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Sample records for basaltic explosive volcanism

  1. A depleted, not ideally chondritic bulk Earth: The explosive-volcanic basalt loss hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Paul H.

    2008-04-01

    It has long been customary to assume that in the bulk composition of the Earth, all refractory-lithophile elements (including major oxides Al 2O 3 and CaO, all of the REE, and the heat-producing elements Th and U) occur in chondritic, bulk solar system, proportion to one another. Recently, however, Nd-isotopic studies (most notably Boyet M. and Carlson R. W. (2006) A new geochemical model for the Earth's mantle inferred from 146Sm- 142Nd systematics. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.250, 254-268) have suggested that at least the outer portion of the planet features a Nd/Sm ratio depleted to ˜0.93 times the chondritic ratio. The primary reaction to this type of evidence has been to invoke a "hidden" reservoir of enriched matter, sequestered into the deepest mantle as a consequence of primordial differentiation. I propose a hypothesis that potentially explains the evidence for Nd/Sm depletion in a very different way. Among the handful of major types of differentiated asteroidal meteorites, two (ureilites and aubrites) are ultramafic restites so consistently devoid of plagioclase that meteoriticists were once mystified as to how all the complementary plagioclase-rich matter (basalt) was lost. The explanation appears to be basalt loss by graphite-fueled explosive volcanism on roughly 100-km sized planetesimals; with the dispersiveness of the process dramatically enhanced, relative to terrestrial experience, because the pyroclastic gases expand into vacuous space (Wilson L. and Keil K. (1991) Consequences of explosive eruptions on small Solar System bodies: the case of the missing basalts on the aubrite parent body. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.104, 505-512). By analogy with lunar pyroclastic products, the typical size of pyroclastic melt/glass droplets under these circumstances will be roughly 0.1 mm. Once separated from an asteroidal or planetesimal gravitational field, droplets of this size will generally spiral toward the Sun, rather than reaccrete, because drag forces such the

  2. 3-D high-speed imaging of volcanic bomb trajectory in basaltic explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, D.; Taddeucci, J; Houghton, B. F.; Orr, Tim R.; Andronico, D.; Del Bello, E.; Kueppers, U.; Ricci, T.; Scarlato, P.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging, in general, and high speed imaging in particular are important emerging tools for the study of explosive volcanic eruptions. However, traditional 2-D video observations cannot measure volcanic ejecta motion toward and away from the camera, strongly hindering our capability to fully determine crucial hazard-related parameters such as explosion directionality and pyroclasts' absolute velocity. In this paper, we use up to three synchronized high-speed cameras to reconstruct pyroclasts trajectories in three dimensions. Classical stereographic techniques are adapted to overcome the difficult observation conditions of active volcanic vents, including the large number of overlapping pyroclasts which may change shape in flight, variable lighting and clouding conditions, and lack of direct access to the target. In particular, we use a laser rangefinder to measure the geometry of the filming setup and manually track pyroclasts on the videos. This method reduces uncertainties to 10° in azimuth and dip angle of the pyroclasts, and down to 20% in the absolute velocity estimation. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by three examples: the development of an explosion at Stromboli, a bubble burst at Halema'uma'u lava lake, and an in-flight collision between two bombs at Stromboli.

  3. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    Pleistocene times. These basalts mark the end of a period of shallow subduction of the Nazca slab beneath the Payenia province and volcanism in the Nevado volcanic field apparently followed the downwarping slab in a north-northwest direction ending in the Northern Segment. The northern Payenia basalts...

  4. Basaltic volcanic episodes of the Yucca Mountain region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize briefly the distribution and geologic characteristics of basaltic volcanism in the Yucca Mountain region during the last 10--12 Ma. This interval largely postdates the major period of silicic volcanism and coincides with and postdates the timing of major extensional faulting in the region. Field and geochronologic data for the basaltic rocks define two distinct episodes. The patterns in the volume and spatial distribution of these basaltic volcanic episodes in the central and southern part of the SNVF are used as a basis for forecasting potential future volcanic activity in vicinity of Yucca Mountain. 33 refs., 2 figs

  5. Long-lived explosive volcanism on Mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Rebecca J.; Rothery, David A.; Conway, Susan J.; Anand, Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    The duration and timing of volcanic activity on Mercury are key indicators of the thermal evolution of the planet and provide a valuable comparative example for other terrestrial bodies. The majority of effusive volcanism on Mercury appears to have occurred early in the planet's geological history (~4.1–3.55 Ga), but there is also evidence for explosive volcanism. Here we present evidence that explosive volcanism occurred from at least 3.9 Ga until less than a billion years ago and so was sub...

  6. Pliocene Basaltic Volcanism in The East Anatolia Region (EAR), Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyan, Vural; Özdemir, Yavuz; Keskin, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    East Anatolia Region (EAR) is one of the high Plateau which is occurred with north-south compressional regime formed depending on continent-continent collision between Eurasia and Arabia plates (Şengör and Kidd, 1979). Recent studies have revealed that last oceanic lithosphere in the EAR have completely depleted to 20 million years ago based on fission track ages (Okay et al. 2010). Our initial studies suggest that extensively volcanic activity in the EAR peaked in the Pliocene and continued in the same productivity throughout Quaternary. Voluminous basaltic lava plateaus and basaltic lavas from local eruption centers occurred as a result of high production level of volcanism during the Pliocene time interval. In order to better understand the spatial and temporal variations in Pliocene basaltic volcanism and to reveal isotopic composition, age and petrologic evolution of the basaltic volcanism, we have started to study basaltic volcanism in the East Anatolia within the framework of a TUBITAK project (project number:113Y406). Petrologic and geochemical studies carried out on the Pliocene basaltic lavas indicate the presence of subduction component in the mantle source, changing the character of basaltic volcanism from alkaline to subalkaline and increasing the amount of spinel peridotitic melts (contributions of lithospheric mantle?) in the mantle source between 5.5-3.5 Ma. FC, AFC and EC-AFC modelings reveal that the while basaltic lavas were no or slightly influenced by crustal contamination and fractional crystallization, to more evolved lavas such as bazaltictrachyandesite, basalticandesite, trachybasalt might have been important processes. Results of our melting models and isotopic analysis data (Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf, 18O) indicate that the Pliocene basaltic rocks were derived from both shallow and deep mantle sources with different melting degrees ranging between 0.1 - 4 %. The percentage of spinel seems to have increased in the mantle source of the basaltic

  7. Basaltic Lava Flow vs. Welded Basaltic Ignimbrite: Determining the Depositional Nature of a Volcanic Flow in the Akaroa Volcanic Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, E. A.; Hampton, S.

    2014-12-01

    Welded basaltic ignimbrites are one of the rarest forms of ignimbrites found on Earth and can often have characteristics that are indistinguishable from those of basaltic lava flows. This study evaluates a basaltic volcanic flow in a coastal cliff sequence in Raupo Bay, Akaroa Volcanic Complex, Banks Peninsula, New Zealand. The Raupo Bay coastal cliff sequence is comprised of 4 units, termed L1, L2, L3, and A, capped by loess. L1 and L2 are basaltic lavas, L3 proximal scoria deposits, which thin inland, and Unit A, a flow with unusual characteristics, which is the focus of this study. Field mapping, sampling, geochemical analysis and petrology were utilized to characterize units. Further detailed structural analysis of Unit A was completed, to determine the nature of the basal contact, variations in welding throughout the unit and the relationship of the layer to the underlying topography. From these analyses it was found: Unit A is thickest in a paleo-valley and thins and mantles higher topography, welding in the unit increases downwards forming topographic controlled columnar jointing, the top of the unit is brecciated and grades into the lower welded/jointed portion, the basal contact is sharp overlying a regional airfall deposit, the unit has a notably distinct geochemical composition from the underlying stratigraphic units, Unit A contains flattened and sheared scoria clasts, has aligned bubbles, and lava lithics. Further thin section analysis of Unit A identified flattened clast boundaries and microlite rimming around phenocrysts. In comparing these features to previous studies on basaltic lavas and ignimbrites it is hypothesized that Unit A is a welded basaltic ignimbrite that was channelized by paleo-topography on the outer flanks of the Akaroa Volcanic Complex. This study furthers the characterization of basaltic ignimbrites and is the first to recognize basaltic ignimbrites within the Akaroa Volcanic Complex.

  8. The biological consequences of flood basalt volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, M.

    2012-12-01

    Flood basalt eruptions are among the largest environmental perturbations of the Phanerozoic. The rapid release of CO2 from a large igneous province would have triggered a chain of events that can include climate warming, ocean acidification, reduced seawater carbonate saturation, and expanded oceanic anoxia. Those stressors have widely negative impacts on marine organisms, especially on calcified taxa, by affecting their respiratory physiology and reducing energy available for growth and reproduction. Many Phanerozoic extinctions, most notably the end-Permian and end-Triassic mass extinctions, coincided with flood basalt eruptions and shared distinctive patterns of taxonomic and ecological selectivity. In these extinctions, highly active organisms were more likely to survive because they possess physiological adaptations for maintaining internal pH during activity, which also proves useful when buffering pH against ocean acidification. In contrast, species that did not move and had low metabolic rates, such as brachiopods and sponges, suffered considerable losses during these extinctions. Heavily-calcified organisms, especially corals, were particularly vulnerable; as a result, ocean acidification and saturation state changes from flood basalt eruptions often triggered crises in reef ecosystems. This characteristic pattern of selectivity during "physiological" extinctions that closely coincided with flood basalts provides a template for assessing the causes of other extinction events. Because these crises also provide deep time analogues for the ongoing anthropogenic crisis of warming, ocean acidification, and expanded anoxia, the selectivity patterns can also help constrain "winners" and "losers" over upcoming decades.

  9. Thermal models for basaltic volcanism on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyil, L.; McEwen, A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new model for the thermal emissions from active basaltic eruptions on Io. While our methodology shares many similarities with previous work, it is significantly different in that (1) it uses a field tested cooling model and (2) the model is more applicable to pahoehoe flows and lava lakes than fountain-fed, channelized, 'a'a flows. This model demonstrates the large effect lava porosity has on the surface cooling rate (with denser flows cooling more slowly) and provides a preliminary tool for examining some of the hot spots on Io. The model infrared signature of a basaltic eruption is largely controlled by a single parameter, ??, the average survival time for a lava surface. During an active eruption surfaces are quickly covered or otherwise destroyed and typical values of ?? for a basaltic eruption are expected to be on the order of 10 seconds to 10 minutes. Our model suggests that the Galileo SSI eclipse data are consistent with moderately active to quiescent basaltic lava lakes but are not diagnostic of such activity. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Petrology and Geochemistry of Jinlongdingzi Active Volcano—the Most Recent Basaltic Explosive Volcano at Longgang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊祺诚; 随建立; 等

    2000-01-01

    The Jinlongdingzi active volcano erupted before 1600a,and it is the latest basaltic explosive volcano at Longgang Volcano.Its volcanic products include the Jinlongdingzi Volcanic cone(elevation 999.4m),the lava flow and the widely-spread volcanic pyroclastic sheet(sihai Pyroclastic Sheet),Jinlongdingzi volcanic rocks are trachybasalts with very similar REE patterns and incompatible element patterns,and their 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios range from 0.704846 ot 0.704921 and from 0.512619 to 0.512646,respectively.It is revealed that the trachybasalt has the character of primary magma derived directly from mantle sources with very little evolution and crust contamination during its ascending.The younger mantle xenoliths demonstrate that the mantle source of the Jinlongdingzi Volcao is hydrous,with relatively low temperature.

  11. Climate Throughout Geologic Time Was Cooled by Sequences of Explosive Volcanic Eruptions Forming Aerosols That Reflect and Scatter Ultraviolet Solar Radiation and Warmed by Relatively Continuous Extrusion of Basaltic Lava that Depletes Ozone, Allowing More Solar Ultraviolet Radiation to Reach Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Active volcanoes of all sizes and eruptive styles, emit chlorine and bromine gases observed to deplete ozone. Effusive, basaltic volcanic eruptions, typical in Hawaii and Iceland, extrude large lava flows, depleting ozone and causing global warming. Major explosive volcanoes also deplete ozone with the same emissions, causing winter warming, but in addition eject megatons of water and sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere where they form sulfuric-acid aerosols whose particles grow large enough to reflect and scatter ultraviolet sunlight, causing net global cooling for a few years. The relative amounts of explosive and effusive volcanism are determined by the configuration of tectonic plates moving around Earth's surface. Detailed studies of climate change throughout geologic history, and since 1965, are not well explained by greenhouse-gas theory, but are explained quite clearly at OzoneDepletionTheory.info. Ozone concentrations vary substantially by the minute and show close relationships to weather system highs and lows (as pointed out by Dobson in the 1920s), to the height of the tropopause, and to the strength and location of polar vortices and jet streams. Integrating the effects of volcanism on ozone concentrations and the effects of ozone concentrations on synoptic weather patterns should improve weather forecasting. For example, the volcano Bárðarbunga, in central Iceland, extruded 85 km2 of basaltic lava between August 29, 2014, and February 28, 2015, having a profound effect on weather. Most surprising, more than a week before the March 4 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, substantial amounts of ozone were released in the vicinity of the volcano precisely when surface deformation showed that magma first began moving up from sills below 4 km depth. Ozone similarly appears to have been emitted 3.5 months before the Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Readily available daily maps of ozone concentrations may allow early warning of an imminent volcanic

  12. Flood basalt volcanism during the past 250 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Michael R.; Stothers, Richard B.

    1988-01-01

    A chronology of the initiation dates of major continental flood basalt volcanism is established from published potassium-argon (K-Ar) and argon-argon (Ar-Ar) ages of basaltic rocks and related basic intrusions. The dating is therefore independent of the biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic time scales. Estimated errors of the initiation dates of the volcanic episodes determined from the distributions of the radiometric ages are, approximately, + or - 4 percent. There were 11 distinct episodes during the past 250 million years. Sometimes appearing in pairs, the episodes have occurred quasi-periodically with a mean cycle time of 32 + or - 1 (estimated error of the mean) million years. The initiation dates of the episodes are close to the estimated dates of mass extinctions of marine organisms. Showers of impacting comets may be the cause.

  13. Heavy minerals in basalt maares and diatremes of South-Slovak alkali basaltic volcanic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heavy mineral is one with a density that is greater than 2.8 g/cm3. Heavy mineral suites are usually used for determination of provenance and history of sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. The present study is focused on heavy minerals from pyroclastic rocks collected in maars and diatremes from the South Slovakian alkali basalt volcanic field. Practical part describes sampling strategy and methods of heavy mineral separation. Heavy minerals association from maar Hodejov and Filakovo as well as from diatremes Surice and Tachty were studied. The results indicates, that the samples are suitable for further research like geochronology, definition of possible heavy minerals source rocks and sedimentology analyses. This work will help us to get new information about alkali basalt volcanism in Southern Slovakia. (author)

  14. Numerical simulation of basaltic lava flows in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand—implication for volcanic hazard assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Kereszturi, G.; Volcanic Risk Solutions, Institute of Agriculture and Environment, Massey University, New Zealand; Cappello, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia; Ganci, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia; Procter, J.; Volcanic Risk Solutions, Institute of Agriculture and Environment, Massey University, New Zealand; Németh, K.; Volcanic Risk Solutions, Institute of Agriculture and Environment, Massey University, New Zealand; Del Negro, C.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia; Cronin, S. J.; Volcanic Risk Solutions, Institute of Agriculture and Environment, Massey University, New Zealand

    2014-01-01

    Monogenetic volcanic fields, such as the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand, are common on the Earth’s surface and are typically dominated by basaltic lava flows up to 10 s of km long. In monogenetic volcanic fields located in close proximity to human population and infrastructure, lava flows are a significant threat. In this study, lava flow emplacement conditions for some basaltic eruptions of the AVF were reconstructed using the thermo-rheological MAGFLOW model. Eight existi...

  15. Investigating the explosivity of shallow sub-aqueous basaltic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtagh, R.; White, J. D. L.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions produce pyroclasts containing vesicles, clearly implying exsolution of volatiles from the magma has occurred. Our aim is to understand the textural characteristics of vesiculated clasts as a quantitative indicator of the eruptive behaviour of a volcano. Assessing water's role in volatile degassing and outgassing has been and is being well documented for terrestrial eruptions; the same cannot be said, however, for their shallow subaqueous counterparts. The eruptive behaviour of Surtseyan volcanoes, which include both subaqueous and subaerial phases (for example, the type-location Surtsey, Iceland in 1963) is under investigation here and for good reason. Volcanic eruptions during which water and basaltic magma come into contact appear to ignite violent eruptions of many of the small "monogenetic" volcanoes so abundant on Earth. A key problem remains that detailed conditions of water-magma interactions are not yet fully understood. Field samples obtained from exposed sequences deposited originally in a subaqueous environment allow for the necessary analysis of lapilli. With the aid of experimental data, mathematical modelling and terrestrial analogues the ambition is to unravel volatile degassing, ascent histories and fragmentation processes, allowing us ultimately to identify both the role water plays in the explosivity of shallow subaqueous eruptions, and the rise history of magma to the point of interaction. The first site, Pahvant Butte is located in southwest Utah, U.S. It is a well preserved tuff cone overlying a subaqueously deposited mound of glassy ash composed of sideromelane and tachylite. It was erupted under ~85m of water into Lake Bonneville approximately 15,300 years ago. Our focus is on samples collected from a well-bedded, broadly scoured coarse ash and lapilli lithofacies on the eastern flank of the edifice. Vesicularity indices span from 52.6% - 60.8%, with very broad vesicularity ranges, 20.6% - 81.0% for one extreme sample. The

  16. Combined effect of permeability and crystallization on the explosive eruption of basaltic magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, P.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Houghton, B. F.; Crozier, J.

    2015-12-01

    Plinian eruptions are the most dangerous style of eruptive activity of basaltic magma. In this study, we focus on the two best studied Plinian eruptions of basaltic magma at Mt. Tarawera, New Zealand (1886 CE) and Mt. Etna, Italy (122 BCE). We measured and analyzed the porosity-permeability relationships of the pyroclasts from both eruptions. We then used numerical modeling to assess the relative importance of two competing processes during eruptive magma ascent, which are the syneruptive crystallization that increases viscosity, potentially increasing bubble overpressure, and the open-system degassing of the permeable magma that allows the pressurized gas to escape, potentially reducing bubble overpressure. We find that the onset of crystallization is likely to have occurred prior to the onset of magma percolation. The orders of magnitude increase in magma viscosity due to the nucleation and growth of microlites had the combined effect of rapidly increasing the decompression rate, due to viscous pressure losses associated with magma flow within the volcanic conduit, and decreasing the rates of bubble growth, thus building up large overpressures inside bubbles. Although measured permeabilities of the studied pyroclasts are 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than their silicic counterpart, our model results show that crystallization and subsequent increase in viscosity are likely to surpass the effect of open-system gas loss, thus increasing bubble overpressure, required for explosive magma fragmentation.

  17. Sedimentology, eruptive mechanism and facies architecture of basaltic scoria cones from the Auckland Volcanic Field (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly

    2016-09-01

    Scoria cones are a common type of basaltic to andesitic small-volume volcanoes (e.g. 10- 1-10- 5 km3) that results from gas-bubble driven explosive eruptive styles. Although they are small in volume, they can produce complex eruptions, involving multiple eruptive styles. Eight scoria cones from the Quaternary Auckland Volcanic Field in New Zealand were selected to define the eruptive style variability from their volcanic facies architecture. The reconstruction of their eruptive and pyroclastic transport mechanisms was established on the basis of study of their volcanic sedimentology, stratigraphy, and measurement of their pyroclast density, porosity, Scanning Electron Microscopy, 2D particle morphology analysis and Visible and Near Visible Infrared Spectroscopy. Collection of these data allowed defining three end-member types of scoria cones inferred to be constructed from lava-fountaining, transitional fountaining and Strombolian type, and explosive Strombolian type. Using the physical and field-based characteristics of scoriaceous samples a simple generalised facies model of basaltic scoria cones for the AVF is developed that can be extended to other scoria cones elsewhere. The typical AVF scoria cone has an initial phreatomagmatic phases that might reduce the volume of magma available for subsequent scoria cone forming eruptions. This inferred to have the main reason to have decreased cone volumes recognised from Auckland in comparison to other volcanic fields evolved dominantly in dry eruptive condition (e.g. no external water influence). It suggests that such subtle eruptive style variations through a scoria cone evolution need to be integrated into the hazard assessment of a potentially active volcanic field such as that in Auckland.

  18. Magnitude-frequency distribution of volcanic explosion earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Iguchi, Masato; Hendrasto, Mohammad; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Yamada, Taishi; Ripepe, Maurizio; Genco, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    Magnitude-frequency distributions of volcanic explosion earthquakes that are associated with occurrences of vulcanian and strombolian eruptions, or gas burst activity, are examined at six active volcanoes. The magnitude-frequency distribution at Suwanosejima volcano, Japan, shows a power-law distribution, which implies self-similarity in the system, as is often observed in statistical characteristics of tectonic and volcanic earthquakes. On the other hand, the magnitude-frequency distributions at five other volcanoes, Sakurajima and Tokachi-dake in Japan, Semeru and Lokon in Indonesia, and Stromboli in Italy, are well explained by exponential distributions. The statistical features are considered to reflect source size, as characterized by a volcanic conduit or chamber. Earthquake generation processes associated with vulcanian, strombolian and gas burst events are different from those of eruptions ejecting large amounts of pyroclasts, since the magnitude-frequency distribution of the volcanic explosivity index is generally explained by the power law.

  19. Particle-water heat transfer during explosive volcanic eruptions

    OpenAIRE

    Woodcock, D. C.; Gilbert, Jennie; Lane, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal interaction between volcanic particles and water during explosive eruptions has been quantified using a numerical heat transfer model for spherical particles. The model couples intraparticle conduction with heat transfer from the particle surface by boiling water in order to explore heat loss with time for a range of particle diameters. The results are combined with estimates of particle settling times to provide insight into heat removal during eruption from samples of volcanic parti...

  20. Explosive eruption of coal and basalt and the end-Permian mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Darcy E; Sleep, Norman H

    2012-01-01

    The end-Permian extinction decimated up to 95% of carbonate shell-bearing marine species and 80% of land animals. Isotopic excursions, dissolution of shallow marine carbonates, and the demise of carbonate shell-bearing organisms suggest global warming and ocean acidification. The temporal association of the extinction with the Siberia flood basalts at approximately 250 Ma is well known, and recent evidence suggests these flood basalts may have mobilized carbon in thick deposits of organic-rich sediments. Large isotopic excursions recorded in this period are potentially explained by rapid venting of coal-derived methane, which has primarily been attributed to metamorphism of coal by basaltic intrusion. However, recently discovered contemporaneous deposits of fly ash in northern Canada suggest large-scale combustion of coal as an additional mechanism for rapid release of carbon. This massive coal combustion may have resulted from explosive interaction with basalt sills of the Siberian Traps. Here we present physical analysis of explosive eruption of coal and basalt, demonstrating that it is a viable mechanism for global extinction. We describe and constrain the physics of this process including necessary magnitudes of basaltic intrusion, mixing and mobilization of coal and basalt, ascent to the surface, explosive combustion, and the atmospheric rise necessary for global distribution.

  1. Measurement of the Dielectric Properties of Volcanic Scoria and Basalt at 9370 MHz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yongchun; WANG Shijie; OUYANG Ziyuan; LI Xiongyao

    2005-01-01

    Dielectric data for volcanic scoria and basalt on the earth at microwave frequency are extremely sparse, and also crucial for volcanic terrains imaging, and development. In consideration of their similarity to lunar regolith (soils and rocks) in chemical and mineral composition, the dielectric data is significative for passive and active microwave remote sensing on the Moon. This study provides the data about the dielectric properties of three kinds of scoria and two kinds of basalt in China. The method put forward in this paper is also applicable for measuring the dielectric properties of dry rocks and other granular ground materials with low complex dielectric constants. Firstly, the authors measured the ε' and tanδvalues of strip specimens prepared from the mixture of scoria or basalt powder and polythene with the resonant cavity perturbation method at 9370 MHz. Secondly, from the ε' and tanδ values of the mixture, the ε's and ranδs values of solid scoria and basalt were calculated using Lichtenecker's mixture formulae. Finally, the effective complex dielectric constants, ε'e and tanδe, of scoria at different bulk densities were calculated. The results have shown that the ε's and tancδs values of all solid basaltic materials measured (both solid basaltic scoria or basalt) are approximately 7 and 0.05, respectively. With increasing bulk density of scoria, the ε'e and tanδe values of scoria increase significantly.

  2. Holocene explosive volcanism of the Jan Mayen (island) volcanic province, North-Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerløw, Eirik; Haflidason, H.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2016-07-01

    The volcanic island Jan Mayen, located in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, hosts the active stratovolcano of Beerenberg, the northernmost active subaerial volcano in the world. At least five eruptions are known from the island following its discovery in the 17th century, but its eruptive history prior to this is basically unknown. In this paper two sediment cores retrieved close to Jan Mayen have been studied in detail to shed light on the Holocene history of explosive volcanism from the Jan Mayen volcanic province. Horizons with elevated tephra concentrations were identified and tephra from these was analysed to determine major element chemistry of the tephra. The tephra chemistry was used to provide a link between the two cores and the land based tephra records from Jan Mayen Island. We managed to link two well-developed tephra peaks in the cores by their geochemical composition and age to Jan Mayen. One of these peaks represents the 1732 AD eruption of Eggøya while the other peak represents a previously undescribed eruption dated to around 10.3 ka BP. Two less prominent tephra peaks, one in each core, dated to approximately 2.3 and 3.0 ka BP, also have a distinct geochemical character linking them to Jan Mayen volcanism. However, the most prominent tephra layer in the cores located close to Jan Mayen and numerous other cores along the Jan Mayen ridge is the 12.1 ka BP Vedde Ash originating from the Iceland volcanic province. We find that the Holocene volcanism on Jan Mayen is much less explosive than volcanism in Iceland, and propose that either low amounts of explosive volcanic activity from the summit region of Beerenberg or small to absent glacier cover on Beerenberg is responsible for this.

  3. Explosive properties of water in volcanic and hydrothermal systems

    OpenAIRE

    Thiery, Régis; Mercury, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    International audience This paper describes, from a thermodynamic point of view, the physicochemical conditions, under which water behaves as an explosive. This phenomenon occurs frequently in hydrothermal and volcanic systems when water is brutally shifted from its initial equilibrium state. Water (either liquid or gas) becomes metastable or unstable and reequilibrates by violent demixing of a liquid-gas mixture. In a first step, a phenomenological approach of metastability is given in a ...

  4. Preliminary K/Ar geochronology of the Crater Basalt volcanic field (CBVF, northern Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Pécskay

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The Crater Basalt volcanic field is one of the Quaternary intraplate basaltic fields in northern Patagonia. A systematic geological, volcanological and geochronological study of CBVF indicates a multistage history of eruptions of basaltic volcanoes. K/Ar dating, using whole rock samples shows that the measured analytical ages are fully consistent with the available stratigraphic control. The radiometric ages fall into three distinct, internally consistent age groups, which give evidence that there were at least three major episodes of volcanic activity, at about 1.0 Ma, 0.6 Ma and 0.3 Ma ago. The age differences appear to be just significant, even although less than 10 % radiogenic argon was found in the isotope analysis of whole rock samples.

  5. Effect of Miocene basaltic volcanism in Shanwang (Shandong Province, China) on environmental changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; ZhengFu; LIU; JiaQi; CHEN; XiaoYu

    2007-01-01

    Miocene (16-10 Ma) basalts, together with significantly well-preserved fossils (including animal and plant fossils) in the contemporaneously tephra-rich Maar sediments, are located in Shanwang volcanic region, Shandong Province, China. Distribution area of the basaltic eruption products is about 240 km2. Detailed field observations indicate that most of basaltic rocks are fissure eruptive products and some are central eruptives constrained by linear faults. The well-preserved fossils in the lacustrine deposits have been considered to be a result of mass mortalities. Based on physically volcanologic modeling results, eruption column of the basaltic fissure activities in the Shanwang volcanic region is estimated to have entered the stratosphere. Petrographic observations indicate that the basalts have porphyritic textures with phenocrysts of olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and alkali feldspar setting in groundmass of plagioclase feldspar, alkali feldspar, quartz, apatite and glass. Based on observations of tephra, tuff and tuffites collected in the Maar sediments of the Shanwang area, we determined major element oxide concentrations and volatile composition of melt inclusions in phenocrysts and matrix glasses by electron microprobe analysis. Volatile (including S, Cl, F and H2O) concentrations erupted into the stratosphere were estimated by comparing pre- and post-eruptive volatile concentrations. Our determination results show that contents of S, Cl, F and H2O emitted into the stratosphere were 0.18%-0.24%, 0.03%-0.05%, 0.03%-0.05% and 0.4%-0.6%, respectively, which was characterized by high-S contents erupted. Amounts of volatiles emitted in the Shanwang volcanic region are much higher than those in eruptions which had a substantial effect on climate and environment. According to the compositions and amounts of the volatiles erupted from the Miocene basaltic volcanism in Shanwang, we propose a hypothesis that volatile-rich basaltic volcanism could result in

  6. Bimodal magmatism, basaltic volcanic styles, tectonics, and geomorphic processes of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S.S.; Smith, R.P.; Hackett, W.R.; McCurry, M.; Anderson, S.R.; Ferdock, G.C.

    1997-01-01

    Geology presented in this field guide covers a wide spectrum of internal and surficial processes of the eastern Snake River Plain, one of the largest components of the combined late Cenozoic igneous provinces of the western United States. Focus is on widespread Quaternary basaltic plains volcanism that produced coalescent shields and complex eruptive centers that yielded compositionally evolved magmas. The guide is constructed in several parts beginning with discussion sections that provide an overview of the geology followed by road directions, with explanations, for specific locations. The geology overview briefly summarizes the collective knowledge gained, and petrologic implications made, over the past few decades. The field guide covers plains volcanism, lava flow emplacement, basaltic shield growth, phreatomagmatic eruptions, and complex and evolved eruptive centers. Locations and explanations are also provided for the hydrogeology, groundwater contamination, and environmental issues such as range fires and cataclysmic floods associated with the region.

  7. The Mantle and Basalt-Crust Interaction Below the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Schmidt, Marick E.

    2010-01-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) lies on the Jemez Lineament on the southeastern margin of the Colorado Plateau. The field is centered on the Mt. Taylor composite volcano and includes Mesa Chivato to the NE and Grants Ridge to the WSW. MTVF magmatism spans approximately 3.8-1.5 Ma (K-Ar). Magmas are dominantly alkaline with mafic compositions ranging from basanite to hy-basalt and felsic compositions ranging from ne-trachyte to rhyolite. We are investigating the state of the mantle and the spatial and temporal variation in basalt-crustal interaction below the MTVF by examining mantle xenoliths and basalts in the context of new mapping and future Ar-Ar dating. The earliest dated magmatism in the field is a basanite flow south of Mt. Taylor. Mantle xenolith-bearing alkali basalts and basanites occur on Mesa Chivato and in the region of Mt. Taylor, though most basalts are peripheral to the main cone. Xenolith-bearing magmatism persists at least into the early stages of conebuilding. Preliminary examination of the mantle xenolith suite suggests it is dominantly lherzolitic but contains likely examples of both melt-depleted (harzburgitic) and melt-enriched (clinopyroxenitic) mantle. There are aphyric and crystal-poor hawaiites, some of which are hy-normative, on and near Mt. Taylor, but many of the more evolved MTVF basalts show evidence of complex histories. Mt. Taylor basalts higher in the cone-building sequence contain >40% zoned plagioclase pheno- and megacrysts. Other basalts peripheral to Mt. Taylor and at Grants Ridge contain clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts and cumulate-textured xenoliths, suggesting they interacted with lower crustal cumulates. Among the questions we are addressing: What was the chemical and thermal state of the mantle recorded by the basaltic suites and xenoliths and how did it change with time? Are multiple parental basalts (Si-saturated vs. undersaturated) represented and, if so, what changes in the mantle or in the tectonic

  8. Stratigraphical framework of basaltic lavas in Torres Syncline main valley, southern Parana-Etendeka Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Lucas M.; Lima, Evandro F.; Waichel, Breno L.; Scherer, Claiton M.; Barreto, Carla J.

    2014-12-01

    The Paraná-Etendeka Volcanic Province records the volcanism of the Early Cretaceous that precedes the fragmentation of the South-Gondwana supercontinent. Traditionally, investigations of these rocks prioritized the acquisition of geochemical and isotopic data, considering the volcanic stack as a monotonous succession of tabular flows. Torres Syncline is a tectonic structure located in southern Brazil and where the Parana-Etendeka basalts are well preserved. This work provides a detailed analysis of lithofacies and facies architecture, integrated to petrographic and geochemical data. We identified seven distinct lithofacies grouped into four facies associations related to different flow morphologies. The basaltic lava flows in the area can be divided into two contrasting units: Unit I - pahoehoe flow fields; and Unit II - simple rubbly flows. The first unit is build up by innumerous pahoehoe lava flows that cover the sandstones of Botucatu Formation. These flows occur as sheet pahoehoe, compound pahoehoe, and ponded lavas morphologies. Compound lavas are olivine-phyric basalts with intergranular pyroxenes. In ponded lavas and cores of sheet flows coarse plagioclase-phyric basalts are common. The first pahoehoe lavas are more primitive with higher contents of MgO. The emplacement of compound pahoehoe flows is related to low volume eruptions, while sheet lavas were emplaced during sustained eruptions. In contrast, Unit II is formed by thick simple rubbly lavas, characterized by a massive core and a brecciated/rubbly top. Petrographically these flows are characterized by plagioclase-phyric to aphyric basalts with high density of plagioclase crystals in the matrix. Chemically they are more differentiated lavas, and the emplacement is related to sustained high effusion rate eruptions. Both units are low TiO2 and have geochemical characteristics of Gramado magma type. The Torres Syncline main valley has a similar evolution when compared to other Large Igneous Provinces

  9. Preliminary K/Ar geochronology of the Crater Basalt volcanic field (CBVF, northern Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Pécskay

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The Crater Basalt volcanic field is one of the Quaternary intraplate basaltic fields in northern Patagonia. A systematic geological, volcanological and geochronological study of CBVF indicates a multistage history of eruptions of basaltic volcanoes. K/Ar dating, using whole rock samples shows that the measured analytical ages are fully consistent with the available stratigraphic control. The radiometric ages fall into three distinct, internally consistent age groups, which give evidence that there were at least three major episodes of volcanic activity, at about 1.0 Ma, 0.6 Ma and 0.3 Ma ago. The age differences appear to be just significant, even although less than 10 % radiogenic argon was found in the isotope analysis of whole rock samples.El campo volcánico del Basalto Cráter (CVBC constituye uno de los campos basálticos cuaternarios de intraplaca de la Patagonia septentrional. El estudio sistemático de la geología, volcanología y geocronología del CVBC muestra una historia eruptiva multiepisódica de volcanes basálticos. Las dataciones K-Ar realizadas sobre roca total son coherentes con el control estratigráfico. Las edades obtenidas para el Basalto Cráter permiten distinguir tres episodios diferentes, pero individualmente coherentes, de actividad volcánica, ocurridos hace ~1,0 Ma; 0,6 Ma y 0,3 Ma. Las diferencias de edad parecen ser significativas, aún cuando el contenido de argón radiogénico determinado en los análisis de roca total resultó menor al 10 %.

  10. Magmatic inclusions in rhyolites, contaminated basalts, and compositional zonation beneath the Coso volcanic field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, C.R.; Metz, J.

    1984-01-01

    Basaltic lava flows and high-silica rhyolite domes form the Pleistocene part of the Coso volcanic field in southeastern California. The distribution of vents maps the areal zonation inferred for the upper parts of the Coso magmatic system. Subalkalic basalts (Coso volcanic field contain sparse andesitic inclusions (55-61% SiO2). Pillow-like forms, intricate commingling and local diffusive mixing of andesite and rhyolite at contacts, concentric vesicle distribution, and crystal morphologies indicative of undercooling show that inclusions were incorporated in their rhyolitic hosts as blobs of magma. Inclusions were probably dispersed throughout small volumes of rhyolitic magma by convective (mechanical) mixing. Inclusion magma was formed by mixing (hybridization) at the interface between basaltic and rhyolitic magmas that coexisted in vertically zoned igneous systems. Relict phenocrysts and the bulk compositions of inclusions suggest that silicic endmembers were less differentiated than erupted high-silica rhyolite. Changes in inferred endmembers of magma mixtures with time suggest that the steepness of chemical gradients near the silicic/mafic interface in the zoned reservoir may have decreased as the system matured, although a high-silica rhyolitic cap persisted. The Coso example is an extreme case of large thermal and compositional contrast between inclusion and host magmas; lesser differences between intermediate composition magmas and inclusions lead to undercooling phenomena that suggest smaller ??T. Vertical compositional zonation in magma chambers has been documented through study of products of voluminous pyroclastic eruptions. Magmatic inclusions in volcanic rocks provide evidence for compositional zonation and mixing processes in igneous systems when only lava is erupted. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  11. X-ray microspectroscopy of sulfur in basaltic glass inclusions. Inference on the volcanic sulfur emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métrich, N.; Susini, J.; Galoisy, L.; Calas, G.; Bonnin-Mosbah, M.; Menez, B.

    2003-03-01

    It is commonly accepted that sulfur is carried out as sulfide (S^{II-}) or/and sulfate (S^{VI}) by Earth mantlederived melts, before being released as SO2 and/or H2S in volcanic emissions. By analyzing reference compounds and a selection of minute glass inclusions in olivine crystals using μXANES (X-ray Near Edge Structure) spectroscopy at the sulfur K-edge, we demonstrated the ubiquitous presence of sulfite (S^{IV}) in addition to sulfate (S^{VI}) in these rare inclusions representative of oxidized and water rich-basaltic magmas, prior to loss of sulfur and water. The sulfide (S^{II-}) when exists is minor. We proposed that sulfite (S^{IV}) acts as an intermediate, metastable species which results in partitioning of sulfur into the volcanic gas emissions.

  12. Complex explosive volcanic activity on the Moon within Oppenheimer crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kristen A.; Horgan, Briony H. N.; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Allen, Carlton C.; Hayne, Paul O.; Bell, James F.; Paige, David A.

    2016-07-01

    Oppenheimer crater is a floor-fractured crater located within the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon, and exhibits more than a dozen localized pyroclastic deposits associated with the fractures. Localized pyroclastic volcanism on the Moon is thought to form as a result of intermittently explosive Vulcanian eruptions under low effusion rates, in contrast to the higher-effusion rate, Hawaiian-style fire fountaining inferred to form larger regional deposits. We use Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images and Diviner Radiometer mid-infrared data, Chandrayaan-1 orbiter Moon Mineralogy Mapper near-infrared spectra, and Clementine orbiter Ultraviolet/visible camera images to test the hypothesis that the pyroclastic deposits in Oppenheimer crater were emplaced via Vulcanian activity by constraining their composition and mineralogy. Mineralogically, we find that the deposits are variable mixtures of orthopyroxene and minor clinopyroxene sourced from the crater floor, juvenile clinopyroxene, and juvenile iron-rich glass, and that the mineralogy of the pyroclastics varies both across the Oppenheimer deposits as a whole and within individual deposits. We observe similar variability in the inferred iron content of pyroclastic glasses, and note in particular that the northwest deposit, associated with Oppenheimer U crater, contains the most iron-rich volcanic glass thus far identified on the Moon, which could be a useful future resource. We propose that this variability in mineralogy indicates variability in eruption style, and that it cannot be explained by a simple Vulcanian eruption. A Vulcanian eruption should cause significant country rock to be incorporated into the pyroclastic deposit; however, large areas within many of the deposits exhibit spectra consistent with high abundances of juvenile phases and very little floor material. Thus, we propose that at least the most recent portion of these deposits must have erupted via a Strombolian or more continuous fire

  13. Geochemical discrimination of the geotectonic environment of basaltic-andesitic volcanic rocks associated with the Laochang polymetallic ore deposit at Lancang, Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jianguo

    2006-01-01

    The Laochang polymetallic ore deposit at Lancang is one of the well known ancient ore deposits associated with volcanic rocks in the Sanjiang (Tri-river) region of Southwest China. Volcanic rocks are dominated by alkali basalt and trachyte basalt. There has long been a controversy on the environment of formation of basalts. Some scholars hold that the basalts were formed in a continental environment, some thought they were formed in an oceanic environment and others considered that the basalts were emplaced in a back-arc basin. This study focuses on the geochemical characteristics of the basalts on the basis of their major elements, REEs and trace elements. At the same time, strongly incompatible elements such as Ta, Th and Hf and their ratios were used to differentiate the geotectonic settings of basalts. The results showed that the basalts in the region studied were formed in a continental rift environment.

  14. Maars to calderas: end-members on a spectrum of explosive volcanic depressions

    OpenAIRE

    Danilo M. Palladino; Valentine, Greg A.; Sottili, Gianluca; Taddeucci, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    We discuss maar-diatremes and calderas as end-members on a spectrum of negative volcanic landforms (depressions) produced by explosive eruptions (note—we focus on calderas formed during explosive eruptions, recognizing that some caldera types are not related to such activity). The former are dominated by ejection of material during numerous discrete phreatomagmatic explosions, brecciation, and subsidence of diatreme fill, while the latter are dominated by subsidence over a partly evacuated ma...

  15. Maars to calderas: end-members on a spectrum of explosive volcanic depressions

    OpenAIRE

    Danilo M. Palladino; Valentine, Greg A.; Gianluca eSottili; Jacopo eTaddeucci

    2015-01-01

    We discuss maar-diatremes and calderas as end-members on a spectrum of negative volcanic landforms (depressions) produced by explosive eruptions (note – we focus on calderas formed during explosive eruptions, recognizing that some caldera types are not related to such activity). The former are dominated by ejection of material during numerous discrete phreatomagmatic explosions, brecciation, and subsidence of diatreme fill, while the latter are dominated by subsidence over a partly evacuated...

  16. Basaltic Clasts in Y-86032 Feldspathic Lunar Meteorite: Ancient Volcanism far from the Procellarum Kreep Terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Takeda, H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D.; Karouji, Y.; Ebihara, M.

    2008-01-01

    Lunar meteorite, Y-86032 is a fragmental or regolith breccia enriched in Al2O3 (28-31 wt%) and having very low concentrations of REEs and Th, U [e.g., 1]. Nyquist et al. [2] suggested that Y- 86032 contains a variety of lithologies not represented by the Apollo samples. They found clasts with old Ar-Ar ages and an ancient Sm-Nd age, and negative Nd indicating a direct link to the primordial magma ocean. Importantly, the final lithification of the Y-86032 breccia was likely >3.8-4.1 Ga ago. Therefore, any lithic components in the breccia formed prior to 3.8 Ga, and lithic components in breccia clasts in the parent breccia formed even earlier. Here we report textures and mineralogy of basaltic and gabbroic clasts in Y- 86032 to better understand the nature of ancient lunar volcanism far from the Procellarum KREEP Terrain (PKT) [3] and the central nearside.

  17. Tephra in marine sediment cores offshore southern Iceland: A 68,000 year record of explosive volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanati, Christina; Wehrmann, Heidi; Portnyagin, Maxim; Hoernle, Kaj; Mirzaloo, Maryam; Nürnberg, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions on Iceland, even of intermediate magnitude have far-reaching impacts. Their far-distal deposits have been found up to Northern Continental Europe and Greenland. On Iceland, the harsh environment and strongly erosive conditions limit the preservation of volcanic deposits and their accessibility on land. The area offshore southern Iceland preserves information about the depositional fans at medial distance from the volcanic source. Here we use this sedimentary archive to reconstruct the Icelandic eruption record in greater detail. This high resolution geological record allows us to infer eruption frequencies and explosiveness in great detail and contributes to the assessment of Icelandic volcanic hazards, volcano-climate interaction, stratigraphy and palaeoceanographic reconstructions. Eight gravity cores were obtained during RV Poseidon Cruise 457, at 260 to 1,600 m water depths and distances of 130 to 400 km west to southeast of Iceland. The ˜4 to 10 m long sediment cores reach back to the Late Pleistocene (˜68 ka BP; dated by 14C and sedimentation rates), mostly excluding the Holocene. Potential tephra layers were identified by visual inspection and color scans. Volcanic glass shards were analyzed for their major element composition by electron microprobe and assigned to their eruptive source by geochemical fingerprinting. More than 50 primary tephra layers and nearly as many reworked layers were identified, several of which were correlated across the cores. The mostly basaltic tephra shards are derived from the Katla, Grímsvötn-Lakagígar, Bárðarbunga-Veiðivötn, and Hekla volcanic systems. Primary and mixed layers with particles of unique bimodal composition identical to the ˜12 ka BP Vedde-Tephra from the Katla Volcanic System, including rhyolitic particles, were identified in nearly all cores and used as time marker and for inter-core correlation. Tephra layers of unique unknown composition were also identified and

  18. Volcanic dust in deep-sea sediments: relationship of microfeatures to explosivity estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T C; Watkins, N D

    1976-08-13

    Particle size variations in a series of volcanic ash layers, deposited in high latitudes of the South Pacific during the past 2.5 million years, were earlier analyzed by using a model in which source cloud height and minimum volcanic paleoexplosivity are derived from downwind ash distribution. Examination of submicrometer morphological features of the volcanic glass shards reveals a clear relationship between what appear to be impact features on the glass surfaces and the independently derived paleoexplosivities, which suggests that this may be a simple means to characterize ash horizons and estimate relative volcanic explosivities. PMID:17759587

  19. Appraisal and evolution of hydrochemical processes from proximity basalt and granite areas of Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkamble, Sahebrao; Sahya, Ashalata; Mondal, N. C.; Harikumar, P.

    2012-05-01

    SummaryThis paper deals with a systematic hydrochemical study carried out at proximity basalt and granite areas of Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) in India to assess groundwater quality and evaluate the hydrochemical processes. A total of 40 groundwater samples were collected equally from these areas and analyzed. Results showed that the groundwaters rich in alkaline earth in the basalt and alkali rich element in the granite. The dominancy of cations was observed as Ca2+ > Mg2+ > Na+ > K+ in the basalt and Na+ > Mg2+ > K+ > Ca2+ in the granite, whereas anions as HCO3->Cl>SO42- and Cl>HCO3->SO42-, respectively. Hydrochemical processes were identified with the helps of ion exchange, carbonate weathering and dissolution, multiple ionic ratios, and silicate weathering, which shown the predominance of carbonate, dolomite, calcite and silicate (anorthite) weathering in basalt, but in granite, silicate (alkali feldspar) weathering was dominated. Factor analysis also showed that there were multiple processes acting on groundwaters, were separated from the main cluster. Salinity, Sodium Absorption Ratio (SAR), Soluble Sodium Percentage (SSP), Residual Sodium Carbonate (RSC), Kelley's Ratio (KR) and Permeability Index (PI) in well samples showed that groundwater in basalt was more suitable for irrigation purposes. Further, a digital elevation model (DEM) was generated using Global mapper (8.0 version) software, which aided to decipher the thickness of basalt trap, and vertical transition zone of basaltic (trap) and granitic (basement) aquifer at this DVP comprising with the well depths and groundwater chemistry.

  20. A brief comparison of lava flows from the Deccan Volcanic Province and the Columbia-Oregon Plateau Flood Basalts: Implications for models of flood basalt emplacement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ninad Bondre; Raymond A Duraiswami; Gauri Dole

    2004-12-01

    The nature and style of emplacement of Continental Flood Basalt (CFB) lava flows has been a atter of great interest as well as considerable controversy in the recent past. However, even a cursory review of published literature reveals that the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and Hawaiian volcanoes provide most of the data relevant to this topic. It is interesting to note, however, that the CRBG lava flows and their palaeotopographic control is atypical of other CFB provinces in the world. In this paper, we first present a short overview of important studies pertaining to the emplacement of flood basalt flows. We then briefly review the morphology of lava flows from the Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) and the Columbia-Oregon Plateau flood basalts. The review underscores the existence of significant variations in lava flow morphology between different provinces, and even within the same province. It is quite likely that there were more than one way of emplacing the voluminous and extensive CFB lava flows. We argue that the establishment of general models of emplacement must be based on a comprehensive documentation of lava flow morphology from all CFB provinces.

  1. Fluidal deep-sea volcanic ash as an indicator of explosive volcanism (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, D. A.; Portner, R. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Dreyer, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Fluidal glassy lava fragments are now known to be abundant at sites of submarine eruptions including the mid-ocean ridge system, near-ridge seamount chains, mid-plate volcanoes and the submarine rifts of ocean islands, deep-sea (4200m) alkalic lava fields, back-arc spreading centers, and arc volcanoes. Fluidal fragments at these diverse settings have compositions including basanite, tholeiite, boninite, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite. Fragments include straight, bent, curved, and coiled Pele's hair; flat, curved, twisted, folded, bent, or keeled ribbons; and flat, curved, or intensely folded limu o Pele. Most of these morphologies attach to blocky glass fragments. The fluidal fragments from different settings and depths are strikingly similar in morphology with variable vesicularity and particle thickness. They have been sampled flat and steep, rocky to sediment-covered substrates. Two different mechanisms are proposed to explain their origin: magmatic-volatile fragmentation during eruption and sea floor lava-water interactions. Volatiles in the melts and ambient water are present in all submarine volcanic settings, making it difficult to separate their role in forming the fragments. Submarine bubble-burst (strombolian) activity has been observed in situ at an active vent at -1200m on West Mata Volcano. However, lava-water interaction at elevated pressure has not been observed to make such fluidal fragments except in laboratory simulations. Lava-water interaction models suggest that pore water in sediment trapped beneath advancing lava flows migrates into the overlying flow where it expands to steam, and the expanding steam bubble escapes explosively through the flow top to form the fluidal fragments. This is different from the hollow (water-filled) pillars that form in inflating flows as trapped water escapes. Pillars grow upwards at contacts between flow lobes, thus the water exiting through pillars never enters (or exits) the molten lava flow interior. Another

  2. A Plagioclase Ultraphyric Basalt group in the Neogene flood basalt piles of eastern Iceland: Volcanic architecture and mode of emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskarsson, B. V.; Riishuus, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    3D photogrammetry in conjunction with ground mapping was applied in order to assess the architecture of a Plagioclase Ultraphyric Basalt (PUB) group in eastern Iceland, namely the Grænavatn group. The ~10 Myr old group is exposed in steep glacially carved fjords and can be traced over 60 km along strike. Two feeder dikes have been found and show that the group erupted along the trend of the dike swarm associated with the Breiddalur central volcano. The group has 9--14 flows where thickest, and thins to about 3--4 flows up-dip to the east within the distance of 15-20 km from the source. We have estimated the volume of the group to exceed 40 km3. The flows have mixed architecture of simple and compound morphology. The flow lobes have thicknesses from 1--24 m and many reach lengths over 1000 m. The surface morphology varies from rubbly to scoriaceous, but is dominantly of pahoehoe style. The internal structure of the lava flows is well preserved and the flows display abundant vesicle cylinders. The modal percentage of An-rich plagioclase macrocrysts varies from 25--50 % and they are in the range of 5--30 mm. The aspect ratio of the group and the nature of the flows indicate fissure-fed eruptions. A thick flow found at the base of the group in various locations seems to record the largest eruption episode in the formation of the group. This phase is also the most abundant in macrocryst. An asymmetric buildup is seen in one location and may have characterized the general buildup of the group. The general morphology of the lava flows suggests low viscous behavior, at odds with the high crystal content. Petrographic observations and mineral chemistry shows that the plagioclase macrocrysts are very calcic (An80-85) and in disequilibrium with the groundmass and plagioclases therein (An50-70). Thus the apparent lava rheology and emplacement of the PUBs was likely achieved due to fast ascent of the magma through the crust and transfer of heat from the primitive macrocrysts

  3. Megacrystic pyroxene basalts sample deep crustal gabbroic cumulates beneath the Mount Taylor volcanic field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mariek E.; Schrader, Christian M.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Rowe, Michael C.; Wolff, John A.; Boroughs, Scott P.

    2016-04-01

    Distributed over the ~ 2.3 m.y. history of the alkaline and compositionally diverse Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF), New Mexico is a widespread texturally distinct family of differentiated basalts that contain resorbed megacrysts (up to 3 cm) of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine ± Ti-magnetite ± ilmenite ± orthopyroxene. These lavas have gabbroic cumulate inclusions with mineral compositions similar to the megacrysts, suggesting a common origin. Gabbroic and megacrystic clinopyroxenes form positive linear arrays in TiO2 (0.2-2.3 wt.%) with respect to Al2O3 (0.7-9.3 wt.%). Plagioclase (An41-80) from representative thin sections analyzed for 87Sr/86Sr by laser ablation ICP-MS range from 0.7036 to 0.7048. The low 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7036 to 0.7037) are associated with high Ti-Al clinopyroxenes. Likewise, the higher 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7043 to 0.7047) are associated with the low-Al clinopyroxenes. Taken together, the pyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts appear to track the differentiation of a gabbroic pluton (or related plutons) from alkaline to Si-saturated conditions by fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation. Clinopyroxene-liquid geobarometry calculations suggest that crystallization occurred near the crust-mantle transition at an average of ~ 1200 °C and 12-13 kbar. The distribution of the megacrystic pyroxene basalts suggests that a gabbroic intrusive body underlies subregions of the MTVF that have generated silicic magmas. The gabbro is interpreted to be a significant heat and mass input into the lower crust that is capable of driving the petrogenesis of diverse silicic compositions (through fractionation and crustal assimilation), including mugearites, trachytes, trachy-andesites and dacites, high-Si rhyolites, and topaz rhyolites of the MTVF.

  4. Global database on large magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions (LaMEVE)

    OpenAIRE

    Crosweller, Helen Sian; Arora, Baneet; Brown, Sarah Krystyna; Cottrell, Elizabeth; Deligne, Natalia Irma; Guerrero, Natalie Ortiz; Hobbs, Laura; Kiyosugi, Koji; Loughlin, Susan Clare; Lowndes, Jonathan; Nayembil, Martin; Siebert, Lee; Sparks, Robert Stephen John; Takarada, Shinji; Venzke, Edward

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate the assessment of hazards and risk from volcanoes, we have created a comprehensive global database of Quaternary Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE). This forms part of the larger Volcanic Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA), and also forms part of the Global Volcano Model (GVM) initiative (http://www.globalvolcanomodel.org). A flexible search tool allows users to select data on a global, regional or local scale; the selected data can be d...

  5. Pollution and paradigms: lessons from Icelandic volcanism for continental flood basalt studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, John

    2005-02-01

    This paper is based on the premise that research into the environmental impact of continental flood basalt (CFB) volcanism has paid insufficient attention to the potential ecosystem damage that would result from the direct deposition of hundreds of megatons (Tg) of sulphur and other volatiles. The environmental impacts of the 1783 Laki Fissure eruption are reviewed in outline. It is shown that in a relatively brief period of volcanic activity, volatiles emitted by the eruption damaged and destroyed vegetation from the Arctic Ocean to the Mediterranean. Air pollution was so intense that human health was affected and the national death rate increased dramatically in both England and France. It is proposed that the events of 1783 may be used as a paradigm for the environmental impacts of a CFB lava flow, and the emissions of 1783 are scaled up to illustrate this point. Thus, if a Laki style event were to erupt for a year it would approach the physical scale of a single episode of the Roza flow in the Columbia River CFB and potentially yield 576 Tg of sulphur gases which could have been oxidised into approximately 945 Tg of aerosol. This could generate a tropospheric aerosol mass of approximately 708 Tg H 2SO 4. The ecosystem impact of the deposition of acids on this scale would be profound and, as with the actual Laki event, be continental in scale. All parts of the plant life cycle would be disrupted, including photosynthesis and fruiting. Inevitably, with the disruption of food webs animals would also be affected. Poorly buffered inland waters would be acidified, as would Boreal soils, reducing their biodiversity. In our already polluted and interdependent world, any future event on this scale would have serious consequences for human health and trade.

  6. Growth, destruction and facies architecture of effusive and explosive volcanics in the Miocene Shama basin, southwest of Saudi Arabia: Subaqueous-subaerial volcanism in a lacustrine setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Motelib, A.; Khalaf, E. A.; Al-Marzouki, H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents for the first time, detailed stratigraphical and petrographical analyses of the Harrat Shama Volcanic Basin (HSVB) of Miocene age in SW Saudi Arabia. This basin is filled by abundant volcanics intercalated with fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary successions. These successions are characterized by a syneruptive-intereruptive cycle, which results from the intercalation periods of volcanics and volcaniclastic sedimentation along with periods of fluvial incision. Two depositional sequences, showing an overall fining-upward trend, are preserved within the HSVB. The first comprises hyaloclastites, zeolite-bearing bedded tuffs, and bedded accretionary-lapilli-tuffs, interpreted as deep lake whereas the second, is made up of extensive pumiceous pyroclastic flows, peperitic breccias, and basaltic lava flows, which are in turn capped by siliciclastic deposits of lacustrine deposits. The passage between two sequences is defined by lateral variations of the lithofacies and textural features reflecting a change in paleogeography. The fining-upward volcaniclastic deposits of the HSVB sequence are interpreted to represent the sedimentation pattern induced by tectonic subsidence with the influence of volcaniclastic sediment input, indicating well-established proximal-distal relationship. HSVB was evolved through three stages, including pre-, syn-, and post-caldera stages. The first two stages correspond to proximal aggradational syn-eruptive event, whereas the latter stage refers to distal degradational inter-eruptive event. These stages overlap in time as shown by the alternation of explosive, effusive, and their resedimented deposits, reflecting diverse eruptive sequences formed by different fragmentation processes. The difference in the latter coupled with the variability in the magma-water interaction and the nature of substrate are responsible for such diversity, resulting in progressive environmental changes from subaqueous to subaerial regime (from bottom to

  7. Assessing the likelihood and magnitude of volcanic explosions based on seismic quiescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Diana C.; Rodgers, Mel; Geirsson, Halldor; LaFemina, Peter C.; Tenorio, Virginia

    2016-09-01

    Volcanic eruptions are generally forecast based on strong increases in monitoring parameters such as seismicity or gas emissions above a relatively low background level (e.g., Voight, 1988; Sparks, 2003). Because of this, forecasting individual explosions during an ongoing eruption, or at persistently restless volcanoes, is difficult as seismicity, gas emissions, and other indicators of unrest are already in a heightened state. Therefore, identification of short-term precursors to individual explosions at volcanoes already in heightened states of unrest, and an understanding of explosion trigger mechanisms, is important for the reduction of volcanic risk worldwide. Seismic and visual observations at Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, demonstrate that a) episodes of seismic quiescence reliably preceded explosions during an eruption in May 2011 and b) the duration of precursory quiescence and the energy released in the ensuing explosion were strongly correlated. Precursory seismic quiescence is interpreted as the result of sealing of shallow gas pathways, leading to pressure accumulation and eventual catastrophic failure of the system, culminating in an explosion. Longer periods of sealing and pressurization lead to greater energy release in the ensuing explosion. Near-real-time observations of seismic quiescence at restless or erupting volcanoes can thus be useful for both timely eruption warnings and for forecasting the energy of impending explosions.

  8. Thermal and mass implications of magmatic evolution in the Lassen volcanic region, California, and minimum constraints on basalt influx to the lower crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Clynne, M.A.; Muffler, L.J.P.

    1996-01-01

    We have analyzed the heat and mass demands of a petrologic model of basaltdriven magmatic evolution in which variously fractionated mafic magmas mix with silicic partial melts of the lower crust. We have formulated steady state heat budgets for two volcanically distinct areas in the Lassen region: the large, late Quaternary, intermediate to silicic Lassen volcanic center and the nearby, coeval, less evolved Caribou volcanic field. At Caribou volcanic field, heat provided by cooling and fractional crystallization of 52 km3 of basalt is more than sufficient to produce 10 km3 of rhyolitic melt by partial melting of lower crust. Net heat added by basalt intrusion at Caribou volcanic field is equivalent to an increase in lower crustal heat flow of ???7 mW m-2, indicating that the field is not a major crustal thermal anomaly. Addition of cumulates from fractionation is offset by removal of erupted partial melts. A minimum basalt influx of 0.3 km3 (km2 Ma)-1 is needed to supply Caribou volcanic field. Our methodology does not fully account for an influx of basalt that remains in the crust as derivative intrusives. On the basis of comparison to deep heat flow, the input of basalt could be ???3 to 7 times the amount we calculate. At Lassen volcanic center, at least 203 km3 of mantle-derived basalt is needed to produce 141 km3 of partial melt and drive the volcanic system. Partial melting mobilizes lower crustal material, augmenting the magmatic volume available for eruption at Lassen volcanic center; thus the erupted volume of 215 km3 exceeds the calculated basalt input of 203 km3. The minimum basalt input of 1.6 km3 (km2 Ma)-1 is >5 times the minimum influx to the Caribou volcanic field. Basalt influx high enough to sustain considerable partial melting, coupled with locally high extension rate, is a crucial factor in development of Lassen volcanic center; in contrast. Caribou volcanic field has failed to develop into a large silicic center primarily because basalt supply

  9. Rare-earth element geochemistry and the origin of andesites and basalts of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J.W.; Cashman, K.V.; Rankin, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of basalt (a high-Al basalt associated with the rhyolitic centres north of Taupo and a "low-Al" basalt erupted from Red Crater, Tongariro Volcanic Centre) and five types of andesite (labradorite andesite, labradorite-pyroxene andesite, hornblende andesite, pyroxene low-Si andesite and olivine andesite/low-Si andesite) occur in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), North Island, New Zealand. Rare-earth abundances for both basalts and andesites are particularly enriched in light rare-earth elements. High-Al basalts are more enriched than the "low-Al" basalt and have values comparable to the andesites. Labradorite and labradorite-pyroxene andesites all have negative Eu anomalies and hornblende andesites all have negative Ce anomalies. The former is probably due to changing plagioclase composition during fractionation and the latter to late-stage hydration of the magma. Least-squares mixing models indicate that neither high-Al nor "low-Al" basalts are likely sources for labradorite/labradorite-pyroxene andesites. High-Al basalts are considered to result from fractionation of olivine and clinopyroxene from a garnet-free peridotite at the top of the mantle wedge. Labradorite/labradorite-pyroxene andesites are mainly associated with an older NW-trending arc. The source is likely to be garnet-free but it is not certain whether the andesites result from partial melting of the top of the subducting plate or a hydrated lower portion of the mantle wedge. Pyroxene low-Si andesites probably result from cumulation of pyroxene and calcic plagioclase within labradorite-pyroxene andesites, and hornblende andesites by late-stage hydration of labradorite-pyroxene andesite magma. Olivine andesites, low-Si andesites and "low-Al" basalts are related to the NNE-trending Taupo-Hikurangi arc structure. Although the initial source material is different for these lavas they have probably undergone a similar history to the labradorite/labradorite-pyroxene andesites. All lavas show evidence

  10. NanoSIMS results from olivine-hosted melt embayments: Magma ascent rate during explosive basaltic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Alexander S.; Ruprecht, Philipp; Hauri, Erik H.; Rose, William; Gonnermann, Helge M.; Plank, Terry

    2014-08-01

    The explosivity of volcanic eruptions is governed in part by the rate at which magma ascends and degasses. Because the time scales of eruptive processes can be exceptionally fast relative to standard geochronometers, magma ascent rate remains difficult to quantify. Here we use as a chronometer concentration gradients of volatile species along open melt embayments within olivine crystals. Continuous degassing of the external melt during magma ascent results in diffusion of volatile species from embayment interiors to the bubble located at their outlets. The novel aspect of this study is the measurement of concentration gradients in five volatile elements (CO2, H2O, S, Cl, F) at fine-scale (5-10 μm) using the NanoSIMS. The wide range in diffusivity and solubility of these different volatiles provides multiple constraints on ascent timescales over a range of depths. We focus on four 100-200 μm, olivine-hosted embayments erupted on October 17, 1974 during the sub-Plinian eruption of Volcán de Fuego. H2O, CO2, and S all decrease toward the embayment outlet bubble, while F and Cl increase or remain roughly constant. Compared to an extensive melt inclusion suite from the same day of the eruption, the embayments have lost both H2O and CO2 throughout the entire length of the embayment. We fit the profiles with a 1-D numerical diffusion model that allows varying diffusivities and external melt concentrations as a function of pressure. Assuming a constant decompression rate from the magma storage region at approximately 220 MPa to the surface, H2O, CO2 and S profiles for all embayments can be fit with a relatively narrow range in decompression rates of 0.3-0.5 MPa/s, equivalent to 11-17 m/s ascent velocity and an 8 to 12 minute duration of magma ascent from ~ 10 km depth. A two stage decompression model takes advantage of the different depth ranges over which CO2 and H2O degas, and produces good fits given an initial stage of slow decompression (0.05-0.3 MPa/s) at high

  11. Maars to calderas: end-members on a spectrum of explosive volcanic depressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo M. Palladino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We discuss maar-diatremes and calderas as end-members on a spectrum of negative volcanic landforms (depressions produced by explosive eruptions (note – we focus on calderas formed during explosive eruptions, recognizing that some caldera types are not related to such activity. The former are dominated by ejection of material during numerous discrete phreatomagmatic explosions, brecciation, and subsidence of diatreme fill, while the latter are dominated by subsidence over a partly evacuated magma chamber during sustained, magmatic volatile-driven discharge. Many examples share characteristics of both, including landforms that are identified as maars but preserve deposits from non-phreatomagmatic explosive activity, and ambiguous structures that appear to be coalesced maars but that also produced sustained explosive eruptions with likely magma reservoir subsidence. A convergence of research directions on issues related to magma-water interaction and shallow reservoir mechanics is an important avenue toward developing a unified picture of the maar-diatreme-caldera spectrum.

  12. Volcanic sulfur dioxide index and volcanic explosivity index inferred from eruptive volume of volcanoes in Jeju Island, Korea: application to volcanic hazard mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Bokyun; Yun, Sung-Hyo

    2016-04-01

    Jeju Island located in the southwestern part of Korea Peninsula is a volcanic island composed of lavaflows, pyroclasts, and around 450 monogenetic volcanoes. The volcanic activity of the island commenced with phreatomagmatic eruptions under subaqueous condition ca. 1.8-2.0 Ma and lasted until ca. 1,000 year BP. For evaluating volcanic activity of the most recently erupted volcanoes with reported age, volcanic explosivity index (VEI) and volcanic sulfur dioxide index (VSI) of three volcanoes (Ilchulbong tuff cone, Songaksan tuff ring, and Biyangdo scoria cone) are inferred from their eruptive volumes. The quantity of eruptive materials such as tuff, lavaflow, scoria, and so on, is calculated using a model developed in Auckland Volcanic Field which has similar volcanic setting to the island. The eruptive volumes of them are 11,911,534 m3, 24,987,557 m3, and 9,652,025 m3, which correspond to VEI of 3, 3, and 2, respectively. According to the correlation between VEI and VSI, the average quantity of SO2 emission during an eruption with VEI of 3 is 2-8 × 103 kiloton considering that the island was formed under intraplate tectonic setting. Jeju Island was regarded as an extinct volcano, however, several studies have recently reported some volcanic eruption ages within 10,000 year BP owing to the development in age dating technique. Thus, the island is a dormant volcano potentially implying high probability to erupt again in the future. The volcanoes might have explosive eruptions (vulcanian to plinian) with the possibility that SO2 emitted by the eruption reaches stratosphere causing climate change due to backscattering incoming solar radiation, increase in cloud reflectivity, etc. Consequently, recommencement of volcanic eruption in the island is able to result in serious volcanic hazard and this study provides fundamental and important data for volcanic hazard mitigation of East Asia as well as the island. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: This research was supported by a grant [MPSS

  13. The geochemical characteristics of basaltic and acidic volcanics around the Myojin depression in the Izu arc, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, S.; Tamaki, K.; Kato, Y.; Machida, S.

    2012-12-01

    Around the Myojin Depression, westside of the Myojin-sho caldera in the Izu arc, seamounts are circular distributed and hydrothermal activity with sulfide deposition are found from the Baiyonneise Caldera, one of seamounts at the northern side. Some knoll chains distribute in the eastside of the Myojin Depression, and connect between these knolls. This circulator distribution of seamounts and connected knoll chains considered to the dykes are similar to the geographical features of the Kuroko Depositions in the Hokuroku Region, Northwest Japan (Tanahashi et al., 2008). Hydrothermal activities are also found from the other rifts (Urabe and Kusakabe 1990). Based on these observations, the cruise KT09-12 by R/V Tansei-Maru, Ocean Research Institute (ORI), University of Tokyo, investigated in the Myojin Rift. During the cruise, basaltic to dacitic volcanic rocks and some acidic plutonic rocks were recovered by dredge system. Herein, we present petrographical and chemical analyses of these rock samples with sample dredged by the cruise MW9507 by R/V MOANA WAVE, and consider the association with hydrothermal activities and depositions. Dredges during the cruise KT09-12 were obtained at the Daini-Beiyonneise Knoll at the northern side, Daisan-Beiyonneise Knoll at the southern side, and the Dragonborn Hill, small knoll chains, at the southeastern side of the depression. Many volcanic rocks are basalt, and recovered mainly from the Dragonborn Hill. Andesite and dacite was recovered from the Daini- and the Daini-Bayonneise Knoll. Tonalites were recovered from the Daisan-Bayonneise Knoll. Basalts from the Dragonborn Hill show less than 50% of SiO2 and more than 6 wt% and 0.88 wt% of MgO and TiO2 content. Basalts from the rift zone show depleted in the volcanic front (VF) side and enriched in the reararc (RA) side. The Dragonborn Hill is distributed near the VF, and basalts show depleted geochemical characteristics. However, these characteristics are different from the basalts

  14. The acoustic signatures of ground acceleration, gas expansion, and spall fallback in experimental volcanic explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Daniel C.; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Kim, Keehoon; Anderson, Jacob F.; Lees, Jonathan M.; Graettinger, Alison H.; Sonder, Ingo; Valentine, Greg A.

    2014-03-01

    Infrasound and high-speed imaging during a series of field-scale buried explosions suggest new details about the generation and radiation patterns of acoustic waves from volcanic eruptions. We recorded infrasound and high-speed video from a series of subsurface explosions with differing burial depths and charge sizes. Joint observations and modeling allow the extraction of acoustic energy related to the magnitude of initial ground deformation, the contribution of gas breakout, and the timing of the fallback of displaced material. The existence and relative acoustic amplitudes of these three phases depended on the size and depth of the explosion. The results motivate a conceptual model that relates successive contributions from ground acceleration, gas breakout, and spall fallback to the acoustic amplitude and waveform characteristics of buried explosions. We place the literature on infrasound signals at Santiaguito Volcano, Guatemala, and Sakurajima and Suwonosejima Volcanoes, Japan, in the context of this model.

