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Sample records for basalt volcanic field

  1. Controls on volcanism at intraplate basaltic volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hove, Jackson C.; Van Otterloo, Jozua; Betts, Peter G.; Ailleres, Laurent; Cas, Ray A. F.

    2017-02-01

    A broad range of controlling mechanisms is described for intraplate basaltic volcanic fields (IBVFs) in the literature. These correspond with those relating to shallow tectonic processes and to deep mantle plumes. Accurate measurement of the physical parameters of intraplate volcanism is fundamental to gain an understanding of the controlling factors that influence the scale and location of a specific IBVF. Detailed volume and geochronology data are required for this; however, these are not available for many IBVFs. In this study the primary controls on magma genesis and transportation are established for the Pliocene-Recent Newer Volcanics Province (NVP) of south-eastern Australia as a case-study for one of such IBVF. The NVP is a large and spatio-temporally complex IBVF that has been described as either being related to a deep mantle plume, or upper mantle and crustal processes. We use innovative high resolution aeromagnetic and 3D modelling analysis, constrained by well-log data, to calculate its dimensions, volume and long-term eruptive flux. Our estimates suggest volcanic deposits cover an area of 23,100 ± 530 km2 and have a preserved dense rock equivalent of erupted volcanics of least 680 km3, and may have been as large as 900 km3. The long-term mean eruptive flux of the NVP is estimated between 0.15 and 0.20 km3/ka, which is relatively high compared with other IBVFs. Our comparison with other IBVFs shows eruptive fluxes vary up to two orders of magnitude within individual fields. Most examples where a range of eruptive flux is available for an IBVF show a correlation between eruptive flux and the rate of local tectonic processes, suggesting tectonic control. Limited age dating of the NVP has been used to suggest there were pulses in its eruptive flux, which are not resolvable using current data. These changes in eruptive flux are not directly relatable to the rate of any interpreted tectonic driver such as edge-driven convection. However, the NVP and other

  2. Preliminary K/Ar geochronology of the Crater Basalt volcanic field (CBVF, northern Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Pécskay

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The Crater Basalt volcanic field is one of the Quaternary intraplate basaltic fields in northern Patagonia. A systematic geological, volcanological and geochronological study of CBVF indicates a multistage history of eruptions of basaltic volcanoes. K/Ar dating, using whole rock samples shows that the measured analytical ages are fully consistent with the available stratigraphic control. The radiometric ages fall into three distinct, internally consistent age groups, which give evidence that there were at least three major episodes of volcanic activity, at about 1.0 Ma, 0.6 Ma and 0.3 Ma ago. The age differences appear to be just significant, even although less than 10 % radiogenic argon was found in the isotope analysis of whole rock samples.

  3. The Mantle and Basalt-Crust Interaction Below the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Schmidt, Marick E.

    2010-01-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) lies on the Jemez Lineament on the southeastern margin of the Colorado Plateau. The field is centered on the Mt. Taylor composite volcano and includes Mesa Chivato to the NE and Grants Ridge to the WSW. MTVF magmatism spans approximately 3.8-1.5 Ma (K-Ar). Magmas are dominantly alkaline with mafic compositions ranging from basanite to hy-basalt and felsic compositions ranging from ne-trachyte to rhyolite. We are investigating the state of the mantle and the spatial and temporal variation in basalt-crustal interaction below the MTVF by examining mantle xenoliths and basalts in the context of new mapping and future Ar-Ar dating. The earliest dated magmatism in the field is a basanite flow south of Mt. Taylor. Mantle xenolith-bearing alkali basalts and basanites occur on Mesa Chivato and in the region of Mt. Taylor, though most basalts are peripheral to the main cone. Xenolith-bearing magmatism persists at least into the early stages of conebuilding. Preliminary examination of the mantle xenolith suite suggests it is dominantly lherzolitic but contains likely examples of both melt-depleted (harzburgitic) and melt-enriched (clinopyroxenitic) mantle. There are aphyric and crystal-poor hawaiites, some of which are hy-normative, on and near Mt. Taylor, but many of the more evolved MTVF basalts show evidence of complex histories. Mt. Taylor basalts higher in the cone-building sequence contain >40% zoned plagioclase pheno- and megacrysts. Other basalts peripheral to Mt. Taylor and at Grants Ridge contain clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts and cumulate-textured xenoliths, suggesting they interacted with lower crustal cumulates. Among the questions we are addressing: What was the chemical and thermal state of the mantle recorded by the basaltic suites and xenoliths and how did it change with time? Are multiple parental basalts (Si-saturated vs. undersaturated) represented and, if so, what changes in the mantle or in the tectonic

  4. Preliminary K/Ar geochronology of the Crater Basalt volcanic field (CBVF, northern Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Pécskay

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The Crater Basalt volcanic field is one of the Quaternary intraplate basaltic fields in northern Patagonia. A systematic geological, volcanological and geochronological study of CBVF indicates a multistage history of eruptions of basaltic volcanoes. K/Ar dating, using whole rock samples shows that the measured analytical ages are fully consistent with the available stratigraphic control. The radiometric ages fall into three distinct, internally consistent age groups, which give evidence that there were at least three major episodes of volcanic activity, at about 1.0 Ma, 0.6 Ma and 0.3 Ma ago. The age differences appear to be just significant, even although less than 10 % radiogenic argon was found in the isotope analysis of whole rock samples.El campo volcánico del Basalto Cráter (CVBC constituye uno de los campos basálticos cuaternarios de intraplaca de la Patagonia septentrional. El estudio sistemático de la geología, volcanología y geocronología del CVBC muestra una historia eruptiva multiepisódica de volcanes basálticos. Las dataciones K-Ar realizadas sobre roca total son coherentes con el control estratigráfico. Las edades obtenidas para el Basalto Cráter permiten distinguir tres episodios diferentes, pero individualmente coherentes, de actividad volcánica, ocurridos hace ~1,0 Ma; 0,6 Ma y 0,3 Ma. Las diferencias de edad parecen ser significativas, aún cuando el contenido de argón radiogénico determinado en los análisis de roca total resultó menor al 10 %.

  5. Magmatic inclusions in rhyolites, contaminated basalts, and compositional zonation beneath the Coso volcanic field, California

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    Bacon, C.R.; Metz, J.

    1984-01-01

    Basaltic lava flows and high-silica rhyolite domes form the Pleistocene part of the Coso volcanic field in southeastern California. The distribution of vents maps the areal zonation inferred for the upper parts of the Coso magmatic system. Subalkalic basalts (Coso volcanic field contain sparse andesitic inclusions (55-61% SiO2). Pillow-like forms, intricate commingling and local diffusive mixing of andesite and rhyolite at contacts, concentric vesicle distribution, and crystal morphologies indicative of undercooling show that inclusions were incorporated in their rhyolitic hosts as blobs of magma. Inclusions were probably dispersed throughout small volumes of rhyolitic magma by convective (mechanical) mixing. Inclusion magma was formed by mixing (hybridization) at the interface between basaltic and rhyolitic magmas that coexisted in vertically zoned igneous systems. Relict phenocrysts and the bulk compositions of inclusions suggest that silicic endmembers were less differentiated than erupted high-silica rhyolite. Changes in inferred endmembers of magma mixtures with time suggest that the steepness of chemical gradients near the silicic/mafic interface in the zoned reservoir may have decreased as the system matured, although a high-silica rhyolitic cap persisted. The Coso example is an extreme case of large thermal and compositional contrast between inclusion and host magmas; lesser differences between intermediate composition magmas and inclusions lead to undercooling phenomena that suggest smaller ??T. Vertical compositional zonation in magma chambers has been documented through study of products of voluminous pyroclastic eruptions. Magmatic inclusions in volcanic rocks provide evidence for compositional zonation and mixing processes in igneous systems when only lava is erupted. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    The extensive Quaternary volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Mendoza, Argentina, is investigated in this study by major and trace element analyses, Sr, Nd, Hf and Pb-isotopic analyses and Zr-Hf isotope dilution data on samples from almost the entire province. The samples are mainly...... in basalts from all the studied volcanic fields in Payenia is signs of lower crustal contamination indicating assimilation of, in some cases, large amounts of trace element depleted, mafic, plagioclase-bearing rocks. The northern Payenia is dominated by backarc basalts erupted between late Pliocene to late...

  7. Geology of the Mid-Miocene Rooster Comb Caldera and Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field, eastern Oregon: Silicic volcanism associated with Grande Ronde flood basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas R.; Mahood, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    The Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) of eastern Oregon consists of rhyolitic caldera centers and lava fields contemporaneous with and spatially related to Mid-Miocene Columbia River flood basalt volcanism. Previous studies delineated two calderas in the southeastern part of LOVF near Owyhee Reservoir, the result of eruptions of two ignimbrites, the Tuff of Leslie Gulch and the Tuff of Spring Creek. Our new interpretation is that these two map units are differentially altered parts of a single ignimbrite produced in a major phreatomagmatic eruption at ~ 15.8 Ma. Areas previously mapped as Tuff of Spring Creek are locations where the ignimbrite contains abundant clinoptilolite ± mordenite, which made it susceptible to erosion. The resistant intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch has an alteration assemblage of albite ± quartz, indicative of low-temperature hydrothermal alteration. Our new mapping of caldera lake sediments and pre- and post-caldera rhyolitic lavas and intrusions that are chemically similar to intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch point to a single ~ 20 × 25 km caldera, which we name the Rooster Comb Caldera. Erosion of the resurgently uplifted southern half of the caldera created dramatic exposures of intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch cut by post-caldera rhyolite dikes and intrusions that are the deeper-level equivalents of lava domes and flows that erupted into the caldera lake preserved in exposures to the northeast. The Rooster Comb Caldera has features in common with more southerly Mid-Miocene calderas of the McDermitt Volcanic Field and High Rock Caldera Complex, including formation in a basinal setting shortly after flood basalt eruptions ceased in the region, and forming on eruption of peralkaline ignimbrite. The volcanism at Rooster Comb Caldera postdates the main activity at McDermitt and High Rock, but, like it, begins ~ 300 ky after flood basalt volcanism begins in the area, and while flood basalts don't erupt through the silicic focus, are

  8. Modern analogues for Miocene to Pleistocene alkali basaltic phreatomagmatic fields in the Pannonian Basin: "soft-substrate" to "combined" aquifer controlled phreatomagmatism in intraplate volcanic fields Research Article

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    Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane; Haller, Miguel; Brenna, Marco; Csillag, Gabor

    2010-09-01

    The Pannonian Basin (Central Europe) hosts numerous alkali basaltic volcanic fields in an area similar to 200 000 km2. These volcanic fields were formed in an approximate time span of 8 million years producing smallvolume volcanoes typically considered to be monogenetic. Polycyclic monogenetic volcanic complexes are also common in each field however. The original morphology of volcanic landforms, especially phreatomagmatic volcanoes, is commonly modified. by erosion, commonly aided by tectonic uplift. The phreatomagmatic volcanoes eroded to the level of their sub-surface architecture expose crater to conduit filling as well as diatreme facies of pyroclastic rock assemblages. Uncertainties due to the strong erosion influenced by tectonic uplifts, fast and broad climatic changes, vegetation cover variations, and rapidly changing fluvio-lacustrine events in the past 8 million years in the Pannonian Basin have created a need to reconstruct and visualise the paleoenvironment into which the monogenetic volcanoes erupted. Here phreatomagmatic volcanic fields of the Miocene to Pleistocene western Hungarian alkali basaltic province have been selected and compared with modern phreatomagmatic fields. It has been concluded that the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) in New Zealand could be viewed as a prime modern analogue for the western Hungarian phreatomagmatic fields by sharing similarities in their pyroclastic successions textures such as pyroclast morphology, type, juvenile particle ratio to accidental lithics. Beside the AVF two other, morphologically more modified volcanic fields (Pali Aike, Argentina and Jeju, Korea) show similar features to the western Hungarian examples, highlighting issues such as preservation potential of pyroclastic successions of phreatomagmatic volcanoes.

  9. Sedimentology, eruptive mechanism and facies architecture of basaltic scoria cones from the Auckland Volcanic Field (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly

    2016-09-01

    Scoria cones are a common type of basaltic to andesitic small-volume volcanoes (e.g. 10- 1-10- 5 km3) that results from gas-bubble driven explosive eruptive styles. Although they are small in volume, they can produce complex eruptions, involving multiple eruptive styles. Eight scoria cones from the Quaternary Auckland Volcanic Field in New Zealand were selected to define the eruptive style variability from their volcanic facies architecture. The reconstruction of their eruptive and pyroclastic transport mechanisms was established on the basis of study of their volcanic sedimentology, stratigraphy, and measurement of their pyroclast density, porosity, Scanning Electron Microscopy, 2D particle morphology analysis and Visible and Near Visible Infrared Spectroscopy. Collection of these data allowed defining three end-member types of scoria cones inferred to be constructed from lava-fountaining, transitional fountaining and Strombolian type, and explosive Strombolian type. Using the physical and field-based characteristics of scoriaceous samples a simple generalised facies model of basaltic scoria cones for the AVF is developed that can be extended to other scoria cones elsewhere. The typical AVF scoria cone has an initial phreatomagmatic phases that might reduce the volume of magma available for subsequent scoria cone forming eruptions. This inferred to have the main reason to have decreased cone volumes recognised from Auckland in comparison to other volcanic fields evolved dominantly in dry eruptive condition (e.g. no external water influence). It suggests that such subtle eruptive style variations through a scoria cone evolution need to be integrated into the hazard assessment of a potentially active volcanic field such as that in Auckland.

  10. Spectroscopy of olivine basalts using FieldSpec and ASTER data: A case study from Wadi Natash volcanic field, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmed Madani

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims at revealing the spectral characteristics of the olivine basalts exposed at Wadi Natash area, Egypt, using FieldSpec spectroradiometer. It also evaluates band ratios and fusion techniques for mapping purposes using ASTER data. Several volcanic episodes occurred during Early- to Late-Cretaceous are recorded in the study area. Early-Cretaceous olivine basalts are highly carbonated. Late-Cretaceous eruptions took place throughout several volcanic cones aligned in NW direction. Based on FieldSpec measurements and petrographic data, two groups of olivine basalt namely `A' and `B' are recognized. Fresh olivine basalt (group A) is characterized by low flat spectral profile with overall low reflectance values (~20%). Spectral profile of altered olivine basalt (group B) shows moderate reflectance values (~37%) with four little absorption features around the 1.10, 1.40, 2.00 and 2.35 μm wavelength regions. These absorption features are attributed mainly to the presence of chlorite and carbonate alteration products as indicated by petrographic examination. ASTER false colour composite band ratio image (3/2:R, 8/1:G and 8/5:B) discriminates easily the fresh and altered basalts by deep blue and red-dish blue colours respectively. Image fusion between previously mentioned FCC ratios image and high spatial resolution ASTER panchromatic image are carried out using brovey and HSV transformation methods. Visual and statistical assessment methods proved that HSV fusion image yields better image interpretability results compared to brovey image. It improves the spatial resolution of original FCC ratios image with acceptable spectral preservation. The present study proved the usefulness of Field-Spec spectral profiles and the processed ASTER data for discriminating different olivine basalt groups exposed at the study area.

  11. Cenozoic diatreme field in Chubut (Argentina) as evidence of phreatomagmatic volcanism accompanied with extensive Patagonian plateau basalt volcanism?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Károly Németh; Ulrike Martin; Miguel J. Haller; Viviana L Alric

    2007-01-01

    @@ In Patagonia, Argentina, at the northern border of the Patagonian Cenozoic mafic plateau lava fields, newly discovered diatremes stand about 100 m above the surrounding plain. These diatremes document phreatomagmatic episodes associated with the formation of the volcanic fields. The identified pyroclastic and intrusive rocks are exposed lower diatremes of former phreatomagmatic volcanoes and their feeding dyke systems.These remotely located erosional remnants cut through Paleozoic granitoids and Jurassic/Cretaceous alternating siliciclastic continental successions that are relatively easily eroded. Plateau lava fields are generally located a few hundreds of metres above the highest level of the present tops of the preserved diatremes suggesting a complex erosional history and potential interrelation-ships between the newly identified diatremes and the surrounding lava fields. Uprising magma from theunderlying feeder dyke into the diatreme root zone intruded the clastic debris in the diatremes, inflated them and mingled with the debris to form subterranean peperite. The significance of identifying diatremes in Patagonia are twofold: 1) in the syn-eruptive paleoenvironment, water was available in various "soft-sediments", commonly porous, media aquifer sources, and 2) the identified abundant diatremes that form diatreme fields are good source candidates for the extensive lava fields with phreatomagmatism facilitating magma rise with effective opening of fissures before major lava effusions.

  12. Surface exposure dating of Holocene basalt flows and cinder cones in the Kula volcanic field (western Turkey) using cosmogenic 3He and 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Caroline; Niedermann, Samuel; Hetzel, Ralf; Akal, Cüneyt

    2015-04-01

    The Kula volcanic field is the youngest volcanic province in western Anatolia and covers an area of about 600 km2 around the town Kula (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996). Its alkali basalts formed by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle in a region of long-lived continental extension and asthenospheric upwelling (Prelevic et al., 2012). Based on morphological criteria and 40Ar/39Ar dating, four phases of Quaternary activity have been distinguished in the Kula volcanic field (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996; Westaway et al., 2006). The youngest lava flows are thought to be Holocene in age, but so far only one sample from this group was dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 7±2 ka (Westaway et al., 2006). In this study, we analysed cosmogenic 3He in olivine phenocrysts from three basalt flows and one cinder cone to resolve the Holocene history of volcanic eruptions in more detail. In addition, we applied 10Be exposure dating to two quartz-bearing xenoliths found at the surface of one flow and at the top of one cinder cone. The exposure ages fall in the range between ~500 and ~3000 years, demonstrating that the youngest volcanic activity is Late Holocene in age and therefore distinctly younger than previously envisaged. Our results show that the Late Holocene lava flows are not coeval but formed over a period of a few thousand years. We conclude that surface exposure dating of very young volcanic rocks provides a powerful alternative to 40Ar/39Ar dating. References Prelevic, D., Akal, C. Foley, S.F., Romer, R.L., Stracke, A. and van den Bogaard, P. (2012). Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post-collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Petrology, 53, 1019-1055. Richardson-Bunbury, J.M. (1996). The Kula Volcanic Field, western Turkey: the development of a Holocene alkali basalt province and the adjacent normal-faulting graben. Geological Magazine, 133, 275-283. Westaway, R., Guillou, H., Yurtmen, S., Beck, A

  13. Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, C.R.; Kurasawa, H.; Delevaux, M.H.; Kistler, R.W.; Doe, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The 2 earliest rhyolites probably were tapped from short-lived silicic reservoirs, in contrast to the other 36 rhyolite domes and lava flows which the isotopic data suggest may have been leaked from the top of a single, long-lived magmatic system. Most Coso basalts show isotopic, geochemical, and mineralogic evidence of interaction with crustal rocks, but one analyzed flow has isotopic ratios that may represent mantle values (87Sr/86Sr=0.7036,206Pb/204Pb=19.05,207Pb/204Pb=15.62,208Pb/204Pb= 38.63). The (initial) isotopic composition of typical rhyolite (87Sr/86Sr=0.7053,206Pb/204Pb=19.29,207Pb/204Pb= 15.68,208Pb/204Pb=39.00) is representative of the middle or upper crust. Andesitic inclusions in the rhyolites are evidently samples of hybrid magmas from the silicic/mafic interface in vertically zoned magma reservoirs. Silicic end-member compositions inferred for these mixed magmas, however, are not those of erupted rhyolite but reflect the zonation within the silicic part of the magma reservoir. The compositional contrast at the interface between mafic and silicic parts of these systems apparently was greater for the earlier, smaller reservoirs. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Pliocene Basaltic Volcanism in The East Anatolia Region (EAR), Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyan, Vural; Özdemir, Yavuz; Keskin, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    East Anatolia Region (EAR) is one of the high Plateau which is occurred with north-south compressional regime formed depending on continent-continent collision between Eurasia and Arabia plates (Şengör and Kidd, 1979). Recent studies have revealed that last oceanic lithosphere in the EAR have completely depleted to 20 million years ago based on fission track ages (Okay et al. 2010). Our initial studies suggest that extensively volcanic activity in the EAR peaked in the Pliocene and continued in the same productivity throughout Quaternary. Voluminous basaltic lava plateaus and basaltic lavas from local eruption centers occurred as a result of high production level of volcanism during the Pliocene time interval. In order to better understand the spatial and temporal variations in Pliocene basaltic volcanism and to reveal isotopic composition, age and petrologic evolution of the basaltic volcanism, we have started to study basaltic volcanism in the East Anatolia within the framework of a TUBITAK project (project number:113Y406). Petrologic and geochemical studies carried out on the Pliocene basaltic lavas indicate the presence of subduction component in the mantle source, changing the character of basaltic volcanism from alkaline to subalkaline and increasing the amount of spinel peridotitic melts (contributions of lithospheric mantle?) in the mantle source between 5.5-3.5 Ma. FC, AFC and EC-AFC modelings reveal that the while basaltic lavas were no or slightly influenced by crustal contamination and fractional crystallization, to more evolved lavas such as bazaltictrachyandesite, basalticandesite, trachybasalt might have been important processes. Results of our melting models and isotopic analysis data (Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf, 18O) indicate that the Pliocene basaltic rocks were derived from both shallow and deep mantle sources with different melting degrees ranging between 0.1 - 4 %. The percentage of spinel seems to have increased in the mantle source of the basaltic

  15. Effect of Miocene basaltic volcanism in Shanwang (Shandong Province, China) on environmental changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; ZhengFu; LIU; JiaQi; CHEN; XiaoYu

    2007-01-01

    Miocene (16-10 Ma) basalts, together with significantly well-preserved fossils (including animal and plant fossils) in the contemporaneously tephra-rich Maar sediments, are located in Shanwang volcanic region, Shandong Province, China. Distribution area of the basaltic eruption products is about 240 km2. Detailed field observations indicate that most of basaltic rocks are fissure eruptive products and some are central eruptives constrained by linear faults. The well-preserved fossils in the lacustrine deposits have been considered to be a result of mass mortalities. Based on physically volcanologic modeling results, eruption column of the basaltic fissure activities in the Shanwang volcanic region is estimated to have entered the stratosphere. Petrographic observations indicate that the basalts have porphyritic textures with phenocrysts of olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar and alkali feldspar setting in groundmass of plagioclase feldspar, alkali feldspar, quartz, apatite and glass. Based on observations of tephra, tuff and tuffites collected in the Maar sediments of the Shanwang area, we determined major element oxide concentrations and volatile composition of melt inclusions in phenocrysts and matrix glasses by electron microprobe analysis. Volatile (including S, Cl, F and H2O) concentrations erupted into the stratosphere were estimated by comparing pre- and post-eruptive volatile concentrations. Our determination results show that contents of S, Cl, F and H2O emitted into the stratosphere were 0.18%-0.24%, 0.03%-0.05%, 0.03%-0.05% and 0.4%-0.6%, respectively, which was characterized by high-S contents erupted. Amounts of volatiles emitted in the Shanwang volcanic region are much higher than those in eruptions which had a substantial effect on climate and environment. According to the compositions and amounts of the volatiles erupted from the Miocene basaltic volcanism in Shanwang, we propose a hypothesis that volatile-rich basaltic volcanism could result in

  16. Morphology and development of pahoehoe flow-lobe tumuli and associated features from a monogenetic basaltic volcanic field, Bahariya Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Ezz El Din Abdel Hakim; Hammed, Mohamed Saleh

    2016-01-01

    The dimensions, landforms, and structural characteristics of pahoehoe flow-lobe tumuli from Bahariya Depression are collectively reported here for the first time. The flow-lobe tumuli documented here characterize hummocky flow surfaces. These tumuli are characterized by low, dome-like mounds, lava-inflation clefts, and squeeze ups. Flow-lobe tumuli are of various shapes and sizes, which are affected by the mechanism of inflation because they formed in response to the increase of pressure within the flow when the flow's crust becomes thicker. The tumuli often appear isolated or in small groups in the middle sectors of the lava flows, whereas in the distal sectors they form large concentration, suggesting the presence of complex lava tubes inside of the flow. Tumuli exhibited by El Bahariya lava flows are between 3.0 and 50 m in length and up to 5.0 m in height with lenticular geometry in aerial view. The flow emplacement of flow-lobe tumuli is controlled by variations in local characteristics such as nature of the substrate, flow orientation, slope, interferrence with other lobes, and rate of lava supply. Their presence generally towards the terminal ends of flow fields suggests that they seldom form over the clogged portions of distributary tubes or pathways. Thus, localized inflations that formed over blockages in major lava tubes result in formation of flow-lobe tumuli. The three-tiered (crust-core-basal zone) internal structure of the flow-lobe tumuli, resembling the typical distribution of vesicles in P-type lobes, confirms emplacement by the mechanism of inflation. All the available data show that the morphology and emplacement mechanism of the studied flow-lobe tumuli may be analogous to similar features preserved within topographically confined areas of the Hawaiian and Deccan hummocky lava flows. Considering the age of the studied volcanic fields (˜22 Ma) it is most probable that the structures described here may be amongst the oldest recognized examples

  17. Mantle Origin of Silicic Calc-alkaline Basalts to Andesites in the Central Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, S. M.; Zellmer, G. F.; Gómez-Tuena, A.; Stuart, F.; Espinasa-Perena, R.; Cai, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Quaternary central Mexican Volcanic Belt, constructed on ~50 km thick continental crust, erupts a broad spectrum of basaltic to dacitic calc-alkaline magmas with the arc-typical high ratios of large-ion lithophile to high-field strength elements. In order to understand their genesis, we investigated high-Mg# olivine-phyric calc-alkaline basalts to andesites from Holocene monogenetic volcanoes Tuxtepec (50.2 wt% SiO2; 9.7 wt% MgO), Yecahuazac (53.1;8.0), Suchiooc Cone (53.2;9.2), Guespalapa (54.4-61.2;5.3-7.9) and Cuatepel (55.6-58.9;5.4-7.5), and as well as one basaltic andesite from composite volcano Popocateptl (56.7;6.9). The high 3He/4He (7.3 ± 0.3 Ra; n=16) of olivine phenocrysts that crystallize at upper crustal levels, and the limited range of Sr-Nd-Hf isotope ratios preclude any significant crustal contamination of these magmas. Moreover, small, but significant differences in Sr-Nd-Hf isotope ratios and the variations of olivine phenocrysts in the Fo-Ni space conclusively rule out that these magmas were related through fractional crystallization. Consequently, the basaltic to andesitic magmas must originate from the sub-arc mantle. Building on the high-Ni content of the olivines that by far exceed Ni abundances of olivines in partial melts of peridotite, we propose that the subarc MVB mantle contains segregations of silica-excess and silica-deficient 'reaction pyroxenites' that formed through infiltration of highly reactive silicic fluids or melts from slab. Upon melting, the pyroxenites produce dacitic and basaltic initial melts, respectively, that mix in variable proportions during ascent through mantle and crust. This genetic model links the silica enrichment of the arc magmas directly to the silica flux from slab, with no requirement for any significant melt silica increase in the overlying crust.

  18. Geochronological, morphometric and geochemical constraints on the Pampas Onduladas long basaltic flow (Payún Matrú Volcanic Field, Mendoza, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espanon, Venera R.; Chivas, Allan R.; Phillips, David; Matchan, Erin L.; Dosseto, Anthony

    2014-12-01

    The Pampas Onduladas flow in southern Mendoza, Argentina, is one of the four longest Quaternary basaltic flows on Earth. Such flows (> 100 km) are relatively rare on Earth as they require special conditions in order to travel long distances and there are no recent analogues. Favourable conditions include: a gentle topographic slope, an insulation process to preserve the melt at high temperature, and a large volume of lava with relatively low viscosity. This study investigates the rheological and geochemical characteristics of the ~ 170 km long Pampas Onduladas flow, assessing conditions that facilitated its exceptional length. The study also reports the first geochronological results for the Pampas Onduladas flow. 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analyses of groundmass reveal an eruption age of 373 ± 10 ka (2σ), making the Pampas Onduladas flow the oldest Quaternary long flow. The methods used to assess the rheological properties include the application of several GIS tools to a digital elevation model (DEM) to determine the length, width, thickness, volume and topographic slope of the flow as well as algorithms to determine its density, viscosity and temperature. The slope of the Pampas Onduladas flow determined from the initial part of the flow on the eastern side of La Carbonilla Fracture to its end point in the province of La Pampa is 0.84% (0.29°), the steepest substrate amongst long Quaternary flows. The rheological properties, such as density viscosity and temperature from the Pampas Onduladas flow are similar to values reported for other long Quaternary flows. However, the minimum volume calculated is relatively low for its length compared with other long Quaternary flows. Therefore, the extension of the Pampas Onduladas flow was probably controlled by a steep slope, combined with an insulating mechanism, which helped in providing optimal conditions for a travel length of almost 170 km.

  19. Constraining the onset of flood volcanism in Isle of Skye Lava Field, British Paleogene Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angkasa, Syahreza; Jerram, Dougal. A.; Svensen, Henrik; Millet, John M.; Taylor, Ross; Planke, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    In order to constrain eruption styles at the onset of flood volcanism, field observations were undertaken on basal sections of the Isle of Skye Lava Field, British Paleogene Volcanic Province. This study investigates three specific sections; Camus Ban, Neist Point and Soay Sound which sample a large area about 1500 km2 and can be used to help explain the variability in palaeo-environments at the onset of flood volcanism. Petrological analysis is coupled with petrophysical lab data and photogrammetry data to create detailed facies models for the different styles of initiating flood basalt volcanism. Photogrammetry is used to create Ortho-rectified 3D models which, along with photomontage images, allow detailed geological observations to be mapped spatially. Petrographic analyses are combined with petrophysical lab data to identify key textural variation, mineral compositions and physical properties of the volcanic rocks emplaced during the initial eruptions. Volcanism initiated with effusive eruptions in either subaerial or subaqueous environments resulting in tuff/hyaloclastite materials or lava flow facies lying directly on the older Mesozoic strata. Volcanic facies indicative of lava-water interactions vary significantly in thickness between different sections suggesting a strong accommodation space control on the style of volcanism. Camus Ban shows hyaloclastite deposits with a thickness of 25m, whereas the Soay Sound area has tuffaceous sediments of under 0.1m in thickness. Subaerial lavas overly these variable deposits in all studied areas. The flood basalt eruptions took place in mixed wet and dry environments with some significant locally developed water bodies (e.g. Camus Ban). More explosive eruptions were promoted in some cases by interaction of lavas with these water bodies and possibly by local interaction with water - saturated sediments. We record key examples of how palaeotopography imparts a primary control on the style of volcanism during the

  20. Measurement of the Dielectric Properties of Volcanic Scoria and Basalt at 9370 MHz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yongchun; WANG Shijie; OUYANG Ziyuan; LI Xiongyao

    2005-01-01

    Dielectric data for volcanic scoria and basalt on the earth at microwave frequency are extremely sparse, and also crucial for volcanic terrains imaging, and development. In consideration of their similarity to lunar regolith (soils and rocks) in chemical and mineral composition, the dielectric data is significative for passive and active microwave remote sensing on the Moon. This study provides the data about the dielectric properties of three kinds of scoria and two kinds of basalt in China. The method put forward in this paper is also applicable for measuring the dielectric properties of dry rocks and other granular ground materials with low complex dielectric constants. Firstly, the authors measured the ε' and tanδvalues of strip specimens prepared from the mixture of scoria or basalt powder and polythene with the resonant cavity perturbation method at 9370 MHz. Secondly, from the ε' and tanδ values of the mixture, the ε's and ranδs values of solid scoria and basalt were calculated using Lichtenecker's mixture formulae. Finally, the effective complex dielectric constants, ε'e and tanδe, of scoria at different bulk densities were calculated. The results have shown that the ε's and tancδs values of all solid basaltic materials measured (both solid basaltic scoria or basalt) are approximately 7 and 0.05, respectively. With increasing bulk density of scoria, the ε'e and tanδe values of scoria increase significantly.

