basalt flow beneath the Hanford Site. Site-speciic data for these hydrologic parameters are currently inadequate for the purpose of preliminary assessment of candidate repository performance. However, this information is required to complete preliminary performance assessment studies. Rockwell chose a probability encoding method developed by SRI International to generate credible and auditable estimates of the probability distributions of effective porosity and hydraulic conductivity anisotropy. The results indicate significant differences of opinion among the experts. This was especially true of the values of the effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow interior for which estimates differ by more than five orders of magnitude. The experts are in greater agreement about the values of effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow top; their estimates for this variable are generally within one to two orders of magnitiude of each other. For anisotropy ratio, the expert estimates are generally within two or three orders of magnitude of each other. Based on this study, the Rockwell hydrologists estimate the effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow top to be generally higher than do the independent experts. For the effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow top, the estimates of the Rockwell hydrologists indicate a smaller uncertainty than do the estimates of the independent experts. On the other hand, for the effective porosity and anisotropy ratio of the Cohassett basalt flow interior, the estimates of the Rockwell hydrologists indicate a larger uncertainty than do the estimates of the independent experts

  3. Constraints on ocean ridge basalt generation from Gakkel Ridge basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmuir, C. H.; Michael, P.; Standish, J.; Goldstein, S.

    2006-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge that traverses the Arctic Ocean from Greenland to Siberia provides five "natural experiments" with respect to our understanding of melt generation and delivery at ocean ridges. (1) It is the deepest of the ocean ridges, and tests the global correlations of basalt chemistry with axial depth and the origin of such correlations. (2) It is the slowest spreading ridge, and tests the influence of ultra-slow spreading on magma generation without the complexity of oblique spreading or multiple transform offsets. (3) The samples are both on- and off-axis, allowing tests of the similarity of on- and off-axis volcanism. (4) It provides a test of the veined mantle disequilibrium melting hypothesis for MORB, since both ultra-slow spreading rate and great depth suggest minimum extents of melting, with the extent of melting decreasing progressively towards the east. (5) It tests segmentation models, because there are no transform offsets along the ridge, and the slow spreading rates should lead to maximum melt focusing along strike. The comprehensive major element, trace element and isotopic data set for the rocks obtained on the AMORE cruise allows investigation of all of these issues. (1) The Gakkel fits global depth-chemistry correlations, and major and trace element data as well as crustal thickness suggest small extents of melting in this region, decreasing towards the east. (2)Ultra-slow spreading leads to a thicker lithospheric lid and more garnet influence towards the east. The effects of thick lithosphere and mantle temperature on melting can be clearly distinguished in this region, and contrast with global systematics. This suggests that lithosphere variations are of minor importance in controlling the global array. (3) Off-axis samples are more diverse than on-axis samples, confirming the importance of off-axis volcanism at ultra-slow ridges. (4) Trace element data do not show an increase in a "veined component" towards the east as spreading rate

  4. Source implications for the different geochemical features of recent basaltic rocks from the northernmost part of the Cappadocian region, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkcuoglu, Biltan; Yurur, Tekin

    2017-04-01

    Extensive magmatic activities developed since middle-Miocene, in the Cappadocian Region of Central Anatolia in Turkey. The nature and the sources of the magmatism were well-constrained by previous studies. Even though the sources of Strato-volcanoes and monogenetic vents were briefly explained, extremely young basalts (1.22 - 0.094 Ka) situated in northernmost part of Cappadocian Region and erupted between the two extentional faults, are not deeply investigated. Karaburna and Gülşehir lavas (1.22, 0.094 Ka, respectively, Dogan, 2011) are considered as a part of the Central Anatolian Volcanic Province, with extremely young ages, generated either at the final or after the final stage of the Cappadocian systems. These lavas have similar LIL and HFS elements patterns with each other, however, Karaburna samples are more enriched in HFS elements. These basalts also display approximately similar trends in LIL elements ( except Rb) and reflect HFS depletion relative to the OIB signature, moreover, HFS are more enriched compared to the Hasandag basaltic rocks, all these features suggesting, basaltic rocks are originated from the modified mantle source. Karaburna and Gülşehir basalts have low Nb/La (0.45-0.5 ; 0.35-0.42), Nb/Y( 0.33-.39; 0.27-0.44 Nb/Th (2.75-4.6; 1.26-1.68) and high Ba/Nb (22-32; 38-43) ratios suggesting the contributions from the crustal sources, moreoever, Gülşehir basaltic rocks differ from the Karaburna lavas with relatively low Nb/U ( 4.5-6.4) and high Ba/La ( 14.67-17.20) Th/La (0.22-0.27), whereas Karaburna samples are represented by low Ba/La (10.04-14.90) and Th/La (0.09-0.16) ratios, these geochemical features reveal that these differences are originated either from the different degrees of crustal involvement or change in the nature of the source in a short time interval. Of all the most recent basaltic products generated in central Anatolia are alkaline in nature, besides, the trace element content, multi-element patterns and HFS/LIL and

  5. Hainan mantle plume produced late Cenozoic basaltic rocks in Thailand, Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Quanshu; Shi, Xuefa; Metcalfe, Ian; Liu, Shengfa; Xu, Taoyu; Kornkanitnan, Narumol; Sirichaiseth, Thanyapat; Yuan, Long; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Hui

    2018-02-08

    Intraplate volcanism initiated shortly after the cessation of Cenozoic seafloor spreading in the South China Sea (SCS) region, but the full extent of its influence on the Indochina block has not been well constrained. Here we present major and trace element data and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotope ratios of late Cenozoic basaltic lavas from the Khorat plateau and some volcanic centers in the Paleozoic Sukhothai arc terrane in Thailand. These volcanic rocks are mainly trachybasalts and basaltic trachyandesites. Trace element patterns and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic compositions show that these alkaline volcanic lavas exhibit oceanic island basalt (OIB)-like characteristics with enrichments in both large-ion lithophile elements (LILE) and high field strength elements (HFSEs). Their mantle source is a mixture between a depleted Indian MORB-type mantle and an enriched mantle type 2 (EMII). We suggest that the post-spreading intraplate volcanism in the SCS region was induced by a Hainan mantle plume which spread westwards to the Paleozoic Sukhothai arc terrane.

  6. Assessing Eruption Column Height in Ancient Flood Basalt Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Self, Stephen; Schmidt, Anja; Hunter, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    A buoyant plume model is used to explore the ability of flood basalt eruptions to inject climate-relevant gases into the stratosphere. An example from the 1986 Izu-Oshima basaltic fissure eruption validates the model's ability to reproduce the observed maximum plume heights of 12-16 km above sea level, sustained above fire-fountains. The model predicts maximum plume heights of 13-17 km for source widths of between 4-16 m when 32% (by mass) of the erupted magma is fragmented and involved in the buoyant plume (effective volatile content of 6 wt%). Assuming that the Miocene-age Roza eruption (part of the Columbia River Basalt Group) sustained fire-fountains of similar height to Izu-Oshima (1.6 km above the vent), we show that the Roza eruption could have sustained buoyant ash and gas plumes that extended into the stratosphere at approximately 45 deg N. Assuming 5 km long active fissure segments and 9000 Mt of SO2 released during explosive phases over a 10-15 year duration, the approximately 180 km of known Roza fissure length could have supported approximately 36 explosive events/phases, each with a duration of 3-4 days. Each 5 km fissure segment could have emitted 62 Mt of SO2 per day into the stratosphere while actively fountaining, the equivalent of about three 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruptions per day. Each fissure segment could have had one to several vents, which subsequently produced lava without significant fountaining for a longer period within the decades-long eruption. Sensitivity of plume rise height to ancient atmospheric conditions is explored. Although eruptions in the Deccan Traps (approximately 66 Ma) may have generated buoyant plumes that rose to altitudes in excess of 18 km, they may not have reached the stratosphere because the tropopause was substantially higher in the late Cretaceous. Our results indicate that some flood basalt eruptions, such as Roza, were capable of repeatedly injecting large masses of SO2 into the stratosphere. Thus sustained

  7. Simulation of core melt spreading with lava: theoretical background and status of validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allelein, H.-J.; Breest, A.; Spengler, C.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present the GRS R and D achievements and perspectives of its approach to simulate ex-vessel core melt spreading. The basic idea followed by GRS is the analogy of core melt spreading to volcanic lava flows. A fact first proposed by Robson (1967) and now widely accepted is that lava rheologically behaves as a Bingham fluid, which is characterized by yield stress and plastic viscosity. Recent experimental investigations by Epstein (1996) reveal that corium-concrete mixtures may be described as Bingham fluids. The GRS code LAVA is based on a successful lava flow model, but is adapted to prototypic corium and corium-simulation spreading. Furthermore some detailed physical models such as a thermal crust model on the free melt surface and a model for heat conduction into the substratum are added. Heat losses of the bulk, which is represented by one mean temperature, are now determined by radiation and by temperature profiles in the upper crust and in the substratum. In order to reduce the weak mesh dependence of the original algorithm, a random space method of cellular automata is integrated, which removes the mesh bias without increasing calculation time. LAVA is successfully validated against a lot of experiments using different materials spread. The validation process has shown that LAVA is a robust and fast running code to simulate corium-type spreading. LAVA provides all integral information of practical interest (spreading length, height of the melt after stabilization) and seems to be an appropriate tool for handling large core melt masses within a plant application. (orig.)