  15. A 780-year record of explosive volcanism from DT263 ice core in east Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Liya; LI Yuansheng; Jihong Cole-da; TAN Dejun; SUN BO; REN Jiawen; WEI Lijia; WANG Henian

    2006-01-01

    Ice cores recovered from polar ice sheet Received and preserved sulfuric acid fallout from explosive volcanic eruptions. DT263 ice core was retrieved from an east Antarctic location. The ice core is dated using a combination of annual layer counting and volcanic time stratigraphic horizon as 780 years (1215-1996 A.D.). The ice core record demonstrates that during the period of approximately 1460-1800 A.D., the accumulation is sharply lower than the levels prior to and after this period. This period coincides with the most recent neoglacial climatic episode, the "Little Ice Age (LIA)", that has been found in numerous Northern Hemisphere proxy and historic records.The non-sea-salt SO2-4 concentrations indicate seventeen volcanic events in DT263 ice core. Compared with those from previous Antarctic ice cores, significant discrepancies are found between these records in relative volcanic flux of several well-known events. The discrepancies among these records may be explained by the differences in surface topography, accumulation rate, snow drift and distribution which highlight the potential impact of local glaciology on ice core volcanic records, analytical techniques used for sulfate measurement, etc. Volcanic eruptions in middle and high southern latitudes affect volcanic records in Antarctic snow more intensively than those in the Iow latitudes.

  16. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    OpenAIRE

    F. S. Marzano; M. Lamantea; Montopoli, M.; S. Di Fabio; Picciotti, E.

    2011-01-01

    The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR) technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km far from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched...

  17. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    OpenAIRE

    F. S. Marzano; M. Lamantea; Montopoli, M.; S Fabio; Picciotti, E.

    2011-01-01

    The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and the Volcanic Ash Radar Retrieval (VARR) technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched...

  18. Geology and petrology of the basalts of Crater Flat: applications to volcanic risk assessment for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volcanic hazard studies of the south-central Great Basin, Nevada, are being conducted for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This report presents the results of field and petrologic studies of the basalts of Crater Flat, a sequence of Pliocene to Quaternary-age volcanic centers located near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site. Crater Flat is one of several basaltic fields constituting a north-northeast-trending volcanic belt of Late Cenozoic age extending from southern Death Valley, California, through the Nevada Test Site region to central Nevada. The basalts of Crater Flat are divided into three distinct volcanic cycles. The cycles are characterized by eruption of basalt magma of hawaiite composition that formed cinder cone clusters and associated lava flows. Total volume of erupted magma for respective cycles is given. The basalts of Crater Flat are sparsely to moderately porphyritic; the major phenocryst phase is olivine, with lesser amounts of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and rare amphibole. The consistent recurrence of evolved hawaiite magmas in all three cycles points to crystal fractionation from more primitive magmas at depth. A possible major transition in mantle source regions through time may be indicated by a transition from normal to Rb-depleted, Sr-enriched hawaiites in the younger basaltic cycles. The recurrence of small volumes of hawaiite magma at Crater Flat supports assumptions required for probability modeling of future volcanic activity and provides a basis for estimating the effects of volcanic disruption of a repository site in the southwestern Nevada Test Site region. Preliminary data suggest that successive basalt cycles at Crater Flat may be of decreasing volume but recurring more frequently

  19. Very long pahoehoe inflated basaltic lava flows in the Payenia volcanic province (Mendoza and la Pampa, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Pasquarè

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Extremely long basaltic lava flows are here presented and described. The flows originated from the great, polygenetic, fissural Payen Volcanic Complex, in the Andean back-arc volcanic province of Payenia in Argentina. The lava flows outpoured during the Late Quaternary from the summit rift of a shield volcano representing the first volcanic centre of this complex. One of these flows presents an individual tongue-like shape with a length of 181 km and therefore is the longest known individual Quaternary lava flow on Earth. Leaving the flanks of the volcano this flow reached the Salado river valley at La Pampa and, in its distal portion, maintained its narrow and straight shape without any topographic control over a flat alluvial plain. It has a hawaiite composition with low phenocryst content of prevailing olivine and minor plagioclase. Rare Earth element patterns are typical of Na-alkaline basalts, but incompatible trace element patterns and Sr -Nd isotope ratios, suggest a geodynamic setting transitional to the orogenic one. The flow advanced following the thermally efficient "inflation" mechanism, as demonstrated by a peculiar association of well developed morphological, structural and textural features. The temperature of 1130-1160°C and the viscosity of 3-73 Pa*s, calculated by petrochemical data, may be considered, together with a very low cooling rate and a sustained and long lasting effusion rate, the main causes of the extremely long transport system of this flow. Both the extreme length of the flow and the partial lack of topographic control may provide new constraints on the physics of large inflated flows, which constitute the largest volcanic provinces on Earth and probably also on the terrestrial planets.

  20. Quickly erupted volcanic sections of the Steens Basalt, Columbia River Basalt Group: Secular variation, tectonic rotation, and the Steens Mountain reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, N.A.; Coe, R.S.; Renne, P.R.; Glen, J.M.G.; Mankinen, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    The Steens Basalt, now considered part of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), contains the earliest eruptions of this magmatic episode. Lava flows of the Steens Basalt cover about 50,000 km2 of the Oregon Plateau in sections up to 1000 m thick. The large number of continuously exposed, quickly erupted lava flows (some sections contain over 200 flows) allows for small loops in the magnetic field direction paths to be detected. For volcanic rocks, this detail and fidelity are rarely found outside of the Holocene and yield estimates of eruption durations at our four sections of ??2.5 ka for 260 m at Pueblo Mountains, 0.5 to 1.5 ka for 190 m at Summit Springs, 1-3 ka for 170 m at North Mickey, and ??3 ka for 160 m at Guano Rim. That only one reversal of the geomagnetic field occurred during the eruption of the Steens Basalt (the Steens reversal at approximately 16.6 Ma) is supported by comparing 40Ar/39Ar ages and magnetic polarities to the geomagnetic polarity timescale. At Summit Springs two 40Ar/39Ar ages from normal polarity flows (16.72 ?? ?? 0.29 Ma (16.61) and 16.92 ?? ?? 0.52 Ma (16.82); ?? ?? equals 2s error) place their eruptions after the Steens reversal, while at Pueblo Mountains an 40Ar/39Ar age of 16.72 ?? ?? 0.21 Ma (16.61) from a reverse polarity flow places its eruption before the Steens reversal. Paleomagnetic field directions yielded 50 nontransitional directional-group poles which, combined with 26 from Steens Mountain, provide a paleomagnetic pole for the Oregon Plateau of 85.7??N, 318.4??E, K = 15.1, A95 = 4.3. Comparison of this new pole with a reference pole derived from CRBG flows from eastern Washington and a synthetic reference pole for North America derived from global data implies relative clockwise rotation of the Oregon Plateau of 7.4 ?? 5.0?? or 14.5 ?? 5.4??, respectively, probably due to northward decreasing extension of the basin and range. ?? 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Explosive Volcanic Eruptions from Linear Vents on Earth, Venus and Mars: Comparisons with Circular Vent Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Wimert, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    Conditions required to support buoyant convective plumes are investigated for explosive volcanic eruptions from circular and linear vents on Earth, Venus, and Mars. Vent geometry (linear versus circular) plays a significant role in the ability of an explosive eruption to sustain a buoyant plume. On Earth, linear and circular vent eruptions are both capable of driving buoyant plumes to equivalent maximum rise heights, however, linear vent plumes are more sensitive to vent size. For analogous mass eruption rates, linear vent plumes surpass circular vent plumes in entrainment efficiency approximately when L(sub o) > 3r(sub o) owing to the larger entrainment area relative to the control volume. Relative to circular vents, linear vents on Venus favor column collapse and the formation of pyroclastic flows because the range of conditions required to establish and sustain buoyancy is narrow. When buoyancy can be sustained, however, maximum plume heights exceed those from circular vents. For current atmospheric conditions on Mars, linear vent eruptions are capable of injecting volcanic material slightly higher than analogous circular vent eruptions. However, both geometries are more likely to produce pyroclastic fountains, as opposed to convective plumes, owing to the low density atmosphere. Due to the atmospheric density profile and water content on Earth, explosive eruptions enjoy favorable conditions for producing sustained buoyant columns, while pyroclastic flows would be relatively more prevalent on Venus and Mars. These results have implications for the injection and dispersal of particulates into the planetary atmosphere and the ability to interpret the geologic record of planetary volcanism.

  2. A model of volcanic explosions at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico): Integrating fragmentation experiments and ballistic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alatorre Ibargüengoitia, Miguel Angel

    2011-01-01

    Summary The dynamics of magma fragmentation is a controlling factor in the behavior of explosive volcanic eruptions. Fragmentation changes the eruption dynamics from a system of bubbly flow to one of gas-particle flow. To date, the influence of the fragmentation process itself on the eruption dynamics has been largely neglected in eruption models. This is understandable, as the explosive expansion of mixtures of pressurized gases and pyroclasts in volcanic eruptions is a complex process t...

  3. A petrologic study of the Teanaway Basalt: Eocene slab window volcanism in central WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepke, E.; Tepper, J. H.; Ivener, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Teanaway Basalt (TB) includes subaerial basalt to andesite flows, mafic to felsic tuffs, and rhyolite domes in the Central Cascades of Washington State. These volcanics overlie the extensive ~47 Ma Teanaway Dike Swarm (TDS) that cuts the underlying Swauk Formation. This study focuses on the tectonic setting of eruption and geochemical variations relating to geography and stratigraphy within the TB. The western-most area of the TB, Easton Ridge (ER), is compared with the eastern-most area of the TB, Liberty Ridge (LR) - 40 km to the east of ER. The bimodal TB consists predominantly of basaltic andesite and andesite (45.3-63.1 wt% SiO2) with subordinate rhyolite (75.9-79.4 wt% SiO2). The mafic rocks classify as primarily medium-K tholeiites (0.1-3.0 wt% K2O), but a few samples classify as alkaline. Enrichment in LILE and depletion in HFSE on spidergrams are indicative of an arc setting. However, compared with the modern Cascade Arc, the TB is distinctly higher in Fe2O3T (8.8-17.1 wt%) and TiO2 (1.1-2.7 wt%), and distinctly lower in Al2O3 (11.2-14.6) and K2O, with a similar range of Mg #s (0.15-0.48). Most tectonic discrimination plots characterize the TB as MORB, but some indicate an arc or within-plate setting. Preliminary Pb isotopic data (206Pb/204Pb = 19.13-19.19, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.62-15.64, and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.78-38.90) indicate the TB and TDS are more enriched than Cascade Arc rocks in 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb. Overall, these geochemical data are consistent with a model in which asthenospheric mantle ascending through a slab window interacts with mantle wedge that has previously acquired arc chemical traits. The existence of a slab window in this region during the mid-Eocene is compatible with plate reconstructions and evidence of extension that have been attributed to subduction of the Resurrection-Kula ridge (Haeussler et al., 2003). Harker plots show lavas at LR are generally more enriched than those at ER in Fe2O3T (11.9-17.1 wt% vs 8.8-15.7 wt%) Mn

  4. Depth of volcanic basalt degassing forecasted from CO2 fluid inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Fluid inclusions have recorded the history of degassing in basalt. Some fluid inclusions in olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts of basalt were analyzed by micro-thermometry and Raman spectroscopy in this paper. The experimental results showed that many inclusions are present almost in a pure CO2 system. The densities of some CO2 inclusions were computed in terms of Raman spectroscopic characteristics of CO2 Fermi resonance at room temperature. Their densities change over a wide range, but mainly between 0.044 g/cm3 and 0.289 g/cm3. Their micro-thermometric measurements showed that the CO2 inclusions examined reached homogenization between 1145.5℃ and 1265℃. The mean value of homogenization temperatures of CO2 inclusions in basalts is near 1210℃. The trap pressures (depths) of inclusions were computed with the equation of state and computer program. Distribution of the trap depths makes it know that the degassing of magma can happen over a wide pressure (depth) range, but mainly at the depth of 0.48 km to 3.85 km. This implicates that basalt magma experienced intensive degassing and the CO2 gas reservoir from the basalt magma also may be formed in this range of depths. The results of this study showed that the depth of basalt magma degassing can be forecasted from CO2 fluid inclusions, and it is meaningful for understanding the process of magma degassing and constraining the inorganogenic CO2 gas reservoir.

  5. Sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 and climate to explosive volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Raible

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of low-latitude, explosive volcanic eruptions on climate and the carbon cycle are quantified by forcing a comprehensive, fully coupled carbon cycle-climate model with pulse-like stratospheric aerosol optical depth changes. The model represents the radiative and dynamical response of the climate system to volcanic eruptions and simulates a decrease of global and regional atmospheric surface temperature, regionally distinct changes in precipitation, a positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation, and a decrease in atmospheric CO2 after volcanic eruptions. The volcanic-induced cooling reduces overturning rates in tropical soils, which dominates over reduced litter input due to soil moisture decrease, resulting in higher land carbon inventories for several decades. The perturbation in the ocean carbon inventory changes sign from an initial weak carbon sink to a carbon source. Positive carbon and negative temperature anomalies in subsurface waters last up to several decades. The multi-decadal decrease in atmospheric CO2 yields a small additional radiative forcing that amplifies the cooling and perturbs the Earth System on longer time scales than the atmospheric residence time of volcanic aerosols. In addition, century-scale global warming simulations with and without volcanic eruptions over the historical period show that the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds for different physical and biogeochemical parameters such as steric sea level or dissolved oxygen. Results from a suite of sensitivity simulations with different magnitudes of stratospheric aerosol optical depth changes and from global warming simulations show that the carbon cycle-climate sensitivity γ, expressed as change in atmospheric CO2 per unit change in global mean surface temperature, depends on the magnitude and temporal evolution of the perturbation, and time scale of interest. On decadal time scales, modeled γ is several times larger for a

  6. Sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 and climate to explosive volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Raible

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of low-latitude, explosive volcanic eruptions on climate and the carbon cycle are quantified by forcing a comprehensive, fully coupled carbon cycle-climate model with pulse-like stratospheric sulfur release. The model represents the radiative and dynamical response of the climate system to volcanic eruptions and simulates a decrease of global and regional atmospheric surface temperature, regionally distinct changes in precipitation, a positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation, and a decrease in atmospheric CO2 after volcanic eruptions. The volcanic-induced cooling reduces overturning rates in tropical soils, which dominates over reduced litter input due to soil moisture decrease, resulting in higher land carbon inventories for several decades. The perturbation in the ocean carbon inventory changes sign from an initially weak carbon sink to a carbon source. Positive carbon and negative temperature anomalies in subsurface waters last up to several decades. The multi-decadal decrease in atmospheric CO2 yields an additional radiative forcing that amplifies the cooling and perturbs the Earth System on much longer time scales than the atmospheric residence time of volcanic aerosols. In addition, century-scale global warming simulations with and without volcanic eruptions over the historical period show that the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds for different physical and biogeochemical parameters such as steric sea level or dissolved oxygen. Results from a suite of sensitivity simulations with different amounts of sulfur released and from global warming simulations show that the carbon cycle-climate sensitivity γ, expressed as change in atmospheric CO2 per unit change in global mean surface temperature, depends on the perturbation. On decadal time scales, modeled γ is several times larger for a Pinatubo-like eruption than for the industrial period and for a high emission, 21st century scenario.

  7. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km far from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  8. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and the Volcanic Ash Radar Retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  9. Neogene volcanism in Gutai Mts. (Eastern Carpathains: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinel Kovacs

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Two types of volcanism developed in Gutâi Mts. (inner volcanic chain of Eastern Carpathians: a felsic, extensional/“back-arc” type and an intermediate, arc type. The felsic volcanism of explosive origin, consisting of caldera-related rhyolitic ignimbrites and resedimented volcaniclastics, had taken place during Early-Middle Badenian and Early Sarmatian. The intermediate volcanism, consisting of extrusive (effusive and explosive and intrusive activity, had developed during Sarmatian and Pannonian (13.4-7.0 Ma. It is represented by typical calc-alkaline series, from basalts to rhyolites. Lava flows of basaltic andesites and andesites are predominant, often emplaced in subaqueous environment. Extrusive domes, mainly composed of dacites, are associated to the andesitic volcanic structures. The intermediate volcanism, consisting of extrusive (effusive and explosive and intrusive activity, had developed during Sarmatian and Pannonian (13.4-7.0 Ma. It is represented by typical calc-alkaline series, from basalts to rhyolites. Lava flows of basaltic andesites and andesites are predominant, often emplaced in subaqueous environment. Extrusive domes, mainly composed of dacites, are associated to the andesitic volcanic structures. The geochemical study on the volcanic rocks shows the calc-alkaline character of both felsic and intermediate volcanism and typical subduction zones geochemical signatures for the intermediate one. The felsic volcanism shows affinities with subduction-related rocks as well. The main petrogenetic process in Gutâi Mts. was crustal assimilation, strongly constrained by trace element and isotope geochemistry.

  10. New Insights to the Mid Miocene Calc-alkaline Lavas of the Strawberry Volcanics, NE Oregon Surrounded by the Coeval Tholeiitic Columbia River Basalt Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Strawberry Volcanics (SV) of NE Oregon were distributed over 3,400 km2 during the mid-Miocene and comprise a diverse volcanic suite, which span the range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite. The predominant composition of this volcanic suite is calc-alkaline (CA) basaltic andesite and andesite, although tholeiitic (TH) lavas of basalt to andesite occur as well. The coeval flood basalts of the Columbia River province surround the SV. Here we will discuss new ages and geochemical data, and present a new geologic map and stratigraphy of the SV. The SV are emplaced on top of pre-Tertiary accreted terranes of the Blue Mountain Province, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and older Tertiary volcanic rocks thought to be mostly Oligocene of age. Massive rhyolites (~300 m thick) are exposed mainly along the western flank and underlie the intermediate composition lavas. In the southern portion of this study area, alkali basaltic lavas, thought to be late Miocene to early Pliocene in age, erupted and overlie the SV. In addition, several regional ignimbrites reach into the area. The 9.7 Ma Devine Canyon Tuff and the 7.1 Ma Rattlesnake Tuff also overlie the SV. The 15.9-15.4 Ma Dinner Creek Tuff is mid-Miocene, and clear stratigraphic relationships are found in areas where the tuff is intercalated between thick SV lava flows. All of the basalts of the SV are TH and are dominated by phenocryst-poor (≤2%) lithologies. These basalts have an ophitic texture dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine (often weathered to iddingsite). Basalts and basaltic andesites have olivine Fo #'s ranging from 44 at the rims (where weathered to iddingsite) and as high as 88 at cores. Pyroxene Mg #'s range from 65 to 85. Andesites of the SV are sub-alkaline, and like the basalts, are exceedingly phenocryst-poor (≤3%) with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and lesser pyroxene and olivine, which occasionally occur as crystal clots of ~1-3 mm instead of single crystals. In addition, minimal

  11. Eruptive History and Chemical Evolution of the Precaldera and Postcaldera Basalt-Dacite Sequences, Long Valley, California: Implications for Magma Sources, Current Seismic Unrest, and Future Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Roy A.

    2004-01-01

    The Long Valley Volcanic Field in east-central California straddles the East Sierran frontal fault zone, overlapping the Sierra Nevada and western Basin and Range Provinces. The volcanic field overlies a mature mid-Tertiary erosional surface that truncates a basement composed mainly of Mesozoic plutons and associated roof pendants of Mesozoic metavolcanic and Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Long Valley volcanism began about 4 Ma during Pliocene time and has continued intermittently through the Holocene. The volcanism is separable into two basalt-rhyolite episodes: (1) an earlier, precaldera episode related to Long Valley Caldera that climaxed with eruption of the Bishop Tuff and collapse of the caldera; and (2) a later, postcaldera episode structurally related to the north-south-trending Mono-Inyo Craters fissure system, which extends from the vicinity of Mammoth Mountain northward through the west moat of the caldera to Mono Lake. Eruption of the basalt-dacite sequence of the precaldera basalt-rhyolite episode peaked volumetrically between 3.8 and 2.5 Ma; few basalts were erupted during the following 1.8 m.y. (2.5?0.7 Ma). Volcanism during this interval was dominated by eruption of the voluminous rhyolites of Glass Mountain (2.2?0.8 Ma) and formation of the Bishop Tuff magma chamber. Catastrophic rupture of the roof of this magma chamber caused eruption of the Bishop Tuff and collapse of Long Valley Caldera (760 ka), after which rhyolite eruptions resumed on the subsided caldera floor. The earliest postcaldera rhyolite flows (700?500 ka) contain quenched globular basalt enclaves (mafic magmatic inclusions), indicating that basaltic magma had reentered shallow parts of the magmatic system after a 1.8-m.y. hiatus. Later, at about 400 ka, copious basalts, as well as dacites, began erupting from vents mainly in the west moat of the caldera. These later eruptions initiated the postcaldera basalt-rhyolite episode related to the Mono-Inyo Craters fissure system, which

  12. Impact of explosive volcanic eruptions around Vesuvius: a story of resilience in Roman time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpati, Claudio; Perrotta, Annamaria; De Simone, Girolamo Ferdinando

    2016-03-01

    Large explosive eruptions have reshaped the landscape around Vesuvius many times in prehistoric and historical times. Previous stratigraphic surveys suggested that people living in this area have probably abandoned their settlements (in the Bronze Age) or towns and villas (in the Roman period) for centuries after each major plinian eruption. New archaeological excavations on the northern slope of Vesuvius suggest a much more intriguing scenario. At Pollena Trocchia, an ongoing excavation has shown the superimposition of three different Roman structures, sandwiched between the deposits of the AD 79, AD 472, and AD 512 Vesuvius eruptions. Each of these eruptions more or less completely destroyed and buried the buildings under meters of volcanic products. Surprisingly, after a few years or decades, a new settlement was established exactly on the top of the buried one, indicating the immediate recovery of part of the devastated area. Our research documents the destruction of Roman buildings by volcanic eruptions over a period of five centuries (first to sixth century AD) and provides new insight into human behavior after major explosive eruptions.

  13. Violent Explosive Eruptions in the Ararat Valley, Armenia and Associated Volcanic Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliksetian, Khachatur; Savov, Ivan; Connor, Charles; Gevorgyan, Hripsime; Connor, Laura; Navasardyan, Gevorg; Manucharyan, Davit; Jrbashyan, Ruben; Ghukasyan, Yura

    2016-04-01

    The Anatolian-Armenian-Iranian volcanically active orogenic plateau is located in the collision zone between the Arabian and Eurasian plates. The majority of regional geodynamic and petrologic models of collision-related magmatism use the model proposed by Keskin (2003), where volcanism is driven by Neo-Tethyan slab break-off, however an updated model by Neill et al. (2015) and Skolbeltsyn et al.(2014) comprise break-off of two slabs. One of the significant (and understudied) features of the regionally extensive collision zone volcanism is the diversity of eruption styles and also the presence of large number of highly explosive (Plinian) eruptions with VEI≥5 during the Middle-Upper Pleistocene. Geological records of the Ararat depression include several generations of thick low aspect ratio Quaternary ignimbrites erupted from Aragats volcano, as well as up to 3 m thick ash and pumice fall deposit from the Holocene-historically active Ararat volcano. The Ararat tephra fall deposit is studied at 12 newly discovered outcrops covering an area ˜1000 km2. It is noteworthy, that the Ararat tephra deposits are loose and unwelded and observed only in cross-sections in small depressions or in areas where they were rapidly covered by younger, colluvium deposits, presumably of Holocene age. Therefore, the spatial extent of the explosive deposits of Ararat is much bigger but not well preserved due to rapid erosion. Whole rock elemental, isotope (Sr, Nd) and mineral chemistry data demonstrate significant difference in the magma sources of the large Aragats and Ararat stratovolcanoes. Lavas and pyroclastic products of Aragats are high K calc-alkaline, and nearly always deprived from H2O rich phases such as amphibole. In contrasts lavas and pyroclastic products from Ararat are medium K calc-alkaline and volatile-rich (>4.6 wt% H2O and amphibole bearing) magmas. Here we shall attempt to reveal possible geochemical triggers of explosive eruptions in these volcanoes and assess

  14. Numerical simulation of explosive volcanic eruptions from the conduit flow to global atmospheric scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. J. Ernst

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions are unsteady multiphase phenomena, which encompass many inter-related processes across the whole range of scales from molecular and microscopic to macroscopic, synoptic and global. We provide an overview of recent advances in numerical modelling of volcanic effects, from conduit and eruption column processes to those on the Earth s climate. Conduit flow models examine ascent dynamics and multiphase processes like fragmentation, chemical reactions and mass transfer below the Earth surface. Other models simulate atmospheric dispersal of the erupted gas-particle mixture, focusing on rapid processes occurring in the jet, the lower convective regions, and pyroclastic density currents. The ascending eruption column and intrusive gravity current generated by it, as well as sedimentation and ash dispersal from those flows in the immediate environment of the volcano are examined with modular and generic models. These apply simplifications to the equations describing the system depending on the specific focus of scrutiny. The atmospheric dispersion of volcanic clouds is simulated by ash tracking models. These are inadequate for the first hours of spreading in many cases but focus on long-range prediction of ash location to prevent hazardous aircraft - ash encounters. The climate impact is investigated with global models. All processes and effects of explosive eruptions cannot be simulated by a single model, due to the complexity and hugely contrasting spatial and temporal scales involved. There is now the opportunity to establish a closer integration between different models and to develop the first comprehensive description of explosive eruptions and of their effects on the ground, in the atmosphere, and on the global climate.

  15. The Catanda extrusive carbonatites (Kwanza Sul, Angola): an example of explosive carbonatitic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeny, Marc; Mangas, José; Melgarejo, Joan C.; Bambi, Aurora; Alfonso, Pura; Gernon, Thomas; Manuel, José

    2014-04-01

    Carbonatite lavas and pyroclastic rocks are exposed in the volcanic graben of Catanda and represent the only known example of extrusive carbonatites in Angola. A new detailed geological map of the area is presented in this study as well as six different stratigraphic sections. Pyroclastic rocks, apparently unwelded, are dominant in the area and represented in all the stratigraphic columns. They form shallowly to moderately inclined layers, mostly devoid of internal structures, that range in thickness from several centimetres to metres. They are dominantly lapilli tuffs and minor tuffs occasionally comprising pelletal lapilli. Based on their different features and field relationships, at least five different pyroclastic lithofacies have been distinguished in the area. Carbonatitic lavas outcrop in the external parts of the Catanda graben, forming coherent layers interbedded with pyroclastic rocks. Calcite is the most common mineral in the lavas, but other accessory minerals such as fluorapatite, titaniferous magnetite, phlogopite, pyrochlore, baddeleyite, monticellite, perovskite, cuspidine and periclase have also been identified. At least four different types of lavas have been distinguished based on their mineral associations and textural features. This study reveals an overall abundance of pyroclastic material in comparison to lava flows in the Catanda area, suggesting that eruptive processes were dominated by explosive activity similar to what has been described in other carbonatite and kimberlite localities. The Catanda carbonatitic volcanism was associated with monogenetic volcanic edifices with tuff ring or maar morphologies, and at least seven possible eruptive centres have been identified in the area.

  16. Sea surface temperature and sea ice variability in the subpolar North Atlantic from explosive volcanism of the late thirteenth century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicre, M. -A.; Khodri, M.; Mignot, J.;

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we use IP25 and alkenone biomarker proxies to document the subdecadal variations of sea ice and sea surface temperature in the subpolar North Atlantic induced by the decadally paced explosive tropical volcanic eruptions of the second half of the thirteenth century. The short-and lo...... and subsurface heat buildup due to sea ice capping. As volcanic forcing relaxes, the surface ocean rapidly warms, likely amplified by subsurface heat, and remains almost ice free for several decades....

  17. Detecting hidden volcanic explosions from Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Alaska with infrasound and ground-couples airwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Slivio; Fee, David; Haney, Matthew; Schneider, David

    2012-01-01

    In Alaska, where many active volcanoes exist without ground-based instrumentation, the use of techniques suitable for distant monitoring is pivotal. In this study we report regional-scale seismic and infrasound observations of volcanic activity at Mt. Cleveland between December 2011 and August 2012. During this period, twenty explosions were detected by infrasound sensors as far away as 1827 km from the active vent, and ground-coupled acoustic waves were recorded at seismic stations across the Aleutian Arc. Several events resulting from the explosive disruption of small lava domes within the summit crater were confirmed by analysis of satellite remote sensing data. However, many explosions eluded initial, automated, analyses of satellite data due to poor weather conditions. Infrasound and seismic monitoring provided effective means for detecting these hidden events. We present results from the implementation of automatic infrasound and seismo-acoustic eruption detection algorithms, and review the challenges of real-time volcano monitoring operations in remote regions. We also model acoustic propagation in the Northern Pacific, showing how tropospheric ducting effects allow infrasound to travel long distances across the Aleutian Arc. The successful results of our investigation provide motivation for expanded efforts in infrasound monitoring across the Aleutians and contributes to our knowledge of the number and style of vulcanian eruptions at Mt. Cleveland.

  18. Spectroscopy of olivine basalts using FieldSpec and ASTER data: A case study from Wadi Natash volcanic field, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims at revealing the spectral characteristics of the olivine basalts exposed at Wadi Natash area, Egypt, using FieldSpec spectroradiometer. It also evaluates band ratios and fusion techniques for mapping purposes using ASTER data. Several volcanic episodes occurred during Early- to Late-Cretaceous are recorded in the study area. Early-Cretaceous olivine basalts are highly carbonated. Late-Cretaceous eruptions took place throughout several volcanic cones aligned in NW direction. Based on FieldSpec measurements and petrographic data, two groups of olivine basalt namely `A' and `B' are recognized. Fresh olivine basalt (group A) is characterized by low flat spectral profile with overall low reflectance values (˜20%). Spectral profile of altered olivine basalt (group B) shows moderate reflectance values (˜37%) with four little absorption features around the 1.10, 1.40, 2.00 and 2.35 μm wavelength regions. These absorption features are attributed mainly to the presence of chlorite and carbonate alteration products as indicated by petrographic examination. ASTER false colour composite band ratio image (3/2:R, 8/1:G and 8/5:B) discriminates easily the fresh and altered basalts by deep blue and reddish blue colours respectively. Image fusion between previously mentioned FCC ratios image and high spatial resolution ASTER panchromatic image are carried out using brovey and HSV transformation methods. Visual and statistical assessment methods proved that HSV fusion image yields better image interpretability results compared to brovey image. It improves the spatial resolution of original FCC ratios image with acceptable spectral preservation. The present study proved the usefulness of FieldSpec spectral profiles and the processed ASTER data for discriminating different olivine basalt groups exposed at the study area.

  19. New Data on mid-Miocene Rhyolite Volcanism in Eastern Oregon Extend Early, co-CRBG Rhyolite Flare up and Constrain Storage Sites of Grande Ronde Flood Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, M. J.; Ferns, M. L.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    The classical view of relating mid-Miocene rhyolites of the tri-state area of Oregon, Nevada, and Idaho to the flood basalts of the Columbia River Basalt was that a mantle plume impinging along the Oregon-Idaho border first causes eruption of the flood basalts but shortly thereafter causes generation of rhyolites at the McDermitt volcanic field from which then hot-spot track rhyolites developed progressively younging towards Yellowstone. More recent work reveals rhyolites as old as found at McDermitt (~16.5 Ma) to occur along a wide E-W tangent along the Oregon-Nevada-Idaho border. And now, our data extend such early rhyolites (>16 Ma) to several locations further north within and in the periphery of the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) adding to the geographically orphaned old age of 16.7 Ma of the Silver City Rhyolite, Idaho. Hence, the rhyolite flare-up associated with flood basalt magmatism occurred within a circular area of ~400 km centered 100 km NNE of McDermitt. Consequently, no south-to-north progression exists in the onset of rhyolite volcanism; instead, rhyolites started up at the same time over this large area. Province-wide rhyolite volcanism was strongest between ~16.4 and 15.4 Ma coincident with eruptions of the most voluminous member of the CRBG - the Grande Ronde Basalt (GRB). Field evidence for such bimodal volcanism consists of intercalated local GRB units with the Dinner Creek Tuff and Littlefield Rhyolite in the Malheur River Gorge corridor. GRB eruption sites exist and were likely fed from reservoirs residing below or near rhyolitic chambers. Presently, we have petrological evidence for pinning down GRB storages sites to areas from where rhyolites of the Dinner Creek Tuff and lava flows of the Littlefield Rhyolite erupted. In summary, input of GRG and other CRBG magmas were driving co-CRBG rhyolite volcanism which in turn may have influenced whether flood basalt magmas erupted locally or travelled in dikes to more distally located areas.

  20. Quantifying the condition of eruption column collapse during explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyaguchi, Takehiro; Suzuki, Yujiro

    2016-04-01

    During an explosive eruption, a mixture of pyroclasts and volcanic gas forms a buoyant eruption column or a pyroclastic flow. Generation of a pyroclastic flow caused by eruption column collapse is one of the most hazardous phenomena during explosive volcanic eruptions. The quantification of column collapse condition (CCC) is, therefore, highly desired for volcanic hazard assessment. Previously the CCC was roughly predicted by a simple relationship between magma discharge rate and water content (e.g., Carazzo et al., 2008). When a crater is present above the conduit, because of decompression/compression process inside/above the crater, the CCC based on this relationship can be strongly modified (Woods and Bower, 1995; Koyaguchi et al., 2010); however, the effects of the crater on CCC has not been fully understood in a quantitative fashion. Here, we have derived a semi-analytical expression of CCC, in which the effects of the crater is taken into account. The CCC depends on magma properties, crater shape (radius, depth and opening angle) as well as the flow rate at the base of crater. Our semi-analytical CCC expresses all these dependencies by a single surface in a parameter space of the dimensionless magma discharge rate, the dimensionless magma flow rate (per unit area) and the ratio of the cross-sectional areas at the top and the base of crater. We have performed a systematic parameter study of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of eruption column dynamics to confirm the semi-analytical CCC. The results of the 3D simulations are consistent with the semi-analytical CCC, while they show some additional fluid dynamical features in the transitional state (e.g., partial column collapse). Because the CCC depends on such many parameters, the scenario towards the generation of pyroclastic flow during explosive eruptions is considered to be diverse. Nevertheless, our semi-analytical CCC together with the existing semi-analytical solution for the 1D conduit flow

  1. Presenting Numerical Modelling of Explosive Volcanic Eruption to a General Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaria, C.; Todesco, M.; Neri, A.; Blasi, G.

    2001-12-01

    Numerical modeling of explosive volcanic eruptions has been widely applied, during the last decades, to study pyroclastic flows dispersion along volcano's flanks and to evaluate their impact on urban areas. Results from these transient multi-phase and multi-component simulations are often reproduced in form of computer animations, representing the spatial and temporal evolution of relevant flow variables (such as temperature, or particle concentration). Despite being a sophisticated, technical tool to analyze and share modeling results within the scientific community, these animations truly look like colorful cartoons showing an erupting volcano and are especially suited to be shown to a general public. Thanks to their particular appeal, and to the large interest usually risen by exploding volcanoes, these animations have been presented several times on television and magazines and are currently displayed in a permanent exposition, at the Vesuvius Observatory in Naples. This work represents an effort to produce an accompanying tool for these animations, capable of explaining to a large audience the scientific meaning of what can otherwise look as a graphical exercise. Dealing with research aimed at the study of dangerous, explosive volcanoes, improving the general understanding of these scientific results plays an important role as far as risk perception is concerned. An educated population has better chances to follow an appropriate behavior, i.e.: one that could lead, on the long period, to a reduction of the potential risk. In this sense, a correct divulgation of scientific results, while improving the confidence of the population in the scientific community, should belong to the strategies adopted to mitigate volcanic risk. Due to the relevance of the long term final goal of such divulgation experiment, this work represents an interdisciplinary effort, combining scientific expertise and specific competence from the modern communication science and risk

  2. Vulnerability of shallow ground water and drinking-water wells to nitrate in the United States: Model of predicted nitrate concentration in shallow, recently recharged ground water -- Input data set for basalt and volcanic rocks (gwava-s_vrox)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the presence or absence of basalt and volcanic rocks in the conterminous United States. The data set was used as an input data layer for a...

  3. Numerical simulations of tsunami generated by underwater volcanic explosions at Karymskoye lake (Kamchatka, Russia and Kolumbo volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ulvrová

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing human activities along the coasts of the world arise the necessity to assess tsunami hazard from different sources (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity. In this paper, we simulate tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions from (1 a submerged vent in a shallow water lake (Karymskoye Lake, Kamchatka, and (2 from Kolumbo submarine volcano (7 km NE of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece. The 1996 tsunami in Karymskoye lake is a well-documented example and thus serves as a case-study for validating the calculations. The numerical model reproduces realistically the tsunami runups measured onshore. Systematic numerical study of tsunamis generated by explosions of Kolumbo volcano is then conducted for a wide range of energies. Results show that in case of reawakening, Kolumbo volcano might represent a significant tsunami hazard for the northern, eastern and southern coasts of Santorini, even for small-power explosions.

  4. Characteristics of volcanic tremor accompanying the September 24th, 1986 explosive eruption of Mt. Etna (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cristofolini

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Features of the volcanic tremor recorded before, during and after the eruptive event which occurred at Mt. Etna on September 24th 1986, are described. The whole eruption was particularly short in time (about eight hours and characterized by an extremely violent explosive activity with lava fountains a few hundred meters high. As the complete record of the seismic signals generated during the whole eruptive episode was available, a detailed spectral analysis of the volcanic tremor recorded at four stations, located at increasing distance from the summit of the volcano, was carried out. Fourier analysis, that was performed using temporal windows of about 11 min in duration, pointed to some large fluctuations of the overall spectral amplitude, as well as some frequency variations of the dominant spectral peaks. The ratio of the overall spectral amplitude recorded at the highest station and at the peripheral ones, was calculated in the two spectral bands 1.0-2.5 and 2.6-6.0 Hz, respectively. The significant contribution of energy at low frequency values supports the hypothesis of a subvertical planar source, which was active during the paroxysmal stage of the eruption. Such results are also supported by the analysis of the attenuation function of the spectral amplitude.

  5. Tephrochronology of a 72 ka-long marine record: implications for the southern Tyrrhenian explosive volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrino, Stella; Insinga, Donatella; Pelosi, Nicola; Kissel, Catherine; Laj, Carlo; Capotondi, Lucilla; Sprovieri, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Several discrete tephra layers occur in a Marion Dufresne 13.9 m-long deep-sea core (MD01-2474G) from the southern Tyrrhenian Sea. Major, minor and trace element data (EMPA-WDS and LA-ICP-MS analyses) from fresh micro-pumices and glass shards allow to correlate them with the volcanic activity from Aeolian Islands (Lipari, Vulcano, Salina), Campanian Plain (Ischia), Pantelleria and Mt. Etna. The chronology of the succession is provided by a high-resolution age-model based on isotope stratigraphy and AMS radiocarbon dating, which places the succession in a time interval spanning the last 72 kyrs BP. According to a detailed proximal-distal and distal-distal correlation, a precise chronological framework is established and some main markers tephras of the central Mediterranean area (Y-1, Y-6, Y-7 and Y-8) are recognised. In additions, the succession is a precious archive to record multiple volcanic events occurred at Ischia volcano and the Aeolian Arc (Lipari and Vulcano). This latter, in particular, erupted several products which exhibits strong compositional variations otherwise non detectable from terrestrial counterparts. The results of the present study, hence, provide new data for a detailed analytical reference database of the Tyrrhenian Sea tephrochronology and may contribute to a better chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the Aeolian arc explosive events.

  6. Simulated meteorite impacts and volcanic explosions: Ejecta analyses and planetary implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    Past cratering studies have focused primarily on crater morphology. However, important questions remain about the nature of crater deposits. Phenomena that need to be studied include the distribution of shock effects in crater deposits and crater walls; the origin of mono- and polymict breccia; differences between local and distal ejecta; deformation induced by explosive volcanism; and the production of unshocked, high-speed ejecta that could form the lunar and martian meteorites found on the Earth. To study these phenomena, one must characterize ejecta and crater wall materials from impacts produced under controlled conditions. New efforts at LLNL simulate impacts and volcanism and study resultant deformation. All experiments use the two-stage light-gas gun facility at LLNL to accelerate projectiles to velocities of 0.2 to 4.3 km/s, including shock pressures of 0.9 to 50 GPa. We use granite targets and novel experimental geometries to unravel cratering processes in crystalline rocks. We have thus far conducted three types of simulations: soft recovery of ejecta, 'frozen crater' experiments, and an 'artificial volcano. Our ejecta recovery experiments produced a useful separation of impactites. Material originally below the projectile remained trapped there, embedded in the soft metal of the flyer plate. In contrast, material directly adjacent to the projectile was jetted away from the impact, producing an ejecta cone that was trapped in the foam recovery fixture. We find that a significant component of crater ejecta shows no signs of strong shock; this material comes from the near-surface 'interference zone' surrounding the impact site. This phenomenon explains the existence of unshocked meteorites on the Earth of lunar and martian origin. Impact of a large bolide on neighboring planets will produce high-speed, weakly shocked ejecta, which may be trapped by the Earth's gravitational field. 'Frozen crater' experiments show that the interference zone is highly

  7. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volcanic hazard investigations during FY 1984 focused on five topics: the emplacement mechanism of shallow basalt intrusions, geochemical trends through time for volcanic fields of the Death Valley-Pancake Range volcanic zone, the possibility of bimodal basalt-rhyolite volcanism, the age and process of enrichment for incompatible elements in young basalts of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region, and the possibility of hydrovolcanic activity. The stress regime of Yucca Mountain may favor formation of shallow basalt intrusions. However, combined field and drill-hole studies suggest shallow basalt intrusions are rare in the geologic record of the southern Great Basin. The geochemical patterns of basaltic volcanism through time in the NTS region provide no evidence for evolution toward a large-volume volcanic field or increases in future rates of volcanism. Existing data are consistent with a declining volcanic system comparable to the late stages of the southern Death Valley volcanic field. The hazards of bimodal volcanism in this area are judged to be low. The source of a 6-Myr pumice discovered in alluvial deposits of Crater Flat has not been found. Geochemical studies show that the enrichment of trace elements in the younger rift basalts must be related to an enrichment of their mantle source rocks. This geochemical enrichment event, which may have been metasomatic alteration, predates the basalts of the silicic episode and is, therefore, not a young event. Studies of crater dimensions of hydrovolcanic landforms indicate that the worst case scenario (exhumation of a repository at Yucca Mountain by hydrovolcanic explosions) is unlikely. Theoretical models of melt-water vapor explosions, particularly the thermal detonation model, suggest hydrovolcanic explosion are possible at Yucca Mountain. 80 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M.; Wohletz, K.H.; Vaniman, D.T.; Gladney, E.; Bower, N.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanic hazard investigations during FY 1984 focused on five topics: the emplacement mechanism of shallow basalt intrusions, geochemical trends through time for volcanic fields of the Death Valley-Pancake Range volcanic zone, the possibility of bimodal basalt-rhyolite volcanism, the age and process of enrichment for incompatible elements in young basalts of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region, and the possibility of hydrovolcanic activity. The stress regime of Yucca Mountain may favor formation of shallow basalt intrusions. However, combined field and drill-hole studies suggest shallow basalt intrusions are rare in the geologic record of the southern Great Basin. The geochemical patterns of basaltic volcanism through time in the NTS region provide no evidence for evolution toward a large-volume volcanic field or increases in future rates of volcanism. Existing data are consistent with a declining volcanic system comparable to the late stages of the southern Death Valley volcanic field. The hazards of bimodal volcanism in this area are judged to be low. The source of a 6-Myr pumice discovered in alluvial deposits of Crater Flat has not been found. Geochemical studies show that the enrichment of trace elements in the younger rift basalts must be related to an enrichment of their mantle source rocks. This geochemical enrichment event, which may have been metasomatic alteration, predates the basalts of the silicic episode and is, therefore, not a young event. Studies of crater dimensions of hydrovolcanic landforms indicate that the worst case scenario (exhumation of a repository at Yucca Mountain by hydrovolcanic explosions) is unlikely. Theoretical models of melt-water vapor explosions, particularly the thermal detonation model, suggest hydrovolcanic explosion are possible at Yucca Mountain. 80 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Evaluation of sulfur dioxide emissions from explosive volcanism: the 1982-1983 eruptions of Galunggung, Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, G.J.S.; Casadevall, T.J.; Schnetzler, C.C.; Doiron, S.D.; Walter, Louis S.; Krueger, A.J.; Badruddin, M.

    1994-01-01

    Galunggung volcano, Java, awoke from a 63-year quiescence in April 1982, and erupted sporadically through January 1983. During its most violent period from April to October, the Cikasasah Volcano Observatory reported 32 large and 56 moderate to small eruptions. From April 5 through September 19 the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), carried on NASA's Nimbus-7 satellite, detected and measured 24 different sulfur dioxide clouds; an estimated 1730 kilotons (kt) of SO2 were outgassed by these explosive eruptions. The trajectories, and rapid dispersion rates, of the SO2 clouds were consistent with injection altitudes below the tropopause. An additional 300 kt of SO2 were estimated to have come from 64 smaller explosive eruptions, based on the detection limit of the TOMS instrument. For the first time, an extended period of volcanic activity was monitored by remote sensing techniques which enabled observations of both the entire SO2 clouds produced by large explosive eruptions (using TOMS), and the relatively lower levels of SO2 emissions during non-explosive outgassing (using the Correlation Spectrometer, or COSPEC). Based on COSPEC measurements from August 1982 to January 1983, and on the relationship between explosive and non-explosive degassing, approximately 400 kt of SO2 were emitted during non-explosive activity. The total sulfur dioxide outgassed from Galunggung volcano from April 1982 to January 1983 is calculated to be 2500 kt (?? 30%) from both explosive and non-explosive activity. While Galunggung added large quantities of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere, its sporadic emissions occurred in relatively small events distributed over several months, and reached relatively low altitudes, and are unlikely to have significantly affected aerosol loading of the stratosphere in 1982 by volcanic activity. ?? 1994.

  10. Igneous Rocks of the East Pacific Rise: The alkali volcanic suite appear to be differentiated from a tholeiitic basalt extruded from the mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1964-10-23

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K(2)O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K(2)O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO(2). Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts. The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 10(4).

  11. Surface exposure dating of Holocene basalt flows and cinder cones in the Kula volcanic field (western Turkey) using cosmogenic 3He and 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Caroline; Niedermann, Samuel; Hetzel, Ralf; Akal, Cüneyt

    2015-04-01

    The Kula volcanic field is the youngest volcanic province in western Anatolia and covers an area of about 600 km2 around the town Kula (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996). Its alkali basalts formed by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle in a region of long-lived continental extension and asthenospheric upwelling (Prelevic et al., 2012). Based on morphological criteria and 40Ar/39Ar dating, four phases of Quaternary activity have been distinguished in the Kula volcanic field (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996; Westaway et al., 2006). The youngest lava flows are thought to be Holocene in age, but so far only one sample from this group was dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 7±2 ka (Westaway et al., 2006). In this study, we analysed cosmogenic 3He in olivine phenocrysts from three basalt flows and one cinder cone to resolve the Holocene history of volcanic eruptions in more detail. In addition, we applied 10Be exposure dating to two quartz-bearing xenoliths found at the surface of one flow and at the top of one cinder cone. The exposure ages fall in the range between ~500 and ~3000 years, demonstrating that the youngest volcanic activity is Late Holocene in age and therefore distinctly younger than previously envisaged. Our results show that the Late Holocene lava flows are not coeval but formed over a period of a few thousand years. We conclude that surface exposure dating of very young volcanic rocks provides a powerful alternative to 40Ar/39Ar dating. References Prelevic, D., Akal, C. Foley, S.F., Romer, R.L., Stracke, A. and van den Bogaard, P. (2012). Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post-collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Petrology, 53, 1019-1055. Richardson-Bunbury, J.M. (1996). The Kula Volcanic Field, western Turkey: the development of a Holocene alkali basalt province and the adjacent normal-faulting graben. Geological Magazine, 133, 275-283. Westaway, R., Guillou, H., Yurtmen, S., Beck, A

  12. Tools and techniques for developing tephra stratigraphies in lake cores: A case study from the basaltic Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Jenni L.; Millet, Marc-Alban; Timm, Christian; Wilson, Colin J. N.; Leonard, Graham S.; Palin, J. Michael; Neil, Helen

    2015-09-01

    Probabilistic hazard forecasting for a volcanic region relies on understanding and reconstructing the eruptive record (derived potentially from proximal as well as distal volcanoes). Tephrostratigraphy is commonly used as a reconstructive tool by cross-correlating tephra deposits to create a stratigraphic framework that can be used to assess magnitude-frequency relationships for eruptive histories. When applied to widespread rhyolitic deposits, tephra identifications and correlations have been successful; however, the identification and correlation of basaltic tephras are more problematic. Here, using tephras in drill cores from six maars in the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand, we show how X-ray density scanning coupled with magnetic susceptibility analysis can be used to accurately and reliably identify basaltic glass shard-bearing horizons in lacustrine sediments and which, when combined with the major and trace element signatures of the tephras, can be used to distinguish primary from reworked layers. After reliably identifying primary vs. reworked basaltic horizons within the cores, we detail an improved method for cross-core correlation based on stratigraphy and geochemical fingerprinting. We present major and trace element data for individual glass shards from 57 separate basaltic horizons identified within the cores. Our results suggest that in cases where major element compositions (SiO2, CaO, Al2O3, FeO, MgO) do not provide unambiguous correlations, trace elements (e.g. La, Gd, Yb, Zr, Nb, Nd) and trace element ratios (e.g. [La/Yb]N, [Gd/Yb]N, [Zr/Yb]N) are successful in improving the compositional distinction between the AVF basaltic tephra horizons, thereby allowing an improved eruptive history of the AVF to be reconstructed.

  13. H2O-rich melt inclusions in fayalitic olivine from Hekla volcano: Implications for phase relationships in silicic systems and driving forces of explosive volcanism on Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnyagin, Maxim; Hoernle, Kaj; Storm, Sonja; Mironov, Nikita; van den Bogaard, Christel; Botcharnikov, Roman

    2012-12-01

    Silicic Icelandic magmas are widely believed to contain low to moderate H2O content prior to degassing, and that their high explosivity mostly results from the interaction of the magmas with ice or meteoric water. Here we report the compositions of glass inclusions (SiO2=57-72 wt%, K2O=1.3-2.6 wt%) in Fe-rich olivines (Fo2-42) from the largest Holocene eruptions of Hekla volcano (H3 and H4) on Iceland, which preserved quenched melts with very high primary H2O contents (3.3-6.2 wt%). The silicic Hekla melts originate primarily by extensive (˜90%) crystal fractionation of H2O-poor (˜0.6 wt%) basalts and represent an end member in the systematics of terrestrial magmas because they originate at low fO2 (ΔQFM ˜-0.1 to -0.4) and have as high H2O contents as significantly more oxidized island-arc magmas (ΔQFM≥1). This demonstrates that H2O and ΔQFM do not correlate in silicic magmas from different tectonic settings, and that fO2, not H2O content, shows a major difference between silicic ocean-island (e.g., Icelandic) and island-arc magmas. Analysis of available experimental data suggests that high H2O activity and low fO2 expand the field of olivine stability in silicic melts. Low fO2 and low MgO content could also suppress crystallization of amphibole. On the basis of these results we propose that an anhydrous mineral assemblage bearing Fe-rich olivine in evolved volcanic and Skaergaard-type intrusive rocks does not imply low H2O in magmas prior to degassing but, in contrast to the commonly held view, is an indicator of H2O-rich silicic parental magmas crystallized at low fO2. Finally, the high H2O content in magma was a major driving force of the largest explosive eruptions of Hekla volcano and must be at least as important for driving silicic explosive volcanism on Iceland as magma-ice interaction.

  14. Evidence for explosive silicic volcanism on the Moon from the extended distribution of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, J T; Massey, R J; Elphic, R C; Jolliff, B L; Lawrence, D J; Llewellin, E W; McElwaine, J N; Teodoro, L F A

    2014-01-01

    We reconstruct the abundance of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex on the Moon, using data from the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. We enhance the resolution via a pixon image reconstruction technique, and find that the thorium is distributed over a larger (40 km $\\times$ 75 km) area than the (25 km $\\times$ 35 km) high albedo region normally associated with Compton-Belkovich. Our reconstructions show that inside this region, the thorium concentration is 15 - 33 ppm. We also find additional thorium, spread up to 300 km eastward of the complex at $\\sim$2 ppm. The thorium must have been deposited during the formation of the volcanic complex, because subsequent lateral transport mechanisms, such as small impacts, are unable to move sufficient material. The morphology of the feature is consistent with pyroclastic dispersal and we conclude that the present distribution of thorium was likely created by the explosive eruption of silicic magma.

  15. Climate Throughout Geologic Time Has Been Controlled Primarily by the Balance Between Cooling Caused by Major Explosive Eruptions of Evolved Magmas Typical of Island Arcs and Warming Caused by Voluminous Effusive Eruptions of Basaltic Magma Typical of Subaerial Ocean Ridges and Island Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2014-12-01

    Most volcanic eruptions deplete ozone ~6% for a few years, allowing more high-energy, ultraviolet-B radiation to warm earth. Record low levels of total column ozone followed the 1991 explosive eruption of Pinatubo. Yet 6% depletion also followed the smaller and more effusive eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull (2010) and Grímsvötn (2011) in Iceland. Explosive volcanoes also eject 10-20 megatons of sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere, forming sulfuric-acid aerosols that reflect and diffuse sunlight causing a net cooling of ~0.5°C for 3 years. High rates of explosive volcanos cool earth into ice ages while high rates of effusive basaltic volcanism in Iceland between 11,500 and 9,500 years ago clearly warmed Earth out of the last ice age depositing sulfate recorded in ice cores in Greenland. Basalts from these eruptions are observed as tuyas in Iceland dated during this period. The 25 Dansgaard-Oeschger abrupt warmings are contemporaneous with increased sulfate in Greenland and with the few older dates available for tuyas in Iceland. Extensive flood basalts were formed during the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum and during times of most major mass extinctions when global temperatures rose substantially, with fossil evidence for ozone depletion. Greenhouse-gas theory assumes electromagnetic radiation travels through space as waves and therefore thermal energy reaching earth is proportional to the square of wave amplitude. Thus the change in energy reaching Earth due to ozone depletion is considered small compared to infrared energy absorbed by greenhouse gases. But waves travel in matter and there is no matter in space. Electromagnetic energy is transmitted as frequency, as shown by radio signals, where energy equals frequency times the Planck constant. Thus thermal energy reaching earth when ozone is depleted is 50 times thermal energy involved in greenhouse gases. Global warming from 1970 to 1998 was caused primarily by 3% ozone depletion due to anthropogenic

  16. Complex explosive volcanic activity on the Moon within Oppenheimer crater, Icarus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kristen A; Horgan, Briony H N; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Allen, Carlton C.; Hayne, Paul O; Bell, James F III; Paige, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Oppenheimer Crater is a floor-fractured crater located within the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon, and exhibits more than a dozen localized pyroclastic deposits associated with the fractures. Localized pyroclastic volcanism on the Moon is thought to form as a result of intermittently explosive Vulcanian eruptions under low effusion rates, in contrast to the higher-effusion rate, Hawaiian-style fire fountaining inferred to form larger regional deposits. We use Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images and Diviner Radiometer mid-infrared data, Chandrayaan-1 orbiter Moon Mineralogy Mapper near-infrared spectra, and Clementine orbiter Ultraviolet/Visible camera images to test the hypothesis that the pyroclastic deposits in Oppenheimer crater were emplaced via Vulcanian activity by constraining their composition and mineralogy. Mineralogically, we find that the deposits are variable mixtures of orthopyroxene and minor clinopyroxene sourced from the crater floor, juvenile clinopyroxene, and juvenile iron-rich glass, and that the mineralogy of the pyroclastics varies both across the Oppenheimer deposits as a whole and within individual deposits. We observe similar variability in the inferred iron content of pyroclastic glasses, and note in particular that the northwest deposit, associated with Oppenheimer U crater, contains the most iron-rich volcanic glass thus far identified on the Moon, which could be a useful future resource. We propose that this variability in mineralogy indicates variability in eruption style, and that it cannot be explained by a simple Vulcanian eruption. A Vulcanian eruption should cause significant country rock to be incorporated into the pyroclastic deposit; however, large areas within many of the deposits exhibit spectra consistent with high abundances of juvenile phases and very little floor material. Thus, we propose that at least the most recent portion of these deposits must have erupted via a Strombolian or more continuous fire

  17. Trace Element Geochemistry of Basaltic Tephra in Maar Cores; Implications for Centre Correlation, Field Evolution, and Mantle Source Characteristics of the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, J. L.; Leonard, G.; Timm, C.; Wilson, C. J. N.; Neil, H.; Millet, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Establishing volcanic hazard and risk management strategies hinges on a detailed understanding of the type, timing and tephra dispersal of past eruptions. In order to unravel the pyroclastic eruption history of a volcanic field, genetic links between the deposits and eruption source centre need to be established. The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF; New Zealand) has been active for ca. 200 kyr and comprises ca. 53 individual centres covering an area of ca. 360km2. These centres show a range of sizes and eruptive styles from maar craters and tuff rings, to scoria cones and lava flows consistent with both phreatomagmatic and magmatic eruptions. Superimposition of the metropolitan area of Auckland (ca. 1.4 million inhabitants) on the volcanic field makes it critically important to assess the characteristics of the volcanic activity, on which to base assessment and management of the consequent hazards. Here we present a geochemical approach for correlating tephra deposits to their source centres. To acquire the most complete stratigraphic record of pyroclastic events, maar crater cores from different locations, covering various depths and thus ages across the field were selected. Magnetic susceptibility and x-ray density scanning of the cores was used to identify the basaltic tephra horizons, which were sampled and in-situ analysis of individual shards undertaken for major and trace elements using EPMA and LA-ICP-MS techniques, respectively. Our results show that tephra shard trace element ratios are comparable and complementary to the AVF whole rock database. The use of specific trace element ratios (e.g. Gd/Yb vs. Zr/Yb) allows us to fingerprint and cross correlate tephra horizons between cores and, when coupled with newly acquired 40Ar-39Ar age dating and eruption size estimates, correlate horizons to their source centres. This integrated style of study can provide valuable information to help volcanic hazard management and forecasting, and mitigation of related risks.

  18. Petrologic insights into basaltic volcanism at historically active Hawaiian volcanoes: Chapter 6 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helz, Rosalind L.; Clague, David A.; Sisson, Thomas W.; Thornber, Carl R.; Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Study of the petrology of Hawaiian volcanoes, in particular the historically active volcanoes on the Island of Hawai‘i, has long been of worldwide scientific interest. When Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., established the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) in 1912, detailed observations on basaltic activity at Kīlauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes increased dramatically. The period from 1912 to 1958 saw a gradual increase in the collection and analysis of samples from the historical eruptions of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa and development of the concepts needed to evaluate them. In a classic 1955 paper, Howard Powers introduced the concepts of magnesia variation diagrams, to display basaltic compositions, and olivine-control lines, to distinguish between possibly comagmatic and clearly distinct basaltic lineages. In particular, he and others recognized that Kīlauea and Mauna Loa basalts must have different sources.

  19. Facies-controlled volcanic reservoirs of northern Songliao Basin, NE China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Volcanic rocks of the late Mesozoic are very important reservoirs for the commercial natural gases including hydrocarbon, carbon dioxide and rare gases in the northern Songliao Basin. The reservoir volcanic rocks include rhyolite,andesite, trachyte, basalt and tuff. Facies of the volcanic rocks can be classified into 5 categories and 15 special types.Porosity and permeability of the volcanic reservoirs are facies-controlled. Commercial reservoirs were commonly found among the following volcanic subfacies: volcanic neck (Ⅰ1), underground-explosive breccia (Ⅰ3), pyroclastic-bearing lava flow (Ⅱ3), upper effusive (Ⅲ3) and inner extrusive ones (Ⅳ1). The best volcanic reservoirs are generally evolved in the interbedded explosive and effusive volcanics. Rhyolites show in general better reservoir features than other types of rocks do.

  20. Bimodal basalt-rhyolite magmatism in the central and western Snake River Plain, Idaho and Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, M.; Bonnichsen, B.; White, C.; Godchaux, M.M.; Hughes, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this trip is to examine Miocene to Pleistocene basalt and rhyolite flows, ignimbrites and hypabyssal intrusions in a transect from the western Snake River Plain graben across the older part of the Snake River Plain "hot-spot-track." The earlier, dominantly explosive rhyolitic phase of volcanism will be examined primarily in the Cassia Mountains, near Twin Falls, Idaho. The second day of the field trip will focus on the Graveyard Point intrusion, a strongly differentiated diabase sill in easternmost Oregon. This late Tertiary sill is well exposed from floor to roof in sections up to 150 m thick, and is an example of the type of solidified shallow magma chamber that may be present beneath some Snake River Plain basalt volcanoes. The field trip will conclude with an examination of the diverse styles of effusive and explosive basaltic volcanism in the central and western Snake River Plain.

  1. The 2010 Eyja eruption evolution by using IR satellite sensors measurements: retrieval comparison and insights into explosive volcanic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscini, A.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Scollo, S.

    2010-12-01

    The 2010 April-May Eyja eruption caused an unprecedented disruption to economic, political and cultural activities in Europe and across the world. Because of the harming effects of fine ash particles on aircrafts, many European airports were in fact closed causing millions of passengers to be stranded, and with a worldwide airline industry loss estimated of about 2.5 billion Euros. Both security and economical issues require robust and affordable volcanic cloud retrievals that may be really improved through the intercomparison among different remote sensing instruments. In this work the Thermal InfraRed (TIR) measurements of different polar and geostationary satellites instruments as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI), have been used to retrieve the volcanic ash and SO2 in the entire eruption period over Iceland. The ash retrievals (mass, AOD and effective radius) have been carried out by means of the split window BTD technique using the channels centered around 11 and 12 micron. The least square fit procedure is used for the SO2 retrieval by using the 7.3 and 8.7 micron channels. The simulated TOA radiance Look-Up Table (LUT) needed for both the ash and SO2 column abundance retrievals have been computed using the MODTRAN 4 Radiative Transfer Model. Further, the volcanic plume column altitude and ash density have been computed and compared, when available, with ground observations. The results coming from the retrieval of different IR sensors show a good agreement over the entire eruption period. The column height, the volcanic ash and the SO2 emission trend confirm the indentified different phases occurred during the Eyja eruption. We remark that the retrieved volcanic plume evolution can give important insights into eruptive dynamics during long-lived explosive activity.

  2. Increased thyroid cancer incidence in a basaltic volcanic area is associated with non-anthropogenic pollution and biocontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandrino, Pasqualino; Russo, Marco; Ronchi, Anna; Minoia, Claudio; Cataldo, Daniela; Regalbuto, Concetto; Giordano, Carla; Attard, Marco; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Trimarchi, Francesco; Vigneri, Riccardo

    2016-08-01

    The increased thyroid cancer incidence in volcanic areas suggests an environmental effect of volcanic-originated carcinogens. To address this problem, we evaluated environmental pollution and biocontamination in a volcanic area of Sicily with increased thyroid cancer incidence. Thyroid cancer epidemiology was obtained from the Sicilian Regional Registry for Thyroid Cancer. Twenty-seven trace elements were measured by quadrupole mass spectrometry in the drinking water and lichens (to characterize environmental pollution) and in the urine of residents (to identify biocontamination) in the Mt. Etna volcanic area and in adjacent control areas. Thyroid cancer incidence was 18.5 and 9.6/10(5) inhabitants in the volcanic and the control areas, respectively. The increase was exclusively due to the papillary histotype. Compared with control areas, in the volcanic area many trace elements were increased in both drinking water and lichens, indicating both water and atmospheric pollution. Differences were greater for water. Additionally, in the urine of the residents of the volcanic area, the average levels of many trace elements were significantly increased, with values higher two-fold or more than in residents of the control area: cadmium (×2.1), mercury (×2.6), manganese (×3.0), palladium (×9.0), thallium (×2.0), uranium (×2.0), vanadium (×8.0), and tungsten (×2.4). Urine concentrations were significantly correlated with values in water but not in lichens. Our findings reveal a complex non-anthropogenic biocontamination with many trace elements in residents of an active volcanic area where thyroid cancer incidence is increased. The possible carcinogenic effect of these chemicals on the thyroid and other tissues cannot be excluded and should be investigated. PMID:26438396

  3. Increased thyroid cancer incidence in a basaltic volcanic area is associated with non-anthropogenic pollution and biocontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandrino, Pasqualino; Russo, Marco; Ronchi, Anna; Minoia, Claudio; Cataldo, Daniela; Regalbuto, Concetto; Giordano, Carla; Attard, Marco; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Trimarchi, Francesco; Vigneri, Riccardo

    2016-08-01

    The increased thyroid cancer incidence in volcanic areas suggests an environmental effect of volcanic-originated carcinogens. To address this problem, we evaluated environmental pollution and biocontamination in a volcanic area of Sicily with increased thyroid cancer incidence. Thyroid cancer epidemiology was obtained from the Sicilian Regional Registry for Thyroid Cancer. Twenty-seven trace elements were measured by quadrupole mass spectrometry in the drinking water and lichens (to characterize environmental pollution) and in the urine of residents (to identify biocontamination) in the Mt. Etna volcanic area and in adjacent control areas. Thyroid cancer incidence was 18.5 and 9.6/10(5) inhabitants in the volcanic and the control areas, respectively. The increase was exclusively due to the papillary histotype. Compared with control areas, in the volcanic area many trace elements were increased in both drinking water and lichens, indicating both water and atmospheric pollution. Differences were greater for water. Additionally, in the urine of the residents of the volcanic area, the average levels of many trace elements were significantly increased, with values higher two-fold or more than in residents of the control area: cadmium (×2.1), mercury (×2.6), manganese (×3.0), palladium (×9.0), thallium (×2.0), uranium (×2.0), vanadium (×8.0), and tungsten (×2.4). Urine concentrations were significantly correlated with values in water but not in lichens. Our findings reveal a complex non-anthropogenic biocontamination with many trace elements in residents of an active volcanic area where thyroid cancer incidence is increased. The possible carcinogenic effect of these chemicals on the thyroid and other tissues cannot be excluded and should be investigated.

  4. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory: a natural laboratory for studying basaltic volcanism: Chapter 1 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, Robert I.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Brantley, Steven R.; Neal, Christina A.; Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    In the beginning of the 20th century, geologist Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., argued that, to fully understand volcanic and associated hazards, the expeditionary mode of studying eruptions only after they occurred was inadequate. Instead, he fervently advocated the use of permanent observatories to record and measure volcanic phenomena—at and below the surface—before, during, and after eruptions to obtain the basic scientific information needed to protect people and property from volcanic hazards. With the crucial early help of American volcanologist Frank Alvord Perret and the Hawaiian business community, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established in 1912, and Jaggar’s vision became reality. From its inception, HVO’s mission has centered on several goals: (1) measuring and documenting the seismic, eruptive, and geodetic processes of active Hawaiian volcanoes (principally Kīlauea and Mauna Loa); (2) geological mapping and dating of deposits to reconstruct volcanic histories, understand island evolution, and determine eruptive frequencies and volcanic hazards; (3) systematically collecting eruptive products, including gases, for laboratory analysis; and (4) widely disseminating observatory-acquired data and analysis, reports, and hazard warnings to the global scientific community, emergency-management authorities, news media, and the public. The long-term focus on these goals by HVO scientists, in collaboration with investigators from many other organizations, continues to fulfill Jaggar’s career-long vision of reducing risks from volcanic and earthquake hazards across the globe.

  5. The Relative Rates of Secondary Hydration in Basalt and Rhyolite, and the use of δD as a Paleoclimate Indicator: Implications for Paleoenvironmental and Volcanic Degassing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2014-12-01

    The δD-H2O correlation is important for volcanic degassing and secondary hydration trends. We utilize the caibration of the TC/EA - MAT 253 continuous flow system, which permits us to analyze wt.% H2O and its δD extracted from 1-8 mg of glass with as little as 0.1 wt% H2O. Tephra that has been secondarily hydrated with meteoric water is widely used as a paleoenvironmental tool, but the rate of secondary hydration, the relative amounts of primary magmatic (degassed) and secondary meteoric water, and the retention of primary and secondary δD values are not well understood. To quantify these processes, we use a natural experiment involving dated Holocene tepha in Kamchatka and Oregon. Our research illustrates the drastic difference in hydration rates between silicic (hydrated after ~1.5 ka) and mafic tephra, which is not hydrated in the Holocene (similar to results for submarine volcanic glasses), and andesitic tephra with intermediate degrees of hydration. The 0.05-7.3 ka basaltic scoria from Klyuchevskoy volcano retains ≤0.45 wt.% primary magmatic H2O, with δD values from -99 to -121 ‰. Four other 0.05-7.6 ka basaltic tephra units from Kamchatka with 65 wt.% have higher (1.5 -3.4) wt.% H2O and δD values between -115 - -160 ‰. We interpret the lower δD values and higher water contents (opposite of the magmatic degassing trend) to be a characteristic of secondary hydration in regions of higher latitude such as Kamchatka and Oregon. We are also investigating 7.7 ka Mt. Mazama tephra in Oregon that are known to be fully hydrated and cover nearly 5000 km2 northeast of Crater Lake and range in elevation from ~1.3-1.9 km to understand the δD and δ18O details of the hydrated water's correspondence with local Holocene meteoric waters. In the future, we plan to use a combination of δD in mid-high latitude precipitation to delineate δD-H2O hydration trends to better understand the distinction between primary magmatic and secondary meteoric water in volcanic

  6. Subaerial records of large-scale explosive volcanism and tsunami along an oceanic arc, Tonga, SW Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, S. J.; Smith, I. E.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new chronology of major terrestrial eruptions and tsunami events for the central Tongan Arc. The active Tonga-Kermadec oceanic arc extends 2500 km northward of New Zealand and hosts many tens of submarine volcanoes with around a dozen forming islands. Despite its obious volcanic setting, the impacts of explosive volcanism and volcano-tectonic related tsunami are an often overlooked in archaeological and paleo-botanical histories, mainly due the lack of good Holocene subaerial exposures. The inhabited small uplifted coral platform islands east of the volcanic arc in Tonga collectively cover only gods flying overhead with baskets of ash, and an analysis of the high-level wind distribution patterns, lake and wetland sites were investigated along the Tongan chain. In most cases former lagoon basins lifted above sea-level by a combination of tectonic rise and the lowering of mean sea levels by around 2 m since the Mid-Holocene form closed lake or swampy depressions. Coring reveaed between 6 and 20 mineral layers at each site, withn humic sediment or peat. Over thirty new radiocarbon dates were collected to develop a chronology for the sequences and the mineral layers were examined mineralogically and geochemically. These sites reveal mainly tephra fall layers of particles.