  1. Volcanic hazard assessment in monogenetic volcanic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolini, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    [eng] One of the most important tasks of modern volcanology, which represents a significant socio-economic implication, is to conduct hazard assessment in active volcanic systems. These volcanological studies are aimed at hazard that allows to constructing hazard maps and simulating different eruptive scenarios, and are mainly addressed to contribute to territorial planning, definition of emergency plans or managing volcanic crisis. The impact of a natural event, as a volcanic eruption, can s...

  2. A minimum UPb age for Siberian flood-basalt volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, S. L.; Czamanske, G. K.; Krogh, T. E.

    1996-09-01

    Establishing an accurate and precise age for Siberian flood-basalt volcanism is of great importance in evaluating causes for the unequaled mass extinction of flora and fauna at the Permian-Triassic boundary. We report a new, minimum UPb age obtained from zircon and baddeleyite from the mineralized Noril'sk I intrusion that cuts the lower third of this rapidly deposited, 3500-m-thick volcanic sequence near Noril'sk. This 251.2 ± 0.3 (2σ) Ma age is within analytical error of the SHRIMP UPb age for zircon from the Permian-Triassic boundary at Meishan, South China [251.1 ± 3.6 Ma (2σ)], and confirms Siberian basaltic volcanism as a possible contributor to the mass extinction.

  3. A minimum U-Pb age for Siberian flood-basalt volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, S.L.; Czamanske, G.K.; Krogh, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Establishing an accurate and precise age for Siberian flood-basalt volcanism is of great importance in evaluating causes for the unequaled mass extinction of flora and fauna at the Permian-Triassic boundary. We report a new, minimum U-Pb age obtained from zircon and baddeleyite from the mineralized Noril'sk I intrusion that cuts the lower third of this rapidly deposited, 3500-m-thick volcanic sequence near Noril'sk. This 251.2 ?? 0.3 (2??) Ma age is within analytical error of the SHRIMP U-Pb age for zircon from the Permian-Triassic boundary at Meishan, South China [251.1 ?? 3.6 Ma (2??)], and confirms Siberian basaltic volcanism as a possible contributor to the mass extinction.

  4. The Zuni-Bandera Volcanic Field, NM: An Analog for Exploring Planetary Volcanic Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Garry, W. B.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Crumpler, L. S.; Aubele, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, near Grants, New Mexico, is comprised of volcanic deposits from several basaltic eruptions during the last million years. This vent field exhibits a diverse group of coalesced lava flows and displays well-preserved volcanic features including a’a and pahoehoe flows, collapsed lava tubes, cinder cones and low shields. The McCartys flow is a 48-km long inflated basalt flow and is the youngest in the field at around 3000 years old. Over the last three years we have used the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, and the McCartys flow in particular, as a terrestrial analog for exploring planetary volcanic fields, and understanding the role of lava sheet inflation in flow field development. We have conducted three different styles of analog tests, 1) basic field science focused on understanding lava sheet inflation, 2) mission operations tests related to EVA design and real-time modification of traverse plans, and 3) science enabling technology tests. The Zuni-Bandera field is an ideal location for each style of analog test because it provides easy access to a diverse set of volcanic features with variable quality of preservation. However, many limitations must also be considered in order to maximize lessons learned. The McCartys flow displays well-preserved inflation plateaus that rise up to 15 m above the surrounding field. The preservation state enables textures and morphologies indicative of this process to be characterized. However, the pristine nature of the flow does not compare well with the much older and heavily modified inflated flows of Mars and the Moon. Older flows west of McCartys add value to this aspect of analog work because of their degraded surfaces, development of soil horizons, loose float, and limited exposure of outcrops, similar to what might be observed on the Moon or Mars. EVA design tests and science enabling technology tests at the Zuni-Bandera field provide the opportunity to document and interpret the relationships

  5. Contributions to Astrogeology: Geology of the lunar crater volcanic field, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D. H.; Trask, N. J.

    1971-01-01

    The Lunar Crater volcanic field in east-central Nevada includes cinder cones, maars, and basalt flows of probably Quaternary age that individually and as a group resemble some features on the moon. Three episodes of volcanism are separated by intervals of relative dormancy and erosion. Changes in morphology of cinder cones, degree of weathering, and superposition of associated basalt flows provide a basis for determining the relative ages of the cones. A method has been devised whereby cone heights, base radii, and angles of slope are used to determine semiquantitatively the age relationships of some cinder cones. Structural studies show that cone and crater chains and their associated lava flows developed along fissures and normal faults produced by tensional stress. The petrography of the basalts and pyroclastics suggests magmatic differentiation at depth which produced interbedded subalkaline basalts, alkali-olivine basalts, and basanitoids. The youngest flows in the field are basanitoids.

  6. Age, distance, and geochemical evolution within a monogenetic volcanic field: Analyzing patterns in the Auckland Volcanic Field eruption sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvec, Nicolas Le; Bebbington, Mark S.; Lindsay, Jan M.; McGee, Lucy E.

    2013-09-01

    The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) is a young active monogenetic basaltic field, which contains ˜50 volcanoes scattered across the Auckland metropolitan area. Understanding the temporal, spatial, and chemical evolution of the AVF during the last c.a. 250 ka is crucial in order to forecast a future eruption. Recent studies have provided new age constraints and potential temporal sequences of the past eruptions within the AVF. We use this information to study how the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers evolves with time, and how the chemical composition of the erupted magmas evolves with time and space. We seek to develop a methodology which compares successive eruptions to describe the link between geochemical and spatiotemporal evolution of volcanic centers within a monogenetic volcanic field. This methodology is tested with the present day data of the AVF. The Poisson nearest neighbor analysis shows that the spatial behavior of the field has been constant overtime, with the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers fitting the Poisson model within the significance levels. The results of the meta-analysis show the existence of correlations between the chemical composition of the erupted magmas and distance, volume, and time. The apparent randomness of the spatiotemporal evolution of the volcanic centers observed at the surface is probably influenced by the activity of the source. The methodology developed in this study can be used to identify possible relationships between composition trends and volume, time and/or distance to the behavior of the source, for successive eruptions of the AVF.

  7. A depleted, not ideally chondritic bulk Earth: The explosive-volcanic basalt loss hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Paul H.

    2008-04-01

    It has long been customary to assume that in the bulk composition of the Earth, all refractory-lithophile elements (including major oxides Al 2O 3 and CaO, all of the REE, and the heat-producing elements Th and U) occur in chondritic, bulk solar system, proportion to one another. Recently, however, Nd-isotopic studies (most notably Boyet M. and Carlson R. W. (2006) A new geochemical model for the Earth's mantle inferred from 146Sm- 142Nd systematics. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.250, 254-268) have suggested that at least the outer portion of the planet features a Nd/Sm ratio depleted to ˜0.93 times the chondritic ratio. The primary reaction to this type of evidence has been to invoke a "hidden" reservoir of enriched matter, sequestered into the deepest mantle as a consequence of primordial differentiation. I propose a hypothesis that potentially explains the evidence for Nd/Sm depletion in a very different way. Among the handful of major types of differentiated asteroidal meteorites, two (ureilites and aubrites) are ultramafic restites so consistently devoid of plagioclase that meteoriticists were once mystified as to how all the complementary plagioclase-rich matter (basalt) was lost. The explanation appears to be basalt loss by graphite-fueled explosive volcanism on roughly 100-km sized planetesimals; with the dispersiveness of the process dramatically enhanced, relative to terrestrial experience, because the pyroclastic gases expand into vacuous space (Wilson L. and Keil K. (1991) Consequences of explosive eruptions on small Solar System bodies: the case of the missing basalts on the aubrite parent body. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.104, 505-512). By analogy with lunar pyroclastic products, the typical size of pyroclastic melt/glass droplets under these circumstances will be roughly 0.1 mm. Once separated from an asteroidal or planetesimal gravitational field, droplets of this size will generally spiral toward the Sun, rather than reaccrete, because drag forces such the

  8. Basaltic continental intraplate volcanism as sustained by shear-driven upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmer, M. D.; Conrad, C. P.; Smith, E. I.

    2012-04-01

    While most volcanism on Earth occurs at plate boundaries, the study of intraplate basaltic volcanism may provide an opportunity to scrutinize the make-up and dynamics of the mantle. In continental settings, a range of mechanisms were proposed to sustain mantle decompression and hence to support such volcanism. These include mantle plumes, fertile melting anomalies, self-sustaining buoyant decompression melting, lithospheric dripping, and edge-driven small-scale convection. Recently, Conrad et al. showed that basaltic continental volcanism occurs more often where shear across the asthenosphere is greatest, and hence propose shear-driven upwelling (SDU) to support such volcanism¹. SDU does not require density heterogeneity to drive convection, in contrast to other mechanisms. Rather, it develops when rapid shear across the asthenosphere meets lateral viscosity variation2. For example, in a case with a low-viscosity pocket in the mantle, asthenospheric shear is accommodated in a different manner across the pocket than across the ambient mantle. This contrast drives vertical flow close to the margins of the pocket, and may be sufficient to sustain decompression melting, particularly if the viscosity anomaly is supported by higher water contents or temperatures2. Mantle melting is also expected for situations in which asthenospheric shear flow enters a lithospheric cavity, or decompresses across a step in lithospheric thickness3 - and even more so if a low-viscosity pocket is entrained in such a flow. Seismic observations indicate that sublithospheric topography, and heterogeneity in mantle viscosity are indeed common beneath continents (regardless of whether the imaged anomalies are thermal or compositional in origin). We use three-dimensional numerical models to explore shear-driven flow, and investigate a range of cases with pockets of variable viscosity contrast and shape, lithospheric steps of variable offset and spacing, and asthenospheric flow with variable

  9. Floral changes across the Triassic/Jurassic boundary linked to flood basalt volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Schootbrugge, B.; Quan, T. M.; Lindström, S.; Püttmann, W.; Heunisch, C.; Pross, J.; Fiebig, J.; Petschick, R.; Röhling, H.-G.; Richoz, S.; Rosenthal, Y.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2009-08-01

    One of the five largest mass extinctions of the past 600million years occurred at the boundary of the Triassic and Jurassic periods, 201.6million years ago. The loss of marine biodiversity at the time has been linked to extreme greenhouse warming, triggered by the release of carbon dioxide from flood basalt volcanism in the central Atlantic Ocean. In contrast, the biotic turnover in terrestrial ecosystems is not well understood, and cannot be readily reconciled with the effects of massive volcanism. Here we present pollen, spore and geochemical analyses across the Triassic/Jurassic boundary from three drill cores from Germany and Sweden. We show that gymnosperm forests in northwest Europe were transiently replaced by fern and fern-associated vegetation, a pioneer assemblage commonly found in disturbed ecosystems. The Triassic/Jurassic boundary is also marked by an enrichment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which, in the absence of charcoal peaks, we interpret as an indication of incomplete combustion of organic matter by ascending flood basalt lava. We conclude that the terrestrial vegetation shift is so severe and wide ranging that it is unlikely to have been triggered by greenhouse warming alone. Instead, we suggest that the release of pollutants such as sulphur dioxide and toxic compounds such as the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons may have contributed to the extinction.

  10. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Woolford, Jeff M

    2015-01-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ∼1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ∼17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ∼17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ∼35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  11. Geochemical discrimination of the geotectonic environment of basaltic-andesitic volcanic rocks associated with the Laochang polymetallic ore deposit at Lancang, Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jianguo

    2006-01-01

    The Laochang polymetallic ore deposit at Lancang is one of the well known ancient ore deposits associated with volcanic rocks in the Sanjiang (Tri-river) region of Southwest China. Volcanic rocks are dominated by alkali basalt and trachyte basalt. There has long been a controversy on the environment of formation of basalts. Some scholars hold that the basalts were formed in a continental environment, some thought they were formed in an oceanic environment and others considered that the basalts were emplaced in a back-arc basin. This study focuses on the geochemical characteristics of the basalts on the basis of their major elements, REEs and trace elements. At the same time, strongly incompatible elements such as Ta, Th and Hf and their ratios were used to differentiate the geotectonic settings of basalts. The results showed that the basalts in the region studied were formed in a continental rift environment.

  12. Modeling Central American Volcanic Front Primitive Lavas with the Arc Basalt Simulator (abs 4.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenson, M.; Carr, M. J.; Gazel, E.

    2012-12-01

    We have used the Arc Basalt Simulator (ABS), developed by J-I Kimura, to explore the conditions and components of melting beneath the Central American volcanic front. ABS is a comprehensive forward model that incorporates slab dehydration and melting and mantle wedge fluxing and melting using realistic P-T conditions and experimentally determined phase relations and partition coefficients. We have applied ABS version 4.00, which includes melting/dehydration relations in eight distinct subducting layers, to model representative magma types along the Central American volcanic front. These magmas are first projected to primary melt compositions by the addition of olivine until they reach Fo90. Then, using a wide range of input parameters including variations in slab components, extent of peridotite depletion, depth of slab dehydration and wedge fluxing and degree of peridotite melting, successful model fits are generated (based on trace element and isotope matching). The solution space is probed using a Monte Carlo technique to cover the enormous range of parameter values. Nicaragua and Costa Rica represent geochemical and geophysical end members of the volcanic front, differing greatly in volcano volume, slab dip beneath the volcano, isotopic composition and incompatible element enrichment. Using appropriate input compositions for ABS 4.0, we find through millions of simulations that the Cerro Negro primary magma (Nicaragua) requires high degrees of source melting (22-27%) and large amounts of slab-derived water (3-5%). In contrast, the Irazu primary magma (central Costa Rica) is generated from more enriched sources with only a small amount of water (less than 0.5%) and at low degrees of partial melting (less than 5%). Other Central American lavas with intermediate geochemical characteristics are produced from conditions within the Nicaragua-Costa Rica range. By reproducing the lava geochemistry with ABS 4.0, it becomes possible to extract constraints on source input

  13. Geochemistry of high-potassium rocks from the mid-Tertiary Guffey volcanic center, Thirtynine Mile volcanic field, central Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobus, Reinhard A.; Mochel, David W.; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Eide, Elizabeth A.; Rothwarf, Miriam T.; Loeffler, Bruce M.; Johnson, David A.; Keating, Gordon N.; Sultze, Kimberly; Benjamin, Anne E.; Venzke, Edward A.; Filson, Tammy

    1990-07-01

    The Guffey volcanic center is the largest within the 2000 km2 mid-Tertiary Thirtynine Mile volcanic field of central Colorado. This study is the first to provide extensive chemical data for these alkalic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, which represent the eroded remnants of a large stratovolcano of Oligocene age. Formation of early domes and flows of latite and trachyte within the Guffey center was followed by extrusion of a thick series of basalt, trachybasalt, and shoshonite flows and lahars. Plugs, dikes, and vents ranging from basalt to rhyolite cut the thick mafic deposits, and felsic tuffs and tuff breccias chemically identical to the small rhyolitic plutons are locally preserved. Whole-rock major and trace element analyses of 80 samples, ranging almost continuously from 47% to 78%SiO2, indicate that the rocks of the Guffey center are among the most highly enriched in K2O (up to 6%) and rare earth elements (typically 200-300 ppm) of any volcanic rocks in Colorado. These observations, along with the relatively high concentrations of Ba and Rb and the depletion of Cr and Ni, suggest an appreciable contribution of lower crustal material to the magmas that produced the Thirtynine Mile volcanic rocks.

  14. The `Strawberry Volcanic Field' of Northeastern Oregon: Another Piece of the CRB Puzzle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Mid to Late Miocene Strawberry Volcanics field (SVF) located along the southern margin of the John Day valley of NE Oregon, comprise a diverse group of volcanic rocks ranging from basalt to rhyolite. The main outcrop area of the SVF (3,400 km2) is bordered by units from the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), with the main CRB units to the north, the Picture Gorge Basalt to the east and Steens Basalt to the south. The geographic position and age of the Strawberry Volcanics make a genetic relationship to CRB volcanism likely, yet little is known about this diverse volcanic field. This research aims at refining the stratigraphic and age relationships as well as the petrology and geochemistry of magmas associated with the SVF. Previous investigations (e.g. Robyn, 1977) found that the SVF was active between 20 to 10 Ma with the main pulse largely being coeval with the 15 Ma CRBG eruptions. Lavas and tuffs from the SVF are calc-alkaline with low FeO*/MgO (~ 2.56 wt. %), high Al2O3 (~ 16.4 wt. %), low TiO2 (~ 1.12 wt.%), and span the entire compositional range from basalt to rhyolite (47-78 wt. % SiO2) with andesite as the dominant lithology. Basaltic lavas from the SVF have compositional affinities to earlier Steens Basalt, and some trace element concentrations and ratios are indistinguishable from those of CRBG lavas (e.g. Zr, Ba, Sr, and Ce/Y). Andesites are calc-alkaline, but contrary to typical arc (orogenic) andesites, SVF andesites are exceedingly phenocryst poor (Strawberry Volcanics are largely the product of hot-spot related basaltic magmas interacting with the continental crust. The range in compositions from calc-alkaline andesite to rhyolite may be attributed to the hybridization of mantle-derived and crustal melts, with the more evolved compositions reflecting greater proportions of crustally derived material and/or higher degrees of differentiation. Furthermore, since the earliest SVF eruption is 3 Ma older than the proposed onset of the CRBG (~ 17 Ma

  15. Appraisal and evolution of hydrochemical processes from proximity basalt and granite areas of Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkamble, Sahebrao; Sahya, Ashalata; Mondal, N. C.; Harikumar, P.

    2012-05-01

    SummaryThis paper deals with a systematic hydrochemical study carried out at proximity basalt and granite areas of Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) in India to assess groundwater quality and evaluate the hydrochemical processes. A total of 40 groundwater samples were collected equally from these areas and analyzed. Results showed that the groundwaters rich in alkaline earth in the basalt and alkali rich element in the granite. The dominancy of cations was observed as Ca2+ > Mg2+ > Na+ > K+ in the basalt and Na+ > Mg2+ > K+ > Ca2+ in the granite, whereas anions as HCO3->Cl>SO42- and Cl>HCO3->SO42-, respectively. Hydrochemical processes were identified with the helps of ion exchange, carbonate weathering and dissolution, multiple ionic ratios, and silicate weathering, which shown the predominance of carbonate, dolomite, calcite and silicate (anorthite) weathering in basalt, but in granite, silicate (alkali feldspar) weathering was dominated. Factor analysis also showed that there were multiple processes acting on groundwaters, were separated from the main cluster. Salinity, Sodium Absorption Ratio (SAR), Soluble Sodium Percentage (SSP), Residual Sodium Carbonate (RSC), Kelley's Ratio (KR) and Permeability Index (PI) in well samples showed that groundwater in basalt was more suitable for irrigation purposes. Further, a digital elevation model (DEM) was generated using Global mapper (8.0 version) software, which aided to decipher the thickness of basalt trap, and vertical transition zone of basaltic (trap) and granitic (basement) aquifer at this DVP comprising with the well depths and groundwater chemistry.

  16. A 3D model of crustal magnetization at the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Abdeslem, Juan; Calmus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located near the western border of the southern Basin and Range province, in the State of Sonora NW Mexico, and within the Gulf of California Extensional Province. This volcanic field contains the shield volcano Santa Clara, which mainly consists of basaltic to trachytic volcanic rocks, and reaches an altitude of ~ 1200 m. The PVF disrupts a series of discontinuous ranges of low topographic relief aligned in a NW direction, which consist mainly of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and Proterozoic through Paleogene granitoids. The PVF covers an area of approximately 60 by 55 km, and includes more than 400 well-preserved cinder cones and vents and eight maar craters. It was active from about 1.7 Ma until about 13 ka. We have used the ages and magnetic polarities of the volcanic rocks, along with mapped magnetic anomalies and their inverse modeling to determine that the Pinacate Volcanic Field was formed during two volcanic episodes. The oldest one built the Santa Clara shield volcano of basaltic and trachytic composition, and occurred during the geomagnetic Matuyama Chron of reverse polarity, which also includes the normal polarity Jaramillo and Olduvai Subchrons, thus imprinting both normal and reverse magnetization in the volcanic products. The younger Pinacate series of basaltic composition represents monogenetic volcanic activity that extends all around the PVF and occurred during the subsequent geomagnetic Brunhes Chron of normal polarity. Magnetic anomalies toward the north of the Santa Clara volcano are the most intense in the PVF, and their inverse modeling indicates the presence of a large subsurface body magnetized in the present direction of the geomagnetic field. This suggests that the magma chambers at depth cooled below the Curie temperature during the Brunhes Chron.

  17. Geochemical constraints on the relationship between the Miocene-Pliocene volcanism and tectonics in the Palaoco and Fortunoso volcanic fields, Mendoza Region, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhr, Charlotte Thorup; Holm, Paul Martin; Llambias, Eduardo J.

    2013-01-01

    and crustal contamination in the generation of geochemically very different lavas from the Palaoco, Fortunoso and Río Grande volcanic fields, north of the Payún Matrú Volcano. The source for the Early Miocene Fortunoso(I) basalts was a OIB-type mantle devoid of subduction zone input. This type of OIB...

  18. A brief comparison of lava flows from the Deccan Volcanic Province and the Columbia-Oregon Plateau Flood Basalts: Implications for models of flood basalt emplacement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ninad Bondre; Raymond A Duraiswami; Gauri Dole

    2004-12-01

    The nature and style of emplacement of Continental Flood Basalt (CFB) lava flows has been a atter of great interest as well as considerable controversy in the recent past. However, even a cursory review of published literature reveals that the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and Hawaiian volcanoes provide most of the data relevant to this topic. It is interesting to note, however, that the CRBG lava flows and their palaeotopographic control is atypical of other CFB provinces in the world. In this paper, we first present a short overview of important studies pertaining to the emplacement of flood basalt flows. We then briefly review the morphology of lava flows from the Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) and the Columbia-Oregon Plateau flood basalts. The review underscores the existence of significant variations in lava flow morphology between different provinces, and even within the same province. It is quite likely that there were more than one way of emplacing the voluminous and extensive CFB lava flows. We argue that the establishment of general models of emplacement must be based on a comprehensive documentation of lava flow morphology from all CFB provinces.

  19. A Plagioclase Ultraphyric Basalt group in the Neogene flood basalt piles of eastern Iceland: Volcanic architecture and mode of emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskarsson, B. V.; Riishuus, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    3D photogrammetry in conjunction with ground mapping was applied in order to assess the architecture of a Plagioclase Ultraphyric Basalt (PUB) group in eastern Iceland, namely the Grænavatn group. The ~10 Myr old group is exposed in steep glacially carved fjords and can be traced over 60 km along strike. Two feeder dikes have been found and show that the group erupted along the trend of the dike swarm associated with the Breiddalur central volcano. The group has 9--14 flows where thickest, and thins to about 3--4 flows up-dip to the east within the distance of 15-20 km from the source. We have estimated the volume of the group to exceed 40 km3. The flows have mixed architecture of simple and compound morphology. The flow lobes have thicknesses from 1--24 m and many reach lengths over 1000 m. The surface morphology varies from rubbly to scoriaceous, but is dominantly of pahoehoe style. The internal structure of the lava flows is well preserved and the flows display abundant vesicle cylinders. The modal percentage of An-rich plagioclase macrocrysts varies from 25--50 % and they are in the range of 5--30 mm. The aspect ratio of the group and the nature of the flows indicate fissure-fed eruptions. A thick flow found at the base of the group in various locations seems to record the largest eruption episode in the formation of the group. This phase is also the most abundant in macrocryst. An asymmetric buildup is seen in one location and may have characterized the general buildup of the group. The general morphology of the lava flows suggests low viscous behavior, at odds with the high crystal content. Petrographic observations and mineral chemistry shows that the plagioclase macrocrysts are very calcic (An80-85) and in disequilibrium with the groundmass and plagioclases therein (An50-70). Thus the apparent lava rheology and emplacement of the PUBs was likely achieved due to fast ascent of the magma through the crust and transfer of heat from the primitive macrocrysts

  20. East Greenland flood basalt volcanism: duration, volatile flux and correlation to the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegner, C.; Heilmann-Clausen, C.; Larsen, R. B.; Kent, A. J. R.

    2012-04-01

    Massive flood basalt volcanism in the NE Atlantic 56 million years ago can be related to the initial manifestation of the Iceland plume and ensuing continental rifting, and has been correlated with a short (c. 200,000 years) global warming period, the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). A hypothesis is that magmatic sills emplaced into organic-rich sediments on the Norwegian margin triggered rapid release of greenhouse gases. However, the largest exposed volcanic succession in the region, the E Greenland flood basalts provide additional details. The alkaline Ash-17 provides regional correlation of continental volcanism and pertubation of the oceanic environment. In E Greenland Ash-17 is interbedded with the uppermost part of the flood basalt succession. In the marine sections of Denmark, Ash-17 postdates PETM, most likely by 3-400,000 years. While radiometric ages bracket the duration of the main flood basalt event to less than a million years, the subsidence history of the Skaergaard intrusion due to flood basalt emplacement indicates it took less than 300,000 years. It is therefore possible that the main flood basalts in E Greenland postdates PETM. This is supported by a scarcity of ash layers within the PETM interval. Continental flood basalt provinces represent some of the highest sustained volcanic outputs preserved within the geologic record. Recent studies have focused on estimating the atmospheric loading of volatile elements and have led to the suggestion that they may be associated with significant global climate changes and mass extinctions. Estimates suggest that c. 400,000 km3 of basaltic lava erupted in E Greenland and the Faeroe islands. Based on measurements of melt inclusions and solubility models, approximately 3000 Gt of SO2 and 220 Gt of HCl were released by these basalts. Calculated yearly fluxes approach 10 Mt/y SO2 and 0.7 Mt/y HCl. Refinements of these estimates, based largely on further melt inclusion measurements, are proceeding. Our

  1. Determining eruption ages and erosion rates of Quaternary basaltic volcanism from combined U-series disequilibria and cosmogenic exposure ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Kenneth W. W.; Ackert, Robert P., Jr.; Ramos, Frank C.; Sohn, Robert A.; Murrell, Michael T.; Depaolo, Donald J.

    2007-05-01

    We present 238U-230Th -226Ra disequilibria and cosmogenic 3He and 36Cl data for the Bluewater flow of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico. The 238U-230Th disequilibria measured on separated groundmass phases yield an internal isochron age of 68 ka (+24/ 20 ka; 2σ). This value cannot be directly compared with surface exposure ages unless erosion rates are known. The apparent (zero erosion) ages determined from both the 3He concentration (47.5 ± 5 ka; 2σ) and the 36Cl concentration (41.2 ± 8.8 ka; 2σ) are significantly younger than the U-Th isochron age. When minimum estimates of surface erosion based on flow morphology are considered, the 3He concentrations indicate a minimum exposure age of 60 ka, in good agreement with the U-Th isochron age, with a minimum erosion rate of 1.7 mm/k.y. and an erosion rate as high as 5 mm/k.y. in other locations. Correcting for erosion has little effect on the model 36Cl age and, as a result, the 36Cl age is significantly younger than the U-Th isochron age and erosion-corrected 3He ages; this discordance is attributed to a lack of closed-system behavior in the 36Cl system. These new ages have local significance for the geochronology of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field; however, their larger significance is in their applicability to dating Quaternary basalts and quantifying erosion rates.

  2. Pollution and paradigms: lessons from Icelandic volcanism for continental flood basalt studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, John

    2005-02-01

    This paper is based on the premise that research into the environmental impact of continental flood basalt (CFB) volcanism has paid insufficient attention to the potential ecosystem damage that would result from the direct deposition of hundreds of megatons (Tg) of sulphur and other volatiles. The environmental impacts of the 1783 Laki Fissure eruption are reviewed in outline. It is shown that in a relatively brief period of volcanic activity, volatiles emitted by the eruption damaged and destroyed vegetation from the Arctic Ocean to the Mediterranean. Air pollution was so intense that human health was affected and the national death rate increased dramatically in both England and France. It is proposed that the events of 1783 may be used as a paradigm for the environmental impacts of a CFB lava flow, and the emissions of 1783 are scaled up to illustrate this point. Thus, if a Laki style event were to erupt for a year it would approach the physical scale of a single episode of the Roza flow in the Columbia River CFB and potentially yield 576 Tg of sulphur gases which could have been oxidised into approximately 945 Tg of aerosol. This could generate a tropospheric aerosol mass of approximately 708 Tg H 2SO 4. The ecosystem impact of the deposition of acids on this scale would be profound and, as with the actual Laki event, be continental in scale. All parts of the plant life cycle would be disrupted, including photosynthesis and fruiting. Inevitably, with the disruption of food webs animals would also be affected. Poorly buffered inland waters would be acidified, as would Boreal soils, reducing their biodiversity. In our already polluted and interdependent world, any future event on this scale would have serious consequences for human health and trade.

  3. Icelandic basaltic geothermal field: A natural analog for nuclear waste isolation in basalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, G.C.; Grandstaff, D.E. (Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Dept. of Geology)

    1984-11-21

    Analog studies of Icelandic geothermal fields have shown that the design of nuclear waste repositories in basalt can benefit by comparison to the data base already available from the development of these geothermal fields. A high degree of similarity exists between these two systems: their petrology, groundwater geochemistry, mineral solubilities, hydrologic parameters, temperature ranges, water-rock redox equilibria, hydrothermal pH values, and secondary mineralogies all show considerable overlap in the range of values. The experimentally-simulated hydrothermal studies of the basaltic nuclear waste repository rocks have, at this time, produced a data base that receives a strong confirmation from the Icelandic analog. Furthermore, the Icelandic analog should eventually be employed to extrapolate into higher and lower temperatures, into longer time-base chemical comparisons, and into more realistic mineral deposition studies, than have been possible in the laboratory evaluations of the nuclear waste repository designs. This eventual use of the Icelandic analog will require cooperative work with the Icelandic Geological Survey. 46 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Geologic map of the Simcoe Mountains Volcanic Field, main central segment, Yakama Nation, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Mountainous parts of the Yakama Nation lands in south-central Washington are mostly covered by basaltic lava flows and cinder cones that make up the Simcoe Mountains volcanic field. The accompanying geologic map of the central part of the volcanic field has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on behalf of the Water Resources Program of the Yakama Nation. The volcanic terrain stretches continuously from Mount Adams eastward as far as Satus Pass and Mill Creek Guard Station. Most of the many hills and buttes are volcanic cones where cinders and spatter piled up around erupting vents while lava flows spread downslope. All of these small volcanoes are now extinct, and, even during their active lifetimes, most of them erupted for no more than a few years. On the Yakama Nation lands, the only large long-lived volcano capable of erupting again in the future is Mount Adams, on the western boundary.

  5. The role of phreatomagmatism in a Plio-Pleistocene high-density scoria cone field: Llancanelo Volcanic Field (Mendoza), Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Corina; Németh, Károly; Combina, Ana María; Nullo, Francisco; Drosina, Marina

    2008-01-01

    The Plio-Pleistocene Llancanelo Volcanic Field, together with the nearby Payun Matru Field, comprises at least 800 scoria cones and voluminous lava fields that cover an extensive area behind the Andean volcanic arc. Beside the scoria cones in the Llancanelo Field, at least six volcanoes show evidence for explosive eruptions involving magma-water interaction. These are unusual in the context of the semi-arid climate of the eastern Andean ranges. The volcanic structures consist of phreatomagmatic-derived tuff rings and tuff cones of olivine basalt composition. Malacara and Jarilloso tuff cones were produced by fallout of a range of dry to wet tephra. The Malacara cone shows more evidence for a predominance of wet-emplaced units, with a steep slump-slope characterized by many soft-sediment deformation structures, such as: undulating bedding planes, truncated beds and water escape features. The Piedras Blancas and Carapacho tuff rings resulted from explosive eruptions with deeper explosion loci. These cones are hence dominated by lapilli tuff and tuff units, emplaced mainly by wet and/or dry pyroclastic surges. Carapacho is the only centre that appears to have started with phreatomagmatic eruptions, with lowermost tephra being rich in non-volcanic country rocks. The presence of deformed beds with impact sags, slumping textures, asymmetrical ripples, dunes, cross- and planar lamination, syn-volcanic faulting and accretionary lapilli beds indicate an eruption scenario dominated by excessive water in the transportational and depositional regime. This subordinate phreatomagmatism in the Llancanelo Volcanic Field suggests presence of ground and/or shallow surface water during some of the eruptions. Each of the tuff rings and cones are underlain by thick, fractured multiple older lava units. These broken basalts are inferred to be the horizons where rising magma interacted with groundwater. The strong palagonitization at each of the phreatomagmatic cones formed hard beds

  6. Zeolites in Eocene basaltic pillow lavas of the Siletz River Volcanics, Central Coast Range, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, T.E.C.; Staples, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    Zeolites and associated minerals occur in a tholeiitic basaltic pillow lava sequence. Although the zeolite assemblages are similar to those found in other major zeolite occurrences in basaltic pillow lavas, regional zoning of the zeolite assemblages is not apparent. The formation of the different assemblages is discussed.-D.F.B.