  8. Giant Plagioclase Basalts, eruption rate versus time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R.Narasimhan(krishtel emaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    can traps; Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 180 13–27. Hooper P R and others 1988 The Giant Plagioclase Basalts. (GPBs) of the Western Ghats, Deccan Traps; Mem. Geol. Soc. India 43 153–65. Khadri S F R and 3 others 1988 Stratigraphy of Thakurvadi. Formation, Western Deccan Basalt Province, India: In. Deccan Flood Basalts ...

  9. Inverse Dipolar Magnetic Anomaly Over the Volcanic Cone Linked to Reverse Polarity Magnetizations in Lavas and Tuffs - Implications for the Conduit System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Trigo-Huesca, A.

    2012-12-01

    A combined magnetics and paleomagnetic study of Toluquilla monogenetic volcano and associated lavas and tuffs from Valsequillo basin in Central Mexico provides evidence on a magnetic link between lavas, ash tuffs and the underground volcanic conduit system. Paleomagnetic analyses show that lavas and ash tuffs carry reverse polarity magnetizations, which correlate with the inversely polarized dipolar magnetic anomaly over the volcano. The magnetizations in the lava and tuff show similar southward declinations and upward inclinations, supporting petrological inferences that the tuff was emplaced while still hot and indicating a temporal correlation for lava and tuff emplacement. Conduit geometry is one of the important controlling factors in eruptive dynamics of basaltic volcanoes. However volcanic conduits are often not, or only partly, exposed. Modeling of the dipolar anomaly gives a reverse polarity source magnetization associated with a vertical prismatic body with southward declination and upward inclination, which correlates with the reverse polarity magnetizations in the lava and tuff. The study documents a direct correlation of the paleomagnetic records with the underground magmatic conduit system of the monogenetic volcano. Time scale for cooling of the volcanic plumbing system involves a longer period than the one for the tuff and lava, suggesting that magnetization for the source of dipolar anomaly may represent a long time average as compared to the spot readings in the lava and tuff. The reverse polarity magnetizations in lava and tuff and in the underground source body for the magnetic anomaly are interpreted in terms of eruptive activity of Toluquilla volcano at about 1.3 Ma during the Matuyama reverse polarity C1r.2r chron.

  10. Effects of lava heating on volatile-rich slopes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    The upper crust of Io may be very rich in volatile sulfur and SO2. The surface is also highly volcanically active, and slopes may be warmed by radiant heat from the lava. This is particularly the case in paterae, which commonly host volcanic eruptions and long-lived lava lakes. Paterae slopes are highly variable, but some are greater than 70°. I model the heating of a volatile slope for two end-member cases: instantaneous emplacement of a large sheet flow, and persistent heating by a long-lived lava lake. In general, single flows can briefly raise sulfur to the melting temperature, or drive a modest amount of sublimation of SO2. Persistently lava-covered surfaces will drive much more significant geomorphic effects, with potentially significant sublimation and slope retreat. In addition to the direct effects, heating is likely to weaken slope materials and may trigger mass wasting. Thus, if the upper crust of Io is rich in these volatile species, future missions with high-resolution imaging are likely to observe actively retreating slopes around lava lakes and other locations of frequent eruptions.

  11. Isla Isabel (Nayarit, México): Quaternary alkalic basalts with mantle xenoliths erupted in the mouth of the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housh, Todd B.; Aranda-Gómez, José Jorge; Luhr, James F.

    2010-11-01

    Isla Isabel is a small island (~ 1.06 km 2) off the coast of Nayarit where intraplate-type alkali-basaltic volcanic rocks erupted during the Quaternary, and one of two Mexican islands (along with Isla Guadalupe) where it is known that the alkali basalts have transported peridotite xenoliths to the surface. The volume of the island is estimated at approximately 4.2 km 3; the volume above sea level is estimated to be approximately 0.03 km 3. The dominant volcanic rock type exposed above sea level is analcime-cemented basaltic tuff-breccia, the rapidly lithified products of hydrovolcanic eruptions; however, subaerial scoria-fall deposits and lava flows are also present. Ten analyzed Isla Isabel volcanic rocks are relatively homogeneous alkali basalts with 4.5-6.4 wt.% nepheline in the CIPW norm. Compared to other analyzed Mexican intraplate-type volcanic rocks from oceanic and continental localities, at the same MgO content, the Isabel samples are depleted in TiO 2, FeO total, and Na 2O, and moderately incompatible trace elements (e.g., Sm, Eu, Tb, and Zr). On the other hand, they are enriched in CaO and Al 2O 3, and relatively compatible trace elements (e.g., Lu and Sc). It is suggested that relative to other Mexican intraplate alkaline lavas the Isabel lavas were derived by higher degrees of melting at lower pressures of mantle that is characterized by ancient HIMU-like isotope systematics. Isabel olivine phenocrysts and their spinel inclusions range to Mg#s that overlap with the peridotite minerals in the accompanying mantle xenoliths, which has not been reported at other Mexican xenolith localities. Olivine-hosted glass inclusions in rapidly quenched scoria yielded the first estimates for volatile contents in Mexican intraplate-type mafic melts; maximum values are: 1.3 wt.% H 2O, 2241 ppm CO 2, 1500 ppm F, 1300 ppm S, and 1200 ppm Cl. Isabel peridotites (Ol ± Hy ± Di + Sp ± Pl) include dunites, harzburgites, and rare plagioclase-harzburgite, and are depleted in

  12. Origin of Lava-Hyaloclastite Sequences in South Iceland as Revealed by Volatile Contents in Magmatic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Tenley; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Miller, Calvin; Furbish, David; Wallace, Paul; Bacon, Charles

    2013-04-01

    In the Síða District of south Iceland, Pleistocene basaltic lava forms flame-like apophyses, dikes, and disaggregation structures (cf. Bergh and Sigvaldason, 1991; Smellie, 2008) that invade overlying hyaloclastite. These features are exposed in valley walls composed of at least 14 (Bergh and Sigvaldason, 1991) paired basalt-hyaloclastite +/- diamictite depositional units. These units are dominated by hyaloclastite deposits that reach over 100 m in thickness, with underlying lava up to 50 m thick. Apophyses as well as underlying lavas show cube jointing, indicating rapid cooling due to formation in a wet environment and suggesting that hyaloclastite and lava were emplaced almost concurrently, while hyaloclastite was wet and weak. Dissolved volatile concentrations in glass give an indication of ambient pressure on quenching and cessation of degassing. FTIR analysis of basaltic glasses from chilled lava margins and hyaloclastite glasses indicate total H2O from below detection to 0.49 wt% with only one sample above 0.15 wt%; CO32- is below detection in all samples. These concentrations suggest extensive degassing at or near atmospheric conditions. S and Cl contents in both glass types were also below or near their respective detection limits by electron microprobe (70%. These data support an eruption that occurred under significantly lower-pressure conditions than previously proposed (Smellie, 2008). The presence of a large volume of hyaloclastite suggests the presence of ice or external water, which is consistent with results of prior studies (Smellie, 2008). Based on the volatile data presented here, the Síða deposits were likely erupted under near-atmospheric pressure and in the presence of significant water. In order to account for the required environmental conditions and volatile data, one possible scenario is that a subglacial eruption near the edge of a glacier may have produced hyaloclastite that was incorporated into a meltwater lake-draining j