  7. Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, C.R.; Kurasawa, H.; Delevaux, M.H.; Kistler, R.W.; Doe, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The 2 earliest rhyolites probably were tapped from short-lived silicic reservoirs, in contrast to the other 36 rhyolite domes and lava flows which the isotopic data suggest may have been leaked from the top of a single, long-lived magmatic system. Most Coso basalts show isotopic, geochemical, and mineralogic evidence of interaction with crustal rocks, but one analyzed flow has isotopic ratios that may represent mantle values (87Sr/86Sr=0.7036,206Pb/204Pb=19.05,207Pb/204Pb=15.62,208Pb/204Pb= 38.63). The (initial) isotopic composition of typical rhyolite (87Sr/86Sr=0.7053,206Pb/204Pb=19.29,207Pb/204Pb= 15.68,208Pb/204Pb=39.00) is representative of the middle or upper crust. Andesitic inclusions in the rhyolites are evidently samples of hybrid magmas from the silicic/mafic interface in vertically zoned magma reservoirs. Silicic end-member compositions inferred for these mixed magmas, however, are not those of erupted rhyolite but reflect the zonation within the silicic part of the magma reservoir. The compositional contrast at the interface between mafic and silicic parts of these systems apparently was greater for the earlier, smaller reservoirs. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Post-rift flood-basalt-like volcanism on the Newfoundland Basin nonvolcanic margin: The U event mapped with spectral decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deemer, S.; Hurich, C.; Hall, J.

    2010-10-01

    Diabase sills emplaced at less than .5 km depth (presently ~ 7 km) are imaged throughout the Newfoundland Basin as an extraordinarily high amplitude package of seismic reflections historically referred to as the U event. The sills are extensive, covering roughly 20,000 km 2, and represent a post-rift voluminous magmatic episode along an otherwise nonvolcanic rifted margin. Spectral decomposition is used to estimate a total magmatic volume at roughly 1000-2000 km 3. On an individual basis the major sills are comparable to flows in flood basalt volcanic environments. A proposed mechanism for generating these large volumes of magma which are also very limited in time to perhaps only two major intrusive episodes (2 sills) is the approach of the Canary and Madeira hot spots. Suppressed volcanism while the hot spots traveled under full thickness continental lithosphere of Newfoundland resulted in a local accumulation of magma which was suddenly released when the hot spots approached thinned lithosphere at the eastern edge of the Grand Banks. The emplacement of the sills 'anticipated' the arrival of the hot spots geographically.

  9. Basaltic rocks from the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone: Insights from the comparison of along-strike and small-scale geochemical variations and their sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey-Vargas, Rosemary; Holbik, Sven; Tormey, Daniel; Frey, Frederick A.; Moreno Roa, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    The origin of spatial variations in the geochemical characteristics of volcanic rocks erupted in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) has been studied by numerous researchers over the past 40 years. Diverse interpretations for along-strike, across-strike, and small-scale variations have been proposed. In this paper, we review geochemical data showing along-strike geochemical variations and address the processes causing such trends. We compare large- and small-scale changes of the same geochemical parameters in basaltic rocks in order to use spatial scale as a tool for isolating processes that may have the same result. Along-strike geochemical variations in the SVZ are expected, due to 1) greater thickness or age of the sub-arc continental crust and mantle lithosphere in the Northern SVZ (NSVZ; 33°S-34°30‧S) and Transitional SVZ (TSVZ; 34°30‧S-37°S) compared with the Central SVZ (CSVZ; 37°S-41.5°S) and Southern SVZ (SSVZ: 41.5°S-46°S); and 2) along-strike changes of the subducting Nazca plate and overlying asthenosphere. Basalts and basaltic andesites erupted at volcanic front stratovolcanoes define several along-strike geochemical trends: 1) higher 87Sr/86Sr and lower 143Nd/144Nd at volcanoes in the NSVZ compared with the TSVZ, CSVZ, and SSVZ; 2) higher and more variable La/Yb at volcanoes in the NSVZ and TSVZ compared with the CSVZ and SSVZ; 3) lower 87Sr/86Sr for a given 143Nd/144Nd at volcanoes in the TSVZ compared with the CSVZ and SSVZ; and 4) large values for time-sensitive subduction tracers such as 10Be/9Be and (238U/230Th) at some volcanoes in the CSVZ, but not in the NSVZ and TSVZ. Geochemical parameters that distinguish the TSVZ from the CSVZ and SSVZ are also found within the CSVZ at small basaltic eruptive centers (SEC) aligned with the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS), which extends from 38°S to the southernmost SVZ. Our interpretation is that CSVZ magmas with strong time-sensitive subduction tracers represent the ambient subduction

  10. Analysis of the seismic wavefield properties of volcanic explosions at Volc ´an de Colima,Mexico: insights into the source mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Palo, M.; Universit´a degli Studio di Salerno, Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Italy; Ibanez, J. M.; Instituto Andaluz de Geofısica, Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain; Cisneros, M.; Observatorio Vulcanologico, Universidad de Colima, Colima, Mexico; Breton, M.; Observatorio Vulcanologico, Universidad de Colima, Colima, Mexico; Del Pezzo, E.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Ocana, E.; Instituto Andaluz de Geof´ısica, Universidad de Granada, Spain.; Orozco-Rojas, J.; Observatorio Vulcanol´ogico, Universidad de Colima, Colima, Mexico; Posadas, A. M.; Departamento de Fısica Aplicada, Universidad de Almerıa, Spain

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated thewavefield properties of the seismic signals generated by the explosions of Volc´an de Colima (M´exico). We have analysed these properties to understand the initial mechanism that triggered the explosive events. Our study is focused on the direct waves coming from the crater area. Thus, we have analysed a set of moderate volcanic explosions at Volc´an de Colima that was recorded by a small aperture seismic array over two periods: October 2005 and April 20...

  11. Subduction zone mantle enrichment by fluids and Zr-Hf-depleted crustal melts as indicated by backarc basalts of the Southern Volcanic Zone, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Paul M.; Søager, Nina; Alfastsen, Mads; Bertotto, Gustavo W.

    2016-10-01

    We aim to identify the components metasomatizing the mantle above the subducting Nazca plate under part of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ). We present new major and ICP-MS trace element and Sr, Nd and high-precision Pb isotope analyses of primitive olivine-phyric alkali basalts from the Northern Segment Volcanic Field, part of the Payenia province in the backarc of the Transitional SVZ. One new 40Ar-39Ar age determination confirms the Late Pleistocene age of this most northerly part of the province. All analysed rocks have typical subduction zone type incompatible element enrichment, and the rocks of the Northern Segment, together with the neighbouring Nevado Volcanic Field, have isotopic compositions intermediate between adjacent Transitional SVZ arc rocks and southern Payenia OIB-type basaltic rocks. Modelling the Ba-Th-Sm variation we demonstrate that fluids as well as 1-2% melts of upper continental crust (UCC) enriched their mantle sources, and La-Nb-Sm variations additionally indicate that the pre-metasomatic sources ranged from strongly depleted to undepleted mantle. Low Eu/Eu* and Sr/Nd also show evidence for a UCC component in the source. The contribution of Chile Trench sediments to the magmas seems insignificant. The Zr/Sm and Hf/Sm ratios are relatively low in many of the Northern Segment rocks, ranging down to 17 and 0.45, respectively, which, together with relatively high Th/U, is argued to indicate that the metasomatizing crustal melts were derived by partial melting of subducted UCC that had residual zircon, in contrast to the UCC melts added to Transitional SVZ arc magmas. Mixing between depleted and undepleted mantle, enriched by UCC and fluids, is suggested by Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes of the Northern Segment and Nevado magmas. The metasomatized undepleted mantle south of the Northern Segment is suggested to be part of upwelling OIB-type mantle, whereas the pre-metasomatically depleted mantle also can be found as a component in some arc

  12. Wendo Koshe Pumice: The latest Holocene silicic explosive eruption product of the Corbetti Volcanic System (Southern Ethiopia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapprich, Vladislav; Žáček, Vladimír; Verner, Kryštof; Erban, Vojtěch; Goslar, Tomasz; Bekele, Yewubinesh; Legesa, Firdawok; Hroch, Tomáš; Hejtmánková, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Main Ethiopian Rift, the rhyolitic magmas of the recently active volcanoes within the Corbetti Volcanic System are most likely produced by extreme fractional crystallization of basaltic melts.

  13. Petrogenesis of basaltic volcanic rocks from the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, by melting of metasomatically enriched depleted lithosphere, crystallization differentiation, and magma mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J.M.; Feeley, T.C.; Deraps, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Pribilof Islands, Alaska, are located in the Bering Sea in a continental intraplate setting. In this study we examine the petrology and geochemistry of volcanic rocks from St. Paul (0??54-0??003 Ma) and St. George (2??8-1??4 Ma) Islands, the two largest Pribilof Islands. Rocks from St. George can be divided into three groups: group 1 is a high-MgO, low-SiO. 2 suite composed primarily of basanites; group 2 is a high-MgO, high-SiO 2 suite consisting predominantly of alkali basalts; group 3 is an intermediate- to low-MgO suite that includes plagioclase-phyric subalkali basalts and hawaiites. Major and trace element geochemistry suggests that groups 1 and 2 formed by small-degree partial melting of amphibole-bearing to amphibole-free garnet peridotite. Group 1 rocks were the earliest melts produced from the most hydrous parts of the mantle, as they show the strongest geochemical signature of amphibole in their source. The suite of rocks from St. Paul ranges from 14??4 to 4??2 wt % MgO at relatively constant SiO 2 contents (43??1-47??3 wt %). The most primitive St. Paul rocks are modeled as mixtures between magmas with compositions similar to groups 1 and 2 from St. George Island, which subsequently fractionated olivine, clinopyroxene, and spinel to form more evolved rocks. Plagioclase-phyric group 3 rocks from St. George are modeled as mixtures between an evolved melt similar to the evolved magmas on St. Paul and a fractionated group 2 end-member from St. George. Mantle potential temperatures estimated for primitive basanites and alkali basalts are ???1400??C and are similar to those of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). Similarly, 87Sr/. 86Sr and 143Nd/. 144Nd values for all rocks are MORB-like, in the range of 0??702704-0??703035 and 0??513026-0??513109, respectively. 208Pb/. 204Pb vs 206Pb/. 204Pb values lie near the MORB end-member but show a linear trend towards HIMU (high time-integrated 238U/. 204Pb). Despite isotopic similarities to MORB, many of the major and

  14. Depositional conditions of the coal-bearing Hirka Formation beneath Late Miocene explosive volcanic products in NW central Anatolia, Turkey

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Şener

    2007-04-01

    This work focuses on the relationship between the coal deposition and explosive volcanism of the Miocene basin, NW central Anatolia, Turkey. The coal-bearing Hirka Formation was deposited over the Galatian Andesitic Complex and/or massive lagoonal environments during the Miocene. The investigated lignite is a high ash (from 32 to 58%) and sulphur (from 1.43 to 3.03%) lignite which is petrographically characterised by a high humunite content. The mineral matter of the studied lignite samples is made up of mainly clay minerals (illite–smectite and kaolinite), plagioclase and quartz in Bolu coal field, clay minerals (illite–smectite, smectite and illite), quartz, calcite, plagioclase and gypsum in Seben coal field, quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase and clay minerals (kaolinite and illite) in Kıbrıscık, and dolomite, quartz, clinoptilolite, opal CT and gypsum in C¸ amlıdere coal field. The differences in these four types of lignite with specific mineralogical patterns may be due to the explosive volcanic events and depositional conditions which changed from one coal field to the others. There is a zonation from SW to SE in the studied area for zeolites such as Opal CT+smectite-clinoptilolite-analcime-K-feldspar. Carbonate minerals are commonly calcite in Seben and Kıbrıscık coal fields. In Bolu, coal samples are devoid of calcite and dolomite. These analyses show that there is an increase in the amount of Mg and a decrease in the amount of Na from the northwestern part to the southern part in the study area.

  15. Heavy Halogen (Br, I) Injections into the Stratosphere from Large Explosive Volcanic Eruptions: Information from Melt Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansteen, T. H.; Kutterolf, S.; Freundt, A.; Frische, M.; Wehrmann, H.; Schmincke, H.; Kluegel, A.

    2008-12-01

    Large explosive volcanic eruptions inject gases, aerosols and ash into the stratosphere, thus influencing stratospheric chemistry and the Earth´s radiation budget. Such periodic injections cause turbulent mixing which enhance chemical reactions. Reactive species responsible for catalytic ozone depletion following large eruptions include not only chlorine (Cl), but also the heavy halogens bromine (Br) and iodine (I) occurring in trace amounts in volcanic plumes. Due to the higher catalytic potential for ozone destruction of Br and I than of Cl, even trace amounts of these elements in volcanic emissions are relevant for stratospheric chemistry. We have analysed halogens in volcanic glasses and in glass inclusions in phenocrysts using electron microprobe and Synchrotron-XRF microprobe methods. Halogens from bulk glass samples were extracted using pyrohydrolysis, and analysed by ICP-MS. Eruptions investigated include Baitoushan, China /North Korea (ca. 969 AD), Mt. Hudson, Chile (1991), and several dacitic Quaternary eruptions from Nicaragua. Chlorine concentrations in glass inclusions are typically 2000 to 4000 ppm, which is on average about 50 percent higher than the concentrations in the matrix glasses. Br concentrations in glass inclusions are typically in the range of 2 to 20 ppm. This gives an average Cl/ Br ratios of about 300:1. Using the petrologic method, involving the concentration differences of halogens between the glass inclusion and those retained in the matrix glass, the average Cl/ Br ratio of the volcanic emissions were about 200:1 Typical I concentrations of Nicaraguan glass inclusions range between 1 and 3 ppm. The resulting Cl/ I ratio of eruptive emissions is about 1100:1. Depending on eruption size, each large event injected between several kt and several hundred kt Br and I into the atmosphere. As a first approach to estimate global Br and I fluxes from subduction zones, although affected by several sources of uncertainty, we combine these

  16. Late-stage volatile saturation as a potential trigger for explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Michael J.; Humphreys, Madeleine C. S.; Smith, Victoria C.; Isaia, Roberto; Pyle, David M.

    2016-03-01

    Magma reservoirs are thought to grow relatively slowly, assembling incrementally under volatile-saturated conditions. Eruptions may be triggered by injections of volatile-rich melt, or generation of over-pressure due to protracted crystallization. Here, we analyse fluorine, chlorine and water in apatite crystals trapped at different stages of magma evolution, and in melt inclusions from clinopyroxene and biotite crystals expelled during an explosive eruption of the Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, about 4,000 years ago. We combine our geochemical analyses with thermodynamic modelling to reconstruct the evolution of magmatic volatile contents leading up to the explosive eruption. We find that the magma reservoir remained persistently water-undersaturated throughout most of its lifetime. Even crystals in contact with the melt shortly before eruption show that the magma was volatile-undersaturated. Our models suggest that the melt reached volatile saturation at low temperatures, just before eruption. We suggest that late-stage volatile saturation probably triggered the eruption, and conclude that `priming’ of the magma system for eruption may occur on timescales much shorter than the decadal to centennial timescales thought typical for magma reservoir assembly. Thus, surface deformation pulses that record magma assembly at depth beneath Campi Flegrei and other similar magmatic systems may not be immediately followed by an eruption; and explosive eruptions may begin with little warning.

  17. Emplacement history and inflation evidence of a long basaltic lava flow located in Southern Payenia Volcanic Province, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Mauro I.; Bertotto, Gustavo W.; Jalowitzki, Tiago L. R.; Orihashi, Yuji; Ponce, Alexis D.

    2015-02-01

    The El Corcovo lava flow, from the Huanul shield volcano in the southern Mendoza province (central-western Argentina) traveled a distance of 70 km and covered a minimum area of ~ 415 km2. The flow emplacement was controlled both by extrinsic (e.g., topography) and intrinsic (e.g., lava supply rate, lava physicochemical characteristics) factors. The distal portion of the lava flow reached the Colorado River Valley, in La Pampa Province, where it spread and then was confined by earlier river channels. Cross-sections through the flow surveyed at several localities show two vesicular layers surrounding a dense central section, where vesicles are absent or clustered in sheet-shaped and cylindrical-shaped structures. Lavas of the El Corcovo flow are alkaline basalts with low values of viscosity. The morphological and structural characteristics of the flow and the presence of landforms associated with lava accumulation are the evidence of inflation. This process involved the formation of a tabular sheet flow up to 4 m of thick with a large areal extent in the proximal sectors, while at terminal sectors frontal lobes reached inflation values up to 10 m. The numerous swelling structures present at these portions of the flow suggest the movement of lava in lava tubes. We propose that this aspect and the low viscosity of the lava allowed the flow travel to a great distance on a gentle slope relief.

  18. Was millennial scale climate change during the Last Glacial triggered by explosive volcanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, James U. L.; Brown, Richard J.; McElwaine, Jim N.

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms responsible for millennial scale climate change within glacial time intervals are equivocal. Here we show that all eight known radiometrically-dated Tambora-sized or larger NH eruptions over the interval 30 to 80 ka BP are associated with abrupt Greenland cooling (>95% confidence). Additionally, previous research reported a strong statistical correlation between the timing of Southern Hemisphere volcanism and Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events (>99% confidence), but did not identify a causative mechanism. Volcanic aerosol-induced asymmetrical hemispheric cooling over the last few hundred years restructured atmospheric circulation in a similar fashion as that associated with Last Glacial millennial-scale shifts (albeit on a smaller scale). We hypothesise that following both recent and Last Glacial NH eruptions, volcanogenic sulphate injections into the stratosphere cooled the NH preferentially, inducing a hemispheric temperature asymmetry that shifted atmospheric circulation cells southward. This resulted in Greenland cooling, Antarctic warming, and a southward shifted ITCZ. However, during the Last Glacial, the initial eruption-induced climate response was prolonged by NH glacier and sea ice expansion, increased NH albedo, AMOC weakening, more NH cooling, and a consequent positive feedback. Conversely, preferential SH cooling following large SH eruptions shifted atmospheric circulation to the north, resulting in the characteristic features of DO events.

  19. Was millennial scale climate change during the Last Glacial triggered by explosive volcanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, James U L; Brown, Richard J; McElwaine, Jim N

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for millennial scale climate change within glacial time intervals are equivocal. Here we show that all eight known radiometrically-dated Tambora-sized or larger NH eruptions over the interval 30 to 80 ka BP are associated with abrupt Greenland cooling (>95% confidence). Additionally, previous research reported a strong statistical correlation between the timing of Southern Hemisphere volcanism and Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events (>99% confidence), but did not identify a causative mechanism. Volcanic aerosol-induced asymmetrical hemispheric cooling over the last few hundred years restructured atmospheric circulation in a similar fashion as that associated with Last Glacial millennial-scale shifts (albeit on a smaller scale). We hypothesise that following both recent and Last Glacial NH eruptions, volcanogenic sulphate injections into the stratosphere cooled the NH preferentially, inducing a hemispheric temperature asymmetry that shifted atmospheric circulation cells southward. This resulted in Greenland cooling, Antarctic warming, and a southward shifted ITCZ. However, during the Last Glacial, the initial eruption-induced climate response was prolonged by NH glacier and sea ice expansion, increased NH albedo, AMOC weakening, more NH cooling, and a consequent positive feedback. Conversely, preferential SH cooling following large SH eruptions shifted atmospheric circulation to the north, resulting in the characteristic features of DO events. PMID:26616338

  20. Longevity of Yellowstone hotspot volcanism: Isotopic evidence linking the Siletzia LIP (56 Ma) and early Columbia River Basalt Group (17 Ma) mantle sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, D. G.; Duncan, R. A.; Wells, R. E.; Graham, D. W.; Hanan, B. B.; Harrison, B. K.; Haileab, B.

    2015-12-01

    Siletzia is a Paleocene-Eocene accreted terrane of submarine and subaerially erupted mafic lavas exposed in the Cascadia forearc. This large igneous province [LIP] is exposed in multiple volcanic sections from Vancouver Island, B.C., to southern Oregon [~700 km]. We estimate Siletzia magmatism at ~2.3 x 106 km3 west of the Cascades and may reach 4.6 x 106 km3 if correlative with Alaskan Yakutat terrane and significant portions of the LIP filled the Oregon Embayment. 40Ar-39Ar ages show the bulk of Siletzia erupted over a 6-7 Myr interval beginning at 56 Ma, implying eruption rates of 0.3-0.7 km3/yr. In Oregon, Siletz River volcanism began in the south [56-53 Ma] and migrated northward [54-50 Ma]. Concurrent eruptions of Metchosin and Crescent basalts do not show a southerly age progression. Therefore, Siletzia likely erupted south of the Kula-Farallon spreading center with ridge collision at or north of the Metchosin igneous complex. Isotopic data for 29 Siletzia lavas have initial 7/6Sr 0.7030-0.7037, ΕNd +4.9 - +7.7, 6/4Pb 18.70-19.94, 7/4Pb 15.49-15.63 and 8/4Pb 38.27-39.53. Olivine yield 3He/4He from 9.4 to 13.7 (R/Ra) and high MgO lavas display a narrow 187Os/188Os range (0.131-0.134) when age corrected. Both He and Os tracers are elevated above typical depleted MORB mantle and indicate plume involvement. Pb-Pb and Pb-Nd arrays suggest 3 mantle components for Siletzia volcanism: a depleted source with isotopic and trace element characteristics expected for spreading center lavas (i.e., Ku-Fa) influenced by a plume, a HIMU contaminant (i.e., high 6/4Pb; low 7/6Sr) confined to southern Siletzia, and a plume source (6/4Pb 19.00; 7/4Pb 15.55; 8/4Pb 38.60; 7/6Sr; 0.7033; ΕNd +6.4; γOs +5.0). Siletzia plume mantle is a close match to recent Yellowstone plume estimates based on early CRBG lavas. Mounting geophysical and geochemical evidence supports the contention that Siletzia is an early product of the Yellowstone hot spot in a sub-oceanic setting.

  1. Constraining the onset of flood volcanism in Isle of Skye Lava Field, British Paleogene Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angkasa, Syahreza; Jerram, Dougal. A.; Svensen, Henrik; Millet, John M.; Taylor, Ross; Planke, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    In order to constrain eruption styles at the onset of flood volcanism, field observations were undertaken on basal sections of the Isle of Skye Lava Field, British Paleogene Volcanic Province. This study investigates three specific sections; Camus Ban, Neist Point and Soay Sound which sample a large area about 1500 km2 and can be used to help explain the variability in palaeo-environments at the onset of flood volcanism. Petrological analysis is coupled with petrophysical lab data and photogrammetry data to create detailed facies models for the different styles of initiating flood basalt volcanism. Photogrammetry is used to create Ortho-rectified 3D models which, along with photomontage images, allow detailed geological observations to be mapped spatially. Petrographic analyses are combined with petrophysical lab data to identify key textural variation, mineral compositions and physical properties of the volcanic rocks emplaced during the initial eruptions. Volcanism initiated with effusive eruptions in either subaerial or subaqueous environments resulting in tuff/hyaloclastite materials or lava flow facies lying directly on the older Mesozoic strata. Volcanic facies indicative of lava-water interactions vary significantly in thickness between different sections suggesting a strong accommodation space control on the style of volcanism. Camus Ban shows hyaloclastite deposits with a thickness of 25m, whereas the Soay Sound area has tuffaceous sediments of under 0.1m in thickness. Subaerial lavas overly these variable deposits in all studied areas. The flood basalt eruptions took place in mixed wet and dry environments with some significant locally developed water bodies (e.g. Camus Ban). More explosive eruptions were promoted in some cases by interaction of lavas with these water bodies and possibly by local interaction with water - saturated sediments. We record key examples of how palaeotopography imparts a primary control on the style of volcanism during the

  2. Has Martian History Been Dominated by Explosive Rather than Effusive Volcanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandfield, J. L.; Edwards, C. S.; Montgomery, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    It is important to gain a clear understanding of basic physical properties of the upper martian crust. We can use these derived properties to test a range of plausible formation mechanisms and place constraints on the processes involved in the creation of the martian crust. Previous studies have addressed this problem using a variety of techniques and observations. It has been well-established that the martian upper crust is typically mechanically weak (e.g. Pike, 1980; Schultz, 2002; Stewart and Valiant, 2006) and the notion of a highly fractured mega-regolith has often been invoked as the cause of this weakness. There are apparent contradictions in the interpretations of separate observations, such as the fine-scale layering in canyon walls that would not be preserved in a mega-regolith (McEwen et al., 1999). In all cases, however, the original material that makes up either the layering or mega-regolith has been assumed to originate as effusive volcanic materials. We have re-examined the body of previous work in the light of more recent global thermophysical observations to place further constraints on the nature of the upper martian crust. Although the upper ~10 km of the crust is indeed mechanically weak, consistent with previous studies, these crustal materials are also inconsistent with a mega-regolith composed of fractured blocks. Thermal inertia derived from Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) data, High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images, and Mars Exploration Rover observations clearly indicate that the upper martian crust is more typically composed of weakly consolidated fine-particulate materials. These materials are consistent with a volcaniclastic origin rather than effusive volcanism. Mechanically competent material akin to what might be derived from lava flows is clearly present on Mars in locations such as Hesperia Planum and at low latitudes within the northern lowlands, but it is much less common than has been assumed. It

  3. Two- and three-dimensional gravity modeling along western continental margin and intraplate Narmada-Tapti rifts: Its relevance to Deccan flood basalt volcanism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Somdev Bhattacharji; Rajesh Sharma; Nilanjan Chatterjee

    2004-12-01

    magma chambers along the western continental margin and the intraplate Narmada-Tapti rifts at estimated depths between 6 and 8 km from the surface (consistent with geological, petrological and geochemical models) appear to be the major reservoirs for Deccan flood basalt volcanism at approximately 65 Ma.

  4. Traces of explosive volcanic eruptions in the Upper Ordovician of the Siberian Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren D. Huff

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ordovician K-bentonite beds have a long history of investigation all around the world. They have been reported from Gondwana, the Argentine Precordillera, the Yangtze Platform, Laurentia, Baltica, and numerous terrains between Gondwana and Baltica, which now constitute a part of Europe. In recent years several K-bentonite beds have also been discovered in the Upper Ordovician of the Siberian Platform. This discovery is significant not only for their value in local and regional chronostratigraphic correlation but also for global geochronology, paleogeography, paleotectonic and paleoclimatic reconstructions. All in all, eight individual K-bentonite beds have been identified in the Baksian, Dolborian and Burian regional stages, which correspond roughly to the Upper Sandbian–Katian Global Stages. Zircon crystals from the uppermost K-bentonite bed within the Baksian regional stage provide a 206Pb/238U age of 450.58 ± 0.27 Ma. We will present preliminary results of the study of the three lowermost beds from the Baksian Regional Stage and suggest that the Taconic–Enisej (also spelled Yenisei or Yenisey volcanic arc was continuous along the western margin of Siberia.

  5. Parallel simulation of particle transport in an advection field applied to volcanic explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künzli, Pierre; Tsunematsu, Kae; Albuquerque, Paul; Falcone, Jean-Luc; Chopard, Bastien; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersal models typically describe particle motion via a turbulent velocity field. Particles are advected inside this field from the moment they leave the vent of the volcano until they deposit on the ground. Several techniques exist to simulate particles in an advection field such as finite difference Eulerian, Lagrangian-puff or pure Lagrangian techniques. In this paper, we present a new flexible simulation tool called TETRAS (TEphra TRAnsport Simulator) based on a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian model. This scheme offers the advantages of being numerically stable with no numerical diffusion and easily parallelizable. It also allows us to output particle atmospheric concentration or ground mass load at any given time. The model is validated using the advection-diffusion analytical equation. We also obtained a good agreement with field observations of the tephra deposit associated with the 2450 BP Pululagua (Ecuador) and the 1996 Ruapehu (New Zealand) eruptions. As this kind of model can lead to computationally intensive simulations, a parallelization on a distributed memory architecture was developed. A related performance model, taking into account load imbalance, is proposed and its accuracy tested.

  6. Pleistocene volcaniclastic units from North-Eastern Sicily (Italy): new evidence for calc-alkaline explosive volcanism in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Marcella; Italiano, Francesco; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Tripodo, Alessandro; Baldanza, Angela; Casella, Sergio; Pino, Paolo; Rasa', Riccardo; Russo, Selma

    2016-08-01

    A well-preserved volcaniclastic sequence crops out in Pleistocene marine sediments along the Tyrrhenian coastline of the Calabrian-Peloritani arc (Sicily, Italy), testifying the occurrence of Lower-Middle Pleistocene volcanic activity in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. The presence of dominant highly vesicular and minor blocky glassy particles indicates that the volcanic clasts were originated by explosive events related to the ascent and violent emission of volatile-rich magmas accompanied by and/or alternated with hydromagmatic fragmentation due to magma-sea water interaction. Field investigations and sedimentological features of the studied volcaniclastic units suggest a deposition from sediment-water density flows. The chemical classification of the pumice clasts indicates prevalent rhyolitic and dacitic compositions with calc-alkaline to high-K calc-alkaline affinity. The geochemical features of immobile trace elements together with the presence of orthopyroxene are indicative of a provenance from an arc-type environment. The age (from 980-910 to 589 ka), the chemical composition and the evidence of subaerial explosive volcanic activity constrain the origin nature and temporal evolution of the arc-type volcanism in the Southern Tyrrhenian domain. Finally, the new information here provided contribute to a better understanding of the temporal geodynamic evolution of this sector of the Mediterranean domain.

  7. Hydrous basalt-limestone interaction at crustal conditions: Implications for generation of ultracalcic melts and outflux of CO2 at volcanic arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Laura B.; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2015-10-01

    High degassing rates for some volcanoes, typically in continental arcs, (e.g., Colli Albani Volcanic District, Etna, Vesuvius, Italy; Merapi, Indonesia; Popocatepetl, Mexico) are thought to be influenced by magma-carbonate interaction in the crust. In order to constrain the nature of reaction and extent of carbonate breakdown, we simulated basalt-limestone wall-rock interactions at 0.5-1.0 GPa, 1100-1200 °C using a piston cylinder and equal mass fractions of calcite (CaCO3) and a hydrous (∼4 wt.% H2O) basalt in a layered geometry contained in AuPd capsules. All experiments produce melt + fluid + calcite ± clinopyroxene ± plagioclase ± calcic-scapolite ± spinel. With increasing T, plagioclase is progressively replaced by scapolite, clinopyroxene becomes CaTs-rich, and fluid proportion, as inferred from vesicle population, increases. At 1.0 GPa, 1200 °C our hydrous basalt is superliquidus, whereas in the presence of calcite, the experiment produces calcite + clinopyroxene + scapolite + melt. With the consumption of calcite with increasing T and decreasing P, melt, on a volatile-free basis, becomes silica-poor (58.1 wt.% at 1.0 GPa, 1100 °C to 34.9 wt.% at 0.5 GPa, 1200 °C) and CaO-rich (6.7 wt.% at 1.0 GPa, 1100 °C to 43.7 wt.% at 0.5 GPa, 1200 °C), whereas Al2O3 drops (e.g., 19.7 at 1100 °C to 12.8 wt.% at 1200 °C at 1.0 GPa) as clinopyroxene becomes more CaTs-rich. High T or low P melt compositions are 'ultracalcic,' potentially presenting a new hypothesis for the origin of ultracalcic melt inclusions in arc lava olivines. Wall-rock calcite consumption is observed to increase with increasing T and decreasing P. At 0.5 GPa, our experiments yield carbonate assimilation from 21.6 to 47.6% between 1100 and 1200 °C. Using measured CO2 outflux rates for Mts. Vesuvius, Merapi, Etna and Popocatepetl over a T variation of 1100 to 1200 °C at 0.5 GPa, we calculate 6-92% of magmatic input estimates undergo this extent of assimilation, suggesting that up to ∼3

  8. Probing the Source of Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (Sergey Soloviev Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, John C.

    2015-04-01

    International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) would continuously core through the margin of the magma body, accompanied by state-of-the-art geophysics, geochemical analyses and 3-D mass/heat transport modeling. Coring of molten rock has been conducted with success in lava lakes. Gradients in phase assemblage and composition will provide definitive tests of models of mass/heat transfer and magma evolution. By knowing 'the answer', techniques for finding magma will likewise be tested, making Krafla an international magma laboratory. In fact, Krafla may resemble the state of neighboring Askja Caldera system prior its 1875 eruption, with hidden rhyolite being brewed in a basalt-fired caldera crucible. Additionally, the observed high permeability and sustained power output from the magma body's margin implies self-sustained thermal fracturing, i.e. an 'Enhanced Geothermal System' an order of magnitude more powerful than conventional geothermal. The cost should be balanced against the higher cost of ignorance. For tsunamis, Sergey Soloviev showed there is no substitute for direct measurements at depth, despite technical and economic obstacles. He also led the way in Russian - American cooperation on natural hazards, thereby mitigating the risk of the ultimate hazard, of humans to each other.

  9. Characterization of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle beneath the Cameroon volcanic line inferred from alkaline basalt hosted peridotite xenoliths from Barombi Mbo and Nyos Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, Zsanett; Patkó, Levente; Tene Djoukam, Joëlle Flore; Kovács, István; Tchouankoue, Jean Pierre; Falus, György; Konc, Zoltán; Tommasi, Andréa; Barou, Fabrice; Mihály, Judith; Németh, Csaba; Jeffries, Teresa

    2015-11-01

    We carried out detailed petrographic, major and trace element geochemical, microstructural and FTIR analyses on eight characteristic ultramafic xenoliths from Nyos and Barombi Mbo Lakes in the continental sector of the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL). The studied xenoliths are spinel lherzolites showing lithologies similar to the other xenoliths reported previously along the CVL. They have protogranular and porphyroclastic textures. One of the Barombi xenolith contains amphibole, which had not been previously reported in this locality. Amphibole is common in the Nyos xenoliths suite. Peridotite xenoliths from both localities show some chemical heterogeneity, but Barombi xenoliths generally are less depleted in basaltic elements with respect to Nyos xenoliths. Trace element compositions of Nyos spinel lherzolites show a moderately depleted initial (premetasomatic) composition and variable enrichment in REE. Evidence for both modal and cryptic metasomatism is present in Nyos xenoliths. Rare earth element patterns of clinopyroxene suggest that interaction between mafic melts and the upper mantle occurred beneath the Nyos locality. Barombi Mbo xenoliths, on the other hand, record a small degree of partial melting. The Barombi Mbo xenoliths have weak, dominantly orthorhombic olivine crystal preferred orientations, whereas Nyos ones have strong axial-[010] patterns, which may have formed in response to transpression. Nominally anhydrous mantle minerals (NAMs) of the Barombi Mbo xenoliths show generally higher bulk concentrations of 'water' (70-127 ppm) than Nyos xenoliths (32-81 ppm). The Barombi Mbo xenoliths could originate from a juvenile segment of the lithospheric mantle, which had been originally part of the asthenosphere. It became a part of the lithosphere in response to thermal relaxation following the extension, forming a weakly deformed lower lithospheric mantle region along the CVL. The Nyos xenoliths, however, represent a shallow lithospheric mantle bearing

  10. Catastrophic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  11. Correlating the end-Triassic mass extinction and basalt volcanism of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province at the 100,000-year level by high-precision U-Pb age determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoene, Blair; Guex, Jean; Bartolini, Annachiara; Schaltegger, Urs; Blackburn, Terrence J.

    2010-05-01

    The end-Triassic mass extinction is one of the five largest extinctions in Earth history, though considerable uncertainty remains in terms of its duration, causes and effects. Many workers suggest that the extinction was related directly or indirectly to adverse climate following the onset of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), which erupted > 2.5x106 km3 of basalt in less than 1 Ma. However, there remains a need for precise and accurate geochronology to correlate the onset of CAMP volcanism, recorded uniquely in terrestrial sections, with the well-documented marine extinction event. We provide new chemical abrasion ID-TIMS U-Pb age determinations on ash bed and basaltic zircons using the well-calibrated EARTHTIME 202Pb-205Pb-233U-235U tracer solution, yielding data that are up to 70% more precise compared to single-Pb/single-U tracers. We show that the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (TJB) and end-Triassic biological crisis from two independent marine stratigraphic sections in northern Peru and in Nevada (USA) correlate with the onset of terrestrial flood volcanism in the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) to <150 ka. Ash bed samples reveal complicated U-Pb systematics, showing ranges in 206Pb/238U zircon dates of up to 2 Ma, representing a range of growth histories prior to eruption. Therefore, we use the youngest single closed-system zircon to approximate the eruption date. Three volcanic ash beds from the Pucara basin, northern Peru, bracket the TJB to a 206Pb/238U age of 201.31 ± 0.18/0.31/0.43 Ma (internal uncertainties/ with tracer calibration uncertainty/ with decay constant uncertainties). The first discovered ash bed from the New York canyon, Nevada, 1.5 m above TJB requires a boundary age of less than 201.33 ± 0.13 Ma. We also provide data from two laboratories which yield a new 206Pb/238U zircon age of 201.28 ± 0.02/0.22/0.31 Ma for the North Mtn. basalt, the lowest CAMP basalt from the Fundy basin, Nova Scotia. This narrows the

  12. Abrupt onset and intensification of the Little Ice Age in Arctic Canada linked to explosive volcanism and sea-ice/ocean feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G. H.; Refsnider, K. A.; Zhong, Y.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Lehman, S. J.; Southon, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    At high northern latitudes the most reliable monitors of summer temperature are glaciers and ice caps. Small ice caps are multi-decadal integrators of climate. Precise 14C dates on rooted vegetation exposed by recent recession of more than 70 different ice caps that have remained perpetually frozen to their beds since their inception date ice-cap inception at that site. Unlike valley glacier moraines that are not formed until long after the initial climate shift, entombed plants date the moment of a persistent summer cooling. The composite probability density function of the 138 calibrated 14C ages indicates that ice caps expanded in four discrete intervals within the past 2 ka, with the most abrupt ice-cap growth ~1250 AD following three centuries of relative warmth, and intensified ice expansion ~1450 AD, with maximum ice cover ~1850 AD. These intervals of sudden and sustained ice expansion coincide with the three most volcanically perturbed half centuries of the past millennium. Separating the impacts of solar and volcanic forcings in the late Holocene has been vexing because decades of low solar irradiance largely coincide with decades of frequent explosive volcanism. Transient simulations with a fully coupled climate model show that the main features of our proxy data can be matched by decadally paced explosive volcanism alone, perpetuated by feedbacks related to consequent sea-ice expansion and export into the northern North Atlantic. Exported sea ice cools and freshens surface waters there, leading to a reduction in the AMOC and consequently perpetuation of an expanded sea ice state. The coincidence of low decadal solar irradiance with decades of explosive volcanism suggests that volcanic impacts may have been amplified by solar variability, but scaling the proxies of past solar irradiance remains uncertain. The persistence in the Eastern Canadian Arctic of some ice caps that formed 5000 years ago and remained intact until melting in the past decade

  13. A 12,000 year record of explosive volcanism in the Siple Dome Ice Core, West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatov, A. V.; Zielinski, G. A.; Dunbar, N. W.; Mayewski, P. A.; Meyerson, E. A.; Sneed, S. B.; Taylor, K. C.

    2006-06-01

    Air mass trajectories in the Southern Hemisphere provide a mechanism for transport to and deposition of volcanic products on the Antarctic ice sheet from local volcanoes and from tropical and subtropical volcanic centers. This study extends the detailed record of Antarctic, South American, and equatorial volcanism over the last 12,000 years using continuous glaciochemical series developed from the Siple Dome A (SDMA) ice core, West Antarctica. The largest volcanic sulfate spike (280 μg/L) occurs at 5881 B.C.E. Other large signals with unknown sources are observed around 325 B.C.E. (270 μg/L) and 2818 B.C.E. (191 μg/L). Ages of several large equatorial or Southern Hemisphere volcanic eruptions are synchronous with many sulfate peaks detected in the SDMA volcanic ice chemistry record. The microprobe "fingerprinting" of glass shards in the SDMA core points to the following Antarctic volcanic centers as sources of tephra found in the SDMA core: Balenny Island, Pleiades, Mount Berlin, Mount Takahe, and Mount Melbourne as well as Mount Hudson and possibly Mount Burney volcanoes of South America. Identified volcanic sources provide an insight into the poorly resolved transport history of volcanic products from source volcanoes to the West Antarctic ice sheet.

  14. Fluid-melt partitioning of sulfur in differentiated arc magmas and the sulfur yield of explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masotta, M.; Keppler, H.; Chaudhari, A.

    2016-03-01

    depolymerized melts (nbo/t = 0.05-0.15). Our data allow quantitative predictions of the sulfur yield of explosive volcanic eruptions over a wide range of magma compositions.

  15. The Study on Pyroclastic Deposits in the Longgang Volcanic Swarm, Northeastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiang; Sui Weiguo; Xiang Tianyuan; Huang Yiqun

    2000-01-01

    The Dayizishan scoria cone and Jinlongdingzi scoria cone in the Longgang volcanic swarm, northeastern China are comprised of basaltic fallout tephra that derived from sub - Plinian eruptions. The airborn tephra formed a scoria cone and tephra sheets in geomorphological character. The fallout tephra deposits consist of basaltic scoria, bomb, ultramafic xenolith and lithic fragments. The tephra deposits in the tephra sheets developed plane parallel bedding and graded bedding. The size parameters of tephra changed with distance away from source and the lapse of time regularly.The Dalongwan tuff ring and Longquanlongwan tuff ring in Longgang volcanic swarm are comprised of base surge deposits, formed by phreatomagmatic explosions. The base surge deposits are composed of basaltic lapilli, pisolites and tuff.The sedimentary structure, for instance, dunelike structure, chute and pool structure, U - shaped channel and cross bedding, massive beds and sandwave beds etc. are recognized.

  16. Volcanism and Oil & Gas In Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Xuanlong

    2000-01-01

    Based on study on the relation with volcanic rock and oil & gas in Songliao Basin and Liaohe Basin in northeast China, author proposes that material from deep by volcanism enrichs the resources in basins, that heat by volcanism promotes organic matter transforming to oil and gas, that volcanic reservoir is fracture, vesicular, solution pore, intercrystal pore.Lava facies and pyroclastic facies are favourable reservoir. Mesozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of intermediate, acid rock,but Cenozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of basalt. Types of oil and gas pool relating to volcanic rock include volcanic fracture pool, volcanic unconformity pool, volcanic rock - screened pool, volcanic darpe structural pool.

  17. Volcanic Clast Cooling Model for the Estimation of the Thermal Energy Release from Vulcanian or Strombolian Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Sánchez, E.; De La Cruz-Reyna, S.; Varley, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    Images were obtained at Popocatepetl and Volcán de Colima, Mexico, during periods of high explosivity, wich resulted lava dome destructions during 1998-2002 and 2005-2007 respectively. We have developed a method to estimate the relative thermal energy release for explosions, and the degree of conversion into mechanical energy spent during fragmentation of the ejecta, based on the cooling rate inferred from successive thermal images obtained immediately after each explosion. The cooling rate was measured on selected pixels of the thermal images, and compared with different possible distributions of fragment sizes considering weighted averages of fragments in the pixels. The selected explosions threw significant amounts of hot debris on the volcano flanks. The optimal fitting of fragment distributions reveals the degree of fragmentation of individual explosions, and along with a model for the cooling process, permitted an estimation of the relative thermal energy release for the area covered by the image. Additionally, the results indicate that radiative thermal conductivity plays a significant role for the outer shell of the fragments, suggesting a free mean path of thermal infrared photons that may reach several millimeters or even a few centimeters.

  18. Volcanic tremor at Volcán de Colima, México recorded during May 2002 and its interactions with the seismic signals produced by low-energy explosive activity and rockfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobin, Vyacheslav M.; Reyes, Gabriel A.; Bretón, Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    The May 2002 eruption episode at Volcán de Colima, México represented the transition period between two stages of effusive activity which were characterized by the formation of lava flows. The short-period seismic signals, recorded during May 2002 at a distance of 1.6 km from the crater, were represented by volcanic tremor and the signals produced by low-energy explosions and rockfalls. Two types of volcanic tremor were recognized: harmonic with two fundamental spectral frequencies of 1.2-1.4 Hz and 1.6-1.7 Hz and non-harmonic. The existence of two fundamental frequencies of volcanic tremor may indicate a two-vent magmatic conduit. No clear relationship between the variations in the spectral content of tremor and occurrence of explosions was observed. The waveforms of the signals, produced by low-energy explosions and rockfalls and recorded on the background of volcanic tremor, were strongly modulated by the low-frequency harmonic tremor signals, forming, in this manner, pseudo-long period events. Fourier analysis of the seismic signals associated with low-energy explosions and rockfalls but recorded on the background of regular seismic noise indicated their high-frequency sources characterized by dominant frequencies within 2-3 Hz and 3-4.5 Hz, respectively.

  19. CO{sub 2} mineral trapping: an experimental study on the carbonation of basalts from the eastern Deccan Volcanic Province, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Nishi; Pathak, Vamdev; Shrivastava, J.P. [Department of Geology, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2013-07-01

    Rock specimens from Deccan flood basalts have been reacted in the laboratory under high pCO{sub 2} (5 and 10 bars), total pressure (vessel pressure between 10 and 20 bars), and temperature (100 and 200 deg. C) conditions for 50, 60, 70, and 80 hours. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses show that calcite, aragonite, siderite and magnesite, and clays are derived from the alteration of Deccan basalts under water-saturated, hydrothermal-like conditions. Alteration reactions were accompanied by significant variation in the pH of the reacting aqueous solution, dependent upon time, pCO{sub 2}, and temperature variables of the experiment. Neo-formed secondary products also include significant amounts of smectite, chlorite, and smectite/chlorite mixed layer clays. (authors)

  20. Is the onset of the 6th century 'dark age' in Maya history related to explosive volcanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooren, Kees; Hoek, Wim Z.; Van der Plicht, Hans; Sigl, Michael; Galop, Didier; Torrescano-Valle, Nuria; Islebe, Gerald; Huizinga, Annika; Winkels, Tim; Middelkoop, Hans; Van Bergen, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Maya societies in Southern Mexico, Guatemala and Belize experienced a 'dark age' during the second half of the 6th century. This period, also known as the 'Maya Hiatus', is characterized by cultural downturn, political instability and abandonment of many sites in the Central Maya Lowlands. Many theories have been postulated to explain the occurrence of this 'dark age' in Maya history. A possible key role of a large volcanic eruption in the onset of this 'dark age' will be discussed. Volcanic deposits recovered from the sedimentary archive of lake Tuspán and the Usumacinta-Grijalva delta were studied in detail and the combination of multiple dating techniques allowed the reconstruction of the timing of a large 6th century eruption. Volcanic glass shards were fingerprinted to indicate the source volcano and high resolution pollen records were constructed to indicate the environmental impact of the eruption. Results are compared with available archaeological data and causality with the disruption of Maya civilization will be evaluated.

  1. Petrogenesis and geodynamic significance of silicic volcanism in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, C. M.; Ferrari, L.; Orozco, M. A.; Lopez Martinez, M.

    2012-04-01

    Silicic volcanism in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (WTMVB) was defined a Pliocene ignimbrite flare-up associated with the rifting of the Jalisco block from mainland Mexico (Frey et al., 2007; GSAB). With the integration of new and published geochronologic, geochemical, and isotope data we revise this interpretation and propose a new petrogenetic model. The oldest silicic volcanism consists of large silicic domes and minor pyroclastic flows (~370 km3) emplaced to the north of Guadalajara above a thick succession of ~11 to 8.7 Ma basaltic lavas, which yielded Ar-Ar and obsidian FT ages of ~7.5 to 5 Ma. Shortly after (4.9 to 2.9 Ma) large amount of rhyolitic lavas and ash flow tuffs (~500 km3) were emplaced in a WNW-ESE trending belt from Guadalajara to Compostela. Rhyolitic domes and flows (~430 km3) were emplaced also in the Pleistocene mostly between Tequila and Guadalajara with the late Pleistocene La Primavera caldera (~35 km3) as the sole explosive volcanic episodes. As a whole, silicic volcanism occurred from Late Miocene to the Pleistocene, and was dominated by dome and lava flows. Most rhyolites have high LILE/HFSE values and negative spikes at Nb, P and Ti. They also show the same Ba/Nb and K/Rb values and slightly higher Rb/Sr ratios as the 11-8 Ma basalts. Rhyolite Sr isotope data (87Sr/86Sr init = 0.70371 - 070598) are only slightly more radiogenic than the 11-8 basalts (87Sr/86Sr init = 0.70349-0.70410), whereas Nd isotope ratios are indistinguishable from them. Sr and Nd isotope ratios of the rhyolites are also similar to the crust nearby, indicating that they can be compatible either with fractional crystallization (FC) of basalts or with crust assimilation/melting. However REE contents are too low to be the result of basalt FC. Isotope and REE data can be successfully modelled with an initial crustal melt which subsequently undergone fractional crystallization of feldspar and quartz. Late Miocene slab detachment and subsequent slab rollback

  2. Geochemistry of quaternary volcanism in the Sunda-Banda arc, Indonesia, and three-component genesis of island-arc basaltic magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheller, G. E.; Varne, R.; Foden, J. D.; Abbott, M. J.

    1987-06-01

    Volcanic rocks of the Sunda and Banda arcs range from tholeiitic through calcalkaline and shoshonitic to leucititic, the widest compositional span of mafic magmatism known from an active arc setting. Mafic rocks in our data set, which includes 315 new analyses of volcanic rocks from twelve Quaternary volcanoes, including Batu Tara in the previously geochemically unknown Flores-Lembata arc sector, are generally similar to those from other island arcs: most contain Flores arc sectors each comprise volcanoes which become progressively more K-rich eastwards, culminating in the leucitite volcanoes Muriah, Soromundi and Sangenges, and Batu Tara, respectively. In the most easterly Banda sector, the volcanics vary from high- to low-K eastwards around the arc. Correlations between geochemistry and 87Sr/ 86Sr values show separate trends for each of the four arc sectors, believed to be the result of involvement of at least three geochemically and isotopically distinct components in the source regions of the arc magmatism. A dominant source component with a low K content and a low 87Sr/ 86Sr value, and common to all sectors, is probably peridotitic mantle. A second component, with low K content but high 87Sr/ 86Sr value, appears to be crustal material. This component is most apparent in the Banda sector, in keeping with that sector's tectonic setting close to Precambrian Australian continental crust, but it is also present to lesser extents in the West Java and Flores sectors. However, the most marked geochemical and isotopic variations shown by the arc volcanics are primarily due to the involvement of a third component, which is rich in K-group elements but has relatively low 87Sr/ 86Sr values. This component appears to be mantle-derived and is least overprinted by crustal material in the Bali sector volcanics where the Pb, Be, U-Th and O isotope characteristics of the rocks support the suggestion that their genesis has not involved incorporation of recently subducted

  3. Economic impact of explosive volcanic eruptions: A simulation-based assessment model applied to Campania region volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, Giulio; Leone, Mattia Federico; Del Cogliano, Davide; Sgroi, Angelo

    2013-10-01

    PLINIVS Study Centre of University of Naples Federico II has developed a methodology that aims to estimate, in probabilistic terms, the direct and the indirect economic impacts of a Sub-Plinian I or Strombolian type eruption of Vesuvius. The economic model has been implemented as a complementary tool of the Volcanic Impact Simulation Model, a tool developed at PLINIVS Center available to the Italian Civil Protection Department (DPC) decision makers to quantify the potential losses consequent to a possible eruption of Vesuvius or Campi Flegrei. Along the expected time history of the eruptive event all the possible "direct costs" and the "factors" (indirect costs) impacting the economic growth in the event area have been identified. Each cost factor is built up through a specific algorithm that is fed by various providers, in order to run software that will estimate the global amount of economic damage from a volcanic event. The model does not include the economic evaluation of intangibles (e.g. human casualties), while the evaluation of damage to the local cultural heritage (historical buildings, archeological sites, monuments, etc.), is linked to the economic impact on tourism, estimated into indirect costs. The architecture of the model is based on a simulation logic, which allows an evaluation of different economic impact scenarios through input changes, allowing the model to be used as a tool to support the decision making process.

  4. The 100-133 ka record of Italian explosive volcanism and revised tephrochronology of Lago Grande di Monticchio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Sabine; Keller, Jörg; Paterne, Martine; Mingram, Jens; Lauterbach, Stefan; Opitz, Stephan; Sottili, Gianluca; Giaccio, Biagio; Albert, Paul G.; Satow, Chris; Tomlinson, Emma L.; Viccaro, Marco; Brauer, Achim

    2012-12-01

    Laminated sediments of the maar lake Lago Grande di Monticchio in southern Italy exhibit a unique sequence of numerous primary tephra events that provide both insights into the Late Quaternary eruptive history of Italian volcanoes and an archive of essential marker horizons for dating and linking palaeoclimate records throughout the Central and Eastern Mediterranean. The acquisition of new sediment cores from this lake now extends the existing 100 ka-tephra record back to 133 ka BP, the end of the penultimate Glacial. The additional ca 30 m of sediments host a total number of 52 single tephra layers forming 21 tephra clusters that have been characterised on the basis of detailed geochemical and petrographical examinations. Tephras can be assigned to hitherto poorly known Plinian to sub-Plinian eruptive events of the nearby Campanian (Ischia Island, Phlegrean Fields), Roman (Sabatini volcanic district) and Aeolian-Sicilian volcanoes (Etna, Stromboli, Salina) and are dated according to the varve and sedimentation rate chronology of Monticchio sediments. The most prominent tephra layers within the interval of investigation - TM-25 and TM-27 - can be firmly correlated with Ionian Sea tephras X-5 (ca 105 ka BP) and X-6 (ca 108-110 ka BP). In addition, a further 26 tephra layers are correlated with radiometrically and radioisotopically dated volcanic events providing the basis for a robust revised tephrochronology of the entire Monticchio sediment sequence for the last 133 ka.

  5. The roles of fractional crystallization, magma mixing, crystal mush remobilization and volatile-melt interactions in the genesis of a young basalt-peralkaline rhyolite suite, the greater Olkaria volcanic complex, Kenya Rift valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, R.; Belkin, H.E.; Fitton, J.G.; Rogers, N.W.; Nejbert, K.; Tindle, A.G.; Marshall, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Greater Olkaria Volcanic Complex is a young (???20 ka) multi-centred lava and dome field dominated by the eruption of peralkaline rhyolites. Basaltic and trachytic magmas have been erupted peripherally to the complex and also form, with mugearites and benmoreites, an extensive suite of magmatic inclusions in the rhyolites. The eruptive rocks commonly represent mixed magmas and the magmatic inclusions are themselves two-, three- or four-component mixes. All rock types may carry xenocrysts of alkali feldspar, and less commonly plagioclase, derived from magma mixing and by remobilization of crystal mushes and/or plutonic rocks. Xenoliths in the range gabbro-syenite are common in the lavas and magmatic inclusions, the more salic varieties sometimes containing silicic glass representing partial melts and ranging in composition from anorthite ?? corundum- to acmite-normative. The peralkaline varieties are broadly similar, in major element terms, to the eruptive peralkaline rhyolites. The basalt-trachyte suite formed by a combination of fractional crystallization, magma mixing and resorption of earlier-formed crystals. Matrix glass in metaluminous trachytes has a peralkaline rhyolitic composition, indicating that the eruptive rhyolites may have formed by fractional crystallization of trachyte. Anomalous trace element enrichments (e.g. ??? 2000 ppm Y in a benmoreite) and negative Ce anomalies may have resulted from various Na- and K-enriched fluids evolving from melts of intermediate composition and either being lost from the system or enriched in other parts of the reservoirs. A small group of nepheline-normative, usually peralkaline, magmatic inclusions was formed by fluid transfer between peralkaline rhyolitic and benmoreitic magmas. The plumbing system of the complex consists of several independent reservoirs and conduits, repeatedly recharged by batches of mafic magma, with ubiquitous magma mixing. ?? The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press. All

  6. Cambrian intermediate-mafic magmatism along the Laurentian margin: Evidence for flood basalt volcanism from well cuttings in the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen (U.S.A.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueseke, Matthew E.; Hobbs, Jasper M.; Bulen, Casey L.; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Puckett, Robert E.; Walker, J. Douglas; Feldman, Josh

    2016-09-01

    The Southern Oklahoma Aulocogen (SOA) stretches from southern Oklahoma through the Texas panhandle and into Colorado and New Mexico, and contains mafic through silicic magmatism related to the opening of the Iapetus Ocean during the early Cambrian. Cambrian magmatic products are best exposed in the Wichita Mountains (Oklahoma), where they have been extensively studied. However, their ultimate derivation is still somewhat contentious and centers on two very different models: SOA magmatism has been suggested to occur via [1] continental rifting (with or without mantle plume emplacement) or [2] transform-fault related magmatism (e.g., leaky strike-slip faults). Within the SOA, the subsurface in and adjacent to the Arbuckle Mountains in southern Oklahoma contains thick sequences of mafic to intermediate lavas, intrusive bodies, and phreatomagmatic deposits interlayered with thick, extensive rhyolite lavas, thin localized tuffs, and lesser silicic intrusive bodies. These materials were first described in the Arbuckle Mountains region by a 1982 drill test (Hamilton Brothers Turner Falls well) and the best available age constraints from SOA Arbuckle Mountains eruptive products are ~ 535 to 540 Ma. Well cuttings of the mafic through intermediate units were collected from that well and six others and samples from all but the Turner Falls and Morton wells are the focus of this study. Samples analyzed from the wells are dominantly subalkaline, tholeiitic, and range from basalt to andesite. Their overall bulk major and trace element chemistry, normative mineralogy, and Srsbnd Nd isotope ratios are similar to magmas erupted/emplaced in flood basalt provinces. When compared with intrusive mafic rocks that crop out in the Wichita Mountains, the SOA well cuttings are geochemically most similar to the Roosevelt Gabbros. New geochemical and isotope data presented in this study, when coupled with recent geophysical work in the SOA and the coeval relationship with rhyolites, indicates

  7. Spreading and collapse of big basaltic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Peltier, Aline; Poland, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. In the frame of MED-SVU project, our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at three Supersite volcanoes: Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These

  8. Temperature dependence of basalt weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaojun; Hartmann, Jens; Derry, Louis A.; West, A. Joshua; You, Chen-Feng; Long, Xiaoyong; Zhan, Tao; Li, Laifeng; Li, Gen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Tao; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Ji, Junfeng; Zhao, Liang; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic balance of Earth's long-term carbon cycle and the equable state of Earth's climate are maintained by negative feedbacks between the levels of atmospheric CO2 and the chemical weathering rate of silicate rocks. Though clearly demonstrated by well-controlled laboratory dissolution experiments, the temperature dependence of silicate weathering rates, hypothesized to play a central role in these weathering feedbacks, has been difficult to quantify clearly in natural settings at landscape scale. By compiling data from basaltic catchments worldwide and considering only inactive volcanic fields (IVFs), here we show that the rate of CO2 consumption associated with the weathering of basaltic rocks is strongly correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT) as predicted by chemical kinetics. Relations between temperature and CO2 consumption rate for active volcanic fields (AVFs) are complicated by other factors such as eruption age, hydrothermal activity, and hydrological complexities. On the basis of this updated data compilation we are not able to distinguish whether or not there is a significant runoff control on basalt weathering rates. Nonetheless, the simple temperature control as observed in this global dataset implies that basalt weathering could be an effective mechanism for Earth to modulate long-term carbon cycle perturbations.

  9. Noble Gases and Halogens in Icelandic Basalts

    OpenAIRE

    Weston, Bridget

    2013-01-01

    Noble gas and halogen data from a suite of Icelandic samples are presented. Iceland combines hotspot volcanism, a spreading ridge and abundant subglacially erupted samples. This combination allows for samples that erupted under high enough pressures to retain a measurable mantle volatile content, and also display signatures representing interaction between ocean island basalt (OIB) and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) mantle sources.Erupted samples used to determine the mantle’s halogen and nobl...

  10. Geochemical constraints on the evolution of mafic and felsic rocks in the Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence of Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashima Saikia; Bibhuti Gogoi; Mansoor Ahmad; Talat Ahmad

    2014-07-01

    The Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary (BVS) sequence is a volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence, best exposed near Bathani village in Gaya district of Bihar. It is located in the northern fringe of the Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex (CGGC). The volcano-sedimentary unit comprises of garnet-mica schist, rhyolite, tuff, banded iron formation (BIF) and chert bands with carbonate rocks as enclaves within the rhyolite and the differentiated volcanic sequence comprises of rhyolite, andesite, pillow basalt, massive basalt, tuff and mafic pyroclasts. Emplacement of diverse felsic and mafic rocks together testifies for a multi-stage and multi-source magmatism for the area. The presence of pillow basalt marks the eruption of these rocks in a subaqueous environment. Intermittent eruption of mafic and felsic magmas resulted in the formation of rhyolite, mafic pyroclasts, and tuff. Mixing and mingling of the felsic and mafic magmas resulted in the hybrid rock andesite. Granites are emplaced later, crosscutting the volcanic sequence and are probably products of fractional crystallization of basaltic magma. The present work characterizes the geochemical characteristics of the magmatic rocks comprising of basalt, andesite, rhyolite, tuff, and granite of the area. Tholeiitic trend for basalt and calc-alkaline affinities of andesite, rhyolite and granite is consistent with their generation in an island arc, subduction related setting. The rocks of the BVS sequence probably mark the collision of the northern and southern Indian blocks during Proterozoic period. The explosive submarine volcanism may be related to culmination of the collision of the aforementioned blocks during the Neoproterozoic (1.0 Ga) as the Grenvillian metamorphism is well established in various parts of CGGC.

  11. Chlorine as a geobarometer tool: Application to the explosive eruptions of the Volcanic Campanian District (Mount Somma-Vesuvius, Phlegrean Fields, Ischia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Boudon, Georges; Zdanowicz, Géraldine; Orsi, Giovanni; Civetta, Lucia; Webster, Jim D.; Cioni, Raffaello; D'Antonio, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    One of the current stakes in modern volcanology is the definition of magma storage conditions which has direct implications on the eruptive style and thus on the associated risks and the management of likely related crisis. In alkaline differentiated magmas, chlorine (Cl), contrary to H2O, occurs as a minor volatile species but may be used as a geobarometer. Numerous experimental studies on Cl solubility have highlighted its saturation conditions in silicate melts. The NaCl-H2O system is characterized by immiscibility under wide ranges of pressure, temperature and NaCl content (Ischia. We have analysed the products of the representative explosive eruptions of each volcano, including Plinian, sub-Plinian and strombolian events. We have focussed our research on the earliest emitted, most evolved products of each eruption, likely representing the shallower, fluid-saturated portion of the reservoir. As the studied eruptions cover the entire eruptive history of each volcanic system, the results allow better constraining the evolution through time of the shallow plumbing system. We highlighted for Mount Somma - Vesuvius two magma ponding zones, at ~170-200 MPa and ~105-115 MPa, alternatively active in time. For Phlegrean Fields, we evidence a progressive deepening of the shallow reservoirs, from the Campanian Ignimbrite (30-50 MPa) to the Monte Nuovo eruption (115 MPa). Only one eruption was studied for Ischia, the Cretaio eruption, that shows a reservoir at 140 MPa. The results on pressure are in large agreement with literature. The Cl geobarometer may help scientists to define the reservoir dynamics through time and provide strong constraints on pre-eruptive conditions, of utmost importance for the interpretation of the monitoring data and the identification of precursory signals.

  12. Morphology and development of pahoehoe flow-lobe tumuli and associated features from a monogenetic basaltic volcanic field, Bahariya Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Ezz El Din Abdel Hakim; Hammed, Mohamed Saleh

    2016-01-01

    The dimensions, landforms, and structural characteristics of pahoehoe flow-lobe tumuli from Bahariya Depression are collectively reported here for the first time. The flow-lobe tumuli documented here characterize hummocky flow surfaces. These tumuli are characterized by low, dome-like mounds, lava-inflation clefts, and squeeze ups. Flow-lobe tumuli are of various shapes and sizes, which are affected by the mechanism of inflation because they formed in response to the increase of pressure within the flow when the flow's crust becomes thicker. The tumuli often appear isolated or in small groups in the middle sectors of the lava flows, whereas in the distal sectors they form large concentration, suggesting the presence of complex lava tubes inside of the flow. Tumuli exhibited by El Bahariya lava flows are between 3.0 and 50 m in length and up to 5.0 m in height with lenticular geometry in aerial view. The flow emplacement of flow-lobe tumuli is controlled by variations in local characteristics such as nature of the substrate, flow orientation, slope, interferrence with other lobes, and rate of lava supply. Their presence generally towards the terminal ends of flow fields suggests that they seldom form over the clogged portions of distributary tubes or pathways. Thus, localized inflations that formed over blockages in major lava tubes result in formation of flow-lobe tumuli. The three-tiered (crust-core-basal zone) internal structure of the flow-lobe tumuli, resembling the typical distribution of vesicles in P-type lobes, confirms emplacement by the mechanism of inflation. All the available data show that the morphology and emplacement mechanism of the studied flow-lobe tumuli may be analogous to similar features preserved within topographically confined areas of the Hawaiian and Deccan hummocky lava flows. Considering the age of the studied volcanic fields (˜22 Ma) it is most probable that the structures described here may be amongst the oldest recognized examples

  13. Evidences for a volcanic province in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Sudhakar, M.

    Based on various lines of evidence such as the widespread occurrence of basalts, pumice, volcanic glass shards and their transformational products (zeolites, palagonites, and smectite-rich sediments), we suggest the presence of a volcanic province...

  14. Very long pahoehoe inflated basaltic lava flows in the Payenia volcanic province (Mendoza and la Pampa, Argentina Flujos de lava basáltica pahoehoe muy extendidos en la provincia volcánica Payenia (Mendoza y La Pampa, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Pasquarè

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Extremely long basaltic lava flows are here presented and described. The flows originated from the great, polygenetic, fissural Payen Volcanic Complex, in the Andean back-arc volcanic province of Payenia in Argentina. The lava flows outpoured during the Late Quaternary from the summit rift of a shield volcano representing the first volcanic centre of this complex. One of these flows presents an individual tongue-like shape with a length of 181 km and therefore is the longest known individual Quaternary lava flow on Earth. Leaving the flanks of the volcano this flow reached the Salado river valley at La Pampa and, in its distal portion, maintained its narrow and straight shape without any topographic control over a flat alluvial plain. It has a hawaiite composition with low phenocryst content of prevailing olivine and minor plagioclase. Rare Earth element patterns are typical of Na-alkaline basalts, but incompatible trace element patterns and Sr -Nd isotope ratios, suggest a geodynamic setting transitional to the orogenic one. The flow advanced following the thermally efficient "inflation" mechanism, as demonstrated by a peculiar association of well developed morphological, structural and textural features. The temperature of 1130-1160°C and the viscosity of 3-73 Pa*s, calculated by petrochemical data, may be considered, together with a very low cooling rate and a sustained and long lasting effusion rate, the main causes of the extremely long transport system of this flow. Both the extreme length of the flow and the partial lack of topographic control may provide new constraints on the physics of large inflated flows, which constitute the largest volcanic provinces on Earth and probably also on the terrestrial planets.En este trabajo se presentan y describen flujos de lava extremadamente largos. Estos flujos se originaron en el complejo volcánico fisural Payen, dentro de la provincia volcánica Payenia en el retroarco andino. Los flujos de lava

  15. Basaltic cannibalism at Thrihnukagigur volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, M. R.; Feineman, M. D.; La Femina, P. C.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic assimilation of felsic continental crust is a well-documented, relatively common phenomenon. The extent to which basaltic crust is assimilated by magmas, on the other hand, is not well known. Basaltic cannibalism, or the wholesale incorporation of basaltic crustal material into a basaltic magma, is thought to be uncommon because basalt requires more energy than higher silica rocks to melt. Basaltic materials that are unconsolidated, poorly crystalline, or palagonitized may be more easily ingested than fully crystallized massive basalt, thus allowing basaltic cannibalism to occur. Thrihnukagigur volcano, SW Iceland, offers a unique exposure of a buried cinder cone within its evacuated conduit, 100 m below the main vent. The unconsolidated tephra is cross-cut by a NNE-trending dike, which runs across the ceiling of this cave to a vent that produced lava and tephra during the ~4 Ka fissure eruption. Preliminary petrographic and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses indicate that there are two populations of plagioclase present in the system - Population One is stubby (aspect ratio 2.1), subhedral to euhedral, and has much higher Ba/Sr ratios. Population One crystals are observed in the cinder cone, dike, and surface lavas, whereas Population Two crystals are observed only in the dike and surface lavas. This suggests that a magma crystallizing a single elongate population of plagioclase intruded the cinder cone and rapidly assimilated the tephra, incorporating the stubbier population of phenocrysts. This conceptual model for basaltic cannibalism is supported by field observations of large-scale erosion upward into the tephra, which is coated by magma flow-back indicating that magma was involved in the thermal etching. While the unique exposure at Thrihnukagigur makes it an exceptional place to investigate basaltic cannibalism, we suggest that it is not limited to this volcanic system. Rather it is a process that likely

  16. Post-Columbia River Basalt Group stratigraphy and map compilation of the Columbia Plateau, Oregon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of reconnaissance mapping of sedimentary deposits and volcanic rocks overlying the Columbia River Basalt. The project area covers parts of the Dalles, Pendleton, Grangeville, Baker, Canyon City, and Bend. The mapping was done to provide stratigraphic data on the sedimentary deposits and volcanic rocks overlying the Columbia River Basalt Group. 160 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  17. Short-lived eruptive episodes during the construction of a Na-alkalic basaltic field (Perşani Mountains, SE Transylvania, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghedi, Ioan; Popa, Răzvan-Gabriel; Panaiotu, Cristian G.; Szakács, Alexandru; Pécskay, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    The Perşani Mts. basaltic field covers >176 km2 (~22 × 8 km) and is one of the youngest and biggest monogenetic volcanic fields in Southeastern Europe. It consists of 21 monogenetic volcanic centers, most of which were built on a basement of Miocene rhyolitic tuffs and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. 40Ar/39Ar dating shows that the eruptions took place in five episodes: 1220, 1142, 1060, 800, and 683 ka. An additional undated episode at 1060-800 ka has been identified using volcanological observations. Initial phreatomagmatic activity was commonly followed by explosive Strombolian/Hawaiian phases that deposited agglutinated spatter around the vents along with massive-to-bedded unconsolidated scoria and lapilli. Some volcanoes lack evidence for magmatic explosive activity, while others lack evidence for the initial phreatomagmatic phase. During most eruptions, the final activity was the effusion of lava flows that in some cases deformed (or partially destroyed) the volcanic edifices. The erupted volumes varied greatly from one episode to other, without showing any pattern: the highest volumes are recorded in deposits from the third pulse (1060 ka). The volcanoes are located close to faults and always on their footwall blocks, and it is inferred that the regional tectonic stress regime controlled both the timing and spacing of volcanic activity in the volcanic field.