  7. Decreasing Magmatic Footprints of Individual Volcanos in a Waning Basaltic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.A> Valentine; F.V. Perry

    2006-06-06

    The distribution and characteristics of individual basaltic volcanoes in the waning Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field provide insight into the changing physical nature of magmatism and the controls on volcano location. During Pliocene-Pleistocene times the volumes of individual volcanoes have decreased by more than one order of magnitude, as have fissure lengths and inferred lava effusion rates. Eruptions evolved from Hawaiian-style eruptions with extensive lavas to eruptions characterized by small pulses of lava and Strombolian to violent Strombolian mechanisms. These trends indicate progressively decreasing partial melting and length scales, or magmatic footprints, of mantle source zones for individual volcanoes. The location of each volcano is determined by the location of its magmatic footprint at depth, and only by shallow structural and topographic features that are within that footprint. The locations of future volcanoes in a waning system are less likely to be determined by large-scale topography or structures than were older, larger volume volcanoes.

  8. Magmatic Evolution in the Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Magma evolution within the Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field (LTVF) is poorly understood. The LTVF is a basaltic, monogenetic field in Veracruz, Mexico, that contains approximately 400 vents and has been active for the last 7 Ma, including a sub-Plinian eruption in 1793. The field is structurally controlled, with cones forming NW-SE lines consistent with local extension. By understanding magmatic evolution through ascent, storage, and mixing, it is possible to more accurately predict future trends in the system. Samples from two alignments of cinder cones located between San Martin Tuxtlas volcano and Laguna Catemaco were analyzed petrographically and geochemically. Geochemical data were plotted in Fenner and Harker diagrams to identify trends, including fractional crystallization and magma recharge. Mineral modes were calculated via point counting in thin sections, and micro-textural variations were noted. Cone morphometry was used as a rough proxy for age along with field relationships to develop an approximate order of events along the alignments. Preliminary data suggest that the aligned vents are part of a linked magmatic plumbing system undergoing periodic recharge.

  9. Using Spatial Density to Characterize Volcanic Fields on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Connor, C. B.; Connor, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new tool to planetary geology for quantifying the spatial arrangement of vent fields and volcanic provinces using non parametric kernel density estimation. Unlike parametricmethods where spatial density, and thus the spatial arrangement of volcanic vents, is simplified to fit a standard statistical distribution, non parametric methods offer more objective and data driven techniques to characterize volcanic vent fields. This method is applied to Syria Planum volcanic vent catalog data as well as catalog data for a vent field south of Pavonis Mons. The spatial densities are compared to terrestrial volcanic fields.

  10. Very long pahoehoe inflated basaltic lava flows in the Payenia volcanic province (Mendoza and la Pampa, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Pasquarè

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Extremely long basaltic lava flows are here presented and described. The flows originated from the great, polygenetic, fissural Payen Volcanic Complex, in the Andean back-arc volcanic province of Payenia in Argentina. The lava flows outpoured during the Late Quaternary from the summit rift of a shield volcano representing the first volcanic centre of this complex. One of these flows presents an individual tongue-like shape with a length of 181 km and therefore is the longest known individual Quaternary lava flow on Earth. Leaving the flanks of the volcano this flow reached the Salado river valley at La Pampa and, in its distal portion, maintained its narrow and straight shape without any topographic control over a flat alluvial plain. It has a hawaiite composition with low phenocryst content of prevailing olivine and minor plagioclase. Rare Earth element patterns are typical of Na-alkaline basalts, but incompatible trace element patterns and Sr -Nd isotope ratios, suggest a geodynamic setting transitional to the orogenic one. The flow advanced following the thermally efficient "inflation" mechanism, as demonstrated by a peculiar association of well developed morphological, structural and textural features. The temperature of 1130-1160°C and the viscosity of 3-73 Pa*s, calculated by petrochemical data, may be considered, together with a very low cooling rate and a sustained and long lasting effusion rate, the main causes of the extremely long transport system of this flow. Both the extreme length of the flow and the partial lack of topographic control may provide new constraints on the physics of large inflated flows, which constitute the largest volcanic provinces on Earth and probably also on the terrestrial planets.

  11. Eruptive Productivity of the Ceboruco-San Pedro Volcanic Field, Nayarit, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H. M.; Lange, R. A.; Hall, C. M.; Delgado-Granados, H.

    2002-12-01

    High-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology coupled with GIS spatial analysis provides constraints on magma eruption rates over the past 1 Myr of the Ceboruco-San Pedro volcanic field (1870 km2), located in the Tepic-Zacoalco rift in western Mexico. The volcanic field is part of the Trans Mexican Volcanic arc and is dominated by the andesitic-dacitic stratocone of Volcan Ceboruco and includes peripheral fissure-fed flows, domes, and monogenetic cinder cones. The ages of these volcanic features were determined using 40Ar/39Ar laser step-heating techniques on groundmass or mineral separates, with 78% of the 52 analyses yielding plateau ages with a 2 sigma error < 50 kyrs. The volumes were determined using high resolution (1:50,000) digital elevation models, orthophotos, and GIS software, which allowed for the delineation of individual volcanic features, reconstruction of the pre-eruptive topography, and volume calculations by linear interpolation. The relative proportions of the 80 km3 erupted over the past 1 Myr are 14.5% basaltic andesite, 64.5% andesite, 20% dacite, and 1% rhyolite, demonstrating the dominance of intermediate magma types (in terms of silica content). Overall, there appears to be no systematic progression in the eruption of different magma types (e.g., basalt, andesite, dacite, etc.) with time. However, more than 75% of the total volume of lava within the Ceboruco-San Pedro volcanic field erupted in the last 100 kyrs. This reflects the youthfulness of Volcan Ceboruco, which was constructed during the last 50 kyrs and has a present day volume of 50 +/- 2.5 km3, accounting for 81% of the andesite and 50% of the dacite within the volcanic field. Eleven cinder cones, ranging from the Holocene to 0.37 Ma, display a narrow compositional range, with 52-58 wt% SiO2, 3-5.5 wt% MgO, and relatively high TiO2 concentrations (0.9-1.8 wt%). The total volume of the cinder cones is 0.83 km3. No lavas with < 51 wt% SiO2 have erupted in the past 1 Myr. Peripheral

  12. Depth of volcanic basalt degassing forecasted from CO2 fluid inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Fluid inclusions have recorded the history of degassing in basalt. Some fluid inclusions in olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts of basalt were analyzed by micro-thermometry and Raman spectroscopy in this paper. The experimental results showed that many inclusions are present almost in a pure CO2 system. The densities of some CO2 inclusions were computed in terms of Raman spectroscopic characteristics of CO2 Fermi resonance at room temperature. Their densities change over a wide range, but mainly between 0.044 g/cm3 and 0.289 g/cm3. Their micro-thermometric measurements showed that the CO2 inclusions examined reached homogenization between 1145.5℃ and 1265℃. The mean value of homogenization temperatures of CO2 inclusions in basalts is near 1210℃. The trap pressures (depths) of inclusions were computed with the equation of state and computer program. Distribution of the trap depths makes it know that the degassing of magma can happen over a wide pressure (depth) range, but mainly at the depth of 0.48 km to 3.85 km. This implicates that basalt magma experienced intensive degassing and the CO2 gas reservoir from the basalt magma also may be formed in this range of depths. The results of this study showed that the depth of basalt magma degassing can be forecasted from CO2 fluid inclusions, and it is meaningful for understanding the process of magma degassing and constraining the inorganogenic CO2 gas reservoir.

  13. Rock magnetism and magnetic anisotropy in folded sills and basaltic flows: A case study of volcanics from the Taimyr Peninsula, Northern Russia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ShuWei; J. Harald WALDERHAUG; YANG YueJun

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic measurements were performed on apparently deformed igneous rocks of 23 sites from the southeastern part of the Taimyr Peninsula. Rock magnetism and reflected light microscopy analyses reveal that fine-grained titanomagnetites up to pure magnetites mainly carry the majority of magnetic fabrics in the sills, and that the slightly coarser Ti-poor or-medium titanomagnetites carry most mag-netic fabrics in the basaltic flows. Magnetic anisotropies were determined by applying anisotropy of low-field magnetic susceptibility (AMS) on 180 unheated samples and 128 samples that had been pre-viously heated to 600℃ during a paleomagnetic study to detect heating effects on the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) properties of volcanic rocks. Laboratory heating significantly affects anisotropy variations of these igneous rocks corresponding to the mineralogical changes during the heat treatment.

  14. From olivine nephelinite, basanite and basalt to peralkaline trachyphonolite and comendite in the Ankaratra volcanic complex, Madagascar: 40Ar/39Ar ages, phase compositions and bulk-rock geochemical and isotopic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucciniello, Ciro; Melluso, Leone; le Roex, Anton P.; Jourdan, Fred; Morra, Vincenzo; de'Gennaro, Roberto; Grifa, Celestino

    2017-03-01

    The Ankaratra volcanic field covers an area of 3800 km2 in central Madagascar and comprises of lava flows, lava domes, scoria cones, tuff rings and maars emplaced at different ages (Miocene to Recent). The volcanic products include ultramafic-mafic (olivine-leucite nephelinite, basanite, alkali basalt, hawaiite and tholeiitic basalt), intermediate (mugearite and benmoreite) and felsic rocks (trachyphonolite, quartz trachyte and rhyolite), the latter often peralkaline. The 40Ar/39Ar determinations for mafic lavas yield ages of 17.45 ± 0.12 Ma, 16.63 ± 0.08 Ma and 8.62 ± 0.09 Ma, indicating a prolonged magmatic activity. The mineralogical and geochemical variations suggest that the magmatic evolution of the alkali basalt-hawaiite-mugearite-benmoreite-trachyte series can be accounted for by removal of olivine, feldspars, clinopyroxene, Fe-Ti oxides and accessory phases, producing residual trachytic and trachyphonolitic compositions mineralogically very similar to those of other volcanic areas and tectonic settings. The Ankaratra olivine leucite nephelinites, basanites and tholeiitic basalts do not seem to be associated with significant amounts of evolved comagmatic rocks. The 87Sr/86Sr (0.70504-0.71012), 143Nd/144Nd (0.51259-0.51244) and 206Pb/204Pb (17.705-18.563) isotopic ratios of trachytes and comendite are consistent with open-system processes. However, other trachyphonolites have 143Nd/144Nd (0.51280), 206Pb/204Pb (18.648), 207Pb/204Pb (15.582) and 208Pb/204Pb (38.795) similar to those of mafic rocks, suggesting differentiation processes without appreciable interaction with crustal materials. The Ankaratra volcanism is to be directly linked to a broadly E-W-trending intracontinental extension. A large-scale thermal anomaly, associated with an anomalously hot source region, is not required to explain the Cenozoic magmatism of Madagascar.

  15. The onset of flood basalt volcanism, Northern Paraná Basin, Brazil: A precise U-Pb baddeleyite/zircon age for a Chapecó-type dacite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; de Freitas, Vivian Azor; Heaman, Larry H.

    2011-02-01

    We report the first U-Pb baddeleyite/zircon date for a felsic volcanic rock from the Paraná Large Igneous Province in south Brazil. The new date of 134.3 ± 0.8 Ma for a hypocrystalline Chapecó-type dacite from Ourinhos (northern Paraná basin) is an important regional time marker for the onset of flood basalt volcanism in the northern and western portion of the province. The dated dacite was erupted onto basement rocks and is overlain by a high-Ti basalt sequence, interpreted to be correlative with Pitanga basalts elsewhere. This new U-Pb date for the Ourinhos dacite is consistent with the local stratigraphy being slightly older than the few reliable step-heating 40Ar/39Ar dates currently available for overlying high-Ti basalts (133.6-131.5 Ma). This indicates an ~ 3 Ma time span for the building of the voluminous high-Ti lava sequence of the Paraná basin. On the other hand, it overlaps the 40Ar/39Ar dates (134.8-134.1 Ma) available for the stratigraphically older low-Ti basalt (Gramado + Esmeralda types) and dacite-rhyolite (Palmas type) sequences from South Brazil, which is consistent with the short-lived character of this volcanism and its rapid succession by the high-Ti sequence.

  16. Experimental insights into the formation of high-Mg basaltic andesites in the trans-Mexican volcanic belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Rachel M.; Wallace, Paul J.; Dana Johnston, A.

    2012-05-01

    High-Mg basaltic andesites and andesites occur in the central trans-Mexican volcanic belt, and their primitive geochemical characteristics suggest equilibration with mantle peridotite. These lavas may represent slab melts that reequilibrated with overlying peridotite or hydrous partial melts of a peridotite source. Here, we experimentally map the liquidus mineralogy for a high-Mg basaltic andesite (9.6 wt% MgO, 54.4 wt% SiO2, Mg# = 75.3) as a function of temperature and H2O content over a range of mantle wedge pressures. Our results permit equilibration of this composition with a harzburgite residue at relatively high water contents (>7 wt%) and low temperatures (1,080-1,150°C) at 11-14 kbar. However, in contrast to the high Ni contents characteristic of olivine phenocrysts in many such samples from central Mexico, those of olivine phenocrysts in our sample are more typical of mantle melts that have fractionated a small amount of olivine. To account for this and the possibility that the refractory mantle source may have had olivine more Fo-rich than Fo90, we numerically evaluated alternative equilibration conditions, using our starting bulk composition adjusted to be in equilibrium with Fo92 olivine. This shifts equilibration conditions to higher temperatures (1,180-1,250°C) at mantle wedge pressures (11-15 kbar) for H2O contents (>3 wt%) comparable to those analyzed in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from this region. Comparison with geodynamic models shows that final equilibration occurred shallower than the peak temperature of the mantle wedge, suggesting that basaltic melts from the hottest part of the wedge reequilibrated with shallower mantle as they approached the Moho.

  17. Subduction zone mantle enrichment by fluids and Zr-Hf-depleted crustal melts as indicated by backarc basalts of the Southern Volcanic Zone, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Paul M.; Søager, Nina; Alfastsen, Mads; Bertotto, Gustavo W.

    2016-10-01

    We aim to identify the components metasomatizing the mantle above the subducting Nazca plate under part of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ). We present new major and ICP-MS trace element and Sr, Nd and high-precision Pb isotope analyses of primitive olivine-phyric alkali basalts from the Northern Segment Volcanic Field, part of the Payenia province in the backarc of the Transitional SVZ. One new 40Ar-39Ar age determination confirms the Late Pleistocene age of this most northerly part of the province. All analysed rocks have typical subduction zone type incompatible element enrichment, and the rocks of the Northern Segment, together with the neighbouring Nevado Volcanic Field, have isotopic compositions intermediate between adjacent Transitional SVZ arc rocks and southern Payenia OIB-type basaltic rocks. Modelling the Ba-Th-Sm variation we demonstrate that fluids as well as 1-2% melts of upper continental crust (UCC) enriched their mantle sources, and La-Nb-Sm variations additionally indicate that the pre-metasomatic sources ranged from strongly depleted to undepleted mantle. Low Eu/Eu* and Sr/Nd also show evidence for a UCC component in the source. The contribution of Chile Trench sediments to the magmas seems insignificant. The Zr/Sm and Hf/Sm ratios are relatively low in many of the Northern Segment rocks, ranging down to 17 and 0.45, respectively, which, together with relatively high Th/U, is argued to indicate that the metasomatizing crustal melts were derived by partial melting of subducted UCC that had residual zircon, in contrast to the UCC melts added to Transitional SVZ arc magmas. Mixing between depleted and undepleted mantle, enriched by UCC and fluids, is suggested by Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes of the Northern Segment and Nevado magmas. The metasomatized undepleted mantle south of the Northern Segment is suggested to be part of upwelling OIB-type mantle, whereas the pre-metasomatically depleted mantle also can be found as a component in some arc

  18. New Insights to the Mid Miocene Calc-alkaline Lavas of the Strawberry Volcanics, NE Oregon Surrounded by the Coeval Tholeiitic Columbia River Basalt Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Strawberry Volcanics (SV) of NE Oregon were distributed over 3,400 km2 during the mid-Miocene and comprise a diverse volcanic suite, which span the range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite. The predominant composition of this volcanic suite is calc-alkaline (CA) basaltic andesite and andesite, although tholeiitic (TH) lavas of basalt to andesite occur as well. The coeval flood basalts of the Columbia River province surround the SV. Here we will discuss new ages and geochemical data, and present a new geologic map and stratigraphy of the SV. The SV are emplaced on top of pre-Tertiary accreted terranes of the Blue Mountain Province, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and older Tertiary volcanic rocks thought to be mostly Oligocene of age. Massive rhyolites (~300 m thick) are exposed mainly along the western flank and underlie the intermediate composition lavas. In the southern portion of this study area, alkali basaltic lavas, thought to be late Miocene to early Pliocene in age, erupted and overlie the SV. In addition, several regional ignimbrites reach into the area. The 9.7 Ma Devine Canyon Tuff and the 7.1 Ma Rattlesnake Tuff also overlie the SV. The 15.9-15.4 Ma Dinner Creek Tuff is mid-Miocene, and clear stratigraphic relationships are found in areas where the tuff is intercalated between thick SV lava flows. All of the basalts of the SV are TH and are dominated by phenocryst-poor (≤2%) lithologies. These basalts have an ophitic texture dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine (often weathered to iddingsite). Basalts and basaltic andesites have olivine Fo #'s ranging from 44 at the rims (where weathered to iddingsite) and as high as 88 at cores. Pyroxene Mg #'s range from 65 to 85. Andesites of the SV are sub-alkaline, and like the basalts, are exceedingly phenocryst-poor (≤3%) with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and lesser pyroxene and olivine, which occasionally occur as crystal clots of ~1-3 mm instead of single crystals. In addition, minimal

  19. Field Detection of Chemical Assimilation in A Basaltic Lava Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K. E.; Bleacher, J. E.; Needham, D. H.; Evans, C. A.; Whelley, P. L.; Scheidt, S. P.; Williams, D. A.; Rogers, A. D.; Glotch, T.

    2017-01-01

    Lava channels are features seen throughout the inner Solar System, including on Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Flow emplacement is therefore a crucial process in the shaping of planetary surfaces. Many studies, including some completed by members of this team at the December 1974 lava flow, have investigated the dynamics of lava flow emplacement, both on Earth and on the Moon and how pre-flow terrain can impact final channel morphology, but far fewer have focused on how the compositional characteristics of the substrate over which a flow was em-placed influenced its final flow morphology. Within the length of one flow, it is common for flows to change in morphology, a quality linked to rheology (a function of multiple factors including viscosi-ty, temperature, composition, etc.). The relationship between rheology and temperature has been well-studied but less is known about the relationship between an older flow's chemistry and how the interaction between this flow and the new flow might affect lava rheology and therefore emplacement dynamics. Lava erosion. Through visual observations of active terrestrial flows, mechanical erosion by flowing lava has been well-documented. Lava erosion by which flow composition is altered as the active lava melts and assimilates the pre-flow terrain over which it moves is also hypothesized to affect channel formation. However, there is only one previous field study that geochemically documents the process in recent basaltic flow systems.

  20. Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ander, M. E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A. W.; Huestis, S.

    1981-05-01

    A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body.

  1. Precaldera lavas of the southeast San Juan Volcanic Field: Parent magmas and crustal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, M. T.; Dungan, M. A.; Ferguson, K. M.; Lipman, P. W.; Moorbath, S.

    1991-07-01

    Early intermediate composition volcanic rocks of the Oligocene (circa 34-29 Ma) southeast San Juan volcanic field, southern Colorado, comprise the Conejos Formation. Conejos lavas include both high-K calc-alkaline and alkaline magma series (54-69% SiO2) ranging in composition from basaltic andesite (basaltic trachyandesite) to dacite (trachydacite). The subsequent Platoro caldera complex (29-27 Ma) was superimposed on a cluster of broadly precursory Conejos stratocones. Precaldera volcanism occurred in three pulses corresponding to three time-stratigraphic members: (1) the Horseshoe Mountain member, (2) the Rock Creek member, and (3) the Willow Mountain member. Each member exhibits distinctive phenocryst modes and incompatible trace element contents. Horseshoe Mountain lavas (hornblende-phyric) have relatively low alkali and incompatible element abundances, Rock Creek lavas (anhydrous phenocrysts) and ash-flow tuffs have the highest abundances, and Willow Mountain lavas (diverse mineralogy) are intermediate. All Conejos lavas exhibit low ratios of lead (206Pb/204Pb = 17.5 to 18.2) and neodymium (ɛNd = -8 to -4) isotopes and high 87Sr/86Sr (0.7045 to 0.7056) compared to depleted asthenospheric mantle. These values lie between those of likely mantle compositions and the isotopic composition of Proterozoic crust of the southern Rocky Mountains. Mafic lavas of the Horseshoe Mountain member have the lowest Pb and Nd isotope ratios among Conejos members but trend toward higher isotopic values with increasing degrees of differentiation. Compositions within the Rock Creek series trend toward higher Pb and lower Nd isotope ratios with increasing SiO2. Willow mountain volcanic sequences define diverse chemical-isotopic correlations. We interpret the chemical and isotopic differences observed between mafic lavas of each member to reflect derivation from compositionally distinct mantle derived parent magmas that have experienced extensive deep level crustal contamination

  2. Constraints on the origin and evolution of magmas in the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field, Quaternary Andean back-arc of western Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernadno, I R; Aragón, E; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Payún Matrú Volcanic Field (Pleistocene–Holocene) is located in the Andean back-arc of the Southern Volcanic Zone, western Argentina, and is contemporaneous with the Andean volcanic arc at the same latitude. It includes two polygenetic, mostly trachytic volcanoes: Payún Matrú (with a summit...... and Sr–Nd isotopic compositions of the basaltic lavas and Payún Matrú rocks indicate that the trachytes of Payún Matrú are the result of fractional crystallization of basaltic parent magmas without significant upper crustal contamination, and that the basalts have a geochemical similarity to ocean island......, and an assimilation–fractional crystallization model indicates a low degree of upper crustal contamination in the youngest trachytes. Magnesium numbers (45–55) and contents of Ni (

  3. Paleoproterozoic arc basalt-boninite-high magnesian andesite-Nb enriched basalt association from the Malangtoli volcanic suite, Singhbhum Craton, eastern India: Geochemical record for subduction initiation to arc maturation continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajanikanta Singh, M.; Manikyamba, C.; Ganguly, Sohini; Ray, Jyotisankar; Santosh, M.; Dhanakumar Singh, Th.; Chandan Kumar, B.

    2017-02-01

    The Singhbhum Craton of eastern India preserves distinct signatures of ultramafic-mafic-intermediate-felsic magmatism of diverse geodynamic affiliations spanning from Paleo-Mesoarchean to Proterozoic. Here we investigate the 2.25 Ga Malangtoli volcanic rocks that are predominantly clinopyroxene- and plagioclase-phyric, calc-alkaline in nature, display basalt-basaltic andesite compositions, and preserve geochemical signatures of subduction zone magmatism. Major, trace and rare earth element characteristics classify the Malangtoli volcanic rocks as arc basalts, boninites, high magnesian andesites (HMA) and Nb enriched basalts (NEB). The typical LILE enriched-HFSE depleted geochemical attributes of the arc basalts corroborate a subduction-related origin. The boninitic rocks have high Mg# (0.8), MgO (>25 wt.%), Ni and Cr contents, high Al2O3/TiO2 (>20), Zr/Hf and (La/Sm)N (>1) ratios with low (Gd/Yb)N (54 wt.%), MgO (>6 wt.%), Mg# (0.47) with elevated Cr, Co, Ni and Th contents, depleted (Nb/Th)N, (Nb/La)N, high (Th/La)N and La/Yb (<9) ratio, moderate depletion in HREE and Y with low Sr/Y. The NEBs have higher Nb contents (6.3-24 ppm), lower magnitude of negative Nb anomalies with high (Nb/Th)pm = 0.28-0.59 and (Nb/La)pm = 0.40-0.69 and Nb/U = 2.8-34.4 compared to normal arc basalts [Nb = <2 ppm; (Nb/Th)pm = 0.10-1.19; (Nb/La)pm 0.17-0.99 and Nb/U = 2.2-44 respectively] and HMA. Arc basalts and boninites are interpreted to be the products of juvenile subduction processes involving shallow level partial melting of mantle wedge under hydrous conditions triggered by slab-dehydrated fluid flux. The HMA resulted through partial melting of mantle wedge metasomatized by slab-dehydrated fluids and sediments during the intermediate stage of subduction. Slab-melting and mantle wedge hybridization processes at matured stages of subduction account for the generation of NEB. Thus, the arc basalt-boninite-HMA-NEB association from Malangtoli volcanic suite in Singhbhum Craton

  4. Origin and formation of neck in a basin landform: Examples from the Camargo volcanic field, Chihuahua (México)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-Gómez, José Jorge; Housh, Todd B.; Luhr, James F.; Noyola-Medrano, Cristina; Rojas-Beltrán, Marco Antonio

    2010-11-01

    The term "neck in a basin" (NIB) landform is proposed for volcanic structures characterized by nearly circular to elliptical open basins, located near the headwater of small streams or drainages, which contain small volcanic necks and/or erosion remnants of one (or more) cinder cones. NIB landforms are typically 400-1000 m in diameter and 30-100 m deep and are invariably surrounded by steep walls cut into one or more basaltic lava flows. NIB landforms lack evidence for a primary volcanogenic origin through either collapse or youthful eruptive activity. In the Pliocene portion (4 - 2 Ma) of the Plio-Quaternary Camargo volcanic field of Chihuahua (México), they are relatively numerous and are best developed at the margins of a gently sloping (3-5°) basaltic lava plateau and near major fault scarps. Mature NIB landforms have ring-like circular drainage patterns and central elevations marked by small volcanic necks and associated radial dikes intruded into basaltic scoria-fall and /or agglutinate deposits. We interpret NIB landforms to be erosional in origin. They develop where a cinder cone is surrounded by one or more sheet-like lava flows from one or more separate subsequent vents. Once eruptive activity ceases at the younger volcano(es), fluvial erosion gradually produces a ring-like drainage pattern along the contact between the lava and the older cinder cone. As a response to a marked contrast in resistance to erosion between lava flows and unconsolidated or poorly lithified pyroclastic deposits, the older cinder cone is preferentially eroded. In this manner, a ring-shaped, steep sided erosional basin, preformed by the scoria cone, is produced; eventually fluvial erosion exposes the central neck and dikes. The volume, relief, and age of the volcanic field are key factors in the formation and preservation of a NIB landform. They form in volcanic fields where lava emissions are sufficiently vigorous to engulf earlier cinder cones. Relief and associated high rates

  5. 3-D high-speed imaging of volcanic bomb trajectory in basaltic explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, D.; Taddeucci, J.; Houghton, B. F.; Orr, T. R.; Andronico, D.; Del Bello, E.; Kueppers, U.; Ricci, T.; Scarlato, P.

    2016-10-01

    Imaging, in general, and high speed imaging in particular are important emerging tools for the study of explosive volcanic eruptions. However, traditional 2-D video observations cannot measure volcanic ejecta motion toward and away from the camera, strongly hindering our capability to fully determine crucial hazard-related parameters such as explosion directionality and pyroclasts' absolute velocity. In this paper, we use up to three synchronized high-speed cameras to reconstruct pyroclasts trajectories in three dimensions. Classical stereographic techniques are adapted to overcome the difficult observation conditions of active volcanic vents, including the large number of overlapping pyroclasts which may change shape in flight, variable lighting and clouding conditions, and lack of direct access to the target. In particular, we use a laser rangefinder to measure the geometry of the filming setup and manually track pyroclasts on the videos. This method reduces uncertainties to 10° in azimuth and dip angle of the pyroclasts, and down to 20% in the absolute velocity estimation. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by three examples: the development of an explosion at Stromboli, a bubble burst at Halema'uma'u lava lake, and an in-flight collision between two bombs at Stromboli.

  6. 3-D high-speed imaging of volcanic bomb trajectory in basaltic explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, D.; Taddeucci, J; Houghton, B. F.; Orr, Tim R.; Andronico, D.; Del Bello, E.; Kueppers, U.; Ricci, T.; Scarlato, P.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging, in general, and high speed imaging in particular are important emerging tools for the study of explosive volcanic eruptions. However, traditional 2-D video observations cannot measure volcanic ejecta motion toward and away from the camera, strongly hindering our capability to fully determine crucial hazard-related parameters such as explosion directionality and pyroclasts' absolute velocity. In this paper, we use up to three synchronized high-speed cameras to reconstruct pyroclasts trajectories in three dimensions. Classical stereographic techniques are adapted to overcome the difficult observation conditions of active volcanic vents, including the large number of overlapping pyroclasts which may change shape in flight, variable lighting and clouding conditions, and lack of direct access to the target. In particular, we use a laser rangefinder to measure the geometry of the filming setup and manually track pyroclasts on the videos. This method reduces uncertainties to 10° in azimuth and dip angle of the pyroclasts, and down to 20% in the absolute velocity estimation. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by three examples: the development of an explosion at Stromboli, a bubble burst at Halema'uma'u lava lake, and an in-flight collision between two bombs at Stromboli.

  7. Petrology of the alkaline rocks of the Macau Volcanic Field, NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngonge, Emmanuel Donald; de Hollanda, Maria Helena Bezerra Maia; Pimentel, Márcio Martins; de Oliveira, Diógenes Custódio

    2016-12-01

    The Macau Volcanic Field (MVF) in the Borborema Province, NE Brazil, contains multiple centres of volcanic activity of Early to Late Cenozoic ages. We present element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope geochemical data for four of the few most prominent basalt types of this volcanic field: Serrote Preto-type, Serra Aguda-type, Pico do Cabugi-type and Serra Preta-type, in order to assess their magmatic history from source to crystallization and the evolution of the mantle beneath the Borborema Province. The basalts are basically sodic nephelinitic-basanitic-alkali olivine basalts enriched in LILE and in Nb-Ta. The Serra Preta, Cabugi and Serra Aguda types demonstrate compositions close to primitive characteristics with 10% < MgO < 15 wt.% and 200 ppm < Ni < 500 ppm, and experienced limited fractional crystallization of olivine-clinopyroxene-plagioclase-oxides with negligible wall-rock assimilation. Rb/Sr and Ba/Rb constraints support the generation of SiO2-undersaturated magmas from mantle melting of amphibole-bearing peridotites with minor phlogopite. The source for the basanites and alkali basalts is estimated to be a garnet-bearing domain around the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (80-93 km deep), while the nephelinites are derived from the adiabatic asthenosphere at 105 km with temperatures of 1480 °C. Their incompatible trace element patterns and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions are similar to FOZO and EM-type OIB magmas. From the comparison of data with those of the Ceará-Mirim dyke swarm we propose that there is a ubiquitous FOZO reservoir in the SCLM beneath the Borborema Province. This FOZO signature characterized the upwelling asthenosphere during the lithospheric extension and thinning at the opening of the Equatorial Atlantic and is clearly represented in the Mesozoic olivine tholeiites of Ceará-Mirim. The upwelled asthenosphere cooled as a rigid SCLM since the Cretaceous and has preserved its FOZO signature evident in the Macau Cenozoic basalts. The EM signatures

  8. Assimilation in lunar basalts and volcanic glasses: Implications for a heterogenous mantle source region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnila, A. B.; Hess, P. C.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Several scientists have called on assimilation of anorthositic crustal material or KREEP compositions to explain various lunar lithologies. In order to address the practicality of such processes, some techniques for calculating how much assimilation is possible in magma chambers and dikes based on thermal energy balances and simple fluid mechanical constraints are outlined. In a previous effort, it was demonstrated that dissolution of plagioclase in an iron-free basalt was too slow to contaminate magmas, and that the energy cost of melting plagioclase-rich crustal material was prohibitive both in magma chambers and in dike conduits. This analysis was extended to include dissolution rates in an orange glass composition and to quantitatively predict the maximum contamination possible due to assimilation of both lunar crustal material and KREEP.