  13. Nano-scale observations of interface between lichen and basaltic rock: Pseudomorphic growth of amorphous silica on augite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, T.; Kyono, A.; Kebukawa, Y.; Takagi, S.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, lichens as the earliest colonizers of terrestrial habitats are recognized to accelerate the mineral degradation at the interface between lichens and surface rocks. Much interest has been therefore devoted in recent years to the weathering induced by the lichen colonization. Here, we report nano-scale observations of the interface between lichens and basaltic rock by TEM and STXM techniques. Some samples of basaltic rocks totally covered by lichens were collected from the 1986 lava flows on the northwest part of Izu-Oshima volcano, Japan. To prepare specimens for the nano-scale observation, we utilized the focused ion beam (FIB) system. The microstructure and local chemistry of the specimens were thoroughly investigated by TEM equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Chemical components and chemical heterogeneity at the interface were observed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at Advanced Light Source branch line 5.3.2.2. The collected rocks were classified into the augite-pigeonite-bronzite basalt including 6 to 8% plagioclase phenocrysts. The lichens adhering to the rocks were mainly Stereocaulon vesuvianum, fruticose lichen, which are widespread over the study area. The metabolites of the Stereocaulon vesuvianum exhibited a mean pH of 4.5 and dominance by acids. The STEM-EDX observations revealed that the interface between augite and the lichen was completely covered with amorphous silica multilayer with a thickness of less than 1 µm. Ca L-edge XANES spectra of the augite showed that the energy profile of the absorption edge at 349 eV was varied with the depth from the surface, indicating that the M2 site coordination accommodating Ca2+ undergoes significant change in shape as a function of distance from the surface. This behavior results from the fact that the M2 site is more distorted and more flexible in the C2/c clinopyroxene phase. Taking into consideration that the S. vesuvianum can produce acidic organic compounds

  14. Petrology of the prehistoric lavas and dyke of the Barren Island ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    activity, whose deposits presently mantle inner and outer caldera walls, a new phase of intra- calderic Vulcanian activities took place. A prominent dyke in the SE inner side of the caldera wall was recognized. Petrographically the lava flows and dyke are similar but they differ in their chemical composition (viz., SiO2, MgO, Ni ...

  15. Flood basalts and extinction events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    The largest known effusive eruptions during the Cenozoic and Mesozoic Eras, the voluminous flood basalts, have long been suspected as being associated with major extinctions of biotic species. Despite the possible errors attached to the dates in both time series of events, the significance level of the suspected correlation is found here to be 1 percent to 4 percent. Statistically, extinctions lag eruptions by a mean time interval that is indistinguishable from zero, being much less than the average residual derived from the correlation analysis. Oceanic flood basalts, however, must have had a different biological impact, which is still uncertain owing to the small number of known examples and differing physical factors. Although not all continental flood basalts can have produced major extinction events, the noncorrelating eruptions may have led to smaller marine extinction events that terminated at least some of the less catastrophically ending geologic stages. Consequently, the 26 Myr quasi-periodicity seen in major marine extinctions may be only a sampling effect, rather than a manifestation of underlying periodicity.

  16. Thermoluminescence dating of Hawaiian basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Rodd James

    1979-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of plagioclase separates from 11 independently dated alkalic basalts 4,500 years to 3.3 million years old and 17 tholeiitic basalts 16 years to 450,000 years old from the Hawaiian Islands were investigated for the purpose of developing a TL dating method for young volcanic rocks. Ratios of natural to artificial TL intensity, when normalized for natural radiation dose rates, were used to quantify the thermoluminescence response of individual samples for age-determination purposes. The TL ratios for the alkalic basalt plagioclase were found to increase with age at a predictable exponential rate that permits the use of the equation for the best-fit line through a plot of the TL ratios relative to known age as a TL age equation. The equation is applicable to rocks ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to trachyte over the age range from about 2,000 to at least 250,000 years before present (B.P.). The TL ages for samples older than 50,000 years have a calculated precision of less than :t 10 percent and a potential estimated accuracy relative to potassium-argon ages of approximately :t 10 percent. An attempt to develop a similar dating curve for the tholeiitic basalts was not as successful, primarily because the dose rates are on the average lower than those for the alkalic basalts by a factor of 6, resulting in lower TL intensities in the tholeiitic basalts for samples of equivalent age, and also because the age distribution of dated material is inadequate. The basic TL properties of the plagioclase from the two rock types are similar, however, and TL dating of tholeiitic basalts should eventually be feasible over the age range 10,000 to at least 200,000 years B.P. The average composition of the plagioclase separates from the alkalic basalts ranges from oligoclase to andesine; compositional variations within this range have no apparent effect on the TL ratios. The average composition of the plagioclase from the tholeiitic

  17. Chronology and isotopic geochemistry of Apollo 14 basalts and Skaergard Gabbro, Eastern Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasch, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Work completed on Apollo 14 basalts has been published. The two dates obtained from these rocks comprised the oldest and two of the three oldest ages (4.1 and 4.3 billion years) known for lunar maria basalts; thus their ages are important in understanding the moon's earliest history. Owing to the antiquity of these rocks, two more fragments have been dated as part of a second ASEE/NASA SFF program. The new ages are 3.95 and 4.12 billion years, thus further establishing and amplifying the earlier results. This work, although perhaps more interesting for its chronologic information, was begun as a test of chemical and petrographic models. Fragments of Apollo basalt were placed into five categories, based on petrologic and chemical, especially rare-earth element, composition. Isotopic studies were begun in an attempt to determine if the five groups of basalts were related by age or initial isotopic composition (isotopic composition of lava at time of extrusion). Although a few of the representatives of the five groups have the same age and/or initial strontium-isotopic composition, within the analtytical uncertainties, most apparently are unrelated. Petrologic implications of these data will be published in an appropriate journal

  18. Origin of phenocrysts and compositional diversity in pre-Mazama rhyodacite lavas, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, S.; Bacon, C.R.; Gartner, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    Phenocrysts in porphyritic volcanic rocks may originate in a variety of ways in addition to nucleation and growth in the matrix in which they are found. Porphyritic rhyodacite lavas that underlie the eastern half of Mount Mazama, the High Cascade andesite/dacite volcano that contains Crater Lake caldera, contain evidence that bears on the general problem of phenocryst origin. Phenocrysts in these lavas apparently formed by crystallization near the margins of a magma chamber and were admixed into convecting magma before eruption. About 20 km3 of pre-Mazama rhyodacite magma erupted during a relatively short period between ~400 and 500 ka; exposed pre-Mazama dacites are older and less voluminous. The rhyodacites formed as many as 40 lava domes and flows that can be assigned to three eruptive groups on the basis of composition and phenocryst content. -from Authors

  19. Operational tracking of lava lake surface motion at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim R.

    2018-03-08

    Surface motion is an important component of lava lake behavior, but previous studies of lake motion have been focused on short time intervals. In this study, we implement the first continuous, real-time operational routine for tracking lava lake surface motion, applying the technique to the persistent lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i. We measure lake motion by using images from a fixed thermal camera positioned on the crater rim, transmitting images to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) in real time. We use an existing optical flow toolbox in Matlab to calculate motion vectors, and we track the position of lava upwelling in the lake, as well as the intensity of spattering on the lake surface. Over the past 2 years, real-time tracking of lava lake surface motion at Halema‘uma‘u has been an important part of monitoring the lake’s activity, serving as another valuable tool in the volcano monitoring suite at HVO.

  20. The Chaitén rhyolite lava dome: Eruption sequence, lava dome volumes, rapid effusion rates and source of the rhyolite magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, John S.; Diefenbach, Angela K.; Burton, William C.; Munoz, Jorge; Griswold, Julia P.; Lara, Luis E.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Valenzuela, Carolina E.