  18. Transport and mixing dynamics from explosions in debris-filled volcanic conduits: Numerical results and implications for maar-diatreme volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Matthew R.; Valentine, Greg A.

    2015-09-01

    Most volcanoes experience some degree of phreatomagmatism during their lifetime. However, the current understanding of such processes remains limited relative to their magmatic counterparts. Maar-diatremes are a common volcano type that form primarily from phreatomagmatic explosions and are an ideal candidate to further our knowledge of deposits and processes resulting from explosive magma-water interaction due to their abundance as well as their variable levels of field exposure, which allows for detailed mapping and componentry. Two conceptual models of maar-diatreme volcanoes explain the growth and evolution of the crater (maar) and subsurface vent (diatreme) through repeated explosions caused by the interaction of magma and groundwater. One model predicts progressively deepening explosions as water is used up by phreatomagmatic explosions while the other allows for explosions at any level in the diatreme, provided adequate hydrologic conditions are present. In the former, deep-seated lithics in the diatreme are directly ejected and their presence in tephra rings is often taken as a proxy for the depth at which that particular explosion occurred. In the latter, deep-seated lithics are incrementally transported toward the surface via upward directed debris jets. Here we present a novel application of multiphase numerical modeling to assess the controls on length scales of debris jets and their role in upward transport of intra-diatreme material to determine the validity of the two models. The volume of gas generated during a phreatomagmatic explosion is a first order control on the vertical distance a debris jet travels. Unless extremely large amounts of magma and water are involved, it is unlikely that most explosions deeper than ∼ 250 m breach the surface. Other factors such as pressure and temperature have lesser effects on the length scales assuming they are within realistic ranges. Redistribution of material within a diatreme is primarily driven by

  19. VOLCANIC RISK ASSESSMENT - PROBABILITY AND CONSEQUENCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk is the product of the probability and consequences of an event. Both of these must be based upon sound science that integrates field data, experiments, and modeling, but must also be useful to decision makers who likely do not understand all aspects of the underlying science. We review a decision framework used in many fields such as performance assessment for hazardous and/or radioactive waste disposal sites that can serve to guide the volcanological community towards integrated risk assessment. In this framework the underlying scientific understanding of processes that affect probability and consequences drive the decision-level results, but in turn these results can drive focused research in areas that cause the greatest level of uncertainty at the decision level. We review two examples of the determination of volcanic event probability: (1) probability of a new volcano forming at the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository, and (2) probability that a subsurface repository in Japan would be affected by the nearby formation of a new stratovolcano. We also provide examples of work on consequences of explosive eruptions, within the framework mentioned above. These include field-based studies aimed at providing data for ''closure'' of wall rock erosion terms in a conduit flow model, predictions of dynamic pressure and other variables related to damage by pyroclastic flow into underground structures, and vulnerability criteria for structures subjected to conditions of explosive eruption. Process models (e.g., multiphase flow) are important for testing the validity or relative importance of possible scenarios in a volcanic risk assessment. We show how time-dependent multiphase modeling of explosive ''eruption'' of basaltic magma into an open tunnel (drift) at the Yucca Mountain repository provides insight into proposed scenarios that include the development of secondary pathways to the Earth's surface. Addressing volcanic risk within a decision

  20. Characteristics of terrestrial basaltic rock populations: Implications for Mars lander and rover science and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Robert A.; Golombek, Matthew P.

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the morphometry of basaltic rock populations that have been emplaced or affected by a variety of geologic processes, including explosive volcanic eruptions (as a proxy for impact cratering), catastrophic flooding, frost shattering, salt weathering, alluvial deposition, and chemical weathering. Morphometric indices for these rock populations were compared to an unmodified population of rocks that had broken off a solidified lava flow to understand how different geologic processes change rock shape. We found that a majority of rocks have an sphericity described as either a disc or sphere in the Zingg classification system and posit that this is a function of cooling fractures in the basalt (Zingg [1935] Schweiz. Miner. Petrogr. Mitt., 15, 39-140). Angularity (roundness) is the most diagnostic morphometric index, but the Corey Shape Factor (CSF), Oblate-Prolate Index (OPI) and deviation from compactness (D) also sometimes distinguished weathering processes. Comparison of our results to prior analyses of rock populations found at the Mars Pathfinder, Spirit, and Curiosity landing sites support previous conclusions. The observation that the size-frequency distribution of terrestrial rock populations follow exponential functions similar to lander and orbital measurements of rocks on Mars, which is expected from fracture and fragmentation theory, indicates that these distributions are being dominantly controlled by the initial fracture and fragmentation of the basalt.

  1. Monogenetic volcanic fields and their geoheritage values of western Saudi Arabia and their implication to holistic geoeducation projects locally and globally (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, K.; Moufti, R.

    2013-12-01

    Monogeneitc volcanic fields are the most common manifestation of volcanism on Earth and other planets. They composed of small volume and short lived volcanoes each of them with a relatively simple eruption history. In spite of recent researches demonstrated complex, repeated and geochemically distinct eruption histories commonly associated with te formation of small-volume volcanoes, they are still considerred as volcanoes that are in human-scale and therefore ideal to use them as educational tools or part of volcanic geoheritage projects including geopark developments. In the western margin of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia there are at least 9 intracontinental volcanic fields subparalell with the Red Sea Rift ranging from alkaline basaltic to basalt-trachyte bimodal dispersed volcanic systems. Among these volcanic fields the geoheritage value of three fields were recently evaluated and proposed that they are suitable for further development to establish the first volcanic geoparks in the Arabian Peninsula in the area of 1) Al Madinah (AMVF) 2) Kishb (KVF) and 3) Hutaymah Volcanic Fields (HVF). The AMVF offers a natural concept based on specific volcanic precinct ordering of its volcanic geoheritages from the most accessable and most common volcanism that is historically significant (eg. scoria and lava spatter cones with extensive lava fields) toward a more adventure geotourism style approach in remote, less common but more destructive type of volcanism (eg. trachytic explosion craters). In the contrary, the KVF is a perfect site where phreatomagmatic volcanism and their consequences were identified as a major driving force for further geopark developments. The HVF with its rich archaeological and cultural sites and superbly exposed variously eroded tuff rings and maars offer a good location to develop geoeducation programs to highlight short- and long-term climatic and hydrologic changes in an area a volcanic field evolved. The three Saudi projects also demonstrate

  2. Volcanic signals in oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2009-08-22

    Sulfate aerosols resulting from strong volcanic explosions last for 2–3 years in the lower stratosphere. Therefore it was traditionally believed that volcanic impacts produce mainly short-term, transient climate perturbations. However, the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds over a wide range of time scales. The associated processes, especially ocean heat uptake, play a key role in ongoing climate change. However, they are not well constrained by observations, and attempts to simulate them in current climate models used for climate predictions yield a range of uncertainty. Volcanic impacts on the ocean provide an independent means of assessing these processes. This study focuses on quantification of the seasonal to multidecadal time scale response of the ocean to explosive volcanism. It employs the coupled climate model CM2.1, developed recently at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration\\'s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, to simulate the response to the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1815 Tambora eruptions, which were the largest in the 20th and 19th centuries, respectively. The simulated climate perturbations compare well with available observations for the Pinatubo period. The stronger Tambora forcing produces responses with higher signal-to-noise ratio. Volcanic cooling tends to strengthen the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Sea ice extent appears to be sensitive to volcanic forcing, especially during the warm season. Because of the extremely long relaxation time of ocean subsurface temperature and sea level, the perturbations caused by the Tambora eruption could have lasted well into the 20th century.

  3. The Records of the Tectonic Evolution From the Volcanics in Qiangtang Basin, Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zhonghua; Yang Deming; Li Cai; Pu Zhongyu

    2000-01-01

    The volcanism in Qiangtang Basin is very frequent due to the divergence and subduction of the various plates. The study indicates that these volcanics are formed in different tectonic settings: 1 )Hercynian volcanics are mainly basalts and are formed in the intraplate and intercontinental rift. 2 ) Indosinian volcanics markedly vary in the distribution and composition and reflect transitional MORB and island are environments respectively. 3) Yanshanian volcanics consist predominantly of basalts, andesites, dacites and rhyolites and are characterized by calc- alkaline volcanic suite, indicating island arc setting. 4)Himalayan volcanics are complicated and associated with intraplate orogency. The volcanism provides important tectonic information for recognizing the evolution of Qiangtang Basin.

  4. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia cover about 90,000 km2, one of the largest areas of alkali olivine basalt in the world. These volcanic rocks are in 13 separate fields near the eastern coast of the Red Sea and in the western Arabian Peninsula highlands from Syria southward to the Yemen Arab Republic.

  5. Influence of explosive volcanic events on the activation versus de-activation of a modern turbidite system: the example of the Dohrn canyon-fan in the continental slope of the Campania volcanic district (Naples Bay, Italy - Western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, M.; Budillon, F.; Pappone, G.; Insinga, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between volcanic activity, volcano-clastic yield and activation/deactivation of a turbidite system can be evaluated along the continental margin of Campania region (Tyrrhenian Sea - Italy), an active volcanic area, where three wide canyon-fans occur at short distances one to another. Actually, the Dohrn, Magnaghi and Cuma canyons cut the continental slope and shelf off Ischia and Procida volcanic islands and off the Campania Plain where Phlegraean Field and Mt. Vesuvius active vents are located. This research, partly supported by the Italian Flagship Project Ritmare, is based on single-channel, high-resolution seismic profiles (Sparker-One 16 kJ, 0.5 s twtt), swath-bathymetry and litho- and tephra-stratigraphy of gravity cores. We focused on the stratigraphic constraint of paleo-thalweg features and channel/levees deposits in seismics, debris flow, turbidites and hemipelagites in cores, to learn more on the activation/deactivation stages of the canyon Dohrn, in the frame of relative eustatic sea level variations over the Middle Pleistocene-Holocene time span.Preliminary outcomes suggest that even major volcanic events occurred in the last 300 ky, such as ignimbrite eruptions or large fallouts, have caused the infilling of the canyon head and the cover of pre-existing seabed morphology. As a consequence, the temporary deactivation of the turbidite system has occurred, despite the volcano-clastic overload in the coastal environment. Phases of renewed activities of the thalweg are observed to be in step with falling stages of sea level, which have driven the re-incision of canyon valleys through continuous volcano-clastic debris and turbidites down-flows. Since Holocene, the quiescence of the Dohrn Canyon has been documented, despite the intense volcano-tectonic activity in the area.

  6. 'Snake River (SR)-type' volcanism at the Yellowstone hotspot track: Distinctive products from unusual, high-temperature silicic super-eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branney, M.J.; Bonnichsen, B.; Andrews, G.D.M.; Ellis, B.; Barry, T.L.; McCurry, M.

    2008-01-01

    A new category of large-scale volcanism, here termed Snake River (SR)-type volcanism, is defined with reference to a distinctive volcanic facies association displayed by Miocene rocks in the central Snake River Plain area of southern Idaho and northern Nevada, USA. The facies association contrasts with those typical of silicic volcanism elsewhere and records unusual, voluminous and particularly environmentally devastating styles of eruption that remain poorly understood. It includes: (1) large-volume, lithic-poor rhyolitic ignimbrites with scarce pumice lapilli; (2) extensive, parallel-laminated, medium to coarse-grained ashfall deposits with large cuspate shards, crystals and a paucity of pumice lapilli; many are fused to black vitrophyre; (3) unusually extensive, large-volume rhyolite lavas; (4) unusually intense welding, rheomorphism, and widespread development of lava-like facies in the ignimbrites; (5) extensive, fines-rich ash deposits with abundant ash aggregates (pellets and accretionary lapilli); (6) the ashfall layers and ignimbrites contain abundant clasts of dense obsidian and vitrophyre; (7) a bimodal association between the rhyolitic rocks and numerous, coalescing low-profile basalt lava shields; and (8) widespread evidence of emplacement in lacustrine-alluvial environments, as revealed by intercalated lake sediments, ignimbrite peperites, rhyolitic and basaltic hyaloclastites, basalt pillow-lava deltas, rhyolitic and basaltic phreatomagmatic tuffs, alluvial sands and palaeosols. Many rhyolitic eruptions were high mass-flux, large volume and explosive (VEI 6-8), and involved H2O-poor, low-??18O, metaluminous rhyolite magmas with unusually low viscosities, partly due to high magmatic temperatures (900-1,050??C). SR-type volcanism contrasts with silicic volcanism at many other volcanic fields, where the fall deposits are typically Plinian with pumice lapilli, the ignimbrites are low to medium grade (non-welded to eutaxitic) with abundant pumice lapilli

  7. Closer look at lunar volcanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the American Apollo and Soviet Luna missions concentrated on mare basalt samples, major questions remain about lunar volcanism. Lunar field work will be indispensable for resolving the scientific questions about ages, compositions, and eruption processes of lunar volcanism. From a utilitarian standpoint, a better knowledge of lunar volcanism will also yield profitable returns in lunar base construction (e.g., exploitation of rille or lava-tube structures) and in access to materials such as volatile elements, pure glass, or ilmenite for lunar industry

  8. Explosive and Phreatomagmatic Activity from San Salvador Volcanic Complex (El Salvador) and Their Effects on El Cambio Archaeological Site: a Review of the Last 3000 yrs. Based on Volcanic Stratigraphy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrés, D.; Delgado, H.; Pullinger, C.; Castillo, R.; Chávez, H. I.

    2007-05-01

    El Cambio archeological site (ECAS; Zapotitán Valley), 4 km NW from the San Salvador Volcanic Complex comprises 3000 yrs. of pyroclastic record. Sheets (1983) identified different levels rich in cultural remains intercalated within the volcanic deposits, indicating that different prehistoric settings were affected by San Salvador volcano eruptions, and giving information on the reoccupation frequency in the area. Accordingly, ECAS was occupied since the Late Pre-Classic period until before the last plinian eruption of Ilopango Caldera (425AD) reference, that originated the Tierra Blanca Joven (TBJ), pyroclastic deposits generally used as key-layer in stratigraphic reconstructions. Within the next two centuries, there is no evidence of human occupation at ECAS until the end of Late Classic which was a period of maximum splendor in the valley. During this time the area was affected by at least 3 eruptions from the San Salvador volcanic complex that produced the: Laguna Caldera volcanic fall deposits (which affected Joya de Cerén archeological site in 625AD), "Talpetate" surge deposits or Toba de San Andrés (600-900AD), and fall deposits of El Playón volcano (1658). We report new data on volcanic stratigraphy and archeological history including the following: a) the phreatomagmatic nature of eruptions that affected the area, the new excavations allowed the detailed study of surge deposits indicating magma-water interaction at Laguna Caldera and El Playón, previously considered strombolian eruptions; b)document the occupation of ECAS during Middle Pre-Classic period, new surge deposits below TBJ have been identified (with Middle Pre-Classic artifacts and pottery), that had not been documented before, extending the historic record up to 3000 yrs. BP. and c) detailed study of the "Talpetate" deposits, this sequence consists of fall, pyroclastic flow and surge deposits, present in the rim and slopes of San Salvador Volcano, which can be correlated with surge deposits

  9. Voluminous Icelandic Basaltic Eruptions Appear To Cause Abrupt Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    Beginning on June 21, 1783, Laki volcano in southern Iceland erupted 14.7 km3 basalt, ejecting 24 Mt SO_{2} into the stratosphere where it was blown eastward and northward and 98 Mt into the troposphere where the jet stream transported it southeastward to Europe. The "dry fog" observed in Europe with an estimated mean concentration of 60 ppbv SO2, raised daytime temperatures as much as 3.3^{o}C, causing the warmest July in England from 1659 when measurements began until 1983. SO2, tropospheric O_{3}, NO2, and fine ash absorb ultraviolet energy from the sun that causes the bonds between and within their atoms to oscillate at 47 times higher frequency than the bonds in CO_{2} absorbing infrared radiation. Temperature is proportional to the kinetic energy of these oscillations, i.e. the frequency squared. Thus these gases are raised to much higher temperatures than greenhouse gases. The Stefan-Boltzmann law says that radiation from these molecules is a constant times temperature raised to the fourth power. As a result, SO2 and ash radiate far more energy back to earth than CO_{2}, causing warming. Another way to look at the energy involved shows that 15 ppbv SO2 in the 0.3-0.42 μm wavelength band absorbs as much solar energy per unit volume as 388,000 ppbv CO_{2} absorbs infrared energy in the 12.7-17.5 μm band. Basaltic volcanoes such as Laki emit 10 to 100 times more SO2 than more evolved magmas and are less explosive, leaving most of the SO_{2} in the troposphere. All 14 Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) sudden warmings between 46 and 11 ka are contemporaneous with the highest levels of sulfate in the GISP2 drill hole near Summit Greenland. These DO events typically warmed the northern hemisphere out of the ice age within decades, but as volcanism waned, ocean temperatures cooled the world back into an ice age within centuries. The world finally exited the ice age when voluminous volcanism continued from 11.6 to 9.6 ka. Basaltic table mountains or tuyas in Iceland document

  10. Origin of High-Alumina Basalt, Andesite, and Dacite Magmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W

    1964-10-30

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it.

  11. Can we identify source lithology of basalt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zong-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The nature of source rocks of basaltic magmas plays a fundamental role in understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the solid earth. However, identification of source lithology of basalts remains uncertainty. Using a parameterization of multi-decadal melting experiments on a variety of peridotite and pyroxenite, we show here that a parameter called FC3MS value (FeO/CaO-3*MgO/SiO2, all in wt%) can identify most pyroxenite-derived basalts. The continental oceanic island basalt-like volcanic rocks (MgO>7.5%) (C-OIB) in eastern China and Mongolia are too high in the FC3MS value to be derived from peridotite source. The majority of the C-OIB in phase diagrams are equilibrium with garnet and clinopyroxene, indicating that garnet pyroxenite is the dominant source lithology. Our results demonstrate that many reputed evolved low magnesian C-OIBs in fact represent primary pyroxenite melts, suggesting that many previous geological and petrological interpretations of basalts based on the single peridotite model need to be reconsidered.

  12. Geochemical Characteristics and Metallogenesis of Volcanic Rocks as Exemplified by Volcanic Rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁庚; 叶霖

    1997-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang,occurring in the collision zone between the Siberia Plate and the Junggar Plate,are distributed along the Eritix River Valley in northern Xinjiang.The volcanic rocks were dated at Late Paleozoic and can be divided into the spilite-keratophyre series and the basalt-andesite series.The spilite-keratophyre series volcanic rocks occur in the Altay orogenic belt at the southwest margin of the Siberia Plate.In addition to sodic volcanic rocks.There are also associated potassic-sodic volcanic rocks and potassic volcanic rocks.The potassic-sodic volcanic rocks occur at the bottom of the eruption cycle and control the distribution of Pb and Zn deposits.The potassic volcanic rocks occur at the top of the eruption cycle and are associated with Au and Cu mineralizations.The sodic volcanic rocks occur in the middle stage of eruption cycle and control the occurrence of Cu(Zn) deposits.The basalt-andesite series volcanic rocks distributed in the North Junggar orogenic belt at the north margin of the Junggar-Kazakstan Plate belong to the potassic sodic volcain rocks.The volcanic rocks distributed along the Ulungur fault are relatively rich in sodium and poor in potassium and are predominated by Cu mineralization and associated with Au mineralization.Those volcanic rocks distributed along the Ertix fault are relatively rich in K and poor in Na,with Au mineralization being dominant.

  13. Two-dimensional simulations of explosive eruptions of Kick-em Jenny and other submarine volcanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gisler, Galen R.; Weaver, R. P. (Robert P.); Mader, Charles L.; Gittings, M. L. (Michael L.)

    2004-01-01

    Kick-em Jenny, in the Eastern Caribbean, is a submerged volcanic cone that has erupted a dozen or more times since its discovery in 1939. The most likely hazard posed by this volcano is to shipping in the immediate vicinity (through volcanic missiles or loss-of-buoyancy), but it is of interest to estimate upper limits on tsunamis that might be produced by a catastrophic explosive eruption. To this end, we have performed two-dimensional simulations of such an event in a geometry resembling that of Kick-em Jenny with our SAGE adaptive mesh Eulerian multifluid compressible hydrocode. We use realistic equations of state for air, water, and basalt, and follow the event from the initial explosive eruption, through the generation of a transient water cavity and the propagation of waves away from the site. We find that even for extremely catastrophic explosive eruptions, tsunamis from Kick-em Jenny are unlikely to pose significant danger to nearby islands. For comparison, we have also performed simulations of explosive eruptions at the much larger shield volcano Vailuluu in the Samoan chain, where the greater energy available can produce a more impressive wave. In general, however, we conclude that explosive eruptions do not couple well to water waves. The waves that are produced from such events are turbulent and highly dissipative, and don't propagate well. This is consistent with what we have found previously in simulations of asteroid-impact generated tsunamis. Non-explosive events, however, such as landslides or gas hydrate releases, do couple well to waves, and our simulations of tsunamis generated by subaerial and sub-aqueous landslides demonstrate this.

  14. TWO-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATIONS OF EXPLOSIVE ERUPTIONS OF KICK-EM JENNY AND OTHER SUBMARINE VOLCANOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen Gisler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Kick-em Jenny, in the Eastern Caribbean, is a submerged volcanic cone that has erupted a dozen or more times since its discovery in 1939. The most likely hazard posed by this volcano is to shipping in the immediate vicinity (through volcanic missiles or loss-of-buoyancy, but it is of interest to estimate upper limits on tsunamis that might be produced by a catastrophic explosive eruption. To this end, we have performed two-dimensional simulations of such an event in a geometry resembling that of Kick-em Jenny with our SAGE adaptive mesh Eulerian multifluid compressible hydrocode. We use realistic equations of state for air, water, and basalt, and follow the event from the initial explosive eruption, through the generation of a transient water cavity and the propagation of waves away from the site. We find that even for extremely catastrophic explosive eruptions, tsunamis from Kick-em Jenny are unlikely to pose significant danger to nearby islands. For comparison, we have also performed simulations of explosive eruptions at the much larger shield volcano Vailulu'u in the Samoan chain, where the greater energy available can produce a more impressive wave. In general, however, we conclude that explosive eruptions do not couple well to water waves. The waves that are produced from such events are turbulent and highly dissipative, and don't propagate well. This is consistent with what we have found previously in simulations of asteroid-impact generated tsunamis. Non-explosive events, however, such as landslides or gas hydrate releases, do couple well to waves, and our simulations of tsunamis generated by sub- aerial and sub-aqueous landslides demonstrate this.

  15. Recurrence models of volcanic events: Applications to volcanic risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Picard, R.; Valentine, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Perry, F.V. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-03-01

    An assessment of the risk of future volcanism has been conducted for isolation of high-level radioactive waste at the potential Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada. Risk used in this context refers to a combined assessment of the probability and consequences of future volcanic activity. Past studies established bounds on the probability of magmatic disruption of a repository. These bounds were revised as additional data were gathered from site characterization studies. The probability of direct intersection of a potential repository located in an eight km{sup 2} area of Yucca Mountain by ascending basalt magma was bounded by the range of 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}10} yr{sup {minus}1 2}. The consequences of magmatic disruption of a repository were estimated in previous studies to be limited. The exact releases from such an event are dependent on the strike of an intruding basalt dike relative to the repository geometry, the timing of the basaltic event relative to the age of the radioactive waste and the mechanisms of release and dispersal of the waste radionuclides in the accessible environment. The combined low probability of repository disruption and the limited releases associated with this event established the basis for the judgement that the risk of future volcanism was relatively low. It was reasoned that that risk of future volcanism was not likely to result in disqualification of the potential Yucca Mountain site.

  16. Recurrence models of volcanic events: Applications to volcanic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the risk of future volcanism has been conducted for isolation of high-level radioactive waste at the potential Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada. Risk used in this context refers to a combined assessment of the probability and consequences of future volcanic activity. Past studies established bounds on the probability of magmatic disruption of a repository. These bounds were revised as additional data were gathered from site characterization studies. The probability of direct intersection of a potential repository located in an eight km2 area of Yucca Mountain by ascending basalt magma was bounded by the range of 10-8 to 10-10 yr-12. The consequences of magmatic disruption of a repository were estimated in previous studies to be limited. The exact releases from such an event are dependent on the strike of an intruding basalt dike relative to the repository geometry, the timing of the basaltic event relative to the age of the radioactive waste and the mechanisms of release and dispersal of the waste radionuclides in the accessible environment. The combined low probability of repository disruption and the limited releases associated with this event established the basis for the judgement that the risk of future volcanism was relatively low. It was reasoned that that risk of future volcanism was not likely to result in disqualification of the potential Yucca Mountain site

  17. Bombs, flyin' high. In-flight dynamics of volcanic bombs from Strombolian to Vulcanian eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, Jacopo; Alatorre, Miguel; Cruz Vázquez, Omar; Del Bello, Elisabetta; Ricci, Tullio; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Palladino, Danilo

    2016-04-01

    Bomb-sized (larger than 64 mm) pyroclasts are a common product of explosive eruptions and a considerable source of hazard, both from directly impacting on people and properties and from wildfires associated with their landing in vegetated areas. The dispersal of bombs is mostly modeled as purely ballistic trajectories controlled by gravity and drag forces associated with still air, and only recently other effects, such as the influence of eruption dynamics, the gas expansion, and in-flight collisions, are starting to be quantified both numerically and observationally. By using high-speed imaging of explosive volcanic eruptions here we attempt to calculate the drag coefficient of free-flying volcanic bombs during an eruption and at the same time we document a wide range of in-flight processes affecting bomb trajectories and introducing deviations from purely ballistic emplacement. High-speed (500 frames per second) videos of explosions at Stromboli and Etna (Italy), Fuego (Gatemala), Sakurajima (Japan), Yasur (Vanuatu), and Batu Tara (Indonesia) volcanoes provide a large assortment of free-flying bombs spanning Strombolian to Vulcanian source eruptions, basaltic to andesitic composition, centimeters to meters in size, and 10 to 300 m/s in fly velocity. By tracking the bombs during their flying trajectories we were able to: 1) measure their size, shape, and vertical component of velocity and related changes over time; and 2) measure the different interactions with the atmosphere and with other bombs. Quantitatively, these data allow us to provide the first direct measurement of the aerodynamic behavior and drag coefficient of volcanic bombs while settling, also including the effect of bomb rotation and changes in bomb shape and frontal section. We also show how our observations have the potential to parameterize a number of previously hypothesized and /or described but yet unquantified processes, including in-flight rotation, deformation, fragmentation, agglutination

  18. The 15 March 2007 explosive crisis at Stromboli Volcano, Italy: assessing physical parameters through a multidisciplinary approach

    OpenAIRE

    Pistolesi, M.; Delle Donne, D.; Pioli, Laura; Rosi, M.; Ripepe, M.

    2011-01-01

    Basaltic volcanoes are dominated by lava emission and mild explosive activity. Nevertheless, many basaltic systems exhibit, from time to time, poorly documented and little-understood violent explosions. A short-lived, multiblast explosive crisis (paroxysmal explosion) occurred on 15 March 2007 during an effusive eruptive crisis at Stromboli (Italy). The explosive crisis, which started at 20:38:14 UT, had a total duration of ∼5 min. The combined use of multiparametric data collected by the per...

  19. Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2004-07-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by active volcanoes provide valuable insight into the eruption dynamics. Because the infrasonic pressure field may be directly associated with the flux rate of gas released at a volcanic vent, infrasound also enhances the efficacy of volcanic hazard monitoring and continuous studies of conduit processes. Here we present new results from Erebus, Fuego, and Villarrica volcanoes highlighting uses of infrasound for constraining quantitative eruption parameters, such as eruption duration, source mechanism, and explosive gas flux.

  20. H 2O in basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions from four subduction-related volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, T. W.; Layne, G. D.

    1993-06-01

    Total dissolved H 2O and major element abundances were measured in basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions in olivine phenocrysts from Quaternary eruptions of four subduction-related volcanoes to test the hypothesis that low-MgO high-alumina basalts contain high H 2O at depth [1] and to reveal any petrogenetically significant correlations between arc basalt compositions and H 2O contents. Total dissolved H 2O (combined molecular H 2O and OH groups) measured by ion microprobe in mafic glass inclusions from the 1974 eruption of Fuego, Guatemala, reaches 6.2 wt.%. Dissolved H 2O contents decrease in more evolved Fuego glasses. Correlations of H 2O with MgO, Na 2O, K 2O, S and Cl indicate that aqueous fluid exsolution during magma ascent forced crystallization and differentiation of residual liquids. Low-K 2O magnesian high-alumina basalt glass inclusions from the 3 ka eruption of Black Crater (Medicine Lake volcano, California) have low H 2O contents, near 0.2 wt.%, which are consistent with the MORB-like character of these and other primitive lavas of the Medicine Lake region. Basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions from Copco Cone and Goosenest volcano on the Cascade volcanic front north of Mt. Shasta have H 2O contents of up to 3.3 wt.%. The range of H 2O contents in Cascade mafic magmas is too large to have resulted solely from enrichment by crystallization and indicates the participation of an H 2O-rich component in magma generation or crustal-level modification. Whereas fluid-absent melting of amphibole-bearing peridotite can account for the H 2O in most mafic arc liquids, the very high H 2O/alkali ratios of the 1974 Fuego eruptives suggest that an aqueous fluid was involved in the generation of Fuego basalts.

  1. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is

  2. A Study on the Forming Conditions of Basalts in Seamounts of the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兆麟; 梁德华; 等

    1994-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in seamounts of the South China Sea consist mainly of alkali basalt, tholeiitic basalt, trachyandesitic pumice, dacite, etc.Inclusions in the minerals of the volcanic rocks are main-ly amorphors melt inclusions, which reflects that the volcanic rocks are characterized by submarine eruption and rapid cooling on the seafloor .Furthermore, fluid-melt inclusions have been discovered for the first time in alkali basalts and mantle-derived xenoliths,indicating a process of differentiation between magma and fluid in the course of mantle partial melting .Alkali basalts and inclusions may have been formed in this nonhomogeneous system.Rock-forming temperatures of four seamouns estimated as follows:the Z hongnan seamount alkali basalt 1155-1185℃; the Xianbei seamount alkali basalt 960-1200℃; tholeiitic basalt 1040-1230℃; the Daimao seamount tholeiitic basalt 1245-1280℃; and the Jianfeng seamount trachandestic prmice 880-1140℃. Equilibrium pressures of alkali basalts in the Zhongnan and Xianbei seamounts are 13.57 and 8.8×108 Pa ,respectively. Pyroxene equilibrium tem-peratures of mantle xenoliths from the Xianbei seamount were estimated at 1073-1121℃, and pres-sures ar (15.58-22.47)×108Pa, suggesting a deep-source (e.g.the asthenosphere )for the alkalibasalts.

  3. An ancient recipe for flood-basalt genesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew G; Carlson, Richard W

    2011-07-27

    Large outpourings of basaltic lava have punctuated geological time, but the mechanisms responsible for the generation of such extraordinary volumes of melt are not well known. Recent geochemical evidence suggests that an early-formed reservoir may have survived in the Earth's mantle for about 4.5 billion years (ref. 2), and melts of this reservoir contributed to the flood basalt emplaced on Baffin Island about 60 million years ago. However, the volume of this ancient mantle domain and whether it has contributed to other flood basalts is not known. Here we show that basalts from the largest volcanic event in geologic history--the Ontong Java plateau--also exhibit the isotopic and trace element signatures proposed for the early-Earth reservoir. Together with the Ontong Java plateau, we suggest that six of the largest volcanic events that erupted in the past 250 million years derive from the oldest terrestrial mantle reservoir. The association of these large volcanic events with an ancient primitive mantle source suggests that its unique geochemical characteristics--it is both hotter (it has greater abundances of the radioactive heat-producing elements) and more fertile than depleted mantle reservoirs-may strongly affect the generation of flood basalts.

  4. Testing hypotheses for the use of Icelandic volcanic ashes as low cost, natural fertilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, W.; Edwards, B.

    2012-04-01

    Andisols are soils derived from tephra/volcanic bedrock and are generally considered to be fertile for plant growth (cf. University of Hawaii at Manoa, CTAHR). However, few studies have been published examining the immediate effects of the addition of volcanic ash to soils immediately after an eruption. Our research is motivated by unpublished accounts from Icelandic farmers that the growing season following the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption ended with unusually high yields in areas that were covered by ash from the eruption early in the spring. To test the hypothesis that addition of volcanic ash to soil would have no immediate effect on plant growth, we conducted a ~6 week growth experiment in at controlled environment at the Dickinson College Farm. The experiment used relatively fast growing grain seeds as a test crop, controlled watering, known quantities of peat as an organic base, and the following general experimental design: peat was mixed in known but systematically differing proportions with 1) commercial quartz sand, 2) basaltic ash from the 2004 Grimsvötn eruption, and 3) trachyandesite ash from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. For all experiments, the seeds growing in the simulated soil created with the two different composition volcanic ash had higher germination rates, higher growth rates, and produced plants that were healthier in appearance than the soil made from peat mixed with quartz sand. Some differences were also noted between the germination and grow rates between the basaltic and trachyandesitic ash experiments as well. Working hypotheses to explain these results include (1) shard shapes and vesicles from volcanic ash provide better water retention than quartz, allowing water to be stored longer and increasing average soil moisture, and (2) chemical nutrients from the ash facilitate germination and growth of plants. Documenting the potential benefits of fresh volcanic ash as a fertilizer is important as use of fresh ash fertlizer

  5. The origin of an unusual tuff ring of perlitic rhyolite pyroclasts: The last explosive phase of the Ramadas Volcanic Centre, Andean Puna, Salta, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, M. A.; Cas, R. A. F.; Viramonte, J. G.

    2009-05-01

    A thick sequence of bedded pyroclastic deposits, comprised largely of crystal poor, partially flow-banded perlite fragments defines the remains of a tuff ring around the eastern margin of the Miocene Ramadas Volcanic Centre (RVC), Central Andes, NW Argentina. In numerous quarry exposures, planar bed-forms dominate, but low-angle cross-stratification, lensoidal truncations and lateral pinching and swelling of cm-dm scale bed-forms occur, consistent with pyroclastic surge as the dominant transport and depositional mechanism. Intercalated are mantling, very fine grained, well-sorted, mm-cm scale planar ash layers that represent deposition from pyroclastic fall out and are most likely the products of co-surge ash clouds. Also observed are thick m-scale, laterally continuous, poorly-sorted horizons that are interpreted as pyroclastic flow deposits. Grainsize variations within the > 70 m thick succession range from fine ash to coarse lapilli, with occasional large blocks reaching 20 cm. Clast vesicularities are typically very low. The sequence constitutes a rhyolitic tuff ring around the proximal margins of the RVC. Stratigraphic relationships indicate that the tuff ring was developed following cessation of the major plinian eruption phase of the RVC. A series of pyroclastic density currents and associated ash clouds is inferred to have resulted in the construction of the rhyolitic tuff ring, with deposition focussed on the eastern and southern margins of the central vent. The fine-grained nature of the deposits and low clast vesicularity are consistent with some degree of magma:water interaction during fragmentation. Pervasive perlitic fracturing of clasts found within the tuff deposits also indicates hydration and an extended, post-depositional hydration of the pyroclastic sequence, due to the influence of meteoric water, is likely to have occurred, with deposit permeability, clast specific surface and climate influential in facilitating additional textural

  6. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of volcanic rocks from Daimao Seamount (South China Sea) and their tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Quanshu; Castillo, Paterno; Shi, Xuefa; Wang, Liaoliang; Liao, Lin; Ren, Jiangbo

    2015-03-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) experienced three episodes of seafloor spreading and left three fossil spreading centers presently located at 18°N, 17°N and 15.5°N. Spreading ceased at these three locations during magnetic anomaly 10, 8, and 5c, respectively. Daimao Seamount (16.6 Ma) was formed 10 my after the cessation of the 17°N spreading center. Volcaniclastic rocks and shallow-water carbonate facies near the summit of Daimao Seamount provide key information on the seamount's geologic history. New major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of basaltic breccia clasts in the volcaniclastics suggest that Daimao and other SCS seamounts have typical ocean island basalt-like composition and possess a 'Dupal' isotopic signature. Our new analyses, combined with available data, indicate that the basaltic foundation of Daimao Seamount was formed through subaqueous explosive volcanic eruptions at 16.6 Ma. The seamount subsided rapidly (> 0.12 mm/y) at first, allowing the deposition of shallow-water, coral-bearing carbonates around its summit and, then, at a slower rate (Hainan mantle plume. In contrast, lavas from contemporaneous seamounts in other marginal basins in the western Pacific are subduction-related.

  7. Basaltic Magma-Water Interaction on Earth: Recognition Criteria To Aid Planetary Mapping on Mars (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skilling, I. P.; Graettinger, A. H.; Mercurio, E.; McGarvie, D.; Edwards, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction of basaltic magma with frozen/liquid water or wet sediment is a very common process on Earth, resulting in a wide array of explosively and non-explosively generated products at the micron to kilometre scale. A variety of products and edifices on Mars have also been interpreted as having formed by such interaction, but with the exception of rootless cones, such interpretations are rarely unequivocal. This talk focuses on terrestrial process recognition criteria at a scale, orientation (vertical) and erosion level that is relevant to Mars geological mapping. In this context, we emphasise intrusions with peperite margins and wide hydrothermal haloes, steep margins of ice-contact lava flows, subaerial-subaqueous lava delta transitions, lava domains with distinctive water-cooled jointing, edifices that are dominated by slumped and rotated beds, and the presence of surrounding fluvial deposits and erosion. The most common products of magma-water interaction on Earth are subaqueously emplaced lava flows, which are dominated by pillow lavas. Though pillows are not easy to distinguish from subaerial pahoehoe toes at the resolution of most remote imagery, they are commonly associated with distinctively jointed lava domains, which are usually on a larger scale, including areas of water-cooled jointing (curvicolumnar, blocky etc), lava-filled tubes, which often display radial jointing, and steep talus deposits of joint-block breccia. Subaqueous basaltic lavas emplaced in an ice-confined environment may also display near-vertical ice-contact margins, draped by curtains of elongate pillows or cavities formed from melting of included ice-blocks. Subaerial lava flows that transition into water also develop large-scale foreset-bedding close to the angle of repose, which should be easily visible, at least in oblique imagery. As the majority of the Martian surface is more deeply eroded than most areas of terrestrial basaltic volcanism, it is important to discuss

  8. Geology of the Sabie River Basalt Formation in the Southern Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.J. Sweeney

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sabie River Basalt Formation (SRBF in the central Lebombo is a virtually continuous sequence of basaltic lavas some 2 500 m thick that was erupted 200 - 179 Ma ago. Flows are dominantly pahoehoe in character and vary from 2 m to 20 m in thickness. Dolerite dykes cross-cutting the basalt sequence probably represent feeders to this considerable volcanic event. Volcanological features observed within the SRBF are described. Two chemically distinct basaltic magma types are recognised, the simultaneous eruption of which presents an intriguing geochemical problem as to their origins.

  9. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  10. Primary explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Robert; Pachman, Jiri [Pardubice Univ. (Czech Republic). Faculty of Chemical Technology

    2013-06-01

    The first chapter provides background such as the basics of initiation and differences between requirements on primary explosives used in detonators and igniters. The authors then clarify the influence of physical characteristics on explosive properties, focusing on those properties required for primary explosives. Furthermore, the issue of sensitivity is discussed. All the chapters on particular groups of primary explosives are structured in the same way, including introduction, physical and chemical properties, explosive properties, preparation and documented use.

  11. Study on lithogeochemistry of Middle Jurassic basalts from southern China represented by the Fankeng basalts from Yongding of Fujian Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jincheng; JIANG Shaoyong; WANG Xiaolei; YANG Jinghong; ZHANG Mengqun

    2006-01-01

    There exists an E-W trending Middle Jurassic volcanic zone in southern China. The Fankeng basalts in the Yongding basin of Fujian Province are considered to be a typical example. The Fankeng basalts have TiO2 contents in the range of 1.92%-3.21%. They are classified as high-Ti basalts. They also have higher total Fe (averaging FeO*= 11.09%). The Middle Jurassic Fankeng basalts from southwestern Fujian have obvious distinctive lithogeochemical features from early Cretaceous basalts from southeastern coast of China. They have higher HFSE, such as Th, Nb, Ta, Zr and Ti. Their element ratios related with HFSE, such as Zr/Ba, La/Nb, La/Ta ,Zr/Y, Ti/Y, Ba/Nb, K/Ti and Rb/Zr are similar to those of OIB. The most samples have εNd(T) of -0.70-0.24, which are near chondrite. Some samples have higher εNd(T) of 1.87-3.55.Therefore, these basaltic magmas might be derived from depleted asthenospheric mantle. The lithogeochemical characteristics of the Fankeng basalts may be caused by interaction between asthenosphere and lithosphere at the time. The (Early-)Middle Jurassic basalts and gabbros from southeastern Hunan, southern Jiangxi and northern Guangdong provinces show similar geochemical features to those of the Fankeng basalts from the Yongding of Fujian. Occurrence of these OIB-type basalts in the area may be regarded as the petrological mark of upwelling of asthenosphere at the time. Upwelling of asthenosphere has led to tectonic extension and the formation of rifted basin in the area.

  12. Age of Tertiary volcanic rocks on the West Greenland continental margin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lotte M.; Pedersen, Asger Ken; Tegner, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    Radiometric ages for undated parts of the volcanic succession and intrusions in West Greenland were obtained by the 40Ar–39Ar incremental heating method. Acceptable crystallization ages were obtained for 27 samples. Combined with published results the new data provide a volcanic stratigraphy...... correlatable throughout the Nuussuaq Basin. The thick onshore volcanic pile consists of four widespread formations: 62.5–61 Ma picrites (Vaigat Formation), 61–60 Ma depleted basalts (Maligât Formation and the Hellefisk-1 well), 60–58 Ma less-depleted basalts (Svartenhuk Formation) and 56–54 Ma enriched basalts...... (Naqerloq Formation). Two local successions comprise 53.5 Ma alkali basalts (Erqua Formation) and 38.7 Ma transitional basalts (Talerua Member). A central volcano developed on Ubekendt Ejland, leading to the Sarqâta qáqâ gabbro-granophyre intrusion at 57–55 Ma. Pre-break-up volcanism took place further...

  13. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt ( than about 7 x 10-8 events yr-1 . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain sit

  14. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M.; Vaniman, D.T.; Carr, W.J.

    1983-03-01

    Volcanism studies of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region are concerned with hazards of future volcanism with respect to underground disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The hazards of silicic volcanism are judged to be negligible; hazards of basaltic volcanism are judged through research approaches combining hazard appraisal and risk assessment. The NTS region is cut obliquely by a N-NE trending belt of volcanism. This belt developed about 8 Myr ago following cessation of silicic volcanism and contemporaneous with migration of basaltic activity toward the southwest margin of the Great Basin. Two types of fields are present in the belt: (1) large-volume, long-lived basalt and local rhyolite fields with numerous eruptive centers and (2) small-volume fields formed by scattered basaltic scoria cones. Late Cenozoic basalts of the NTS region belong to the second field type. Monogenetic basalt centers of this region were formed mostly by Strombolian eruptions; Surtseyean activity has been recognized at three centers. Geochemically, the basalts of the NTS region are classified as straddle A-type basalts of the alkalic suite. Petrological studies indicate a volumetric dominance of evolved hawaiite magmas. Trace- and rare-earth-element abundances of younger basalt (<4 Myr) of the NTS region and southern Death Valley area, California, indicate an enrichment in incompatible elements, with the exception of rubidium. The conditional probability of recurring basaltic volcanism and disruption of a repository by that event is bounded by the range of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -10} as calculated for a 1-yr period. Potential disruptive and dispersal effects of magmatic penetration of a repository are controlled primarily by the geometry of basalt feeder systems, the mechanism of waste incorporation in magma, and Strombolian eruption processes.

  15. Preliminary geologic map of the Sleeping Butte volcanic centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sleeping Butte volcanic centers comprise two, spatially separate, small-volume (3) basaltic centers. The centers were formed by mildly explosive Strombolian eruptions. The Little Black Peak cone consists of a main scoria cone, two small satellitic scoria mounds, and associated lobate lava flows that vented from sites at the base of the scoria cone. The Hidden Cone center consists of a main scoria cone that developed on the north-facing slope of Sleeping Butte. The center formed during two episodes. The first included the formation of the main scoria cone, and venting of aa lava flows from radial dikes at the northeast base of the cone. The second included eruption of scoria-fall deposits from the summit crater. The ages of the Little Black Peak and the Hidden Cone are estimated to be between 200 to 400 ka based on the whole-rock K-Ar age determinations with large analytical undertainty. This age assignment is consistent with qualitative observations of the degree of soil development and geomorphic degradation of volcanic landforms. The younger episode of the Hidden Cone is inferred to be significantly younger and probably of Late Pleistocene or Holocene age. This is based on the absence of cone slope rilling, the absence of cone-slope apron deposits, and erosional unconformity between the two episodes, the poor horizon- development of soils, and the presence of fall deposits on modern alluvial surfaces. Paleomagnetic data show that the centers record similar but not identical directions of remanent magnetization. Paleomagnetic data have not been obtained for the youngest deposits of the Hidden Cone center. Further geochronology, soils, geomorphic, and petrology studies are planned of the Sleeping Butte volcanic centers 20 refs., 3 figs

  16. Reappraisal of the significance of volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo

    2016-01-01

    "Volcanic field" is a term commonly used to loosely describe a group of volcanoes. Often, it is implicitly assumed that the volcanoes on a volcanic field are small, monogenetic and dominantly basaltic, but none of those attributes is indispensable on some definitions of the term. Actually, the term "volcanic field" can be used to describe a group of purely monogenetic edifices, a group of mixed monogenetic and polygenetic edifices, or even a group formed only by purely polygenetic edifices. Differences between each of those alternatives might be important, but the extent to which those differences are truly relevant remains still to be explored. Furthermore, there are several limitations on the current knowledge of this type of volcanic activity that explain the lack of a comprehensive effort to study volcanic fields in global contexts. In this work, issues concerning current definitions of a volcanic field are examined, and some criteria that can be used to distinguish volcanic fields from non-field volcanoes are suggested. Special attention is given to the role played by spatial scale on such a distinction. Also, the tectonic implications of their spatial distribution are explored. In particular, it is shown that volcanic fields are an important component of volcanic activity at a global scale that is closely associated to diffuse plate boundaries, and might well be considered the archetypical volcanic form of such tectonic scenarios.

  17. Infrasound research of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Emanuele; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions are efficient sources of infrasound produced by the rapid perturbation of the atmosphere by the explosive source. Being able to propagate up to large distances from the source, infrasonic waves from major (VEI 4 or larger) volcanic eruptions have been recorded for many decades with analogue micro-barometers at large regional distances. In late 1980s, near-field observations became progressively more common and started to have direct impact on the understanding and modeling of explosive source dynamics, to eventually play a primary role in volcano research. Nowadays, infrasound observation from a large variety of volcanic eruptions, spanning from VEI 0 to VEI 5 events, has shown a dramatic variability in terms of signature, excess pressure and frequency content of radiated infrasound and has been used to infer complex eruptive source mechanisms for the different kinds of events. Improved processing capability and sensors has allowed unprecedented precise locations of the explosive source and is progressively increasing the possibility to monitor volcanoes from distant records. Very broadband infrasound observations is also showing the relation between volcanic eruptions and the atmosphere, with the eruptive mass injection in the atmosphere triggering acoustic-gravity waves which eventually might control the ash dispersal and fallout.

  18. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report

  19. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  20. Petrochemistry and origin of basalt breccia from Ban Sap Sawat area, Wichian Buri, Phetchabun, central Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phisit Limtrakun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Thailand is usually considered to be controlled by escape tectonics associated with India-Asia collision during theLate Cenozoic, and basaltic volcanism took place in this extensional period. This volcanism generated both subaqueous andsubaerial lava flows with tholeiitic to alkalic basaltic magma. The subaqueous eruptions represented by the studied WichianBuri basalts, Ban Sap Sawat in particular, are constituted by two main types of volcanic lithofacies, including lava flows andbasalt breccias. The lava flows are commonly porphyritic with olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts and microphenocrysts,and are uncommonly seriate textured. The basalt breccias are strongly vitrophyric texture with olivine and plagioclasephenocrysts and microphenocrysts. Chemical analyses indicate that both lava flows and basalt breccias have similar geochemical compositions, signifying that they were solidified from the same magma. Their chondrite normalized REE patternsand N-MORB normalized patterns are closely analogous to the Early to Middle Miocene tholeiites from central Sinkhote-Alinand Sakhalin, northeastern margin of the Eurasian continent which were erupted in a continental rift environment. The originfor the Wichian Buri basalts show similarity of lava flows and basalt breccias, in terms of petrography and chemical compositions, signifying that they have been formed from the same continental within-plate, transitional tholeiitic magma.

  1. Volcanic Structure of the Gakkel Ridge at 85°E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, C.; Humphris, S.; Soule, S. A.; Reves-Sohn, R.; Shank, T.; Singh, H.

    2007-12-01

    We present an initial volcanologic interpretation of a magmatically-robust segment of the ultra-slow spreading (3- 7 mm/yr) Gakkel Ridge at 85°E in the eastern Arctic Basin based on surveys conducted during the July 2007 Arctic GAkkel Vents Expedition (AGAVE). A previous expedition (2001 AMORE) and seismic stations in the area found evidence for active hydrothermal circulation and seismicity that suggested volcanic activity may be ongoing at 85°E. We examine multi-beam bathymetric data, digital imagery, and rock and sediment samples in order to determine the nature of volcanic accretion that is occurring in this environment including the distribution of flow types and their relationship to features of the axial valley. Raw multi-beam bathymetric data was logged by the Kongsberg EM 120 1°x1° multi-beam echo sounder aboard the icbreaker IB Oden. Digital imagery was recorded on five video and still cameras mounted on the CAMPER fiber-optic wireline vehicle, which was towed 1-3m above the seafloor. Digital imagery was recorded on thirteen CAMPER drift-dives over interesting bathymetry including: a volcanic ridge in the axial valley named Duque's Hill, and Oden and Loke volcanoes that are part of the newly discovered Asgard volcanic chain. Talus, lava flows, and volcaniclastics were sampled with the clamshell grabber and slurp suction sampler on CAMPER. A variety of lava morphologies are identified in the imagery including large basalt pillows with buds and other surface ornamentation, lava tubes, lobates, sheet flows, and a thick cover of volcaniclastic sediment over extensive areas suggestive of explosive volcanic activity.

  2. Geochemical characterization of oceanic basalts using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Sridhar D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The geochemical discriminate diagrams help to distinguish the volcanics recovered from different tectonic settings but these diagrams tend to group the ocean floor basalts (OFB under one class i.e., as mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORB. Hence, a method is specifically needed to identify the OFB as normal (N-MORB, enriched (E-MORB and ocean island basalts (OIB. We have applied Artificial Neural Network (ANN technique as a supervised Learning Vector Quantisation (LVQ to identify the inherent geochemical signatures present in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB basalts. A range of N-MORB, E-MORB and OIB dataset was used for training and testing of the network. Although the identification of the characters as N-MORB, E-MORB and OIB is completely dependent upon the training data set for the LVQ, but to a significant extent this method is found to be successful in identifying the characters within the CIOB basalts. The study helped to geochemically delineate the CIOB basalts as N-MORB with perceptible imprints of E-MORB and OIB characteristics in the form of moderately enriched rare earth and incompatible elements. Apart from the fact that the magmatic processes are difficult to be deciphered, the architecture performs satisfactorily.

  3. Sensitivity of geochemical monitoring for CO2 sequestration in basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, N. V.; Goldberg, D.; Herron, M.; Grau, J.

    2010-12-01

    Continental flood basalts is a promising target for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage due to high storage capacity, presence of seals, and potential for geochemical trapping which results in binding CO2 into stable carbonate minerals. The success of long-term CO2 storage in igneous rocks highly depends on our ability to monitor mineralization under in situ conditions. The direct chemistry measurements on cores are costly and typically do not provide continuous coverage. In this study we investigate the potential of borehole geochemical logging for monitoring of CO2 mineralization in basalt. Neutron-induced capture gamma ray spectroscopy tools allow obtaining in-situ concentration logs for up to 10 major elements which can be used to construct a quantitative mineralogical model. While this usually provides good bulk mineralogy estimates, detecting small-volume mineral alteration in volcanic rocks remains challenging, especially if borehole conditions are poor. We analyze Schlumberger Elemental Capture Spectroscopy logs and chemical core analysis from the pilot CO2 sequestration project in the Columbia River flood basalt. We use the geochemical spectroscopy logs and quantitative modeling to quantify their sensitivity to secondary mineralization in basalt. We apply statistical analysis to explain the variance in elemental concentrations (and other logs) and establish detection limits for various mineral alteration products in basalt. We use these results to evaluate monitoring capabilities and limitations of geochemical logging for CO2 mineralization after underground injection in basalt and suggest areas for future research.

  4. Basalt: Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, D. S. S.; Abercromby, A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Kobayashi, L.; Hughes, S. S.; Chappell, S.; Bramall, N. E.; Deans, M. C.; Heldmann, J. L.; Downs, M.; Cockell, C. S.; Stevens, A. H.; Caldwell, B.; Hoffman, J.; Vadhavk, N.; Marquez, J.; Miller, M.; Squyres, S. W.; Lees, D. S.; Fong, T.; Cohen, T.; Smith, T.; Lee, G.; Frank, J.; Colaprete, A.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the BASALT (Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains) program. BASALT research addresses Science, Science Operations, and Technology. Specifically, BASALT is focused on the investigation of terrestrial volcanic terrains and their habitability as analog environments for early and present-day Mars. Our scientific fieldwork is conducted under simulated Mars mission constraints to evaluate strategically selected concepts of operations (ConOps) and capabilities with respect to their anticipated value for the joint human and robotic exploration of Mars. a) Science: The BASALT science program is focused on understanding habitability conditions of early and present-day Mars in two relevant Mars-analog locations (the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and the East Rift Zone (ERZ) flows on the Big Island of Hawai'i and the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) in Idaho) to characterize and compare the physical and geochemical conditions of life in these environments and to learn how to seek, identify, and characterize life and life-related chemistry in basaltic environments representing these two epochs of martian history. b) Science Operations: The BASALT team will conduct real (non-simulated) biological and geological science at two high-fidelity Mars analogs, all within simulated Mars mission conditions (including communication latencies and bandwidth constraints) that are based on current architectural assumptions for Mars exploration missions. We will identify which human-robotic ConOps and supporting capabilities enable science return and discovery. c) Technology: BASALT will incorporate and evaluate technologies in to our field operations that are directly relevant to conducting the scientific investigations regarding life and life-related chemistry in Mars-analogous terrestrial environments. BASALT technologies include the use of mobile science platforms, extravehicular informatics, display technologies, communication

  5. Age and petrology of the Kalaupapa Basalt, Molokai, Hawaii ( geochemistry, Sr isotopes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The post-erosional Kalaupapa Basalt on East Molokai, Hawaii, erupted between 0.34 and 0.57 million years ago to form the Kalaupapa Peninsula. The Kalaupapa Basalt ranges in composition from basanite to lava transitional between alkalic and tholeiitic basalt. Rare-earth and other trace-element abundances suggest that the Kalaupapa Basalt could be generated by 11-17% partial melting of a light-REE-enriched source like that from which the post-erosional lavas of the Honolulu Group on Oahu were generated by 2-11% melting. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the lavas range from 0.70320 to 0.70332, suggesting that the variation in composition mainly reflects variation in the melting process rather than heterogeneity of sources. The length of the period of volcanic quiescence that preceded eruption of post-erosional lavas in the Hawaiian Islands decreased as volcanism progressed from Kauai toward Kilauea. - Authors

  6. Geochemical Interpretation of Collision Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Julian

    2014-05-01

    collision type with extreme LILE and significant HFSE enrichment relative to MORB and with large negative Nb-Ta and Ti anomalies. Post-collision volcanism is usually ascribed to combinations of slab detachment, delamination, and slab roll back (orogenic) and extension (post-orogenic). The magma source is typically conductively-heated, sub-continental mantle lithosphere with composition and depth of melting depending on the nature and evolution of the collision zone in question. Geochemical patterns may be similar to those of syn-collision basalts or of intraplate, continental basalts - or transitional between these. This variability in space and time, though problematic for geochemical fingerprinting, can give clues to the polarity and development of the collision zone, for example by highlighting the distribution of subduction-modified mantle lithosphere and hence of pre-collision subduction zones. One characteristic common to this setting is a high crustal input resulting from the presence of a hot, thick 'crustal chemical filter' which is evident on geochemical projections that highlight AFC-type processes. Using this, and other, geochemical features it is possible to develop methodologies to at least partly see through the complexity of collision terranes.

  7. Source mechanisms of volcanic tsunamis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Raphaël

    2015-10-28

    Volcanic tsunamis are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including volcano-tectonic earthquakes, slope instabilities, pyroclastic flows, underwater explosions, shock waves and caldera collapse. In this review, we focus on the lessons that can be learnt from past events and address the influence of parameters such as volume flux of mass flows, explosion energy or duration of caldera collapse on tsunami generation. The diversity of waves in terms of amplitude, period, form, dispersion, etc. poses difficulties for integration and harmonization of sources to be used for numerical models and probabilistic tsunami hazard maps. In many cases, monitoring and warning of volcanic tsunamis remain challenging (further technical and scientific developments being necessary) and must be coupled with policies of population preparedness.

  8. Interpreting chemical compositions of small scale basaltic systems: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Lucy E.; Smith, Ian E. M.

    2016-10-01

    Small scale basaltic magmatic systems occur in all of the major tectonic environments of planet Earth and are characteristically expressed at the Earth's surface as fields of small monogenetic cones. The chemical compositions of the materials that make up these cones reflect processes of magma generation and differentiation that occur in their plumbing system. The volumes of magmas involved are very small and significantly their compositional ranges reveal remarkably complex processes which are overwhelmed or homogenized in larger scale systems. Commonly, compositions are basaltic, alkalic and enriched in light rare earth elements and large ion lithophile elements, although the spectrum extends from highly enriched nephelinites to subalkalic and tholeiitic basalts. Isotopic analyses of rocks from volcanic fields almost always display compositions which can only be explained by the interaction of two or more mantle sources. Ultimately their basaltic magmas originate by small scale melting of mantle sources. Compositional variety is testament to melting processes at different depths, a range of melting proportions, a heterogeneous source and fractionation, magma mixing and assimilation within the plumbing system that brings magmas to the surface. The fact that such a variety of compositions is preserved in a single field shows that isolation of individual melting events and their ascent is an important and possibly defining feature of monogenetic volcanism, as well as the window their chemical behavior provides into the complex process of melt generation and extraction in the Earth's upper mantle.

  9. Intrusion Triggering of Explosive Eruptions: Lessons Learned from EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL 2010 Eruptions and Crustal Deformation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsson, F.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Hooper, A. J.; Arnadottir, T.; Pedersen, R.; Roberts, M. J.; Oskarsson, N.; Auriac, A.; Decriem, J.; Einarsson, P.; Geirsson, H.; Hensch, M.; Ofeigsson, B. G.; Sturkell, E. C.; Sveinbjornsson, H.; Feigl, K.

    2010-12-01

    . Alternatively, mixing of larger portion of olivine basalt with more evolved magma may have occurred. Intrusions may lead to eruptions not only when they find their way to the surface; at Eyjafjallajökull our observation show how primitive melts in an intrusive complex active since 1992 catalyzed an explosive eruption of trachyandesite. Eyjafjallajökull’s behaviour can be attributed to its off-rift setting with a relatively cold subsurface structure and limited magma at shallow depth, as may be typical for moderately active volcanoes. Clear signs of volcanic unrest signals over years to weeks may indicate reawakening of such volcanoes whereas immediate short-term precursors may be subtle and difficult to detect.

  10. Putative cryptoendolithic life in Devonian pillow basalt, Rheinisches Schiefergebirge, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckmann, J; Bach, W; Behrens, K; Reitner, J

    2008-03-01

    Middle Devonian (Givetian) pillow basalt and inter-pillow breccia from the Rheinisches Schiefergebirge in Germany were found to contain putative biogenic filaments that indicate that life once proliferated within these volcanic rocks. Mineralized filaments are found in carbonate amygdules (vesicles filled by carbonate cement) in the volcanic rock, where they started to form on the internal surface of the once water-filled vesicles. Biogenicity of the filaments is indicated by (1) their size and shape resembling modern microorganisms including a constant diameter along the length of curved filaments, (2) their independence of crystal faces or cleavage planes, (3) branching patterns reminiscent of modern microorganisms, and (4) their spatial clustering and preferential occurrence close to the margin of pillows and in the inter-pillow breccias. A time lag between the deposition of pillow basalt and the activity of endoliths is revealed by the sequence of carbonate cements filling the amygdules. The putative filamentous microorganisms thrived after the formation of early fibrous rim cement, but before later equant calcite spar filled most of the remaining porosity. Microbial clay authigenesis analogous to the encrustation of prokaryotes in modern iron-rich environments led to the preservation of filaments. The filaments predominantly consist of the clay minerals chamosite and illite. Having dwelled in water-filled vesicles, the Devonian basalt-hosted filaments apparently represent cryptoendoliths. This finding suggests that a previously unrecognized niche for life exists within volcanic rock.

  11. Distribution and characteristics of volcanic reservoirs in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yulong; WANG Pujun; CHEN Shuming

    2009-01-01

    About forty productive oil/gas fields hosted in volcanic reservoirs have been found since 1957 in fourteen basins of China. They can be simply subdivided into two groups, the east and the west. Reservoir volcanic rocks of the east group are predominantly composed of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous rhyolite and Tertiary basalt, preferred being considered as rift type volcanics developed in the circum-Pacific tectonic regime. Those of the west are Permo-Carboniferous intermediate/basic volcanic rocks, being island-arc type ones developed in paleo-Asian Ocean tectonic regime.

  12. Pre-breakup magmatism on the Vøring Margin: Insight from new sub-basalt imaging and results from Ocean Drilling Program Hole 642E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalak, M. M.; Meyer, R.; Planke, S.; Faleide, J. I.; Gernigon, L.; Frieling, J.; Sluijs, A.; Reichart, G.-J.; Zastrozhnov, D.; Theissen-Krah, S.; Said, A.; Myklebust, R.

    2016-04-01

    Lower Series Flows facies unit is proposed. This model comprises several stages: (1) the emplacement of subaqueous peperitic basaltic andesitic flows intruding and/or extruding wet sediments; (2) a subaerial to shallow marine volcanism and extrusion of dacitic flows; (3) a proto-breakup phase with intense shallow marine to subaerial explosive volcanism responsible for pyroclastic flow deposits, which can be correlated with the seismic K-Reflection; and (4) the main breakup stage with intense transitional tholeiitic MORB-type volcanism and large subsidence concomitant with the buildup of the Seaward-Dipping Reflector wedge.

  13. The Giant Lavas of Kalkarindji: rubbly pāhoehoe lava in an ancient continental flood basalt province

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Peter E.; Widdowson, Mike; Murphy, David T.

    2016-01-01

    The Kalkarindji continental flood basalt province of northern Australia erupted in the mid Cambrian (c. 511-505 Ma). It now consists of scattered basaltic lava fields, the most extensive being the Antrim Plateau Volcanics (APV) - a semi-continuous outcrop (c. 50,000 km2) reaching a maximum thickness of 1.1 km. Cropping out predominately in the SW of the APV, close to the top of the basalt succession, lies the Blackfella Rockhole Member (BRM). Originally described as ‘basaltic agglomerate’ the...

  14. East Mariana Basin tholeiites: Cretaceous intraplate basalts or rift basalts related to the Ontong Java plume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, P.R.; Pringle, M.S.; Carlson, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Studies of seafloor magnetic anomaly patterns suggest the presence of Jurassic oceanic crust in a large area in the western Pacific that includes the East Mariana, Nauru and Pigafetta Basins. Sampling of the igneous crust in this area by the Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) allows direct evaluation of the age and petrogenesis of this crust. ODP Leg 129 drilled a 51 m sequence of basalt pillows and massive flows in the central East Mariana Basin. 40Ar 39Ar ages determined in this study for two Leg 129 basalts average 114.6 ?? 3.2 Ma. This age is in agreement with the Albian-late Aptian paleontologic age of the overlying sediments, but is distinctively younger than the Jurassic age predicted by magnetic anomaly patterns in the basin. Compositionally, the East Mariana Basin basalts are uniformly low-K tholeiites that are depleted in highly incompatible elements compared to moderately incompatible ones, which is typical of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) erupted near hotspots. The Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of the tholeiites ( 87Sr 86Srinit = 0.70360-0.70374; 143Nd 144Ndinit = 0.512769-0.512790; 206Pb 204Pbmeas = 18.355-18.386) also overlap with some Indian Ocean Ridge MORB, although they are distinct from the isotopic compositions of Jurassic basalts drilled in the Pigafetta Basin, the oldest Pacific MORB. The isotopic compositions of the East Mariana Basin tholeiites are also similar to those of intraplate basalts, and in particular, to the isotopic signature of basalts from the nearby Ontong Java and Manihiki Plateaus. The East Mariana Basin tholeiites also share many petrologic and isotopic characteristics with the oceanic basement drilled in the Nauru Basin at DSDP Site 462. In addition, the new 110.8 ?? 1.0 Ma 40Ar 39Ar age for two flows from the bottom of Site 462 in the Nauru Basin is indistinguishable from the age of the East Mariana Basin flows. Thus, while magnetic anomaly patterns predict that the igneous

  15. Volcanic loading: The dust veil index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, H.H. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Climatic Research Unit

    1985-09-01

    Dust ejected into the high atmosphere during explosive volcanic eruptions has been considered as a possible cause for climatic change. Dust veils created by volcanic eruptions can reduce the amount of light reaching the Earth`s surface and can cause reductions in surface temperatures. These climatic effects can be seen for several years following some eruptions and the magnitude and duration of the effects depend largely on the density or amount of tephra (i.e. dust) ejected, the latitude of injection, and atmospheric circulation patterns. Lamb (1970) formulated the Dust Veil Index (DVI) in an attempt to quantify the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact of a particular volcanic eruptions release of dust and aerosols over the years following the event. The DVI for any volcanic eruptions are available and have been used in estimating Lamb`s dust veil indices.

  16. Immiscible iron- and silica-rich melt in basalt petrogenesis documented in the Skaergaard intrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jakob Kløve; Veksler, Ilya; Tegner, Christian;

    2005-01-01

    Silicate liquid immiscibility in basalt petrogenesis is a contentious issue. Immiscible iron and silica-rich liquids were reported in melt inclusions of lunar basalt and in groundmass glasses of terrestrial volcanics. In fully crystallized plutonic rocks, however, silicate liquid immiscibility has...... emulsion of silica and iron-rich liquids. On the outcrop scale, silica-rich (melanogranophyre) pods and layers in iron-rich ferrodiorite of the Upper Zone of the Skaergaard intrusion witness segregation of the two liquids. These findings demand that silicate immiscibility is considered in basalt...

  17. Space-Time-Isotopic Trends of Snake River Plain Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, M. M.; Hanan, B. B.; Shervais, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Snake River Plain (SRP) volcanic province is an 800 km track of basalt extending from the Owyhee Plateau to its current terminus, the Yellowstone Plateau. It is one of several late-Tertiary magmatic terranes that also include the Cascades magmatic arc, the Columbia River basalts, and the Oregon Plateau basalts; all of which are adjacent to the Basin and Range Province extensional system (Hughes and McCurry, 2002). This province represents the track of the Yellowstone plume and consists of basalt that is compositionally similar to ocean-island basalt. This basalt overlies a series of rhyolitic eruptive centers (overlapping caldera complexes, ignimbrites, and caldera-filling eruptions) that signal the arrival of the plume head (Christiansen, 2001) and herald the onset of plume-related rhyolitic and basaltic volcanism (Pierce et al., 2002). Observed within the SRP are two basalt types: the dominant low-K olivine tholeiites and less common high-K alkaline basalts. We report new Sr-, Nd-, and Pb-isotopic analyses of these two basalt types from all three SRP provinces: eastern, central, and western. Low-K tholeiites are enriched in 143Nd/144Nd and 86Sr/87Sr and forms a quasi-linear array in Pb-isotope space, along with Craters of the Moon and eastern SRP basalts. High-K lavas are found largely in the western plain, and have a uniquely different isotopic signature. They are depleted in 143Nd/144Nd and 86Sr/87Sr, relative to the low-K tholeiites, and plot closer to the BSE component of Zindler and Hart (1986). They also share the same Pb-isotopic space with high-K basalts from Smith Prairie (Boise River Group 2 of Vetter and Shervais, 1992). One low-K tholeiite - Eureka North, plots with these high alkali basalts. Mass balance models have demonstrated an increasing plume component from the Yellowstone caldera in the east to the craton edge in the west. The lavas analyzed in this study conform remarkably to this model. The mass fraction of plume component in western

  18. Geochemical characteristics and petrogenesis of Mesozoic basalts from the North China Craton: A case study in Fuxin, Liaoning Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Occurrence of Cretaceous basalts in Fuxin County, Liaoning Province provides us an opportunity to understand Mesozoic mantle processes beneath the northern margin of the North China Craton (NNCC). Fuxin Jianguo basalts occur as volcanic channel phases with well-developed columnar jointings and contain few spinel lherzolite and pyroxenite xenoliths. They are poor in silica and rich in alkalis, Ti and Al, belonging to alkaline basalts. In trace element compositions, Jianguo basalts are moderately enriched in LREE and LILE, but not depleted in HFSE. They have low Sr and high Nd and Pb isotopic ratios. These geochemical characteristics suggest that Jianguo basalts originated from the depleted asthenosphere, representing an undifferentiated and uncontaminated primitive magma. Presence of these basalts indicates that the lithosphere beneath the region had thickness less than 65 km at the time of basalt eruption and was mainly composed of fertile pargasite-bearing spinel lherzolite and plagioclase pyroxenite. The voluminous basaltic-andesitic magmatism during the early Jurassic-late Cretaceous time indicates that the commencement and accomplishment of lithosphere thinning in the NNCC was much earlier than that in the southern margin, since the mafic-intermediate volcanism only occurred at the Cretaceous time in the southern margin and the basalts with an asthenosphere isotopic signature at the Tertiary. This shows that highly spatial and temporal heterogeneity existed in the Mesozoic lithosphere evolution.