  9. Lunar Mare Basalts as Analogues for Martian Volcanic Compositions: Evidence from Visible, Near-IR, and Thermal Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    The lunar mare basalts potentially provide a unique sample suite for understanding the nature of basalts on the martian surface. Our current knowledge of the mineralogical and chemical composition of the basaltic material on Mars comes from studies of the basaltic martian meteorites and from orbital and surface remote sensing observations. Petrographic observations of basaltic martian meteorites (e.g., Shergotty, Zagami, and EETA79001) show that the dominant phases are pyroxene (primarily pigeonite and augite), maskelynite (a diaplectic glass formed from plagioclase by shock), and olivine [1,2]. Pigeonite, a low calcium pyroxene, is generally not found in abundance in terrestrial basalts, but does often occur on the Moon [3]. Lunar samples thus provide a means to examine a variety of pigeonite-rich basalts that also have bulk elemental compositions (particularly low-Ti Apollo 15 mare basalts) that are comparable to basaltic SNC meteorites [4,5]. Furthermore, lunar basalts may be mineralogically better suited as analogues of the martian surface basalts than the basaltic martian meteorites because the plagioclase feldspar in the basaltic Martian meteorites, but not in the lunar surface basalts, is largely present as maskelynite [1,2]. Analysis of lunar mare basalts my also lead to additional endmember spectra for spectral libraries. This is particularly important analysis of martian thermal emission spectra, because the spectral library apparently contains a single pigeonite spectrum derived from a synthetic sample [6].

  10. Ancient Mudflows in the Tuxtla Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Godinez, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is a basaltic volcanic enclave in eastern Mexico at the margin of the Gulf of Mexico. Due to the high rates of precipitation floods and mudflows are common. Resulting from a systematic study of geologic hazard in the TVF we found several mudflow deposits that impacted pre-Columbian settlements. Sections of the deposits were observed in detail and sampled for granulometric studies. The deposits contained materials suitable for dating: ceramic shards and some of them charcoal fragments. Shards from the interior of the deposit were collected and placed in black bags to prevent the action of light and to be analyzed by thermoluminiscense (TL), the charcoal samples were dated using standard radiocarbon methods (C-14). The sites were dubbed La Mojarra (18°37.711', 95°18.860'), Revolución (18° 35.848', 95°11.412'), Pisatal (18°36.618', 95°10.634'), and Toro Prieto (18°38.229, 95°12.037'). These places were named after the nearby villages the first two, lake Pisatal the third and Toro Prieto creek the fourth. All the deposits occur close to the margins of riverbeds or lakes. Samples of these sites yielded ages of 1176±100 (TL), 1385±70 (C-14), 1157±105 (TL), 2050+245-235 (C-14), respectively. These locations have undergone recurrent floods in the last decades, showing that these phenomena impact the same areas over centuries. The dates mentioned are important because, no vestiges of human settlements had been reported in the area, which in the past was covered by a dense forest. The settlements must have been very small and depended of such cities as nearby Matacapan an important city with strong ties to Teotihuacán in central Mexico. The ages agree with the findings of archeologic studies in Matacapan, which indicate that the population became increasingly ruralized since the late classic period (≈ 600-800 AD).

  11. Monogenetic volcanic fields and their geoheritage values of western Saudi Arabia and their implication to holistic geoeducation projects locally and globally (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, K.; Moufti, R.

    2013-12-01

    Monogeneitc volcanic fields are the most common manifestation of volcanism on Earth and other planets. They composed of small volume and short lived volcanoes each of them with a relatively simple eruption history. In spite of recent researches demonstrated complex, repeated and geochemically distinct eruption histories commonly associated with te formation of small-volume volcanoes, they are still considerred as volcanoes that are in human-scale and therefore ideal to use them as educational tools or part of volcanic geoheritage projects including geopark developments. In the western margin of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia there are at least 9 intracontinental volcanic fields subparalell with the Red Sea Rift ranging from alkaline basaltic to basalt-trachyte bimodal dispersed volcanic systems. Among these volcanic fields the geoheritage value of three fields were recently evaluated and proposed that they are suitable for further development to establish the first volcanic geoparks in the Arabian Peninsula in the area of 1) Al Madinah (AMVF) 2) Kishb (KVF) and 3) Hutaymah Volcanic Fields (HVF). The AMVF offers a natural concept based on specific volcanic precinct ordering of its volcanic geoheritages from the most accessable and most common volcanism that is historically significant (eg. scoria and lava spatter cones with extensive lava fields) toward a more adventure geotourism style approach in remote, less common but more destructive type of volcanism (eg. trachytic explosion craters). In the contrary, the KVF is a perfect site where phreatomagmatic volcanism and their consequences were identified as a major driving force for further geopark developments. The HVF with its rich archaeological and cultural sites and superbly exposed variously eroded tuff rings and maars offer a good location to develop geoeducation programs to highlight short- and long-term climatic and hydrologic changes in an area a volcanic field evolved. The three Saudi projects also demonstrate

  12. Vulnerability of shallow ground water and drinking-water wells to nitrate in the United States: Model of predicted nitrate concentration in shallow, recently recharged ground water -- Input data set for basalt and volcanic rocks (gwava-s_vrox)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the presence or absence of basalt and volcanic rocks in the conterminous United States. The data set was used as an input data layer for a...

  13. Internal architecture of the Tuxtla volcanic field, Veracruz, Mexico, inferred from gravity and magnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, Juan Manuel; Lopez-Loera, Hector; Mena, Manuel; Zamora-Camacho, Araceli

    2016-09-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is a basaltic volcanic field emerging from the plains of the western margin of the Gulf of Mexico in the Mexican State of Veracruz. Separated by hundreds of kilometers from the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the NW and the Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc to the SE, it stands detached not only in location but also in the composition of its rocks, which are predominantly alkaline. These characteristics make its origin somewhat puzzling. Furthermore, one of the large volcanoes of the field, San Martin Tuxtla, underwent an eruptive period in historical times (CE 1793). Such volcanic activity conveys particular importance to the study of the TVF from the perspective of volcanology and hazard assessment. Despite the above circumstances, few investigations about its internal structure have been reported. In this work, we present analyses of gravity and aeromagnetic data obtained from different sources. We present the complete Bouguer anomaly of the area and its separation into regional and residual components. The aeromagnetic data were processed to yield the reduction to the pole, the analytic signal, and the upward continuation to complete the interpretation of the gravity analyses. Three-dimensional density models of the regional and residual anomalies were obtained by inversion of the gravity signal adding the response of rectangular prisms at the nodes of a regular grid. We obtained a body with a somewhat flattened top at 16 km below sea level from the inversion of the regional. Three separate slender bodies with tops 6 km deep were obtained from the inversion of the residual. The gravity and magnetic anomalies, as well as the inferred source bodies that produce those geophysical anomalies, lie between the Sontecomapan and Catemaco faults, which are proposed as flower structures associated with an inferred deep-seated fault termed the Veracruz Fault. These fault systems along with magma intrusion at the lower crust are necessary features to

  14. Oxygen Isotope Character of the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, T.; Strickland, A.; Valley, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen isotope analyses of zircons from lavas and tuffs from the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) of east central Oregon unequivocally demonstrate the presence of mid-Miocene low-δ18O magmas (δ18Ozrc<4.7 ‰). Despite the growing data set of low-δ18O melts within, and proximal to, the Snake River Plain (SRP) Large Igneous Province, debate persists regarding both the mechanisms for low-δ18O magma petrogenesis, and their relative influence in the SRP. The LOVF is associated with widespread silicic volcanism roughly concurrent with the eruption of the Steens-Columbia River Basalt Group between ~17-15Ma. Silicic activity in the LOVF is limited to 16-15Ma, when an estimated 1100km3 of weakly peralkaline to metaluminous rhyolitic lavas and ignimbrites erupted from a series of fissures and calderas. Geographically, the LOVF overlaps the Oregon-Idaho Graben (OIG), and straddles the 87Sr/86Sr= 0.704 line which, together with the 0.706 line to the east, delineate the regional transition from the North American Precambrian continental crust to the east to younger Phanerozoic accreted terranes to the west. Here we report high accuracy ion microprobe analyses of δ18O in zircons using a 10-15μm spot, with average spot-to-spot precision ±0.28‰ (2SD), to investigate intra-grain and intra-unit δ18Ozrc trends for LOVF rhyolites. Due to its high closure temperature, chemical and physical resistance, and slow oxygen diffusion rates, zircon offers a robust record of magmatic oxygen isotope ratios during crystallization and provides constraints on the petrogenesis of Snake River Plain (SRP) low-δ18O melts. Individual zircons from LOVF rhyolites show no evidence of core-rim δ18O zoning, and populations exhibit ≤0.42‰ (2SD) intra-unit variability. Unit averages range from 2.2 to 4.3‰, with the lowest values in caldera-forming ignimbrites, but all units show evidence of crystallization from low-δ18O melts. Quartz and feldspar analyses by laser fluorination (precision

  15. Igneous Rocks of the East Pacific Rise: The alkali volcanic suite appear to be differentiated from a tholeiitic basalt extruded from the mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1964-10-23

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K(2)O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K(2)O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO(2). Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts. The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 10(4).

  16. Short-lived eruptive episodes during the construction of a Na-alkalic basaltic field (Perşani Mountains, SE Transylvania, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghedi, Ioan; Popa, Răzvan-Gabriel; Panaiotu, Cristian G.; Szakács, Alexandru; Pécskay, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    The Perşani Mts. basaltic field covers >176 km2 (~22 × 8 km) and is one of the youngest and biggest monogenetic volcanic fields in Southeastern Europe. It consists of 21 monogenetic volcanic centers, most of which were built on a basement of Miocene rhyolitic tuffs and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. 40Ar/39Ar dating shows that the eruptions took place in five episodes: 1220, 1142, 1060, 800, and 683 ka. An additional undated episode at 1060-800 ka has been identified using volcanological observations. Initial phreatomagmatic activity was commonly followed by explosive Strombolian/Hawaiian phases that deposited agglutinated spatter around the vents along with massive-to-bedded unconsolidated scoria and lapilli. Some volcanoes lack evidence for magmatic explosive activity, while others lack evidence for the initial phreatomagmatic phase. During most eruptions, the final activity was the effusion of lava flows that in some cases deformed (or partially destroyed) the volcanic edifices. The erupted volumes varied greatly from one episode to other, without showing any pattern: the highest volumes are recorded in deposits from the third pulse (1060 ka). The volcanoes are located close to faults and always on their footwall blocks, and it is inferred that the regional tectonic stress regime controlled both the timing and spacing of volcanic activity in the volcanic field.

  17. Primitive magmas at five Cascade volcanic fields: Melts from hot, heterogeneous sub-arc mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, C.R.; Bruggman, P.E.; Christiansen, R.L.; Clynne, M.A.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hildreth, W.

    1997-01-01

    Major and trace element concentrations, including REE by isotope dilution, and Sr, Nd, Pb, and O isotope ratios have been determined for 38 mafic lavas from the Mount Adams, Crater Lake, Mount Shasta, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic fields, in the Cascade arc, northwestern part of the United States. Many of the samples have a high Mg# [100Mg/(Mg + FeT) > 60] and Ni content (>140 ppm) such that we consider them to be primitive. We recognize three end-member primitive magma groups in the Cascades, characterized mainly by their trace-element and alkali-metal abundances: (1) High-alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) has trace element abundances similar to N-MORB, except for slightly elevated LILE, and has Eu/Eu* > 1. (2) Arc basalt and basaltic andesite have notably higher LILE contents, generally have higher SiO2 contents, are more oxidized, and have higher Cr for a given Ni abundance than HAOT. These lavas show relative depletion in HFSE, have lower HREE and higher LREE than HAOT, and have smaller Eu/Eu* (0.94-1.06). (3) Alkali basalt from the Simcoe volcanic field east of Mount Adams represents the third end-member, which contributes an intraplate geochemical signature to magma compositions. Notable geochemical features among the volcanic fields are: (1) Mount Adams rocks are richest in Fe and most incompatible elements including HFSE; (2) the most incompatible-element depleted lavas occur at Medicine Lake; (3) all centers have relatively primitive lavas with high LILE/HFSE ratios but only the Mount Adams, Lassen, and Medicine Lake volcanic fields also have relatively primitive rocks with an intraplate geochemical signature; (4) there is a tendency for increasing 87Sr/86Sr, 207Pb/204Pb, and ??18O and decreasing 206Pb/204Pb and 143Nd/144Nd from north to south. The three end-member Cascade magma types reflect contributions from three mantle components: depleted sub-arc mantle modestly enriched in LILE during ancient subduction; a modern, hydrous subduction component

  18. The Pali Aike Volcanic Field, Patagonia: slab-window magmatism near the tip of South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Massimo; Agostini, Samuele; Mazzarini, Francesco; Innocenti, Fabrizio; Manetti, Piero; Haller, Miguel J.; Lahsen, Alfredo

    2000-06-01

    The Pali Aike Volcanic Field (PAVF) represents the southernmost occurrence of the Cenozoic back-arc Patagonian Plateau Lavas. Its activity (Pliocene-Recent) started forming tabular lavas followed by the growth of about 470 essentially monogenetic volcanic centers (tuff-rings, maars, spatter and scoria cones). Azimuths of cone alignment, cone elongation and morphologic lineations show prevailing ENE-WSW and NW-SE trends. Erupted products consist mainly of alkaline basalt and basanite, with minor olivine basalt. PAVF rocks are quite primitive in composition (average Mg#=66, Ni=220 ppm and Cr=313 ppm) with relatively high TiO 2 (average 3.0 wt.%). Ultramafic garnet- and/or spinel-bearing xenoliths are found within PAVF volcanics. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns are significantly LREE-enriched and almost rectilinear [(La/Yb) N=10.9-21.0]. Primordial mantle-normalized distributions of incompatible trace elements, as well as Sr and Nd isotope ratios ( 87Sr/ 86Sr=0.70317-0.70339, 143Nd/ 144Nd=0.51290-0.51294), show values typical of intra-plate basalts, despite the fact that these rocks occur only 200 km east of the Andean Cordillera. Primary magmas were generated from a fertile garnet-bearing asthenospheric source at P=1.9-2.9 GPa and T=1420-1470°C. The data suggest a geodynamic model that implies sub-slab asthenosphere flow through a slab window, which started opening below this sector of South America 14 m.y. ago as a consequence of the collision of the Chile Ridge with the Chile Trench. The trailing edge of the Nazca Plate crossed below the Pali Aike area at 9-10 Ma, that is 6-5 m.y. before the onset of the volcanic activity. We hypothesize that this time delay resulted from changes in the kinematics of the South America-Scotia transform plate boundary which only allowed the Pali Aike magmas to rise after about 4 m.y.

  19. Physical Volcanology and Hazard Analysis of a Young Volcanic Field: Black Rock Desert, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, A. R.

    2009-05-01

    The Black Rock Desert volcanic field, located in west-central Utah, consists of ~30 small-volume monogenetic volcanoes with compositions ranging from small rhyolite domes to large basaltic lava flow fields. The field has exhibited bimodal volcanism for > 9 Ma with the most recent eruption of Ice Springs volcano ˜ 600 yrs ago. Together this eruptive history along with ongoing geothermal activity attests to the usefulness of a hazard assessment. The likelihood of a future eruption in this area has been calculated to be ˜ 8% over the next 1 Ka (95% confidence). However, many aspects of this field such as the explosivity and nature of many of these eruptions are not well known. The physical volcanology of the Tabernacle Hill volcano, suggests a complicated episodic eruption that may have lasted up to 50 yrs. The initial phreatomagmatic eruptions at Tabernacle Hill are reported to have begun ~14 Ka. This initial eruptive phase produced a tuff cone approximately 150 m high and 1.5 km in diameter with distinct bedding layers. Recent mapping and sampling of Tabernacle Hill's lava field, tuff cone and intra-crater deposits were aimed at better constraining the eruptive history, physical volcanology, and explosive energy associated with this eruption. Blocks ejected during the eruption were mapped and analyzed to yield minimum muzzle velocities of 60 - 70 meters per second. These velocities were used in conjunction with an estimated shallow depth of explosion to calculate an energy yield of ˜ 0.5 kT.

  20. Geology and K-Ar dating of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stephen A.; Gonzalez-Caver, Erika

    1992-12-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is located on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico in the southern part of the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Volcanism began about 7 my ago, in the Late Miocene, and continued to recent times with historical eruptions in ad 1664 and 1793. The oldest rocks occur as highly eroded remnants of lava flows in the area surrounding the historically active cone of San Martín Tuxtla. Between about 3 and 1 my ago, four large composite volcanoes were built in the eastern part of the area. Rocks from these structures are hydrothermally altered and covered with lateritic soils, and their northern slopes show extensive erosional dissection that has widened preexisting craters to form erosional calderas. The eastern volcanoes are composed of alkali basalts, hawaiites, mugearites, and benmoreites, with less common calc-alkaline basaltic andesites and andesites. In the western part of the area, San Martín Tuxtla Volcano and its over 250 satellite cinder cones and maars produced about 120 km3 of lava over the last 0.8 my. A ridge of flank cinder cones blocked drainage to the north to form Laguna Catemaco. Lavas erupted from San Martín and its flank vents are restricted to compositions between basanite and alkali basalt. The alignment of major volcanoes and flank vents along a N55°W trend suggests an extensional stress field in the crust with a minimum compressional stress orientation of N35° E. In total, about 800 km3 of lava has been erupted in the TVF in the last 7 my. This gives a magma output rate of about 0.1 km3/1000 year, a value smaller than most composite cones, but similar to cinder cone fields that occur in central Mexico. Individual eruptions over the last 5000 years had volumes on the order of 0.1km3, with average recurrence intervals of 600 years. The alkaline compositions of the TVF lavas contrast markedly with the calc-alkaline compositions erupted in the subduction-related Mexican Volcanic Belt to the west, leading previous workers to

  1. Radar Imaging of Volcanic Fields and Sand Dune Fields: Implications for VOIR

    OpenAIRE

    Elachi, C.; Blom, R; Daily, M.; Farr, T; Saunders, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    A number of volcanic fields and sand dune fields in the western part of North America were studied using aircraft and Seasat synthetic aperture radar images and LANDSAT images. The capability of radars with different characteristics (i.e., frequency, polarization and look angles was assessed to identify and map different volcanic features, lava flows and sand dune types. It was concluded that: (1) volcanic features which have a relatively large topographic expression (i.e., cinder cones, coll...

  2. Crustal thickness at the Tuxtla Volcanic Field (Veracruz, Mexico) from receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Camacho, A.; Espindola, V. H.; Pacheco, J. F.; Espindola, J. M.; Godinez, M. L.

    2010-09-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is a structure of basaltic rocks on the western margin of the Gulf of Mexico in the Mexican State of Veracruz. Located some 150 km from the easternmost tip of the Mexican Volcanic Belt, its tectonic relationship is still unclear. The volcanism, mostly alkaline, is younger than 7 Ma and has given origin to hundreds of cinder and scoria cones, maars and four large composite volcanoes, one of which, San Martín Tuxtla, erupted explosively in 1793. Due to its volcanological importance, it has been the subject of several geological studies, none of which focused on its crustal structure. Moreover, because the seismicity level in the area is relatively low, no broadband seismometers of Mexico's National Seismological Service are currently installed in the area. In this paper we present the results of the analyses of 24 teleseismic events occurring between 2004 and 2008 recorded in two broadband stations deployed around San Martín volcano. The aim of this study was to determine the depth to the Moho, any major intracrustal interface in the area, and a velocity model by means of receiver function analysis. The results show that the crustal thickness in the area varies between roughly 28 and 34 km. The receiver functions at one station suggest a second interface at a depth between 10 and 14 km. This interface is probably the contact between an upper sedimentary layer and the transitional crust found elsewhere in the margins of the Gulf of Mexico. The determination of the crustal thickness in the TVF is of importance to characterize the area and as a framework to pursue further studies of this volcanic field.

  3. A distinct source and differentiation history for Kolumbo submarine volcano, Santorini volcanic field, Aegean arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaver, Martijn; Carey, Steven; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Smet, Ingrid; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Vroon, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the first detailed geochemical characterization of Kolumbo submarine volcano in order to investigate the role of source heterogeneity in controlling geochemical variability within the Santorini volcanic field in the central Aegean arc. Kolumbo, situated 15 km to the northeast of Santorini, last erupted in 1650 AD and is thus closely associated with the Santorini volcanic system in space and time. Samples taken by remotely-operated vehicle that were analyzed for major element, trace element and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope composition include the 1650 AD and underlying K2 rhyolitic, enclave-bearing pumices that are nearly identical in composition (73 wt.% SiO2, 4.2 wt.% K2O). Lava bodies exposed in the crater and enclaves are basalts to andesites (52-60 wt.% SiO2). Biotite and amphibole are common phenocryst phases, in contrast with the typically anhydrous mineral assemblages of Santorini. The strong geochemical signature of amphibole fractionation and the assimilation of lower crustal basement in the petrogenesis of the Kolumbo magmas indicates that Kolumbo and Santorini underwent different crustal differentiation histories and that their crustal magmatic systems are unrelated. Moreover, the Kolumbo samples are derived from a distinct, more enriched mantle source that is characterized by high Nb/Yb (>3) and low (206)Pb/(204)Pb (<18.82) that has not been recognized in the Santorini volcanic products. The strong dissimilarity in both petrogenesis and inferred mantle sources between Kolumbo and Santorini suggests that pronounced source variations can be manifested in arc magmas that are closely associated in space and time within a single volcanic field.

  4. Estimation of ash injection in the atmosphere by basaltic volcanic plumes: The case of the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, E.; Tait, S.; Ferrucci, F.; Martet, M.; Hirn, B.; Husson, P.

    2011-09-01

    During explosive eruptions, volcanic plumes inject ash into the atmosphere and may severely affect air traffic, as illustrated by the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. Quantitative estimates of ash injection can be deduced from the height reached by the volcanic plume on the basis of scaling laws inferred from models of powerful Plinian plumes. In less explosive basaltic eruptions, there is a partitioning of the magma influx between the atmospheric plume and an effusive lava flow on the ground. We link the height reached by the volcanic plume with the rate of ash injection in the atmosphere via a refined plume model that (1) includes a recently developed variable entrainment law and (2) accounts for mass partitioning between ground flow and plume. We compute the time evolution of the rate of injection of ash into the atmosphere for the Eyjafjallajökull eruption on the basis of satellite thermal images and plume heights and use the dispersion model of the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center of Toulouse to translate these numbers into hazard maps. The classical Plinian model would have overestimated ash injection by about 20% relative to the refined estimate, which does not jeopardize risk assessment. This small error was linked to effective fragmentation by intense interactions of magma with water derived from melting of ice and hence strong mass partitioning into the plume. For a less well fragmented basaltic dry eruption, the error may reach 1 order of magnitude and hence undermine the prediction of ash dispersion, which demonstrates the need to monitor both plume heights and ground flows during an explosive eruption.

  5. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia cover about 90,000 km2, one of the largest areas of alkali olivine basalt in the world. These volcanic rocks are in 13 separate fields near the eastern coast of the Red Sea and in the western Arabian Peninsula highlands from Syria southward to the Yemen Arab Republic.

  6. Explosive Volcanic Activity at Extreme Depths: Evidence from the Charles Darwin Volcanic Field, Cape Verdes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Devey, C. W.; Hansteen, T. H.; Freundt, A.; Kutterolf, S.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions on the deep sea floor have traditionally been assumed to be non-explosive as the high-pressure environment should greatly inhibit steam-driven explosions. Nevertheless, occasional evidence both from (generally slow-) spreading axes and intraplate seamounts has hinted at explosive activity at large water depths. Here we present evidence from a submarine field of volcanic cones and pit craters called Charles Darwin Volcanic Field located at about 3600 m depth on the lower southwestern slope of the Cape Verdean Island of Santo Antão. We examined two of these submarine volcanic edifices (Tambor and Kolá), each featuring a pit crater of 1 km diameter, using photogrammetric reconstructions derived from ROV-based imaging followed by 3D quantification using a novel remote sensing workflow, aided by sampling. The measured and calculated parameters of physical volcanology derived from the 3D model allow us, for the first time, to make quantitative statements about volcanic processes on the deep seafloor similar to those generated from land-based field observations. Tambor cone, which is 2500 m wide and 250 m high, consists of dense, probably monogenetic medium to coarse-grained volcaniclastic and pyroclastic rocks that are highly fragmented, probably as a result of thermal and viscous granulation upon contact with seawater during several consecutive cycles of activity. Tangential joints in the outcrops indicate subsidence of the crater floor after primary emplacement. Kolá crater, which is 1000 m wide and 160 m deep, appears to have been excavated in the surrounding seafloor and shows stepwise sagging features interpreted as ring fractures on the inner flanks. Lithologically, it is made up of a complicated succession of highly fragmented deposits, including spheroidal juvenile lapilli, likely formed by spray granulation. It resembles a maar-type deposit found on land. The eruption apparently entrained blocks of MORB-type gabbroic country rocks with

  7. Petrologic insights into basaltic volcanism at historically active Hawaiian volcanoes: Chapter 6 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helz, Rosalind L.; Clague, David A.; Sisson, Thomas W.; Thornber, Carl R.; Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Study of the petrology of Hawaiian volcanoes, in particular the historically active volcanoes on the Island of Hawai‘i, has long been of worldwide scientific interest. When Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., established the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) in 1912, detailed observations on basaltic activity at Kīlauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes increased dramatically. The period from 1912 to 1958 saw a gradual increase in the collection and analysis of samples from the historical eruptions of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa and development of the concepts needed to evaluate them. In a classic 1955 paper, Howard Powers introduced the concepts of magnesia variation diagrams, to display basaltic compositions, and olivine-control lines, to distinguish between possibly comagmatic and clearly distinct basaltic lineages. In particular, he and others recognized that Kīlauea and Mauna Loa basalts must have different sources.

  8. Field Validation of Supercritical CO 2 Reactivity with Basalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; Spane, Frank A.; Cliff, John B.; Qafoku, Odeta; Horner, Jake A.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Owen, Antoinette T.; Sullivan, Charlotte E.

    2017-01-10

    Continued global use of fossil fuels places a premium on developing technology solutions to minimize increases in atmospheric CO2 levels. CO2 storage in reactive basalts might be one of these solutions by permanently converting injected gaseous CO2 into solid carbonates. Herein we report results from a field demonstration where ~1000 MT of CO2 was injected into a natural basalt formation in Eastern Washington State. Following two years of post-injection monitoring, cores were obtained from within the injection zone and subjected to detailed physical and chemical analysis. Nodules found in vesicles throughout the cores were identified as the carbonate mineral, ankerite Ca[Fe, Mg, Mn](CO3)2. Carbon isotope analysis showed the nodules are chemically distinct as compared with natural carbonates present in the basalt and clear correlation with the isotopic signature of the injected CO2. These findings provide field validation of rapid mineralization rates observed from years of laboratory testing with basalts.

  9. Spatio-temporal evolution of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobs Nawotniak, S. E.; Espindola, J.; Godinez, L.

    2010-12-01

    Mapping of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF), located in Veracruz, Mexico, through the use of digital elevation models, aerial photography, and field confirmation has found 353 distinct cones, 4 large composite volcanoes, and 42 maars. Eruptive activity in the TVF began in the late Miocene, underwent a quiescent period approximately 2.6-0.8 Ma, and continues into historic times with the most recent eruption occurring at San Martín Tuxtla volcano in 1793. The covariance of the minimum cone separation in the TVF indicates that, despite the influence of clear vent alignments following regional faulting trends, the field as a whole is anticlustered. Dividing the cones by morphometric age shows that while the older cones have an anti-clustered distribution, the younger cones (Catemaco. These areas of concentrated volcanism roughly correspond to the locations of two gravity anomalies previously identified in the area. While the average height/width ratio is equal between the two clusters, the cones in the eastern group are significantly smaller than their counterparts in the western group. The maars of the TVF are mostly located within the younger volcanic series, west of Laguna Catemaco, and have an anticlustered distribution; many of the maars are evenly spaced along curved lines, where they are weakly grouped according to crater diameter. Results indicate volcanism TVF has undergone continued spatial restriction over time, concentrating in the western half of the TVF with the onset of the eruption of the younger volcanic series 0.8 Ma and further contracting along the principle fault system within the last 50 Ka.

  10. Magma evolution and ascent at the Craters of the Moon and neighboring volcanic fields, southern Idaho, USA: implications for the evolution of polygenetic and monogenetic volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putirka, Keith D.; Kuntz, Mel A.; Unruh, Daniel M.; Vaid, Nitin

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of polygenetic and monogenetic volcanic fields must reflect differences in magma processing during ascent. To assess their evolution we use thermobarometry and geochemistry to evaluate ascent paths for neighboring, nearly coeval volcanic fields in the Snake River Plain, in south-central Idaho, derived from (1) dominantly Holocene polygenetic evolved lavas from the Craters of the Moon lava field (COME) and (2) Quaternary non-evolved, olivine tholeiites (NEOT) from nearby monogenetic volcanic fields. These data show that NEOT have high magmatic temperatures (1205 + or - 27 degrees C) and a narrow temperature range (50 degrees C). Prolonged storage of COME magmas allows them to evolve to higher 87Sr/86Sr and SiO2, and lower MgO and 143Nd/144Nd. Most importantly, ascent paths control evolution: NEOT often erupt near the axis of the plain where high-flux (Yellowstone-related), pre-Holocene magmatic activity replaces granitic middle crust with basaltic sills, resulting in a net increase in NEOT magma buoyancy. COME flows erupt off-axis, where felsic crustal lithologies sometimes remain intact, providing a barrier to ascent and a source for crustal contamination. A three-stage ascent process explains the entire range of erupted compositions. Stage 1 (40-20 km): picrites are transported to the middle crust, undergoing partial crystallization of olivine + or - clinopyroxene. COME magmas pass through unarmored conduits and assimilate 1% or less of ancient gabbroic crust having high Sr and 87Sr/86Sr and low SiO2. Stage 2 (20-10 km): magmas are stored within the middle crust, and evolve to moderate MgO (10%). NEOT magmas, reaching 10% MgO, are positively buoyant and migrate through the middle crust. COME magmas remain negatively buoyant and so crystallize further and assimilate middle crust. Stage 3 (15-0 km): final ascent and eruption occurs when volatile contents, increased by differentiation, are sufficient (1-2 wt % H2O) to provide magma buoyancy through the

  11. A micro-scale investigation of melt production and extraction in the upper mantle based on silicate melt pockets in ultramafic xenoliths from the Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field (Western Hungary)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bali, Eniko; Zanetti, A.; Szabo, C.;

    2008-01-01

    Mantle xenoliths in Neogene alkali basalts of the Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field (Western Hungary) frequently have melt pockets that contain silicate minerals, glass, and often carbonate globules. Textural, geochemical and thermobarometric data indicate that the melt pockets formed at rel...