    2013-01-01

    We use geologic field mapping and sampling, photogrammetric analysis of oblique aerial photographs, and digital elevation models to document the 2008-2009 eruptive sequence at Chaitén Volcano and to estimate volumes and effusion rates for the lava dome. We also present geochemical and petrologic data that contribute to understanding the source of the rhyolite and its unusually rapid effusion rates. The eruption consisted of five major phases: 1. An explosive phase (1-11 May 2008); 2. A transitional phase (11-31 May 2008) in which low-altitude tephra columns and simultaneous lava extrusion took place; 3. An exogenous lava flow phase (June-September 2008); 4. A spine extrusion and endogenous growth phase (October 2008-February 2009); and 5. A mainly endogenous growth phase that began after the collapse of a prominent Peléean spine on 19 February 2009 and continued until the end of the eruption (late 2009 or possibly earliest 2010). The 2008-2009 rhyolite lava dome has a total volume of approximately 0.8 km3. The effusion rate averaged 66 m3s-1 during the first two weeks and averaged 45 m3s-1 for the first four months of the eruption, during which 0.5 km3 of rhyolite lava was erupted. These are among the highest rates measured world-wide for historical eruptions of silicic lava. Chaitén’s 2008-2009 lava is phenocryst-poor obsidian and microcrystalline rhyolite with 75.3±0.3% SiO2. The lava was erupted at relatively high temperature and is remarkably similar in composition and petrography to Chaitén’s pre-historic rhyolite. The rhyolite’s normative composition plots close to that of low pressure (100-200 MPa) minimum melts in the granite system, consistent with estimates of approximately 5 to 10 km source depths based on phase equilibria and geodetic studies. Calcic plagioclase, magnesian orthopyroxene and aluminous amphibole among the sparse phenocrysts suggest derivation of the rhyolite by melt extraction from a more mafic magmatic mush. High temperature

  1. The Ethiopian subcontinental mantle domains: geochemical evidence from Cenozoic mafic lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasini, S.; Manetti, P.; Innocenti, F.; Abebe, T.; Sintoni, M.; Conticelli, S.

    2005-07-01

    Since the Cenozoic, Ethiopia was affected by a widespread volcanic activity related to the geodynamic evolution of the Afar triple junction. The plateau building phase was followed by the formation of the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) accompanied by a bimodal volcanic activity in both the inner parts of the rift and its shoulders. Outside the rift, a concurrent volcanic activity occurred mainly along transversal tectonic lineaments, the most important of which is the Yerer-Tullu Wellel Volcano-Tectonic Lineament (YTVL) developing for ˜500 km westward of Addis Abeba. Scattered Pliocene Quaternary volcanoes are reported also inside the plateau such as those out cropping nearby Lake Tana. Here we present the result of a study on carefully screened mafic lavas outcropping in two sectors located off-axis the MER, namely, the YTVL and the southern part of Lake Tana; and in one sector located in the southern tip of the MER close to Megado, in the Sidamo region. The screened samples are petrographically fresh and have SiO24 wt.%, to minimise crystal fractionation effects. Most of the samples belong to the Late Miocene Quaternary volcanic activity of the East African Rift System (EARS), although a number of samples along the YTVL are representative of the Late Eocene Early Miocene Ethiopian Volcanic Plateau flood basalts. The selected mafic lavas offer the opportunity to assess the geochemical diversity, if any, of the subcontinental mantle domains along the MER (Megado and the easternmost part of the YTVL) and in sectors far away from the MER (YTVL and Lake Tana). The samples have a wide compositional range: from basanite to alkali basalt, hy-normative basalt, qz-normative basalt, basaltic andesite, hawaiite, trachybasalt, and trachyandesite. The major and trace element characteristics of the mafic lavas demonstrate an origin from a relatively fertile and trace element enriched lithospheric mantle at pressure variable from ˜2.0 to 3.5 GPa. Moreover, systematic variations in

  2. Petrological and Geochemical characterization of central Chihuahua basalts: a possible local sign of rifting activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejel-Garcia, V. V.; Garcia-Rascon, M.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.; Morton-Bermea, O.

    2012-12-01

    The central part of the mexican state, Chihuahua, is the oriental border of the Sierra Madre Occidental (silicic large igneous province), which consist of series of ignimbrites divided into two volcanic groups of andesites and rhyolites. In the central region of Chihuahua, the volcanic rocks are now part of the Basin and Range, allowing the presence of mafic rocks in the lower areas. The study area is located approximately 200 km to the NW of Chihuahua city near to La Guajolota town, in the Namiquipa County. There are at least 5 outcrops of basalts to the west of the road, named Puerto de Lopez, Malpaises, El Tascate, Quebrada Honda, and Carrizalio, respectively. These outcrops have only been previously described by the Mexican Geologic Survey (SGM) as thin basaltic flows, with vesicles filled with quartz, and phenocrystals of labradorite, andesine, oligoclase and olivine. Petrologically, the basalts present different textures, from small phenocrysts of plagioclase in a very fine matrix to large, zoned and sometimes broken phenocrysts of plagioclase in a coarser matrix. All samples have olivine in an advanced state of alteration, iddingsite. The geochemical analyses report that these basaltic flows contain characteristics of rift basalts. The rocks have a normative olivine values from 5.78 to 27.26 and nepheline values from 0 to 2.34. In the TAS diagram the samples straddle the join between basalt and trachy-basalt, reflecting a high K2O content. The Mg# average is 0.297, a value that suggests that the basalts do not come from a primitive magma. The basalts have high values of Ba (945-1334 ppm), Cu (54-147 ppm), and Zn (123-615 ppm). The contents of Rb (23-57 ppm), Sr (659-810 ppm), Y (26-33 ppm), Zr (148-217 ppm) and Cr (79-98 ppm) are characteristics of rift basalts. Using discrimination diagrams, the basalts plot in the field of within plate, supporting the rifting origin. Outcrops of other basalts, at about 80 to 100 km to the east of the study area, Lomas El

  3. Cumulate xenoliths from St. Vincent, Lesser Antilles Island Arc: a window into upper crustal differentiation of mantle-derived basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollan, P. M. E.; Bindeman, I.; Blundy, J. D.

    2012-02-01

    In order to shed light on upper crustal differentiation of mantle-derived basaltic magmas in a subduction zone setting, we have determined the mineral chemistry and oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of individual cumulus minerals in plutonic blocks from St. Vincent, Lesser Antilles. Plutonic rock types display great variation in mineralogy, from olivine-gabbros to troctolites and hornblendites, with a corresponding variety of cumulate textures. Mineral compositions differ from those in erupted basaltic lavas from St. Vincent and in published high-pressure (4-10 kb) experimental run products of a St. Vincent high-Mg basalt in having higher An plagioclase coexisting with lower Fo olivine. The oxygen isotope compositions (δ18O) of cumulus olivine (4.89-5.18‰), plagioclase (5.84-6.28‰), clinopyroxene (5.17-5.47‰) and hornblende (5.48-5.61‰) and hydrogen isotope composition of hornblende (δD = -35.5 to -49.9‰) are all consistent with closed system magmatic differentiation of a mantle-derived basaltic melt. We employed a number of modelling exercises to constrain the origin of the chemical and isotopic compositions reported. δ18OOlivine is up to 0.2‰ higher than modelled values for closed system fractional crystallisation of a primary melt. We attribute this to isotopic disequilibria between cumulus minerals crystallising at different temperatures, with equilibration retarded by slow oxygen diffusion in olivine during prolonged crustal storage. We used melt inclusion and plagioclase compositions to determine parental magmatic water contents (water saturated, 4.6 ± 0.5 wt% H2O) and crystallisation pressures (173 ± 50 MPa). Applying these values to previously reported basaltic and basaltic andesite lava compositions, we can reproduce the cumulus plagioclase and olivine compositions and their associated trend. We conclude that differentiation of primitive hydrous basalts on St. Vincent involves crystallisation of olivine and Cr-rich spinel at depth

  4. Re-Os isotopic systematics of primitive lavas from the Lassen region of the Cascade arc, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, L.E.; Brandon, A.D.; Clynne, M.A.; Walker, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    Rhenium-osmium isotopic systematics of primitive calc-alkaline lavas from the Lassen region appear to be controlled by mantle wedge processes. Lavas with a large proportion of slab component have relatively low Re and Os abundances, and have radiogenic Os and mid ocean ridge basalt-like Sr and Pb isotopic compositions. Lavas with a small proportion of slab component have higher Re and Os elemental abundances and display mantle-like Os, Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions. Assimilation with fractional crystallization can only generate the Re-Os systematics of the Lassen lavas from a common parent if the distribution coefficient for Re in sulfide is ~40-1100 times higher than most published estimates and if most incompatible element abundances decrease during differentiation. High Re/Os ratios in mid ocean ridge basalts makes subducted oceanic crust a potential source of radiogenic Os in volcanic arcs. The slab beneath the southernmost Cascades is estimated to have 187Os/188Os ratios as high as 1.4. Mixing between a slab component and mantle wedge peridotite can generate the Os isotopic systematics of the Lassen lavas provided the slab component has a Sr/Os ratio of ~7.5X105 and Os abundances that are 100-600 times higher than mid ocean ridge basalts. For this model to be correct, Os must be readily mobilized and concentrated in the slab component, perhaps as a result of high water and HCl fugacities in this subduction environment. Another possible mechanism to account for the correlation between the magnitude of the subduction geochemical signature and Os isotopic composition involves increasing the stability of an Os-bearing phase in mantle wedge peridotites as a result of fluxing with the slab component. Melting of such a source could yield low Os magmas that are more susceptible to crustal contamination, and hence have more radiogenic Os isotopic compositions, than magmas derived from sources with a smaller contribution from the slab. Thus, the addition of the