  19. Volcanic hazards of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and adjacent areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, W.R. [WRH Associates, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Smith, R.P. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Potential volcanic hazards are assessed, and hazard zone maps are developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent areas. The basis of the hazards assessment and mapping is the past volcanic history of the INEL region, and the apparent similarity of INEL volcanism with equivalent, well-studied phenomena in other regions of active volcanism, particularly Hawaii and Iceland. The most significant hazards to INEL facilities are associated with basaltic volcanism, chiefly lava flows, which move slowly and mainly threaten property by inundation or burning. Related hazards are volcanic gases and tephra, and ground disturbance associated with the ascent of magma under the volcanic zones. Several volcanic zones are identified in the INEL area. These zones contain most of the volcanic vents and fissures of the region and are inferred to be the most probable sites of future INEL volcanism. Volcanic-recurrence estimates are given for each of the volcanic zones based on geochronology of the lavas, together with the results of field and petrographic investigations concerning the cogenetic relationships of INEL volcanic deposits and associated magma intrusion. Annual probabilities of basaltic volcanism within the INEL volcanic zones range from 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 16,000-year interval between eruptions) for the axial volcanic zone near the southern INEL boundary and the Arco volcanic-rift zone near the western INEL boundary, to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 100,000-year interval between eruptions) for the Howe-East Butte volcanic rift zone, a geologically old and poorly defined feature of the central portion of INEL. Three volcanic hazard zone maps are developed for the INEL area: lava flow hazard zones, a tephra (volcanic ash) and gas hazard zone, and a ground-deformation hazard zone. The maps are useful in land-use planning, site selection, and safety analysis.

  20. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age and significance of Early Paleozoic volcanic rocks in East Kunlun orogenic belt, Qinghai Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Yunhai; LIN; Qixiang; JIA; Chunxing; WANG; Guocan

    2006-01-01

    Early Paleozoic volcanic rocks in Nuomuhong area occurred as basalt slice and meta-volcanic slice. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating of the basalt slice and the meta-volcanic slice show that the age of the basalt slice is 419±5 Ma, and that of the meta-volcanic slice is 401± 6 Ma. These ages directly testify that there existed Early Paleozoic ocean-continent transform in East Kunlun, the basalt slice was formed in an extensional mid-ocean ridge setting and the meta-volcanic rock slice was formed in an extrusion subduction and collision setting. The inherited zircon age of 1734 Ma in volcanic rocks reflects that the base of East Kunlun may be Middle Proterozoic.

  1. Determination of properties of Proterozoic continental flood basalts of western part from North Qilian Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏林圻; 夏祖春; 赵江天; 徐学义; 杨合群; 赵东宏

    1999-01-01

    Proterozoic volcanic rocks of the western part from the North Qilian Mountains are the products of continental rift volcanism, belonging to continental flood basalts, the petrogeochemistry of which apears to suggest that they are derived from sub-lithospheric mantle plume sources, but that they also show evidence of continental lithosphere components involvement. Their formation is the consequences of plume-lithosphere interactions and is precursive to the opening of the North Qilian Early-Paleozoic ocean basin.

  2. Influences on the variability of eruption sequences and style transitions in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.; Procter, Jonathan; Agustín-Flores, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Monogenetic basaltic volcanism is characterised by a complex array of eruptive behaviours, reflecting spatial and temporal variability of the magmatic properties (e.g. composition, eruptive volume, magma flux) as well as environmental factors at the vent site (e.g. availability of water, country rock geology, faulting). These combine to produce changes in eruption style over brief periods (minutes to days) in many eruption episodes. Monogenetic eruptions in some volcanic fields often start with a phreatomagmatic vent-opening phase that later transforms into "dry" magmatic explosive or effusive activity, with a strong variation in the duration and importance of this first phase. Such an eruption sequence pattern occurred in 83% of the known eruption in the 0.25 My-old Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand. In this investigation, the eruptive volumes were compared with the sequences of eruption styles preserved in the pyroclastic record at each volcano of the AVF, as well as environmental influencing factors, such as distribution and thickness of water-saturated semi- to unconsolidated sediments, topographic position, distances from known fault lines. The AVF showed that there is no correlation between ejecta ring volumes and environmental influencing factors that is valid for the entire AVF. In contrary, using a set of comparisons of single volcanoes with well-known and documented sequences, resultant eruption sequences could be explained by predominant patterns of the environment in which these volcanoes were erupted. Based on the spatial variability of these environmental factors, a first-order susceptibility hazard map was constructed for the AVF that forecasts areas of largest likelihood for phreatomagmatic eruptions by overlaying topographical and shallow geological information. Combining detailed phase-by-phase breakdowns of eruptive volumes and the event sequences of the AVF, along with the new susceptibility map, more realistic eruption scenarios can be

  3. Controls on long-term low explosivity at andesitic arc volcanoes: Insights from Mount Hood, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleszar, Alison M.; Kent, Adam J. R.; Wallace, Paul J.; Scott, William E.

    2012-03-01

    The factors that control the explosivity of silicic volcanoes are critical for hazard assessment, but are often poorly constrained for specific volcanic systems. Mount Hood, Oregon, is a somewhat atypical arc volcano in that it is characterized by a lack of large explosive eruptions over the entire lifetime of the current edifice (~ 500,000 years). Erupted Mount Hood lavas are also compositionally homogeneous, with ~ 95% having SiO2 contents between 58 and 66 wt.%. The last three eruptive periods in particular have produced compositionally homogeneous andesite-dacite lava domes and flows. In this paper we report major element and volatile (H2O, CO2, Cl, S, F) contents of melt inclusions and selected phenocrysts from these three most recent eruptive phases, and use these and other data to consider possible origins for the low explosivity of Mount Hood. Measured volatile concentrations of melt inclusions in plagioclase, pyroxene, and amphibole from pumice indicate that the volatile contents of Mount Hood magmas are comparable to those in more explosive silicic arc volcanoes, including Mount St. Helens, Mount Mazama, and others, suggesting that the lack of explosive activity is unlikely to result solely from low intrinsic volatile concentrations or from substantial degassing prior to magma ascent and eruption. We instead argue that an important control over explosivity is the increased temperature and decreased magma viscosity that results from mafic recharge and magma mixing prior to eruption, similar to a model recently proposed by Ruprecht and Bachmann (2010). Erupted Mount Hood magmas show extensive evidence for mixing between magmas of broadly basaltic and dacitic-rhyolitic compositions, and mineral zoning studies show that mixing occurred immediately prior to eruption. Amphibole chemistry and thermobarometry also reveal the presence of multiple amphibole populations and indicate that the mixed andesites and dacites are at least 100 °C hotter than the high-SiO2

  4. One Hundred Years of Land Use Change in an Iconic Young Volcanic Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, E. B.; Batdorff, K.; Cross, J.; Krome, T.; Hamilton, D.; Bernstein, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    In young basaltic terrain, land use patterns are constrained by soil-forming processes and the ability to retain water in near-surface substrate. Rapid population growth over the last two centuries and a relatively lengthy tradition of land cover mapping makes Mt. Fuji a prime location for investigating how such constraints play out quantitatively. Though often considered the iconic stratovolcano, Mt. Fuji has erupted primarily basalt, in both explosive and effusive eruptions. We digitized historical land use maps to document land use patterns in 1898 and 1990 and related these to topographic and geologic controls. The dominant land use transformations include a 75% reduction (by area) in grasslands, a 100% increase in coniferous forest, and a >250% increase in mixed broadleaf/coniferous forest. Though much less extensive in absolute terms, the area devoted to mulberry plantation declined by 75%, while the area devoted to tea plantations increased by 150%. Forest areas have mean slopes of 15-20 degrees, while agricultural areas (e.g., rice paddy, tea plantations, mulberry plantations) occur on slopes of <10 degrees. In 1898, 40-60% of bamboo forests, mulberry plantations, tea plantations, and rice paddies were grown on sediment deposits - e.g., terraces, lahar deposits, alluvium deposits. By 1990, 80% of the remaining mulberry plantations occurred on young volcanic deposits and 70% of tea plantations occurred on old volcanic deposits, while 65% of rice paddies still occurred on sediment deposits. This reflects a shifting hierarchy of priorities and a differentiation of cultivation strategies where sedimentary deposits, the most suitable for cultivation, are sparse.

  5. Multiple Volcanic Episodes of Flood Basalts Caused by Underplating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Dan; XU Yi-gang; SONG Xie-yang; HU Rui-zhong

    2008-01-01

    @@ Most Large igneous provinces (LIPs) are emplaced within <10 Ma, with a main pulse of the magmatism in<1 Ma[1]. For example, the Siberian Traps [2] and the Deccan Traps [3] were probably erupted within one million years. Many events, such as the Columbia River event, feature a single pulse of magmatism, followed by a protrac-ted period of magmatism at a much lower rate that is linked to a plume tail[4].

  6. Micromorphological Characterization of Some Volcanic Soil In West Java

    OpenAIRE

    Mahfud Arifin; Rina Devnita

    2014-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol3no4.20082Micromorphological characterization has been studied on six pedons of soils developing in volcanic materials in West Java. The pedons represent deposits of different volcanoes (Mount Tangkuban Perahu, Mount Patuha and Mount Papandayan) with different ages (Pleistocene, Holocene) within two types of volcanisms (andesitic, basaltic), and three agroclimatic zones (A, B1, B2). Undisturbed soil samples were taken from each identifiable horizon for thin ...

  7. Strong responses of Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities to volcanic ash

    OpenAIRE

    Browning, T.J.; Bouman, H. A.; Henderson, G. M.; Mather, T.A.; D. M. Pyle; Schlosser, Christian; Woodward, E.M.S.; Moore, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions have been hypothesized as an iron supply mechanism for phytoplankton blooms; however, little direct evidence of stimulatory responses has been obtained in the field. Here we present the results of twenty-one 1-2day bottle enrichment experiments from cruises in the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean which conclusively demonstrated a photophysiological and biomass stimulation of phytoplankton communities following supply of basaltic or rhyolitic volcanic ash. Furthermore, expe...

  8. Laboratory studies on electrical effects during volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Büttner

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This laboratory study reports on electrical phenomena during the explosive eruption of a basaltoid silicate melt. Contact electricity is produced in the phase of thermo-hydraulic fracturing of magma during the explosive interaction with water. The electrical charge produced is directly proportional to the force of the explosion, as the force of explosion is linearly proportional to the surface generated by the thermo-hydraulic fracturing. Simulation of the ejection history using inerted gas as a driving medium under otherwise constant conditions did not result in significant electric charging. The results have the potential to explain in nature observed lightening in eruption clouds of explosive volcanic events.

  9. Payenia volcanic province, southern Mendoza, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina; Holm, Paul Martin; Llambias, Eduardo Jorge

    2013-01-01

    to the low thickness of the lithospheric mantle and preheating of the lower crust by earlier Mio-Pliocene volcanism. Rare earth element modelling of mantle melting calls for enriched source compositions and a beginning of melting within the garnet stability field for all Payenia basalts. The Río Colorado......The Pleistocene to Holocene Payenia volcanic province is a backarc region of 60,000 km2 in Mendoza, Argentina, which is dominated by transitional to alkaline basalts and trachybasalts. We present major and trace element compositions of 139 rocks from this area of which the majority are basaltic...... rocks with 4 to 12 wt.% MgO and 44 to 50 wt.% SiO2. The southern Payenia province is dominated by intraplate basalts and the trace element patterns of the Río Colorado and Payún Matrú lavas suggest little or no influence from subducted slab components. The mantle source of these rocks is similar to some...

  10. Mantle and crustal processes in the magmatism of the Campania region: inferences from mineralogy, geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-O isotopes of young hybrid volcanics of the Ischia island (South Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Massimo; Tonarini, Sonia; Arienzo, Ilenia; Civetta, Lucia; Dallai, Luigi; Moretti, Roberto; Orsi, Giovanni; Andria, Mariachiara; Trecalli, Alberto

    2013-06-01

    Ischia, one active volcano of the Phlegraean Volcanic District, prone to very high risk, is dominated by a caldera formed 55 ka BP, followed by resurgence of the collapsed area. Over the past 3 ka, the activity extruded evolved potassic magmas; only a few low-energy explosive events were fed by less evolved magmas. A geochemical and Sr-Nd-O isotope investigation has been performed on minerals and glass from products of three of such eruptions, Molara, Vateliero, and Cava Nocelle (Ischia volcanism in the past. Detailed study on the most mafic magma has permitted to investigate its origin. The mantle sector below Ischia underwent subduction processes that modified its pristine chemical, isotopic, and redox conditions by addition of ≤1 % of sediment fluids/melts. Similar processes occurred from Southeast to Northwest along the Apennine compressive margin, with addition of up to 2.5 % of sediment-derived material. This is shown by volcanics with poorly variable, typical δ18O mantle values, and 87Sr/86Sr progressively increasing toward typical continental crust values. Multiple partial melting of this modified mantle generated distinct primary magmas that occasionally assimilated continental crust, acquiring more 18O than 87Sr. At Ischia, 7 % of Hercynian granodiorite assimilation produced isotopically distinct, K-basaltic to latitic magmas. A SW-NE regional tectonic structure gave these magmas coming from large depth the opportunity to mingle/mix with felsic magmas stagnating in shallower reservoirs, eventually triggering explosive eruptions.

  11. Explosive Super-eruptions: Problems and Prejudices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, S.

    2010-12-01

    A super-eruption is defined as one with a magma yield > 10^15 kg (magnitude (M) 8). The term has mainly been applied to large-scale, caldera and ignimbrite-forming explosive eruptions, but it can be applied to all eruptions that released > 10^15 kg of magma. For effusive volcanism, evidence suggests that individual eruptions of this size ( > ~ 370 km^3 of typical basalt or > 450 km^3 of rhyolite flood lava) arise only during periods of LIP formation. The super-eruption concept raises interesting questions about genesis and storage of magmas that feed these vast events. Deposits of major explosive eruptions are Plinian fallout, ignimbrite sheets, and co-ignimbrite ash fall. Based on earlier suggestions and evidence, widespread outflow ignimbrite (O), co-ignimbrite ash (A), and inter-caldera ignimbrite (I) are all major components of the total super-eruption deposit and may tend towards being subequal. In super-eruption deposits, the reported volume of vent-derived Plinian eruption column fallout is often a minor component of the total volume, yet in several cases (Oruanui, Taupo, 26 ka ago, M 8.1; Bishop Tuff, 760 ka, M 8.2; Bandelier (Otowi) Tuff, 1.6 Ma, M8) it is now recognized that vent-derived columns persisted for most of the eruption. Thus, distally, the ash-fall derived from co-ignimbrite ash clouds may be mixed with contemporaneous fallout from a vertical column. Some major ignimbrites have no reported associated Plinian deposit; the huge Young Toba Tuff (YTT, 74 ka, M 8.8) is a significant example. However, the very widespread Toba ash-fall deposit constitutes ~ 40 % of the total mass of magma erupted and is presumed to be co-ignimbrite. Timing of the onset of column collapse probably controls whether a recognizable Plinian deposit is laid down. All super-eruptions probably produce extensive fallout deposits, and this is generally of vent-derived and pyroclastic-flow-derived origin. Establishing the relationships between large-scale ignimbrites and their

  12. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the

  13. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the

  14. Intracanyon basalt lavas of the Debed River (northern Armenia), part of a Pliocene-Pleistocene continental flood basalt province in the South Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Hetu; Meliksetian, Khachatur; Gevorgyan, Hripsime; Israyelyan, Arsen; Navasardyan, Gevorg

    2015-03-01

    Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene (~ 3.25-2.05 Ma), 200-400 m thick basalt lavas outcrop in the South Caucasus region, including the Kars-Erzurum Plateau (northeastern Turkey), the Javakheti Plateau (Georgia-Armenia), and the Lori Plateau (northern Armenia). These fissure-fed, rapidly erupted fluid lavas filled pre-existing river valleys over many tens of kilometres. The basalts exposed in the Debed River canyon, northern Armenia, are ~ 200 m thick and of three morphological types: (1) basal pillow basalts and hyaloclastites, overlain by (2) columnar-jointed pahoehoe sheet flows, in turn overlain by (3) slabby pahoehoe and rubbly pahoehoe flows. The lower and middle lavas show evidence for damming of river drainage, like many lavas of the Columbia River flood basalt province, Scotland, Ireland, and Iceland. There is also evidence for syn-volcanic faulting of the early lavas. Related basalts also outcrop in the Gegham Uplands and the Hrazdan River basin in Armenia. This 3.25-2.05 Ma South Caucasus basalt province, covering parts of Turkey, Georgia and Armenia, has an estimated areal extent of ~ 15,000 km2 and volume of ~ 2250 km3. Because its main geological features are remarkably like those of many continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces, we consider it a true, albeit small, CFB province. It is the smallest and youngest CFB in the world. An analogue closely similar in major features is the Late Miocene Altos de Jalisco CFB province in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Both provinces formed during lithospheric pull-apart and transtensional faulting. Their broader significance is in showing flood basalt size distribution to be a continuum without natural breaks, with implications for geodynamic models.

  15. Explosive demolition of activated concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the removal of a radiologically contaminated concrete pad. This pad was removed during 1979 by operating personnel under the direction of the Waste Management Program of EG and G Idaho, Inc. The concrete pad was the foundation for the Organic Moderated Reactor Experiment (OMRE) reactor vessel located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The pad consisted of a cylindrical concrete slab 15 ft in diameter, 2 ft thick, and reinforced with steel bar. It was poured directly onto basalt rocks approximately 20 ft below grade. The entire pad contained induced radioactivity and was therefore demolished, boxed, and buried rather than being decontaminated. The pad was demolished by explosive blasting

  16. 准噶尔盆地春晖油田石炭系火山岩储层控制因素分析%Controlling factors of the Carboniferous volcanic reservoirs in the Chunhui Oil Field, Junggar Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董臣强

    2014-01-01

    春晖油田石炭系火山岩地层中,油气富集程度与储层发育程度呈正相关关系。研究认为,储层的发育与分布主要受岩相、岩性和构造运动的控制。岩相控制岩性,岩性控制储集空间组合类型,溢流相和火山沉积相围绕爆发相具有环带状分布特点,从火山角砾岩→玄武岩、安山岩→凝灰岩,储集性能逐渐变差;构造运动则控制裂缝的发育及溶蚀作用,断层周边微裂缝发育,沿着微裂缝则溶蚀作用增强,次生孔隙发育。%The Chunhui Oil Field in the Junggar Basin lies in the western part of the Halaalate Mountain tectonic zone, in which the Carboniferous volcanic strata consist dominantly of the volcanic rocks such as tuff, andesite, basalt and volcanic breccias. There is a positive correlation between the hydrocarbon enrichment and reservoir development in the Carboniferous volcanic reservoir rocks from the Chunhui Oil Field. The distribution and development of the volcanic reservoir rocks are primarily controlled by lithofacies, lithology and tectonism. On the whole, the lithofacies may exercise a major control on lithology of the volcanic reservoir rocks, which, in turn, may control the reservoir spaces types. The volcanic rocks in the Chunhui Oil Field exhibit a trend of the girdle pattern of lithofacies changes from the explosive facies through the effusive facies to the volcano-sedimentary facies. The reservoir capacity is gradually getting poor and poor from volcanic breccias to basalt and andesite and finally to tuff. The tectonism is also believed to be a major control on the fissure development and dissolution. The structural stress may give rise to the formation of the cracks or fissures in the brittle rocks, which may greatly improve the reservoir spaces of the Carboniferous volcanic reservoir rocks in the study area.

  17. Magma decompression rates during explosive eruptions of Kīlauea volcano, Hawaii, recorded by melt embayments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, David J.; Gonnermann, Helge M.; Ruprecht, Philipp; Plank, Terry; Hauri, Erik H.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Swanson, Donald A.

    2016-10-01

    The decompression rate of magma as it ascends during volcanic eruptions is an important but poorly constrained parameter that controls many of the processes that influence eruptive behavior. In this study, we quantify decompression rates for basaltic magmas using volatile diffusion in olivine-hosted melt tubes (embayments) for three contrasting eruptions of Kīlauea volcano, Hawaii. Incomplete exsolution of H2O, CO2, and S from the embayment melts during eruptive ascent creates diffusion profiles that can be measured using microanalytical techniques, and then modeled to infer the average decompression rate. We obtain average rates of ~0.05-0.45 MPa s-1 for eruptions ranging from Hawaiian style fountains to basaltic subplinian, with the more intense eruptions having higher rates. The ascent timescales for these magmas vary from around ~5 to ~36 min from depths of ~2 to ~4 km, respectively. Decompression-exsolution models based on the embayment data also allow for an estimate of the mass fraction of pre-existing exsolved volatiles within the magma body. In the eruptions studied, this varies from 0.1 to 3.2 wt% but does not appear to be the key control on eruptive intensity. Our results do not support a direct link between the concentration of pre-eruptive volatiles and eruptive intensity; rather, they suggest that for these eruptions, decompression rates are proportional to independent estimates of mass discharge rate. Although the intensity of eruptions is defined by the discharge rate, based on the currently available dataset of embayment analyses, it does not appear to scale linearly with average decompression rate. This study demonstrates the utility of the embayment method for providing quantitative constraints on magma ascent during explosive basaltic eruptions.

  18. Seismic signature of a phreatic explosion: hydrofracturing damage at Karthala volcano, Grande Comore Island, Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Cécile; Grasso, Jean-Robert; Bachelery, Patrick

    2005-09-01

    Karthala volcano is a basaltic shield volcano with an active hydrothermal system that forms the southern two-thirds of the Grande Comore Island, off the east coat of Africa, northwest of Madagascar. Since the start of volcano monitoring by the local volcano observatory in 1988, the July 11th, 1991 phreatic eruption was the first volcanic event seismically recorded on this volcano, and a rare example of a monitored basaltic shield. From 1991 to 1995 the VT locations, 0.5explosion, are due to the activation of the whole hydrothermal system, as roughly sized by the distribution of VT hypocenters. The seismicity rate in 1995 was still higher than the pre-eruption seismicity rate, and disagrees with the time pattern of thermo-elastic stress readjustment induced by single magma intrusions at basaltic volcanoes. We propose that it corresponds to the still ongoing relaxation of pressure heterogeneity within the hydrothermal system as suggested by the few LP events that still occurred in 1995.

  19. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition.

  20. Seismic wave propagation through surface basalts - implications for coal seismic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weijia; Zhou, Binzhong; Hatherly, Peter; Fu, Li-Yun

    2010-02-01

    Seismic reflection surveying is one of the most widely used and effective techniques for coal seam structure delineation and risk mitigation for underground longwall mining. However, the ability of the method can be compromised by the presence of volcanic cover. This problem arises within parts of the Bowen and Sydney Basins of Australia and seismic surveying can be unsuccessful. As a consequence, such areas are less attractive for coal mining. Techniques to improve the success of seismic surveying over basalt flows are needed. In this paper, we use elastic wave-equation-based forward modelling techniques to investigate the effects and characteristics of seismic wave propagation under different settings involving changes in basalt properties, its thickness, lateral extent, relative position to the shot position and various forms of inhomogeneity. The modelling results suggests that: 1) basalts with high impedance contrasts and multiple flows generate strong multiples and weak reflectors; 2) thin basalts have less effect than thick basalts; 3) partial basalt cover has less effect than full basalt cover; 4) low frequency seismic waves (especially at large offsets) have better penetration through the basalt than high frequency waves; and 5) the deeper the coal seams are below basalts of limited extent, the less influence the basalts will have on the wave propagation. In addition to providing insights into the issues that arise when seismic surveying under basalts, these observations suggest that careful management of seismic noise and the acquisition of long-offset seismic data with low-frequency geophones have the potential to improve the seismic results.

  1. Morphology and dynamics of explosive vents through cohesive rock formations

    OpenAIRE

    O. Galland; G. R. Gisler; Øystein Thorden Haug

    2014-01-01

    Shallow explosive volcanic processes, such as kimberlite volcanism and phreatomagmatic and phreatic activity, produce volcanic vents exhibiting a wide variety of morphologies, including vertical pipes and V-shaped vents. In this study we report on experimental and numerical models designed to capture a range of vent morphologies in an eruptive system. Using dimensional analysis, we identified key governing dimensionless parameters, in particular the gravitational stress-to-fluid pressure rati...

  2. Assessing the volcanic styles of the North Atlantic Igneous Province and their potential implications for the PETM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerram, Dougal; Reynolds, Peter; Jones, Morgan; Svensen, Henrik; Planke, Sverre; Millett, John; Galland, Olivier; Angkasa, Syahreza; Schofield, Nick; Howell, John

    2016-04-01

    In order to understand the role that large igneous provinces play in changing climatic conditions, it is important to constrain the different styles of volcanism and their volumes, both temporally and spatially. Regional variations in palaeo-environment as well as different volcanic materials (basic-acidic) can all have effects on the eruption styles, and determine whether eruptions effectively release gases into the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) covers a vast area as well as a significant time span, having formed at 60-55 Ma. Importantly, its' formation is implicated in the climatic perturbations at the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The products of volcanism in the NAIP range from lava flows and hyaloclastites to more explosive tephra forming eruptions from both basaltic and more evolved eruptions. The explosive end member styles of both mafic and felsic volcanism also produce ash beds in the rock record at key times. Hydrothermal vent structures which are predominantly related with the emplacement of large (>1000 km3) intrusions into the subvolcanic basins in the NAIP are another style of eruption, where climate-forcing gases can be transferred into the atmosphere and hydrosphere. In this case, the types and volumes of gas produced by intrusions is heavily dependent on the host-rock sediment properties that they intrude through. The distribution of vent structures can be shown to be widespread on both the Norwegian and the Greenland margins of the NAIP. In this overview we assess the main eruption styles, deposits and their distribution within the NAIP using mapped examples from offshore seismic data as well as outcrop analogues, highlighting the variability of these structures and their deposits. As the availability of 3D data from offshore and onshore increases, the full nature of the volcanic stratigraphy from the subvolcanic intrusive complexes, through the main eruption cycles into the piercing vent

  3. Volcanic terrain and the possible periglacial formation of "excess ice" at the mid-latitudes of Utopia Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soare, R. J.; Horgan, B.; Conway, S. J.; Souness, C.; El-Maarry, M. R.

    2015-08-01

    At the mid-latitudes of Utopia Planitia (UP), Mars, a suite of spatially-associated landforms exhibit geomorphological traits that, on Earth, would be consistent with periglacial processes and the possible freeze-thaw cycling of water. The suite comprises small-sized polygonally-patterned ground, polygon-junction and -margin pits, and scalloped, rimless depressions. Typically, the landforms incise a dark-toned terrain that is thought to be ice-rich. Here, we investigate the dark-toned terrain by using high resolution images from the HiRISE as well as near-infrared spectral-data from the OMEGA and CRISM. The terrain displays erosional characteristics consistent with a sedimentary nature and near-infrared spectra characterised by a blue slope similar to that of weathered basaltic-tephra. We also describe volcanic terrain that is dark-toned and periglacially-modified in the Kamchatka mountain-range of eastern Russia. The terrain is characterised by weathered tephra inter-bedded with snow, ice-wedge polygons and near-surface excess ice. The excess ice forms in the pore space of the tephra as the result of snow-melt infiltration and, subsequently, in-situ freezing. Based on this possible analogue, we construct a three-stage mechanism that explains the possible ice-enrichment of a broad expanse of dark-toned terrain at the mid-latitudes of UP: (1) the dark-toned terrain accumulates and forms via the regional deposition of sediments sourced from explosive volcanism; (2) the volcanic sediments are blanketed by atmospherically-precipitated (H2O) snow, ice or an admixture of the two, either concurrent with the volcanic-events or between discrete events; and, (3) under the influence of high obliquity or explosive volcanism, boundary conditions tolerant of thaw evolve and this, in turn, permits the migration, cycling and eventual formation of excess ice in the volcanic sediments. Over time, and through episodic iterations of this scenario, excess ice forms to decametres of

  4. Volcanic Rocks As Targets For Astrobiology Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, N.

    2010-12-01

    Almost two decades of study highlight the importance of terrestrial subaqueous volcanic rocks as microbial habitats, particularly in glass produced by the quenching of basaltic lava upon contact with water. On Earth, microbes rapidly begin colonizing glassy surfaces along fractures and cracks exposed to water. Microbial colonization of basaltic glass leads to enhanced alteration through production of characteristic granular and/or tubular bioalteration textures. Infilling of formerly hollow alteration textures by minerals enable their preservation through geologic time. Basaltic rocks are a major component of the Martian crust and are widespread on other solar system bodies. A variety of lines of evidence strongly suggest the long-term existence of abundant liquid water on ancient Mars. Recent orbiter, lander and rover missions have found evidence for the presence of transient liquid water on Mars, perhaps persisting to the present day. Many other solar system bodies, notably Europa, Enceladus and other icy satellites, may contain (or have once hosted) subaqueous basaltic glasses. The record of terrestrial glass bioalteration has been interpreted to extend back ~3.5 billion years and is widespread in modern oceanic crust and its ancient metamorphic equivalents. The terrestrial record of glass bioalteration strongly suggests that glassy or formerly glassy basaltic rocks on extraterrestrial bodies that have interacted with liquid water are high-value targets for astrobiological exploration.

  5. Recognizing subtle evidence for silicic magma derivation from petrochemically-similar arc crust: Isotopic and chemical evidence for the bimodal volcanic series of Gorely Volcanic Center, Kamchatka, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.; Ellis, B. S.; Ponomareva, V.; Leonov, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Kamchatka Peninsula is home to some of the most prolific subduction related volcanic activity in the world. Gorely caldera and its central volcano are located in the rear of its currently active Eastern Volcanic Front. Recent work determined the presence of explosive ignimbrite eruptions sourced from Gorely volcano during the Pleistocene. We studied 32 eruptive units, including tephrochronologically-dated Holocene tephra, stratigraphically-arranged ignimbrites, as well as pre- and post-caldera lavas. We analyzed oxygen isotope ratios of pyroxene and plagioclase grains by laser fluorination, and major and trace element compositions of whole rocks. In addition, we determined 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios of caldera-forming ignimbrite eruptions. Chemical compositions show that Gorely eruptive units range from basalt to basaltic andesite in the "Pra-Gorely" stages prior to caldera formation and the modern Gorely stages forming its current edifice. In contrast, eruptive material from earlier ignimbrites exposed at Opasny Ravine consists primarily of dacite. Whole rock analyses for Gorely indicate that silicic rocks and ignimbrites volumetrically dominate all other products, forming separate bimodal peaks in our SiO2-frequency diagram. In addition, trace element concentrations and ratios define two trends, one for more silicic and another for more mafic material. δ18Omelt values range from a low of 4.85 up to 6.22‰, where the lowest value was found in the last caldera forming eruption, suggesting incorporation of hydrothermally-altered material from earlier eruptions. 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios range from 0.70328 to 0.70351 and from 0.51303 to 0.51309 respectively, with higher and more diverse values being characteristic of earlier ignimbrite units; again suggesting incorporation of surrounding crustal material. In contrast to these results, MELTS modeling using a variety of likely primitive basalts from Gorely shows it is possible to obtain silicic

  6. The Role of Volcanic Activity in Climate and Global Change

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2015-09-23

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are magnificent events that in many ways affect the Earth\\'s natural processes and climate. They cause sporadic perturbations of the planet\\'s energy balance, activating complex climate feedbacks and providing unique opportunities to better quantify those processes. We know that explosive eruptions cause cooling in the atmosphere for a few years, but we have just recently realized that volcanic signals can be seen in the subsurface ocean for decades. The volcanic forcing of the previous two centuries offsets the ocean heat uptake and diminishes global warming by about 30%. The explosive volcanism of the twenty-first century is unlikely to either cause any significant climate signal or to delay the pace of global warming. The recent interest in dynamic, microphysical, chemical, and climate impacts of volcanic eruptions is also excited by the fact that these impacts provide a natural analogue for climate geoengineering schemes involving deliberate development of an artificial aerosol layer in the lower stratosphere to counteract global warming. In this chapter we aim to discuss these recently discovered volcanic effects and specifically pay attention to how we can learn about the hidden Earth-system mechanisms activated by explosive volcanic eruptions. To demonstrate these effects we use our own model results when possible along with available observations, as well as review closely related recent publications.

  7. MISR Observations of Etna Volcanic Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, S.; Kahn, R. A.; Nelson, D. L.; Coltelli, M.; Diner, D. J.; Garay, M. J.; Realmuto, V. J.

    2012-01-01

    In the last twelve years, Mt. Etna, located in eastern Sicily, has produced a great number of explosive eruptions. Volcanic plumes have risen to several km above sea level and created problems for aviation and the communities living near the volcano. A reduction of hazards may be accomplished using remote sensing techniques to evaluate important features of volcanic plumes. Since 2000, the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on board NASA s Terra spacecraft has been extensively used to study aerosol dispersal and to extract the three-dimensional structure of plumes coming from anthropogenic or natural sources, including volcanoes. In the present work, MISR data from several explosive events occurring at Etna are analyzed using a program named MINX (MISR INteractive eXplorer). MINX uses stereo matching techniques to evaluate the height of the volcanic aerosol with a precision of a few hundred meters, and extracts aerosol properties from the MISR Standard products. We analyzed twenty volcanic plumes produced during the 2000, 2001, 2002-03, 2006 and 2008 Etna eruptions, finding that volcanic aerosol dispersal and column height obtained by this analysis is in good agreement with ground-based observations. MISR aerosol type retrievals: (1) clearly distinguish volcanic plumes that are sulphate and/or water vapor dominated from ash-dominated ones; (2) detect even low concentrations of volcanic ash in the atmosphere; (3) demonstrate that sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes consist of smaller-sized particles compared to ash plumes. This work highlights the potential of MISR to detect important volcanic plume characteristics that can be used to constrain the eruption source parameters in volcanic ash dispersion models. Further, the possibility of discriminating sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes from ash-dominated ones is important to better understand the atmospheric impact of these plumes.

  8. Uranium Series Chronology of the Late Pleistocene Basalt from the Longgang Volcanoes, Jilin Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Fusheng; HAN Song; MA Zhibang; XIE Ruijie

    2005-01-01

    The Longgang volcanic cluster located in Jilin Province belongs to one of the active volcanic regions in northeast China, and has been active in modem times. In view of the multiple eruptions in history, it is very important to determine the age of each eruption for evaluating the volcanic hazards. Two alkaline basalt samples taken from Dayizishan and Diaoshuihu were analyzed with the U-series component dating after magnetic separation. The ages of the two samples are (71±9) ka and (106±13) ka B.P., respectively. These data indicate that there existed intensive eruption activities during the late Pleistocene.

  9. Hot Spot Induced Cenozoic Volcanism in the Upper Rajang Valley, Sarawak - Is Borneo Rifting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taib, N.

    2010-12-01

    The Upper Rajang Valley covers a large area in the northern interior of the island of Borneo, in the Malaysian state of Sarawak . It is underlain by the Cretaceous to Late Eocene deep to shallow marine sediments of the Rajang Group. Within this area are several Cenozoic volcanic edifices, which to date have been sparsely studied. Two distinct episodes of volcanism are recognized - the first, dated early Eocene, consists of K-rich basalts, and is represented by the Bukit Mersing volcanics, which were erupted conformably onto deep water turbidites of the Rajang Group. The second, far more extensive, is dated Pliocene to Quaternary, and is bimodal, consisting mainly of early dacite and rhyodacite tuffs, with a smaller amount of later basalt, forming several volcanic plateaus and massifs (Hose Mountains, Usun Apau, Linau-Balui, Nieuwenhuis Mountains and others). They lie unconformably over pre-Miocene sediments, the Linau-Balui basalts having been erupted onto Quaternary river terraces. Mantle-normalized REE and incompatible trace element spider plots reveal that the Bukit Mersing basalts have geochemical affinity with Oceanic Island Basalts (OIB) and rift basalts, being enriched in LREEs and Most Incompatible Elements, and no Eu anomaly. Preliminary trace element data for several basalt samples from Usun Apau also show Oceanic Island/Rift affinity. Bimodal volcanism is most often associated with rift environments. Efforts are being made to radiometrically date the volcanics, in part to determine the possibility of future eruptions. The Upper Rajang Valley is remote, covered in tropical rainforest and is very sparsely populated. At this time, there is no information concerning signs of imminent volcanism, such as hot springs and microseismicity.

  10. Explosive laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent relates to a laser system wherein reaction products from the detonation of a condensed explosive expand to form a gaseous medium with low translational temperature but high vibration population. Thermal pumping of the upper laser level and de-excitation of the lower laser level occur during the expansion, resulting in a population inversion. The expansion may be free or through a nozzle as in a gas-dynamic configuration. In one preferred embodiment, the explosive is such that its reaction products are CO2 and other species that are beneficial or at least benign to CO2 lasing

  11. A first Event-tree for the Bárðarbunga volcanic system (Iceland): from the volcanic crisis in 2014 towards a tool for hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Sara; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnús; Jónsdottir, Kristín; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Larsen, Gudrun; Oddsson, Björn

    2015-04-01

    Bárdarbunga volcano is part of a large volcanic system that had its last confirmed eruption before the present unrest in 1910. This system is partially covered by ice within the Vatnajökull glacier and it extends further to the NNE as well as to SW. Based on historical data, its eruptive activity has been predominantly characterized by explosive eruptions, originating beneath the glacier, and important effusive eruptions in the ice-free part of the system itself. The largest explosive eruptions took place on the southern side of the fissure system in AD 1477 producing about 10 km3 of tephra. Due to the extension and location of this volcanic system, the range of potential eruptive scenarios and associated hazards is quite wide. Indeed, it includes: inundation, due to glacial outburst; tephra fallout, due to ash-rich plume generated by magma-water interaction; abundant volcanic gas release; and lava flows. Most importantly these phenomena are not mutually exclusive and might happen simultaneously, creating the premise for a wide spatial and temporal impact. During the ongoing volcanic crisis at Bárdarbunga, which started on 16 August, 2014, the Icelandic Meteorological Office, together with the University of Iceland and Icelandic Civil Protection started a common effort of drawing, day-by-day, the potential evolution of the ongoing rifting event and, based on the newest data from the monitoring networks, updated and more refined scenarios have been identified. Indeed, this volcanic crisis created the occasion for pushing forward the creation of the first Event-tree for the Bárðarbunga volcanic system. We adopted the approach suggested by Newhall and Pallister (2014) and a preliminary ET made of nine nodes has been constructed. After the two initial nodes (restless and genesis) the ET continues with the identification of the location of aperture of future eruptive vents. Due to the complex structure of the system and historical eruptions, this third node

  12. Eruption and emplacement of flood basalt. An example from the large-volume Teepee Butte Member, Columbia River Basalt Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidel, S.P. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (United States)); Tolan, T.L. (Portland State Univ., OR (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Flows of the Teepee Butte Member, Grande Ronde Basalt, issued from a vent system in southeastern Washington, northeastern Oregon, and western Idaho. Three distinct basalt flows were erupted: the Limekiln Rapids flow, the Joseph Creek flow, and the Pruitt Draw flow. Together these mappable flows cover more than 52,000 km[sup 2] and have a volume exceeding 5,000 km[sup 3]. A portion of the vent system for the Joseph Creek flow is exposed in cross section in Joseph Canyon, Washington; it is one of the best preserved Columbia River Basalt Group vent complexes known. The vent complex is about 1 km in cross section, 30 m high, and composed of deposits characteristic of Hawaiian-type volcanism. The vent is asymmetrical; the eastern rampart consists of intercalated pyroclastic deposits and thin pahoehoe flows; the western rampart is composed wholly of pahoehoe flows. Flows of the Teepee Butte Member are compositionally homogeneous and were emplaced as sheet flows, each having several local flow units. Our study supports the importance of linear vent systems and the westward Palouse Slope, along with the large-volume lava flows, in controlling the distribution of Columbia River Basalt Group flows. Other factors, including the number of active fissure segments and topography, modified the shape of the flows and the number of flow units. 45 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Lunar volcanism in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J. W., III

    1976-01-01

    The role of lunar volcanism in the history of the moon is documented using lunar-orbit and earth-based data along with characterizations derived from Apollo and Luna sample-return missions. Characteristics of mare and highland volcanic features are described, Apollo and Luna results are discussed, and the characteristics of other mare deposits and of other highland features of possible volcanic origin are summarized. Major conclusions are that: (1) there is little unequivocal morphologic evidence for highland volcanism, (2) lunar mare lavas appear to have originated from depths of 100 to 500 km, (3) impact melting does not appear to have been a factor in the generation of mare lavas, (4) mare volcanism was characterized by massive outpourings of very fluid volatile-poor lava analogous to terrestrial flood basalts, (5) mare volcanism took place from 3.83 to about 2.5 billion years ago, (6) the preferential occurrence of mare deposits in large impact basins appears to be generically unrelated to basin formation, and (7) a thicker farside crust may be responsible for the distinctive nearside-farside asymmetry of mare deposits.

  14. Impact of volcanism on the evolution of Lake Van (eastern Anatolia) III: Periodic (Nemrut) vs. episodic (Süphan) explosive eruptions and climate forcing reflected in a tephra gap between ca. 14 ka and ca. 30 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich; Sumita, Mari

    2014-09-01

    Fifteen Lateglacial to Holocene rhyolitic, dominantly primary tephra layers piston-cored and drilled (ICDP Paleovan drilling project) in western Lake Van (eastern Anatolia, Turkey) were precisely correlated to either of the two adjacent and active large volcanoes Nemrut and Süphan based on shard textures, mineralogy and mineral and glass compositions. The young peralkaline (comenditic to pantelleritic) primary rhyolitic Nemrut tephras are characterized by anorthoclase, hedenbergitic to augitic clinopyroxene, fayalitic olivine, minor quartz, and rare accessory chevkinite and zircon. Phenocrysts in subalkaline primary rhyolitic Süphan tephras are chiefly oligoclase-labradorite, with minor K-rich sanidine in some, biotite, amphibole, hypersthene, rare augitic clinopyroxene, relatively common allanite and rare zircon. Two contrasting explosive eruptive modes are distinguished from each other: episodic (Süphan) and periodic (Nemrut). The Lateglacial Süphan tephra swarm covers a short time interval of ca. 338 years between ca. 13,078 vy BP and 12,740 vy BP, eruptions having occurred statistically every ca. 42 years with especially short intervals between V-11 (reworked) and V-14. Causes for the strongly episodic Süphan explosive behavior might include seismic triggering of a volcano-magma system unable to erupt explosively without the benefit of external triggering, as reflected in pervasive faulting preceding the Süphan tephra swarm. Seismic triggering may have caused the rise of more mafic ("trachyandesitic") parent magma, heating near-surface pockets of highly evolved magma - that might have formed silicic domes during this stage of volcano evolution - resulting in ascent and finally explosive fragmentation of magma essentially by external factors, probably significantly enhanced by magma-water/ice interaction. Explosive eruptions of the Nemrut volcano system, interpreted to be underlain by a large fractionating magma reservoir, follow a more periodic mode of (a

  15. Intrusion triggering of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull explosive eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Hooper, Andrew; Arnadóttir, Thóra; Pedersen, Rikke; Roberts, Matthew J; Oskarsson, Níels; Auriac, Amandine; Decriem, Judicael; Einarsson, Páll; Geirsson, Halldór; Hensch, Martin; Ofeigsson, Benedikt G; Sturkell, Erik; Sveinbjörnsson, Hjörleifur; Feigl, Kurt L

    2010-11-18

    Gradual inflation of magma chambers often precedes eruptions at highly active volcanoes. During such eruptions, rapid deflation occurs as magma flows out and pressure is reduced. Less is known about the deformation style at moderately active volcanoes, such as Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, where an explosive summit eruption of trachyandesite beginning on 14 April 2010 caused exceptional disruption to air traffic, closing airspace over much of Europe for days. This eruption was preceded by an effusive flank eruption of basalt from 20 March to 12 April 2010. The 2010 eruptions are the culmination of 18 years of intermittent volcanic unrest. Here we show that deformation associated with the eruptions was unusual because it did not relate to pressure changes within a single magma chamber. Deformation was rapid before the first eruption (>5 mm per day after 4 March), but negligible during it. Lack of distinct co-eruptive deflation indicates that the net volume of magma drained from shallow depth during this eruption was small; rather, magma flowed from considerable depth. Before the eruption, a ∼0.05 km(3) magmatic intrusion grew over a period of three months, in a temporally and spatially complex manner, as revealed by GPS (Global Positioning System) geodetic measurements and interferometric analysis of satellite radar images. The second eruption occurred within the ice-capped caldera of the volcano, with explosivity amplified by magma-ice interaction. Gradual contraction of a source, distinct from the pre-eruptive inflation sources, is evident from geodetic data. Eyjafjallajökull's behaviour can be attributed to its off-rift setting with a 'cold' subsurface structure and limited magma at shallow depth, as may be typical for moderately active volcanoes. Clear signs of volcanic unrest signals over years to weeks may indicate reawakening of such volcanoes, whereas immediate short-term eruption precursors may be subtle and difficult to detect. PMID:21085177

  16. Hanford basalt flow mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineralogy of the core samples from five core wells was examined in some detail. The primary mineralogy study included an optical examination of polished mounts, photomicrographs, chemical analyses of feldspars, pyroxenes, metallic oxides and microcrystalline groundmasses and determination from the chemical analyses of the varieties of feldspars, pyroxenes and metallic oxides. From the primary mineralogy data, a firm understanding of the average Hanford basalt flow primary mineralogy emerged. The average primary feldspar was a laboradorite, the average pyroxene was an augite and the average metallic oxide was a solid solution of ilmenite and magnetite. Secondary mineralization consisted of vug filling and joint coating, chiefly with a nontronite-beidellite clay, several zeolites, quartz, calcite, and opal. Specific flow units also were examined to determine the possibility of using the mineralogy to trace flows between core wells. These included units of the Pomona, the Umatilla and a high chromium flow just below the Huntzinger. In the Umatilla, or high barium flow, the compositional variation of the feldspars was unique in range. The pyroxenes in the Pomona were relatively highly zoned and accumulated chromium. The high chromium flow contained chromium spinels that graded in chromium content into simple magnetites very low in chromium content. A study of the statistical relationships of flow unit chemical constituents showed that flow unit constituents could be roughly correlated between wells. The probable cause of the correlation was on-going physical-chemical changes in the source magma

  17. Explosive complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, My Hang V.

    2009-09-22

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula [M.sup.II(A).sub.R(B.sup.X).sub.S](C.sup.Y).sub.T, where A is 1,5-diaminotetrazole, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  18. Niche explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normark, Benjamin B; Johnson, Norman A

    2011-05-01

    The following syndrome of features occurs in several groups of phytophagous insects: (1) wingless females, (2) dispersal by larvae, (3) woody hosts, (4) extreme polyphagy, (5) high abundance, resulting in status as economic pests, (6) invasiveness, and (7) obligate parthenogenesis in some populations. If extreme polyphagy is defined as feeding on 20 or more families of hostplants, this syndrome is found convergently in several species of bagworm moths, tussock moths, root weevils, and 5 families of scale insects. We hypothesize that extreme polyphagy in these taxa results from "niche explosion", a positive feedback loop connecting large population size to broad host range. The niche explosion has a demographic component (sometimes called the "amplification effect" in studies of pathogens) as well as a population-genetic component, due mainly to the increased effectiveness of natural selection in larger populations. The frequent origins of parthenogenesis in extreme polyphages are, in our interpretation, a consequence of this increased effectiveness of natural selection and consequent reduced importance of sexuality. The niche explosion hypothesis makes detailed predictions about the comparative genomics and population genetics of extreme polyphages and related specialists. It has a number of potentially important implications, including an explanation for the lack of observed trade-offs between generalists and specialists, a re-interpretation of the ecological correlates of parthenogenesis, and a general expectation that Malthusian population explosions may be amplified by Darwinian effects.

  19. Characteristics of mix crystal xenolith from basaltic(shoshonitic) volcanic breccia at Maguan Area, Yunnan Province, and their geological significance%云南马关碧(钾)玄质火山角砾岩中矿物混晶包体特征及其地质意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄玉蓬; 刘显凡; 李春辉; 卢秋霞; 陶专; 赵甫峰; 董毅; 邹金汐; 易立文

    2013-01-01

    在云南马关碧(钾)玄质火山角砾岩中发现了一类特殊包体,呈红色与黑色两种.经X射线粉晶衍射鉴定,红色者为以锰铝榴石为主要结晶相的隐晶-非晶质混晶,黑色者为以绿辉石为主要结晶相的隐晶-非晶质混晶.两种矿物混晶包体在一定程度上类似于熔浆玻璃或熔体囊,它们具有同源演化的相似地球化学特征.文中通过对两种矿物混晶包体的显微特征与地球化学分析研究表明,它们是亏损地幔部分熔融的产物,并作为一种不混溶熔体成分被碱性玄武岩浆携带、运移上升.它们代表了石榴石相(榴辉岩相)地幔源区组分,暗示新生代时期软流圈上涌除释放小体积交代熔体交代上地幔使其富集之外,还造成岩石圈地幔拆沉,尖晶石相地幔组分向石榴石相地幔组分转变.另外,据两种混晶包体与其他类型包体和寄主岩岩浆的不同来源,推测马关地区深部岩石圈地幔经交代作用发生过两次转换.首先是由原始地幔向亏损地幔转化,并发生部分熔融,其后是由亏损地幔转化为富集地幔,形成富碱岩浆和与其互不混溶的进一步富集成矿元素的地幔流体.由此暗示滇西地区与富碱斑岩有关的多金属成矿作用即受制于这一深部地质过程与壳幔混染机制.%A special kind of xenolith has been discovered from the basaltic (shoshonitic) volcanic breccia at Maguan area. Yunnan Province. There are two kinds of xenoliths: one is red and the other is black in color. It can be identified by X-ray crystal powder diffraction that the red one is a mixed crystal of aphanites-amorphous material, the major potential component of which is spessartine. while the black one is a mixed crystal of aphanites-amorphous material, major potential component of which is omphacite. To some extent the two kind of mixed crystals are similar to melting glass or melt pockets. It shows that they have the similar geochemical

  20. Aeromagnetic Expression of Buried Basaltic Volcanoes Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, D. W.; Mankinen, E.A.; Blakely, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Ponce, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey has defined a number of small dipolar anomalies indicating the presence of magnetic bodies buried beneath the surface of Crater Flat and the Amargosa Desert. Results of potential-field modeling indicate that isolated, small-volume, highly magnetic bodies embedded within the alluvial deposits of both areas produce the anomalies. Their physical characteristics and the fact that they tend to be aligned along major structural trends provide strong support for the hypothesis that the anomalies reflect buried basaltic volcanic centers. Other, similar anomalies are identified as possible targets for further investigation. High-resolution gravity and ground-magnetic surveys, perhaps along with drilling sources of selected anomalies and radiometric age determinations, can provide valuable constraints in estimating potential volcanic hazard to the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

  1. Mapping and compositional analysis of mare basalts in the Aristarchus region of the Moon using Clementine data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of accurately defining and outlining mare basalt units is necessary for constraining the stratigraphy and ages of basalt units, which are used to determine the duration and the flux of lunar volcanism. We use a combination of Clementine's five-band ultraviolet/visible data and TiO2 and FeO abundance distribution maps to define homogenous mare basalt units and characterize their compositional variations (with maturity) in the Aristarchus region. With 20 groups of distinct mare basaltic soils identified using the method in this paper, six additional spectrally defined areas and five basaltic units are constructed, and their mineralogic quantization values provide new constraints on their temporal and spatial evolution. Our results indicate that the Aristarchus region has diverse basalt units and a complex history of volcanic evolution. We also demonstrate that the techniques, from which spectrally distinct mare basalts can be mapped, performed well in this study and can be confidently expanded to other mare regions of the Moon. (research papers)

  2. Role of volcanism in climate and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelrod, D.I.

    1981-01-01

    Several major episodes of Tertiary explosive volcanism coincided with sharply lowered temperature as inferred from oxygen-isotope composition of foraminiferal tests in deep-sea cores. At these times, fossil floras in the western interior recorded significant changes. Reductions in taxa that required warmth occurred early in the Paleogene. Later, taxa that demand ample summer rain were reduced during a progressive change reflecting growth of the subtropic high. Other ecosystem changes that appear to have responded to volcanically induced climatic modifications include tachytely in Equidae (12 to 10 m.y. B.P.), rapid evolution of grasses (7 to 5 m.y. B.P.), evolution of marine mammals, and plankton flucuations. Although Lake Cretaceous extinctions commenced as epeiric seas retreated, the pulses of sharply lowered temperature induced by explosive volcanism, together with widespread falls of volcanic ash, may have led to extinction of dinosaurs, ammonites, cycadeoids, and other Cretaceous taxa. earlier, as Pangaea was assembled, Permian extinctions resulted not only from the elimination of oceans, epeiric seas, and shorelines, and the spread of more-continental climates, bu also from the climatic effects of major pulses of global volcanism and Gondwana glaciation.

  3. Catastrophic volcanism as a cause of shocked features found at the K/T boundary and in cryptoexplosion structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loper, D. E.; Mccartney, K.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of quartz grains containing shock lamellae at the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary is viewed by many as the single most compelling evidence of meteoritic or cometary impact because there is no known endogenous mechanism for producing these features. Similarly the presence of shocked quartz, shatter cones, coesite and stishovite at cryptoexplosion structures is comonly taken as conclusive evidence of impact. However, several recent studies have cast doubt on this interpretation. It is argued that basaltic volcanism, although not normally explosive, can under exceptional circumstances produce overpressures sufficiently high to produce shock features. The exceptional circumstances include a high content of volatiles, usually CO2, and no preestablished pathway to the surface. Rapid cooling of the saturated basaltic magma can occur if it underlies a cooler more evolved magma in a chamber. Initial slow cooling and partial exsolution of the volatiles will cause the density of the basaltic magma to become less than that of the overlying magma, leading to overturning and mixing. Gas will escape the magma chamber along planar cracks once the pressure becomes sufficiently high. In the vicinity of the crack tip there is a smallscale deviatoric stress pattern which is thought to be sufficiently high to produce transient cracks along secondary axes in the quartz crystals, causing the planar features. The CO2-rich fluid inclusions which have been found along planar elements of quartz in basement rocks of the Vredefort Dome were likely to have been emplaced by such a process. If the mechanism described is capable of producing shocked features as above, it would require a reassessment of the origin of many cryptoexplosion structures as well as seriously weakening the case for an impact origin of the K/T event.

  4. Age and Geochemical Features of Dredged Basalts from Offshore SW Taiwan: The Coincidence of Intra-Plate Magmatism with the Spreading South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Lung Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports age and geochemical analyses of basaltic rocks dredged from volcanic seamounts offshore SW Taiwan. 40Ar/39Ar dating results of these rocks show them to be of the early Miocene age of ~22 - 21 Ma. They are evolved alkali basalts that show OIB-type geochemical features similar to post-spreading seamount basalts (14 - 3.5 Ma in the South China Sea (SCS and Miocene intraplate basalts on the Penghu Islands (16 - 8 Ma and NW Taiwan (23 - 9 Ma. Their Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data plot within the range of the SCS seamount basalts that show an EM2-like component in the mantle source. The age and overall geochemical characteristics of the dredged basalts are comparable to those of the Kungkuan basalts, NW Taiwan and Baolai basalts, SW Taiwan, suggesting an extensive alkali basaltic volcanism along the southeastern Eurasian continental margin during the early Miocene that resulted from regional lithospheric extension in association with seafloor spreading in the South China Sea.

  5. Early J2 basalts in SE China: Incipience of large-scale late Mesozoic magmatism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Xin; XU; Xisheng; ZOU; Haibo; JIANG; Shaoyong; ZHANG; Ming

    2006-01-01

    Magmatism in SE China was dormant during 204-180 Ma, but was reactivated in 180-170 Ma (early J2), and then became more and more intensive towards the end of early Cretaceous. The small-scale early J2 magmatism is the incipience to long-term and large-scale magmatism in this region. A near east-west (EW) trend volcanic belt was distributed across south Hunan, south Jiangxi and southwest Fujian was formed during early J2 time. Along this belt from the inland toward the coast, the lithology of basalts changes from alkali into tholeiite, and the amount of erupted volcanic rocks and the proportions of rhyolites coexisting with the basalts increase. On the basis of geochemical characteristics of these basalts, we infer that the melting degree of source rocks and the extent of fractional crystallization and crustal contamination all increased whereas the depth of mantle source decreased from the inland to the coast, which led to the variations of geological characteristics of the volcanic belt. In early J2, the western spreading Pacific plate began to subduct underneath SE China continental block, reactivating near EW trend deep fault that was originally formed during the Indosinian event. The stress of the western spreading Pacific plate and the extent of asthenosphere upwelling increased from the inland to the coast, which is consistent with the generation and evolution of early J2 basalts.

  6. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth

  7. Magmatic Source Composition and Magmatism of the Volcanic Rocks in the Area of Kuruktag, Southern Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Changyi; BAI Kaiyin; HI Aizhi; ZHAO Xiaoning; ZHANG Hongbo

    2001-01-01

    In the Sinian-Cambrian strata in the area of Kuruktag, southern Xingjiang, four layers of volcanic rocks occurred in the Early Sinian Beiyixi Formation, Late Sinian Zhamoketi Formation and Shuiquan Formation, and Early Cambrian Xishanbulake Formation, respectively. Volcanics of the Shuiquan Formation and Xishanbulake Formation are of alkali basalt series, those of the Zhamoketi Formation are of alkali basalt series and tholeiite series, and those of the Beiyixi Formation are obviously characterized by bimodal assemblage and mostly belong to alkali volcanics. Multi-element distribution patterns of the rocks show continental tumescence characters of interplate basalt.Fractional crystallization of plagioclase led to negative Eu-anomalies of some volcanics and the cumulation of olivine resulted in high MgO and low SiO2 content of some volcanic rocks. The SiO2 saturability of volcanic rocks of the Xishanbulake Formation and Shuiquan Formation is lower than that of tholeiite of the Zhamoketi Formation. Correspondingly, the abundance of incompatible elements in the first two formations is higher than those in the last formation, and the differences can be attributed to the different degrees of partial melting. The intense fractionation of REE and the obvious depletion of HREE suggest that these volcanic rocks were derived from garnet Iherzolite of the mantle in the continental lithosphere. The Ba/Nb, La/Nb, Ba/La, Ba/Th and Rb/Nb rations demonstrate that these volcanic rocks were exclusively derived from the enriched mantle, mainly the EMI type mantle.

  8. 78 FR 64246 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosives Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... isomorphously substituted inorganic salts. *ANFO . Aromatic nitro-compound explosive mixtures. Azide explosives.... Explosive mixtures containing tetranitromethane (nitroform). Explosive nitro compounds of aromatic... polyhydric alcohol explosives. Nitric acid and a nitro aromatic compound explosive. Nitric acid...

  9. Vapor segregation and loss in basaltic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of volcanic gases at Pu'u'O??'o??, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, reveal distinct degassing regimes with respect to vapor segregation and loss during effusive activity in 2004-2005. Three styles of vapor loss are distinguished by the chemical character of the emitted volcanic gases, measured by open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: 1 persistent continuous gas emission, 2 gas piston events, and 3 lava spattering. Persistent continuous gas emission is associated with magma ascent and degassing beneath the crater vents, then eruption of the degassed magma from flank vents. Gas piston events are the result of static gas accumulation at depths of 400-900 m beneath Pu'u'O??'o??. A CO2-rich gas slug travels up the conduit at a few meters per second, displacing magma as it expands. Lava spattering occurs due to dynamic bubble coalescence in a column of relatively stagnant magma. The Large gas bubbles are H2O rich and are generated by open-system degassing at depths of segregation in basaltic melts, but their implications differ. Accumulation and segregation of CO2-rich vapor at depth does not deplete the melt of H2O (required to drive lava fountains near to the surface) and therefore gas piston events can occur interspersed with lava fountaining activity. Lava spattering, however, efficiently strips H2O-rich vapor from magma beneath the crater vents; the magma must then erupt effusively from vents on the flank of the cone. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  10. Cross-arc geochemical variations in volcanic fields in Honduras C.A.: progressive changes in source with distance from the volcanic front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Lina C.; Carr, Michael J.; Feigenson, Mark D.

    A geochemical traverse across Honduras reveals the heterogeneity of the mantle underneath Central America. Alkali basalts from Lake Yojoa (170km behind the front) have low 87Sr/86Sr but high La/Yb, and elevated incompatible trace element abundances, consistent with derivation from a normal mid-ocean ridge basalt source mantle via low degrees of melting. These lavas lack evidence for an enriched source thought to be intermingled with normal mid-ocean ridge basalt source mantle beneath most of Central America. The amplitude of the subducted slab signature decreases smoothly with distance from the volcanic front. Lavas from Zacate Grande, the area nearest to the volcanic front (17 km behind the arc), display large ion lithophile element enrichment and high field strength element depletion indicating the involvement of subducted material in magma genesis. Components of subducted material are not evident in lavas from Lake Yojoa, the area furthest from the arc. Basalts and basaltic andesites from Tegucigalpa, 102 km behind the volcanic front, are geochemically intermediate between those of Lake Yojoa and Zacate Grande. The lavas from Tegucigalpa show a decreased influence of the subduction component, and are affected by assimilation-fractional crystallization processes at shallow depths. The gradual decrease in the subducted component from the volcanic front to Zacate Grande, Tegucigalpa and finally Lake Yojoa contrasts with the abrupt decrease documented for southeast Guatemala, the only other area in Central America where a cross-arc transect has been studied.

  11. The mode of emplacement of Neogene flood basalts in eastern Iceland: Facies architecture and structure of simple aphyric basalt groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Óskarsson, Birgir V.; Riishuus, Morten S.

    2014-12-01

    Simple flows (tabular) in the Neogene flood basalt sections of Iceland are described and their mode of emplacement assessed. The flows belong to three aphyric basalt groups: the Kumlafell group, the Hólmatindur group and the Hjálmadalur group. The groups can be traced over 50 km and originate in the Breiðdalur-Thingmuli volcanic zone. The groups have flow fields that display mixed volcanic facies architecture and can be classified after dominating type morphology. The Kumlafell and the Hólmatindur groups have predominantly simple flows of pāhoehoe and rubbly pāhoehoe morphologies with minor compound or lobate pāhoehoe flows. The Hjálmadalur group has simple flows of rubbly pāhoehoe, but also includes minor compound or lobate flows of rubble and 'a'ā. Simple flows are most common in the distal and medial areas from the vents, while more lobate flows in proximal areas. The simple flows are formed by extensive sheet lobes that are several kilometers long with plane-parallel contacts, some reaching thicknesses of ~ 40 m (aspect ratios inflation structures. Their internal structure consists generally of a simple upper vesicular crust, a dense core and a thin basal vesicular zone. The brecciated flow-top is formed by clinker and crustal rubble, the clinker often welded or agglutinated. The simple flows erupted from seemingly short-lived fissures and have the characteristics of cooling-limited flows. We estimate the effusion rates to be ~ 105 m3/s for the simple flows of the Kumlafell and Hólmatindur groups and ~ 104 m3/s for the Hjálmadalur group. The longest flows advanced 15-20 km from the fissures, with lava streams of fast propagating flows inducing tearing and brecciation of the chilled crust. Compound or lobate areas appear to reflect areas of low effusion rates or the interaction of the lava with topographic barriers or wetlands, resulting in chaotic flowage. Slowing lobes with brecciated flow-tops developed into 'a'ā flows. The groups interdigitated

  12. Supervolcanoes Within an Ancient Volcanic Province in Arabia Terra, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Joseph. R.; Bleacher, Jacob E.

    2014-01-01

    Several irregularly shaped craters located within Arabia Terra, Mars represent a new type of highland volcanic construct and together constitute a previously unrecognized martian igneous province. Similar to terrestrial supervolcanoes, these low-relief paterae display a range of geomorphic features related to structural collapse, effusive volcanism, and explosive eruptions. Extruded lavas contributed to the formation of enigmatic highland ridged plains in Arabia Terra. Outgassed sulfur and erupted fine-grained pyroclastics from these calderas likely fed the formation of altered, layered sedimentary rocks and fretted terrain found throughout the equatorial region. Discovery of a new type of volcanic construct in the Arabia volcanic province fundamentally changes the picture of ancient volcanism and climate evolution on Mars. Other eroded topographic basins in the ancient Martian highlands that have been dismissed as degraded impact craters should be reconsidered as possible volcanic constructs formed in an early phase of widespread, disseminated magmatism on Mars.

  13. Sr, Nd, Pb and Hf isotopic constraints on mantle sources and crustal contaminants in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina; Holm, Paul Martin; Thirlwall, Matthew F.

    2015-01-01

    The presented Sr, Nd, Hf and double-spike Pb-isotopic analyses of Quaternary basalts from the Payenia volcanic province in southern Mendoza, Argentina, confirm the presence of two distinct mantle types feeding the Payenia volcanism. The southern Payenia mantle source feeding the intraplate-type Río...

  14. Age and petrology of the Tertiary As Sarat volcanic field, southwestern Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Bray, E.A.; Stoeser, D.B.; McKee, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    Harrat As Sarat forms the second smallest and southernmost of the basalt fields of western Saudi Arabia and is part of a voluminous Red Sea rift-related continental alkali basalt province. The rocks of the As Sarat were emplaced during the first stage of Red Sea rifting and represent the northernmost extension of the Tertiary Trap Series volcanics that occur mainly in the Yemen Arab Republic and Ethiopia. The field consists of up to 580 m of basalt flows, that are intruded by basaltic plugs, necks, minor dikes, and highly evolved peralkaline trachyte intrusions. K-Ar ages indicate that the As Sarat field formed between 31 and 22 Ma and contains an eruption hiatus of one million years that began about 25 Ma ago. Pre-hiatus flows are primarily hypersthene normative intersertal subalkaline basalt, whereas the majority of post-hiatus flows are nepheline normative alkali basalt and hawaiite with trachytic textures. Normative compositions of the basalts are consistent with their genesis by partial melting at varying depths. Trace element abundances in the basalt indicate that varying degrees of partial melting and fractional crystallization (or crystal accumulation) had major and minor roles, respectively, in development of compositional variation in these rocks. Modeling indicates that the pre-hiatus subalkaline basalts represent 8-10 percent mantle melting at depths of about 70 km and the post-hiatus alkali basalts represent 4-9 percent mantle melting at depths greater than 70 km. ?? 1991.

  15. Strength of Concrete Containing Basalt Fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvez Imraan Ansari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comparative study of effect of basalt fibre on compressive and split tensile strength of M40 grade concrete. The basalt fibre was mixed in concrete by (0.5%, 1%, and 1.5% of its total weight of cement in concrete. Results indicated that the strength increases with increase of basalt fibre content up to 1.0% beyond that there is a reduction in strength on increasing basalt fibre. The results show that the concrete specimen with 1.0% of basalt fibre gives better performance when it compared with 0.5%and 1.5% basalt fibre mix in concrete specimens.

  16. Chemical and Isotopic Constraints on the Origin of Cenozoic Pacific Northwest Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.; Hart, W. K.; Grove, T. L.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Barr, J. A.; Till, C. B.

    2009-12-01

    Though there is little debate about the connection of Cascade volcanism to subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate, the cause of extensive Neogene volcanism east of the Cascades is not as well understood. Volumetrically, the most significant component of this volcanism, the flood basalts of the Columbia Plateau and Steens Mountain, are dominated by lavas that have suffered extensive crystal fractionation in crustal magma chambers. The evolved, crustally contaminated, nature of most of these basalts makes identification of the primary magma difficult, confounding interpretation of the background cause of the volcanism. Some Steens lavas are relatively undifferentiated (Johnson et al., USGS Open File report 98-0482). These Steens basalts have compositions that are distinguished from younger primitive basalts on the High Lava Plains (HLP) by distinctly lower Al and higher FeO, Ti, Zr and Nb concentrations, but also Mg#s that are too low to be in equilibrium with mantle that has Fo90 olivine. If these are primary magmatic characteristics, they suggest either a more fertile, FeO-rich source, or lower, not higher, degrees of melting at greater depth during the flood basalt era as opposed to the much smaller-volume younger HLP volcanism. Experimental results on primitive Quaternary HLP and Newberry Volcano lavas suggest last equilibration at pressures corresponding to just below the Moho (30-40 km) with water contents that range from substantial (up to 4 wt %) at Newberry to low (Columbia River basalts and most Snake River Plain basalts have Pb isotope compositions strongly displaced from values seen in oceanic basalts plotting instead along a circa 2.5 Ga trend. The shift in Pb (and Sr, Nd, and Hf) isotope composition occurs precisely at the boundary between young accreted terranes to the west and Precambrian North America to the east, suggesting that ancient continental lithospheric mantle is an important source component of Snake River basaltic volcanism. At precisely the

  17. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    to eruption behaviour and during ascent magma behaves in an increasingly rock-like manner as it degasses and crystallises. This character aids the development of shear zones in the conduit, producing fault surfaces that host gouge, cataclasite and pseudotachylyte and which control the last hundreds of meters of ascent by frictional slip. Recent work has shown that the occurrence of vesiculation of gas bubbles modifies the rheology of frictional melt and in extreme cases can trigger eruption style to switch from effusive to explosive activity. Hence it is of vital importance to recognise the frictional behaviour of volcanic rocks and magmas to understand the continuation of an eruption and associated hazards.