  12. Raton-Clayton Volcanic Field magmatism in the context of the Jemez Lineament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, C. M.; Pontbriand, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Raton-Clayton Volcanic Field (RCVF) was active from 9 Ma to approximately 50 Ka and stretches from Raton, New Mexico in the west to Clayton, New Mexico in the east. The field occurs in the Great Plains at the northeastern end of the Jemez Lineament, a major crustal feature and focus of volcanism that extends southwest to the Colorado Plateau in Arizona and encompasses five other major volcanic fields. Jemez Lineament magmatism is temporally related to Rio Grande Rift magmatism, though it extends NE and SW from the rift itself, and it has been suggested that it represents an ancient crustal suture that serves as a conduit for magmatism occurring beneath the larger region of north and central New Mexico (Magnani et al., 2004, GEOL SOC AM BULL, 116:7/8, pp. 1-6). This study extends our work into the RCVF from prior and ongoing work in the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, where we identified different mantle sources with varying degrees of subduction alteration and we determined some of the crustal processes that contribute to the diversity of magma chemistry and eruptive styles there (e.g., AGU Fall Meeting, abst. #V43D-2884 and #V43D-2883). In the RCVF, we are analyzing multiple phases by electron microprobe and plagioclase phenocrysts and glomerocrysts by LA-ICPMS for Sr isotopes and trace elements. We are undertaking this investigation with the following goals: (1) to evaluate previous magma mixing and crustal assimilation models for Sierra Grande andesites (Zhu, 1995, unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Rice University; Hesse, 1999, unpublished M.S. thesis, Northern Arizona University); (2) to evaluate subduction-modified mantle as the source for RCVF basanites (specifically those at Little Grande); and (3) to assess the possible role of deep crustal cumulates in buffering transitional basalts. In the larger context, these data will be used to evaluate the varying degree of subduction-modification and the effect of crustal thickness on magmatism along the Jemez

  13. Increased thyroid cancer incidence in a basaltic volcanic area is associated with non-anthropogenic pollution and biocontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandrino, Pasqualino; Russo, Marco; Ronchi, Anna; Minoia, Claudio; Cataldo, Daniela; Regalbuto, Concetto; Giordano, Carla; Attard, Marco; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Trimarchi, Francesco; Vigneri, Riccardo

    2016-08-01

    The increased thyroid cancer incidence in volcanic areas suggests an environmental effect of volcanic-originated carcinogens. To address this problem, we evaluated environmental pollution and biocontamination in a volcanic area of Sicily with increased thyroid cancer incidence. Thyroid cancer epidemiology was obtained from the Sicilian Regional Registry for Thyroid Cancer. Twenty-seven trace elements were measured by quadrupole mass spectrometry in the drinking water and lichens (to characterize environmental pollution) and in the urine of residents (to identify biocontamination) in the Mt. Etna volcanic area and in adjacent control areas. Thyroid cancer incidence was 18.5 and 9.6/10(5) inhabitants in the volcanic and the control areas, respectively. The increase was exclusively due to the papillary histotype. Compared with control areas, in the volcanic area many trace elements were increased in both drinking water and lichens, indicating both water and atmospheric pollution. Differences were greater for water. Additionally, in the urine of the residents of the volcanic area, the average levels of many trace elements were significantly increased, with values higher two-fold or more than in residents of the control area: cadmium (×2.1), mercury (×2.6), manganese (×3.0), palladium (×9.0), thallium (×2.0), uranium (×2.0), vanadium (×8.0), and tungsten (×2.4). Urine concentrations were significantly correlated with values in water but not in lichens. Our findings reveal a complex non-anthropogenic biocontamination with many trace elements in residents of an active volcanic area where thyroid cancer incidence is increased. The possible carcinogenic effect of these chemicals on the thyroid and other tissues cannot be excluded and should be investigated.

  14. Optimal likelihood-based matching of volcanic sources and deposits in the Auckland Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Emily; Bebbington, Mark S.; Cronin, Shane J.; Wang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    In monogenetic volcanic fields, where each eruption forms a new volcano, focusing and migration of activity over time is a very real possibility. In order for hazard estimates to reflect future, rather than past, behavior, it is vital to assemble as much reliable age data as possible on past eruptions. Multiple swamp/lake records have been extracted from the Auckland Volcanic Field, underlying the 1.4 million-population city of Auckland. We examine here the problem of matching these dated deposits to the volcanoes that produced them. The simplest issue is separation in time, which is handled by simulating prior volcano age sequences from direct dates where known, thinned via ordering constraints between the volcanoes. The subproblem of varying deposition thicknesses (which may be zero) at five locations of known distance and azimuth is quantified using a statistical attenuation model for the volcanic ash thickness. These elements are combined with other constraints, from widespread fingerprinted ash layers that separate eruptions and time-censoring of the records, into a likelihood that was optimized via linear programming. A second linear program was used to optimize over the Monte-Carlo simulated set of prior age profiles to determine the best overall match and consequent volcano age assignments. Considering all 20 matches, and the multiple factors of age, direction, and size/distance simultaneously, results in some non-intuitive assignments which would not be produced by single factor analyses. Compared with earlier work, the results provide better age control on a number of smaller centers such as Little Rangitoto, Otuataua, Taylors Hill, Wiri Mountain, Green Hill, Otara Hill, Hampton Park and Mt Cambria. Spatio-temporal hazard estimates are updated on the basis of the new ordering, which suggest that the scale of the 'flare-up' around 30 ka, while still highly significant, was less than previously thought.

  15. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory: a natural laboratory for studying basaltic volcanism: Chapter 1 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, Robert I.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Brantley, Steven R.; Neal, Christina A.; Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    In the beginning of the 20th century, geologist Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., argued that, to fully understand volcanic and associated hazards, the expeditionary mode of studying eruptions only after they occurred was inadequate. Instead, he fervently advocated the use of permanent observatories to record and measure volcanic phenomena—at and below the surface—before, during, and after eruptions to obtain the basic scientific information needed to protect people and property from volcanic hazards. With the crucial early help of American volcanologist Frank Alvord Perret and the Hawaiian business community, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established in 1912, and Jaggar’s vision became reality. From its inception, HVO’s mission has centered on several goals: (1) measuring and documenting the seismic, eruptive, and geodetic processes of active Hawaiian volcanoes (principally Kīlauea and Mauna Loa); (2) geological mapping and dating of deposits to reconstruct volcanic histories, understand island evolution, and determine eruptive frequencies and volcanic hazards; (3) systematically collecting eruptive products, including gases, for laboratory analysis; and (4) widely disseminating observatory-acquired data and analysis, reports, and hazard warnings to the global scientific community, emergency-management authorities, news media, and the public. The long-term focus on these goals by HVO scientists, in collaboration with investigators from many other organizations, continues to fulfill Jaggar’s career-long vision of reducing risks from volcanic and earthquake hazards across the globe.

  16. Intermediate composition magma production in an intracontinental setting: Unusual andesites and dacites of the mid-Miocene Santa Rosa-Calico volcanic field, Northern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueseke, Matthew E.; Hart, William K.

    2009-11-01

    The mid-Miocene Santa Rosa-Calico volcanic field (SC) of northern Nevada provides an outstanding example of the role open-system magmatic processes play in producing calc-alkaline and tholeiitic andesite-dacite magmas in an intracontinental setting. SC volcanism commenced at ˜ 16.7 Ma and is associated with the initial manifestations of the Yellowstone hotspot, the Columbia River-Steens flood basalt event(s), and the formation of the Northern Nevada rift. Locally a diverse package of magmatic products ranging from tholeiitic basalt to high-Si rhyolite was produced during an ˜ 2 myr duration. Within this package are the products of at least four distinct intermediate composition magmatic systems that may represent as much as 40% of the SC volcanic pile. These help differentiate the SC from contemporaneous Oregon Plateau volcanic fields (e.g. McDermitt, Lake Owyhee, Northwest Nevada) that are dominated by bimodal basalt-rhyolite assemblages. All SC intermediate units are characterized by textural and mineralogic complexities including xenoliths and xenocrysts of local crust and crystal clots of plagioclase ± clinopyroxene ± orthopyroxene ± oxide. SC intermediate units are dominantly tholeiitic, but include lava flows with transitional to calc-alkaline affinities. Relative to locally erupted Steens Basalt, SC intermediate lava flows have similar elemental enrichments and depletions, but dissimilar Sr and Nd isotopic compositions. These isotopic differences, coupled with the abundant disequilibrium features and variable incompatible element ratios, indicate that open system magmatic processes played a major role in the genesis of the intermediate units. SC silicic magmas were produced primarily via upper crustal melting of chemically and isotopically heterogeneous Cretaceous granitoid. Interaction between fractionating mafic Steens flood basalt magmas and the more evolved crustal melts ± assimilation of local upper crust provides a general template for the

  17. 39Ar/40Ar Chronology and Volumes of Eruptive Products Over the Last 1 Myr in the Tequila Volcanic Field, Jalisco, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Kenedi, C. B.; Lange, R. A.; Hall, C. M.; Delgado-Granados, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Tequila volcanic field, located within the western Trans-Mexican arc, covers an area of 1036 km2 and includes a central, andesitic stratocone, Volc\\­_{a}n Tequila, as well as cinder cones, domes, and fissure-fed flows. Sixty-nine high precision 39Ar-40Ar dates reveal that major activity in the Tequila volcanic field began at approximately 1 Ma. From 1 Ma to 200 ka, rhyolite (> 73 wt. % SiO2) and alkali basalt (­š 51 wt. % SiO2) were the only compositions erupted in significant volumes (29 +/- 5.7 km3 and 12 +/- 1.2 km3, respectively). At approximately 200 ka, the andesite comprising Volc\\­_{a}n Tequila erupted within 30-40 kyr, producing a volume of 30 +/- 2.0 km3. Additional andesitic flows (11 +/- 1.4 km3) erupted to the northwest and southeast of the stratocone between 140 and 20 ka. The total volume of dacite that erupted at the Tequila volcanic field is small (1.3 +/- 0.03 km3) and occurred largely (88%) within the last 70 kyrs. Unlike the andesites and dacites, the basalts and rhyolites did not erupt within narrow time intervals, but extruded over the entire last 1 Myr, producing a total volume of 12.6 +/- 1.2 km3 and 32 +/- 6.1 km3, respectively. This detailed eruptive history, combined with the observed phenocryst assemblages (0-10 vol. %) in the small-volume andesite, dacite, and alkali basalt flows, suggest that they were erupted directly from the lower (or middle) crust, without prior storage in an upper crustal chamber. In contrast, the voluminous burst of andesitic volcanism that produced the phenocryst-rich (35-45 vol. %) lavas of Volc\\­_{a}n Tequila was likely fed from a short-lived (­š 40 kyrs) upper crustal chamber. This scenario is supported by the complex, disequilibrium textures seen in the phenocryst assemblage of the Volc\\­_{a}n Tequila lavas, indicative of magma mingling within an upper crustal chamber (Wallace and Carmichael, 1994). The total volume of erupted material at the Tequila volcanic field is 89 +/- 12 km3, of which

  18. The Relative Rates of Secondary Hydration in Basalt and Rhyolite, and the use of δD as a Paleoclimate Indicator: Implications for Paleoenvironmental and Volcanic Degassing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2014-12-01

    The δD-H2O correlation is important for volcanic degassing and secondary hydration trends. We utilize the caibration of the TC/EA - MAT 253 continuous flow system, which permits us to analyze wt.% H2O and its δD extracted from 1-8 mg of glass with as little as 0.1 wt% H2O. Tephra that has been secondarily hydrated with meteoric water is widely used as a paleoenvironmental tool, but the rate of secondary hydration, the relative amounts of primary magmatic (degassed) and secondary meteoric water, and the retention of primary and secondary δD values are not well understood. To quantify these processes, we use a natural experiment involving dated Holocene tepha in Kamchatka and Oregon. Our research illustrates the drastic difference in hydration rates between silicic (hydrated after ~1.5 ka) and mafic tephra, which is not hydrated in the Holocene (similar to results for submarine volcanic glasses), and andesitic tephra with intermediate degrees of hydration. The 0.05-7.3 ka basaltic scoria from Klyuchevskoy volcano retains ≤0.45 wt.% primary magmatic H2O, with δD values from -99 to -121 ‰. Four other 0.05-7.6 ka basaltic tephra units from Kamchatka with andesitic tephra have slightly higher water contents (0.9-3.0 %) and slightly lower δD values (-113 - -146 ‰). Seven 0.3-7.9 ka silicic samples with SiO2 >65 wt.% have higher (1.5 -3.4) wt.% H2O and δD values between -115 - -160 ‰. We interpret the lower δD values and higher water contents (opposite of the magmatic degassing trend) to be a characteristic of secondary hydration in regions of higher latitude such as Kamchatka and Oregon. We are also investigating 7.7 ka Mt. Mazama tephra in Oregon that are known to be fully hydrated and cover nearly 5000 km2 northeast of Crater Lake and range in elevation from ~1.3-1.9 km to understand the δD and δ18O details of the hydrated water's correspondence with local Holocene meteoric waters. In the future, we plan to use a combination of δD in mid-high latitude

  19. Nature and composition of interbedded marine basaltic pumice in the ~52–50 Ma Vastan lignite sequence, western India: Implication for Early Eocene MORB volcanism offshore Arabian Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarajit Sensarma; Hukam Singh; R S Rana; Debajyoti Paul; Ashok Sahni

    2017-03-01

    The recognition of pyroclasts preserved in sedimentary environments far from its source is uncommon. We here describe occurrences of several centimetres-thick discontinuous basaltic pumice lenses occurring within the Early Eocene Vastan lignite mine sedimentary sequence, western India at two different levels –one at ~5 m and the other at 10 m above a biostratigraphically constrained 52 Ma old marker level postdating the Deccan Volcanism. These sections have received global attention as they record mammalian and plant radiations. We infer the repetitive occurrence of pumice have been sourced from a ~52–50Ma MORB related to sea-floor spreading in the western Arabian Sea, most plausibly along the Carlsberg Ridge. Pyroclasts have skeletal plagioclase with horsetail morphologies ± pyroxene ± Fe–Ti oxide euhedral crystals, and typically comprise of circular polymodal (radii ≤10 to ≥30 μm), non-coalescing microvesicles (>40–60%). The pumice have undergone considerable syngenetic alteration during oceanic transport and post-burial digenesis, and are a composite mixture of Fe–Mn-rich clay and hydrated alteredbasaltic glass (palagonite). The Fe–Mn-rich clay is extremely low in SiO₂, Al₂ O₂, TiO₂ , MgO, alkalies and REE, but very high in Fe₂O₃, MnO, P, Ba, Sr contents, and palagonitization involved significant loss of SiO₂, Al₂O₃, MgO and variable gain in Fe₂O₃, TiO₂, Ni, V, Zr, Zn and REE. Bubble initiationto growth in the ascending basaltic magma (liquidus ~1200–1250◦C) may have occured in ~3 hr. Shortdistance transport, non-connected vesicles, deposition in inner shelf to more confined lagoonal condition in the Early Eocene and quick burial helped preservation of the pumice in Vastan. Early Eocene Arabian Sea volcanism thus might have been an additional source to marginal sediments along the passive margin of western India.

  20. Combining probabilistic hazard assessment with cost-benefit analysis to support decision making in a volcanic crisis from the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Laura; Jolly, Gill; Lindsay, Jan; Howe, Tracy; Marzocchi, Warner

    2010-05-01

    One of the main challenges of modern volcanology is to provide the public with robust and useful information for decision-making in land-use planning and in emergency management. From the scientific point of view, this translates into reliable and quantitative long- and short-term volcanic hazard assessment and eruption forecasting. Because of the complexity in characterizing volcanic events, and of the natural variability of volcanic processes, a probabilistic approach is more suitable than deterministic modeling. In recent years, two probabilistic codes have been developed for quantitative short- and long-term eruption forecasting (BET_EF) and volcanic hazard assessment (BET_VH). Both of them are based on a Bayesian Event Tree, in which volcanic events are seen as a chain of logical steps of increasing detail. At each node of the tree, the probability is computed by taking into account different sources of information, such as geological and volcanological models, past occurrences, expert opinion and numerical modeling of volcanic phenomena. Since it is a Bayesian tool, the output probability is not a single number, but a probability distribution accounting for aleatory and epistemic uncertainty. In this study, we apply BET_VH in order to quantify the long-term volcanic hazard due to base surge invasion in the region around Auckland, New Zealand's most populous city. Here, small basaltic eruptions from monogenetic cones pose a considerable risk to the city in case of phreatomagmatic activity: evidence for base surges are not uncommon in deposits from past events. Currently, we are particularly focussing on the scenario simulated during Exercise Ruaumoko, a national disaster exercise based on the build-up to an eruption in the Auckland Volcanic Field. Based on recent papers by Marzocchi and Woo, we suggest a possible quantitative strategy to link probabilistic scientific output and Boolean decision making. It is based on cost-benefit analysis, in which all costs

  1. Seismic Activity at tres Virgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antayhua, Y. T.; Lermo, J.; Quintanar, L.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    2013-05-01

    The volcanic and geothermal field Tres Virgenes is in the NE portion of Baja California Sur State, Mexico, between -112°20'and -112°40' longitudes, and 27°25' to 27°36' latitudes. Since 2003 Power Federal Commission and the Engineering Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) initiated a seismic monitoring program. The seismograph network installed inside and around the geothermal field consisted, at the beginning, of Kinemetrics K2 accelerometers; since 2009 the network is composed by Guralp CMG-6TD broadband seismometers. The seismic data used in this study covered the period from September 2003 - November 2011. We relocated 118 earthquakes with epicenter in the zone of study recorded in most of the seismic stations. The events analysed have shallow depths (≤10 km), coda Magnitude Mc≤2.4, with epicentral and hypocentral location errors geothermal explotation zone where there is a system NW-SE, N-S and W-E of extensional faults. Also we obtained focal mechanisms for 38 events using the Focmec, Hash, and FPFIT methods. The results show normal mechanisms which correlate with La Virgen, El Azufre, El Cimarron and Bonfil fault systems, whereas inverse and strike-slip solutions correlate with Las Viboras fault. Additionally, the Qc value was obtained for 118 events. This value was calculated using the Single Back Scattering model, taking the coda-waves train with window lengths of 5 sec. Seismograms were filtered at 4 frequency bands centered at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz respectively. The estimates of Qc vary from 62 at 2 Hz, up to 220 at 16 Hz. The frequency-Qc relationship obtained is Qc=40±2f(0.62±0.02), representing the average attenuation characteristics of seismic waves at Tres Virgenes volcanic and geothermal field. This value correlated with those observed at other geothermal and volcanic fields.

  2. Basaltic cannibalism at Thrihnukagigur volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, M. R.; Feineman, M. D.; La Femina, P. C.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic assimilation of felsic continental crust is a well-documented, relatively common phenomenon. The extent to which basaltic crust is assimilated by magmas, on the other hand, is not well known. Basaltic cannibalism, or the wholesale incorporation of basaltic crustal material into a basaltic magma, is thought to be uncommon because basalt requires more energy than higher silica rocks to melt. Basaltic materials that are unconsolidated, poorly crystalline, or palagonitized may be more easily ingested than fully crystallized massive basalt, thus allowing basaltic cannibalism to occur. Thrihnukagigur volcano, SW Iceland, offers a unique exposure of a buried cinder cone within its evacuated conduit, 100 m below the main vent. The unconsolidated tephra is cross-cut by a NNE-trending dike, which runs across the ceiling of this cave to a vent that produced lava and tephra during the ~4 Ka fissure eruption. Preliminary petrographic and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses indicate that there are two populations of plagioclase present in the system - Population One is stubby (aspect ratio 2.1), subhedral to euhedral, and has much higher Ba/Sr ratios. Population One crystals are observed in the cinder cone, dike, and surface lavas, whereas Population Two crystals are observed only in the dike and surface lavas. This suggests that a magma crystallizing a single elongate population of plagioclase intruded the cinder cone and rapidly assimilated the tephra, incorporating the stubbier population of phenocrysts. This conceptual model for basaltic cannibalism is supported by field observations of large-scale erosion upward into the tephra, which is coated by magma flow-back indicating that magma was involved in the thermal etching. While the unique exposure at Thrihnukagigur makes it an exceptional place to investigate basaltic cannibalism, we suggest that it is not limited to this volcanic system. Rather it is a process that likely

  3. A mantle plume below the Eifel volcanic fields, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Ritter, Joachim R. R.; Jordan, Michael; Christensen, Ulrich R.; Achauer, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    We present seismic images of the upper mantle below the Quaternary Eifel volcanic fields, Germany, determined by teleseismic travel time tomography. The data were measured at a dedicated network of more than 200 stations. Our results show a columnar low P-velocity anomaly in the upper mantle with a lateral contrast of up to 2%. The 100 km wide structure extends to at least 400 km depth and is equivalent to about 150–200 K excess temperature. This clear evidence for a plume below a region of c...

  4. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M.; Vaniman, D.T.; Carr, W.J.

    1983-03-01

    Volcanism studies of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region are concerned with hazards of future volcanism with respect to underground disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The hazards of silicic volcanism are judged to be negligible; hazards of basaltic volcanism are judged through research approaches combining hazard appraisal and risk assessment. The NTS region is cut obliquely by a N-NE trending belt of volcanism. This belt developed about 8 Myr ago following cessation of silicic volcanism and contemporaneous with migration of basaltic activity toward the southwest margin of the Great Basin. Two types of fields are present in the belt: (1) large-volume, long-lived basalt and local rhyolite fields with numerous eruptive centers and (2) small-volume fields formed by scattered basaltic scoria cones. Late Cenozoic basalts of the NTS region belong to the second field type. Monogenetic basalt centers of this region were formed mostly by Strombolian eruptions; Surtseyean activity has been recognized at three centers. Geochemically, the basalts of the NTS region are classified as straddle A-type basalts of the alkalic suite. Petrological studies indicate a volumetric dominance of evolved hawaiite magmas. Trace- and rare-earth-element abundances of younger basalt (<4 Myr) of the NTS region and southern Death Valley area, California, indicate an enrichment in incompatible elements, with the exception of rubidium. The conditional probability of recurring basaltic volcanism and disruption of a repository by that event is bounded by the range of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -10} as calculated for a 1-yr period. Potential disruptive and dispersal effects of magmatic penetration of a repository are controlled primarily by the geometry of basalt feeder systems, the mechanism of waste incorporation in magma, and Strombolian eruption processes.

  5. 1992-93 Results of geomorphological and field studies Volcanic Studies Program, Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, S.G.

    1993-10-01

    Field mapping and stratigraphic studies were completed of the Black Tank volcanic center, which represents the southwestern most eruptive center in the Cima volcanic field of California. The results of this mapping are presented. Contacts between volcanic units and geomorphic features were field checked, incorporating data from eight field trenches as well as several exposures along Black Tank Wash. Within each of the eight trenches, logs were measured and stratigraphic sections were described. These data indicate that three, temporally separate volcanic eruptions occurred at the Black Tank center. The field evidence for significant time breaks between each stratigraphic unit is the presence of soil and pavement-bounded unconformities.

  6. A geologic and anthropogenic journey from the Precambrian to the new energy economy through the San Juan volcanic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Douglas B.; Burchell,; Johnson, Raymond H.

    2010-01-01

    The San Juan volcanic field comprises 25,000 km2 of intermediate composition mid-Tertiary volcanic rocks and dacitic to rhyolitic calderas including the San Juan–Uncompahgre and La Garita caldera-forming super-volcanoes. The region is famous for the geological, ecological, hydrological, archeological, and climatological diversity. These characteristics supported ancestral Puebloan populations. The area is also important for its mineral wealth that once fueled local economic vitality. Today, mitigating and/or investigating the impacts of mining and establishing the region as a climate base station are the focuses of ongoing research. Studies include advanced water treatment, the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of propylitic bedrock for use in mine-lands cleanup, and the use of soil amendments including biochar from beetle-kill pines. Biochar aids soil productivity and revegetation by incorporation into soils to improve moisture retention, reduce erosion, and support the natural terrestrial carbon sequestration (NTS) potential of volcanic soils to help offset atmospheric CO2 emissions. This field trip will examine the volcano-tectonic and cultural history of the San Juan volcanic field as well as its geologic structures, economic mineral deposits and impacts, recent mitigation measures, and associated climate research. Field trip stops will include a visit to (1) the Summitville Superfund site to explore quartz alunite-Au mineralization, and associated alteration and new water-quality mitigation strategies; (2) the historic Creede epithermal-polymetallic–vein district with remarkably preserved resurgent calderas, keystone-graben, and moat sediments; (3) the historic mining town of Silverton located in the nested San Juan–Silverton caldera complex that exhibits base-metal Au-Ag mineralization; and (4) the site of ANC and NTS studies. En route back to Denver, we will traverse Grand Mesa, a high NTS area with Neogene basalt-derived soils and will enjoy a soak

  7. Petrogenesis of basaltic volcanic rocks from the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, by melting of metasomatically enriched depleted lithosphere, crystallization differentiation, and magma mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J.M.; Feeley, T.C.; Deraps, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Pribilof Islands, Alaska, are located in the Bering Sea in a continental intraplate setting. In this study we examine the petrology and geochemistry of volcanic rocks from St. Paul (0??54-0??003 Ma) and St. George (2??8-1??4 Ma) Islands, the two largest Pribilof Islands. Rocks from St. George can be divided into three groups: group 1 is a high-MgO, low-SiO. 2 suite composed primarily of basanites; group 2 is a high-MgO, high-SiO 2 suite consisting predominantly of alkali basalts; group 3 is an intermediate- to low-MgO suite that includes plagioclase-phyric subalkali basalts and hawaiites. Major and trace element geochemistry suggests that groups 1 and 2 formed by small-degree partial melting of amphibole-bearing to amphibole-free garnet peridotite. Group 1 rocks were the earliest melts produced from the most hydrous parts of the mantle, as they show the strongest geochemical signature of amphibole in their source. The suite of rocks from St. Paul ranges from 14??4 to 4??2 wt % MgO at relatively constant SiO 2 contents (43??1-47??3 wt %). The most primitive St. Paul rocks are modeled as mixtures between magmas with compositions similar to groups 1 and 2 from St. George Island, which subsequently fractionated olivine, clinopyroxene, and spinel to form more evolved rocks. Plagioclase-phyric group 3 rocks from St. George are modeled as mixtures between an evolved melt similar to the evolved magmas on St. Paul and a fractionated group 2 end-member from St. George. Mantle potential temperatures estimated for primitive basanites and alkali basalts are ???1400??C and are similar to those of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). Similarly, 87Sr/. 86Sr and 143Nd/. 144Nd values for all rocks are MORB-like, in the range of 0??702704-0??703035 and 0??513026-0??513109, respectively. 208Pb/. 204Pb vs 206Pb/. 204Pb values lie near the MORB end-member but show a linear trend towards HIMU (high time-integrated 238U/. 204Pb). Despite isotopic similarities to MORB, many of the major and

  8. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, paleomagnetism, and evolution of the Boring volcanic field, Oregon and Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar investigations of a large suite of fine-grained basaltic rocks of the Boring volcanic field (BVF), Oregon and Washington (USA), yielded two primary results. (1) Using age control from paleomagnetic polarity, stratigraphy, and available plateau ages, 40Ar/39Ar recoil model ages are defined that provide reliable age results in the absence of an age plateau, even in cases of significant Ar redistribution. (2) Grouping of eruptive ages either by period of activity or by composition defines a broadly northward progression of BVF volcanism during latest Pliocene and Pleistocene time that reflects rates consistent with regional plate movements. Based on the frequency distribution of measured ages, periods of greatest volcanic activity within the BVF occurred 2.7–2.2 Ma, 1.7–0.5 Ma, and 350–50 ka. Grouped by eruptive episode, geographic distributions of samples define a series of northeast-southwest–trending strips whose centers migrate from south-southeast to north-northwest at an average rate of 9.3 ± 1.6 mm/yr. Volcanic activity in the western part of the BVF migrated more rapidly than that to the east, causing trends of eruptive episodes to progress in an irregular, clockwise sense. The K2O and CaO values of dated samples exhibit well-defined temporal trends, decreasing and increasing, respectively, with age of eruption. Divided into two groups by K2O, the centers of these two distributions define a northward migration rate similar to that determined from eruptive age groups. This age and compositional migration rate of Boring volcanism is similar to the clockwise rotation rate of the Oregon Coast Range with respect to North America, and might reflect localized extension on the trailing edge of that rotating crustal block.

  9. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M.; Wohletz, K.H.; Vaniman, D.T.; Gladney, E.; Bower, N.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanic hazard investigations during FY 1984 focused on five topics: the emplacement mechanism of shallow basalt intrusions, geochemical trends through time for volcanic fields of the Death Valley-Pancake Range volcanic zone, the possibility of bimodal basalt-rhyolite volcanism, the age and process of enrichment for incompatible elements in young basalts of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region, and the possibility of hydrovolcanic activity. The stress regime of Yucca Mountain may favor formation of shallow basalt intrusions. However, combined field and drill-hole studies suggest shallow basalt intrusions are rare in the geologic record of the southern Great Basin. The geochemical patterns of basaltic volcanism through time in the NTS region provide no evidence for evolution toward a large-volume volcanic field or increases in future rates of volcanism. Existing data are consistent with a declining volcanic system comparable to the late stages of the southern Death Valley volcanic field. The hazards of bimodal volcanism in this area are judged to be low. The source of a 6-Myr pumice discovered in alluvial deposits of Crater Flat has not been found. Geochemical studies show that the enrichment of trace elements in the younger rift basalts must be related to an enrichment of their mantle source rocks. This geochemical enrichment event, which may have been metasomatic alteration, predates the basalts of the silicic episode and is, therefore, not a young event. Studies of crater dimensions of hydrovolcanic landforms indicate that the worst case scenario (exhumation of a repository at Yucca Mountain by hydrovolcanic explosions) is unlikely. Theoretical models of melt-water vapor explosions, particularly the thermal detonation model, suggest hydrovolcanic explosion are possible at Yucca Mountain. 80 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. The ~ 2000 yr BP Jumento volcano, one of the youngest edifices of the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, J. L.; Muñoz-Salinas, E.; Castillo, M.; Salinas, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Chichinautzin Volcanic Field is situated at the southern limit of the Basin of Mexico and the Metropolitan area of Mexico City, the third most populated city around the world. The Chichinautzin Volcanic field holds more than 220 monogenetic volcanoes. Xitle is the youngest of these with an estimated age of 1.6 ky BP. Xitle's eruptive activity took place during the Mesoamerican Mexican Pre-classic period and is related to the destruction of Cuicuilco Archaeological Site, the oldest civilization known in Central Mexico. However, there are still several regional cones that have not been dated. Based on 14C ages, stratigraphic and geomorphologic criteria, we conclude that the Jumento volcano, located to the west of Xitle, is one of the youngest cones of the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field. The Jumento volcano has a basaltic andesite composition, and its eruptive activity was initially hydromagmatic, followed by Strombolian and finally effusive events occurred recorded through: (1) a sequence of hydromagmatic pyroclastic surges and ashfall layers emplaced at a radius of > 5 km from the crater with charcoal fragments at its base; this activity built the Jumento's cone with slopes of 32°; and (2) lava flows that breached the southern part of the cone and flowed for up to 2.5 km from the vent. The resulting 14C ages for this volcano yielded a maximum age of ~ 2 ky BP. Morphometric analysis indicates that the state of degradation of Jumento cone is similar to the Xitle, suggesting that the Jumento could be in the state of degradation of a volcanic structure of similar age or younger adding credence to the probable radiocarbon age of ~ 2 ky BP for the Jumento edifice.