  5. Field-trip guide to the vents, dikes, stratigraphy, and structure of the Columbia River Basalt Group, eastern Oregon and southeastern Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Victor E; Reidel, Stephen P.; Ross, Martin E.; Brown, Richard J.; Self, Stephen

    2017-06-22

    The Columbia River Basalt Group covers an area of more than 210,000 km2 with an estimated volume of 210,000 km3. As the youngest continental flood-basalt province on Earth (16.7–5.5 Ma), it is well preserved, with a coherent and detailed stratigraphy exposed in the deep canyonlands of eastern Oregon and southeastern Washington. The Columbia River flood-basalt province is often cited as a model for the study of similar provinces worldwide.This field-trip guide explores the main source region of the Columbia River Basalt Group and is written for trip participants attending the 2017 International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) Scientific Assembly in Portland, Oregon, USA. The first part of the guide provides an overview of the geologic features common in the Columbia River flood-basalt province and the stratigraphic terminology used in the Columbia River Basalt Group. The accompanying road log examines the stratigraphic evolution, eruption history, and structure of the province through a field examination of the lavas, dikes, and pyroclastic rocks of the Columbia River Basalt Group.

  6. Vertical Structural Variation and Their Development of the Sanukayama Rhyolite Lava in Kozushima Island, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, K.; Uno, K.; Kanamaru, T.; Nakai, K.

    2017-12-01

    We revealed structural development of the Pleistocene Sanukayama rhyolite lava of Kozushima Island, Japan. The good exposure, with about 130 m thick, provides valuable opportunity to understand the vertical structural variation. This exposure corresponds to the upper half of the lava. The paleomagnetic results show that the lava emplaced in subaerial condition at least in the exposed part. The vertical lithofacies are divided into the pumiceous (25-40 m thick), obsidian (40-60 m), spherulitic (30-50 m) layers from top to base. The pumiceous layer is characterized by massive foliated pumice. The foliation dips are gradually changed from gentle (10-30°) in lower part to steep (around 90°) in upper part. This shows the balloon-like morphology. The massive pumiceous layer would be generated from late stage diapiric inflation of the lava (Fink and Manley, 1987). The obsidian layer is composed of massive and welded-brecciated parts. The ductile-deformed light-colored veins, with a few mm thick, are frequently developed. In the microscopic observation, the veins are composed of broken crystals and obsidian clasts indicating fracturing of the lava followed by ductile deformation such as the RFH process (Tuffen et al., 2003). In this layer, extensive vesiculation and microlite development must have been prevented by higher load pressure and faster cooling, respectively. Consequently, they resulted in formation of the obsidian. The spherulitic layer is characterized by development of the ductile-deformed flow banding. The microscopic observation shows that the bands are formed by the spherulite trail. Furthermore, the microlites are aligned within the spherulites. In the heat-retained inner part of the lava, microlites would be developed around the healed fractures. The microlites acted as nucleation site of spherulite. In transition layer between obsidian and spherulitic layers (flow-induced shear arising from their rheological contrast. We showed the complicated

  7. Stratigraphic imaging of sub-basalt sediments using waveform tomography of wide-angle seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sain, K.; Gao, F.; Pratt, G.; Zelt, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    The oil industry is interested in imaging the fine structures of sedimentary formations masked below basalt flows for commercial exploration of hydrocarbons. Seismic exploration of sediments hidden below high-velocity basalt cover is a difficult problem because near-vertical reflection data are contaminated with multiples, converted waves and scattering noise generated by interbeds, breccia and vesicles within the basalt. The noise becomes less prominent as the source-receiver offset increases, and the signals carrying sub-surface information stand out at the wide-angle range. The tomography of first arrival traveltime data can provide little information about the underlying low-velocity sediments. Traveltime inversion of wide-angle seismic data including both first arrivals and identifiable wide-angle reflected phases has been an important tool in the delineation of the large-scale velocity structure of sub-basalt sediments, although it lacks the small-scale velocity details. Here we apply 2-D full-waveform inversion ("waveform tomography") to wide-angle seismic data with a view to extracting the small-scale stratigraphic features of sedimentary formations. Results from both synthetic data, generated for a realistic earth model, and field dataset from the basalt covered Saurashtra peninsula, India, will be presented. This approach has potential to delineate thin sedimentary layers hidden below thick basalt cover also, and may serve as a powerful tool to image sedimentary basins, where they are covered by high-velocity materials like basalts, salts, carbonates, etc. in various parts of the world.

  8. Characterization and recognition of intraflow structures, Grande Ronde Basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, P.E.

    1978-09-01

    This investigation was carried out as part of a feasibility study for long-term storage of nuclear waste at depth in the Pasco Basin. Three general types of intraflow structures were found at Sentinel Gap: flows with stubby, irregular columns that lack a well-developed entablature; flows consisting of multiple tiers of largely entablature-type columns; and flows with a well-developed colonnade and entablature showing a sharp break between the two. Certain features occur locally in all three types of intraflow structures: variations in fracture morphology, primary platey fracture zones, pillow-palagonite zones, and tectonically induced zones of closely spaced fractures. Fractures in each of the three types of flows were logged both at the surface and in core from Core Hole DH-5, and petrographic textures of basalt sampled from surface exposures were examined. The textures of the basalt correlate with the intraflow structures and provide a technique for identifying flows as to their general type of intraflow structure, locating internal contacts between intraflow structures and possibly estimating fracture density within flows. Fracture logging, on the other hand, does not accurately delimit intraflow structures

  9. Multiple rhyolite magmas and basalt injection in the 17.7 ka Rerewhakaaitu eruption episode from Tarawera volcanic complex, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Phil; Martin, S. B.; Smith, V. C.; Beggs, K. F.; Darragh, M. B.; Cole, J. W.; Nairn, I. A.

    2007-07-01

    The 17.7 ka Rerewhakaaitu eruption episode (volume ˜ 5 km 3 DRE rhyolite magma) was the second of five major episodes that have built the Tarawera volcanic complex in the Okataina Volcanic Centre over the past 22 kyr. The Rerewhakaaitu episode produced a widespread tephra fall deposit, associated proximal pyroclastic flow deposits, and voluminous rhyolite lava extrusions. Two different rhyolite magmas (T1 and T2) were simultaneously erupted from the main vent area throughout much of the eruption episode. T1 magma was a crystal-poor orthopyroxene-hornblende rhyolite that is highly evolved (whole rock SiO 2 = 77 wt.%), with a moderate temperature (˜ 760 °C, based on Fe-Ti oxides). T2 is a crystal-rich biotite-hornblende rhyolite that is less evolved (SiO 2 = 75 wt.%), with a Fe-Ti oxide temperature of ˜ 700 °C. Ejecta from the simultaneous and sequential eruption of these two magmas include some pumice clasts with mixed (hybrid) and mingled glass compositions and crystal populations. A third rhyolite magma (T3) was extruded from another vent 3 km distant to form an apparently contemporaneous lava dome. T3 was the least evolved (SiO 2 = 74 wt.%) and hottest (˜ 820 °C) of the three magmas. Saturation pressures calculated using dissolved H 2O and CO 2 contents of melt inclusions in quartz crystals indicate that T2 magma stagnated and crystallised at about 12 km depth, while small quartz crystals in T1 magma grew during ascent through ˜ 8 km depths. Some T1 and T2 rhyolite clasts contain vesicular brown blebs with widely variable (andesite to rhyolite) glass compositions, accompanied by olivine, clinopyroxene and calcic plagioclase crystals that are interpreted as xenocrysts derived from injected basalt. Temperatures over 1000 °C estimated from pyroxene phase equilibria in these clasts reflect intrusion of the more mafic magma, which is now identified as the priming and triggering mechanism for three of the four post-22 ka Tarawera rhyolite eruption episodes

  10. Decaying lava extrusion rate at El Reventador Volcano, Ecuador measured using high-resolution satellite radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, D. W. D.; Biggs, J.; Anderson, Kyle R.; Vallejo Vargas, S.; Wadge, G.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Naranjo, M. F.; Mothes, P.