  18. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Woolford, Jeff M

    2015-01-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ∼1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ∼17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ∼17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ∼35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  19. Synopsis of volcanic stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    Volcanic stratigraphic units are mappable layered units composed of volcanic rocks that are formed on land (subaerially) or under water (subaqueously) by volcanic processes. At least ten different types of volcanic stratigraphic units are recognized. The characteristics for each are discussed briefly and some typical examples are illustrated by diagrams to show their salient features.

  20. Olivine Major and Trace Element Compositions in Southern Payenia Basalts, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina; Portnyagin, Maxim; Hoernle, Kaj;

    2015-01-01

    Olivine major and trace element compositions from 12 basalts from the southern Payenia volcanic province in Argentina have been analyzed by electron microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The olivines have high Fe/Mn and low Ca/Fe and many fall at the end...... by subduction-zone fluids and/or melts. The increasing contributions from the pyroxene-rich source in the southern Payenia basalts are correlated with an increasing Fe-enrichment, which caused the olivines to have lower forsterite contents at a given Ni content. Al-in-olivine crystallization temperatures...

  1. Evidence for a basalt-free surface on Mercury and implications for internal heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, R; Mitchell, D L; Sprague, A L; de Pater, I

    1995-06-01

    Microwave and mid-infrared observations reveal that Mercury's surface contains less FeO + TiO2 and at least as much feldspar as the lunar highlands. The results are compatible with the high albedo (brightness) of Mercury's surface at visible wavelengths in suggesting a rock and soil composition that is devoid of basalt, the primary differentiate of terrestrial mantles. The occurrence of a basalt-free, highly differentiated crust is in accord with recent models of the planet's thermal evolution and suggests that Mercury has retained a hot interior as a result of a combination of inefficient mantle convection and minimal volcanic heat loss.

  2. Age discrimination among basalt flows using digitally enhanced LANDSAT imagery. [Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodget, H. W.; Brown, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    Digitally enhanced LANDSAT MSS data were used to discriminate among basalt flows of historical to Tertiary age, at a test site in Northwestern Saudi Arabia. Spectral signatures compared favorably with a field-defined classification that permits discrimination among five groups of basalt flows on the basis of geomorphic criteria. Characteristics that contributed to age definition include: surface texture, weathering, color, drainage evolution, and khabrah development. The inherent gradation in the evolution of geomorphic parameters, however, makes visual extrapolation between areas subjective. Therefore, incorporation of spectrally-derived volcanic units into the mapping process should produce more quantitatively consistent age groupings.

  3. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating for volcanic rocks of the Dasi Formation in southeast Hubei Province, middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River and its implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Guiqing; MAO Jingwen; LI Ruiling; ZHOU Shaodong; YE Huishou; YAN Quanren; ZHANG Zusong

    2006-01-01

    The Jinniu Basin in southeast Hubei,located at the westernmost part of middle-lower valley of the Yangtze River, is one of the important volcanic basins in East China. Volcanic rocks in the Jinniu Basin are distributed mainly in the Majiashan Formation, the Lingxiang Formation and the Dasi Formation, consisting of rhyolite, basalt and basaltic andesite, (trachy)-basalt and basaltic trachy-andesite and (trachy)-andesite and (trachy)-dacite and rhyolite respectively, in which the Dasi volcanism is volumetrically dominant and widespread. The Dasi volcanic rocks were selected for SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating to confirm the timing of volcanism. The results indicate that there exist a large amount of magmatic zircons characterized by high U and Th contents in the volcanic rocks. The concordia ages for 13 points are 128±1Ma (MSWD = 3.0). On account of the shape of zircons and Th/U ratios, this age is considered to represent the crystallization time of the Dasi volcanism. The volcanic rocks in the Dasi, Majiashan and Lingxiang Formations share similar trace element and REE partition patterns as well as Sr-Nd isotopic compositions. In combination with the regional geology, it is proposed that the southeast Hubei volcanic rocks were formed mainly during the Early Cretaceous, just like other volcanic basins in middle-lower Yangtze valley. A lithospheric extension is also suggested for tectonic regime in this region in the Cretaceous Period.

  4. Experimental generation of volcanic lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    the plume that emerge as the key variables in volcanic lightning generation. A proportionality between fine ash content of the jet and number of lightning strikes is also evident in our experiments. This first recorded experimental generation of volcanic lightning means that rapid progress can now be expected (under controlled laboratory conditions) in understanding electrical phenomena produced during explosive volcanic eruptions. This in turn may aid the development of lightning monitoring systems for the forecasting of volcanic ash emissions into the atmosphere. Furthermore, our experiments are significant for the investigation of self-charging mechanism of particles that are relevant for atmospheric phenomena (such as dust storms) on Earth and other planetary bodies.

  5. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J; Kendrick, Jackie E; von Aulock, Felix W; Kennedy, Ben M; Andrews, Benjamin J; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-24

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the 'strength' of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive-explosive

  6. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Andrews, Benjamin J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the ‘strength’ of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive-explosive

  7. Volcanism in Elysium Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    Geomorphic mapping revealed that the three volcanic constructs within Elysium Planitia (Hecates Tholus, elysium Mons and Albor Tholus) are very different in their overall morphology and represent three distinct types of martian volcano. Hecates Tholus was found to possess the most likely possible example of a young, explosively generated, air fall deposit, while the volume of magma erupted from Elysium Mons appears to have been orders of magnitude larger than that erupted from Albor Tholus. A primary aim of the regional geological analysis of Elysium Planitia is to further understand the volcanic and tectonic evolution of the area by the identification and interpretation of individual lava flows and their source vents. Lava flow size, spatial distribution, flow direction and the stratigraphic relationships of these lava flows to adjacent structural features were all measured. The topographic form of Elysium Mons has totally controlled the flow direction of lava flows within Elysium Planitia. Lava flows from Elysium Mons can be traced for distances of 150 to 250 km in a radial direction from the volcano. Parasitic vents located beyond the recognizable volcanic construct also conform to this radial pattern. A second unusual characteristic of the Elysium Planitia region is the high frequency of occurrence of sinuous channels that are morphologically similar to lunar sinuous rilles.

  8. Chemistry and fluxes of magmatic gases powering the explosive trachyandesitic phase of Eyjafjallajokull 2010 eruption: constraints on degassing magma volumes and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, P.; Burton, M. R.; Oskarsson, N.; Michel, A.; Polacci, M.

    2010-12-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption developed in two distinct phases, with initial lateral effusion of alkali basalt since March 20, followed by highly explosive extrusion of a quite homogenous and crystal-poor trachyandesitic magma [1] through the central volcano ice cap between April 14 and May 24. As usual, magmatic volatiles played a key role in the eruption dynamics. Here we report on the chemical composition and the mass output of magmatic gases powering intense explosive activity during the second eruptive phase in early May. On May 8 we could measure the composition of magmatic gases directly issuing from the eruptive vents, by using OP-FTIR spectroscopy from the crater rim (~900 m distance) and molten lava blocks as IR radiation source. FTIR spectra reveal a variable mixture between two gas components equally rich in H2O (91.3 mol%) and CO2 (8%) but differing in their SO2/HCl ratio (up to 3.5 for the main one and 0.5 for the Cl-richer second one). Analysis of S-Cl-F in ash leachates and in ash and lava bomb samples (pyrohydrolysis) show that this second component was generated by greater chlorine loss during extensive magma fragmentation into fine ash. S/Cl and Cl/F ratios from both these analyses and solar occultation FTIR plume sensing indicate a modest fluorine content in emitted gas and its preferential adsorption onto solid particles during plume transport. DOAS traverses under the volcanic plume (4-6 km height), though hampered by dense ash load, gave most reliable SO2 fluxes of 4500-6600 tons d-1 on May 9, consistent with OMI satellite data [2]. These imply the daily co-emission of 7.2x105 tons of H2O, 1.5x105 tons of CO2, 2000 tons of HCl and ≤200 tons of HF. Eyjafjallajökull thus produced more hydrous and relatively CO2-poorer gas, in much greater quantities, during that stage than during its first basaltic phase [3]. Linear variations of dissolved S with TiO2/FeO ratio in nearby Katla alkali magmas [4] suggest possible pre-eruptive S contents

  9. The degassing character of a young volcanic center: Cerro Negro, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucic, Gregor; Stix, John; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Muñoz, Angélica; Carcache, Martha Ibarra

    2014-09-01

    Cerro Negro volcano is a young basaltic cinder cone which is part of the Nicaraguan volcanic arc. Eruptive activity at Cerro Negro is characterized by explosive strombolian to subplinian eruptions driven by volatile-rich basaltic magma ascending rapidly from various crustal depths (>15 to 6 km) resulting in the onset of precursory activity only ˜30 min before an eruption. In this paper, we present a comprehensive degassing characterization of the volcano over a 4-year period aimed at improving our understanding of the magmatic plumbing network and its relationship with regional tectonics. A total of 124 individual soil gas samples were collected between 2010 and 2013 and analyzed for stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) from CO2. High temperature fumaroles were sampled for δ18O, δD, and 3He/4He isotope analysis, and major degassing zones were mapped using soil CO2 flux measurements. Gases at Cerro Negro are characterized by a strong 3He/4He mantle signature (6.3 to 7.3 RA), magmatic δ13C ratios (-2.3 to -3.0 ‰), meteoric δ18O and δD ratios, and stable CO2 fluxes (31 t d-1). The lack of δ13C fractionation and an increase in the relative mantle component from 2002 to 2012 suggest that the volatile flux at Cerro Negro originates from the mantle and ascends to the surface via a series of crustal fractures that act as permeable conduits. Despite the lack of new eruptions, the hydrothermal system of Cerro Negro continues to evolve due to seasonal inputs of meteoric water, slope failures that expose and bury sites of active degassing, and bursts of regional seismicity that have the potential to open up new conduits for gas release as well as magma. Continuing geophysical and geochemical monitoring of the main edifice and the recently formed south zone is essential, as the volcano remains overdue to erupt.

  10. Geophysical investigations of buried volcanic centers near Yucca Mountain, Southwest Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aeromagnetic dipolar anomalies occur over flat, alluvial areas near Yucca Mountain that resemble anomalies typically associated with subaerial basaltic volcanic centers. Detailed gravity and ground magnetic data were collected along a surveyed traverse across an aeromagnetic anomaly in Amargosa Valley, south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Modeling of the ground magnetic data collected over the largest of these anomalies, the Lathrop Wells aeromagnetic anomaly, indicates that the top of the causative body, most likely basalt, is less than 250 m below the surface. Gravity data indicate an apparent lack of an associated gravity anomaly and suggest that either the causative body may be tuff rather than basalt, or the volume of the body is small. Both drilling and collection of more magnetic and gravity data are necessary because ages and volumes of buried volcanic centers are important constraints for estimating the probability of potential volcanism near the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

  11. Transient Sulfate Aerosols as a Signature of Exoplanet Volcanism

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Amit; Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Koehler, Matthew C.; Sholes, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Geological activity is thought to be important for the origin of life and for maintaining planetary habitability. We show that transient sulfate aerosols could be a signature of exoplanet volcanism, and therefore a geologically active world. A detection of transient aerosols, if linked to volcanism, could thus aid in habitability evaluations of the exoplanet. On Earth, subduction-induced explosive eruptions inject SO2 directly into the stratosphere, leading to the formation of sulfate aerosol...

  12. Leidenfrost explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Moreau, F; Dorbolo, S

    2012-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video showing the behavior of Leidenfrost droplets composed by a mixture of water and surfactant (SDS, Sodium Dodecyl sulfate). When a droplet is released on a plate heated above a given temperature a thin layer of vapor isolates the droplet from the plate. The droplet levitates over the plate. This is called the Leidenfrost effect. In this work we study the influence of the addition of a surfactant on the Leidenfrost phenomenon. As the droplet evaporates the concentration of SDS rises up to two orders of magnitude over the Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC). An unexpected and violent explosive behavior is observed. The video presents several explosions taken with a high speed camera (IDT-N4 at 30000 fps). All the presented experiments were performed on a plate heated at 300{\\deg}C. On the other hand, the initial quantity of SDS was tuned in two ways: (i) by varying the initial concentration of SDS and (ii) by varying the initial size of the droplet. By measuring the volume of th...

  13. Radiation shielding concrete made of Basalt aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhajali, S; Yousef, S; Kanbour, M; Naoum, B

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the fact that Basalt is a widespread type of rock, there is very little available information on using it as aggregates for concrete radiation shielding. This paper investigates the possibility of using Basalt for the aforementioned purpose. The results have shown that Basalt could be used successfully for preparing radiation shielding concrete, but some attention should be paid to the choice of the suitable types of Basalt and for the neutron activation problem that could arise in the concrete shield.

  14. Laboratory Studies of Ice Nucleation on Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Ice nucleation on volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect human respiratory health, atmospheric transport, and global climate. We have performed laboratory studies of the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman Microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (Basaltic Ash, Guatemala), Soufriere Hills (Andesetic Ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Rhyolitic Ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. We find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.1. For immersion freezing, however, only the Taupo ash exhibited efficient heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  15. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (-7 events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a priority issue for performance assessment studies

  16. Making Earth's earliest continental crust - an analogue from voluminous Neogene silicic volcanism in NE-Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Sylvia E.; Troll, Valentin R.; Burchardt, Steffi; Riishuus, Morten S.; Deegan, Frances M.; Harris, Chris; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Gústafsson, Ludvik E.

    2014-05-01

    Borgarfjörður Eystri in NE-Iceland represents the second-most voluminous exposure of silicic eruptive rocks in Iceland and is a superb example of bimodal volcanism (Bunsen-Daly gap), which represents a long-standing controversy that touches on the problem of crustal growth in early Earth. The silicic rocks in NE-Iceland approach 25 % of the exposed rock mass in the region (Gústafsson et al., 1989), thus they significantly exceed the usual ≤ 12 % in Iceland as a whole (e.g. Walker, 1966; Jonasson, 2007). The origin, significance, and duration of the voluminous (> 300 km3) and dominantly explosive silicic activity in Borgarfjörður Eystri is not yet constrained (c.f. Gústafsson, 1992), leaving us unclear as to what causes silicic volcanism in otherwise basaltic provinces. Here we report SIMS zircon U-Pb ages and δ18O values from the region, which record the commencement of silicic igneous activity with rhyolite lavas at 13.5 to 12.8 Ma, closely followed by large caldera-forming ignimbrite eruptions from the Breiðavik and Dyrfjöll central volcanoes (12.4 Ma). Silicic activity ended abruptly with dacite lava at 12.1 Ma, defining a ≤ 1 Myr long window of silicic volcanism. Magma δ18O values estimated from zircon range from 3.1 to 5.5 (± 0.3; n = 170) and indicate up to 45 % assimilation of a low-δ18O component (e.g. typically δ18O = 0 ‰, Bindeman et al., 2012). A Neogene rift relocation (Martin et al., 2011) or the birth of an off-rift zone to the east of the mature rift associated with a thermal/chemical pulse in the Iceland plume (Óskarsson & Riishuus, 2013), likely brought mantle-derived magma into contact with fertile hydrothermally-altered basaltic crust. The resulting interaction triggered large-scale crustal melting and generated mixed-origin silicic melts. Such rapid formation of silicic magmas from sustained basaltic volcanism may serve as an analogue for generating continental crust in a subduction-free early Earth (e.g. ≥ 3 Ga, Kamber et

  17. The geology and petrology of Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii; a study of postshield volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Wise, William S.; Dalrymple, G. Brent

    1997-01-01

    Mauna Kea Volcano, on the Island of Hawaii, is capped by lavas of alkalic and transitional basalt (Hamakua Volcanics) erupted between approximately 250-200 and 70-65 ka and hawaiite, mugearite, and benmoreite (Laupahoehoe Volcanics) erupted between approximately 65 and 4 ka. These lavas, which form the entire subaerial surface of the volcano, issued from numerous scattered vents and are intercalated on the upper slopes with glacial deposits. The lavas record diminishing magma-supply rate and degree of partial melting from the shield stage through the postshield stage. Much of the compositional variation apparently reflects fractionation of basaltic magma in reservoirs within and beneath the volcano.

  18. Chaotic Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Altmann, Eduardo G; Tél, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    We investigate chaotic dynamical systems for which the intensity of trajectories might grow unlimited in time. We show that (i) the intensity grows exponentially in time and is distributed spatially according to a fractal measure with an information dimension smaller than that of the phase space,(ii) such exploding cases can be described by an operator formalism similar to the one applied to chaotic systems with absorption (decaying intensities), but (iii) the invariant quantities characterizing explosion and absorption are typically not directly related to each other, e.g., the decay rate and fractal dimensions of absorbing maps typically differ from the ones computed in the corresponding inverse (exploding) maps. We illustrate our general results through numerical simulation in the cardioid billiard mimicking a lasing optical cavity, and through analytical calculations in the baker map.

  19. Scenarios constructed for basaltic igneous activity at Yucca Mountain and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basaltic volcanism has been identified as a possible future event initiating a release of radionuclides from a potential repository at the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository site. The performance assessment method set forth in the Site Characterization Plan (DOE, 1988) requires that a set of scenarios encompassing all significant radionuclide release paths to the accessible environment be described. This report attempts to catalogue the details of the interactions between the features and processes produced by basaltic volcanism in the presence of the presumed groundwater flow system and a repository structure, the engineered barrier system (EBS), and waste. This catalogue is developed in the form of scenarios. We define a scenario as a well-posed problem, starting from an initiating event or process and proceeding through a logically connected and physically possible combination or sequence of features, events, and processes (FEPs) to the release of contaminants

  20. Water in volcanic glass: From volcanic degassing to secondary hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Angela N.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Watkins, James M.; Ross, Abigail M.

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic glass is deposited with trace amounts (0.1-0.6 wt.%) of undegassed magmatic water dissolved in the glass. After deposition, meteoric water penetrates into the glass structure mostly as molecular H2O. Due to the lower δD (‰) values of non-tropical meteoric waters and the ∼30‰ offset between volcanic glass and environmental water during hydration, secondary water imparts lighter hydrogen isotopic values during secondary hydration up to a saturation concentration of 3-4 wt.% H2O. We analyzed compositionally and globally diverse volcanic glass from 0 to 10 ka for their δD and H2Ot across different climatic zones, and thus different δD of precipitation, on a thermal conversion elemental analyzer (TCEA) furnace attached to a mass spectrometer. We find that tephrachronologically coeval rhyolite glass is hydrated faster than basaltic glass, and in the majority of glasses an increase in age and total water content leads to a decrease in δD (‰), while a few equatorial glasses have little change in δD (‰). We compute a magmatic water correction based on our non-hydrated glasses, and calculate an average 103lnαglass-water for our hydrated felsic glasses of -33‰, which is similar to the 103lnαglass-water determined by Friedman et al. (1993a) of -34‰. We also determine a smaller average 103lnαglass-water for all our mafic glasses of -23‰. We compare the δD values of water extracted from our glasses to local meteoric waters following the inclusion of a -33‰ 103lnαglass-water. We find that, following a correction for residual magmatic water based on an average δD and wt.% H2Ot of recently erupted ashes from our study, the δD value of water extracted from hydrated volcanic glass is, on average, within 4‰ of local meteoric water. To better understand the difference in hydration rates of mafic and felsic glasses, we imaged 6 tephra clasts ranging in age and chemical composition with BSE (by FEI SEM) down to a submicron resolution. Mafic tephra

  1. Growing magma chambers control the distribution of small-scale flood basalts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xun; Chen, Li-Hui; Zeng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Small-scale continental flood basalts are a global phenomenon characterized by regular spatio-temporal distributions. However, no genetic mechanism has been proposed to explain the visible but overlooked distribution patterns of these continental basaltic volcanism. Here we present a case study from eastern China, combining major and trace element analyses with Ar-Ar and K-Ar dating to show that the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts is controlled by the growth of long-lived magma chambers. Evolved basalts (SiO2 > 47.5 wt.%) from Xinchang-Shengzhou, a small-scale Cenozoic flood basalt field in Zhejiang province, eastern China, show a northward younging trend over the period 9.4-3.0 Ma. With northward migration, the magmas evolved only slightly ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.40-0.66; TiO2/MgO = 0.23-0.35) during about 6 Myr (9.4-3.3 Ma). When the flood basalts reached the northern end of the province, the magmas evolved rapidly (3.3-3.0 Ma) through a broad range of compositions ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.60-1.28; TiO2/MgO = 0.30-0.57). The distribution and two-stage compositional evolution of the migrating flood basalts record continuous magma replenishment that buffered against magmatic evolution and induced magma chamber growth. Our results demonstrate that the magma replenishment-magma chamber growth model explains the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts. PMID:26581905

  2. Thermal control of low-pressure fractionation processes. [in basaltic magma solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, T. M.; Hodge, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal models detailing the solidification paths for shallow basaltic magma chambers (both open and closed systems) were calculated using finite-difference techniques. The total solidification time for closed chambers are comparable to previously published calculations; however, the temperature-time paths are not. These paths are dependent on the phase relations and the crystallinity of the system, because both affect the manner in which the latent heat of crystallization is distributed. In open systems, where a chamber would be periodically replenished with additional parental liquid, calculations indicate that the possibility is strong that a steady-state temperature interval is achieved near a major phase boundary. In these cases it is straightforward to analyze fractionation models of the basaltic liquid evolution and their corresponding cumulate sequences. This steady thermal fractionating state can be invoked to explain large amounts of erupted basalts of similar composition over long time periods from the same volcanic center and some rhythmically layered basic cumulate sequences.

  3. Understanding Volcanic Conduit Dynamics: from Experimental Fragmentation to Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M. A.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    The investigation of conduit dynamics at high pressure, under controlled laboratory conditions is a powerful tool to understand the physics behind volcanic processes before an eruption. In this work, we analyze the characteristics of the seismic response of an "experimental volcano" focusing on the dynamics of the conduit behavior during the fragmentation process of volcanic rocks. The "experimental volcano" is represented by a shock tube apparatus, which consists of a low-pressure voluminous tank (3 x 0.40 m), for sample recovery; and a high-pressure pipe-like conduit (16.5 x 2,5 cm), which represents the volcanic source mechanism, where rock samples are pressurized and fragmented. These two serial steel pipes are connected and sealed by a set of diaphragms that bear pressures in a range of 4 to 20 MPa. The history of the overall process of an explosion consists of four steps: 1) the slow pressurization of the pipe-like conduit filled with solid pumice and gas, 2) the sudden removal of the diaphragms, 3) the rapid decompression of the system and 4) the ejection of the gas-particle mixture. Each step imprints distinctive features on the microseismic records, reflecting the conduit dynamics during the explosion. In this work we show how features such as waveform characteristics, the three components of the force system acting on the conduit, the independent components of the moment tensor, the volumetric change of the source mechanism, the arrival time of the shock wave and its velocity, are quantified from the experimental microseismic data. Knowing these features, each step of the eruptive process, the conduit conditions and the source mechanism characteristics can be determined. The procedure applied in this experimental approach allows the use of seismic field data to estimate volcanic conduit conditions before an eruption takes place. We state on the hypothesis that the physics behind the pressurization and depressurization process of any conduit is the same

  4. Classification of Volcanic Eruptions on Io and Earth Using Low-Resolution Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2005-01-01

    Two bodies in the Solar System exhibit high-temperature active volcanism: Earth and Io. While there are important differences in the eruptions on Earth and Io, in low-spatial-resolution data (corresponding to the bulk of available and foreseeable data of Io), similar styles of effusive and explosive volcanism yield similar thermal flux densities. For example, a square metre of an active pahoehoe flow on Io looks very similar to a square metre of an active pahoehoe flow on Earth. If, from observed thermal emission as a function of wavelength and change in thermal emission with time, the eruption style of an ionian volcano can be constrained, estimates of volumetric fluxes can be made and compared with terrestrial volcanoes using techniques derived for analysing terrestrial remotely-sensed data. In this way we find that ionian volcanoes fundamentally differ from their terrestrial counterparts only in areal extent, with Io volcanoes covering larger areas, with higher volumetric flux. Io outbursts eruptions have enormous implied volumetric fluxes, and may scale with terrestrial flood basalt eruptions. Even with the low-spatial resolution data available it is possible to sometimes constrain and classify eruption style both on Io and Earth from the integrated thermal emission spectrum. Plotting 2 and 5 m fluxes reveals the evolution of individual eruptions of different styles, as well as the relative intensity of eruptions, allowing comparison to be made from individual eruptions on both planets. Analyses like this can be used for interpretation of low-resolution data until the next mission to the jovian system. For a number of Io volcanoes (including Pele, Prometheus, Amirani, Zamama, Culann, Tohil and Tvashtar) we do have high/moderate resolution imagery to aid determination of eruption mode from analyses based only on low spatial-resolution data.

  5. Volcanism and soil mercury on Mars - Consequences for terrestrial microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, B. Z.; Siegel, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    An earth-Mars depletion formula proposed by Anders and Owen for volatiles is used to calculate a range of putative Hg levels for Martian volcanic soils based upon analyzed samples from Hawaii. The range is about 50-150 microgram per kg. When applied either in conventional or special media (e.g., basalt powder), these levels of Hg are effective inhibitors of the growth of earth microorganisms. Taken together with other hostile chemical and physical factors, volcanic toxicants would appear to provide a further deterrent to the accidental establishment of terrestrial microbiota on Mars.

  6. The Volcanic History of Mars and Influences on Carbon Outgassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Whelley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Exploration of Mars has revealed some of the most impressive volcanic landforms found throughout the solar system. Volatiles outgassed from volcanoes were likely to have strongly influenced atmospheric chemistry and affected the martian climate. On Earth the role of carbon involved in volcanic outgassing is strongly influenced by tectonic setting, with the greatest weight percent contributions coming from partial mantle melts associated with hot spot volcanism. Most martian volcanic centers appear to represent this style of volcanism. Thus, one important factor in understanding the martian carbon cycle through time is understanding this volatile's link to the planet's volcanic history. The identified volcanic constructs on Mars are not unlike those of the Earth suggesting similar magmatic and eruptive processes. However, the dimensions of many martian volcanic features are significantly larger. The distribution of volcanoes and volcanic deposits on Mars are not spatially or temporally uniform. Large volcanoes (> 100 km diameter) are spatially concentrated in volcanic provinces that likely represent focused upwellings or zones of crustal weakness that enabled magma ascension. Smaller (10s km diameters) volcanoes such as cones, low shields and fissures are often grouped into fields and their lava flows coalesce to produce low slope plains. In some cases plains lava fields are quite extensive with little to no evidence for the volcanic constructs. Although martian volcanism appears to have been dominated by effusive eruptions with likely contributions from passive degassing from the interior, explosive volcanic centers and deposits are known to exist. After the development of a martian crust the planet's volcanic style appears to have evolved from early explosive activity to effusive activity centered at major volcanoes to effusive distributed activity in fields. However, questions remain as to whether or not these styles significantly overlapped in time and if so

  7. Effect of volatiles erupted from Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanic activities on paleo-environmental changes in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the determination of composition of volcanic volatiles and petrologic estimation of the total mass of volatiles erupted,we showed important advances in the study of the impact of Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanic activities on paleo-environmental changes in China.The volcanic activities include western Liaoning and Zhangjiakou Mesozoic intermediate-acidic explosive eruptions,southern Tibet and Shanwang Cenozoic volcanism,and Mt.Changbai volcanic eruption around one thousand years ago.The paper predominantly discusses the earth's surface temperature changes,ozone depletion,acidic rain formation and mass mortalities of vertebrate induced by the Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanism in China.

  8. Recognition and Significance of Volcanic Rocks of the Anda Depression of the Songliao Basin in Jurassic-Cretaceous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuhong Gao; Dongpo Wang; Xinrong Zhang; Guixia Ji; Jian Zhao

    2003-01-01

    A series of volcanic rocks were developed in the deep part of Anda faulting depression. The reflection of therocks are mainly stratiform and hummocky. Three kinds of volcanic facies, e.g. explosion facies, effusion facies andsub-volcanic facies,were recognized by different reflecting characteristics in the seismic profile. The volcanic rocks areformed during three episodes of volcanic activities from Shahezi Formation to Yingcheng Formation. The volcanismshave relation to the formation of Songliao Basin and regional tectonics of northeastern China. Some of the volcanic rocksare good oil and gas reservoirs.

  9. Vulcanian explosions: precursory and eruptive signatures from a multiparameteric perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, J.; De Angelis, S.; Fournier, N.; Sacks, S. I.; Van Camp, M. J.; Linde, A. T.; Ripepe, M.

    2012-12-01

    Vulcanian explosions: precursory and eruptive signatures from a multiparameteric perspective Vulcanian eruptions form a continuum ranging from the weaker Strombolian-type to violent sub-Plinian activity. They are short-lived (tens of seconds to tens of minutes) events commonly associated with a Volcanic Eruption Index (VEI) of 2-3. Extrusion of viscous magma and the formation of a lava dome is often interspersed by short-lived vigorous (Vulcanian) explosions. The causes for and the timing of the transition from effusive to explosive activity during dome formation are poorly understood and forecasting this transition remains a challenge. Previous investigations have pointed towards pressure sources at shallow levels in volcanic conduits, which ultimately fuel Vulcanian explosions. Here, we describe and interpret a robust and unique multi-parameter data set documenting the subsurface processes associated with Vulcanian explosions at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat. We show that explosion priming can be driven by processes in the shallow or the deep magmatic system. The geophysical constraints on the eruption dynamics are consitent with the geological evidence of eruptive products. One geophysical signature is related exclusively to shallow dynamics including conduit destabilisation, syn-eruptive decompression and magma fragmentation, conduit emptying and expulsion of juvenile pumice. By contrast, another explosion was triggered by unprecedented sudden pressurisation of the entire plumbing system from depths of about 10 km resulting in the partial failure of the dome carapace, a violent cannon-like explosion, propagation of pressure waves and pronounced ballistic ejection of dome fragments. The timescale for explosion precursors is on the order of few minutes for both types of explosions, however, the precursory geophysical signatures are indicative of the nature of ensuing explosions. The short precursory phases characterise Vulcanian explosions as freak events

  10. New inferences from spectral seismic energy measurement of a link between regional seismicity and volcanic activity at Mt. Etna, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, R.; Falsaperla, S.; Marrero, J. M.; Messina, A.

    2009-04-01

    The existence of a relationship between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity has been the subject of several studies in the last years. Generally, activity in basaltic volcanoes such as Villarica (Chile) and Tungurahua (Ecuador) shows very little changes after the occurrence of regional earthquakes. In a few cases volcanic activity has changed before the occurrence of regional earthquakes, such as observed at Teide, Tenerife, in 2004 and 2005 (Tárraga et al., 2006). In this paper we explore the possible link between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity at Mt. Etna in 2006 and 2007. On 24 November, 2006 at 4:37:40 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 4.7 stroke the eastern coast of Sicily. The epicenter was localized 50 km SE of the south coast of the island, and at about 160 km from the summit craters of Mt. Etna. The SSEM (Spectral Seismic Energy Measurement) of the seismic signal at stations at 1 km and 6 km from the craters highlights that four hours before this earthquake the energy associated with volcanic tremor increased, reached a maximum, and finally became steady when the earthquake occurred. Conversely, neither before nor after the earthquake, the SSEM of stations located between 80 km and 120 km from the epicentre and outside the volcano edifice showed changes. On 5 September, 2007 at 21:24:13 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 3.2 and 7.9 km depth stroke the Lipari Island, at the north of Sicily. About 38 hours before the earthquake occurrence, there was an episode of lava fountain lasting 20 hours at Etna volcano. The SSEM of the seismic signal recorded during the lava fountain at a station located at 6 km from the craters highlights changes heralding this earthquake ten hours before its occurrence using the FFM method (e.g., Voight, 1988; Ortiz et al., 2003). A change in volcanic activity - with the onset of ash emission and Strombolian explosions - was observed a couple of hours before the occurrence of the regional

  11. Mantle potential temperature estimates of basalt from the surface of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2016-10-01

    The crater density and distribution of Venus indicates the average surface age is younger (≤1 Ga) than most terrestrial planets and satellites in the Solar System. The type and rate (i.e. equilibrium, catastrophic or differential) of volcanism associated with the stagnant lid tectonic system of Venus is a first order problem that has yet to be resolved but is directly related to the thermal conditions of the mantle. The calculated primary melt composition of basalt at the Venera 14 landing site is high-Mg basalt to picrite with a mantle potential temperature estimate similar to terrestrial ambient mantle (1370 ± 70 °C). The calculated accumulated fractional melting curves indicate the olivine compositions from the melt have Mg# of 89-91. The results show that the thermal regime required to generate the primary melt composition of the Venera 14 basalt was not anomalously high (i.e. mantle-plume system) but rather consistent with a lithospheric tensional rift system. The juxtaposition of high thermal regime structures (e.g. Beta Regio) and 'ambient' mantle potential temperature estimates of the Venera 14 basalt suggests that the relatively young surface of Venus is the result of volcanism from a combination of thermal systems that resurfaced the planet at variable rates.

  12. Palaeoenvironment reconstruction, volcanic evolution and geochronology of the Cerro Blanco subcomplex, Nevados de Chillan volcanic complex, Central Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Mee, Katy; Gilbert, Jennie S.; McGarvie, David W.; Naranjo, Jose A.; Pringle, Malcolm S.

    2009-01-01

    Nevados de Chillán Volcanic Complex, central Chile, has been active for at least 640 ka—a period spanning a number of glacial and interglacial periods. Geologic mapping, radiometric dating and geochemical analysis have identified six new volcanic units and produced four new 40Ar/39Ar ages for Cerro Blanco, the northern subcomplex of Nevados de Chillán volcano. Compositions range from dacite to basaltic-andesite and a new geologic map is presented. Examination of lava fracture structures on bo...

  13. Xenolitos ultramáficos en el cerro De la Laguna, volcanismo basáltico de retroarco en el sureste de la provincia de Mendoza, Argentina Ultramafic xenoliths in De la Laguna hill, retro-arc basaltic volcanism in the southeast of Mendoza Province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Bertotto

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describen por primera vez xenolitos ultramáficos incluidos en basaltos de retroarco cenozoicos, en el sector extraandino de la provincia de Mendoza. El basalto portador tiene estructura masiva y textura porfírica con asociaciones de fenocristales de olivino-clinopiroxeno y olivino-plagioclasa. Todos los xenolitos ultramáficos son peridotitas en facies de espinela, se reconocieron lherzolitas, wehrlitas y dunitas, en orden de abundancia. Presentan una asociación mineral compuesta por olivino, ortopiroxeno, clinopiroxeno y espinela. Las texturas identificadas son porfiroclástica de Tipo I y porfiroclástica a equigranular de Tipo I. Estos xenolitos tienen zonas de reacción microscópicas mayormente desarrolladas en los ortopiroxenos y clinopiroxenos en el contacto con el basalto. La presencia de reacción indica al menos un evento de desequilibrio. Estas peridotitas representan fragmentos del manto superior situado debajo de la zona estudiada.Ultramafic xenoliths in Cenozoic retro-arc basalts of the extra-Andean sector of Mendoza province are described here for the first time. The host basalt has a massive structure and porphyritic texture with phenocryst assemblages of olivine-clinopyroxene and olivine-plagioclase. All the ultramafic xenoliths are spinel-bearing peridotites; lherzolite, wehrlite and dunite, in order of abundance, have been recognized. The mineral assemblage is olivine-orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene-spinel. Textures are porphyroclastic Type I and porphyroclastic to equigranular Type I. The xenoliths contain microscopic reaction areas, mainly developed in orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene in the contact with basalt. The reaction indicates at least one disequilibrium event. The peridotites are fragments of the upper mantle situated beneath the study area.

  14. Evidence of pre-Columbian settlements in the forest of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Araceli Zamora-Camacho; Juan Manuel Espíndola; Peter Schaaf; Angel Ramírez; María de Lourdes Godínez Calderón

    2015-01-01

    The basaltic Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field (LTVF) is located at the western margin of the Gulf of Mexico in the State of Veracruz, Mexico. The field is a massif composed of four large volcanic structures and hundreds of scoria cones, lava domes and maars. This area was in the past covered by a dense forest in whose margins flourished several of the ancient cities of importance in central and southern Veracruz. Within the forest no enduring archeological ruins have been found; but ...

  15. Basalt weathering in an Arctic Mars-analog site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesavage, Tiffany; Thompson, Aaron; Hausrath, Elisabeth M.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-07-01

    The martian surface has undergone chemical and physical weathering in the past, and these processes may continue intermittently today. To explore whether martian rocks are likely to retain features indicative of weathering, we investigated how basaltic material weathers on Earth. Specifically, we investigated weathering of a Quaternary-aged basaltic flow at the Sverrefjell volcano in Svalbard, above the Arctic Circle. This flow weathered since deglaciation under cold, dry (characterized the mineralogical and morphological properties using electron microscopy (EM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and selective chemical dissolution. In addition, we ran colloidal dispersion, wetting/drying, and freeze/thaw experiments. In the regolith, we observed concentrations of short-range ordered (SRO) phases similar to those observed in warmer, wetter volcanic ash soils. IR and EM analyses of the clay-sized fraction were consistent with allophane as the predominant secondary phase. Selective chemical extractions targeting SRO phases indicated lower Al/Si ratios than those observed in volcanic soils reported in warmer localities, which we attribute to Si-rich allophane and/or abundant Si-rich rock coatings. The oxic circumneutral-pH colloidal dispersion experiments mobilized Al, Fe and Ti primarily as 260-415 nm particles and Ca, Mg and Na as solutes. Si was lost both in the colloidal and dissolved forms. Dispersed colloids likely contain allophane and ferrihydrite. Under anoxic conditions, dissolution of Fe oxide cements also released fines. The experiments help to explain elemental loss from the clay-sized regolith fraction at Svalbard: observed depletions in Ca, K, Mg and Na were likely due to solute loss, while particle-reactive Al, Fe, Si and Ti were mostly retained. Wetting/drying was observed to be as effective as freeze/thaw in driving material loss. It is thus possible that cyclic adsorption of water onto basaltic rocks in this dry climate may result

  16. Multiphase Alkaline Basalts of Central Al-Haruj Al-Abyad of Libya: Petrological and Geochemical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Aal M. Abdel-Karim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Al-Haruj basalts that represent the largest volcanic province in Libya consist of four lava flow phases of varying thicknesses, extensions, and dating. Their eruption is generally controlled by the larger Afro-Arabian rift system. The flow phases range from olivine rich and/or olivine dolerites to olivine and/or normal basalts that consist mainly of variable olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, and glass. Olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene form abundant porphyritic crystals. In olivine-rich basalt and olivine basalt, these minerals occur as glomerophyric or seriate clusters of an individual mineral or group of minerals. Groundmass textures are variably intergranular, intersertal, vitrophyric, and flow. The pyroclastic, clastogenic flows and/or ejecta of the volcanic cones show porphyritic, vitrophric, pilotaxitic, and vesicular textures. They are classified into tholeiite, alkaline, and olivine basalts. Three main groups are recorded. Basalts of phase 1 are generated from tholeiitic to alkaline magma, while those of phases 3 and 4 are derived from alkaline magma. It is proposed that the tholeiitic basalts represent prerift stage magma generated by higher degree of partial melting (2.0–3.5% of garnet-peridotite asthenospheric mantle source, at shallow depth, whereas the dominant alkaline basalts may represent the rift stage magma formed by low degree of partial melting (0.7–1.5% and high fractionation of the same source, at greater depth in an intra-continental plate with OIB affinity. The melt generation could be also attributed to lithosphere extension associated with passive rise of variable enriched mantle.

  17. The `Strawberry Volcanic Field' of Northeastern Oregon: Another Piece of the CRB Puzzle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Mid to Late Miocene Strawberry Volcanics field (SVF) located along the southern margin of the John Day valley of NE Oregon, comprise a diverse group of volcanic rocks ranging from basalt to rhyolite. The main outcrop area of the SVF (3,400 km2) is bordered by units from the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), with the main CRB units to the north, the Picture Gorge Basalt to the east and Steens Basalt to the south. The geographic position and age of the Strawberry Volcanics make a genetic relationship to CRB volcanism likely, yet little is known about this diverse volcanic field. This research aims at refining the stratigraphic and age relationships as well as the petrology and geochemistry of magmas associated with the SVF. Previous investigations (e.g. Robyn, 1977) found that the SVF was active between 20 to 10 Ma with the main pulse largely being coeval with the 15 Ma CRBG eruptions. Lavas and tuffs from the SVF are calc-alkaline with low FeO*/MgO (~ 2.56 wt. %), high Al2O3 (~ 16.4 wt. %), low TiO2 (~ 1.12 wt.%), and span the entire compositional range from basalt to rhyolite (47-78 wt. % SiO2) with andesite as the dominant lithology. Basaltic lavas from the SVF have compositional affinities to earlier Steens Basalt, and some trace element concentrations and ratios are indistinguishable from those of CRBG lavas (e.g. Zr, Ba, Sr, and Ce/Y). Andesites are calc-alkaline, but contrary to typical arc (orogenic) andesites, SVF andesites are exceedingly phenocryst poor (Strawberry Volcanics are largely the product of hot-spot related basaltic magmas interacting with the continental crust. The range in compositions from calc-alkaline andesite to rhyolite may be attributed to the hybridization of mantle-derived and crustal melts, with the more evolved compositions reflecting greater proportions of crustally derived material and/or higher degrees of differentiation. Furthermore, since the earliest SVF eruption is 3 Ma older than the proposed onset of the CRBG (~ 17 Ma

  18. Extrusion cast explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, Kenneth J.

    1985-01-01

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

  19. Chemical profiling of explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M.H. Brust

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this thesis is to develop analytical methods for the chemical profiling of explosives. Current methodologies for the forensic analysis of explosives focus on identification of the explosive material. However, chemical profiling of explosives becomes increasingly important, as thi

  20. Sustained Water Quality Impacts in Marine Environments Due to Mechanical Milling of Volcanic Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genareau, K. D.; Cronin, S. J.; Stewart, C.; Back, E.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are known to be a significant geohazard, but post- or inter-eruptive processes (such as lahars, landslides, and debris avalanches) can be equally damaging to local and regional areas by remobilizing deposits. Numerous studies have found that soluble salts bound to ash grain surfaces may be quickly released into exposed waters, often lowering pH and adding trace metals with both beneficial and deleterious effects on marine flora and fauna (e.g., Fe influx initiating blooms of marine phytoplankton). Most of the cation content of pyroclastic deposits is released slowly into the environment through weathering and alteration processes. However, other pathways exist through the physical comminution of pyroclasts in fluvial and marine settings. In this case, mechanical fracturing of pyroclasts during progressive stages of disaggregation will lead to exposure of reactive particle surfaces. This study evaluates the potential, ongoing effects on water quality by experimental, mechanical milling of pyroclasts and the evaluation of released metals into exposed waters using the pyroclastic density current deposits of both the 2010 eruption of Merapi and the 2014 eruption of Kelud (Java, Indonesia), which have a bulk basaltic andesite/andesite composition (60-65 wt% SiO2). The electrical conductivity (EC) of water samples positively correlates with Ca and Sr concentrations in the case of bulk ash, whole, and crushed lapilli, but correlates with Na for the milled samples. Compared to other stages of pyroclast disaggregation, milled lapilli have the greatest effect on the concentration of alkali elements and produce a significant increase in Ca, Na, K, and Si. Mechanical milling of pyroclasts grinds down minerals and glass, resulting in an increased EC, pH, and Na concentration of exposed waters. Similar experiments are currently being conducted using basalt (50 wt% SiO2) and rhyolite (70 wt% SiO2) deposits, and these results will be presented

  1. Cenozoic intraplate volcanism in Mongolia; if not a mantle plume then what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, T. L.; Saunders, A. D.; Kempton, P. D.

    2003-04-01

    Diffuse, small-volume basaltic volcanism has occurred throughout Mongolia for the past 30 My. This region provides an excellent opportunity to study intraplate volcanism because it is clearly on continental crust and far removed from the effects of subduction-related processes. Although magma has been erupted onto 45 km thick crust, there appears to be very little crustal contamination (Barry et al., 2003). The volcanism also provides an important link between the basaltic volcanism to the north around the Baikal rift zone, which has often been related to a mantle plume and Cenozoic basaltic volcanism that infills extensional grabens within NE China. Very clear chemical similarities within all the Baikal-Mongolia-NE China Cenozoic basalts exists (Barry &Kent, 1998) suggesting that the mantle source region beneath this vast area may be the same. Therefore, one general model should be able to explain all the volcanism. Trace element, REE and isotopic modeling of Mongolian basalt compositions indicate that the melts most likely formed within the lowermost lithospheric mantle from recently metasomatised lithosphere. There is no evidence for high heat flow within the mantle (Khutorskoy &Yarmolyuk, 1989), but geophysical studies infer anomalously dense material to be present at the base of the lithospheric mantle (Petit et al., 2002) which is coincident with a low velocity zone at ~200 km depth (Villaseñor et al., 2001). However, there does not appear to be anomalous low velocity material within the asthenospheric mantle. Geochemistry of the basalts give no positive indication for the presence of an underlying mantle plume. Conversely, whilst localized extensional tectonics may have aided the extrusion of basaltic melts, the small amount of extension cannot account for the generation of the basalts (McKenzie &Bickle, 1988). Lacking evidence for a high heat flux mantle plume, we may suggest the presence of a thermal anomaly, i.e. additional heat within the asthenosphere

  2. Lava and Life: New investigations into the Carson Volcanics, lower Kimberley Basin, north Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Karin; Phillips, Chris; Hollis, Julie

    2014-05-01

    The Carson Volcanics are the only volcanic unit in the Paleoproterozoic Kimberley Basin and are part of a poorly studied Large Igneous Province (LIP) that was active at 1790 Ma. New work focussing on this LIP in 2012 and 2013 involved helicopter-supported traverses and sampling of the Carson Volcanics in remote areas near Kalumburu in far north Western Australia's Kimberley region. The succession is widespread and flat lying to gently dipping. It consists of three to six basalt units with intercalated sandstone and siltstone. The basalts are 20-40 m thick, but can be traced up to 60 km along strike. The basalt can be massive or amygdaloidal and commonly display polygonal to subhorizontal and rare vertical columnar jointing. Features of the basalt include ropy lava tops and basal pipe vesicles consistent with pahoehoe lavas. The intercalated cross-bedded quartzofeldspathic sandstone and siltstone vary in thickness up to 40 m and can be traced up to 40 km along strike. Peperite is common and indicates interaction between wet, unconsolidated sediment and hot lava. Stromatolitic chert at the top of the formation represents the oldest life found within the Kimberley region. Mud cracks evident in the sedimentary rocks, and stromatolites suggest an emergent broad tidal flat environment. The volcanics were extruded onto a wide marginal margin setting subject to frequent flooding events. Thickening of the volcanic succession south and the palaeocurrents in the underlying King Leopold Sandstone and the overlying Warton Sandstone suggest that this shelf sloped to the south. The type of basalt and the basalt morphology indicate a low slope gradient of about 1°.

  3. Alkaline volcanic rocks from the Columbia Hills, Gusev crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSween, H.Y.; Ruff, S.W.; Morris, R.V.; Bell, J.F., III; Herkenhoff, K.; Gellert, Ralf; Stockstill, K.R.; Tornabene, L.L.; Squyres, S. W.; Crisp, J.A.; Christensen, P.R.; McCoy, T.J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Schmidt, M.

    2006-01-01

    Irvine, Backstay, and Wishstone are the type specimens for three classes of fine-grained or fragmental, relatively unaltered rocks with distinctive thermal emission spectra, found as float on the flanks of the Columbia Hills. Chemical analyses indicate that these rocks are mildly alkaline basalt, trachybasalt, and tephrite, respectively. Their mineralogy consists of Na- and K-rich feldspar(s), low- and high-Ca pyroxenes, ferroan olivine, Fe-Ti (and possibly Cr) oxides, phosphate, and possibly glass. The texture of Wishstone is consistent with a pyroclastic origin, whereas Irvine and Backstay are lavas or possibly dike rocks. Chemical compositions of these rocks plot on or near liquid lines of descent for most elements calculated for Adirondack class rocks (olivine-rich basalts from the Gusev plains) at various pressures from 0.1 to 1.0 GPa. We infer that Wishstone-, Backstay-, and Irvine-class magmas may have formed by fractionation of primitive, oxidized basaltic magma similar to Adirondack-class rocks. The compositions of all these rocks reveal that the Gusev magmatic province is alkaline, distinct from the subalkaline volcanic rocks thought to dominate most of the planet's surface. The fact that differentiated volcanic rocks were not encountered on the plains prior to ascending Husband Hill may suggest a local magma source for volcanism beneath Gusev crater. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Chopped basalt fibres: A new perspective in reinforcing poly(lactic acid to produce injection moulded engineering composites from renewable and natural resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tamas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the reinforcing of Poly(lactic acid with chopped basalt fibres by using silane treated and untreated basalt fibres. Composite materials with 5–10–15–20–30–40 wt% basalt fibre contents were prepared from silane sized basalt fibres using extrusion, and injection moulding, while composites with 5–10–15 wt% basalt fibre contents were also prepared by using untreated basalt fibres as control. The properties of the injection moulded composites were extensively examined by using quasi-static (tensile, three-point bending and dynamic mechanical tests (notched and unnotched Charpy impact tests, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, heat deflection temperature (HDT analysis, dimensional stability test, as well as melt flow index (MFI analysis and scanning electron microscopic (SEM observations. It was found that silane treated chopped basalt fibres are much more effective in reinforcing Poly(lactic acid than natural fibres; although basalt fibres are not biodegradable but they are still considered as natural (can be found in nature in the form of volcanic rocks and biologically inert. It is demonstrated in this paper that by using basalt fibre reinforcement, a renewable and natural resource based composite can be produced by injection moulding with excellent mechanical properties suitable even for engineering applications. Finally it was shown that by using adequate drying of the materials, composites with higher mechanical properties can be achieved compared to literature data.

  5. A deterministic methodology for prediction of fracture distribution in basaltic multiflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lore, Jason; Aydin, Atilla; Goodson, Kenneth

    2001-04-01

    The fracture distribution in basalt flows is a direct result of thermal processes. Thus basalt flows present a unique opportunity to characterize a nearly perfect deterministic system with its fundamental physical parameters. Fracture distribution data collected on cliff exposures of basalt flows near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are combined with calculations of cooling rate and temperature distribution from a finite element model to construct a predictive methodology for fracture spacing. The methodology is based on an empirical power law relationship between inverse cooling rate and fracture spacing. The methodology may be applied to unexposed basalt flows of approximately elliptical cross section whose thickness and width are constrained only by geophysical or borehole data if sufficient fracture data on nearby exposed flows are available. The methodology aids waste remediation efforts at sites involving contaminant transport through fractured basalt, such as the INEEL and the Hanford site in Washington, as well as involving transport and fluid flow through volcanic or intrusive rocks where thermal processes are responsible for fracturing.

  6. Interactions between basalts and oil source rocks in rift basins: CO2 generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Basalts interbedded with oil source rocks are discovered frequently in rift basins of eastern China, where CO2 is found in reservoirs around or within basalts, for example in the Binnan reservoir of the Dongying Depression. In the reservoirs, CO2 with heavy carbon isotopic composition (δ13C>-10‰ PDB) is in most cases accounts for 40% of the total gas reserve, and is believed to have resulted from degassing of basaltic magma from the mantle. In their investigations of the Binnan reservoir, the authors suggested that the CO2 would result from interactions between the source rocks and basalts. As the source rocks around basalts are rich in carbonate minerals, volcanic minerals, transition metals and organic matter, during their burial history some of the transition metals were catalyzed on the thermal degradation of organic matter into hydrocarbons and on the decomposition of carbonate minerals into CO2, which was reproduced in thermal simulations of the source rocks with the transition metals (Ni and Co). This kind of CO2 accounts for 55%-85% of the total gas reserve generated in the process of thermal simulation, and its δ13C values range from -11‰- -7.2‰ PDB, which are very similar to those of CO2 found in the Binnan reservoir. The co-generation of CO2 and hydrocarbon gases makes it possible their accumulation together in one trap. In other words, if the CO2 resulted directly from degassing of basaltic magma or was derived from the mantle, it could not be accumulated with hydrocarbon gases because it came into the basin much earlier than hydrocarbon generation and much earlier than trap formation. Therefore, the source rocks around basalts generated hydrocarbons and CO2 simultaneously through catalysis of Co and Ni transition metals, which is useful for the explanation of co-accumulation of hydrocarbon gases and CO2 in rift basins in eastern China.

  7. Characterization of reference Umtanum and Cohassett basalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, C.C.; Johnston, R.G.; Strope, M.B.

    1985-02-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Materials Testing Group (MTG) provides large quantities of reference basalt for testing waste package materials under repository conditions, site sorption characteristics and other experimental purposes. This document describes the reference rock materials currently used in testing, namely entablature and colonnade basalt from the Umtanum and Cohassett flows. The data include sampling locations, bulk chemical composition, modal percentages of major phases, and the chemical and mineralogical compositions of these phases. 8 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. The Use of Basalt, Basalt Fibers and Modified Graphite for Nuclear Waste Repository - 12150

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulik, V.I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, pr. Nauky 47, Kyiv, 03680 (Ukraine); Biland, A.B. [HHK Technologies, 3535 Wilcreast Dr., Houston TX 77042 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    New materials enhancing the isolation of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are continuously being developed.. Our research suggests that basalt-based materials, including basalt roving chopped basalt fiber strands, basalt composite rebar and materials based on modified graphite, could be used for enhancing radioactive waste isolation during the storage and disposal phases and maintaining it during a significant portion of the post-closure phase. The basalt vitrification process of nuclear waste is a viable alternative to glass vitrification. Basalt roving, chopped basalt fiber strands and basalt composite rebars can significantly increase the strength and safety characteristics of nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel storages. Materials based on MG are optimal waterproofing materials for nuclear waste containers. (authors)

  9. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, M.; Bengtson, S.

    2013-12-01

    The oceanic crust makes up the largest potential habitat for life on Earth, yet next to nothing is known about the abundance, diversity and ecology of its biosphere. Our understanding of the deep biosphere of subseafloor crust is, with a few exceptions, based on a fossil record. Surprisingly, a majority of the fossilized microorganisms have been interpreted or recently re-interpreted as remnants of fungi rather than prokaryotes. Even though this might be due to a bias in fossilization the presence of fungi in these settings can not be neglected. We have examined fossilized microorganisms in drilled basalt samples collected at the Emperor Seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomography microscopy (SRXTM) studies has revealed a complex morphology and internal structure that corresponds to characteristic fungal morphology. Chitin was detected in the fossilized hyphae, which is another strong argument in favour of a fungal interpretation. Chitin is absent in prokaryotes but a substantial constituent in fungal cell walls. The fungal colonies consist of both hyphae and yeast-like growth states as well as resting structures and possible fruit bodies, thus, the fungi exist in vital colonies in subseafloor basalts. The fungi have also been involved in extensive weathering of secondary mineralisations. In terrestrial environments fungi are known as an important geobiological agent that promotes mineral weathering and decomposition of organic matter, and they occur in vital symbiosis with other microorganisms. It is probable to assume that fungi would play a similar role in subseafloor basalts and have great impact on the ecology and on biogeochemical cycles in such environments.

  10. Origin of the Grande Ronde Basalts, Columbia River Basalt Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, S. R.; Sen, G.; Reidel, S. P.

    2005-12-01

    The Columbia River basalts are generally thought to have formed by plume melting. Takahashi et al. (1998) suggested that the near-aphyric Grande Ronde Basalts (GR), which comprise ~63% of the CRBG, are essentially primary melts formed by nearly complete fusion of eclogite source rock in the plume and that such melting took place ~2.0 GPa. Durand and Sen (2002) examined phenocrysts and whole rock analyses and concluded that all the basalts are non-primary and, more importantly, that they underwent significant "processing" in shallow crustal magma chambers which erased their higher pressure geochemical signal, thus casting doubt on the validity of the eclogitic plume melting model. Here we report the results of our efforts to simulate the higher pressure histories of GR basalts using COMAGMAT and MELTS software. Our intent was to evaluate (1) whether such melts could be derived from primary melts formed by partial melting of a peridotite source as an alternative to the eclogite model, or if bulk melting of eclogite is required; and (2) at what pressure such primary melts could have been in equilibrium with the mantle. We carried out both forward and inverse modeling. In the forward models we chose different starting melt compositions, all produced in laboratory experiments, from peridotite vs. eclogitic sources. Our starting melts were produced by 6-17% partial melting of the peridotite KLB-1 (Hirose and Kushiro, 1993) and 18-40% melting of eclogites (77SL-582; CRB72-31; Keshav et al., 2004; Takahashi et al., 1998) at 1-3.0 GPa. In a second model, our starting melt composition was the most primitive GR lava with 6.5 wt. % MgO. We extrapolated a linear regression through the GR data to 8 wt. % MgO. We then assumed that such a melt was only olivine-equilibrated, and incrementally added olivine while maintaining equilibrium between olivine and melt using a Kd of 0.3, until a melt in equilibrium with the mantle olivine (Fo89) was found. This composition was fractionated

  11. Understanding vented gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautkaski, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1997-12-31

    The report is an introduction to vented gas explosions for nonspecialists, particularly designers of plants for flammable gases and liquids. The phenomena leading to pressure generation in vented gas explosions in empty and congested rooms are reviewed. The four peak model of vented gas explosions is presented with simple methods to predict the values of the individual peaks. Experimental data on the external explosion of dust and gas explosions is discussed. The empirical equation relating the internal and external peak pressures in vented dust explosions is shown to be valid for gas explosion tests in 30 m{sup 3} and 550 m{sup 3} chambers. However, the difficulty of predicting the internal peak pressure in large chambers remains. Methods of explosion relief panel design and principles of vent and equipment layout to reduce explosion overpressures are reviewed. (orig.) 65 refs.

  12. Volcanic ash: What it is and how it forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.

    1991-09-13

    There are four basic eruption processes that produce volcanic ash: (1) decompression of rising magma, gas bubble growth, and fragmentation of the foamy magma in the volcanic vent (magmatic), (2) explosive mixing of magma with ground or surface water (hydrovolcanic), (3) fragmentation of country rock during rapid expansion of steam and/or hot water (phreatic), and (4) breakup of lava fragments during rapid transport from the vent. Variations in eruption style and the characteristics of volcanic ashes produced during explosive eruptions depend on many factors, including magmatic temperature, gas content, viscosity and crystal content of the magma before eruption, the ratio of magma to ground or surface water, and physical properties of the rock enclosing the vent. Volcanic ash is composed of rock and mineral fragments, and glass shards, which is less than 2 mm in diameter. Glass shard shapes and sizes depend upon size and shape of gas bubbles present within the magma immediately before eruption and the processes responsible for fragmentation of the magma. Shards range from slightly curved, thin glass plates, which were broken from large, thin-walled spherical bubble walls, to hollow needles broken from pumiceous melts containing gas bubbles stretched by magma flow within the volcanic vent. Pumice fragments make up the coarser-grained portions of the glass fraction. Particle sizes range from meters for large blocks expelled near the volcanic vent to nanometers for fine ash and aerosol droplets within well-dispersed eruption plumes. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Probing permeability and microstructure: Unravelling the role of a low-permeability dome on the explosivity of Merapi (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Alexandra R. L.; Martel, Caroline; Bourdier, Jean-Louis; Heap, Michael J.; Reuschlé, Thierry; Erdmann, Saskia; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Cholik, Noer

    2016-04-01

    Low permeability dome rocks may contribute to conduit overpressure development in volcanic systems, indirectly abetting explosive activity. The permeability of dome-forming rocks is primarily controlled by the volume, type (vesicles and/or microcracks), and connectivity of the void space present. Here we investigate the permeability-porosity relationship of dome-forming rocks and pumice clasts from Merapi's 1888 to 2013 eruptions and assess their possible role in eruptive processes, with particular emphasis on the 2010 paroxysmal eruption. Rocks are divided into three simple field classifications common to all eruptions: Type 1 samples have low bulk density and are pumiceous in texture; Type 2 samples, ubiquitous to the 2010 eruption, are dark grey to black in hand sample and vary greatly in vesicularity; and Type 3 samples are weakly vesicular, light grey in hand sample, and are the only samples that contain cristobalite. Type 2 and Type 3 rocks are present in all eruptions and their permeability and porosity data define similar power law relationships, whereas data for Type 1 samples are clearly discontinuous from these trends. A compilation of permeability and porosity data for andesites and basaltic andesites with published values highlights two microstructural transitions that exert control on permeability, confirmed by modified Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) analysis. Permeability is microcrack- and diktytaxitic-controlled at connected porosities, φc, 31 vol.%. Type 3 basaltic andesites, the least permeable of the measured samples and therefore the most likely to have originated in the uppermost low-permeability dome, are identified as relicts of terminal domes (the last dome extruded prior to quiescence). Cristobalite commonly found in the voids of Type 3 blocks may not contribute significantly to the reduction of the permeability of these samples, mainly because it is associated with an extensive microporous, diktytaxitic texture. Indeed, the low

  14. Tracing volatile loss during the eruption of individual flood basalt flows in the Columbia River Flood Basalt Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, K. W.; Vye, C.; Gannoun, A.; Self, S.

    2010-12-01

    Continental flood basalt (CFB) volcanism is characterised by the repeated eruption of huge batches of magma, producing enormous basalt provinces (105-106 km3) over relatively brief intervals of time, and delivering large masses of volcanic gas to the atmosphere. The release of gases and aerosols during CFB volcanism is thought to have had a significant impact on the atmosphere, ocean chemistry and climate [1-3]. The key factors influencing atmospheric chemistry and the environmental impact of CFB eruptions are the timing, mechanism and duration of volatile release during individual eruptions, but for the most part such information remains poorly known. The 187Re-187Os isotope system offers a highly sensitive tracer of the evolution of melt chemistry, and of the timing and mechanism of volatile release. This is partly because the contrasting behaviour of Re and Os during melting results in the extreme fractionation of parent/daughter (Re/Os) isotope ratios, thus magmatic phases can yield precise chronological information, and crustal rocks develop highly radiogenic isotope compositions that can be readily traced if assimilated [4]. Partly also because Re behaves as a highly volatile element during sub-aerial volcanism [5]. This study presents 187Re-187Os isotope data for rocks and minerals from two flows in the Columbia River Flood Basalt Group, one of the youngest flood basalt provinces that formed over a 2 million year interval in the Mid-Miocene. The 2,660 km3 Sand Hollow flow field displays small major and trace element variations, both laterally and vertically across the flow, indicative of fractional crystallisation, but the elemental data cannot be used to distinguish source variations and/or crustal contamination. However, Os isotopes indicate systematic crustal contamination over the timescale of an individual eruption, where the earliest formed lavas show the greatest degree of contamination. Isotope and elemental data for phenocryst phases from the 40

  15. Micromorphological Characterization of Some Volcanic Soil In West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfud Arifin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol3no4.20082Micromorphological characterization has been studied on six pedons of soils developing in volcanic materials in West Java. The pedons represent deposits of different volcanoes (Mount Tangkuban Perahu, Mount Patuha and Mount Papandayan with different ages (Pleistocene, Holocene within two types of volcanisms (andesitic, basaltic, and three agroclimatic zones (A, B1, B2. Undisturbed soil samples were taken from each identifiable horizon for thin section preparations. Observations were carried out by means of a magnifying lens, binocular stereomicroscope, polarization microscope, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The result demonstrates that micromorphological characteristics of volcanic soils developing from different ages, types of parent material, and climate were different through their c/f related distribution 2µ patterns, c/f ratios, sorting, infillings and coatings of voids, and microstructure.  

  16. Atmospheric oxygenation caused by a change in volcanic degassing pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno; Arndt, Nicholas T

    2011-10-12

    The Precambrian history of our planet is marked by two major events: a pulse of continental crust formation at the end of the Archaean eon and a weak oxygenation of the atmosphere (the Great Oxidation Event) that followed, at 2.45 billion years ago. This oxygenation has been linked to the emergence of oxygenic cyanobacteria and to changes in the compositions of volcanic gases, but not to the composition of erupting lavas--geochemical constraints indicate that the oxidation state of basalts and their mantle sources has remained constant since 3.5 billion years ago. Here we propose that a decrease in the average pressure of volcanic degassing changed the oxidation state of sulphur in volcanic gases, initiating the modern biogeochemical sulphur cycle and triggering atmospheric oxygenation. Using thermodynamic calculations simulating gas-melt equilibria in erupting magmas, we suggest that mostly submarine Archaean volcanoes produced gases with SO(2)/H(2)S atmosphere.

  17. VOLCANIC TSUNAMI GENERATING SOURCE MECHANISMS IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, volcanic island flank failures and underwater slides have generated numerous destructive tsunamis in the Caribbean region. Convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity caused primarily from the eastward movement of the Caribbean Plate in relation to the North American, Atlantic and South American Plates, is responsible for zones of subduction in the region, the formation of island arcs and the evolution of particular volcanic centers on the overlying plate. The inter-plate tectonic interaction and deformation along these marginal boundaries result in moderate seismic and volcanic events that can generate tsunamis by a number of different mechanisms. The active geo-dynamic processes have created the Lesser Antilles, an arc of small islands with volcanoes characterized by both effusive and explosive activity. Eruption mechanisms of these Caribbean volcanoes are complex and often anomalous. Collapses of lava domes often precede major eruptions, which may vary in intensity from Strombolian to Plinian. Locally catastrophic, short-period tsunami-like waves can be generated directly by lateral, direct or channelized volcanic blast episodes, or in combination with collateral air pressure perturbations, nuéss ardentes, pyroclastic flows, lahars, or cascading debris avalanches. Submarine volcanic caldera collapses can also generate locally destructive tsunami waves. Volcanoes in the Eastern Caribbean Region have unstable flanks. Destructive local tsunamis may be generated from aerial and submarine volcanic edifice mass edifice flank failures, which may be triggered by volcanic episodes, lava dome collapses, or simply by gravitational instabilities. The present report evaluates volcanic mechanisms, resulting flank failure processes and their potential for tsunami generation. More specifically, the report evaluates recent volcanic eruption mechanisms of the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat, of Mt. Pel

  18. Venus volcanism: initial analysis from magellan data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J W; Campbell, D B; Elachi, C; Guest, J E; McKenzie, D P; Saunders, R S; Schaber, G G; Schubert, G

    1991-04-12

    Magellan images confirm that volcanism is widespread and has been fimdamentally important in the formation and evolution of the crust of Venus. High-resolution imaging data reveal evidence for intrusion (dike formation and cryptodomes) and extrusion (a wide range of lava flows). Also observed are thousands of small shield volcanoes, larger edifices up to several hundred kilometers in diameter, massive outpourings of lavas, and local pyroclastic deposits. Although most features are consistent with basaltic compositions, a number of large pancake-like domes are morphologically similar to rhyolite-dacite domes on Earth. Flows and sinuous channels with lengths of many hundreds of kilometers suggest that extremely high effusion rates or very fluid magmas (perhaps komatiites) may be present. Volcanism is evident in various tectonic settings (coronae, linear extensional and compressional zones, mountain belts, upland rises, highland plateaus, and tesserae). Volcanic resurfacing rates appear to be low (less than 2 Km(3)/yr) but the significance of dike formation and intrusions, and the mode of crustal formation and loss remain to be established.

  19. Tracing acidification induced by Deccan volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Eric; Adatte, Thierry; Fantasia, Alicia; Ponte, Jorge; Florindo, Fabio; Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Samant, Bandana; Mohabey, Dhananjay; Thakre, Deepali

    2015-04-01

    The Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) is constituted by three major phases of eruptions, for which the most voluminous - the Deccan Phase-2 - encompassed the Cretaceous-Paleogene (KT) boundary and has been pointed as the main contributor of the KT mass extinction. However, the mechanisms (including acidification) by which the massive Deccan Phase eruptions contributed to the end-Cretaceous global changes and to the controversial KT mass extinction are still poorly constrained. Here we identify the regional climate and environmental effects of the Deccan eruptions by studying the magnetic and mineral assemblages preserved in the lacustrine and continental intertrappeans sediments from the western Maharashtra Deccan Volcanic Provinces (DVP). To achieve this objective, we applied rock magnetic techniques coupled to scanning electron microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry to samples collected in three different stratigraphic sections. Our results show that the main magnetic carriers of the Deccan lacustrine and continental sediments are represented by allogenic (detrital) magnetite and hematite inherited from the weathering of the surrounding underlying basaltic bedrocks. Iron sulphides (pyrrhotite or greigite) are accessorily observed. Interestingly, the Podgawan deposits show peculiar and very distinct magnetic and mineralogical signatures, including iron oxide reductive dissolution and widespread crystallisation of iron vanadates, that we interpreted as the effect of Deccan induced acidification. Keywords: Deccan Volcanic Province, intertrappean continental sediments, environmental magnetism Funded by FCT (PTDC/CTE-GIX/117298/2010)

  20. Venus volcanism: Initial analysis from Magellan data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J.W.; Campbell, D.B.; Elachi, C.; Guest, J.E.; Mckenzie, D.P.; Saunders, R.S.; Schaber, G.G.; Schubert, G.

    1991-01-01

    Magellan images confirm that volcanism is widespread and has been fundamentally important in the formation and evolution of the crust of Venus. High-resolution imaging data reveal evidence for intrusion (dike formation and cryptodomes) and extrusion (a wide range of lava flows). Also observed are thousands of small shield volcanoes, larger edifices up to several hundred kilometers in diameter, massive outpourings of lavas, and local pyroclastic deposits. Although most features are consistent with basaltic compositions, a number of large pancake-like domes are morphologically similar to rhyolite-dacite domes on Earth. Flows and sinuous channels with lengths of many hundreds of kilometers suggest that extremely high effusion rates or very fluid magmas (perhaps komatiites) may be present. Volcanism is evident in various tectonic settings (coronae, linear extensional and compressional zones, mountain belts, upland rises, highland plateaus, and tesserae). Volcanic resurfacing rates appear to be low (less than 2 km3/yr) but the significance of dike formation and intrusions, and the mode of crustal formation and loss remain to be established.

  1. Primitive and contaminated basalts from the Southern Rocky Mountains, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, B.R.; Lipman, P.W.; Hedge, C.E.; Kurasawa, H.

    1969-01-01

    to the primitive basalts in lead isotope ratios. The primitive basalts have: 206Pb/204Pb ??? 18.09-18.34, 207Pb/204Pb ??? 15.5, 208Pb/204Pb ??? 37.6-37.9, 87Sr/86Sr ??? 0.704-0.705. In the primitive basalts from the Southern Rocky Mountains the values of 206Pb/204Pb are similar to values reported by others for Hawaiian and eastern Honshu basalts and abyssal basalts, whereas 208Pb/204Pb tends to be equal to or a little less radiogenic than those from the oceanic localities. 87Sr/86Sr appears to be equal to or a little greater than those of the oceanic localities. These 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios are distinctly less radiogenic and 87Sr/86Sr values are about equal to those reported by others for volcanic islands on oceanic ridges and rises. ?? 1969 Springer-Verlag.