  11. Space Radar Image of Pinacate Volcanic Field, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image shows the Pinacate Volcanic Field in the state of Sonora, Mexico, about 150 kilometers (93 miles) southeast of Yuma, Arizona. The United States/Mexico border runs across the upper right corner of the image. More than 300 volcanic vents occur in the Pinacate field, including cinder cones that experienced small eruptions as recently as 1934. The larger circular craters seen in the image are a type of volcano known as a 'maar', which erupts violently when rising magma encounters groundwater, producing highly pressurized steam that powers explosive eruptions. The highest elevations in the volcanic field, about 1200 meters (4000 feet), occur in the 'shield volcano' structure shown in bright white, occupying most of the left half of the image. Numerous cinder cones dot the flanks of the shield. The yellow patches to the right of center are newer, rough-textured lava flows that strongly reflect the long wavelength radar signals. Along the left edge of the image are sand dunes of the Gran Desierto. The dark areas are smooth sand and the brighter brown and purple areas have vegetation on the surface. Radar data provide a unique means to study the different types of lava flows and wind-blown sands. This image was acquired by Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 18, 1994. The image is 57 kilometers by 48 kilometers (35 miles by 30 miles) and is centered at 31.7 degrees north latitude, 113.4 degrees West longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  12. Radar imaging of volcanic fields and sand dune fields: Implications for VOIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elachi, C.; Blom, R.; Daily, M.; Farr, T.; Saunders, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    A number of volcanic fields and sand dune fields in the western part of North America were studied using aircraft and Seasat synthetic aperture radar images and LANDSAT images. The capability of radars with different characteristics (i.e., frequency, polarization and look angles was assessed to identify and map different volcanic features, lava flows and sand dune types. It was concluded that: (1) volcanic features which have a relatively large topographic expression (i.e., cinder cones, collapse craters, calderas, etc.) are easily identified; (2) lava flows of different ages can be identified, particularly on the L-band images; and (3) sand dunes are clearly observed and their extent and large scale geometric characteristics determined, provided the proper imaging geometry exists.

  13. Morphometric characterization of monogenetic volcanic cones of the Chichinautzin and Michoacán-Guanajuato monogenetic volcanic fields in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazua-Carbajal, Maria Cristina; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2014-05-01

    Morphometric characterization of volcanic edifices is one of the main approaches providing information about a volcano eruptive history, whether it has one or more eruptive vents or if it had any sector collapses. It also provides essential information about the physical processes that modify their shapes during periods of quietness, and quite significantly, about the volcanoes' ages. In the case of monogenetic activity, a volcanic field can be characterized by the size and slope distributions, and other cone's morphometric parameter distributions that may provide valuable information about the temporal evolution of the volcanic field. The increasingly available high-resolution digital elevation models and the continuously developing computer tools have allowed a faster development and more detailed morphometric characterization techniques. We present here a methodology to readily obtain diverse volcanic cone shape parameters from the contour curves such as mean slope, slope distribution, dimensions of the cone and crater, crater location within the cone, orientation of the cone's principal axis, eccentricity, and other morphological features using an analysis algorithm that we developed, programmed in Python and ArcPy. Preliminary results from the implementation of this methodology to the Chichinautzin and Michoacán-Guanajuato monogenetic volcanic fields in Mexico have permitted a preliminary estimation of the age distribution of some of the cones with an acceptable correlation with the available radiometric ages. A large part of the Chichinautzin region DEM was obtained from a LIDAR survey by the Mexican National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI).

  14. The roles of fractional crystallization, magma mixing, crystal mush remobilization and volatile-melt interactions in the genesis of a young basalt-peralkaline rhyolite suite, the greater Olkaria volcanic complex, Kenya Rift valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, R.; Belkin, H.E.; Fitton, J.G.; Rogers, N.W.; Nejbert, K.; Tindle, A.G.; Marshall, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Greater Olkaria Volcanic Complex is a young (???20 ka) multi-centred lava and dome field dominated by the eruption of peralkaline rhyolites. Basaltic and trachytic magmas have been erupted peripherally to the complex and also form, with mugearites and benmoreites, an extensive suite of magmatic inclusions in the rhyolites. The eruptive rocks commonly represent mixed magmas and the magmatic inclusions are themselves two-, three- or four-component mixes. All rock types may carry xenocrysts of alkali feldspar, and less commonly plagioclase, derived from magma mixing and by remobilization of crystal mushes and/or plutonic rocks. Xenoliths in the range gabbro-syenite are common in the lavas and magmatic inclusions, the more salic varieties sometimes containing silicic glass representing partial melts and ranging in composition from anorthite ?? corundum- to acmite-normative. The peralkaline varieties are broadly similar, in major element terms, to the eruptive peralkaline rhyolites. The basalt-trachyte suite formed by a combination of fractional crystallization, magma mixing and resorption of earlier-formed crystals. Matrix glass in metaluminous trachytes has a peralkaline rhyolitic composition, indicating that the eruptive rhyolites may have formed by fractional crystallization of trachyte. Anomalous trace element enrichments (e.g. ??? 2000 ppm Y in a benmoreite) and negative Ce anomalies may have resulted from various Na- and K-enriched fluids evolving from melts of intermediate composition and either being lost from the system or enriched in other parts of the reservoirs. A small group of nepheline-normative, usually peralkaline, magmatic inclusions was formed by fluid transfer between peralkaline rhyolitic and benmoreitic magmas. The plumbing system of the complex consists of several independent reservoirs and conduits, repeatedly recharged by batches of mafic magma, with ubiquitous magma mixing. ?? The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press. All

  15. Geochemical constraints on the relationship between the Miocene-Pliocene volcanism and tectonics in the Palaoco and Fortunoso volcanic fields, Mendoza Region, Argentina: New insights from 40Ar/39Ar dating, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes and trace elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyhr, Charlotte T.; Holm, Paul M.; Llambías, Eduardo J.

    2013-10-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar analyses constrain the formation of the volcanic succession of Sierra de Palaoco in the present back-arc of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), near 36°S, to the Late Miocene and assigns them to the Huincán II Formation. The composition of major and trace elements, Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes of the Palaoco and nearby Río Grande rocks require a strong arc-like component in the mantle that is absent or weak in both Early Miocene (Fortunoso Group) and Pleistocene alkaline lavas (Llancanelo Group) erupted in the same area. We evaluate the relative roles of varying mantle source compositions and crustal contamination in the generation of geochemically very different lavas from the Palaoco, Fortunoso and Río Grande volcanic fields, north of the Payún Matrú Volcano. The source for the Early Miocene Fortunoso(I) basalts was a OIB-type mantle devoid of subduction zone input. This type of OIB-like volcanic activity terminated due to a change from an extensional to a compressional tectonic regime. Towards the end of the Miocene renewed alkaline volcanism at Fortunoso (II) display a transition to arc-type incompatible element enrichment. Shortly after the calc-alkaline Palaoco volcanism started with a very strong geochemical arc-signature including Ba/La ≈ 60 and La/Nb = 2-3. After a quiesence of 1 Ma the major part of the voluminous Late Palaoco basalts were erupted around 7.5 Ma over a few hundred ka. These are less enriched in Ba and Sr and have compositions like many Holocene rocks of the Southern Volcanic Zone. Isotopically the Fortunoso I and Palaoco rocks are distinct. Regional volcanism of the Charilehue, Huincán I and II mostly has a moderate arc-type enrichment indicating incipient arc developments. However, Palaoco and La Brea at (c. 35°S) show full geochemical arc-signature, and we infer that a frontal arc was established. The subsequent development in the Palaoco-Río Grande area encompasses renewed late Pliocene calc-alkaline low volume

  16. Emplacement history and inflation evidence of a long basaltic lava flow located in Southern Payenia Volcanic Province, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Mauro I.; Bertotto, Gustavo W.; Jalowitzki, Tiago L. R.; Orihashi, Yuji; Ponce, Alexis D.

    2015-02-01

    The El Corcovo lava flow, from the Huanul shield volcano in the southern Mendoza province (central-western Argentina) traveled a distance of 70 km and covered a minimum area of ~ 415 km2. The flow emplacement was controlled both by extrinsic (e.g., topography) and intrinsic (e.g., lava supply rate, lava physicochemical characteristics) factors. The distal portion of the lava flow reached the Colorado River Valley, in La Pampa Province, where it spread and then was confined by earlier river channels. Cross-sections through the flow surveyed at several localities show two vesicular layers surrounding a dense central section, where vesicles are absent or clustered in sheet-shaped and cylindrical-shaped structures. Lavas of the El Corcovo flow are alkaline basalts with low values of viscosity. The morphological and structural characteristics of the flow and the presence of landforms associated with lava accumulation are the evidence of inflation. This process involved the formation of a tabular sheet flow up to 4 m of thick with a large areal extent in the proximal sectors, while at terminal sectors frontal lobes reached inflation values up to 10 m. The numerous swelling structures present at these portions of the flow suggest the movement of lava in lava tubes. We propose that this aspect and the low viscosity of the lava allowed the flow travel to a great distance on a gentle slope relief.

  17. Sedimentation architecture of the volcanically-dammed Alf valley in the West Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Luise; Lange, Thomas; Engelhardt, Jörn; Polom, Ulrich; Pirrung, Michael; Büchel, Georg

    2015-04-01

    In the southeastern part of the Quaternary West Eifel Volcanic Field, the Alf valley with its morphologically wide (~ 500 m) and flat valley bottom is visibly outstanding. This flat valley bottom was formed during the Marine Isotope Stage 2 due to fluviolacustrine sediments which deposited upstream of a natural volcanic dam. The dam consisted of lava and scoria breccia from the Wartgesberg Volcano complex (Cipa 1958, Hemfler et al. 1991) that erupted ~ 31 BP (40Ar/ 39Ar dating on glass shards, Mertz, pers. communication 2014). Due to this impoundment, the Alf creek turned into a dendritic lake, trapping the catchment sediments. The overall aim is to create the sedimentation architecture of the Alf valley. In comparison to maar archives like Holzmaar or Meerfelder Maar in the vicinity, the fluviolacustrine sediments of the Alf valley show clay-silt lamination despite the water percolation. This archive covers the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to Early Holocene (Pirrung et al. 2007). Focus of this study is the creation of a 3D model by applying the program ESRI ArcGIS 10.2 to reconstruct the pre-volcanic Alf valley. Moreover, the sedimentation architecture is reconstructed and the sediment fill quantified. Therefore, the digital elevation model with 5 m resolution from the State Survey and Geobasis Information of Rhineland-Palatinate, polreduced magnetic data measured on top of the Strohn lava stream, shear seismic data and core stratigraphies were utilized. Summarizing previous results, Lake Alf had a catchment area of ~ 55 km² (Meerfelder Maar: 1.27 km²) and a surface area of 8.2 km² (Meerfelder Maar: 0.24 km²) considering a maximum lake water level of 410 m a.s.l.. In the deepest parts (~ 50 m) of Lake Alf, lake sediments are laminated, up to 21 m thick and show a very high sedimentation rate ~ 3 mm a-1 (Dehner Maar ~ 1.5 mm a-1, (Sirocko et al. 2013)). The sediments become coarser upstream und stratigraphically above the fine-grained lake sediments

  18. Geothermal Fields on the Volcanic Axis of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado, S.; Gonzalez, A.

    1980-12-16

    At present in Mexico, geothermal energy is receiving a great impulse due to the excellent results obtained in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, in which a geothermoelectric plant is operated. This plant has four units of 37.5 MW each, with a total capacity of 150 MW, and under program 470 MW more by 1984. The Government Institution, Comisi6n Federal de Electricidad, is in charge of the exploration and exploitation of geothermal fields as well as construction and operation of power plants in Mexico. By this time CFE has an extensive program of exploration in the central part of Mexico, in the Eje Neovolcdnico. In this area, several fields with hydrothermal alteration are under exploration, like the Michoac6n geothermal area, where Los Azufres geothermal field is being developed. Seventeen wells have been drilled and twelve of them presented excellent results, including two dry steam wells. In other areas, such as Arar6, Cuitzeo, San Agustln del Maiz,Ixtldn de Los Hervores and Los Negritos, geological, geophysical and geochemical explorations have been accomplished, including shallow well drilling with good results. Another main geothermal area is in the State of Jalisco with an extension of 5,000 m2, where La Primavera geothermal field shows a lot of volcanic domes and has an intensive hydrothermal activity. Deep wells have been drilled, one of them with a bottom temperature of 29OOC. Other fields in this area, like San Narcos, Hervores de La Vega, La Soledad, Villa Corona, etc., have a good geothermal potential. A new geothermal area has been explored recently in the eastern part of the country named Los Humeros, Puebla. In this area studies are being made and there are plans for well drilling exploration by the beginning of 1981. Like this one, there are many other areas in the country in which 300 hydrothermal alteration zones are been classified and 100 of them are considered economically exploitable.

  19. The Late Pliocene mafic lavas from the Camusú Aike volcanic field (˜50°S, Argentina): Evidence for geochemical variability in slab window magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, M.; Innocenti, F.; Manetti, P.; Haller, M. J.; Di Vincenzo, G.; Tonarini, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Camusú Aike volcanic field (CAVF), part of the discontinuous N-S-trending belt of Cenozoic mafic lava formations that occur in a backarc position along extra-Andean Patagonia, is located in southern Patagonia (˜50°S, Santa Cruz province), approximately 70 km east of the extensive Meseta de las Vizcachas and just south of the upper Río Santa Cruz valley. The CAVF volcanics cover a surface of ˜200 km 2 and occur mainly as lava flows and scoria cones. They are subdivided into two groups: Group I volcanics are high-TiO 2, low-Mg# olivine-hypersthene-normative basalts and trachybasalts that erupted at about 2.9 Ma; Group II lavas are much less abundant, more primitive basaltic andesites that erupted at about 2.5 Ma. Both groups show a within-plate geochemical signature, though it is more marked in Group I lavas. The main geochemical characteristics, age, and location of CAVF volcanics are consistent with the slab window opening model proposed by different authors for the genesis of the Miocene-Recent mafic magmatism of Patagonia south of 46.5°S. The whole-rock geochemical and Sr-Nd isotope features of Group I lavas ( 87Sr/ 86Sr=0.7035-0.7037; 143Nd/ 144Nd=0.51288-0.51291) indicate a genetic link between these lavas and the primitive basalts in southernmost Patagonia (Pali Aike volcanic field and Estancia Glencross area), which have been interpreted as melting products of an isotopically depleted asthenosphere. The relatively evolved compositions of the erupted Group I magmas are modeled by a polybaric crystal fractionation process without significant involvement of crustal contamination. The more primitive Group II lavas are strongly depleted in incompatible elements, have slightly higher (LREE+Ba+Th+U)/HFSE ratios, and have more enriched Sr-Nd isotope compositions ( 87Sr/ 86Sr≈0.7039; 143Nd/ 144Nd≈0.51277) that are more akin to the Patagonian basalts farther to the north. The most likely explanation for the geochemical features of Group II lavas is the

  20. Hydrothermal Alteration in Submarine Basaltic Rocks from the Reykjanes Geothermal Field, Iceland. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierenberg, R. A.; Schiffman, P.; Fowler, A. P.; Marks, N.; Fridleifsson, G.; Elders, W. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) is preparing to drill to 4-5 km in the Reykjanes Geothermal Field to sample geothermal fluids at supercritical temperature and pressure for power generation. The Reykjanes geothermal field is the on-land extension of the Reykjanes Ridge spreading center. The upper 1-2 kilometers drilled at Reykjanes are submarine basalts and basaltic sediments, hyalloclastites, and breccias, with an increasing proportion of basaltic intrusive rocks below 2 km depth. Geothermal fluids are evolved seawater with a composition similar to mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. Zn- and Cu-rich sulfide scale, locally enriched in Au and Ag, are deposited in production pipes. The sulfide deposits are compositionally and isotopically similar to seafloor massive sulfides. In anticipation of deeper drilling, we have investigated the mineralogy and geochemistry of drill cuttings from a 3 km deep well (RN-17). The depth zoning of alteration minerals is similar to that described from other Icelandic geothermal fields, and is comparable to observed seafloor metamorphic gradients in ODP drill holes and ophiolites. Chlorite-epidote alteration occurs at depths >400 m and passes downhole through epidote-actinolite alteration and into amphibole facies (hornblende-calcic plagioclase) alteration below 2.5 km. Local zones of high temperature (>800°C), granoblastic-textured, pyroxene hornfels, are interpreted to form by contact metamorphism during dike/sill emplacement. Similar granoblasically altered basalts were recovered from the base of the sheeted dikes in IODP Hole 1256D. Downhole compositional variations of drill cuttings, collected every 50 m, suggest that rocks below ~ 2 km are little altered. Whole-rock oxygen isotope profiles are consistent with low water/rock ratios, but suggest that early stages of hydrothermal alteration included meteoric water-derived fluids. Strontium isotope profiles indicate more extensive exchange with seawater-derived fluids

  1. Geochemistry of the late Holocene rocks from the Tolbachik volcanic field, Kamchatka: Quantitative modelling of subduction-related open magmatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnyagin, Maxim; Duggen, Svend; Hauff, Folkmar; Mironov, Nikita; Bindeman, Ilya; Thirlwall, Matthew; Hoernle, Kaj

    2015-12-01

    We present new major and trace element, high-precision Sr-Nd-Pb (double spike), and O-isotope data for the whole range of rocks from the Holocene Tolbachik volcanic field in the Central Kamchatka Depression (CKD). The Tolbachik rocks range from high-Mg basalts to low-Mg basaltic trachyandesites. The rocks considered in this paper represent mostly Late Holocene eruptions (using tephrochronological dating), including historic ones in 1941, 1975-1976 and 2012-2013. Major compositional features of the Tolbachik volcanic rocks include the prolonged predominance of one erupted magma type, close association of middle-K primitive and high-K evolved rocks, large variations in incompatible element abundances and ratios but narrow range in isotopic composition. We quantify the conditions of the Tolbachik magma origin and evolution and revise previously proposed models. We conclude that all Tolbachik rocks are genetically related by crystal fractionation of medium-K primary magmas with only a small range in trace element and isotope composition. The primary Tolbachik magmas contain ~ 14 wt.% of MgO and ~ 4% wt.% of H2O and originated by partial melting (~ 6%) of moderately depleted mantle peridotite with Indian-MORB-type isotopic composition at temperature of ~ 1250 °C and pressure of ~ 2 GPa. The melting of the mantle wedge was triggered by slab-derived hydrous melts formed at ~ 2.8 GPa and ~ 725 °C from a mixture of sediments and MORB- and Meiji-type altered oceanic crust. The primary magmas experienced a complex open-system evolution termed Recharge-Evacuation-Fractional Crystallization (REFC). First the original primary magmas underwent open-system crystal fractionation combined with periodic recharge of the magma chamber with more primitive magma, followed by mixing of both magma types, further fractionation and finally eruption. Evolved high-K basalts, which predominate in the Tolbachik field, and basaltic trachyandesites erupted in 2012-2013 approach steady-state REFC

  2. Sr, Nd and Pb isotope and geochemical data from the Quaternary Nevado de Toluca volcano, a source of recent adakitic magmatism, and the Tenango Volcanic Field, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Serrano, Raymundo G.; Schaaf, Peter; Solís-Pichardo, Gabriela; Hernández-Bernal, Ma. del Sol; Hernández-Treviño, Teodoro; Julio Morales-Contreras, Juan; Macías, José Luis

    2004-11-01

    Volcanic activity at Nevado de Toluca (NT) volcano began 2.6 Ma ago with the emission of andesitic lavas, but over the past 40 ka, eruptions have produced mainly lava flows and pyroclastic deposits of predominantly orthopyroxene-hornblende dacitic composition. In the nearby Tenango Volcanic Field (TVF) pyroclastic products and lava flows ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to andesite were erupted at most of 40 monogenetic volcanic centers and were coeval with the last stages of NT. All volcanic rocks in the study area are characterized by a calc-alkaline affinity that is consistent with a subduction setting. Relatively high concentrations of Sr (>460 ppm) coupled with low Y (45 km) that underlies the volcanoes of the study area, the geochemical and isotopic patterns of these rocks indicate low interaction with this crust. NT volcano was constructed at the intersection of three fault systems, and it seems that the Plio-Quaternary E-W system played an important role in the ascent and storage of magmas during the recent volcanic activity in the two regions. Chemical and textural features of orthopyroxene, amphibole and Fe-Ti oxides from NT suggest that crystallization of magmas occurred at polybaric conditions, confirming the rapid upwelling of magmas.

  3. Stress fields of the overriding plate at convergent margins and beneath active volcanic arcs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apperson, K D

    1991-11-01

    Tectonic stress fields in the overriding plate at convergent plate margins are complex and vary on local to regional scales. Volcanic arcs are a common element of overriding plates. Stress fields in the volcanic arc region are related to deformation generated by subduction and to magma generation and ascent processes. Analysis of moment tensors of shallow and intermediate depth earthquakes in volcanic arcs indicates that the seismic strain field in the arc region of many convergent margins is subhorizontal extension oriented nearly perpendicular to the arc. A process capable of generating such a globally consistent strain field is induced asthenospheric corner flow below the arc region.

  4. Two- and three-dimensional gravity modeling along western continental margin and intraplate Narmada-Tapti rifts: Its relevance to Deccan flood basalt volcanism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Somdev Bhattacharji; Rajesh Sharma; Nilanjan Chatterjee

    2004-12-01

    magma chambers along the western continental margin and the intraplate Narmada-Tapti rifts at estimated depths between 6 and 8 km from the surface (consistent with geological, petrological and geochemical models) appear to be the major reservoirs for Deccan flood basalt volcanism at approximately 65 Ma.

  5. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  6. Residence, resorption and recycling of zircons in Devils Kitchen rhyolite, Coso Volcanic Field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.S.; Wooden, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Zircons from the Devils Kitchen rhyolite in the Pleistocene Coso Volcanic field, California have been analyzed by in situ Pb/U ion microprobe (SHRIMP-RG) and by detailed cathodoluminescence imaging. The zircons yield common-Pb-corrected and disequilibrium-corrected 206Pb/238U ages that predate a previously reported K-Ar sanidine age by up to 200 kyr, and the range of ages exhibited by the zircons is also approximately 200 kyr. Cathodoluminescence imaging indicates that zircons formed in contrasting environments. Most zircons are euhedral, and a majority of the zircons are weakly zoned, but many also have anhedral, embayed cores, with euhedral overgrowths and multiple internal surfaces that are truncated by later crystal zones. Concentrations of U and Th vary by two orders of magnitude within the zircon population, and by 10-20 times between zones within some zircon crystals, indicating that zircons were transferred between contrasting chemical environments. A zircon saturation temperature of ???750??C overlaps within error a previously reported phenocryst equilibration temperature of 740 ?? 25??C. Textures in zircons indicative of repeated dissolution and subsequent regrowth are probably caused by punctuated heating by mafic magma input into rhyolite. The overall span of ages and large variation in U and Th concentrations, combined with calculated zircon saturation temperatures and resorption times, are most compatible with crystallization in magma bodies that were emplaced piecemeal in the crust at Coso over 200 kyr prior to eruption, and that were periodically rejuvenated or melted by subsequent basaltic injections. ?? Oxford University Press 2004; all rights reserved.

  7. Pleistocene high-silica rhyolites of the Coso volcanic field, Inyo County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, C.R.; Macdonald, R.; Smith, R.L.; Baedecker, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    The high-silica rhyolite domes and lava flows of the bimodal Pleistocene part of the Coso volcanic field provide an example of the early stages of evolution of a silicic magmatic system of substantial size and longevity. Major and trace element compositions are consistent with derivation from somewhat less silicic parental material by liquid state differentiation processes in compositionally and thermally zoned magmatic systems. Seven chemically homogeneous eruptive groups can be distinguished on the basis of trace element and K/Ar data. The oldest two groups are volumetrically minor and geochemically distinct from the younger groups, all five of which appear to have evolved from the same magmatic system. Erupted volume-time relations suggest that small amounts of magma were bled from the top of a silicic reservoir at a nearly constant long-term rate over the last 0.24Ma. The interval of repose between eruptions appears to be proportional to the volume of the preceding eruptive group. This relationship suggests that eruptions take place when some parameter which increases at a constant rate reaches a critical value; this parameter may be extensional strain accumulated in roof rocks. Extension of the lithosphere favors intrusion of basalt into the crust, attendant partial melting, and maintenance of a long-lived silicic magmatic system. The Coso silicic system may contain a few hundred cubic kilometers of magma. The Coso magmatic system may eventually have the potential for producing voluminous pyroclastic eruptions if the safety valve provided by rapid crustal extension becomes inadequate to 1) defuse the system through episodic removal of volatile-rich magma from its top and 2) prohibit migration of the reservoir to a shallow crustal level.-from Authors

  8. Geologic field-trip guide to Lassen Volcanic National Park and vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffler, L. J. Patrick; Clynne, Michael A.

    2015-07-22

    This geologic field-trip guide provides an overview of Quaternary volcanism in and around Lassen Volcanic National Park in northern California. The guide begins with a comprehensive overview of the geologic framework and the stratigraphic terminology of the Lassen region, based primarily on the “Geologic map of Lassen Volcanic National Park and vicinity” (Clynne and Muffler, 2010). The geologic overview is then followed by detailed road logs describing the volcanic features that can readily be seen in the park and its periphery. Twenty-one designated stops provide detailed explanations of important volcanic features. The guide also includes mileage logs along the highways leading into the park from the major nearby communities. The field-trip guide is intended to be a flexible document that can be adapted to the needs of a visitor approaching the park from any direction.

  9. Isotopic and trace element constraints on the petrogenesis of lavas from the Mount Adams volcanic field, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jicha, B.R.; Hart, G.L.; Johnson, C.M.; Hildreth, W.; Beard, B.L.; Shirey, S.B.; Valley, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Strontium, Nd, Pb, Hf, Os, and O isotope compositions for 30 Quaternary lava flows from the Mount Adams stratovolcano and its basaltic periphery in the Cascade arc, southern Washington, USA indicate a major component from intraplate mantle sources, a relatively small subduction component, and interaction with young mafic crust at depth. Major- and trace-element patterns for Mount Adams lavas are distinct from the rear-arc Simcoe volcanic field and other nearby volcanic centers in the Cascade arc such as Mount St. Helens. Radiogenic isotope (Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf) compositions do not correlate with geochemical indicators of slab-fluids such as (Sr/P)n and Ba/Nb. Mass-balance modeling calculations, coupled with trace-element and isotopic data, indicate that although the mantle source for the calc-alkaline Adams basalts has been modified with a fluid derived from subducted sediment, the extent of modification is significantly less than what is documented in the southern Cascades. The isotopic and trace-element compositions of most Mount Adams lavas require the presence of enriched and depleted mantle sources, and based on volume-weighted chemical and isotopic compositions for Mount Adams lavas through time, an intraplate mantle source contributed the major magmatic mass of the system. Generation of basaltic andesites to dacites at Mount Adams occurred by assimilation and fractional crystallization in the lower crust, but wholesale crustal melting did not occur. Most lavas have Tb/Yb ratios that are significantly higher than those of MORB, which is consistent with partial melting of the mantle in the presence of residual garnet. ??18O values for olivine phenocrysts in Mount Adams lavas are within the range of typical upper mantle peridotites, precluding involvement of upper crustal sedimentary material or accreted terrane during magma ascent. The restricted Nd and Hf isotope compositions of Mount Adams lavas indicate that these isotope systems are insensitive to crustal

  10. Isotopic and trace element constraints on the petrogenesis of lavas from the Mount Adams volcanic field, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jicha, Brian R.; Hart, Garret L.; Johnson, Clark M.; Hildreth, Wes; Beard, Brian L.; Shirey, Steven B.; Valley, John W.

    2009-02-01

    Strontium, Nd, Pb, Hf, Os, and O isotope compositions for 30 Quaternary lava flows from the Mount Adams stratovolcano and its basaltic periphery in the Cascade arc, southern Washington, USA indicate a major component from intraplate mantle sources, a relatively small subduction component, and interaction with young mafic crust at depth. Major- and trace-element patterns for Mount Adams lavas are distinct from the rear-arc Simcoe volcanic field and other nearby volcanic centers in the Cascade arc such as Mount St. Helens. Radiogenic isotope (Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf) compositions do not correlate with geochemical indicators of slab-fluids such as (Sr/P) n and Ba/Nb. Mass-balance modeling calculations, coupled with trace-element and isotopic data, indicate that although the mantle source for the calc-alkaline Adams basalts has been modified with a fluid derived from subducted sediment, the extent of modification is significantly less than what is documented in the southern Cascades. The isotopic and trace-element compositions of most Mount Adams lavas require the presence of enriched and depleted mantle sources, and based on volume-weighted chemical and isotopic compositions for Mount Adams lavas through time, an intraplate mantle source contributed the major magmatic mass of the system. Generation of basaltic andesites to dacites at Mount Adams occurred by assimilation and fractional crystallization in the lower crust, but wholesale crustal melting did not occur. Most lavas have Tb/Yb ratios that are significantly higher than those of MORB, which is consistent with partial melting of the mantle in the presence of residual garnet. δ 18O values for olivine phenocrysts in Mount Adams lavas are within the range of typical upper mantle peridotites, precluding involvement of upper crustal sedimentary material or accreted terrane during magma ascent. The restricted Nd and Hf isotope compositions of Mount Adams lavas indicate that these isotope systems are insensitive to crustal

  11. 40Ar/39Ar dating, geochemistry, and isotopic analyses of the quaternary Chichinautzin volcanic field, south of Mexico City: implications for timing, eruption rate, and distribution of volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, J. L.; Layer, P. W.; Lassiter, J. C.; Benowitz, J. A.; Macías, J. L.; Ramírez-Espinosa, J.

    2013-12-01

    Monogenetic structures located at the southern and western ends of the Chichinautzin volcanic field (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico) yield 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging from 1.2 Ma in the western portion of the field to 1.0-0.09 Ma in the southern portion, all of which are older than the volcanic field. These new ages indicate: (1) an eruption rate of 0.47 km3/kyr, which is much lower than the 11.7 km3/kyr previously estimated; (2) that the Chichinautzin magmatism coexisted with the Zempoala (0.7 Ma) and La Corona (1.0 Ma) polygenetic volcanoes on the southern edge of Las Cruces Volcanic Range (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt); and confirm (3) that the drainage system between the Mexico and Cuernavaca basins was closed during early Pleistocene forming the Texcoco Lake. Whole-rock chemistry and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic data indicate heterogeneous magmatism throughout the history of Chichinautzin activity that likely reflects variable degrees of slab and sediment contributions to the mantle wedge, fractional crystallization, and crustal assimilation. Even with the revised duration of volcanism within the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field, its eruption rate is higher than most other volcanic fields of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and is comparable only to the Tacámbaro-Puruaran area in the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field to the west. These variations in eruption rates among different volcanic fields may reflect a combination of variable subduction rates of the Rivera and Cocos plates along the Middle America Trench, as well as different distances from the trench, variations in the depth with respect to the subducted slab, or the upper plate characteristics.