    2017-01-01

    Lava extrusion at erupting volcanoes causes rapid changes in topography and morphology on the order of tens or even hundreds of meters. Satellite radar provides a method for measuring changes in topographic height over a given time period to an accuracy of meters, either by measuring the width of radar shadow cast by steep sided features, or by measuring the difference in radar phase between two sensors separated in space. We measure height changes, and hence estimate extruded lava volume flux, at El Reventador, Ecuador, between 2011 and 2016, using data from the RADARSAT-2 and TanDEM-X satellite missions. We find that 39 new lava flows were extruded between 9 February 2012 and 24 August 2016, with a cumulative volume of 44.8M m3 dense rock equivalent and a gradually decreasing eruption rate. The average dense rock rate of lava extrusion during this time is 0.31 ± 0.02 m3 s−1, which is similar to the long-term average from 1972 to 2016. Apart from a volumetrically small dyke opening event between 9 March and 10 June 2012, lava extrusion at El Reventador is not accompanied by any significant magmatic ground deformation. We use a simple physics-based model to estimate that the volume of the magma reservoir under El Reventador is greater than 3 km3. Our lava extrusion data can be equally well fit by models representing a closed reservoir depressurising during the eruption with no magma recharge, or an open reservoir with a time-constant magma recharge rate of up to 0.35 ± 0.01 m3 s−1.

  11. Petrology and age of alkalic lava from the Ratak Chain of the Marshall Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A.S.; Pringle, M.S.; Pickthorn, L.-B.G.; Clague, D.A.; Schwab, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    Volcanic rock dredged from the flanks of four volcanic edifices in the Ratak chain of the Marshall Islands consist of alkalic lava that erupted above sea level or in shallow water. Compositions of recovered samples are predominantly differentiated alkalic basalt and hawaiite but include strongly alkalic melilitite. Whole rock 40Ar/39Ar total fusion and incremental heating ages of 87.3 ?? 0.6 Ma and 82.2 ?? 1.6 Ma determined for samples from Erikub Seamount and Ratak Guyot, respectively, are within the range predicted by plate rotation models but show no age progression consistent with a simple hot spot model. Variations in isotopic and some incompatible element ratios suggest interisland heterogeneity. -from Authors

  12. Kilauea Iki lava lake experiment plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J.C.; Hills, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Twelve experimental studies are proposed to complete field laboratory work at Kilauea Iki lava lake. Of these twelve experiments, eleven do not require the presence of melt. Some studies are designed to use proven techniques in order to expand our existing knowledge, while others are designed to test new concepts. Experiments are grouped into three main categories: geophysics, energy extraction, and drilling technology. Each experiment is described in terms of its location, purpose, background, configuration, operation, and feasibility.

  13. Textural history of recent basaltic-andesites and plutonic inclusions from Merapi volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwan, Froukje M.; Chadwick, Jane P.; Troll, Valentin R.

    2013-07-01

    Mt. Merapi in Central Java is one of the most active stratovolcanoes on Earth and is underlain by a multistage plumbing system. Crystal size distribution analyses (CSD) were carried out on recent Merapi basaltic-andesites and co-eruptive magmatic and plutonic inclusions to characterise the crystallisation processes that operate during storage and ascent and to obtain information on respective time scales. The basaltic-andesites exhibit log-linear, kinked-upwards CSD curves for plagioclase and clinopyroxene that can be separated into two main textural populations. Large plagioclase phenocrysts (≥1.6 mm) make up one population, but correspond to crystals with variable geochemical composition and reflect a period of crystal growth at deep to mid-crustal levels. This population was subsequently influenced by crystal accumulation and the onset of crustal assimilation, including the incorporation of high-Ca skarn-derived xenocrysts. Textural re-equilibration is required for these crystals to form a single population in CSD. A second episode of crystal growth at shallower levels is represented by chemically homogenous plagioclase crystals <1.6 mm in size. Crustal assimilation is indicated by, for example, oxygen isotopes and based on the CSD data, crystallisation combined with contamination is likely semi-continuous in these upper crustal storage chambers. The CSD data observed in the basaltic-andesite samples are remarkably consistent and require a large-volume steady state magmatic system beneath Merapi in which late textural equilibration plays a significant role. Plagioclase CSDs of co-eruptive magmatic and plutonic inclusions may contain a third crystal population (<1 mm) not found in the lavas. This third population has probably formed from enhanced degassing of portions of basaltic-andesite magma at shallow crustal levels which resulted in increased crystallinity and basaltic-andesite mush inclusions. A suite of coarse plutonic inclusions is also present that

  14. Continuous terrestrial geodetic monitoring of the 2007 Lava Fan in the Sciara de Fuoco (Stromboli volcano, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, G.; Bonforte, A.; Cantarero, M.; Spata, A.

    2009-12-01

    At the end of the 2002-2003 eruption, a terrestrial monitoring system was set up to regularly measure the movements of benchmarks installed inside the Sciara del Fuoco (hereafter SdF) (Puglisi et al., 2005). This system, named THEODOROS, is based on a remotely controlled robotized Total Station installed near Punta Labronzo, on the northern border of the SdF. The 2007 eruption caused a dramatic change in the operations of THEODOROS. Indeed, the 2007 lava flows destroyed all the benchmarks installed on the northern part of the SdF, leaving only those on its central part. This eruption produced a lava fan at the base of the SdF, due to the rapid cooling of the lava flows on entering the sea. The continuous overlapping of several flows during the eruption built a thick lava body (the fan); it was emplaced on a very steep slope, partially originated during the landslides occurring in December 2002, producing a hazardous condition due to the potential sudden sliding of this fan into the sea. In order to monitor the stability of this lava fan, a new terrestrial geodetic network, was implemented on 6 April 2007, by installing 5 reflectors along a profile crossing the lava body, approximately over the old coastline. Later, in June 2007, 4 more reflectors were installed at higher and lower altitudes with respect to the previous profile, to obtain more information on the overall deformation of the lava body. Measurements were rather noisy during the first months, but a better definition of the reference system strongly improved the quality of the data. The position of the 9 benchmarks over the lava fan enable the areal distribution of the deformation to be drawn. The measurements carried out every 10 minutes allow following their motion with high temporal detail. The data collected since the end of the eruption highlighted a significant downslope motion of the entire lava fan, decreasing from the South to the North, where the body is buttressed by the rocky northern wall of

  15. Geochemical and isotopic constraints on the genesis of the Jueluotage native copper mineralized basalt, Eastern Tianshan, Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dayu; Zhou, Taofa; Yuan, Feng; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Said, Nuru; Lu, Yongjun; Pirajno, Franco

    2013-09-01

    The Jueluotage native copper mineralized basalt is located in the Jueluotage Volcanic-sedimentary Belt, Eastern Tianshan, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous region. The basalt, amygdaloidal basalt and tuff, which host native copper mineralization, were erupted in the lower strata of the Late Carboniferous Matoutan Formation. Whole-rock geochemistry shows that the basaltic occurrences at Shilipo, Heilongfeng, Changchengshan and Dongjianfeng have fractionated chondrite-normalized REE distributions and distinctly negative primitive mantle-normalized Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies. The whole-rock strontium, neodymium and lead isotopic data indicate low εSr(t) (-7.9 to +23.6), high εNd(t) (+2.5 to +7.1), with restricted 206Pb/204Pb (18.152-18.491), 207Pb/204Pb (15.521-15.562) and 208Pb/204Pb (37.978-38.251) ranges. On the basis of these data, we report that the Cu-bearing basalt is associated with high-iron tholeiitic basalts that were sourced from depleted continental lithosphere mantle garnet-bearing peridotite. The primary magma of the Cu-bearing basalt was: (1) relatively low in silica and magnesium; and (2) underwent only slight olivine and clinopyroxene crystal fractionation during the magmatic evolution process. In the Jueluotage belt, the Shilipo basalt lavas display significant geochemical similarities to numerous mafic intrusions that are present throughout the Jueluotage belt. Those mafic lavas and intrusions probably represent successive pulses of mafic magmatism, which lasted between ca. 310 and 270 Ma. A crucial empirical observation is that the Jueluotage volcanic-sedimentary belt is a well-known metallogenic province that contains a wide range of copper, nickel, gold, and iron mineral deposits. These mineral systems were formed at different times and are associated with radically different ore-forming processes. However, they are all within the Jueluotage belt, which is interpreted to be a suture zone between the Junggar and Tarim plates, northwestern China. We

  16. Melt Channel Formation in Paraffin With Applications to Lava Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, J. A.; Mills, C. J.