  2. A Backarc Basin Origin for the Eocene Volcanic Rocks North of Abbas Abad, East of Shahrud, Northeast Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatbari Jafari, M.; Mobasher, K.; Davarpanah, A.; Babaie, H.; La Tour, T.

    2008-12-01

    The region in northeastern Iran, bordered by the Miami fault and the Doruneh fault, mainly exposes the Eocene volcanic and Tertiary sedimentary rocks and sporadic outcrops of pre- Jurassic metamorphic rocks such as gneiss and mica-schist. We have divided the volcanic and volcanic-sedimentary rocks into six main units: E1 through the youngest E6. North of Abbas Abad, the Lower Eocene is conglomerate, sandstone, and red shale with lenses of nummulite-bearing limestone at the base, and dacitic lava (E1) at the top. The nummulites give an Early Eocene age for the limestone lenses. The E2 unit includes vesicular basalt, intercalated, intraformational conglomerate, and lenses of nummulite-bearing limestone. E3 is volcanic- sedimentary, and is made of green tuff, tuffite, shale, and nummulite bearing limestone. E4 includes basalt and vesicular trachy-basalt, and E5 is mostly sedimentary, made of tan marl, sandstone, shale, and lenses of Middle Eocene nummulite-bearing limestone. The E6 unit is the most extensive, with at least three levels of nummulite-bearing limestone lenses which give a Middle to Early Eocene age. The volcanic rocks of the E6 unit include few hundred meters of epiclastic to hyaloclastic breccia, with intercalations of lava at the base. These are overlain by four horizons of aphyric olivine basalt and basalt, and phyric trachy-andesite and trachy-basalt. The volume of the aphyric lavas decreases, and that of the phyric lavas increases upsection. The Eocene volcanic sequence is covered by turbidite; the marl washings give an Eocene-Oligocene age range. Chondrite-normalized multi-element plots indicate enrichment of the Eocene Abbas Abad volcanic rocks in the LILE elements, with variable ratios of La/Yb (4.36-19.33) and La/Sm (3.10-7.91). These plots show a gentle slope, and the volcanic rocks in the E1 to E4 units are less enriched than those in the E6 unit, probably reflecting the difference in the original source for the melt. The multi-element plots

  3. Geochemical characteristics of island-arc volcanic rocks in the Nan-Nam Pat-Phetchabun zone, northern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shangyue; FENG Qinglai; YANG Wenqiang; ZHANG Zhibin; Chongpom Chonglakmani

    2010-01-01

    Late Permian-Early Triassic (P2-T1) volcanic rocks distributed on the eastern side of ocean-ridge and oceanic-island basalts in the Nan-Uttaradit zone were analyzed from aspects of petrographic characteristics, rock assemblage, REE, trace elements, geotectonic setting, etc., indicating that those volcanic rocks possess the characteristic features of island-arc volcanic rocks. The volcanic rock assemblage is basalt-basaltic andesite-andesite. The volcanic rocks are sub-alkaline, dominated by calc-alkaline series, with tholeiite series coming next. The chemical composition of the volcanic rocks is characterized by low TiO2 and K2O and high Al2O3 and Na2O. Their REE patterns are of the flat, weak LREE-enrichment right-inclined type. The trace elements are characterized by the enrichment of large cation elements such as K, Rb and Ba, common enrichment of U and Th, and depletion of Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf. The petrochemical plot falls within the field of volcanic rocks, in consistency with the plot of island-arc volcanic rocks in the Jinsha River zone of China. This island-arc volcanic zone, together with the ocean-ridge/oceanic island type volcanic rocks in the Nan-Uttaradit zone, constitutes the ocean-ridge volcanic rock-island-arc magmatic rock zones which are distributed in pairs, indicating that the oceanic crust of the Nan-Uttaradit zone once was of eastward subduction. This work is of great significance in exploring the evolution of paleo-Tethys in the Nan-Uttaradit zone.

  4. Hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Estrup, Maja;

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of the hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics on their degree of crystallisation has been explored by means of differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Vickers indentation. Different degrees of crystallisation in the basaltic glasses were achieved...

  5. Evolution and genesis of volcanic rocks from Mutnovsky Volcano, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Robertson, K.; Smith, E.; Selyangin, O.; Kiryukhin, A.; Mulcahy, S. R.; Walker, J. D.

    2014-10-01

    This study presents new geochemical data for Mutnovsky Volcano, located on the volcanic front of the southern portion of the Kamchatka arc. Field relationships show that Mutnovsky Volcano is comprised of four distinct stratocones, which have grown over that past 80 ka. The youngest center, Mutnovsky IV, has produced basalts and basaltic andesites only. The three older centers (Mutnovsky I, II, III) are dominated by basalt and basaltic andesite (60-80% by volume), but each has also produced small volumes of andesite and dacite. Across centers of all ages, Mutnovsky lavas define a tholeiitic igneous series, from 48-70% SiO2. Basalts and basaltic andesites have relatively low K2O and Na2O, and high FeO* and Al2O3 compared to volcanic rocks throughout Kamchatka. The mafic lavas are also depleted in the light rare earth elements (REEs), with chondrite-normalized La/Sm arc volcanic rocks worldwide. Radiogenic isotope ratios (Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf) are similar for samples from all four eruptive centers, and indicate that all samples were produced by melting of a similar source mixture. No clear age-progressive changes are evident in the compositions of Mutnovsky lavas. Mass balance and assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) modeling of major and rare earth elements (REEs) indicate that basaltic andesites were produced by FC of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine from a parental basalt, combined with assimilation of a melt composition similar to dacite lavas present at Mutnovsky. This modeling also indicates that andesites were produced by FC of plagioclase from basaltic andesite, combined with assimilation of dacite. Dacites erupted from Mutnovsky I and II have low abundances of REEs, and do not appear to be related to mafic magmas by FC or AFC processes. These dacites are modeled as the products of dehydration partial melting at mid-crustal levels of a garnet-free, amphibole-bearing basaltic rock, which itself formed in the mid-crust by emplacement of magma that

  6. Monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Scollo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the results of a project ongoing at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV. The objective is to develop and implement a system for monitoring and forecasting volcanic plumes of Etna. Monitoring is based at present by multispectral infrared measurements from the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager on board the Meteosat Second Generation geosynchronous satellite, visual and thermal cameras, and three radar disdrometers able to detect ash dispersal and fallout. Forecasting is performed by using automatic procedures for: i downloading weather forecast data from meteorological mesoscale models; ii running models of tephra dispersal, iii plotting hazard maps of volcanic ash dispersal and deposition for certain scenarios and, iv publishing the results on a web-site dedicated to the Italian Civil Protection. Simulations are based on eruptive scenarios obtained by analysing field data collected after the end of recent Etna eruptions. Forecasting is, hence, supported by plume observations carried out by the monitoring system. The system was tested on some explosive events occurred during 2006 and 2007 successfully. The potentiality use of monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes, in a way to prevent threats to aviation from volcanic ash, is finally discussed.

  7. Monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, S.; Prestifilippo, M.; Spata, G.; D'Agostino, M.; Coltelli, M.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper we describe the results of a project ongoing at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV). The objective is to develop and implement a system for monitoring and forecasting volcanic plumes of Etna. Monitoring is based at present by multispectral infrared measurements from the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager on board the Meteosat Second Generation geosynchronous satellite, visual and thermal cameras, and three radar disdrometers able to detect ash dispersal and fallout. Forecasting is performed by using automatic procedures for: i) downloading weather forecast data from meteorological mesoscale models; ii) running models of tephra dispersal, iii) plotting hazard maps of volcanic ash dispersal and deposition for certain scenarios and, iv) publishing the results on a web-site dedicated to the Italian Civil Protection. Simulations are based on eruptive scenarios obtained by analysing field data collected after the end of recent Etna eruptions. Forecasting is, hence, supported by plume observations carried out by the monitoring system. The system was tested on some explosive events occurred during 2006 and 2007 successfully. The potentiality use of monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes, in a way to prevent threats to aviation from volcanic ash, is finally discussed.

  8. Records of volcanic events since AD 1800 in the East Rongbuk ice core from Mt. Qomolangma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU JianZhong; KASPARI S.; HOU ShuGui; KANG ShiChang; QIN DaHe; REN JiaWen; MAYEWSKI p

    2009-01-01

    Continuous Bi profile of the East Rongbuk (ER) ice core near Mr.Qomolangma reveals nine major volcanic events since AD 1800.Compared with Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI),it shows that the con-centrations of Bi in the ER ice core can reflect the major volcanic events within the key areas.This provides a good horizon layer for ice core dating,as well as a basis for reconstructing a long sequence of volcanic records from the Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) Plateau ice cores.

  9. Petrogenesis of the flood basalts from the Early Permian Panjal Traps, Kashmir, India: Geochemical evidence for shallow melting of the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory; Bhat, Ghulam M.; Wang, Kuo-Lung; Brookfield, Michael E.; Jahn, Bor-Ming; Dostal, Jaroslav

    2014-09-01

    The Early Permian Panjal Traps of northern India represent a significant eruption of volcanic rocks which occurred during the opening of the Neotethys Ocean. Basaltic, basaltic-andesites, dacitic and rhyolitic rocks collected from Guryal Ravine and Pahalgam show evidence for subaerial and subaqueous eruptions indicating that they are contemporaneous with the formation of a shallow marine basin. The major and trace element geochemistry of the basalts is consistent with a within-plate setting and there are basalts which have high-Ti (TiO2 > 2.0 wt.%) and low-Ti (TiO2 < 1.8 wt.%) compositions. The ‘high-Ti’ basalts are similar to OIB whereas the ‘low-Ti’ basalts are similar to continental tholeiites. The identification of ‘high- and low-Ti’ basalts within the Panjal Traps is analogous to other large igneous provinces (e.g. Karoo, Deccan, Parana, Emeishan). The Sr-Nd isotopic values (εNd(T) = - 5.3 to + 1.3; ISr = 0.70432 to 0.71168) of both types of basalts overlap indicating that the rocks may have originated from the same ancient subcontinental lithospheric (i.e. EMII-like) mantle source (TDM = ~ 2000 Ma). The two groups of basalts can be modeled by using a primitive mantle source and different degrees of partial melting where the high-Ti rocks are produced by ~ 1% partial melting of a spinel peridotite source whereas the low-Ti rocks are produced by ~ 8% partial melting. Trace elemental and isotope modeling indicates that some of the basalts assimilated ≤ 10% crustal material. In contrast, the basaltic-andesites are likely formed by mixing between basaltic magmas and crustal melts which produced rocks with higher SiO2 (~ 55 wt.%) content and enriched isotopic signatures (εNd(T) = - 6.1; ISr = 0.70992). The Panjal Trap volcanism was likely due to partial melting of the SCLM within a passive extensional setting related to the rifting of Cimmeria from Gondwana. Contemporaneous volcanic and plutonic granitic rocks throughout the Himalaya are probably

  10. Middle Triassic volcanic rocks in the Northern Qiangtang (Central Tibet): Geochronology, petrogenesis, and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng-Sheng; Shi, Ren-Deng; Yi, Guo-Ding; Zou, Hai-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Although voluminous magmatism occurred during the Triassic in the Qiangtang terrane, the petrogenesis of the volcanic rocks and the associated tectonic scenarios remain mysterious. This study focuses on new identified primitive volcanic rocks from the Yanshiping area, Northern Qiangtang subterrane. The whole-rock major-trace elemental, Sr-Nd isotopic data, and zircon U-Pb age of volcanic rocks are reported in this paper in order to understand their petrogenesis and tectonic setting. The studied volcanic rocks can be grouped into two types, i.e., Nb-enriched basalts and basaltic andesites (NEBs) in the low sequence and arc basalts in the upper sequence. Zircon U-Pb dating using LA-ICP-MS techniques yields the concordant age with a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of ca. 242-241 Ma for the NEBs and ca. 240 Ma for the arc basalts. The distinct geochemical and isotopic characteristics of whole-rock and varying Th-U-REE components of zircon grains from the volcanic rocks suggest that the NEBs were derived from partial melting of relatively enriched mantle wedge that have been metasomatised by slab-related melts and that the arc basalts originated from partial melting of mixing of mantle wedge and depleted asthenospheric mantle in response to the slab breakoff. Our new geochemical and geochronological results, in combination with regional studies, imply that the Middle Triassic magmatism was generated in the tectonic setting of northward subduction of the Paleo-Tethys or Bangong-Nujiang Ocean. Subduction-related processes that include melting of the slab and the slab breakoff during the Permian-Middle Triassic made an important contribution to crustal growth in the Qiangtang terrane, whereas vertical crustal growth associated with collision-related setting during the Late Triassic is nonsignificant.

  11. Cenozoic Volcanism in South China Sea and Its Vicinity and South China Sea Spreading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The rock series, rock types and Sr-Nd isotopic dating of the Cenozoic volcanic rocks in the South China Sea are similar to those in its vicinity. On the basis of the spreading age of the South China Sea, the Cenozoic volcanic rocks are divided into three stages: the pre-spreading stage, the spreading stage and the post-spreading stage. The deep process characteristics of the asthenosphere and lithosphere may be inferred from the study on primary basaltic magma. The top layers of the asthenosphere both in the spreading stage and in the pre-spreading stage are closer to the earth surface than that in the post-spreading stage. From the pre-spreading stage to the spreading stage, the top layer of the asthenosphere decreased in depth, while the amount of interstitial partial melts increased. The evolution of the primary basaltic magma shows a progressive evolution sequence of the rifting volcanism and a faster lithospheric spreading velocity. From the spreading stage to the post-spreading stage, the top layer of the asthenosphere gradually increased in depth, but the amount of interstitial partial melts decreased. The evolution of primary basaltic magma shows a retrogressive evolution sequence of the rifting volcanism and a gradual decrease in the lithospheric spreading velocity. The depth recognized by the study on the Cenozoic volcanism demonstrates the deep environment for the formation and evolution of the South China Sea.

  12. Age, distance, and geochemical evolution within a monogenetic volcanic field: Analyzing patterns in the Auckland Volcanic Field eruption sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvec, Nicolas Le; Bebbington, Mark S.; Lindsay, Jan M.; McGee, Lucy E.

    2013-09-01

    The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) is a young active monogenetic basaltic field, which contains ˜50 volcanoes scattered across the Auckland metropolitan area. Understanding the temporal, spatial, and chemical evolution of the AVF during the last c.a. 250 ka is crucial in order to forecast a future eruption. Recent studies have provided new age constraints and potential temporal sequences of the past eruptions within the AVF. We use this information to study how the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers evolves with time, and how the chemical composition of the erupted magmas evolves with time and space. We seek to develop a methodology which compares successive eruptions to describe the link between geochemical and spatiotemporal evolution of volcanic centers within a monogenetic volcanic field. This methodology is tested with the present day data of the AVF. The Poisson nearest neighbor analysis shows that the spatial behavior of the field has been constant overtime, with the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers fitting the Poisson model within the significance levels. The results of the meta-analysis show the existence of correlations between the chemical composition of the erupted magmas and distance, volume, and time. The apparent randomness of the spatiotemporal evolution of the volcanic centers observed at the surface is probably influenced by the activity of the source. The methodology developed in this study can be used to identify possible relationships between composition trends and volume, time and/or distance to the behavior of the source, for successive eruptions of the AVF.

  13. Geology and geothermal potential of Alid Volcanic Center, Eritrea, Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clynne, M.A.; Duffield, W.A.; Fournier, R.O.; Janik, C.J. [and others

    1996-12-31

    Alid volcanic center is a 700-meter-tall mountain in Eritrea, northeast Africa. This mountain straddles the axis of an active crustal-spreading center called the Danakil Depression. Though volcanism associated with this crustal spreading is predominantly basaltic, centers of silicic volcanism, including Alid, are present locally. Silicic centers imply a magma reservoir in the crust and thus a possible potent shallow heat source for a hydrothermal-convection system. Boiling-temperature fumaroles are common on Alid, and their gas compositions indicate a reservoir temperature of at least 250{degrees}C. Alid is a 7-km x 5-km structural dome. The domed rocks, in decreasing age, are Precambrian schist and granite, a sequence of intercalated sedimentary rocks and basaltic lavas, and a sequence of basaltic and rhyolitic lava flows. Though isotopic ages are not yet determined, the domed volcanic rocks of Alid appear to be late Tertiary and/or Quaternary. Doming was likely caused by intrusion of relatively low density silicic magma into the upper crust. Subsequent to dome formation, a substantial volume of this magma was erupted from a vent near the west end of the summit area of the dome. This eruption produced a blanket of plinian rhyolite pumice over most, if not all, of the dome and fed pyroclastic flows that covered the part of the Danakil Depression around the base of the dome. The pumice deposits contain abundant inclusions of granophyric, miarolitic pyroxene granite, chemically indistinguishable from the pumice. This granite likely represents the uppermost part of the magma reservoir, which crystallized just prior to the pumice eruption.

  14. The Grizzly Lake complex (Yellowstone Volcano, USA): Mixing between basalt and rhyolite unraveled by microanalysis and X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgavi, Daniele; Arzilli, Fabio; Pritchard, Chad; Perugini, Diego; Mancini, Lucia; Larson, Peter; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-09-01

    Magma mixing is a widespread petrogenetic process. It has long been suspected to operate in concert with fractional crystallization and assimilation to produce chemical and temperature gradients in magmas. In particular, the injection of mafic magmas into felsic magma chambers is widely regarded as a key driver in the sudden triggering of what often become highly explosive volcanic eruptions. Understanding the mechanistic event chain leading to such hazardous events is a scientific goal of high priority. Here we investigate a mingling event via the evidence preserved in mingled lavas using a combination of X-ray computed microtomographic and electron microprobe analyses, to unravel the complex textures and attendant chemical heterogeneities of the mixed basaltic and rhyolitic eruption of Grizzly Lake in the Norris-Mammoth corridor of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field (YVF). We observe evidence that both magmatic viscous inter-fingering of magmas and disequilibrium crystallization/dissolution processes occur. Furthermore, these processes constrain the timescale of interaction between the two magmatic components prior to their eruption. X-ray microtomography images show variegated textural features, involving vesicle and crystal distributions, filament morphology, the distribution of enclaves, and further textural features otherwise obscured in conventional 2D observations and analyses. Although our central effort was applied to the determination of mixing end members, analysis of the hybrid portion has led to the discovery that mixing in the Grizzly Lake system was also characterized by the disintegration and dissolution of mafic crystals in the rhyolitic magma. The presence of mineral phases in both end member, for example, forsteritic olivine, sanidine, and quartz and their transport throughout the magmatic mass, by a combination of both mixing dynamics and flow imposed by ascent of the magmatic mass and its eruption, might have acted as a "geometric

  15. Phreatomagmatic eruptions through unconsolidated coastal plain sequences, Maungataketake, Auckland Volcanic Field (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Flores, Javier; Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.; Lindsay, Jan M.; Kereszturi, Gábor; Brand, Brittany D.; Smith, Ian E. M.

    2014-04-01

    Maungataketake is a monogenetic basaltic volcano formed at ~ 85-89 ka in the southern part of the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand. It comprises a basal 1100-m diameter tuff ring, with a central scoria/spatter cone and lava flows. The tuff ring was formed under hydrogeological and geographic conditions very similar to the present. The tuff records numerous density stratified, wet base surges that radiated outward up to 1 km, decelerating rapidly and becoming less turbulent with distance. The pyroclastic units dominantly comprise fine-grained expelled grains from various sedimentary deposits beneath the volcano mixed with a minor component of juvenile pyroclasts (~ 35 vol.%). Subtle lateral changes relate to deceleration with distance and vertical transformations are minor, pointing to stable explosion depths and conditions, with gradual transitions between units and no evidence for eruptive pauses. This volcano formed within and on ~ 60 m-thick Plio/Pleistocene, poorly consolidated, highly permeable shelly sands and silts (Kaawa Formation) capped by near-impermeable, water-saturated muds (Tauranga Group). These sediments rest on moderately consolidated Miocene-aged permeable turbiditic sandstones and siltstones (Waitemata Group). Magma-water fuelled thermohydraulic explosions remained in the shallow sedimentary layers, excavating fine-grained sediments without brittle fragmentation required. On the whole, the resulting cool, wet pyroclastic density currents were of low energy. The unconsolidated shallow sediments deformed to accommodate rapidly rising magma, leading to development of complex sill-like bodies and a range of magma-water contact conditions at any time. The weak saturated sediments were also readily liquefied to provide an enduring supply of water and fine sediment to the explosion loci. Changes in magma flux and/or subsequent stabilisation of the conduit area by a lava ring-barrier led to ensuing Strombolian and fire-fountaining eruption

  16. A 3D model of crustal magnetization at the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Abdeslem, Juan; Calmus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located near the western border of the southern Basin and Range province, in the State of Sonora NW Mexico, and within the Gulf of California Extensional Province. This volcanic field contains the shield volcano Santa Clara, which mainly consists of basaltic to trachytic volcanic rocks, and reaches an altitude of ~ 1200 m. The PVF disrupts a series of discontinuous ranges of low topographic relief aligned in a NW direction, which consist mainly of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and Proterozoic through Paleogene granitoids. The PVF covers an area of approximately 60 by 55 km, and includes more than 400 well-preserved cinder cones and vents and eight maar craters. It was active from about 1.7 Ma until about 13 ka. We have used the ages and magnetic polarities of the volcanic rocks, along with mapped magnetic anomalies and their inverse modeling to determine that the Pinacate Volcanic Field was formed during two volcanic episodes. The oldest one built the Santa Clara shield volcano of basaltic and trachytic composition, and occurred during the geomagnetic Matuyama Chron of reverse polarity, which also includes the normal polarity Jaramillo and Olduvai Subchrons, thus imprinting both normal and reverse magnetization in the volcanic products. The younger Pinacate series of basaltic composition represents monogenetic volcanic activity that extends all around the PVF and occurred during the subsequent geomagnetic Brunhes Chron of normal polarity. Magnetic anomalies toward the north of the Santa Clara volcano are the most intense in the PVF, and their inverse modeling indicates the presence of a large subsurface body magnetized in the present direction of the geomagnetic field. This suggests that the magma chambers at depth cooled below the Curie temperature during the Brunhes Chron.

  17. Base surge in recent volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.G.

    1967-01-01

    A base surge, first identified at the Bikini thermonuclear undersea explosion, is a ring-shaped basal cloud that sweeps outward as a density flow from the base of a vertical explosion column. Base surges are also common in shallow underground test explosions and are formed by expanding gases which first vent vertically and then with continued expansion rush over the crater lip (represented by a large solitary wave in an underwater explosion), tear ejecta from it, and feed a gas-charged density flow, which is the surge cloud. This horizontally moving cloud commonly has an initial velocity of more than 50 meters per second and can carry clastic material many kilometers. Base surges are a common feature of many recent shallow, submarine and phreatic volcanic eruptions. They transport ash, mud, lapilli, and blocks with great velocity and commonly sandblast and knock down trees and houses, coat the blast side with mud, and deposit ejecta at distances beyond the limits of throw-out trajectories. Close to the eruption center, the base surge can erode radial channels and deposit material with dune-type bedding. ?? 1967 Stabilimento Tipografico Francesco Giannini & Figli.

  18. Viscous flow behavior of tholeiitic and alkaline Fe-rich martian basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrel, Magdalena Oryaëlle; Baratoux, David; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical compositions of martian basalts are enriched in iron with respect to terrestrial basalts. Their rheology is poorly known and liquids of this chemical composition have not been experimentally investigated. Here, we determine the viscosity of five synthetic silicate liquids having compositions representative of the diversity of martian volcanic rocks including primary martian mantle melts and alkali basalts. The concentric cylinder method has been employed between 1500 °C and the respective liquidus temperatures of these liquids. The viscosity near the glass transition has been derived from calorimetric measurements of the glass transition. Although some glass heterogeneity limits the accuracy of the data near the glass transition, it was nevertheless possible to determine the parameters of the non-Arrhenian temperature-dependence of viscosity over a wide temperature range (1500 °C to the glass transition temperature). At superliquidus conditions, the martian basalt viscosities are as low as those of the Fe-Ti-rich lunar basalts, similar to the lowest viscosities recorded for terrestrial ferrobasalts, and 0.5 to 1 order of magnitude lower than terrestrial tholeiitic basalts. Comparison with empirical models reveals that Giordano et al. (2008) offers the best approximation, whereas the model proposed by Hui and Zhang (2007) is inappropriate for the compositions considered. The slightly lower viscosities exhibited by the melts produced by low degree of mantle partial melting versus melts produced at high degree of mantle partial melting (likely corresponding to the early history of Mars), is not deemed sufficient to lead to viscosity variations large enough to produce an overall shift of martian lava flow morphologies over time. Rather, the details of the crystallization sequence (and in particular the ability of some of these magmas to form spinifex texture) is proposed to be a dominant effect on the viscosity during martian lava flow emplacement and

  19. K-Ar Geochronology and isotopic composition of the late oligocene- early miocene Ancud volcanic complex, Chiloe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ancud Volcanic Complex (Gally and Sanchez , 1960) forms a portion of the Mid-Tertiary Coastal Magmatic Belt which outcrops in the area of northern Chiloe island. Main exposures occur at Ancud, Punta Polocue, Punihuil, Pumillahue, Tetas de Teguaco and Bahia Cocotue. The Ancud Volcanic Complex consists of basaltic to basaltic andesites lava flows and volcanic necks and rhyolitic pyroclastic flows and vitric domes. Previous studies indicate a Late Oligocene-Early Miocene age (Garcia et al., 1988; Stern and Vergara, 1992; Munoz et al., 2000). The Ancud Volcanic Complex covers and intrudes Palaeozoic-Triassic metamorphic rocks and is partially covered by an early to middle Miocene marine sedimentary sequence known as Lacui Formation (Valenzuela, 1982) and by Pleistocene glacial deposits (Heusser, 1990). At Punihuil locality, lava flows are interbedded with the lower part of the marine sedimentary sequence, which includes significant amounts of redeposited pyroclastic components. Locally, the presence of hyaloclastic breccias suggests interaction of magma with marine water (au)

  20. Geothermal systems in volcanic arcs: Volcanic characteristics and surface manifestations as indicators of geothermal potential and favorability worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelling, P.; Shevenell, L.; Hinz, N.; Coolbaugh, M.; Melosh, G.; Cumming, W.

    2016-09-01

    than systems hosted by Holocene calderas or non-caldera volcanic centers. Power-hosting volcanic centers that have erupted within the last 160 years supply 50% of the global installed geothermal power in subduction zones, and nearly all of these systems are generally mafic (basaltic or andesitic) in average composition. Volcanic centers erupting between 160 and 900 years ago are dominated by felsic volcanic systems, and provide 47% of the global power from volcanic arcs. Only 3% of geothermal power produced in subduction zones are hosted by volcanic center erupting more than 900 years ago. We anticipate that these results may be able to help guide future geothermal exploration efforts.

  1. New geochronological constraints of the Lassen segment's regional volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germa, A.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Malservisi, R.; Tavarez, S.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Clynne, M. A.; Perry, C.; Quidelleur, X.; Ricci, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Lassen region is the southernmost active volcanic field in the Cascade Range. Since ~3.5 Ma distributed mafic to intermediate calc-alkaline magmas continuously built hundreds of cinder cones, lava flows, and a few small shield volcanoes. A set of 10 new unspiked K-Ar ages obtained on groundmass separates help reveal the timing of this regional volcanism. Although most lavas show a high atmospheric contamination level and a low K content, significant ages were obtained with this technique. Shields were dated at about 2.5 Ma (Clynne and Muffler, 2010) and are commonly dissected by erosion. However, we obtained a K-Ar age of 374 ± 25 ka for the late lava flow at the summit of Crater Mountain, which is less eroded than the other shields. This indicates that this regional volcano's activity overlapped that of the Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC), and raises questions regarding the ages of other shields. The Caribou Volcanic field (CVF), at the eastern boundary of the Lassen region, was also contemporaneous with the LVC. The field's activity initiated ~425 ka ago, but does not appear to have extended into the Holocene (Clynne and Muffler, 2010). We obtained a K-Ar age of 296 ± 13 ka on the basaltic andesite of Eleanor Lake, extending further the activity of the Caribou sequence. Our K-Ar age of 59 ± 3 ka on a basaltic flow confirms that the Bidwell Spring Chain was active between 20 and 70 ka as previously shown. We dated the basaltic andesite tuya of Turnaround Lake at 4 ± 5 ka. However, this conflicts with the timing of Tuya chain (15-18 ka). Finally, to the south-west of LVC, basalts of Cold Creek Butte yield an age of 207 ± 26 ka, and we dated a basaltic flow from Inskip Hill at ~5 ka. The new ages obtained, especially the Holocene ones, are consistent with magnetotelluric soundings and gravity data that show mid-crustal anomalies in the back-arc (Tavarez, 2015). These data demonstrate that the CVF is still active and has the potential for future eruptions.

  2. Geodetic constraints on volcanic plume height at Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Roberts, Matthew; Björnsson, Halldór; Grapenthin, Ronni; Arason, Pórdur; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Hólmjárn, Jósef; Geirsson, Halldór; Bennett, Richard; Gudmundsson, Magnús; Oddsson, Björn; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Villemin, Thierry; Jónsson, Torsteinn; Sturkell, Erik; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Larsen, Gudrún; Thordarson, Thor; Óladóttir, Bergrún

    2014-05-01

    In 2011 a VEI 4 explosive eruption took place at Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland. Grímsvötn is a subglacial basaltic volcano beneath the Vatnajökull ice cap. It is Iceland's most frequently erupting volcano, with recent eruptions in 1983, 1998, 2004, and 2011. The volcano has a low seismic velocity anomaly down to about 3 km depth, interpreted as a magma chamber. A continuous GPS station and a tiltmeter are located on a nunatak, Mount Grímsfjall, which protrudes from the ice at the southern rim of the caldera. The 21-28 May 2011 eruption was Grímsvötn's largest since 1873, resulting in airspace closure in northern Europe and the cancellation of about 900 passenger flights. The eruption was preceded by gradual inflation following the 2004 eruption and progressive increase in seismicity. Kinematic 1 Hz solutions were derived for the position of the GPS station in the hours immediately before and during the 2011 eruption. The onset of deformation preceded the eruption by one hour and reached maximum of 0.57 m within 48 hours. Throughout the eruption the GPS station moved consistently in direction N38.4+/-0.5W, opposite to the direction of movements during the 2004-2011 inter eruptive phase. The deformation characteristics suggest that the signal was mostly due to pressure change in a source at 1.7 +/- 0.2 km depth. We use the geodetic measurements to infer co-eruptive pressure change in the magma chamber using the Mogi model. The rate of pressure drop is then used to estimate the magma flow rate from the chamber. Numerous studies have shown that plume height in explosive eruptions can be related to magma discharge. Using an empirical relationship between the volcanic plume height and magma flow rate (Mastin et al., 2009) we estimate the evolution of the plume height from the geodetic data. Two weather radars monitored the height of the volcanic plume during the eruption. A strong initial plume with peaks at 20-25 km was followed by a declining, pulsating activity

  3. Geology and geochemistry characteristics of the Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (Central Area), Chiapas Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, J. C.; Jaimes-Viera, M. C.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Layer, P. W.; Pompa-Mera, V.; Godinez, M. L.

    2007-04-01

    The Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (CVA), located in the central portion of the State of Chiapas, is a 150 km stretch of volcanoes irregularly aligned in the northwest direction between two great volcanic features: the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the northwest and the Central American Volcanic Arc to the southeast. The CVA is located in a complex zone marking the interaction of the North American, Caribbean and Cocos plates, near the Motagua-Polochic fault system, the boundary between North American and Caribbean plates. The central part of the CVA is composed of an irregular northwest alignment of at least 10 volcanic structures generally lying along NNW-SSE-trending faults splayed from the Motagua-Polochic system. Among the structures there are seven volcanic domes (Huitepec, Amahuitz, La Iglesia, Mispía, La Lanza, Venustiano Carranza and Santotón), one explosion crater (Navenchauc), one collapse structure (Apas), and one dome complex (Tzontehuitz). In the majority of the structures there is a clear resurgence with the formation of several domes in the same structure, with the destruction of previous domes (Navenchauc) or with the formation of new explosion craters or collapse structures (Apas). The volcanic activity in the CVA was mainly effusive accompanied by explosive and phreatomagmatic events and is characterized by volcanic domes accompanied by block-and-ash-flows, ash flows with accretionary lapilli, falls, and pumice flows. The volcanic structures and deposits are calcalkaline in composition with a medium to high content of potassium. CVA volcanic rocks vary from andesite to dacite with SiO 2 between 57 and 66 wt.%, show low concentrations of Ti, P, Nb and Ta, are enriched in Light Rare Earths, depleted in Heavy Rare Earths, and show a small Eu anomaly; all indicative of arc-related volcanism associated with subduction of the Cocos plate under the North American plate, but complicated by the geometry of the plate boundary fault system.

  4. Geomagnetic imprint of the Persani volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Seghedi, Ioan; Zlagnean, Luminita; Atanasiu, Ligia; Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Pomeran, Mihai; Visan, Madalina

    2016-04-01

    The Persani small volume volcanism is located in the SE corner of the Transylvanian Depression, at the north-western edge of the intra-mountainous Brasov basin. It represents the south-easternmost segment of the Neogene-Quaternary volcanic chain of the East Carpathians. The alkaline basalt monogenetic volcanic field is partly coeval with the high-K calc-alkaline magmatism south of Harghita Mountains (1-1.6 Ma). Its eruptions post-dated the calc-alkaline volcanism in the Harghita Mountains (5.3-1.6 Ma), but pre-dated the high-K calc-alkaline emissions of Ciomadul volcano (1.0-0.03 Ma). The major volcanic forms have been mapped in previous geological surveys. Still, due to the small size of the volcanoes and large extent of tephra deposits and recent sediments, the location of some vents or other volcanic structures has been incompletely revealed. To overcome this problem, the area was subject to several near-surface geophysical investigations, including paleomagnetic research. However, due to their large-scale features, the previous geophysical surveys proved to be an inappropriate approach to the volcanological issues. Therefore, during the summers of 2014 and 2015, based on the high magnetic contrast between the volcanic rocks and the hosting sedimentary formations, a detailed ground geomagnetic survey has been designed and conducted, within central Persani volcanism area, in order to outline the presence of volcanic structures hidden beneath the overlying deposits. Additionally, information on the rock magnetic properties was also targeted by sampling and analysing several outcrops in the area. Based on the acquired data, a detailed total intensity scalar geomagnetic anomaly map was constructed by using the recent IGRF12 model. The revealed pattern of the geomagnetic field proved to be fully consistent with the direction of magnetisation previously determined on rock samples. In order to enhance the signal/noise ratio, the results were further processed by

  5. Bimodal Silurian and Lower Devonian volcanic rock assemblages in the Machias-Eastport area, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Olcott; Moench, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Exposed in the Machias-Eastport area of southeastern Maine is the thickest (at least 8,000 m), best exposed, best dated, and most nearly complete succession of Silurian and Lower Devonian volcanic strata in the coastal volcanic belt, remnants of which crop out along the coasts of southern New Brunswick, Canada, and southeastern New England in the United States. The volcanics were erupted through the 600-700-million-year-old Avalonian sialic basement. To test the possibility that this volcanic belt was a magmatic arc above a subduction zone prior to presumed Acadian continental collision, samples representing the entire section in the Machias-Eastport area of Maine were chemically analyzed. Three strongly bimodal assemblages of volcanic rocks and associated intrusives are recognized, herein called the Silurian, older Devonian, and younger Devonian assemblages. The Silurian assemblage contains typically nonporphyritic high-alumina tholeiitic basalts, basaltic andesites, and diabase of continental characterand calc-alkalic rhyolites, silicic dacites, and one known dike of andesite. These rocks are associated with fossiliferous, predominantly marine strata of the Quoddy, Dennys, and Edmunds Formations, and the Leighton Formation of the Pembroke Group (the stratigraphic rank of both is revised herein for the Machias-Eastport area), all of Silurian age. The shallow marine Hersey Formation (stratigraphic rank also revised herein) of the Pembroke Group, of latest Silurian age (and possibly earliest Devonian, as suggested by an ostracode fauna), contains no known volcanics; and it evidently was deposited during a volcanic hiatus that immediately preceded emergence of the coastal volcanic belt and the eruption of the older Devonian assemblage. The older Devonian assemblage, in the lagoonal to subaerial Lower Devonian Eastport Formation, contains tholeiitic basalts and basaltic andesites, typically with abundant plagioclase phenocrysts and typically richer in iron and

  6. Pucarilla-Cerro Tipillas volcanic complex: the oldest recognized caldera in the southeastern portion of central volcanic zone of Central Andes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, Silvina; Petrinovic, Ivan [CONICET -IBIGEO. Museo de Cs. Naturales, Universidad de Salta, Mendoza 2 (4400), Salta (Argentina)], E-mail: guzmansilvina@gmail.com

    2008-10-01

    We recognize the most eastern and oldest collapse caldera structure in the southern portion of the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes. A description of Middle-Upper Miocene successions related to explosive- effusive events is presented. The location of this centre close to Cerro Galn Caldera attests a recurrence in the volcanism between 12 and 2 Ma in this portion of the Altiplano - Puna Plateau.

  7. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  8. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  9. Timescales and mechanisms of formation of amorphous silica coatings on fresh basalts at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemtob, Steven M.; Rossman, George R.

    2014-10-01

    Young basalts from Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, frequently feature opaque surface coatings, 1-80 μm thick, composed of amorphous silica and Fe-Ti oxides. These coatings are the product of interaction of the basaltic surface with volcanically-derived acidic fluids. Previous workers have identified these coatings in a variety of contexts on Hawai'i, but the timescales of coating development, coating growth rates, and factors controlling lateral coating heterogeneity were largely unconstrained. We sampled and analyzed young lava flows (of varying ages, from hours to ~ 40 years) along Kīlauea's southwest and east rift zones to characterize variation in silica coating properties across the landscape. Coating thickness varies as a function of flow age, flow surface type, and proximity to acid sources like local fissure vents and regional plumes emitted from Kīlauea Caldera and Pu'u Ō'ō. Silica coatings that form in immediate proximity to acid sources are more chemically pure than those forming in higher pH environments, which contain significant Al and Fe. Incipient siliceous alteration was observed on basalt surfaces as young as 8 days old, but periods of a year or more are required to develop contiguous coatings with obvious opaque coloration. Inferred coating growth rates vary with environmental conditions but were typically 1-5 μm/year. Coatings form preferentially on flow surfaces with glassy outer layers, such as spatter ramparts, volcanic bombs, and dense pahoehoe breakouts, due to glass strain weakening during cooling. Microtextural evidence suggests that the silica coatings form both by in situ dissolution-reprecipitation and by deposition of silica mobilized in solution. Thin films of water, acidified by contact with volcanic vapors, dissolved near-surface basalt, then precipitated amorphous silica in place, mobilizing more soluble cations. Additional silica was transported to and deposited on the surface by silica-bearing altering fluids derived from the

  10. Potassium-argon/argon-40-argon-39 geochronology of Cenozoic alkali basalts from the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Quanshu; SHI Xuefa; YANG Yaomin; WANG Kunshan

    2008-01-01

    Based on the isotopic chronologic results of Cenozoic alkali basalts from the South China Sea,the characteristics of volcanic activi-ty of the South China Sea after spreading were studied.The potassium - argon ages of eight alkali basalt samples from the South China Sea,and the argon - argon ages of two samples among them are reported.Apparent ages of the whole rock are 3.80 to 7.91 Ma with an average value of 5.43 Ma (potassium- argon,whole rock),and there is little difference among samples at the same location,e.g.,4.76~5.78 Ma for location S04-12.The argon - argon ages for the two samples are 6.06 and 4.71 Ma,which lie within the age scope of potassium - argon method.The dating results indicate that rock-forming age is from late Miocene to Pli-ocene,which is consistent with erupting event for alkali basalts from adjacent regions of the South China Sea.Volcanic activities occur after the cessation of spreading of the South China Sea,which are controlled by lithospheric fault and the spreading center formed during the spreading period of the South China Sea.These dating results,combined with geochemical characteristics of these basalts,the published chronological data for the South China Sea and its adjacent regions,and the updated geophysical data near Hainan Island,suggest that after the cessation of spreading of the South China Sea,there occur widely distributing magmatic activities which primarily is alkali basalt,and the volcanic activity continues to Quaternary.The activity may be relative to Hainan mantle plume originated from core/mantle boundary.

  11. SURFACE AREA AND MICRO-ROUGHNESS OF VOLCANIC ASH PARTICLES: A case study, Acigol Volcanic Complex, Cappadocia, Central Turkiye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, O.; Aydar, E.; Sen, E.; Atici, G.

    2009-04-01

    Every single ash particle may convey information about its own formation environment and conditions. Certain features on particles may give a hint about the fragmentation regime, the intensity of fragmentation and quantity of water that partakes in the fragmentation process, etc. On this account, this study majored in the analysis on finer pyroclastic material, namely volcanic ash particles. Here, we used volcanic ash particles from Quaternary Acigol Volcanic complex (West of Nevsehir, Cappadocia, Central Turkiye). Quaternary Acigol Volcanic complex lies between the towns of Nevsehir and Acigol. It consists of a shallow caldera, a thick pyroclastic apron, seven obsidian dome clusters, and scattered cinder cones and associated lavas (Druitt et al., 1995). The products of explosive volcanism of the region were distinguished as two main Quaternary tuffs by a recent study (Druitt et al., 1995). Samples are from ashfall beds in a sequence of intercalated pumice fall, ashfall, and ignimbrite beds. In this study in order to achieve surface properties of volcanic ash particles, surface areas and micro-roughness of ash particles were measured on digital elevation models (DEM) reconstructed from stereoscopic images acquired on Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at varying specimen tilt angles. Correlation between surface texture of volcanic ash particles and eruption characteristics was determined.

  12. Characterizing slab inputs in the earliest stages of subduction: Preliminary evidence from fluid-mobile element systematics for IODP Expedition 352 recovered volcanic samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanatan, Keir; Ryan, Jeffrey; Atlas, Zachary; Reagan, Mark

    2016-04-01

    IODP Expedition 352 recovered ~1.22 km of boninitic and basaltic volcanic rocks from four sites in the Izu-Bonin forearc to examine the volcanic phenomena associated with subduction initiation. While the recovered forearc basalts give little indication for the involvement of slab-derived volatiles, the extensive sequences of boninite series lavas recovered up-section show physical evidence for extensive fluid involvement (heavy vesicularity, explosive eruptive style), along with chemistries indicative of fluid-addition melting of depleted mantle sources. We are attempting to assay the makeup and likely slab provenance of these fluids via their fluid-mobile element (B, As, Cs, Sb, Pb, Li) systematics. Boron abundances measured thus far in fresh boninitic glasses recovered from Holes U1439C and U1442A range from 3-12 ppm, with B/Be and B/La ranging from 7.5-106 and 2-18.5, respectively. While the highest values are comparable to those observed in the most B-enriched Izu-bonin arc rocks, most of the data are at the low end of this range. Cs/Th and Pb/Ce ratios encompass the range of values encountered in IBM boninites in the literature, and are comparable to values for Izu arc lavas, while As/Sm ratios appear to be lower than in arc suites. Li concentrations are elevated relative to basaltic lavas, at 7-17 ppm, and Li/Yb ratios range from 8-22, a factor of four higher than the range encountered in volcanic arc suites. While fluid-mobile element systematics of Izu-Bonin volcanic arc lavas show evidence for inputs of two unique slab components with markedly different fluid-mobile element enrichments, the Izu-Bonin boninites can best be explained as simple mixtures of very depleted mantle and a single slab phase with high abundances of fluid-mobile species, along with elevated K, Ba, and other common subduction indicator species. Volcanic arc lavas globally show evidence for a fluid-mobile element enriched component that appears to be similar to serpentinite

  13. Medieval Irish chronicles reveal persistent volcanic forcing of severe winter cold events, 431–1649 CE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Explosive volcanism resulting in stratospheric injection of sulfate aerosol is a major driver of regional to global climatic variability on interannual and longer timescales. However, much of our knowledge of the climatic impact of volcanism derives from the limited number of eruptions that have occurred in the modern period during which meteorological instrumental records are available. We present a uniquely long historical record of severe short-term cold events from Irish chronicles, 431–1649 CE, and test the association between cold event occurrence and explosive volcanism. Thirty eight (79%) of 48 volcanic events identified in the sulfate deposition record of the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 ice-core correspond to 37 (54%) of 69 cold events in this 1219 year period. We show this association to be statistically significant at the 99.7% confidence level, revealing both the consistency of response to explosive volcanism for Ireland’s climatically sensitive Northeast Atlantic location and the large proportional contribution of volcanism to historic cold event frequencies here. Our results expose, moreover, the extent to which volcanism has impacted winter-season climate for the region, and can help to further resolve the complex spatial patterns of Northern Hemisphere winter-season cooling versus warming after major eruptions. (letter)

  14. The temporal evolution of back-arc magmas from the Auca Mahuida shield volcano (Payenia Volcanic Province, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallares, Carlos; Quidelleur, Xavier; Gillot, Pierre-Yves; Kluska, Jean-Michel; Tchilinguirian, Paul; Sarda, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    In order to better constrain the temporal volcanic activity of the back-arc context in Payenia Volcanic Province (PVP, Argentina), we present new K-Ar dating, petrographic data, major and trace elements from 23 samples collected on the Auca Mahuida shield volcano. Our new data, coupled with published data, show that this volcano was built from about 1.8 to 1.0 Ma during five volcanic phases, and that Auca Mahuida magmas were extracted from, at least, two slightly different OIB-type mantle sources with a low partial melting rate. The first one, containing more garnet, was located deeper in the mantle, while the second contains more spinel and was thus shallower. The high-MgO basalts (or primitive basalts) and the low-MgO basalts (or evolved basalts), produced from the deeper and shallower lherzolite mantle sources, respectively, are found within each volcanic phase, suggesting that both magmatic reservoirs were sampled during the 1 Myr lifetime of the Auca Mahuida volcano. However, a slight increase of the proportion of low-MgO basalts, as well as of magmas sampled from the shallowest source, can be observed through time. Similar overall petrological characteristics found in the Pleistocene-Holocene basaltic rocks from Los Volcanes and Auca Mahuida volcano suggest that they originated from the same magmatic source. Consequently, it can be proposed that the thermal asthenospheric anomaly is probably still present beneath the PVP. Finally, our data further support the hypothesis that the injection of hot asthenosphere with an OIB mantle source signature, which was triggered by the steepening of the Nazca subducting plate, induced the production of a large volume of lavas within the PVP since 2 Ma.

  15. Climatic Impact of Volcanic Eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Zielinski

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions have the potential to force global climate, provided they are explosive enough to emit at least 1–5 megaton of sulfur gases into the stratosphere. The sulfuric acid produced during oxidation of these gases will both absorb and reflect incoming solar radiation, thus warming the stratosphere and cooling the Earth’s surface. Maximum global cooling on the order of 0.2–0.3°C, using instrumental temperature records, occurs in the first 2 years after the eruption, with lesser cooling possibly up to the 4th year. Equatorial eruptions are able to affect global climate, whereas mid- to high-latitude events will impact the hemisphere of origin. However, regional responses may differ, including the possibility of winter warming following certain eruptions. Also, El Niño warming may override the cooling induced by volcanic activity. Evaluation of different style eruptions as well as of multiple eruptions closely spaced in time beyond the instrumental record is attained through the analysis of ice-core, tree-ring, and geologic records. Using these data in conjunction with climate proxy data indicates that multiple eruptions may force climate on decadal time scales, as appears to have occurred during the Little Ice Age (i.e., roughly AD 1400s–1800s. The Toba mega-eruption of ~75,000 years ago may have injected extremely large amounts of material into the stratosphere that remained aloft for up to about 7 years. This scenario could lead to the initiation of feedback mechanisms within the climate system, such as cooling of sea-surface temperatures. These interacting mechanisms following a mega-eruption may cool climate on centennial time scales.

  16. The ice-core record of volcanism: Status and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigl, Michael; McConnell, Joseph R.; Chellman, Nathan; Ludlow, Francis; Curran, Mark; Plunkett, Gill; Büntgen, Ulf; Toohey, Matthew; Burke, Andrea; Grieman, Mackenzie

    2016-04-01

    Radiative forcing resulting from stratospheric aerosols produced by major volcanic eruptions is a dominant driver of climate variability in the Earth's past. Accurate knowledge of the climate anomalies resulting from volcanic eruptions provides important information for understanding the global and regional responses of the Earth system to external forcing agents. Based on a unique compilation of newly obtained, high-resolution, ice-core measurements, as well as palaeo-climatic evidence inferred from existing tree-ring records and historical documentary sources, we revised the dating of ice-core based reconstructions of past volcanic eruptions and confirmed the dominant role of explosive volcanism on short-term summer temperature variability throughout the past 2,500 years. Continuous weekly surface snow measurements obtained from Summit, Greenland (2005-2014) further allow placing volcanic sulphate emissions arising from a series of moderate volcanic eruptions during the last decade into a multi-millennial context. While these updated ice core records provide a more accurate constraint on the timing and magnitude of volcanic eruptions, there is also new data emerging on the geographic locations of past eruptions, atmospheric transport of volcanic fallout and climatic consequences (e.g. sea-ice; hydro-climate) from studying volcanic deposits (e.g. extent of volcanic ash deposition), proxy data and historical records. On the basis of selected case studies we will discuss the role volcanic eruptions have played in the Earth's climate system during the past and identify potential additional constraints provided by ice cores.

  17. Orthopyroxene fractionation in the Grande Ronde Basalt--Columbia River Basalt group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six orthopyroxenes were microprobed; five orthopyroxenes were from the Grande Ronde Basalt, and one was from the Buford flow of the Saddle Mountains Basalt. The orthopyroxenes are primarily bronzite in composition, but some analyses show that hypersthene is present. The reaction rims of all analyzed orthopyroxene crystals are pigeonite, while the groundmass pyroxene is both augite and pigeonite. Preliminary results from the least-squares linear modeling of the Grande Ronde Basalt indicate orthopyroxene is a necessary phase for mass balancing between flow compositions. Three models were tried in order to determine if selected mineral phases could be used to model the chemical compositions of the flows. These models suggest that orthopyroxene and plagioclase are phases common to the Grande Ronde Basalt. The similarity of orthopyroxene and plagioclase occurrences suggests that they are important intratelluric phases of the Grande Ronde Basalt which reacted out when the basaltic liquids were erupted at the surface

  18. Diatremes and craters attributed to natural explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Eugene Merle

    1956-01-01

    Diatremes - volcanic pipes attributed to explosion - and craters have been studied to infer the ultimate causes and physical conditions attending natural explosive processes. Initial piercement of diatremes on the Navajo reservation, Arizona was probably along a fracture propagated by a high-pressure aqueous fluid. Gas rising at high velocity along the fracture would become converted to a gas-solid fluidized system by entrainment of wall- rock fragments. The first stages of widening of the vent are probably accomplished mainly by simple abrasion of the high-velocity fluidized system on the walls of the fracture. As the vent widens, its enlargement may be accelerated by inward spalling of the walls. The inferred mechanics of the Navajo-Hopi diatremes is used to illustrate the possibility of diatreme formation over a molten salt mass.

  19. Multiphase Instabilities in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S. ``Bala''

    2015-11-01

    Explosive dispersal of particles is a complex multiphase phenomenon that can be observed in volcanic eruptions or in engineering applications such as multiphase explosives. As the layer of particles moves outward at high speed, it undergoes complex interactions with the blast-wave structure following the reaction of the energetic material. Particularly in this work, we are interested in the multiphase flow instabilities related to Richmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RM) instabilities (in the gas phase and particulate phase), which take place as the particle layer disperses. These types of instabilities are known to depend on initial conditions for a relatively long time of their evolution. Using a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, we study the growth of these instabilities and their dependence on initial conditions related to the particulate phase - namely, (i) particle size, (ii) initial distribution, and (iii) mass ratio (particles to explosive). Additional complexities associated with compaction of the layer of particles are avoided here by limiting the simulations to modest initial volume fraction of particles. A detailed analysis of the initial conditions and its effects on multiphase RM/RT-like instabilities in the context of an explosive dispersal of particles is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  20. MARIUS HILLS REGION, MOON: Stratigraphy of low shields and mare basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, Jennifer; Hiesinger, Harry; van der Bogert, Carolyn; Hendrik Pasckert, Jan; Weinauer, Julia; Lawrence, Samuel; Stopar, Julie; Robinson, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The Marius Hills region consists of more than 250 individual basaltic low shields (usually referred to as "domes") and cones, located on a broad topographic rise. The bases of numerous low shields have slope angles of ~2-3° whereas the upper portions have slopes of ~6-7° [1], interpreted to reflect changes in composition over time [1]. However, the absence of spectral differences between the two dome morphologies and the surrounding mare basalts suggests that the observed morphologies are more plausibly explained by changes in effusion rates, temperature (viscosity), and/or crystallization over time [e.g., 2]. Previous studies indicate that volcanism in this region occurred in the Upper Imbrian (3.2-3.8 Ga) [3], although several other authors reported ages ranging from the Imbrian (~3.3 Ga) to the Eratosthenian (~2.5 Ga) [e.g., 1,2,4]. [2,5] reported that all low shields are embayed by younger mare units, indicating that they formed during an older stage of volcanic activity. Mare basalts surrounding the Marius Hills exhibit absolute model ages of 1.2-3.7 Ga [6]. We used 36 LRO NAC images to perform crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements. The images were calibrated and map-projected with ISIS 3 and imported into ArcGIS. Within ArcGIS, we used CraterTools [7] to perform our CSFD measurements. The crater size-frequency distributions were then plotted with CraterStats [8], using the production and chronology functions of [9]. We conducted CSFD measurements for 50 Marius Hills low shields. Our count area sizes ranged from 1.06 x 101 to 8.75 x 101 km2; those for adjacent basalts varied between 6.17 x 100 and 8.01 x 101 km2. We determined absolute model ages (AMAs) of 1.03 to 3.65 Ga for the low shields and did not find a spatial correlation of ages versus their locations. CSFD measurements for 27 adjacent basalts show AMAs of 1.20-3.69 Ga. Of those basalts, 24 exhibit AMAs of 3-3.5 Ga; there is no correlation of AMAs and the geographic position of the

  1. Basaltic Soil of Gale Crater: Crystalline Component Compared to Martian Basalts and Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Schmidt, M.; Downs, R. T.; Stolper, E. M.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Achilles, C. N.; Chipera, S. J.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, J. A.; Farmer, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Morrison, S. M.; Rampe, E. B.; Sarrazin, P.; Yen, A. S.; Anderosn, R. C.; DesMarais, D. J.; Spanovich, N.

    2013-01-01

    A significant portion of the soil of the Rocknest dune is crystalline and is consistent with derivation from unweathered basalt. Minerals and their compositions are identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) data from the CheMin instrument on MSL Curiosity. Basalt minerals in the soil include plagioclase, olivine, low- and high-calcium pyroxenes, magnetite, ilmenite, and quartz. The only minerals unlikely to have formed in an unaltered basalt are hematite and anhydrite. The mineral proportions and compositions of the Rocknest soil are nearly identical to those of the Adirondack-class basalts of Gusev Crater, Mars, inferred from their bulk composition as analyzed by the MER Spirit rover.

  2. 76 FR 64974 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2011R-18T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... inorganic salts. * ANFO . Aromatic nitro-compound explosive mixtures. Azide explosives. B Baranol. Baratol...). Explosive nitro compounds of aromatic hydrocarbons. Explosive organic nitrate mixtures. Explosive powders. F... explosive. Nitrated polyhydric alcohol explosives. Nitric acid and a nitro aromatic compound...

  3. 75 FR 1085 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2009R-18T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    .... *ANFO . Aromatic nitro-compound explosive mixtures. Azide explosives. B Baranol. Baratol. BEAF . Black...). Explosive nitro compounds of aromatic hydrocarbons. Explosive organic nitrate mixtures. Explosive powders. F... explosive. Nitrated polyhydric alcohol explosives. Nitric acid and a nitro aromatic compound...

  4. High-speed imaging, acoustic features, and aeroacoustic computations of jet noise from Strombolian (and Vulcanian) explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, J.; Sesterhenn, J.; Scarlato, P.; Stampka, K.; Del Bello, E.; Pena Fernandez, J. J.; Gaudin, D.

    2014-05-01

    High-speed imaging of explosive eruptions at Stromboli (Italy), Fuego (Guatemala), and Yasur (Vanuatu) volcanoes allowed visualization of pressure waves from seconds-long explosions. From the explosion jets, waves radiate with variable geometry, timing, and apparent direction and velocity. Both the explosion jets and their wave fields are replicated well by numerical simulations of supersonic jets impulsively released from a pressurized vessel. The scaled acoustic signal from one explosion at Stromboli displays a frequency pattern with an excellent match to those from the simulated jets. We conclude that both the observed waves and the audible sound from the explosions are jet noise, i.e., the typical acoustic field radiating from high-velocity jets. Volcanic jet noise was previously quantified only in the infrasonic emissions from large, sub-Plinian to Plinian eruptions. Our combined approach allows us to define the spatial and temporal evolution of audible jet noise from supersonic jets in small-scale volcanic eruptions.

  5. Origin of Columbia River flood basalt controlled by propagating rupture of the Farallon slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Stegman, Dave R

    2012-02-15

    The origin of the Steens-Columbia River (SCR) flood basalts, which is presumed to be the onset of Yellowstone volcanism, has remained controversial, with the proposed conceptual models involving either a mantle plume or back-arc processes. Recent tomographic inversions based on the USArray data reveal unprecedented detail of upper-mantle structures of the western USA and tightly constrain geodynamic models simulating Farallon subduction, which has been proposed to influence the Yellowstone volcanism. Here we show that the best-fitting geodynamic model depicts an episode of slab tearing about 17 million years ago under eastern Oregon, where an associated sub-slab asthenospheric upwelling thermally erodes the Farallon slab, leading to formation of a slab gap at shallow depth. Driven by a gradient of dynamic pressure, the tear ruptured quickly north and south and within about two million years covering a distance of around 900 kilometres along all of eastern Oregon and northern Nevada. This tear would be consistent with the occurrence of major volcanic dikes during the SCR-Northern Nevada Rift flood basalt event both in space and time. The model predicts a petrogenetic sequence for the flood basalt with sources of melt starting from the base of the slab, at first remelting oceanic lithosphere and then evolving upwards, ending with remelting of oceanic crust. Such a progression helps to reconcile the existing controversies on the interpretation of SCR geochemistry and the involvement of the putative Yellowstone plume. Our study suggests a new mechanism for the formation of large igneous provinces.

  6. Volcanic Rocks and Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. The...

  7. Hydrothermal evolution of repository groundwaters in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwaters in the near field of a radioactive waste repository in basalt will change their chemical composition in response to reactions with the basalt. These reactions will be promoted by the heat generated by the decaying waste. It is important to predict both the rate and the extent of these reactions, and the secondary minerals produced, because the alteration process controls the chemical environment affecting the corrosion of the canister, the solubility and complexation of migrating radionuclides, the reactivity of the alteration products to radionuclides sorption, and the porosity and permeability of the host rock. A comprehensive review of the literature leads to the preliminary finding that hydrothermally altering basalts in geothermal regions such as Iceland lead to a secondary mineralogy and groundwater composition similar to that expected to surround a repository. Furthermore, laboratory experiments replicating the alteration conditions approximate those observed in the field and expected in a repository. Preliminary estimates were made of the rate of hydration and devitrification of basaltic glass and the zero-order dissolution rate of basaltic materials. The rates were compared with those for rhyolitic glasses and silicate minerals. Preliminary calculations made of mixed process alteration kinetics, involving pore diffusion and surface reaction suggest that at temperatures greater than 1500C, alteration proceeds so rapidly as to become pervasive in normally fractured basalt exposed to higher temperatures in the field. 70 references

  8. The eruptive history of the Tequila volcanic field, western Mexico: ages, volumes, and relative proportions of lava types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Kenedi, Catherine B.; Lange, Rebecca A.; Hall, Chris M.; Delgado-Granados, Hugo

    2005-06-01

    The eruptive history of the Tequila volcanic field (1600 km2) in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt is based on 40Ar/39Ar chronology and volume estimates for eruptive units younger than 1 Ma. Ages are reported for 49 volcanic units, including Volcán Tequila (an andesitic stratovolcano) and peripheral domes, flows, and scoria cones. Volumes of volcanic units ≤1 Ma were obtained with the aid of field mapping, ortho aerial photographs, digital elevation models (DEMs), and ArcGIS software. Between 1120 and 200 kyrs ago, a bimodal distribution of rhyolite (~35 km3) and high-Ti basalt (~39 km3) dominated the volcanic field. Between 685 and 225 kyrs ago, less than 3 km3 of andesite and dacite erupted from more than 15 isolated vents; these lavas are crystal-poor and show little evidence of storage in an upper crustal chamber. Approximately 200 kyr ago, ~31 km3 of andesite erupted to form the stratocone of Volcán Tequila. The phenocryst assemblage of these lavas suggests storage within a chamber at ~2 3 km depth. After a hiatus of ~110 kyrs, ~15 km3 of andesite erupted along the W and SE flanks of Volcán Tequila at ~90 ka, most likely from a second, discrete magma chamber located at ~5 6 km depth. The youngest volcanic feature (~60 ka) is the small andesitic volcano Cerro Tomasillo (~2 km3). Over the last 1 Myr, a total of 128±22 km3 of lava erupted in the Tequila volcanic field, leading to an average eruption rate of ~0.13 km3/kyr. This volume erupted over ~1600 km2, leading to an average lava accumulation rate of ~8 cm/kyr. The relative proportions of lava types are ~22 43% basalt, ~0.4 1% basaltic andesite, ~29 54% andesite, ~2 3% dacite, and ~18 40% rhyolite. On the basis of eruptive sequence, proportions of lava types, phenocryst assemblages, textures, and chemical composition, the lavas do not reflect the differentiation of a single (or only a few) parental liquids in a long-lived magma chamber. The rhyolites are geochemically diverse and were likely

  9. Volcanic hazard assessment in monogenetic volcanic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolini, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut de Ciències de la Terra “Jaume Almera” (ICTJA-CSIC) One of the most important tasks of modern volcanology, which represents a significant socio-economic implication, is to conduct hazard assessment in active volcanic systems. These volcanological studies are aimed at hazard that allows to constructing hazard maps and simulating different eruptive scenarios, and are mainly addressed to contribute to territorial planning, definition of emergency plans or managing...

  10. Late Cenozoic volcanism in the western Woodlark Basin area, SW Pacific: the sources of marine volcanic ash layers based on their elemental and Sr-Nd isotope compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackschewitz, K. S.; Mertz, D. F.; Devey, C. W.; Garbe-Schönberg, C.-D.

    2002-12-01

    Tephra fallout layers and volcaniclastic deposits, derived from volcanic sources around and on the Papuan Peninsula, form a substantial part of the Woodlark Basin marine sedimentary succession. Sampling by the Ocean Drilling Program Leg 180 in the western Woodlark Basin provides the opportunity to document the distribution of the volcanically-derived components as well as to evaluate their chronology, chemistry, and isotope compositions in order to gain information on the volcanic sources and original magmatic systems. Glass shards selected from 57 volcanogenic layers within the sampled Pliocene-Pleistocene sedimentary sequence show predominantly rhyolitic compositions, with subordinate basaltic andesites, basaltic trachy-andesites, andesites, trachy-andesites, dacites, and phonolites. It was possible to correlate only a few of the volcanogenic layers between sites using geochemical and age information apparently because of the formation of strongly compartmentalised sedimentary realms on this actively rifting margin. In many cases it was possible to correlate Leg 180 volcanic components with their eruption source areas based on chemical and isotope compositions. Likely sources for a considerable number of the volcanogenic deposits are Moresby and Dawson Strait volcanoes (D'Entrecasteaux Islands region) for high-K calc-alkaline glasses. The Dawson Strait volcanoes appear to represent the source for five peralkaline tephra layers. One basaltic andesitic volcaniclastic layer shows affinities to basaltic andesites from the Woodlark spreading tip and Cheshire Seamount. For other layers, a clear identification of the sources proved impossible, although their isotope and chemical signatures suggest similarities to south-west Pacific subduction volcanism, e.g. New Britain and Tonga-Kermadec island arcs. Volcanic islands in the Trobriand Arc (for example, Woodlark Island Amphlett Islands and/or Egum Atoll) are probable sources for several volcaniclastic layers with ages

  11. The Carrán-Los Venados volcanic field and its relationship with coeval and nearby polygenetic volcanism in an intra-arc setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchi, Francisco; Lara, Luis E.; Gutiérrez, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between monogenetic and polygenetic volcanism has been a long-standing goal in volcanology, especially in cases where these two styles of volcanism are coeval and geographically adjacent. We studied the Carrán-Los Venados (CLV) volcanic field and made comparisons with published data on CLV's polygenetic neighbor Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (PCC) in the Southern Andean arc, using quantitative tools and recent numerical simulations of magma reservoir formation. CLV is a basaltic to basaltic andesitic volcanic field composed of 65 post-glacial scoria cones and maars and a 1-km-high Pleistocene stratovolcano, whereas PCC is a basaltic to rhyolitic composite volcano. Our results point to three main differences between CLV and PCC: (1) the CLV magmas differentiate at low-crustal reservoirs, followed by rapid ascent to the surface, while the PCC magmas stagnate and differentiate in lower- and upper-crustal reservoirs; (2) CLV is elongated in the NE direction while PCC is elongated in the NW direction. Under the current stress field (N60°E σHmax), these two volcanic alignments correspond, respectively, to local extensional and compressive deformation zones within the arc; and (3), the post-glacial CLV magma flux was estimated to be 3.1 ± 1.0 km3/ky, which is similar to the average magma flux estimated for PCC; however, the PCC magma flux is estimated at approximately twice this value during peak eruptive periods (5.5 ± 1.1 km3/ky). Based on numerical simulations, CLV is in a limit situation to create and sustain a mush-type upper-crustal reservoir containing highly crystalline magma, which is however not eruptible. The PCC volcanic system would have been able to create a stable reservoir containing eruptible silicic magma during periods of peak magma flux. We postulate that monogenetic volcanism occurs at CLV due to both low magma flux and an extensional/transtensional regime that favors rapid magma rise without storage and differentiation in

  12. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  13. Formation of the Permian basalts and implications of geochemical tracing for paleo-tectonic setting and regional tectonic background in the Turpan-Hami and Santanghu basins, Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU; Dingwu; LIU; Yiqun; XING; Xiujuan; HAO; Jianrong; DONG; Yunpeng; OUYANG; Zhengjian

    2006-01-01

    The Turpan-Hami and Santanghu basins are the late Paleozoic-Mesozoic-Cenozoic reworked intracontinental basins that superposed on the folded basement of the Paleozoic orogenic belt. 40Ar/39Ar geochronological study of the basalts developed in the basins reveals that the formation period is Permain (293-266 Ma). From geochemical comparison of the basalts, the Santanghu basalts exhibit a strong depletion in Nb and Ta, and a selective enrichment in HFSE, reflecting that the source region is influenced by the subducted components related to subduction of the ancient oceanic crust and characterized with "lagged arc volcanic rocks". In contrast, the Turpan-Hami basalts show a slight depletion in Nb and Ta, high Th/Ta ratio, similar to the basalts formed in an intracontinental extensional zone or in an initial rift. Combined with the formation period of the ophiolite and ophiolite mélange zones and regional magmatic activities occurring on the post-orogenic extensional background in northern Xinjiang, it can be inferred from these geochemical characteristics that the tectonic background for forming the Turpan-Hami and Santanghu basins is closely related to the regional extension after the continent-continent collisional orogeny. The basalts of the two basins came from different sources on the post-orogenic extensional background of the similar basin-forming dynamics. Although the settings are all intracontinental rift, the source for the Santanghu basalts is obviously subjected to the metasomatism of the subducted components, implying the existence of the previous subduction.

  14. Petrogenesis of the Neoproterozoic bimodal volcanic rocks along the western margin of the Yangtze Block: New constraints from Hf isotopes and Fe/Mn ratios

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xianhua; QI Changshi; LIU Ying; LIANG Xirong; TU Xianglin; XIE Liewen; YANG Yueheng

    2005-01-01

    High-precision major element and Hf isotope data are reported for the Neoproterozoic Suxiong volcanic rocks along the western margin of the Yangtze Block. These volcanic rocks have variable εHf(T) values and Fe/Mn ratios. The relatively primitive basalts have high Fe/Mn ratios and high Hf-Nd isotopic compositions, indicating that they were generated by partial melting of garnet clinopyroxene in mantle plume at high pressure. Thus, the Suxiong basalts are genetically related to the proposed Neoproterozoic superplume. On the contrary, a few differentiated basalts have low Fe/Mn ratios and low Hf-Nd isotopic compositions. They are likely to experience assimilation-fractional crystallization process. The Suxiong rhyolites have consistent Hf and Nd model ages of 1.3-1.4 Ga. They are likely generated by shallow dehydration melting of pre-existing young arc igneous rocks associated with the basaltic underplating/intrusion in a continental rift.

  15. The Quaternary volcanic rocks of the northern Afar Depression (northern Ethiopia): Perspectives on petrology, geochemistry, and tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagos, Miruts; Koeberl, Christian; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    The northern Afar Depression is one of the most volcano-tectonically active parts of the East African Rift system, a place where oceanic rifting may be beginning to form an incipient oceanic crust. In its center, over an area that is ∼80 km long and ∼50 km wide, there are seven major NNW-SSE-aligned shield volcanoes/volcanic edifices surrounded by compositionally distinct fissure-fed basalts. The Quaternary lavas in this area range from transitional to tholeiitic basalts, with significant across-axis variation both in mineralogy and chemistry. The variation in the contents of the major elements (TiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3), incompatible trace elements (Nd, Hf, Th, Ta), and the contents and ratios of the rare earth elements (REE) (e.g., (La/Yb)n = 5.3-8.9) indicate some variation in the petrogenetic processes responsible for the formation of these basalts. However, the variation in isotopic compositions of the mafic lavas is minimal (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7036-0.7041, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51286-0.51289), which suggests only one source for all the Danakil Depression basalts. These basalts have isotope and incompatible trace element ratios that overlap with those of the Oligocene High-Ti2 flood basalts from the Ethiopian Plateau, interpreted as being derived from the last phase/tail of the Afar mantle plume source. Moreover, the Ce/Pb, Ba/U ratios indicate that the involvement of continental crust in the petrogenesis of the basaltic rocks is minimal; instead, both depth and degree of melting of the source reservoir underneath the northern Afar Depression played a major role for the production of incompatible element-enriched basalts (e.g., AleBagu Shield basalts) and the incompatible element-depleted tholeiitic basalts (e.g., Erta'Ale and Alu Shield basalts).