  12. Quantifying the morphometric variability of monogenetic cones in volcanic fields: the Virunga Volcanic Province, East African Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Sam; Grosse, Pablo; Barette, Florian; Smets, Benoît; Albino, Fabien; Kervyn, François; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic cone fields are generally made up of tens to hundreds of monogenetic cones, sometimes related to larger polygenetic edifices, which can exhibit a wide range of morphologies and degrees of preservation. The Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP) developed itself in a transfer zone which separates two rift segments (i.e. Edward and Kivu rift) within the western branch of the East-African Rift. As the result of volcanic activity related to this tectonic regime of continental extension, the VVP hosts eight large polygenetic volcanoes, surrounded by over 500 monogenetic cones and eruptive fissures, scattered over the vast VVP lava flow fields. Some cones lack any obvious geo-structural link to a specific Virunga volcano. Using recent high-resolution satellite images (SPOT, Pléiades) and a newly created 5-m-resolution digital elevation model (TanDEM-X), we have mapped and classified all monogenetic cones and eruptive fissures of the VVP. We analysed the orientation of all mapped eruptive fissures and, using the MORVOLC program, we calculated a set of morphometric parameters to highlight systematic spatial variations in size or morphometric ratios of the cones. Based upon morphological indicators, we classified the satellite cones into 4 categories: 1. Simple cones with one closed-rim crater; 2. Breached cones with one open-rim crater; 3. Complex cones with two or more interconnected craters and overlapping cones; 4. Other edifices without a distinguishable crater or cone shape (e.g. spatter mounds and levees along eruptive fissures). The results show that cones are distributed in clusters and along alignments, in some cases parallel with the regional tectonic orientations. Contrasts in the volumes of cones positioned on the rift shoulders compared to those located on the rift valley floor can possibly be attributed to contrasts in continental crust thickness. Furthermore, higher average cone slopes in the East-VVP (Bufumbira zone) and central-VVP cone clusters suggest

  13. The structural architecture of the Los Humeros volcanic complex and geothermal field, Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Sulpizio, Roberto; Carrasco Núñez, Gerardo; Davila Harris, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    The development of geothermal energy in Mexico is a very important goal, given the presence of a large heat anomaly, associated with the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, the renewability of the resource and the low environmental impact. The Quaternary Los Humeros volcanic complex is an important geothermal target, whose evolution involved at least two caldera events, that alternated with other explosive and effusive activity. The first caldera forming event was the 460 ka eruption that produced the Xaltipan ignimbrite and formed a 15-20 km wide caldera. The second collapse event occurred 100 ka with the formation of the Zaragoza ignimbrite and a nested 8-10 km wide caldera. The whole volcano structure, the style of the collapses and the exact location of the calderas scarps and ring faults are still a matter of debate. The Los Humeros volcano hosts the productive Los Humeros Geothermal Field, with an installed capacity of 40 MW and additional 75 MW power plants under construction. Recent models of the geothermal reservoir predict the existence of at least two reservoirs in the geothermal system, separated by impermeable rock units. Hydraulic connectivity and hydrothermal fluids circulation occurs through faults and fractures, allowing deep steam to ascend while condensate flows descend. As a consequence, the plans for the exploration and exploitation of the geothermal reservoir have been based on the identification of the main channels for the circulation of hydrothermal fluids, constituted by faults, so that the full comprehension of the structural architecture of the caldera is crucial to improve the efficiency and minimize the costs of the geothermal field operation. In this study, we present an analysis of the Los Humeros volcanic complex focused on the Quaternary tectonic and volcanotectonics features, like fault scarps and aligned/elongated monogenetic volcanic centres. Morphostructural analysis and field mapping reveal the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of

  14. Geology and geochemistry of volcanic centers within the eastern half of the Sonoma volcanic field, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Rytuba, James J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in the Sonoma volcanic field in the northern California Coast Ranges contain heterogeneous assemblages of a variety of compositionally diverse volcanic rocks. We have used field mapping, new and existing age determinations, and 343 new major and trace element analyses of whole-rock samples from lavas and tuff to define for the first time volcanic source areas for many parts of the Sonoma volcanic field. Geophysical data and models have helped to define the thickness of the volcanic pile and the location of caldera structures. Volcanic rocks of the Sonoma volcanic field show a broad range in eruptive style that is spatially variable and specific to an individual eruptive center. Major, minor, and trace-element geochemical data for intracaldera and outflow tuffs and their distal fall equivalents suggest caldera-related sources for the Pinole and Lawlor Tuffs in southern Napa Valley and for the tuff of Franz Valley in northern Napa Valley. Stratigraphic correlations based on similarity in eruptive sequence and style coupled with geochemical data allow an estimate of 30 km of right-lateral offset across the West Napa-Carneros fault zones since ~5 Ma.

  15. 天山石炭纪火山岩系中含有富Nb岛弧玄武岩吗?%Do the Tianshan Carboniferous volcanic successions contain Nb-enriched arc basalts?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏林圻; 夏祖春; 徐学义; 李向民; 马中平

    2009-01-01

    中国西北部天山石炭纪-早二叠世裂谷火山作用代表了一个新近被认可的大火成岩省.有人认为,在天山石炭纪火山岩系中发育有富Nb岛弧玄武岩、埃达克岩和高镁安山岩组合.然而,该岩石组合具有与典型富Nb岛弧玄武岩、埃达克岩和高镁安山岩不同的化学和同位素特点,表明其并非是岛弧岩石组合.这一推断的岛弧岩石组合实际上是大陆板内火山岩组合,由未遭受地壳混染、受到地壳轻微混染和遭受地壳强烈混染的大陆火山岩组成.%The Tianshan Carboniferous-Early Permian rift-related volcanism in northwestern China represents a newly recognized large igneous province. It has been deemed that an assemblage of Nb-enriched arc basalt, adakite and high-Mg andesite occurred in the Tianshan Carboniferous volcanic successions. Divergent chemical and isotopic characteristics between this rock assemblage and the typical Nb-enriched arc basalts, adakites and high-Mg andesites reveal that the former is not arc related. This postulated arc-related assemblage is indeed an intracontinental volcanic assemblage that consists of crustally uncontaminated, less-contaminated and strongly contaminated continental volcanic rocks.

  16. Distribution and characteristics of volcanic reservoirs in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yulong; WANG Pujun; CHEN Shuming

    2009-01-01

    About forty productive oil/gas fields hosted in volcanic reservoirs have been found since 1957 in fourteen basins of China. They can be simply subdivided into two groups, the east and the west. Reservoir volcanic rocks of the east group are predominantly composed of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous rhyolite and Tertiary basalt, preferred being considered as rift type volcanics developed in the circum-Pacific tectonic regime. Those of the west are Permo-Carboniferous intermediate/basic volcanic rocks, being island-arc type ones developed in paleo-Asian Ocean tectonic regime.

  17. Geochemical characterization of oceanic basalts using artificial neural network

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Das, P.; Iyer, S.D.

    The geochemical discriminate diagrams help to distinguish the volcanics recovered from different tectonic settings but these diagrams tend to group the ocean floor basalts (OFB) under one class i.e., as mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORB). Hence, a...

  18. Contemporaneous trachyandesitic and calc-alkaline volcanism of the Huerto Andesite, San Juan Volcanic Field, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parat, F.; Dungan, M.A.; Lipman, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    Locally, voluminous andesitic volcanism both preceded and followed large eruptions of silicic ash-flow tuff from many calderas in the San Juan volcanic field. The most voluminous post-collapse lava suite of the central San Juan caldera cluster is the 28 Ma Huerto Andesite, a diverse assemblage erupted from at least 5-6 volcanic centres that were active around the southern margins of the La Garita caldera shortly after eruption of the Fish Canyon Tuff. These andesitic centres are inferred, in part, to represent eruptions of magma that ponded and differentiated within the crust below the La Garita caldera, thereby providing the thermal energy necessary for rejuvenation and remobilization of the Fish Canyon magma body. The multiple Huerto eruptive centres produced two magmatic series that differ in phenocryst mineralogy (hydrous vs anhydrous assemblages), whole-rock major and trace element chemistry and isotopic compositions. Hornblende-bearing lavas from three volcanic centres located close to the southeastern margin of the La Garita caldera (Eagle Mountain - Fourmile Creek, West Fork of the San Juan River, Table Mountain) define a high-K calc-alkaline series (57-65 wt % SiO2) that is oxidized, hydrous and sulphur rich. Trachyandesitic lavas from widely separated centres at Baldy Mountain-Red Lake (western margin), Sugarloaf Mountain (southern margin) and Ribbon Mesa (20 km east of the La Garita caldera) are mutually indistinguishable (55-61 wt % SiO2); they are characterized by higher and more variable concentrations of alkalis and many incompatible trace elements (e.g. Zr, Nb, heavy rare earth elements), and they contain anhydrous phenocryst assemblages (including olivine). These mildly alkaline magmas were less water rich and oxidized than the hornblende-bearing calc-alkaline suite. The same distinctions characterize the voluminous precaldera andesitic lavas of the Conejos Formation, indicating that these contrasting suites are long-term manifestations of San Juan

  19. Paleomagnetism of the Pleistocene Tequila Volcanic Field (Western Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Ceja, M.; Goguitchaichvili, A.; Calvo-Rathert, M.; Morales-Contreras, J.; Alva-Valdivia, L.; Rosas Elguera, J.; Urrutia Fucugauchi, J.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents new paleomagnetic results from 24 independent cooling units in Tequila area (western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt). These units were recently dated by means of state-of-the-art 40Ar-39Ar method (Lewis-Kenedy et al., 2005) and span from 1130 to 150 ka. The characteristic paleodirections are successfully isolated for 20 cooling units. The mean paleodirection, discarding intermediate polarity sites, is I = 29.6°, D = 359.2°, k = 26, α95 = 7.1°, n = 17, which corresponds to the mean paleomagnetic pole position Plat = 85.8°, Plong = 84.3°, K = 27.5, A95 = 6.9°. These directions are practically undistinguishable from the expected Plestocene paleodirections, as derived from reference poles for the North American polar wander curve and in agreement with previously reported directions from western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This suggests that no major tectonic deformation occurred in studied area since early-middle Plestocene to present. The paleosecular variation is estimated trough the study of the scatter of virtual geomagnetic poles giving SF = 15.4 with SU = 19.9 and SL = 12.5 (upper and lower limits respectively). These values are consistent with those predicted by the latitude-dependent variation model of McFadden et al. (1991) for the last 5 Myr. The interesting feature of the paleomagnetic record obtained here is the occurrence of an intermediate polarity at 671± 13 ka which may correspond the worldwide observed Delta excursion at about 680-690 ka. This gives the volcanic evidence of this event. Two independent lava flows dated as 362± 13 and 354± 5 ka respectively, yield transitional paleodirections as well, probably corresponding to the Levantine excursion.

  20. Origin of temporal compositional trends in monogenetic vent eruptions: Insights from the crystal cargo in the Papoose Canyon sequence, Big Pine Volcanic Field, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruohan; Lassiter, John C.; Ramirez, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    Many monogenetic vents display systematic temporal-compositional variations over the course of eruption. Previous studies have proposed that these trends may reflect variable degrees of crustal assimilation, or melting and mixing of heterogeneous mantle source(s). Discrimination between these two endmember hypotheses is critical for understanding the plumbing systems of monogenetic volcanoes, which pose a significant volcanic hazard in many areas. In this study, we examine the Papoose Canyon (PC) monogenetic vent in the Big Pine Volcanic Field (BPVF), which had been well characterized for temporal-compositional variations in erupted basalts. We present new major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotopic data from the PC "crystal cargo" (phenocrysts and xenoliths). Comparison of "crystal cargo" and host basalt provides new constraints on the history of magma storage, fractionation, and crustal contamination that are obscured in the bulk basalts due to pre- and syn-eruptive magma mixing processes. The abundances of phenocrysts and ultramafic xenoliths in the PC sequence decrease up-section. Olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts span a wide range of Mg# (77-89). The majority of phenocrysts are more evolved than olivine or clinopyroxene in equilibrium with their host basalts (Mg# = 68- 71, equilibrium Fo ≈ 85- 89). In addition, the ultramafic xenoliths display cumulate textures. Olivine and clinopyroxene from ultramafic xenoliths have Mg# (73-87) similar to the phenocrysts, and lower than typical mantle peridotites. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions of the xenoliths are similar to early PC basalts. Finally, many clinopyroxene phenocrysts and clinopyroxene in xenoliths have trace element abundances in equilibrium with melts that are more enriched than the erupted basalts. These features suggest that the phenocrysts and xenoliths derive from melt that is more fractionated and enriched than erupted PC basalts. Pressure constraints suggest phenocrysts and ultramafic

  1. Inverse steptoes in Las Bombas volcano, as an evidence of explosive volcanism in a solidified lava flow field. Southern Mendoza-Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Corina; Prezzi, Claudia; Orgeira, María Julia; Nullo, Francisco; Margonari, Liliana; Németh, Karoly

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe the unusual genesis of steptoes in Las Bombas volcano- Llancanelo Volcanic Field (LVF) (Pliocene - Quaternary), Mendoza, Argentina. Typically, a steptoe forms when a lava flow envelops a hill, creating a well-defined stratigraphic relationship between the older hill and the younger lava flow. In the Llancanelo Volcanic Field, we find steptoes formed with an apparent normal stratigraphic relationship but an inverse age-relationship. Eroded remnants of scoria cones occur in "circular depressions" in the lava field. To express the inverse age-relationship between flow fields and depression-filled cones here we define this landforms as inverse steptoes. Magnetometric analysis supports this inverse age relationship, indicating reverse dipolar magnetic anomalies in the lava field and normal dipolar magnetization in the scoria cones (e.g. La Bombas). Negative Bouguer anomalies calculated for Las Bombas further support the interpretation that the scoria cones formed by secondary fracturing on already solidified basaltic lava flows. Advanced erosion and mass movements in the inner edge of the depressions created a perfectly excavated circular depression enhancing the "crater-like" architecture of the preserved landforms. Given the unusual genesis of the steptoes in LVF, we prefer the term inverse steptoe for these landforms. The term steptoe is a geomorphological name that has genetic implications, indicating an older hill and a younger lava flow. Here the relationship is reversed.

  2. Impact of Environmental Factors on the Spectral Characteristics of Lava Surfaces: Field Spectrometry of Basaltic Lava Flows on Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on spectral reflectance measurements of basaltic lava flows on Tenerife Island, Spain. Lava flow surfaces of different ages, surface roughness and elevations were systematically measured using a field spectroradiometer operating in the range of 350–2500 nm. Surface roughness, oxidation and lichen coverage were documented at each measured site. Spectral properties vary with age and morphology of lava. Pre-historical lavas with no biological coverage show a prominent increase in spectral reflectance in the 400–760 nm range and a decrease in the 2140–2210 nm range. Pāhoehoe surfaces have higher reflectance values than ʻaʻā ones and attain a maximum reflectance at wavelengths < 760 nm. Lichen-covered lavas are characterized by multiple lichen-related absorption and reflection features. We demonstrate that oxidation and lichen growth are two major factors controlling spectra of Tenerife lava surfaces and, therefore, propose an oxidation index and a lichen index to quantify surface alterations of lava flows: (1 the oxidation index is based on the increase of the slope of the spectral profile from blue to red as the field-observed oxidation level strengthens; and (2 the lichen index is based on the spectral reflectance in the 1660–1725 nm range, which proves to be highly correlated with lichen coverage documented in the field. The two spectral indices are applied to Landsat ETM+ and Hyperion imagery of the study area for mapping oxidation and lichen coverage on lava surfaces, respectively. Hyperion is shown to be capable of discriminating different volcanic surfaces, i.e., tephra vs. lava and oxidized lava vs. lichen-covered lava. Our study highlights the value of field spectroscopic measurements to aid interpretation of lava flow characterization using satellite images and of the effects of environmental factors on lava surface evolution over time, and, therefore, has the potential to contribute to the mapping as well as dating

  3. Strong responses of Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities to volcanic ash

    OpenAIRE

    Browning, T.J.; Bouman, H. A.; Henderson, G. M.; Mather, T.A.; D. M. Pyle; Schlosser, Christian; Woodward, E.M.S.; Moore, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions have been hypothesized as an iron supply mechanism for phytoplankton blooms; however, little direct evidence of stimulatory responses has been obtained in the field. Here we present the results of twenty-one 1-2day bottle enrichment experiments from cruises in the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean which conclusively demonstrated a photophysiological and biomass stimulation of phytoplankton communities following supply of basaltic or rhyolitic volcanic ash. Furthermore, expe...

  4. Stratigraphy, geomorphology, geochemistry and hazard implications of the Nejapa Volcanic Field, western Managua, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellán, Denis Ramón; Macías, José Luis; Pardo, Natalia; Scolamacchia, Teresa; Rodriguez, Dionisio

    2012-02-01

    The Nejapa Volcanic Field (NVF) is located on the western outskirts of Managua, Nicaragua. It consists of at least 30 volcanic structures emplaced along the N-S Nejapa fault, which represents the western active edge of the Managua Graben. The study area covers the central and southern parts of the volcanic field. We document the basic geomorphology, stratigraphy, chemistry and evolution of 17 monogenetic volcanic structures: Ticomo (A, B, C, D and E); Altos de Ticomo; Nejapa; San Patricio; Nejapa-Norte; Motastepe; El Hormigón; La Embajada; Asososca; Satélite; Refinería; and Cuesta El Plomo (A and B). Stratigraphy aided by radiocarbon dating suggests that 23 eruptions have occurred in the area during the past ~ 34,000 years. Fifteen of these eruptions originated in the volcanic field between ~ 28,500 and 2,130 yr BP with recurrence intervals varying from 400 to 7,000 yr. Most of these eruptions were phreatomagmatic with minor strombolian and fissural lava flow events. A future eruption along the fault might be of a phreatomagmatic type posing a serious threat to the more than 500,000 inhabitants in western Managua.

  5. Development and relationship of monogenetic and polygenetic volcanic fields in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germa, Aurelie; Connor, Chuck; Connor, Laura; Malservisi, Rocco

    2013-04-01

    The classification of volcanic systems, developed by G. P. L. Walker and colleagues, relates volcano morphology to magma transport and eruption processes. In general, distributed monogenetic volcanic fields are characterized by infrequent eruptions, low average output rate, and a low spatial intensity of the eruptive vents. In contrast, central-vent-dominated systems, such as stratovolcanoes, central volcanoes and lava shields are characterized by frequent eruptions, higher average flux rates, and higher spatial intensity of eruptive vents. However, it has been observed that a stratovolcano is often associated to parasitic monogenetic vents on its flanks, related to the central silicic systems, and surrounded by an apron of monogenetic edifices that are part of the volcanic field but independent from the principal central system. It appears from spatial distribution and time-volume relationships that surface area of monogenetic fields reflects the lateral extent of the magma source region and the lack of magma focusing mechanisms. In contrast, magma is focused through a unique conduit system for polygenetic volcanoes, provided by a thermally and mechanically favorable pathway toward the surface that is maintained by frequent and favorable stress conditions. We plan to relate surface observations of spatio-temporal location of eruptive vents and evolution of the field area through time to processes that control magma focusing during ascent and storage in the crust. We choose to study fields that range from dispersed to central-vent dominated, through transitional fields (central felsic system with peripheral field of monogenetic vents independent from the rhyolitic system). We investigate different well-studied volcanic fields in the Western US and Western Europe in order to assess influence of the geodynamic setting and tectonic stress on the spatial distribution of magmatism. In summary, incremental spatial intensity maps should reveal how fast a central conduit

  6. Interpreting chemical compositions of small scale basaltic systems: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Lucy E.; Smith, Ian E. M.

    2016-10-01

    Small scale basaltic magmatic systems occur in all of the major tectonic environments of planet Earth and are characteristically expressed at the Earth's surface as fields of small monogenetic cones. The chemical compositions of the materials that make up these cones reflect processes of magma generation and differentiation that occur in their plumbing system. The volumes of magmas involved are very small and significantly their compositional ranges reveal remarkably complex processes which are overwhelmed or homogenized in larger scale systems. Commonly, compositions are basaltic, alkalic and enriched in light rare earth elements and large ion lithophile elements, although the spectrum extends from highly enriched nephelinites to subalkalic and tholeiitic basalts. Isotopic analyses of rocks from volcanic fields almost always display compositions which can only be explained by the interaction of two or more mantle sources. Ultimately their basaltic magmas originate by small scale melting of mantle sources. Compositional variety is testament to melting processes at different depths, a range of melting proportions, a heterogeneous source and fractionation, magma mixing and assimilation within the plumbing system that brings magmas to the surface. The fact that such a variety of compositions is preserved in a single field shows that isolation of individual melting events and their ascent is an important and possibly defining feature of monogenetic volcanism, as well as the window their chemical behavior provides into the complex process of melt generation and extraction in the Earth's upper mantle.

  7. 准噶尔盆地春晖油田石炭系火山岩储层控制因素分析%Controlling factors of the Carboniferous volcanic reservoirs in the Chunhui Oil Field, Junggar Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董臣强

    2014-01-01

    春晖油田石炭系火山岩地层中,油气富集程度与储层发育程度呈正相关关系。研究认为,储层的发育与分布主要受岩相、岩性和构造运动的控制。岩相控制岩性,岩性控制储集空间组合类型,溢流相和火山沉积相围绕爆发相具有环带状分布特点,从火山角砾岩→玄武岩、安山岩→凝灰岩,储集性能逐渐变差;构造运动则控制裂缝的发育及溶蚀作用,断层周边微裂缝发育,沿着微裂缝则溶蚀作用增强,次生孔隙发育。%The Chunhui Oil Field in the Junggar Basin lies in the western part of the Halaalate Mountain tectonic zone, in which the Carboniferous volcanic strata consist dominantly of the volcanic rocks such as tuff, andesite, basalt and volcanic breccias. There is a positive correlation between the hydrocarbon enrichment and reservoir development in the Carboniferous volcanic reservoir rocks from the Chunhui Oil Field. The distribution and development of the volcanic reservoir rocks are primarily controlled by lithofacies, lithology and tectonism. On the whole, the lithofacies may exercise a major control on lithology of the volcanic reservoir rocks, which, in turn, may control the reservoir spaces types. The volcanic rocks in the Chunhui Oil Field exhibit a trend of the girdle pattern of lithofacies changes from the explosive facies through the effusive facies to the volcano-sedimentary facies. The reservoir capacity is gradually getting poor and poor from volcanic breccias to basalt and andesite and finally to tuff. The tectonism is also believed to be a major control on the fissure development and dissolution. The structural stress may give rise to the formation of the cracks or fissures in the brittle rocks, which may greatly improve the reservoir spaces of the Carboniferous volcanic reservoir rocks in the study area.

  8. Volcanic hazard assessment in the Phlegraean Fields: A contribution based on stratigraphic and historical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosi, M.; Santacroce, R. (Universita di Pisa (Italy) Gruppo Nazionale per la Vulcanologia, Roma (Italy))

    1984-01-01

    Phenomena occurring since 1982 in the Phlegraean fields, interpreted as precursors of a potential renewal of volcanic activity, have forced the authors to anticipate some conclusions of a volcanic-hazard study based on the reconstruction of past eruptions in the area, to serve as basis for civil defense preparedness plans. The eruptive history of the Phlegraean Fields suggests a progressive decrease with time in the strength of eruptive phenomena paralleling a migration of vents towards the center of the Phlegraean caldera. Studies concerning the volcanic risk zonation were therefore concentrated on activities during the last 4,500 years and two eruptions (Monte Nuovo and Agnano Monte Spina), that occurred in 1538 and 4,400 years B.P., respectively were selected as the reference eruptions from which possible eruption scenarios were drawn.

  9. Timing and nature of volcanic particle clusters based on field and numerical investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Gholamhossein; Rossi, Eduardo; Biass, Sébastien; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2016-11-01

    Aggregation processes are known to play an important role in volcanic particle dispersal and sedimentation. They are also a primary source of uncertainty in ash dispersal forecasting since fundamental questions, such as the timing and deposition dynamics of volcanic aggregates, still remain unanswered. Here, we applied a state-of-the-art combination of field and numerical strategies to characterize volcanic aggregates. We introduce a new category of aggregates observed with high-speed-high-resolution videos, namely cored clusters. Cored clusters are mostly sub-spherical fragile aggregates that have never been observed in the deposits nor on adhesive tape as they typically break at impact with the ground. They consist of a core particle (200-500μm) fully covered by a thick shell of particles field-based evidence of the so-called rafting effect, in which the sedimentation of coarse ash in cored clusters is delayed due to aggregation.

  10. Evolution of the Latir volcanic field, Northern New Mexico, and its relation to the Rio Grande Rift, as indicated by potassium-argon and fission track dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.; Mehnert, Harald H.; Naeser, Charles W.

    1986-05-01

    Remnants of the Latir volcanic field and cogenetic plutonic rocks are exceptionally exposed along the east margin of the present-day Rio Grande rift by topographic and structural relief in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico. Evolution of the magmatic system associated with the Latir field, which culminated in eruption of a regional ash flow sheet (the Amalia Tuff) and collapse of the Questa caldera 26 m.y. ago, has been documented by 74 new potassium-argon (K-Ar) and fission track (F-T) ages. The bulk of the precaldera volcanism, ash flow eruptions and caldera formation, and initial crystallization of the associated shallow granitic batholith took place between 28 and 25 Ma; economically important molybdenum mineralization is related to smaller granitic intrusions along the south margin of the Questa caldera at about 23 Ma. Interpretation of the radiogenic ages within this relatively restricted time span is complicated by widespread thermal resetting of earlier parts of the igneous sequence by later intrusions. Many samples yielded discordant ages for different mineral phases. Thermal blocking temperatures decrease in the order: K-Ar sanidine > K-Ar biotite > F-T zircon ≫ F-T apatite. The F-T results are especially useful indicators of cooling and uplift rates. Upper portions of the subvolcanic batholith, that underlay the Questa caldera, cooled to about 100°C within about a million years of emplacement; uplift of the batholith increases to the south along this segment of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Activity in the Latir volcanic field was concurrent with southwest directed extension along the early Rio Grande rift zone in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado. The geometry of this early rifting is compatible with interpretation as back arc extension related to a subduction system dipping gently beneath the cordilleran region of the American plate. The Latir field lies at the southern end of a southward migrating Tertiary magmatic

  11. GIS methods applied to the degradation of monogenetic volcanic fields: A case study of the Holocene volcanism of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Aulinas, M.; Carracedo, J. C.; Gimeno, D.; Guillou, H.; Paris, R.

    2011-11-01

    Modeling of volcanic morphometry provides reliable measurements of parameters that assist in the determination of volcanic landform degradation. Variations of the original morphology enable the understanding of patterns affecting erosion and their development, facilitating the assessment of associated hazards. A total of 24 volcanic Holocene eruptions were identified in the island of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain). 87% of these eruptions occurred in a wet environment while the rest happened in a dry environment. 45% of Holocene eruptions are located along short barrancos (S-type, less than 10 km in length), 20% along large barrancos (L-type, 10-17 km in length) and 35% along extra-large barrancos (XL-type, more than 17 km in length). The erosional history of Holocene volcanic edifices is in the first stage of degradation, with a geomorphic signature characterized by a fresh, young cone with a sharp profile and a pristine lava flow. After intensive field work, a careful palaeo-geomorphological reconstruction of the 24 Holocene eruptions of Gran Canaria was conducted in order to obtain the Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) of the pre- and post-eruption terrains. From the difference between these DTMs, the degradation volume and the incision rate were obtained. The denudation of volcanic cones and lava flows is relatively independent both their geographical location and the climatic environment. However, local factors, such as pre-eruption topography and ravine type, have the greatest influence on the erosion of Holocene volcanic materials in Gran Canaria. Although age is a key factor to help understand the morphological evolution of monogenetic volcanic fields, the Gran Canaria Holocene volcanism presented in this paper demonstrates that local and regional factors may determine the lack of correlation between morphometric parameters and age. Consequently, the degree of transformation of the volcanic edifices evolves, in many cases, independently of their age.

  12. Petrologic and petrographic variation of youthful eruptive products in the Tuxtla Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, C. B.; Kobs Nawotniak, S. E.; Fredrick, K. C.; Espindola, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is located near the Gulf of Mexico in the southern part of the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Volcanism in the region began around 7 Ma and has continued until recent times with the volcano San Martín Tuxtla’s latest eruptions in AD 1664 and 1793. The TVF rocks are mainly of alkaline composition and have been divided into two separate volcanic series, an older and younger. The TVF is a structural high located between the Veracruz Basin to the southwest and the Gulf of Mexico to the northeast, characterized by relatively thin crust with the depth to the Moho around 28 to 34 km. The TVF is unique because it is isolated from the nearest volcanic fields (the Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central American Volcanic Belt and the Eastern Alkaline Province) by at least 230km and because of the on-going debate over its magmatic origin. Many models have been proposed to explain the TVF’s alkaline nature in a unique location with most linking it either to the subduction of the Cocos plate to the west of Mexico and/or to extensional faulting in the region. The purpose of our study was to determine systematic changes in the youthful volcanic deposits across the TVF. Regional and local mapping was conducted and lava and scoria samples were collected from seven sites associated with two vent clusters in the TVF. Mapping of the easternmost cluster of deposits suggests chronological emplacement of the deposits through superposition and vent location and morphology. The petrography of lava and tephra deposits may further indicate magmatic origins and other factors influencing the development of the field, including chronology and possible mixing and/or differentiation. Previous published studies analyzed samples near the San Martin Tuxtla volcanic center. Their data is used as a comparative reference for these samples, most of which were collected from another, younger cluster east of Laguna Catemaco. From this study, a better understanding of past eruptive

  13. Volcanism and Oil & Gas In Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Xuanlong

    2000-01-01

    Based on study on the relation with volcanic rock and oil & gas in Songliao Basin and Liaohe Basin in northeast China, author proposes that material from deep by volcanism enrichs the resources in basins, that heat by volcanism promotes organic matter transforming to oil and gas, that volcanic reservoir is fracture, vesicular, solution pore, intercrystal pore.Lava facies and pyroclastic facies are favourable reservoir. Mesozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of intermediate, acid rock,but Cenozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of basalt. Types of oil and gas pool relating to volcanic rock include volcanic fracture pool, volcanic unconformity pool, volcanic rock - screened pool, volcanic darpe structural pool.

  14. Volcanic ash layers in blue ice fields (Beardmore Glacier Area, Antarctica): Iridium enrichments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Christian

    1988-01-01

    Dust bands on blue ice fields in Antarctica have been studied and have been identified to originate from two main sources: bedrock debris scraped up from the ground by the glacial movement (these bands are found predominantly at fractures and shear zones in the ice near moraines), and volcanic debris deposited on and incorporated in the ice by large-scale eruptions of Antarctic (or sub-Antractic) volcanoes. Ice core studies have revealed that most of the dust layers in the ice cores are volcanic (tephra) deposits which may be related to some specific volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have to be related to some specific volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have to be relatively recent (a few thousand years old) since ice cores usually incorporate younger ice. In contrast, dust bands on bare blue ice fields are much older, up to a few hundred thousand years, which may be inferred from the rather high terrestrial age of meteorites found on the ice and from dating the ice using the uranium series method. Also for the volcanic ash layers found on blue ice fields correlations between some specific volcanoes (late Cenozoic) and the volcanic debris have been inferred, mainly using chemical arguments. During a recent field expedition samples of several dust bands found on blue ice fields at the Lewis Cliff Ice Tongue were taken. These dust band samples were divided for age determination using the uranium series method, and chemical investigations to determine the source and origin of the dust bands. The investigations have shown that most of the dust bands found at the Ice Tongue are of volcanic origin and, for chemical and petrological reasons, may be correlated with Cenozoic volcanoes in the Melbourne volcanic province, Northern Victoria Land, which is at least 1500 km away. Major and trace element data have been obtained and have been used for identification and correlation purposes. Recently, some additional trace elements were determined in some of the dust band

  15. Rapid uplift in Laguna del Maule volcanic field of the Andean Southern Volcanic zone (Chile) 2007-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigl, Kurt L.; Le Mével, Hélène; Tabrez Ali, S.; Córdova, Loreto; Andersen, Nathan L.; DeMets, Charles; Singer, Bradley S.

    2014-02-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in Chile is an exceptional example of postglacial rhyolitic volcanism in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes. By interferometric analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired between 2007 and 2012, we measure exceptionally rapid deformation. The maximum vertical velocity exceeds 280 mm yr-1. Although the rate of deformation was negligible from 2003 January to 2004 February, it accelerated some time before 2007 January. Statistical testing rejects, with 95 per cent confidence, four hypotheses of artefacts caused by tropospheric gradients, ionospheric effects, orbital errors or topographic relief, respectively. The high rate of deformation is confirmed by daily estimates of position during several months in 2012, as measured by analysis of signals transmitted by the Global Positioning System (GPS) and received on the ground at three stations around the reservoir forming the LdM. The fastest-moving GPS station (MAU2) has a velocity vector of [-180 ± 4, 46 ± 2, 280 ± 4] mm yr-1 for the northward, eastward and upward components, respectively, with respect to the stable interior of the South America Plate. The observed deformation cannot be explained by changes in the gravitational load caused by variations in the water level in the reservoir. For the most recent observation time interval, spanning 44 d in early 2012, the model that best fits the InSAR observations involves an inflating sill at a depth of 5.2 ± 0.3 km, with length 9.0 ± 0.3 km, width 5.3 ± 0.4 km, dip 20 ± 3° from horizontal and strike 14 ± 5° clockwise from north, assuming a rectangular dislocation in a half-space with uniform elastic properties. During this time interval, the estimated rate of tensile opening is 1.1 ± 0.04 m yr-1, such that the rate of volume increase in the modelled sill is 51 ± 5 million m3 yr-1 or 1.6 ± 0.2 m3 s-1. From 2004 January to 2012 April the total increase in volume was at least 0.15 km3 over the 5.2-yr

  16. Geologic Investigations Spurred by Analog Testing at the 7504 Cone-Sp Mountain Area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Needham, D. H.; Evans, C. A.; Skinner, J. A.; Feng, W.