    2005-12-01

    We present the results from laboratory experiments designed to explore channel formation caused by instabilities in fluid flow, and to provide a simple experimental basis to facilitate the extension of lava channel theory. Kelemen et. al. [1995] reported on a series of experiments that explored channel formation resulting from fluid instabilities caused by the ``reactive infiltration instability'' (RII). However, the material used in portions of their experiments was undesirable because of a poorly suited rheology. Therefore, our experiments were initiated as an extension of those earlier experiments, using instead a material with more robust rheological properties. The material chosen for this series of experiments is a paraffin with a freezing temperature of 4°C, which is transparent when liquid and opaque-white when frozen. The paraffin is pumped at a constant and controlled rate into a narrow gap between two circular plates, both with a diameter of ~51cm. The gap is open along the circumference of the plates, allowing the paraffin to flow out of the gap once it reaches the edge of the plate. The upper plate is constructed of Plexiglas to allow observation of the wax below, and it has a hole in the center through which the paraffin is pumped. The lower plate is constructed of aluminum, painted black, and kept at -5°C by circulating coolant through a reservoir below the it. As the paraffin, which is kept at 20°C before being pumped into the gap, flows over the cold lower plate, it begins to freeze and eventually fills up the gap between the plates. A single channel then forms, surrounded by solid paraffin, and the liquid being pumped in is transported via this channel to the edge of the plate. This is a stable state for all but the lowest flow rates attempted and verifies the results from the earlier work exploring the RII. We conducted experiments at different flows rates from 270mL/min to <30mL/min, and recorded the dimensions of the steady state channel

  17. Geochemistry of 24 Ma Basalts from Northeast Egypt: Implications for Small-Scale Convection Beneath the East African Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endress, C. A.; Furman, T.; Ali Abu El-Rus, M.

    2009-12-01

    Basalts ~24 Ma in the Cairo-Suez and Fayyum districts of NE Egypt represent the youngest and northernmost lavas potentially associated with the initiation of rifting of the Red Sea. The age of these basalts corresponds to a time period of significant regional magmatism that occurred subsequent to emplacement of 30 Ma flood basalts attributed to the Afar Plume in Ethiopia and Yemen. Beginning ~28 Ma, widespread magmatism occurred across supra-equatorial Africa in Hoggar (Algeria), Tibesti (Chad), Darfur (Sudan), Turkana (Kenya) and Samalat, Bahariya, Quesir and the Sinai Peninsula (Egypt) (e.g. Allegre et al., 1981; Meneisy, 1990; Baldridge et al., 1991; Wilson and Guiraud, 1992; Furman et al., 2006; Lucassen et al., 2008). Available geochemical and isotopic data indicate that Hoggar and Darfur basalts are similar to Turkana lavas, although no direct link between the N African lavas and the Kenya Plume has been made. New geochemical data on the NE Egyptian basalts provide insight into the thermochemical, isotopic, and mineralogical characteristics of the mantle beneath the region in which they were emplaced. The basalts are subalkaline with OIB-like incompatible trace element abundances and homogeneous major element, trace element and isotopic geochemistry. They display relatively flat ITE patterns, with notable positive Pb and negative P anomalies. Isotopic (143Nd/144Nd = 0.51274-0.51285, 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7049-0.7050) and trace element signatures (Ce/Pb = 16-22, Ba/Nb = 9-14, and La/Nb = 0.9-1.0) are consistent with melting of a sub-lithospheric source that has been slightly contaminated by continental crust during ascent and emplacement. The Pb isotopic ratios (206Pb/204Pb = 18.53-18.62, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.59-15.64, and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.80-39.00) in the Egyptian basalts are close to the range of those found in the 30 Ma Ethiopian flood basalts, which are distinct from the more highly radiogenic, high-μ type signature seen in basalts from Turkana, Darfur, and Hoggar

  18. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ivarsson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The oceanic crust is believed to host the largest potential habitat for microbial life on Earth, yet, still we lack substantial information about the abundance, diversity, and consequence of its biosphere. The last two decades have involved major research accomplishments within this field and a change in view of the ocean crust and its potential to harbour life. Here fossilised fungal colonies in subseafloor basalts are reported from three different seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. The fungal colonies consist of various characteristic structures interpreted as fungal hyphae, fruit bodies and spores. The fungal hyphae are well preserved with morphological characteristics such as hyphal walls, septa, thallic conidiogenesis, and hyphal tips with hyphal vesicles within. The fruit bodies consist of large (∼50–200 µm in diameter body-like structures with a defined outer membrane and an interior filled with calcite. The fruit bodies have at some stage been emptied of their contents of spores and filled by carbonate-forming fluids. A few fruit bodies not filled by calcite and with spores still within support this interpretation. Spore-like structures (ranging from a few µm to ∼20 µm in diameter are also observed outside of the fruit bodies and in some cases concentrated to openings in the membrane of the fruit bodies. The hyphae, fruit bodies and spores are all closely associated with a crust lining the vein walls that probably represent a mineralized biofilm. The results support a fungal presence in deep subseafloor basalts and indicate that such habitats were vital between ∼81 and 48 Ma.

  19. Insights into mantle heterogeneities: mid-ocean ridge basalt tapping an ocean island magma source in the North Fiji Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brens, R., Jr.; Jenner, F. E.; Bullock, E. S.; Hauri, E. H.; Turner, S.; Rushmer, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    The North Fiji Basin (NFB), and connected Lau Basin, is located in a complex area of volcanism. The NFB is a back-arc basin (BAB) that is a result of an extinct subduction zone, incorporating the complicated geodynamics of two rotating landmasses: Fiji and the Vanuatu island arc. Collectively this makes the spreading centers of the NFB the highest producing spreading centers recorded. Here we present volatile concentrations, major, and trace element data for a previously undiscovered triple junction spreading center in the NFB. We show our enrichment samples contain some of the highest water contents yet reported from (MORB). The samples from the NFB exhibit a combination of MORB-like major chemical signatures along with high water content similar to ocean island basalts (OIB). This peculiarity in geochemistry is unlike other studied MORB or back-arc basin (to our knowledge) that is not attributed to subduction related signatures. Our results employ the use of volatiles (carbon dioxide and water) and their constraints (Nb and Ce) combined with trace element ratios to indicate a potential source for the enrichment in the North Fiji Basin. The North Fiji Basin lavas are tholeiitic with similar major element composition as averaged primitive normal MORB; with the exception of averaged K2O and P2O5, which are still within range for observed normal MORB. For a mid-ocean ridge basalt, the lavas in the NFB exhibit a large range in volatiles: H2O (0.16-0.9 wt%) and CO2 (80-359 ppm). The NFB lavas have volatile levels that exceed the range of MORB and trend toward a more enriched source. In addition, when compared to MORB, the NFB lavas are all enriched in H2O/Ce. La/Sm values in the NFB lavas range from 0.9 to 3.8 while, Gd/Yb values range from 1.2 to 2.5. The NFB lavas overlap the MORB range for both La/Sm (~1.1) and Gd/Yb (~1.3). However, they span a larger range outside of the MORB array. High La/Sm and Gd/Yb ratios (>1) are indications of deeper melting within the

  20. The airborne lava-seawater interaction plume at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    Lava flows into the sea at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, and generates an airborne gas and aerosol plume. Water (H2O), hydrogen chloride (HCl), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) gases were quantified in the plume in 2004–2005, using Open Path Fourier Transform infra-red Spectroscopy. The molar abundances of these species and thermodynamic modelling are used to discuss their generation. The range in molar HCl / H2O confirms that HCl is generated when seawater is boiled dry and magnesium salts are hydrolysed (as proposed by [T.M. Gerlach, J.L. Krumhansl, R.O. Fournier, J. Kjargaard, Acid rain from the heating and evaporation of seawater by molten lava: a new volcanic hazard, EOS (Trans. Am. Geophys. Un.) 70 (1989) 1421–1422]), in contrast to models of Na-metasomatism. Airborne droplets of boiled seawater brine form nucleii for subsequent H2O and HCl condensation, which acidifies the droplets and liberates CO2 gas from bicarbonate and carbonate. NO2 is derived from the thermal decomposition of nitrates in coastal seawater, which takes place as the lava heats droplets of boiled seawater brine to 350–400 °C. SO2 is derived from the degassing of subaerial lava flows on the coastal plain. The calculated mass flux of HCl from a moderate-sized ocean entry significantly increases the total HCl emission at Kīlauea (including magmatic sources) and is comparable to industrial HCl emitters in the United States. For larger lava ocean entries, the flux of HCl will cause intense local environmental hazards, such as high localised HCl concentrations and acid rain.