  16. Differences in recovery between deep-sea hydrothermal vent and vent-proximate communities after a volcanic eruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gollner, S.; Govenar, B.; Martinez Arbizu, P.; Mills, S.; Le Bris, N.; Weinbauer, M.; Shank, T.M.; Bright, M.

    2015-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents and the surrounding basalt seafloor are subject to major natural disturbance events such as volcanic eruptions. In the near future, anthropogenic disturbance in the form of deep-sea mining could also significantly affect the faunal communities of hydrothermal vents. In th

  17. From northern Gondwana passive margin to arc dismantling: a geochemical discrimination of Ordovician volcanisms (Sardinia, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggero, L.; Oggiano, G.; Buzzi, L.; Funedda, A.

    2009-04-01

    In Sardinia, one of the southernmost remain of the European Variscan belt, a crustal section through northern Gondwanan paleodomains is largely preserved. It bears significant evidence of igneous activity, recently detailed in field relationships and radiometric dating (Oggiano et al., submitted). A Cambro - Ordovician (491.7 ± 3.5 Ma ÷ 479.9 ± 2.1 Ma, LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon age) bimodal volcanic suite occurs with continuity in external and inner Variscan nappes of Sardinia below the so-called Sardic unconformity. The igneous suite represents an intraplate volcanic activity developed through subsequent episodes: i) an intermediate explosive and effusive volcanism, i.e. pyroclastic fall deposits and lava flows, embedded into epicontinental clastic sediments, culminating in silicic ignimbrite eruptions, and ii) mafic effusives. Geochemical data document a transitional, within-plate signature, e.g. the average Th/Ta (4.5) and La/Nb (2.7) overlap the upper continental crust values. The volcanites are characterized by slight fractionation of LREEs, nearly flat HREE abundance. The negative Eu anomaly increases towards evolved compositions. Some prominent HREE depletion (GdCN/YbCN = 13.8), and the high Nb/Y suggest a garnet-bearing source. The high 87Sr radiogenic content (87Sr/86Sr 490 Ma = 0.71169) and the epsilon Nd 490 Ma value of -6.54 for one dacite sample, imply a time integrated LREE-enriched source with a high Rb/Sr, such as a metasedimentary source. The stratigraphy of the succession and the geochemical composition of igneous members suggest a volcanic passive margin along the northern Gondwana at the early Ordovician. The bimodal Mid-Ordovician arc volcanism (465.4 ± 1.4 Ma, U-Pb zircon age; Oggiano et al., submitted) is developed in the external nappes (e.g. in Sarrabus and Sarcidano) and in the foreland occurs as clasts at the base of the Hirnantian succession (Leone et al. 1991). The Mid Ordovician sub-alkalic volcanic suite has reliable stratigraphic and

  18. The geochemistry of primitive volcanic rocks of the Ankaratra volcanic complex, and source enrichment processes in the genesis of the Cenozoic magmatism in Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melluso, L.; Cucciniello, C.; le Roex, A. P.; Morra, V.

    2016-07-01

    The Ankaratra volcanic complex in central Madagascar consists of lava flows, domes, scoria cones, tuff rings and maars of Cenozoic age that are scattered over 3800 km2. The mafic rocks include olivine-leucite-nephelinites, basanites, alkali basalts and hawaiites, and tholeiitic basalts. Primitive samples have high Mg# (>60), high Cr and Ni concentrations; their mantle-normalized patterns peak at Nb and Ba, have troughs at K, and smoothly decrease towards the least incompatible elements. The Ankaratra mafic rocks show small variation in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions (e.g., 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70377-0.70446, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51273-0.51280, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.25-18.87). These isotopic values differ markedly from those of Cenozoic mafic lavas of northern Madagascar and the Comoro archipelago, typical Indian Ocean MORB and oceanic basalt end-members. The patterns of olivine nephelinitic magmas can be obtained through 3-10% partial melting of a mantle source that was enriched by a Ca-rich alkaline melt, and that contained garnet, carbonates and phlogopite. The patterns of tholeiitic basalts can be obtained after 10-12% partial melting of a source enriched with lower amounts of the same alkaline melt, in the spinel- (and possibly amphibole-) facies mantle, hence in volumes where carbonate is not a factor. The significant isotopic change from the northernmost volcanic rocks of Madagascar and those in the central part of the island implicates a distinct source heterogeneity, and ultimately assess the role of the continental lithospheric mantle as source region. The source of at least some volcanic rocks of the still active Comoro archipelago may have suffered the same time-integrated geochemical and isotopic evolution as that of the northern Madagascar volcanic rocks.

  19. Revisiting the Jurassic Geomagnetic Reversal recorded in the Lesotho Basalt (Southern Africa)

    CERN Document Server

    Prévot, M; Thompson, J; Faynot, L; Perrin, M; Camps, P; Prevot, Michel; Roberts, Neil; Thompson, John; Faynot, Liliane; Perrin, Mireille; Camps, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    We carried out a detailed and continuous paleomagnetic sampling of the reversed to normal geomagnetic transition recorded by some 60 consecutive flow units near the base of the Lesotho Basalt (183  1 Ma). After alternating field or thermal cleaning the directions of remanence are generally well clustered within flow units. In contrast, the thermal instability of the samples did not allow to obtain reliable paleointensity determinations. The geomagnetic transition is incompletely recorded due to a gap in volcanic activity attested both by eolian deposits and a large angular distance between the field directions of the flows underlying or overlying these deposits. The transition path is noticeably different from that reported in the pioneer work of van Zijl et al. (1962). The most transitional Virtual Geomagnetic Poles are observed after the volcanic hiatus. Once continents are replaced in their relative position 180 Ma ago, the post-hiatus VGP cluster over Russia. However, two successive rebounds f...

  20. High-3He plume origin and temporal-spatial evolution of the Siberian flood basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, A.R.; Poreda, R.J.; Renne, P.R.; Teichmann, F.; Vasiliev, Y.R.; Sobolev, N.V.; Turrin, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    An olivine nephelinite from the lower part of a thick alkalic ultrabasic and mafic sequence of volcanic rocks of the northeastern part of the Siberian flood basalt province (SFBP) yielded a 40ArX39Ar plateau age of 253.3 ?? 2.6 million years, distinctly older than the main tholeiitic pulse of the SFBP at 250.0 million years. Olivine phenocrysts of this rock showed 3He/4He ratios up to 12.7 times the atmospheric ratio; these values suggest a lower mantle plume origin. The neodymium and strontium isotopes, rare earth element concentration patterns, and cerium/lead ratios of the associated rocks were also consistent with their derivation from a near-cnondritic, primitive plume. Geochemical data from the 250-million-year-old volcanic rocks higher up in the sequence indicate interaction of this high-3He SFBP plume with a suboceanic-type upper mantle beneath Siberia.

  1. Assessment of volcanic hazards, vulnerability, risk and uncertainty (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    A volcanic hazard is any phenomenon that threatens communities . These hazards include volcanic events like pyroclastic flows, explosions, ash fall and lavas, and secondary effects such as lahars and landslides. Volcanic hazards are described by the physical characteristics of the phenomena, by the assessment of the areas that they are likely to affect and by the magnitude-dependent return period of events. Volcanic hazard maps are generated by mapping past volcanic events and by modelling the hazardous processes. Both these methods have their strengths and limitations and a robust map should use both approaches in combination. Past records, studied through stratigraphy, the distribution of deposits and age dating, are typically incomplete and may be biased. Very significant volcanic hazards, such as surge clouds and volcanic blasts, are not well-preserved in the geological record for example. Models of volcanic processes are very useful to help identify hazardous areas that do not have any geological evidence. They are, however, limited by simplifications and incomplete understanding of the physics. Many practical volcanic hazards mapping tools are also very empirical. Hazards maps are typically abstracted into hazards zones maps, which are some times called threat or risk maps. Their aim is to identify areas at high levels of threat and the boundaries between zones may take account of other factors such as roads, escape routes during evacuation, infrastructure. These boundaries may change with time due to new knowledge on the hazards or changes in volcanic activity levels. Alternatively they may remain static but implications of the zones may change as volcanic activity changes. Zone maps are used for planning purposes and for management of volcanic crises. Volcanic hazards maps are depictions of the likelihood of future volcanic phenomena affecting places and people. Volcanic phenomena are naturally variable, often complex and not fully understood. There are

  2. Geology, geochemistry and mineralisation of the Erongo Volcanic Complex, Namibia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Erongo Volcanic Complex (EVC) is one of a number of anorogenic complexes of the Damaraland Alkaline Province in west-central Namibia. Geological mapping, and studies of the petrology, geochemistry and mineralized systems have permitted the reconstruction of the geological evolution of the Complex. The history of the EVC commenced with the outpouring of basaltic lavas on a basement formed by fault-bounded blocks of late Proterozoic rocks of the Damara sequence. The next eruptive phase comprised three volcano-plutonic events, each culminating with voluminous eruptions of pyroclastic flows. 33 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Petrophysical and geochemical properties of Columbia River flood basalt: Implications for carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Natalia V.; Goldberg, David S.; Sullivan, E. Charlotte; Herron, Michael M.; Grau, James A.

    2012-11-01

    This study presents borehole geophysical data and sidewall core chemistry from the Wallula Pilot Sequestration Project in the Columbia River flood basalt. The wireline logging data were reprocessed, core-calibrated and interpreted in the framework of reservoir and seal characterization for carbon dioxide storage. Particular attention is paid to the capabilities and limitations of borehole spectroscopy for chemical characterization of basalt. Neutron capture spectroscopy logging is shown to provide accurate concentrations for up to 8 major and minor elements but has limited sensitivity to natural alteration in fresh-water basaltic reservoirs. The Wallula borehole intersected 26 flows from 7 members of the Grande Ronde formation. The logging data demonstrate a cyclic pattern of sequential basalt flows with alternating porous flow tops (potential reservoirs) and massive flow interiors (potential caprock). The log-derived apparent porosity is extremely high in the flow tops (20-45%), and considerably overestimates effective porosity obtained from hydraulic testing. The flow interiors are characterized by low apparent porosity (0-8%) but appear pervasively fractured in borehole images. Electrical resistivity images show diverse volcanic textures and provide an excellent tool for fracture analysis, but neither fracture density nor log-derived porosity uniquely correlate with hydraulic properties of the Grande Ronde formation. While porous flow tops in these deep flood basalts may offer reservoirs with high mineralization rates, long leakage migration paths, and thick sections of caprock for CO2 storage, a more extensive multiwell characterization would be necessary to assess lateral variations and establish sequestration capacity in this reservoir.

  4. Petrophysical and Geochemical Properties of Columbia River Flood Basalt: Implications for Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharova, Natalia V.; Goldberg, David S.; Sullivan, E. C.; Herron, Michael M.; Grau, Jim A.

    2012-11-02

    Abstract This study presents borehole geophysical data and sidewall core chemistry from the Wallula Pilot Sequestration Project in the Columbia River flood basalt. The wireline logging data were reprocessed, core-calibrated and interpreted in the framework of reservoir and seal characterization for carbon dioxide storage. Particular attention is paid to the capabilities and limitations of borehole spectroscopy for chemical characterization of basalt. Neutron capture spectroscopy logging is shown to provide accurate concentrations for up to 8 major and minor elements but has limited sensitivity to natural alteration in fresh-water basaltic reservoirs. The Wallula borehole intersected 26 flows from 7 members of the Grande Ronde formation. The logging data demonstrate a cyclic pattern of sequential basalt flows with alternating porous flow tops (potential reservoirs) and massive flow interiors (potential caprock). The log-derived apparent porosity is extremely high in the flow tops (20%-45%), and considerably overestimates effective porosity obtained from hydraulic testing. The flow interiors are characterized by low apparent porosity (0-8%) but appear pervasively fractured in borehole images. Electrical resistivity images show diverse volcanic textures and provide an excellent tool for fracture analysis, but neither fracture density nor log-derived porosity uniquely correlate with hydraulic properties of the Grande Ronde formation. While porous flow tops in these deep flood basalts may offer reservoirs with high mineralization rates, long leakage migration paths, and thick sections of caprock for CO2 storage, a more extensive multi- well characterization would be necessary to assess lateral variations and establish sequestration capacity in this reservoir.

  5. Characterization and interpretation of volcanic activity at Redoubt, Bezymianny and Karymsky volcanoes through direct and remote measurements of volcanic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Taryn M.

    Surface measurements of volcanic emissions can provide critical insight into subsurface processes at active volcanoes such as the influx or ascent of magma, changes in conduit permeability, and relative eruption size. In this dissertation I employ direct and remote measurements of volcanic emissions to characterize activity and elucidate subsurface processes at three active volcanoes around the North Pacific. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, produced elevated SO2 emissions that were detected by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite sensor for over three months. This provided a rare opportunity to characterize Redoubt's daily SO2 emissions and to validate the OMI measurements. Order of magnitude variations in daily SO2 mass were observed, with over half of the cumulative SO2 emissions released during the explosive phase of the eruption. Correlations among OMI daily SO2 mass, tephra mass and acoustic energies during the explosive phase suggest that OMI data may be used to infer eruption size and explosivity. From 2007 through 2010 direct and remote measurements of volcanic gas composition and flux were measured at Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. During this period Bezymianny underwent five explosive eruptions. Estimates of passive and eruptive SO2 emissions suggest that the majority of SO2 is released passively. Order of magnitude variations in total volatile flux observed throughout the study period were attributed to changes in the depth of gas exsolution and separation from the melt at the time of sample collection. These findings suggest that exsolved gas composition may be used to detect magma ascent prior to eruption at Bezymianny Volcano. Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, is a dynamic volcano which exhibited four end-member activity types during field campaigns in 2011 and 2012, including: discrete ash explosions, pulsatory degassing, gas jetting, and explosive eruption. These activity types were characterized quantitatively

  6. Oligocene and Miocene arc volcanism in northeastern California: evidence for post-Eocene segmentation of the subducting Farallon plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, J.P.; Egger, A.E.; John, D.A.; Cousens, B.; Fleck, R.J.; Henry, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    The Warner Range in northeastern California exposes a section of Tertiary rocks over 3 km thick, offering a unique opportunity to study the long-term history of Cascade arc volcanism in an area otherwise covered by younger volcanic rocks. The oldest locally sourced volcanic rocks in the Warner Range are Oligocene (28–24 Ma) and include a sequence of basalt and basaltic andesite lava flows overlain by hornblende and pyroxene andesite pyroclastic flows and minor lava flows. Both sequences vary in thickness (0–2 km) along strike and are inferred to be the erosional remnants of one or more large, partly overlapping composite volcanoes. No volcanic rocks were erupted in the Warner Range between ca. 24 and 16 Ma, although minor distally sourced silicic tuffs were deposited during this time. Arc volcanism resumed ca. 16 Ma with eruption of basalt and basaltic andesite lavas sourced from eruptive centers 5–10 km south of the relict Oligocene centers. Post–16 Ma arc volcanism continued until ca. 8 Ma, forming numerous eroded but well-preserved shield volcanoes to the south of the Warner Range. Oligocene to Late Miocene volcanic rocks in and around the Warner Range are calc-alkaline basalts to andesites (48%–61% SiO2) that display negative Ti, Nb, and Ta anomalies in trace element spider diagrams, consistent with an arc setting. Middle Miocene lavas in the Warner Range are distinctly different in age, composition, and eruptive style from the nearby Steens Basalt, with which they were previously correlated. Middle to Late Miocene shield volcanoes south of the Warner Range consist of homogeneous basaltic andesites (53%–57% SiO2) that are compositionally similar to Oligocene rocks in the Warner Range. They are distinctly different from younger (Late Miocene to Pliocene) high-Al, low-K olivine tholeiites, which are more mafic (46%–49% SiO2), did not build large edifices, and are thought to be related to backarc extension. The Warner Range is ∼100 km east of the

  7. Magma storage under Iceland's Eastern Volcanic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, J.; Neave, D.; Hartley, M. E.; Edmonds, M.; Thordarson, T.; Morgan, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) of Iceland is defined by a number of volcanic systems and large basaltic eruptions occur both through central volcanoes (e.g. Grímsvötn) and on associated fissure rows (e.g. Laki, Eldgjá). We have collected a large quantity of micro-analytical data from a number of EVZ eruptions, with the aim of identifying common processes that occur in the premonitory stages of significant volcanic events. Here, we focus on the AD 1783 Laki event, the early postglacial Saksunarvatn tephra and the sub-glacially erupted Skuggafjöll tindar and for each of these eruptions we have >100 olivine-hosted or plagioclase-hosted melt inclusion analyses for major, trace and volatile elements. These large datasets are vital for understanding the history of melt evolution in the plumbing system of basaltic volcanoes. Diverse trace element compositions in melt inclusions hosted in primitive macrocrysts (i.e. Fo>84, An>84) indicate that the mantle melts supplied to the plumbing system of EVZ eruptions are highly variable in composition. Concurrent mixing and crystallisation of these melts occurs in crustal magma bodies. The levels of the deepest of these magma bodies are not well constrained by EVZ petrology, with only a handful of high-CO2 melt inclusions from Laki providing evidence for magma supply from >5 kbar. In contrast, the volatile contents of melt inclusions in evolved macrocrysts, which are close to equilibrium with the carrier liquids, indicate that final depths of inclusion entrapment are 0.5-2 kbar. The major element composition of the matrix glasses shows that the final pressure of equilibration between the melt and its macrocryst phases also occurred at 0.5-2 kbar. The relationship between these pressures and seismic/geodetic estimates of chamber depths needs to be carefully evaluated. The melt inclusion and macrocryst compositional record indicates that injection of porphyritic, gas-rich primitive melt into evolved/enriched and degassed shallow

  8. Precursory volcanic CO2 signals from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Kataoka, Fumie; Kuze, Akihiko; Shiomi, Kei; Goto, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Identification of earliest signals heralding volcanic unrest benefits from the unambiguous detection of precursors that reflect deviation of magmatic systems from metastable background activity. Ascent and emplacement of new basaltic magma at depth may precede eruptions by weeks to months. Transient localized carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions stemming from exsolution from depressurized magma are expected, and have been observed weeks to months ahead of magmatic surface activity. Detecting such CO2 precursors by continuous ground-based monitoring operations is unfortunately not a widely implemented method yet, save a handful of volcanoes. Detecting CO2 emissions from space offers obvious advantages - however it is technologically challenging, not the least due to the increasing atmospheric burden of CO2, against which a surface emission signal is hard to discern. In a multi-year project, we have investigated the feasibility of space-borne detection of pre-eruptive volcanic CO2 passive degassing signals using observations from the Greenhouse Gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Since 2010, we have observed over 40 active volcanoes from space using GOSAT's special target mode. Over 72% of targets experienced at least one eruption over that time period, demonstrating the potential utility of space-borne CO2 observations in non-imaging target-mode (point source monitoring mode). While many eruption precursors don't produce large enough CO2 signals to exceed space-borne detection thresholds of current satellite sensors, some of our observations have nevertheless already shown significant positive anomalies preceding eruptions at basaltic volcanoes. In 2014, NASA launched its first satellite dedicated to atmospheric CO2 observation, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2). Its observation strategy differs from the single-shot GOSAT instrument. At the expense of GOSAT's fast time series capability (3-day repeat cycle, vs. 16 for OCO-2), its 8-footprint continuous swath can slice

  9. Steam explosion studies review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Kim, Hee Dong

    1999-03-01

    When a cold liquid is brought into contact with a molten material with a temperature significantly higher than the liquid boiling point, an explosive interaction due to sudden fragmentation of the melt and rapid evaporation of the liquid may take place. This phenomenon is referred to as a steam explosion or vapor explosion. Depending upon the amount of the melt and the liquid involved, the mechanical energy released during a vapor explosion can be large enough to cause serious destruction. In hypothetical severe accidents which involve fuel melt down, subsequent interactions between the molten fuel and coolant may cause steam explosion. This process has been studied by many investigators in an effort to assess the likelihood of containment failure which leads to large scale release of radioactive materials to the environment. In an effort to understand the phenomenology of steam explosion, extensive studies has been performed so far. The report presents both experimental and analytical studies on steam explosion. As for the experimental studies, both small scale tests which involve usually less than 20 g of high temperature melt and medium/large scale tests which more than 1 kg of melt is used are reviewed. For the modelling part of steam explosions, mechanistic modelling as well as thermodynamic modelling is reviewed. (author)

  10. Steam explosion studies review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a cold liquid is brought into contact with a molten material with a temperature significantly higher than the liquid boiling point, an explosive interaction due to sudden fragmentation of the melt and rapid evaporation of the liquid may take place. This phenomenon is referred to as a steam explosion or vapor explosion. Depending upon the amount of the melt and the liquid involved, the mechanical energy released during a vapor explosion can be large enough to cause serious destruction. In hypothetical severe accidents which involve fuel melt down, subsequent interactions between the molten fuel and coolant may cause steam explosion. This process has been studied by many investigators in an effort to assess the likelihood of containment failure which leads to large scale release of radioactive materials to the environment. In an effort to understand the phenomenology of steam explosion, extensive studies has been performed so far. The report presents both experimental and analytical studies on steam explosion. As for the experimental studies, both small scale tests which involve usually less than 20 g of high temperature melt and medium/large scale tests which more than 1 kg of melt is used are reviewed. For the modelling part of steam explosions, mechanistic modelling as well as thermodynamic modelling is reviewed. (author)

  11. Explosions and static electricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Niels M

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of electrostatic discharges as causes of ignition of vapor/gas and dust/gas mixtures. A series of examples of static-caused explosions will be discussed. The concepts of explosion limits, the incendiveness of various discharge types and safe voltages are explained...

  12. Late Miocene volcanism and intra-arc tectonics during the early development of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Luca; Conticelli, Sandro; Vaggelli, Gloria; Petrone, Chiara M.; Manetti, Piero

    2000-03-01

    The early stage of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (hereafter TMVB) is marked by widespread, mafic to intermediate, volcanism emplaced between 11 and 7 Ma from the Pacific coast to the longitude of Mexico City, to the north of the modern volcanic arc. Petrological and geochronological data support the hypothesis that this volcanism made up a unique late Miocenic central Mexican comagmatic province. Mafic lavas at the mouth of the Gulf of California and along the northwestern sector of the TMVB made up the Nayarit district, which includes calc-alkaline to transitional varieties. The central sector of the TMVB is characterized by two basaltic districts: the Jalisco-Guanajuato and the Queretaro-Hidalgo, which are distinguished from the westernmost ones by their lower Nb/La and generally lower HFSE/LILE values, as well as by spider diagrams characterized by larger negative spikes at Th, Ta, Nb, and Ti. The surface occurrence of the late Miocene basalts appears to be controlled by pre-existing zones of crustal weakness that channeled the mafic magmas. Field observations suggest that these structures have been reactivated in a transtensional fashion induced by differential tectonic motion of crustal blocks to the south and to the north of the TMVB. Starting from ˜12 Ma the TMVB separates a northern tectonic domain, subject to the developing divergent Pacific-North America plate boundary, from a southern tectonic domain, characterized by oblique subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates. Apparently, far field stresses related to these complex plate boundaries reactivated older suture zones, allowing rapid uprise of mantle-derived magmas. The subduction-related signature shown by Miocene mafic lavas of the Jalisco-Guanajuato district argues against the existence of mantle plumes beneath this sector of the North America plate. On the other hand, the occurrence in the western TMVB and in the Guadalajara region of a large volume of mafic magmas, which sometimes show

  13. Hail formation triggers rapid ash aggregation in volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eaton, Alexa; Mastin, Larry G.; Herzog, M.; Schwaiger, Hans F.; Schneider, David J.; Wallace, Kristi; Clarke, Amanda B

    2015-01-01

    During explosive eruptions, airborne particles collide and stick together, accelerating the fallout of volcanic ash and climate-forcing aerosols. This aggregation process remains a major source of uncertainty both in ash dispersal forecasting and interpretation of eruptions from the geological record. Here we illuminate the mechanisms and timescales of particle aggregation from a well-characterized ‘wet’ eruption. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska incorporated water from the surface (in this case, a glacier), which is a common occurrence during explosive volcanism worldwide. Observations from C-band weather radar, fall deposits, and numerical modeling demonstrate that volcanic hail formed rapidly in the eruption plume, leading to mixed-phase aggregation of ~95% of the fine ash and stripping much of the cloud out of the atmosphere within 30 minutes. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanism of hail-like aggregation that contributes to the anomalously rapid fallout of fine ash and the occurrence of concentrically-layered aggregates in volcanic deposits.

  14. Potassium, thorium, and uranium contents of upper Cenozoic basalts of the southern Rocky Mountain region, and their relation to the Rio Grande depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.; Bunker, Carl M.; Bush, Charles A

    1973-01-01

    Late Cenozoic basaltic volcanism in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico was most intense near the Rio Grande rift depression but extended onto stable platforms to the west (Colorado Plateau) and to the east (High Plains). Tholeiitic rocks are largely confined to the Rio Grande depression, and the basalts become increasingly alkalic with distance from the depression. The K, Th, and U contents and the Th/K and U/K ratios consistently increase away from the depression, and Th/U ratios also tend to increase slightly. Geographically distinct suites of petrographicaUy related basalts that are very similar in major-oxide compositions are readily distinguishable by K, Th, and U contents. Sialic crustal contamination did not contribute significantly to development of these compositional variations, and the lateral change from tholeiitic to alkalic basaltic volcanism may be related to different depths of or degrees of partial melting in the mantle. The compositions and compositional ranges of basalts in the southern Rocky Mountain region are similar to those of many Pacific islands, despite the contrasting geologic settings.

  15. Radionuclide reactions with groundwater and basalts from Columbia River basalt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical reactions of radionuclides with geologic materials found in Columbia River basalt formations were studied. The objective was to determine the ability of these formations to retard radionuclide migration from a radioactive waste repository located in deep basalt. Reactions that can influence migration are precipitation, ion-exchange, complexation, and oxidation-reduction. These reactions were studied by measuring the effects of groundwater composition and redox potential (Eh) on radionuclide sorption on fresh basalt surfaces, a naturally altered basalt, and a sample of secondary minerals associated with a Columbia River basalt flow. In addition, radionuclide sorption isotherms were measured for these materials and reaction kinetics were determined. The radionuclides studied were 137Cs, 85Sr, 75Se, /sup 95m/Tc, 237Np, 241Am, 226Ra and 237Pu. The Freundlich equation accurately describes the isotherms when precipitation of radionuclides does not occur. In general, sorption increased in the order: basalt < altered basalt < secondary minerals. This increase in sorption corresponds to increasing surface area and cation exchange capacity. The Eh of the system had a large effect on technetium, plutonium, and neptunium sorption. Technetium(VII), Pu(VI), and Np(V) are reduced to Tc(IV), Pu(IV), and Np(IV), respectively, under Eh conditions expected in deep basalt formations. The kinetics of radionuclide sorption and basalt-groundwater reactions were observed over a period of 18 weeks. Most sorption reactions stabilized after about four weeks. Groundwater composition changed the least in contact with altered basalt. Contact with secondary minerals greatly increased Ca, K, and Mg concentrations in the groundwater

  16. Influence of mesostasis in volcanic rocks on the alkali-aggregate reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Tiecher, Francieli

    2012-11-01

    Mesostasis material present in the interstices of volcanic rocks is the main cause of the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) in concretes made with these rock aggregates. Mesostasis often is referred to as volcanic glass, because it has amorphous features when analyzed by optical microscopy. However, this study demonstrates that mesostasis in the interstitials of volcanic rocks most often consists of micro to cryptocrystalline mineral phases of quartz, feldspars, and clays. Mesostasis has been identified as having different characteristics, and, thus, this new characterization calls for a re-evaluation of their influence on the reactivity of the volcanic rocks. The main purpose of this study is to correlate the characteristics of mesostasis with the AAR in mortar bars containing basalts and rhyolites. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Geologic map of the Simcoe Mountains Volcanic Field, main central segment, Yakama Nation, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Mountainous parts of the Yakama Nation lands in south-central Washington are mostly covered by basaltic lava flows and cinder cones that make up the Simcoe Mountains volcanic field. The accompanying geologic map of the central part of the volcanic field has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on behalf of the Water Resources Program of the Yakama Nation. The volcanic terrain stretches continuously from Mount Adams eastward as far as Satus Pass and Mill Creek Guard Station. Most of the many hills and buttes are volcanic cones where cinders and spatter piled up around erupting vents while lava flows spread downslope. All of these small volcanoes are now extinct, and, even during their active lifetimes, most of them erupted for no more than a few years. On the Yakama Nation lands, the only large long-lived volcano capable of erupting again in the future is Mount Adams, on the western boundary.

  18. Petrogenesis of early Jurassic basalts in southern Jiangxi Province, South China: Implications for the thermal state of the Mesozoic mantle beneath South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Tao; Li, Wu-xian; Wang, Xuan-ce; Pang, Chong-jin; Li, Zheng-xiang; Xing, Guang-fu; Zhao, Xi-lin; Tao, Jihua

    2016-07-01

    Early Jurassic bimodal volcanic and intrusive rocks in southern South China show distinct associations and distribution patterns in comparison with those of the Middle Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks in the area. It is widely accepted that these rocks formed in an extensional setting, although the timing of the onset and the tectonic driver for extension are debated. Here, we present systematic LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb ages, whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotope data for bimodal volcanic rocks from the Changpu Formation in the Changpu-Baimianshi and Dongkeng-Linjiang basins in southern Jiangxi Province, South China. Zircon U-Pb ages indicate that the bimodal volcanic rocks erupted at ca. 190 Ma, contemporaneous with the Fankeng basalts (~ 183 Ma). A compilation of geochronological results demonstrates that basin-scale basaltic eruptions occurred during the Early Jurassic within a relatively short interval (< 5 Ma). These Early Jurassic basalts have tholeiitic compositions and OIB-like trace element distribution patterns. Geochemical analyses show that the basalts were derived from depleted asthenospheric mantle, dominated by a volatile-free peridotite source. The calculated primary melt compositions suggest that the basalts formed at 1.9-2.1 GPa, with melting temperatures of 1378 °C-1405 °C and a mantle potential temperature (TP) ranging from 1383 °C to 1407 °C. The temperature range is somewhat hotter than normal mid-ocean-basalt (MORB) mantle but similar to an intra-plate continental mantle setting, such as the Basin and Range Province in western North America. This study provides an important constraint on the Early Jurassic mantle thermal state beneath South China.

  19. Research topics in explosives - a look at explosives behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviors of explosives under many conditions - e.g., sensitivity to inadvertent reactions, explosion, detonation - are controlled by the chemical and physical properties of the explosive materials. Several properties are considered for a range of improvised and conventional explosives. Here I compare these properties across a wide range of explosives to develop an understanding of explosive behaviors. For improvised explosives, which are generally heterogeneous mixtures of ingredients, a range of studies is identified as needed to more fully understand their behavior and properties. For conventional explosives, which are generally comprised of crystalline explosive molecules held together with a binder, I identify key material properties that determine overall sensitivity, including the extremely safe behavior of Insensitive High Explosives, and discuss an approach to predicting the sensitivity or insensitivity of an explosive.

  20. Tectonic Controls on Pyroclastic Volcanism on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, M.; Klimczak, C.

    2015-12-01

    Over much of Mercury's geologic history the planet has contracted as a response to cooling of its interior. Such contraction is evident as landforms formed by thrust faults, which have accommodated a radius decrease of ~5 km. Stresses from global contraction imposed on the lithosphere are not favorable for and prevent volcanism. Yet, there are examples on Mercury where pyroclastic deposits superpose thrust faults, indicating that explosive volcanism has occurred after the onset of global contraction. To better understand the spatial relationships of thrust faults with the pyroclastic vents, we used MESSENGER image data to categorize 343 vents by their occurrence either (1) within 30 km, (2) within 100 km, or (3) farther than 100 km from a thrust fault, using ArcGIS. Vents were also classified by their association with impact craters. Results show that 75% of all vents are located within impact structures, with 36% of vents within 30 km of thrust faults, 41% located farther than 30 but within 100 km of thrust faults, and 23% of vents are farther than 100 km from a thrust fault. To investigate whether this geospatial relationship is tectonically controlled, three areas —representing the three categories of vents— were mapped, and the locations and orientations of vents and faults were recorded. Stress changes around these faults were then numerically modeled with the COULOMB 3.4 software, using elastic rock properties, a background stress field, and fault size- and dislocation parameters applicable to conditions of Mercury's global contractional tectonic environment. Preliminary results indicate that stress changes can locally produce conditions beneficial for volcanism. Further modeling will determine if such beneficial conditions are geospatially correlated with the pyroclastic vents and thus enable a better understanding of pyroclastic volcanism on Mercury after the onset of global contraction.

  1. Distribution and Evolution of Volcanism of the Bolaven Plateau, Southern Laos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrin, J. S.; Sieh, K.; Wiwegwin, W.; Charusiri, P.; Singer, B. S.; Singsomboun, K.; Jicha, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Bolaven Plateau of southern Laos hosts a 6000 km2 basaltic volcanic complex erupted through flat-lying Mesozoic non-marine clastic sedimentary rocks. It is among the largest of dozens of isolated intracontinental Neogene-Quaternary volcanic centers in southeast Asia. The most voluminous flow sequences are tholeiitic, but a significant component of alkalic basalt is also present as morphologically younger cinder cones and related flows that cap the Plateau. Two salient aspects of the volcanic field are these: (1) Lava compositions appear to transition temporally from tholeiitic to alkaline, suggesting that the field tapped low-degree partial melts of a fresh mantle source toward the end of its lifespan. Circumstantial evidence for this can be found in abundant spinel lherzolite, wehrlite, and olivine websterite xenoliths within the alkaline basalts. (2) The volcanic center appears to have initiated atop a pre-existing 1000 m high, 90 km wide bedrock plateau, with nearly all visible vents confined to a 30-km wide zone that extends 80-km north to south. Our work on the Bolaven volcanic complex aims at establishment of a geochemical and temporal framework for its evolution. Using field relationships, petrologic and geochemical studies, and 40Ar/39Ar dating, we hope to unravel the genetic and age relationships of these compositionally varied lava sequences. Another objective of our investigation is to assess the possibility that lavas of the Bolaven might mask the heretofore undiscovered impact site of the Australasian tektite strewnfield (see Sieh et al, this meeting). Toward this aim, we will determine whether a sufficient expanse of the volcanic field is younger than the 0.8 Ma tektites. Finally, we intend to constrain the timing of incision of the Bolaven Plateau by the Mekong River and its tributaries.

  2. Jun Jaegyu Volcano: A Recently Discovered Alkali Basalt Volcano in Antarctic Sound, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, A.; Bailey, D.; Domack, E.; Brachfeld, S.; Gilbert, R.; Ishman, S.; Krahmann, G.; Leventer, A.

    2004-12-01

    Jun Jaegyu is a young volcanic construct discovered in May 2004 by researchers aboard the National Science Foundation (NSF) vessel Laurence M. Gould (LMG04-04). The volcano is located on the Antarctic continental shelf in Antarctic Sound, approximately 9 km due north of the easternmost point of Andersson Island. Swath bathymetry (NBP01-07) indicates that the volcano stands 700 meters above the seafloor, yet remains 275 meters short of the ocean surface. The seamount lies along a northwest-southeast oriented fault scarp and contains at least 1.5 km3 of volcanic rock. Video recording of the volcano's surface revealed regions nearly devoid of submarine life. These areas are associated with a thermal anomaly of up to 0.052° C higher than the surrounding ocean water. A rock dredge collected ~13 kg of material, over 80% of which was fresh volcanic rock; the remainder was glacial IRD. These observations, along with reports by mariners of discolored water in this region of Antarctic Sound, suggest that the volcano has been recently active. The basalt samples are generally angular, glassy and vesicular. Preliminary petrographic observations indicate that plagioclase, olivine, and clinopyroxene are all present as phenocryst phases, and that small (tectonic setting of the region is complex, volcanism appears to be associated with active faults related to within-plate extension.

  3. Bromine release during Plinian eruptions along the Central American Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansteen, T. H.; Kutterolf, S.; Appel, K.; Freundt, A.; Perez-Fernandez, W.; Wehrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanoes of the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA) have produced at least 72 highly explosive eruptions within the last 200 ka. The eruption columns of all these “Plinian” eruptions reached well into the stratosphere such that their released volatiles may have influenced atmospheric chemistry and climate. While previous research has focussed on the sulfur and chlorine emissions during such large eruptions, we here present measurements of the heavy halogen bromine by means of synchrotron radiation induced micro-XRF microanalysis (SR-XRF) with typical detection limits at 0.3 ppm (in Fe rich standard basalt ML3B glass). Spot analyses of pre-eruptive glass inclusions trapped in minerals formed in magma reservoirs were compared with those in matrix glasses of the tephras, which represent the post-eruptive, degassed concentrations. The concentration difference between inclusions and matrix glasses, multiplied by erupted magma mass determined by extensive field mapping, yields estimates of the degassed mass of bromine. Br is probably hundreds of times more effective in destroying ozone than Cl, and can accumulate in the stratosphere over significant time scales. Melt inclusions representing deposits of 22 large eruptions along the CAVA have Br contents between 0.5 and 13 ppm. Br concentrations in matrix glasses are nearly constant at 0.4 to 1.5 ppm. However, Br concentrations and Cl/Br ratios vary along the CAVA. The highest values of Br contents (>8 ppm) and lowest Cl/Br ratios (170 to 600) in melt inclusions occur across central Nicaragua and southern El Salvador, and correlate with bulk-rock compositions of high Ba/La > 85 as well as low La/Yb discharged 700 kilotons of Br. On average, each of the remaining 21 CAVA eruptions studied have discharged c.100 kilotons of bromine. During the past 200 ka, CAVA volcanoes have emitted a cumulative mass of 3.2 Mt of Br through highly explosive eruptions. There are six periods in the past (c. 2ka, 6ka, 25ka, 40ka, 60ka, 75

  4. Compositional Variations of Primary Basalts in the Poison Lake Chain, Lassen Region of Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G. T.; Teasdale, R.; Wenner, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple compositional mantle domains are represented by primitive basalts of the Poison Lake chain (PLC), located east of the Lassen Volcanic Center in the southern Cascades and on the western margin of the Basin and Range. Four of the nine compositional groups of PLC basalts include primary basalt samples that represent distinct mantle compositions from which other samples are likely derived. Primitive basalts from two of the groups, the old railroad grade (bg; 102.1 +/- 11.4 ka) and the basalts of Poison Butte (bp; 105.0 +/- 6.0 ka), spatially and chronologically overlap. Both groups are primitive basalts that have phenocrysts of olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene. However, bg has larger, more euhedral olivine while bp has fewer, smaller, anhedral and embayed olivine phenocrysts. Compositionally, bg has higher whole-rock MgO (9.2-12.2 %) and Ni (189-238 ppm) and lower Zr (57-89 ppm) than bp (MgO = 5.3-7.8 %; Ni = 35-89 ppm; Zr = 98-153 ppm), suggesting bp has undergone more fractionation than bg. MELTS and REE models predict that the most primitive unit of bg (bg3) could have fractionated to produce the other three bg units. Similarly, MELTS and REE models suggest that four of the six units of bp can be derived by fractional crystallization from bg3. However, those models require that bg3 would need to fractionate between 40-50% in order to generate the bp compositions. Unreasonably high % fractionation suggests that the relationship between bg and bp groups is more complex than simple fractionation allows, but their similar Cr spinel compositions (bg Cr# =32.9-50.9 and bp Cr# = 44.0-56.3) suggest bg and bp are likely derived from a common mantle source. Additional petrogenetic modeling and isotope analyses will help clarify the relationship between PLC primitive basalt groups. The combination of small scale mantle heterogeneities along with detailed examination of magma processing are only recognized in the PLC with high density sampling, which may be

  5. Late Neoproterozoic Nuqara Dokhan Volcanics, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: Geochemistery and petrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Tharwat; Asran, Asran; Amron, Taha; Natflos, Theo

    2014-05-01

    The Nuqara volcanic is one of the northernmost outcrops of the Arabian-Nubian Shield Dokhan volcanics. The origin and tectonic setting of the late Neoproterozoic Dokhan volcanics (ca. 610-560 Ma) in the Egyptian Eastern Desert is highly debated. The debate concerns the tectonic setting where they formed during transition between convergent to extensional regime or after the East- and the West-Gondwana collision (~600Ma). In order to solve this problem, lavas from Nuqara area were studied geologically and geochemically. Nuqara Dokhan volcanics comprises two main rock suites: (a) an intermediate volcanic suite, consisting of basaltic andesite, andesite and their associated pyroclastics rocks; and (b) a felsic volcanic suite composed of dacite, rhyolite and ignimbrites. The two suites display well-defined major and trace element trends and continuum in composition with wide ranges in SiO2 (52-75.73%), CaO (9.19-0.22%), MgO (5.29-0.05%), Sr (1367-7.4 ppm), Zr (688.5-172.7 ppm), Cr (207-0.4 ppm), and Ni (94.3-0.2 ppm). The Nuqara Dokhan volcanics are characterized by strong enrichment in LILE relative to HFSE and affiliated to the calc-alkaline subducted - related magmatism. Geochemical Modeling displays that the evolution of these rocks was governed by fractional crystallization of plagioclase, amphiboles, pyroxene, magnetite and apatite in the intermediate varieties and plagioclase, amphibole, magnetite, apatite and zircon in the felsic varieties. The obtained mineral chemistry of these volcanics reveals: (a) Plagioclase range in composition from An55 to An40 in basaltic andesite and from An39 to An24 in andesite. (b) Alkali feldspars have sanidine composition. (c) Clinopyroxenes have augite composition. The low Al2O3 contents (1.94-5.588 wt %) indicate that clinopyroxene crystallized at low - pressure conditions. (d) Amphiboles have magnesio- hornblende composition.

  6. Composition of plagioclases in volcanic rocks of King George Island, Antarctica with reference to the petrogenetic significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Plagioclases occur mainly as phenocrysts in volcanic rocks of King George Island, South Shetland Islands, West Antarctica. In basaltic andesites and andesites of Keller Peninsula and Ullman Spur (Admiralty Bay), they are high structure state labradorite-andesines; and in high-A1 basalts and basaltic andesites of Barton and Weaver peninsulas (Maxwell Bay), they are high structure state bytownite-anorthites.∑REE, La/Yb ratios and δEu values of plagioclases from Admiralty Bay are higher than those from Maxwell Bay. All plagioclases have rather identical chondritenormalized transitional element distribution patterns, probably reflecting that crystal structure rather than composition of plagioclase controls their diversity. Compositions of plagioclases depend chiefly on those of their host rocks, compositional differences of plagioclases reveal that basaltic magmas in the Admiralty Bay area are more evolved than in the Maxwell Bay area.

  7. Study of crystallization of a basalt glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basalt vitreous ceramics posses industrial importance by presenting high mechanical resistance to the abrasion. It was studied the obtention and the crystallization of a glass obtained from a basalt of Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil, aiming to develop a material with great abrasive resistance. Fusions were made at 1400 deg Celsius in electrical oven and in alumina crucible, of fine residues of basalt mining. The obtained glass was treated in a crystallization temperature of 880 deg Celsius, determined by DSC, by various time of treatment. The present main crystalline phases, detected by XRD, were the magnesium-ferrite (MgFe2O4) and the diopsid Ca(Mg,Fe,Al)(Si,Al)2O6. Analysing the density by the Archimedes methodology and the DRX it was possible to follow the crystallization kinetic up.

  8. Pressure grouting of fractured basalt flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a field trial of pressure grouting in basalt and presents the results of subsequent coring and permeability measurements. The trial shows that hydraulic conductivity of fractured basalt bedrock can be significantly reduced by pressure injection of cementitious materials. The effectiveness of the pressure grout procedure was evaluated by measuring the change in the hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock. The extent of grout penetration was determined by analyzing postgrout injection drilling chips for the presence of a tracer in the grout and also by examining cores of the treated basalt. Downhole radar mapping indicated major lava flow patterns and follow water movement during a surface infiltration test. A site called Box Canyon, which is northwest of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), was chosen for the study because its surface outcrop geology is similar to the underlying bedrock fracture system at the INEL's Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC)

  9. CO2 sequestration in basalts: laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otheim, L. T.; Adam, L.; van Wijk, K.; McLing, T. L.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 is proposed as the only promising large-scale method to help reduce CO2 gas emission by its capture at large point sources and subsequent long-term storage in deep geologic formations. Reliable and cost-effective monitoring will be important aspect of ensuring geological sequestration is a safe, effective, and acceptable method for CO2 emissions mitigation. Once CO2 injection starts, seismic methods can be used to monitor the migration of the carbon dioxide plume. To calibrate changes in rock properties from field observations, we propose to first analyze changes in elastic properties on basalt cores. Carbon dioxide sequestration in basalt rocks results in fluid substitution and mixing of CO2 with water and rock mineralizations. Carbon dioxide sequestration in mafic rocks creates reactions such as Mg2SiO 4 + CaMgSi2O 6 + 4CO2 = Mg 3Ca(CO 3) 4 + 3SiO2 whereby primary silicate minerals within the basalt react with carbonic acid laden water to creating secondary carbonate minerals and silicates. Using time-lapse laboratory scale experiments, such as laser generated ultrasonic wave propagation; it is possible to observe small changes in the physical properties of a rock. We will show velocity and modulus measurements on three basalt core samples for different saturation. The ultimate goal of the project is to track seismic changes due to fluid substitution and mineralization. The porosity of our basalts ranges from 8% to 12%, and the P-wave velocity increases by 20% to 40% from dry to water saturated conditions. Petrographic analysis (CT-scans, thin sections, XRF, XRf) will aid in the characterization of the mineral structure in these basalts and its correlation to seismic properties changes resulting from fluid substitution and mineralization.

  10. Database for potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Melissa N.; Ramsey, David W.; Miller, C. Dan

    2011-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the past 10,000 yr. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Sooner or later, volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health and safety of the State's citizens as well as on its economy. This report describes the nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property. It includes hazard-zonation maps that show areas relatively likely to be affected by future eruptions in California. This digital release contains information from maps of potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in the state of California, published as Plate 1 in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1847. The main component of this digital release is a spatial database prepared using geographic information systems (GIS) applications. This release also contains links to files to view or print the map plate, main report text, and accompanying hazard tables from Bulletin 1847. It should be noted that much has been learned about the ages of eruptive events in the State of California since the publication of Bulletin 1847 in 1989. For the most up to date information on the status of California volcanoes, please refer to the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website.

  11. Siderophile and chalcophile metal variations in Tertiary picrites and basalts from West Greenland with implications for the sulphide saturation history of continental flood basalt magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keays, Reid R.; Lightfoot, Peter C.

    2007-04-01

    much more severe than that of the West Greenland contaminated basalts. Moreover, the volumes of the contaminated and metal-depleted volcanic rocks in West Greenland pale is significant when compared to the Nadezhdinsky Formation; local centers rarely contain more than 15 thin flows with a combined thickness of <50 m and more typically 10-20 m, so the volume of the eruptive portions of each system is probably two orders of magnitude smaller than the Nadezhdinsky edifice. The West Greenland centres are juxtaposed along fault zones that appear to be linked to the subsidence of the Tertiary delta, and so emplacement along N-S structures appears to be a principal control on the distribution of lavas and feeder intrusions. This leads us to suggest that the Greenland system is small and segregation of sulphide took place at high levels in the crust, whereas at Noril’sk, the saturation event took place at depth with subsequent emplacement of sulphide-bearing magmas into high levels of the crust. As a consequence, it may be unreasonable to expect that the West Greenland flood basalts experienced mineralizing processes on the scale of the Noril’sk system.

  12. Liquid explosives detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Lowell J.

    1994-03-01

    A Liquid Explosives Screening System capable of scanning unopened bottles for liquid explosives has been developed. The system can be operated to detect specific explosives directly, or to verify the labeled or bar-coded contents of the container. In this system nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to interrogate the liquid. NMR produces an extremely rich data set and many parameters of the NMR response can be determined simultaneously. As a result, multiple NMR signatures may be defined for any given set of liquids, and the signature complexity then selected according to the level of threat.

  13. Geochemical characteristics of the oceanic island- type volcanic rocks in the Chiang Mai zone, northern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shangyue; FENG Qinglai; ZHANG Zhibin; CHONGPAN Chonglakmani

    2009-01-01

    The oceanic island volcanic rocks in the Chiang Mai zone, northern Thailand, are usually covered by Lower Carboniferous and Upper Permian shallow-water carbonate rocks, with the Hawaii rocks and potash trachybasalt being the main rock types. The alkaline series is dominant with sub-alkaline series occurring in few cases. The geochemical characteristics are described as follows: the major chemical compositions are characterized by high TiO2, high P2O5 and medium K2O; the rare-earth elements are characterized by right-inclined strong LREE-enrichment patterns; the trace element patterns are of the upward-bulging K-Ti enrichment type; multi-component plots falling within the fields of oceanic island basalts and alkali basalts, belonging to the oceanic island-type volcanic rocks, which are similar to the equivalents in Deqin and Gengma (the Changning-Menglian zone) of Yunnan Province, China.

  14. 231Pa systematics in postglacial volcanic rocks from Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Simon; Kokfelt, Thomas; Hoernle, Kaj; Lundstrom, Craig; Hauff, Folkmar

    2016-07-01

    Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of combined 238U-230Th and 235U-231Pa systematics to constrain upwelling rates and the role of recycled mafic lithologies in mantle plume-derived basalts. Accordingly, we present measurements of the 231Pa concentrations from 26 mafic volcanic rocks from Iceland, including off-axis basalts from the Snaefellsnes Peninsula, to complement previously published 238U-230Th-226Ra data. 231Pa concentrations vary from 27 to 624 fg/g and (231Pa/235U) ratios from 1.12 to 2.11 with the exception of one anomalous sample from the Southeast Rift which has a 231Pa deficit with (231Pa/235U) = 0.86. An important new result is that basalts from the Southeast Rift and the Snaefellsnes Peninsula define a trend at relatively low (231Pa/235U) for a given (230Th/238U) ratio. Many of the remaining samples fall in or around the global field for ocean island basalts but those from the Mid-Iceland Belt and the Southwest Rift/Reykjanes Peninsula extend to higher (231Pa/235U) ratios at a given (230Th/238U), similar to mid-ocean ridge basalts. In principle, these lavas could result from melting of peridotite at lower pressures. However, there is no reason to suspect that the Mid-Iceland Belt and the Southwest Rift lavas reflect shallower melting than elsewhere in Iceland. In our preferred model, these lavas reflect melting of garnet peridotite whereas those from the Southeast Rift and the Snaefellsnes Peninsula contain a significant contribution (up to 20%) of melt from garnet pyroxenite. This is consistent with incompatible trace element and radiogenic isotope evidence for recycled oceanic crust in these lavas. There is increasing agreement that the displacement of ocean island basalts to lower (231Pa/235U) ratios at a given (230Th/238U), compared to mid-ocean ridge basalts, reflects the role of recycled mafic lithologies such as garnet pyroxenite as well as higher average pressures of melting. It now seems likely that this interpretation may

  15. Structural change in molten basalt at deep mantle conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanloup, Chrystèle; Drewitt, James W E; Konôpková, Zuzana; Dalladay-Simpson, Philip; Morton, Donna M; Rai, Nachiketa; van Westrenen, Wim; Morgenroth, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Silicate liquids play a key part at all stages of deep Earth evolution, ranging from core and crust formation billions of years ago to present-day volcanic activity. Quantitative models of these processes require knowledge of the structural changes and compression mechanisms that take place in liquid silicates at the high pressures and temperatures in the Earth's interior. However, obtaining such knowledge has long been impeded by the challenging nature of the experiments. In recent years, structural and density information for silica glass was obtained at record pressures of up to 100 GPa (ref. 1), a major step towards obtaining data on the molten state. Here we report the structure of molten basalt up to 60 GPa by means of in situ X-ray diffraction. The coordination of silicon increases from four under ambient conditions to six at 35 GPa, similar to what has been reported in silica glass. The compressibility of the melt after the completion of the coordination change is lower than at lower pressure, implying that only a high-order equation of state can accurately describe the density evolution of silicate melts over the pressure range of the whole mantle. The transition pressure coincides with a marked change in the pressure-evolution of nickel partitioning between molten iron and molten silicates, indicating that melt compressibility controls siderophile-element partitioning.

  16. Assessing the potential for luminescence dating of basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Duller, G.A.T.; Wintle, A.G.; Muhs, D.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of dating basalt using luminescence was tested on four samples with independent age control from Cima volcanic field, California, with the ultimate aim of assessing whether the technique could be used to date sediments on the surface of Mars. Previous analysis of these samples had demonstrated that the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signal is most suitable for dating as it showed the lowest fading rate among various luminescence signals. In this study, changes in equivalent dose as a function of preheat are described. The ages for the two youngest Cima samples agree with the independent ages based on cosmogenic nuclide measurements (12.0 ?? 0.8 ka). In the two older samples (dated to 320 and 580 ka by K-Ar), the luminescence behaviour is more complex and the form of the IRSL decay curve is seen to vary with dose. Mathematical fitting is used to isolate two components and their intensities are used to produce dose response curves. The slower component yields a larger equivalent dose. However, even using this component and after correction for fading, the ages obtained for the older samples are younger than the K-Ar ages. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Highly siderophile element abundances in Eoarchean komatiite and basalt protoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Elizabeth A.; Maier, Wolfgang D.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Plume-derived, Mg-rich, volcanic rocks (komatiites, high-Mg basalts, and their metamorphic equivalents) can record secular changes in the highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances of mantle sources. An apparent secular time-dependent enrichment trend in HSE abundances from Paleoarchean to Paleoproterozoic mantle-derived rocks could represent the protracted homogenization of a Late Veneer chondritic contaminant into the pre-Late Veneer komatiite source. To search for a possible time dependence of a late accretion signature in the Eoarchean mantle, we report new data from rare >3700 Myr-old mafic and ultramafic schists locked in supracrustal belts from the Inukjuak domain (Québec, Canada) and the Akilia association (West Greenland). Our analysis shows that some of these experienced HSE mobility and/or include a cumulate component (Touboul et al. in Chem Geol 383:63-75, 2014), whereas several of the oldest samples show some of the most depleted HSE abundances measured for rocks of this composition. We consider these new data for the oldest documented rocks of komatiite protolith in light of the Late Veneer hypothesis.

  18. Volcanological aspects of the northwest region of Paraná continental flood basalts (Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz Machado, F.; Reis Viana Rocha-Júnior, E.; Soares Marques, L.; Ranalli Nardy, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    There has been little research on volcanological aspects of Paraná continental flood basalts (PCFBs), and all investigations have mainly been concentrated on the internal portions of the lava flows. Thus, this study describes for the first time morphological aspects of lava flows and structural characteristics caused by lava-sediment interaction in the northwestern PCFB province (NW-PCFB). Early Cretaceous (134 to 132 Ma) tholeiitic rocks of the PCFB were emplaced on a large intracratonic Paleozoic sedimentary basin (Paraná Basin), mainly covering dry eolian sandstones (Botucatu Formation). As this sedimentary unit is overlain by the basic lava flows of the PCFB, the interaction of lavas and unconsolidated sediments resulted in the generation of fluidal peperites. This aspect is significant because it shows that restricted wet environments should have existed in the Botucatu desert. The peperite zones of the NW-PCFB are associated with compound pahoehoe-type (P-type) flows and are always related to the first volcanic pulses. These flows have dispersed vesicles and sand-filled cracks in their base and top borders, as well as the presence of interlayered sandstones with irregular contacts and varied thicknesses. It is remarkable that, to the best of current knowledge, only in this area of the whole PCFB did the volcanic activity start with low-Ti basalt flows of Ribeira type (TiO2 < 2.3 wt%), which are scarce in the province.

  19. Carboniferous Bimodal Volcanic Rocks and Their Plate Tectonic Setting,Hainan Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏邦栋; 施光宇; 等

    1992-01-01

    The Carboniferous volcanic rocks in western Hainan Island consist of a series of oceanic tholeite and rhyoporphyrite,showing bimodal nature.Similar geochemical characters,in terms of abun-daces and relative rations of incompatible elements and REE and the REE patterns,between the basalt and continental rift-associated tholeiite indicate the occurrence of Late Paleozoic rifting in the area.The basaltic magma,with a low degree of evolution,was originated from deep mantle,show-ing contamination by low crustal material.The rhyolite is thought to be formed from partial melting of the continental crust by higher thermal flow in a rift environment rather than from fractional crystallization of a basaltic magma.

  20. Late Cretaceous intraplate silicic volcanism in the Lake Chad region: incipient continental rift volcanism vs. Cameroon Line volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellnutt, G.; Lee, T. Y.; Torng, P. K.; Yang, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    The crustal evolution of west-central Africa during the Cretaceous was directly related to plate motion associated with the opening of the central Atlantic Ocean. Late Cretaceous (~66 Ma) to recent magmatism related to the Cameroon Line stretches from Northern Cameroon (i.e. Golda Zuelva) to the Gulf of Guinea (i.e. Pagalu) and is considered to be due to mantle-crust interaction. The volcanic rocks at Hadjer el Khamis, west-central Chad, are considered to be amongst the oldest volcanic rocks of the Cameroon Line but their relationship is uncertain because they erupted during a period of a regional extension associated with the opening of the Late Cretaceous (~75 Ma) Termit basin. The silicic volcanic rocks can be divided into a peraluminous group and a peralkaline group with both rock types having similar chemical characteristics as within-plate granitoids. In situ U/Pb zircon dating yielded a mean 206Pb/238U age of 74.4 ± 1.3 Ma and indicates the rocks erupted ~10 million years before the next oldest eruption attributed to the Cameroon Line. The Sr isotopes (i.e. ISr = 0.7050 to 0.7143) show a wide range but the Nd isotopes (i.e. 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51268 to 0.51271) are more uniform and indicate that the rocks were derived from a moderately depleted mantle source. Major and trace elemental modeling show that the silicic rocks likely formed by shallow fractionation of a mafic parental magma where the peraluminous rocks experienced crustal contamination and the peralkaline rocks did not. The silicic rocks are more isotopically similar to Late Cretaceous basalts in the Doba and Bongor basins (i.e. ISr = 0.7040 to 0.7060; 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51267 to 0.51277) of southern Chad than to rocks of the Cameroon Line (i.e. ISr = 0.7026 to 0.7038; 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51270 to 0.51300). Given the age and isotopic compositions, it is likely that the silicic volcanic rocks of the Lake Chad area are related to Late Cretaceous extensional tectonics rather than to Cameroon Line magmatism.

  1. K/Ar radiometric dating of basaltic rocks in Transdanubia, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K/Ar datings were made on 39 types of Pliocene-Pleistocene basaltic rocks from Transdanubia, Hungary. The isotopic tracer technique and the isochron method for dating are presented. The radiometric data were evaluated in view of the geological position and petrographic type and character of the samples. In addition to the conventional K/Ar dates, the 40Ar/36Ar-K/36Ar isochron dates were also calculated for presumably cogenetic samples. According to the present determinations, the age of basalts erupted near Pula at the end of the middle part of the Upper Pannonian Formation is 4.15+-0.17 m.y. The basalts of some hills in the area could be assigned to the upper part of the Upper Pannonian Formation. The average K/Ar age of the Pleistocene basic volcanic rock at village Bar is 2.02+-0.14 m.y., and its isochron age is 2.11+-0.17 m.y. (author)

  2. Basaltic glass alteration in confined media: analogy with nuclear glass in geological disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation concerns basaltic glass alteration mechanisms and rates. Through a better understanding of the processes controlling the basaltic glass durability, this thesis attempts to establish a link between laboratory studies and volcanic glass alteration in natural environment. The methodology used here is similar to the one used for nuclear glasses. Thus, we measured for the first time the residual alteration rate of basaltic glasses. Protective effect of the alteration film is clearly established. Moreover, synthetic glass representativeness is evaluated through a study focused on the effect of iron oxidation degree on the glass structure and leaching properties. A minor effect of Fe II on the forward rate and a negligible effect on the residual rate are shown. The residual rate is extrapolated at 5 C and compared to the mean alteration rate of natural samples of ages ranging from 1900 to 107 years. Non-zeolitized natural glasses follow this linear tendency, suggesting a control of the long-term rate by clayey secondary phase precipitation. Natural environments are open environments: a parametric study was performed in order to quantify the water flow rate effect on chemical composition of the alteration layer. When applied to two natural samples, the obtained laws provide coherent results. It seems possible to unify the descriptive approach from the study of natural environments to the mechanistic approach developed at the laboratory. The next step will consist in developing a model to transpose these results to nuclear glasses. (author)

  3. Geochemistry and Petrology of Emeishan Basalts and Subcontinental Mantle Evolution in Southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪云亮; S.S.HUGHES; 等

    1989-01-01

    Three major volcanic rock sequences in the P2β formation(Emeishan basalts)were sampled dur-ing a comprehensive study of the Late Permian volcanics associated with the Panxi paleorift in southwestern China .Two of the three sections-Emei and Tangfang are composed of continental flood basalts(CFB) while the third-Ertan is an alkalic center.Multi-element chemical analyses indi-cate a predominance of low MgO transitional quartz tholeiites at Emei and Tangfang,whereas the Ertan suite ranges from high-MgO alkaline olivine basalts to rhombic porphyry trachytes and quartz-bearing aegerine-augite syenites.Consanguineity of the rocks from the three sections is sug-gested by consistently high TiO2 ,K2O,incompatible trace elements and uniformly fractionated REE patterns typical of alkalic compositions,but antypical of CFB.Sr isotope data for ten Emei basalt samples(87Sr/86Sr=0.7066-0.7082)which show no correla-tion with Rb/Sr ratios (0.02-0.12) and Nd isotopes for two of the samples(143Nd/144Nd=0.51171-0.51174)are interpreted as being related to the mantle evolution.The primary magmas re-sponsible for all the three sequences have been modeled in terms of a uniformly metasomatized man-tle source.Trace element models support the derivation of the Emei and Tangfang primary magmas from 10-15 percent partial melting of spinel lherzolite,followed by fractional crystallization of olivive and clinopyroxene.The primary alkaline olivine basalts at Ertan are generated by 7-10 percent par-tial melting of a chemically equivalent source in the garnet-peridodite stability region.The assumed mantle composition is characterixzed by Rb=3.8-5.5 ppm,Sr=62-83ppm,Ba=45-64 ppm,La=3.8-5.6ppm,and Yb=0.46-0.57ppm.The proposed mechanism of regional mantle enrichment requires metasomatic stabilization of phlogopite which becomes depleted later during par-tial melting.Such enrichment is consistent with the models proposed for alkalic systems in which a large mantle diaper acts as the agent for upward

  4. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard...

  5. UNCOVERING BURIED VOLCANOES: NEW DATA FOR PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basaltic volcanism poses a potential hazard to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository because multiple episodes of basaltic volcanism have occurred in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) in the past 11 Ma. Intervals between eruptive episodes average about 1 Ma. Three episodes have occurred in the Quaternary at approximately 1.1 Ma (5 volcanoes), 350 ka (2 volcanoes), and 80 ka (1 volcano). Because Yucca Mountain lies within the Basin and Range Province, a significant portion of the pre-Quaternary volcanic history of the YMR may be buried in alluvial-filled basins. An exceptionally high-resolution aeromagnetic survey and subsequent drilling program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in 2004 and is gathering data that will enhance understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns of Pliocene and Miocene volcanism in the region (Figure 1). DOE has convened a ten-member expert panel of earth scientists that will use the information gathered to update probabilistic volcanic hazard estimates originally obtained by expert elicitation in 1996. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-trending ridges of eastward-tilted fault blocks that are bounded by north to northeast-trending normal faults. Topographic basins filled with up to 500 m of alluvium surround it to the east, south and west. In the past several decades, nearly 50 holes have been drilled in these basins, mainly for Yucca Mountain Project Site Characterization and the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Several of these drill holes have penetrated relatively deeply buried (300-400 m) Miocene basalt; a Pliocene basalt dated at 3.8 Ma was encountered at a relatively shallow depth (100 m) in the northern Amargosa Desert (Anomaly B in Figure 1). The current drilling program is the first to specifically target and characterize buried basalt. Based on the new aeromagnetic survey and previous air and ground magnetic surveys (Connor et al. 2000; O'Leary et al. 2002), at least eight drill

  6. Campagne Fournaise 1: Etude de la partie sous-marine du volcan de la Fournaise

    OpenAIRE

    Lenat, J-f

    1990-01-01

    In 1984, a survey of the bathymetry (Seabeam), the gravity and magnetic fields of the submarine east flank of Piton de la Fournaise was performed with R/V "Jean Charcot ". Piton de la Fournaise is one of the most active volcanoes in the world. It is a basaltic shield volcano which occupies the southeast third of Reunion Island in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Three main types of volcanic or volcano-tectonic features have been identified on the Seabeam map.

  7. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  8. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lut Tamam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent explosive disorder is an impulse control disorder characterized by the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in violent assault or destruction of property. Though the prevalence intermittent explosive disorder has been reported to be relatively rare in frontier studies on the field, it is now common opinion that intermittent explosive disorder is far more common than previously thought especially in clinical psychiatry settings. Etiological studies displayed the role of both psychosocial factors like childhood traumas and biological factors like dysfunctional neurotransmitter systems and genetics. In differential diagnosis of the disorder, disorders involving agression as a symptom such as alcohol and drug intoxication, antisocial and borderline personality disorders, personality changes due to general medical conditions and behavioral disorder should be considered. A combination of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches are suggested in the treatment of the disorder. This article briefly reviews the historical background, diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, etiology and treatment of intermittent explosive disorder.

  9. Shock waves & explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, PL

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of explosions is important to experts in a broad range of disciplines, including the military, industrial and environmental research, aeronautic engineering, and applied mathematics. Offering an introductory review of historic research, Shock Waves and Explosions brings analytic and computational methods to a wide audience in a clear and thorough way. Beginning with an overview of the research on combustion and gas dynamics in the 1970s and 1980s, the author brings you up to date by covering modeling techniques and asymptotic and perturbative methods and ending with a chapter on computational methods.Most of the book deals with the mathematical analysis of explosions, but computational results are also included wherever they are available. Historical perspectives are provided on the advent of nonlinear science, as well as on the mathematical study of the blast wave phenomenon, both when visualized as a point explosion and when simulated as the expansion of a high-pressure ...

  10. Modeling nuclear explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, Jeremy; Panin, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    As a result of the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, no nuclear explosion tests have been performed by the US since 1992. This appreciably limits valuable experimental data needed for improvement of existing weapons and development of new ones, as well as for use of nuclear devices in non-military applications (such as making underground oil reservoirs or compressed air energy storages). This in turn increases the value of numerical modeling of nuclear explosions and of their effects on the environment. We develop numerical codes simulating fission chain reactions in a supercritical U and Pu core and the dynamics of the subsequent expansion of generated hot plasma in order to better understand the impact of such explosions on their surroundings. The results of our simulations (of both above ground and underground explosions) of various energy yields are presented.

  11. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  12. Aging of civil explosives (Poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbendam-La Haye, E.L.M.; Klerk, W.P.C. de; Hoen, C. 't; Krämer, R.E.

    2014-01-01

    For the Dutch MoD and police, TNO composed sets with different kinds of civil explosives to train their detection dogs. The manufacturer of these explosives guarantees several years of stability of these explosives. These sets of explosives are used under different conditions, like temperature and h

  13. Modelling of gas explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Vågsæther, Knut

    2010-01-01

    The content of this thesis is a study of gas explosions in complex geometries and presentation and validation of a method for simulating flame acceleration and deflagration to detonation transition. The thesis includes a description of the mechanisms of flame acceleration and DDT that need to be modeled when simulating all stages of gas explosions. These mechanisms are flame acceleration due to instabilities that occur in fluid flow and reactive systems, shock propagation, deflagration to det...

  14. Explosive Welding with Nitroguanidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadwin, L D

    1964-03-13

    By using the explosive nitroguanidine, continuous welds can be made between similar and dissimilar metals. Since low detonation pressures are attainable, pressure transfer media are not required between the explosive and the metal surface. The need for either a space or an angle between the metals is eliminated, and very low atmospheric pressures are not required. Successful welds have been made between tantalum and 4140 steel, 3003H14 aluminum and 4140 steel, and 304 stainless steel and 3003H14 aluminum.

  15. Chemical Explosion Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Peder; Brachet, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    A database containing information on chemical explosions, recorded and located by the International Data Center (IDC) of the CTBTO, should be established in the IDC prior to entry into force of the CTBT. Nearly all of the large chemical explosions occur in connection with mining activity. As a first step towards the establishment of this database, a survey of presumed mining areas where sufficiently large explosions are conducted has been done. This is dominated by the large coal mining areas like the Powder River (U.S.), Kuznetsk (Russia), Bowen (Australia) and Ekibastuz (Kazakhstan) basins. There are also several other smaller mining areas, in e.g. Scandinavia, Poland, Kazakhstan and Australia, with large enough explosions for detection. Events in the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) of the IDC that are located in or close to these mining areas, and which therefore are candidates for inclusion in the database, have been investigated. Comparison with a database of infrasound events has been done as many mining blasts generate strong infrasound signals and therefore also are included in the infrasound database. Currently there are 66 such REB events in 18 mining areas in the infrasound database. On a yearly basis several hundreds of events in mining areas have been recorded and included in the REB. Establishment of the database of chemical explosions requires confirmation and ground truth information from the States Parties regarding these events. For an explosion reported in the REB, the appropriate authority in whose country the explosion occurred is encouraged, on a voluntary basis, to seek out information on the explosion and communicate this information to the IDC.

  16. Geologic Map of Lassen Volcanic National Park and Vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L.J. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    detail (1:24,000) was modified for inclusion here. Figure 2 (sheet 3) shows the mapping credit for previous work; figure 3 (sheet 3) shows locations discussed throughout the text. A CD-ROM entitled Database for the Geologic Map of Lassen Volcanic National Park and Vicinity, California accompanies the printed map (Muffler and oth