  1. Mantle amphibole control on arc and within-plate chemical signatures: Quaternary lavas from Kurdistan Province, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirkhah, M.; Allen, M. B.; Neill, I.; Emami, M. H.; McLeod, C.

    2012-04-01

    New analyses of Quaternary lavas from Kurdistan Province in west Iran shed light on the nature of collision zone magmatism. The rocks are from the Turkish-Iranian plateau within the Arabia-Eurasia collision. Compositions are typically basanite, hawaiite and alkali basalt. Sr-Nd isotope values are close to BSE, which is similar to Quaternary alkali basalts of NW Iran, but distinct from a depleted source melting under Mount Ararat. The chemical signatures suggests variable melting of two distinct sources. One inferred source produced melts with La/Nb from~3.5 to~1.2, which we model as the result of depletion of amphibole during ≤1% melting in the garnet stability field. We infer phlogopite in the source of potassic lavas from Takab. Lithosphere delamination or slab break-off mechanisms for triggering melting are problematic, as the lithosphere is~150-200km thick. It is possible that the negative dT/dP section of the amphibole peridotite solidus was crossed as a result of lithospheric thickening in the collision zone. This explanation is conditional upon the mantle source being weakly hydrated and so only containing a small proportion of amphibole, which can be exhausted during small degrees of partial melting. Our model maybe viable for other magmatic areas within orogenic plateaux, e.g. northern Tibet. Depletion of mantle amphibole may also help explain larger scale transitions from arc to within-plate chemistry in orogens, such as the Palaeogene Arabia-Eurasia system.

  2. Time Series Periodicity for Lava Compositions of Shield Volcanoes Above Hot Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, V.; Zhmodik, A.

    2005-05-01

    Thoileitic sheets for the Siberian Platform trapps and basalts of Hawaii and Iceland have similar time series for lava profiles in the following respects: 1. periodicity 2. interruption of distribution functions both at the suit boundaries and within continuous discharge of active volcanoes 3. presence or absence of time trends 4. substantial difference in distribution function types for profiles resulted from fissure conduit located at 30-40 km distance from each other. Wavelet analysis shows the functions for tholeiitic shield volcanoes are similar for the time intervals form 20 to 20000 years. Spectral characteristics of petrogenous and trace components as well as isotope ratios show coherent and incoherent values for frequency spectra. The main tendencies for evolution of compositions in completed sequences are similar. The spatial zoning depends on structural and geodynamic conditions of a lava sheet formation and its size. The trapps of the Siberian Platform can be regarded as unique structures from this viewpoint. The most various are time and spatial series for the Hawaiian Island. Two types of time series evolution can be distinguished: `Icelandic' and `Hawaiian'. It is interesting to note, that for the Western Siberian Slab the former type is typical, and for the Siberian Platform - the latter. The reasons for this phenomenon are still not clear. This work was supported by the RFBR (Grants No. 04-05-64276, No. 04-05-64107, and No. 04-05-64332).

  3. Emplacement dynamics and timescale of a Holocene flow from the Cima Volcanic Field (CA): Insights from rheology and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, Arianna; Beem, Jordon; Gomez, Francisco; Huntley, John Warren; Robertson, Timothy; Whittington, Alan

    2017-11-01

    We present a rheological and morphological study of a Holocene lava flow emitted by a monogenetic cinder cone in the Cima Volcanic Field, eastern California. Our field observations focused on surface morphology, which transitions from smooth core extrusions near the vent to jagged 'a'ā blocks over the majority of the flow, and on channel and levée dimensions. We collected airborne photogrammetry data and used it to generate a digital elevation model. From this, the total flow volume was estimated and surface roughness was quantified in terms of standard deviation of the real surface (5 cm resolution) from the software-generated 1 m-average plane. Sample textural analyses revealed that the near-vent portion of the flow is significantly more crystalline (ϕxtal = 0.95 ± 0.04) than the main flow body (ϕxtal = 0.66 ± 0.11). The rheology of Cima lavas was determined experimentally by concentric cylinder viscometry between 1550 °C and 1160 °C, including the first subliquidus rheology measurements for a continental intraplate trachybasaltic lava. The experimentally determined effective viscosity increases from 54 Pa·s to 1361 Pa·s during cooling from the liquidus ( 1230 °C) to 1160 °C, where crystal fraction is 0.11. The lava viscosity over this range is still lower than most basaltic melts, due to the high alkali content of Cima lavas ( 6 wt% Na2O + K2O). Monte Carlo simulations were used to account for and propagate experimental uncertainties, and to determine which rheological model (Bingham, power law, or Herschel-Bulkley) provides the best-fit of the obtained rheological data. Results suggest that Bingham and Herschel-Bulkley models are statistically indistinguishable from each other, and that both fit the data better than a power law model. By combining field observations and experimental results, we reconstructed the eruption temperature and few days-long emplacement history of the Cima flow.

  4. Constraining pre-eruptive volatile contents and degassing histories in submarine lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M.; Soule, S. A.; Liao, Y.; Le Roux, V.; Brodsky, H.; Kurz, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Vesicle textures in submarine lavas have been used to calculate total (pre-eruption) volatile concentrations in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB), which provide constraints on upper mantle volatile contents and CO2 fluxes along the global MOR. In this study, we evaluate vesicle size distributions and volatile contents in a suite of 20 MORB samples, which span the range of typical vesicularities and bubble number densities observed in global MORB. We demonstrate that 2D imaging coupled with traditional stereological methods closely reproduces vesicle size distributions and vesicularities measured using 3D x-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT). We further demonstrate that x-ray μ-CT provides additional information about bubble deformation and clustering that are linked to bubble nucleation and lava emplacement dynamics. The validation of vesicularity measurements allows us to evaluate the methods for calculating total CO2 concentrations in MORB using dissolved volatile content (SIMS), vesicularity, vesicle gas density, and equations of state. We model bubble and melt contraction during lava quenching and show that the melt viscosity prevents bubbles from reaching equilibrium at the glass transition temperature. Thus, we suggest that higher temperatures should be used to calculate exsolved volatile concentrations based on observed vesicularities. Our revised method reconciles discrepancies between exsolved volatile contents measured by gas manometry and calculated from vesicularity. In addition, our revised method suggests that some previous studies may have overestimated MORB volatile concentrations by up to a factor of two, with the greatest differences in samples with the highest vesicularities (e.g., `popping rock' 2πD43). These new results have important implications for CO2/Nb of `undegassed' MORB and global ridge CO2 fluxes. Lastly, our revised method yields constant total CO2 concentrations in sample suites from individual MOR eruptions that experienced syn

  5. American pika in a low-elevation lava landscape: expanding the known distribution of a temperature-sensitive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinderman, Matt

    2015-09-01

    In 2010, the American pika (Ochotona princeps fenisex) was denied federal protection based on limited evidence of persistence in low-elevation environments. Studies in nonalpine areas have been limited to relatively few environments, and it is unclear whether patterns observed elsewhere (e.g., Bodie, CA) represent other nonalpine habitats. This study was designed to establish pika presence in a new location, determine distribution within the surveyed area, and evaluate influences of elevation, vegetation, lava complexity, and distance to habitat edge on pika site occupancy. In 2011 and 2012, we conducted surveys for American pika on four distinct subalpine lava flows of Newberry National Volcanic Monument, Oregon, USA. Field surveys were conducted at predetermined locations within lava flows via silent observation and active searching for pika sign. Site habitat characteristics were included as predictors of occupancy in multinomial regression models. Above and belowground temperatur