    2015-12-01

    The SP Mountain area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, AZ, has been used as an analog mission development site for NASA since 1998. This area consists of basaltic cinder cones, lava flows and maar craters that have been active since mid-Miocene, with the youngest events occurring within the last 10,000 years. The area has been used because its geologic and topographic resemblance to lunar and Martian terrains provides an ideal venue for testing hardware and science operations practices that might be employed on planetary surfaces, as well as training astronauts in field geology. Analog operations have often led to insights that spurred new scientific investigations. Most recently, an investigation of the 7504 cone was initiated due to perceptions that Apollo-style traverse plans executed during the Desert RATS 2010 mission had characterized the area incorrectly, leading to concerns that the Apollo traverse planning process was scientifically flawed. This investigation revealed a complex history of fissure eruptions of lava and cinders, cinder cone development, a cone-fill-and-spill episode, extensive rheomorphic lava flow initiation and emplacement, and cone sector collapse that led to a final lava flow. This history was not discernible on pre-RATS mission photogeology, although independent analysis of RATS 2010 data and samples develped a "75% complete solution" that validated the pre-RATS mission planning and Apollo traverse planning and execution. The study also pointed out that the development of scientific knowledge with time in a given field area is not linear, but may follow a functional form that rises steeply in the early period of an investigation but flattens out in the later period, asymptotically approaching a theoretical "complete knowledge" point that probably cannot be achieved. This implies that future human missions must be prepared to shift geographic areas of investigation regularly if significant science returns are to be forthcoming.

  17. Geologic Investigations Spurred by Analog Testing at the 7504 Cone-SP Mountain Area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppler, Dean B.

    2015-01-01

    The SP Mountain area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, AZ, has been used as an analog mission development site for NASA since 1998. This area consists of basaltic cinder cones, lava flows and maar craters that have been active since mid-Miocene, with the youngest events occurring within the last 10,000 years. The area has been used because its geologic and topographic resemblance to lunar and Martian terrains provides an ideal venue for testing hardware and science operations practices that might be employed on planetary surfaces, as well as training astronauts in field geology. Analog operations have often led to insights that spurred new scientific investigations. Most recently, an investigation of the 7504 cone was initiated due to perceptions that Apollo-style traverse plans executed during the Desert RATS 2010 mission had characterized the area incorrectly, leading to concerns that the Apollo traverse planning process was scientifically flawed. This investigation revealed a complex history of fissure eruptions of lava and cinders, cinder cone development, a cone-fill-and-spill episode, extensive rheomorphic lava flow initiation and emplacement, and cone sector collapse that led to a final lava flow. This history was not discernible on pre-RATS mission photogeology, although independent analysis of RATS 2010 data and samples develped a "75% complete solution" that validated the pre-RATS mission planning and Apollo traverse planning and execution. The study also pointed out that the development of scientific knowledge with time in a given field area is not linear, but may follow a functional form that rises steeply in the early period of an investigation but flattens out in the later period, asymptotically approaching a theoretical "complete knowledge" point that probably cannot be achieved. This implies that future human missions must be prepared to shift geographic areas of investigation regularly if significant science returns are to be forthcoming.

  18. A field investigation of the basaltic ring structures of the Channeled Scabland and the relevance to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestay, Laszlo P.; Jaeger, Windy L.

    2015-01-01

    The basaltic ring structure (BRS) is a class of peculiar features only reported in the Channeled Scabland of eastern Washington State. They have been suggested to be good analogs, however, for some circular features on Mars. BRSs are found where Pleistocene floods scoured the Columbia River Basin, stripping off the uppermost part of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group and exposing structures that were previously embedded in the lava. The “Odessa Craters,” near Odessa, WA, are 50–500-m-wide BRSs that are comprised of discontinuous, concentric outcrops of subvertically-jointed basalt and autointrusive dikes. Detailed field investigation of the Odessa Craters in planform and a cross-sectional exposure of a similar structure above Banks Lake, WA, lead us to propose that BRSs formed by concurrent phreatovolcanism and lava flow inflation. In this model, phreatovolcanic (a.k.a., “rootless”) cones formed on a relatively thin, active lava flow; the lava flow inflated around the cones, locally inverting topography; tensile stresses caused concentric fracturing of the lava crust; lava from within the molten interior of the flow exploited the fractures and buried the phreatovolcanic cones; and subsequent erosive floods excavated the structures. Another population of BRSs near Tokio Station, WA, consists of single-ringed, raised-rimmed structures that are smaller and more randomly distributed than the Odessa Craters. We find evidence for a phreatovolcanic component to the origin as well, and hypothesize that they are either flood-eroded phreatovolcanic cones or Odessa Crater-like BRSs. This work indicates that BRSs are not good analogs to the features on Mars because the martian features are found on the uneroded surfaces. Despite this, the now superseded concepts for BRS formation are useful for understanding the formation of the martian features.

  19. Measurements and Slope Analyses of Quaternary Cinder Cones, Camargo Volcanic Field, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, M. I.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Camargo volcanic field (CVF) covers ~3000 km2 and is located in the southeast part of the state of Chihuahua, within the Basin and Range province. The CVF represents the largest mafic alkali volcanic field in northern Mexico. Over a 300 cinder cones have been recognized in the Camargo volcanic field. Volcanic activity ranges from 4.7 to 0.09 Ma revealed by 40Ar/39Ar dating methods. Previous studies say that there is a close relationship between the cinder cone slope angle, due to mechanical weathering, and age. This technique is considered a reliable age indicator, especially in arid climates, such as occur in the CVF. Data were acquired with digital topographic maps (DRG) and digital elevation models (DEM) overlapped in the Global Mapper software. For each cone, the average radius (r) was calculated from six measurements, the height (h) is the difference between peak elevation and the altitude of the contour used to close the radius, and the slope angle was calculated using the equation Θ = tan-1(h/r). The slope angles of 30 cinder cones were calculated showing angles ranging from 4 to 15 degrees. A diffusion model, displayed by an exponential relationship between slope angle and age, places the ages of these 30 cones from 215 to 82 ka, within the range marked by radiometric methods. Future work include the analysis of more cinder cones to cover the whole CVF, and contribute to the validation of this technique.

  20. Rheology and Morphology of a Trachybasaltic Lava Flow: a Case Study from the Cima Volcanic Field (CA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, A.; Beem, J. R.; Robertson, T.; Gomez, F. G.; Whittington, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    Subliquidus rheology of a trachybasaltic lava was measured in the laboratory for the first time. Field observations of the parent flow focused on surface morphology characterization, which was later quantified in terms of surface roughness. The studied lava flow was emitted during the Holocene by a monogenetic cinder cone in the Cima Volcanic Field (CA). Surface morphology transitions from smooth pahoehoe ropes near the vent to jagged `a`a blocks over the majority of the flow. A variety of 2 m2 outcrops were photographed using a hand-held DSLR camera, and their surface texture was reconstructed with photogrammetry. The roughness of each outcrop, effectively described by the standard deviation between the real photogrammetric point cloud and the best-fitting surface, was quantified at different spatial scales, ranging from 0.5 cm to 200 m. We found that the roughness of the flow increases linearly as spatial resolution decreases, with a slope break corresponding to the average size of the outcrop lava blocks. The rheology of Cima lavas was determined by concentric cylinder viscometry in the 1220 °C to 1160 °C temperature range. The obtained rheological flow curves indicate a Bingham rheology, with clearly detected yield strength ranging from 25 Pa at the higher temperatures up to 650 Pa at the lower temperatures. Plagioclase crystallization begins at 1170 °C, likely playing a key role in promoting yield strength escalation. Viscosity increases by one order of magnitude (from 94 to 1116 Pa·s) over the 60 °C span of cooling considered, remaining consistently lower than most basaltic melts due to the high alkali content (6 wt%). The rheological and morphological results are being integrated, in order to assess if it is possible to identify the rheological fingerprint of the active flow on the preserved flow morphology. The composition-dependence of the morphological pahoehoe to `a`a transition in a rheological map is being assessed by comparing our results to

  1. Basalt: Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, D. S. S.; Abercromby, A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Kobayashi, L.; Hughes, S. S.; Chappell, S.; Bramall, N. E.; Deans, M. C.; Heldmann, J. L.; Downs, M.; Cockell, C. S.; Stevens, A. H.; Caldwell, B.; Hoffman, J.; Vadhavk, N.; Marquez, J.; Miller, M.; Squyres, S. W.; Lees, D. S.; Fong, T.; Cohen, T.; Smith, T.; Lee, G.; Frank, J.; Colaprete, A.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the BASALT (Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains) program. BASALT research addresses Science, Science Operations, and Technology. Specifically, BASALT is focused on the investigation of terrestrial volcanic terrains and their habitability as analog environments for early and present-day Mars. Our scientific fieldwork is conducted under simulated Mars mission constraints to evaluate strategically selected concepts of operations (ConOps) and capabilities with respect to their anticipated value for the joint human and robotic exploration of Mars. a) Science: The BASALT science program is focused on understanding habitability conditions of early and present-day Mars in two relevant Mars-analog locations (the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and the East Rift Zone (ERZ) flows on the Big Island of Hawai'i and the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) in Idaho) to characterize and compare the physical and geochemical conditions of life in these environments and to learn how to seek, identify, and characterize life and life-related chemistry in basaltic environments representing these two epochs of martian history. b) Science Operations: The BASALT team will conduct real (non-simulated) biological and geological science at two high-fidelity Mars analogs, all within simulated Mars mission conditions (including communication latencies and bandwidth constraints) that are based on current architectural assumptions for Mars exploration missions. We will identify which human-robotic ConOps and supporting capabilities enable science return and discovery. c) Technology: BASALT will incorporate and evaluate technologies in to our field operations that are directly relevant to conducting the scientific investigations regarding life and life-related chemistry in Mars-analogous terrestrial environments. BASALT technologies include the use of mobile science platforms, extravehicular informatics, display technologies, communication

  2. Nature and composition of interbedded marine basaltic pumice in the ˜52-50 Ma Vastan lignite sequence, western India: Implication for Early Eocene MORB volcanism offshore Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensarma, Sarajit; Singh, Hukam; Rana, R. S.; Paul, Debajyoti; Sahni, Ashok

    2017-03-01

    The recognition of pyroclasts preserved in sedimentary environments far from its source is uncommon. We here describe occurrences of several centimetres-thick discontinuous basaltic pumice lenses occurring within the Early Eocene Vastan lignite mine sedimentary sequence, western India at two different levels - one at ˜5 m and the other at 10 m above a biostratigraphically constrained 52 Ma old marker level postdating the Deccan Volcanism. These sections have received global attention as they record mammalian and plant radiations. We infer the repetitive occurrence of pumice have been sourced from a ˜52-50 Ma MORB related to sea-floor spreading in the western Arabian Sea, most plausibly along the Carlsberg Ridge. Pyroclasts have skeletal plagioclase with horsetail morphologies ± pyroxene ± Fe-Ti oxide euhedral crystals, and typically comprise of circular polymodal (radii ≤10 to ≥30 μm), non-coalescing microvesicles (>40-60%). The pumice have undergone considerable syngenetic alteration during oceanic transport and post-burial digenesis, and are a composite mixture of Fe-Mn-rich clay and hydrated altered basaltic glass (palagonite). The Fe-Mn-rich clay is extremely low in SiO 2, Al 2 O 3, TiO 2, MgO, alkalies and REE, but very high in Fe 2 O 3, MnO, P, Ba, Sr contents, and palagonitization involved significant loss of SiO 2, Al 2 O 3, MgO and variable gain in Fe 2 O 3, TiO 2, Ni, V, Zr, Zn and REE. Bubble initiation to growth in the ascending basaltic magma (liquidus ˜1200-1250 ∘C) may have occured in ˜3 hr. Short-distance transport, non-connected vesicles, deposition in inner shelf to more confined lagoonal condition in the Early Eocene and quick burial helped preservation of the pumice in Vastan. Early Eocene Arabian Sea volcanism thus might have been an additional source to marginal sediments along the passive margin of western India.

  3. Additive Construction using Basalt Regolith Fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Lippitt, Thomas C.; Mantovani, James G.; Nugent, Matthew W.; Townsend, Ivan I.

    2014-01-01

    Planetary surfaces are often covered in regolith (crushed rock), whose geologic origin is largely basalt. The lunar surface is made of small-particulate regolith and areas of boulders located in the vicinity of craters. Regolith composition also varies with location, reflecting the local bedrock geology and the nature and efficiency of the micrometeorite-impact processes. In the lowland mare areas (suitable for habitation), the regolith is composed of small granules (20 - 100 microns average size) of mare basalt and volcanic glass. Impacting micrometeorites may cause local melting, and the formation of larger glassy particles, and this regolith may contain 10-80% glass. Studies of lunar regolith are traditionally conducted with lunar regolith simulant (reconstructed soil with compositions patterned after the lunar samples returned by Apollo). The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Granular Mechanics & Regolith Operations (GMRO) lab has identified a low fidelity but economical geo-technical simulant designated as Black Point-1 (BP-1). It was found at the site of the Arizona Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) analog field test site at the Black Point lava flow in adjacent basalt quarry spoil mounds. This paper summarizes activities at KSC regarding the utilization of BP-1 basalt regolith and comparative work with lunar basalt simulant JSC-1A as a building material for robotic additive construction of large structures. In an effort to reduce the import or in-situ fabrication of binder additives, we focused this work on in-situ processing of regolith for construction in a single-step process after its excavation. High-temperature melting of regolith involves techniques used in glassmaking and casting (with melts of lower density and higher viscosity than those of metals), producing basaltic glass with high durability and low abrasive wear. Most Lunar simulants melt at temperatures above 1100 C, although melt processing of terrestrial regolith at 1500 C is not

  4. Application of Downhole Magnetic Field Measurements in the Identification of Petrological Variations in Basalts, Gabbros and Volcaniclastic Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartetzko, A.; Heike, D.

    2002-12-01

    Downhole magnetic field measurements are routinely carried out during many downhole-logging operations for spatial orientation of borehole wall images. The tools used for this purpose, like the Schlumberger General Purpose Inclinometer Tool (GPIT), were not specifically developed for geological interpretations but comparisons with measurements from precise magnetometers show very good correlations. However, systematic value shifts sometimes occur in some holes and this means that data from the GPIT should be used only qualitatively. We show examples from several holes drilled by the ODP demonstrating the potential of magnetic field logs for geologic and petrologic purposes. Variations in the magnetic field data are caused by different geologic processes in these examples. Injections of Fe-Ti-oxide rich gabbros into olivine gabbro of the lower oceanic crust drilled in ODP Holes 735B and 1105A (SW Indian Ridge) cause distinct signals in the magnetic field logs. The vertical resolution of the tool allows detection of thin layers (10 cm minimum thickness) with small anomalies in the magnetic field logs. Cyclicity in eruption processes at mid-ocean ridges can be revealed using the magnetic field logs. Slight petrologic differences between magmas from different eruptions and changes in the Earth?s magnetic field due to reversals, or secular variations in pauses between the eruptions cause characteristic patterns in the logs (e.g. ODP Holes 395A and 418A). Cooling and subsequent alteration processes cause the formation of different types of Fe- and/or Ti-oxide minerals. Typical examples of the formation of secondary magnetic minerals in subaerial lava flows are seen in ODP Hole 1137A (Kerguelen Plateau). Characteristic anomalies in the magnetic field log correlate well with total gamma ray measurement, which is an indicator for alteration in this type of rocks. Grain Size linked with crystallinity variations in basaltic volcaniclastic deposits and debris flows influence

  5. Spurious behavior in volcanic records of geomagnetic field reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlut, Julie; Vella, Jerome; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Soler, Vicente; Legoff, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Very large directional variations of magnetization have been reported in several lava flows recording a geomagnetic reversal. Such behavior could reflect real geomagnetic changes or be caused by artifacts due to post-emplacement alteration and/or non-ideal magnetic behavior. More recently, a high resolution paleomagnetic record from sediments pleads also for an extremely rapid reversal process during the last reversal. Assuming that the geomagnetic field would have moved by tens of degrees during cooling of moderate thickness lava flows implies brief episodes of rapid changes by a few degrees per day that are difficult to reconcile with the rate of liquid motions at the core surface. Systematical mineralogical bias is a most likely explanation to promote such behavior as recently reconsidered by Coe et al., 2014 for the rapid field changes recorded at Steens Mountain. We resampled three lava flows at La Palma island (Canarias) that are sandwiched between reverse polarity and normal polarity flows associated with the last reversal. The results show an evolution of the magnetization direction from top to bottom. Thermal demagnetization experiments were conducted using different heating and cooling rates. Similarly, continuous demagnetization and measurements. In both cases, we did not notice any remagnetization associated with mineralogical transformations during the experiments. Magnetic grain sizes do not show any correlation with the amplitude of the deviations. Microscopic observations indicate poor exsolution, which could suggests post-cooling thermochemical remagnetization processes.

  6. Influence of the substrate on maar-diatreme volcanoes — An example of a mixed setting from the Pali Aike volcanic field, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Pierre-Simon; Delpit, Séverine; Haller, Miguel J.; Németh, Károly; Corbella, Hugo

    2011-04-01

    The morphologic parameters, pyroclastic deposits and evolution of maar-diatreme volcanoes are affected by the type of environment in which they are emplaced. End-member cases are a hard substrate (rocks) and a soft substrate (unconsolidated volcaniclastic or sedimentary deposits). In this paper, we present an example of a volcanic complex emplaced in a mixed hard-soft setting from the Pali Aike volcanic field (PAVF) near the Argentina-Chile border. The Plio-Pleistocene PAVF is an alkaline, mafic, back-arc monogenetic field which contains over 100 phreatomagmatic volcanoes. The studied volcanic complex contains two large coalescent maars overlain by scoria and spatter. The 1.4 × 1.3 km East Maar has better exposures than the shallower, 1.9 km-wide West Maar and seems to have been less modified by post-eruptive processes. The tephra rim of the East Maar was studied in detail and we infer it was produced mostly by base surges from phreatomagmatic eruption columns, with rare instances of intercalated scoria fall layers. Based on regional information, the general pre-maar stratigraphy is dominated by sedimentary and volcaniclastic rocks of the Magallanes Basin, including a thick poorly consolidated upper unit dating from the Miocene. These are overlain by Plio-Pleistocene fluvio-glacial deposits and PAVF lavas, some of which are exposed in the East Maar just below the phreatomagmatic deposits. All of these units are represented as lithic clasts in the tephra rim of the East Maar, the most abundant being the clasts from the earlier basaltic lavas and rock fragments derived from the glacial deposits. There is no specific evidence for a deep diatreme under the East Maar, and in this particular case, the mixed environment seems to have produced a maar-diatreme volcano typical of a soft substrate.

  7. Role of crustal assimilation and basement compositions in the petrogenesis of differentiated intraplate volcanic rocks: a case study from the Siebengebirge Volcanic Field, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K. P.; Kirchenbaur, M.; Fonseca, R. O. C.; Kasper, H. U.; Münker, C.; Froitzheim, N.

    2016-06-01

    The Siebengebirge Volcanic Field (SVF) in western Germany is part of the Cenozoic Central European Volcanic Province. Amongst these volcanic fields, the relatively small SVF comprises the entire range from silica-undersaturated mafic lavas to both silica-undersaturated and silica-saturated differentiated lavas. Owing to this circumstance, the SVF represents a valuable study area representative of intraplate volcanism in Europe. Compositions of the felsic lavas can shed some new light on differentiation of intraplate magmas and on the extent and composition of potential crustal assimilation processes. In this study, we provide detailed petrographic and geochemical data for various differentiated SVF lavas, including major and trace element concentrations as well as Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope compositions. Samples include tephriphonolites, latites, and trachytes with SiO2 contents ranging between 53 and 66 wt%. If compared to previously published compositions of mafic SVF lavas, relatively unradiogenic 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf coupled with radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb lead to the interpretation that the differentiated volcanic rocks have assimilated significant amounts of lower crustal mafic granulites like the ones found as xenoliths in the nearby Eifel volcanic field. These crustal contaminants should possess unradiogenic 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf, radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr, and highly radiogenic 207Pb/204Pb compositions requiring the presence of ancient components in the central European lower crust that are not sampled on the surface. Using energy-constrained assimilation-fractional crystallisation (EC-AFC) model calculations, differentiation of the SVF lithologies can be modelled by approximately 39-47 % fractional crystallisation and 6-15 % crustal assimilation. Notably, the transition from silica-undersaturated to silica-saturated compositions of many felsic lavas in the SVF that is difficult to account for in closed-system models is also well explained by

  8. Geology, geochronology, and paleogeography of the southern Sonoma volcanic field and adjacent areas, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Clahan, K.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Allen, J.R.; Deino, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping in the northern San Francisco Bay region (California, USA) supported by radiometric dating and tephrochronologic correlations, provides insights into the framework geology, stratigraphy, tectonic evolution, and geologic history of this part of the San Andreas transform plate boundary. There are 25 new and existing radiometric dates that define three temporally distinct volcanic packages along the north margin of San Pablo Bay, i.e., the Burdell Mountain Volcanics (11.1 Ma), the Tolay Volcanics (ca. 10-8 Ma), and the Sonoma Volcanics (ca. 8-2.5 Ma). The Burdell Mountain and the Tolay Volcanics are allochthonous, having been displaced from the Quien Sabe Volcanics and the Berkeley Hills Volcanics, respectively. Two samples from a core of the Tolay Volcanics taken from the Murphy #1 well in the Petaluma oilfield yielded ages of 8.99 ?? 0.06 and 9.13 ?? 0.06 Ma, demonstrating that volcanic rocks exposed along Tolay Creek near Sears Point previously thought to be a separate unit, the Donnell Ranch volcanics, are part of the Tolay Volcanics. Other new dates reported herein show that volcanic rocks in the Meacham Hill area and extending southwest to the Burdell Mountain fault are also part of the Tolay Volcanics. In the Sonoma volcanic field, strongly bimodal volcanic sequences are intercalated with sediments. In the Mayacmas Mountains a belt of eruptive centers youngs to the north. The youngest of these volcanic centers at Sugarloaf Ridge, which lithologically, chemically, and temporally matches the Napa Valley eruptive center, was apparently displaced 30 km to the northwest by movement along the Carneros and West Napa faults. The older parts of the Sonoma Volcanics have been displaced at least 28 km along the RodgersCreek fault since ca. 7 Ma. The Petaluma Formation also youngs to the north along the Rodgers Creek-Hayward fault and the Bennett Valley fault. The Petaluma basin formed as part of the Contra Costa basin in the Late Miocene and was

  9. Episodic soil succession on basaltic lava fields in a cool, dry environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, K.L.; McDaniel, P.A.; Phillips, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Holocene- to late Pleistocene-aged lava flows at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve provide an ideal setting to examine the early stages of soil formation under cool, dry conditions. Transects were used to characterize the amount and nature of soil cover on across basaltic lava flows ranging in age from 2.1 to 18.4 ka. Results indicate that on flows soils (Folists in Soil Taxonomy) are the dominant soil type, providing an areal coverage of up to ∼25%. On flows ≥13.9 ka, deeper mineral soils including Entisols, Aridisols, and Mollisols become dominant and the areal extent increases to ≥95% on flows older than 18.4 ka. These data suggest there are two distinct pedogenic pathways associated with lava flows of the region. The first pathway is illustrated by the younger flows, where Folists dominate. In the absence of a major source of loess, relatively little mineral material accumulates and soils provide only minor coverage of the lava flows. Our results indicate that this pathway of soil development has not changed appreciably over the past ∼10 ka. The second pedogenic pathway is illustrated by the flows older than 13.9 ka. These flows have been subject to deposition of large quantities of loess during and after the last regional glaciation, resulting in almost complete coverage. Subsequent pedogenesis has given rise to Aridisols and Mollisols with calcic and cambic horizons and mollic epipedons. This research highlights the importance of regional climate change on the evolution of Craters of the Moon soilscapes.

  10. Secular variation of the middle and late Miocene geomagnetic field recorded by the Columbia River Basalt Group in Oregon, Idaho and Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Ada R.; Van der Voo, Rob

    2014-06-01

    This study of 118 discrete volcanic flows from the Columbia River Basalt Group is aimed to determine their distribution of geomagnetic field directions and virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) and to compare the inherent secular variation parameters with those from other studies. The magnetic signature of these rocks is uniformly carried by primary titanomagnetite, indicating that magnetic changes are due to variations in the magnetic field. Although most flows are flat lying, those that are tilted pass the Tauxe and Watson tilt test. Sequential flows with statistically similar site means were grouped, and directions that were considered outliers were evaluated and removed using the Vandamme cut-off method. Three normal-polarity (N-polarity) and three reversed-polarity (R-polarity) intervals are revealed by the stratigraphically ordered flows and have mean directions of N polarity (dec/inc = 6.6°/+61.2°, k = 29.3, α95 = 4.2°), and R polarity (dec/inc = 178.2°/-59.2°, k = 16, α95 = 5.5°). Regression analysis indicates that the secular variation analysis has not been affected by regional rotation, and that apparent polar wander is negligible. The VGP distribution is almost perfectly circular and supports the preference of VGP positions for the dispersion analysis. Dispersion parameters with corrections for within-site scatter (Sb) show a range of 14.3°-25.5°, including error limits, and were consistently higher for R-polarity results than for those of N polarity. Published dispersion parameters for extrusives <5 Ma show Sb values slightly lower than ours, yielding values of 16°-19°, although the difference is not statistically significant. In contrast, published dispersion parameters from high quality data from the Cretaceous Normal Superchron are lower than those for the Neogene, which suggests that the noisiness of the magnetic field correlates with the frequency of reversals. Our new results allow us to extend the Plio-Pleistocene palaeosecular variation

  11. Eifel maars: Quantitative shape characterization of juvenile ash particles (Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Juanita; Grobéty, Bernard; Vonlanthen, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The Eifel region in western central Germany is the type locality for maar volcanism, which is classically interpreted to be the result of explosive eruptions due to shallow interaction between magma and external water (i.e. phreatomagmatic eruptions). Sedimentary structures, deposit features and particle morphology found in many maar deposits of the West Eifel Volcanic Field (WEVF), in contrast to deposits in the East Eifel Volcanic Field (EEVF), lack the diagnostic criteria of typical phreatomagmatic deposits. The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively the shape of WEVF and EEVF maar ash particles in order to infer the governing eruption style in Eifel maar volcanoes. The quantitative shape characterization was done by analyzing fractal dimensions of particle contours (125-250 μm sieve fraction) obtained from Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM micro-computed tomography (SEM micro-CT) images. The fractal analysis (dilation method) and the fractal spectrum technique confirmed that the WEVF and EEVF maar particles have contrasting multifractal shapes. Whereas the low small-scale dimensions of EEVF particles (Eppelsberg Green Unit) coincide with previously published values for phreatomagmatic particles, the WEVF particles (Meerfelder Maar, Pulvermaar and Ulmener Maar) have larger values indicating more complex small-scale features, which are characteristic for magmatic particles. These quantitative results are strengthening the qualitative microscopic observations, that the studied WEVF maar eruptions are rather dominated by magmatic processes. The different eruption styles in the two volcanic fields can be explained by the different geological and hydrological settings found in both regions and the different chemical compositions of the magmas.

  12. Spatial and Alignment Analyses for a field of Small Volcanic Vents South of Pavonis Mons Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Glaze, L. S.; Greeley, R.; Hauber, E.; Baloga, S. M.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Williams, D. A.; Glotch, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    The Tharsis province of Mars displays a variety of small volcanic vent (10s krn in diameter) morphologies. These features were identified in Mariner and Viking images [1-4], and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data show them to be more abundant than originally observed [5,6]. Recent studies are classifying their diverse morphologies [7-9]. Building on this work, we are mapping the location of small volcanic vents (small-vents) in the Tharsis province using MOLA, Thermal Emission Imaging System, and High Resolution Stereo Camera data [10]. Here we report on a preliminary study of the spatial and alignment relationships between small-vents south of Pavonis Mons, as determined by nearest neighbor and two-point azimuth statistical analyses. Terrestrial monogenetic volcanic fields display four fundamental characteristics: 1) recurrence rates of eruptions,2 ) vent abundance, 3) vent distribution, and 4) tectonic relationships [11]. While understanding recurrence rates typically requires field measurements, insight into vent abundance, distribution, and tectonic relationships can be established by mapping of remotely sensed data, and subsequent application of spatial statistical studies [11,12], the goal of which is to link the distribution of vents to causal processes.

  13. A mantle plume beneath California? The mid-Miocene Lovejoy Flood Basalt, northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, N.J.; Busby, C.J.; Gans, P.B.; Putirka, K.; Wagner, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Lovejoy basalt represents the largest eruptive unit identified in California, and its age, volume, and chemistry indicate a genetic affinity with the Columbia River Basalt Group and its associated mantle-plume activity. Recent field mapping, geochemical analyses, and radiometric dating suggest that the Lovejoy basalt erupted during the mid-Miocene from a fissure at Thompson Peak, south of Susanville, California. The Lovejoy flowed through a paleovalley across the northern end of the Sierra Nevada to the Sacramento Valley, a distance of 240 km. Approximately 150 km3 of basalt were erupted over a span of only a few centuries. Our age dates for the Lovejoy basalt cluster are near 15.4 Ma and suggest that it is coeval with the 16.1-15.0 Ma Imnaha and Grande Ronde flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Our new mapping and age dating support the interpretation that the Lovejoy basalt erupted in a forearc position relative to the ancestral Cascades arc, in contrast with the Columbia River Basalt Group, which erupted in a backarc position. The arc front shifted trenchward into the Sierran block after 15.4 Ma. However, the Lovejoy basalt appears to be unrelated to volcanism of the predominantly calc-alkaline Cascade arc; instead, the Lovejoy is broadly tholeiitic, with trace-element characteristics similar to the Columbia River Basalt Group. Association of the Lovejoy basalt with mid-Miocene flood basalt volcanism has considerable implications for North American plume dynamics and strengthens the thermal "point source" explanation, as provided by the mantle-plume hypothesis. Alternatives to the plume hypothesis usually call upon lithosphere-scale cracks to control magmatic migrations in the Yellowstone-Columbia River basalt region. However, it is difficult to imagine a lithosphere-scale flaw that crosses Precambrian basement and accreted terranes to reach the Sierra microplate, where the Lovejoy is located. Therefore, we propose that the Lovejoy represents a rapid

  14. Petrological and Geochemical characterization of central Chihuahua basalts: a possible local sign of rifting activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejel-Garcia, V. V.; Garcia-Rascon, M.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.; Morton-Bermea, O.

    2012-12-01

    The central part of the mexican state, Chihuahua, is the oriental border of the Sierra Madre Occidental (silicic large igneous province), which consist of series of ignimbrites divided into two volcanic groups of andesites and rhyolites. In the central region of Chihuahua, the volcanic rocks are now part of the Basin and Range, allowing the presence of mafic rocks in the lower areas. The study area is located approximately 200 km to the NW of Chihuahua city near to La Guajolota town, in the Namiquipa County. There are at least 5 outcrops of basalts to the west of the road, named Puerto de Lopez, Malpaises, El Tascate, Quebrada Honda, and Carrizalio, respectively. These outcrops have only been previously described by the Mexican Geologic Survey (SGM) as thin basaltic flows, with vesicles filled with quartz, and phenocrystals of labradorite, andesine, oligoclase and olivine. Petrologically, the basalts present different textures, from small phenocrysts of plagioclase in a very fine matrix to large, zoned and sometimes broken phenocrysts of plagioclase in a coarser matrix. All samples have olivine in an advanced state of alteration, iddingsite. The geochemical analyses report that these basaltic flows contain characteristics of rift basalts. The rocks have a normative olivine values from 5.78 to 27.26 and nepheline values from 0 to 2.34. In the TAS diagram the samples straddle the join between basalt and trachy-basalt, reflecting a high K2O content. The Mg# average is 0.297, a value that suggests that the basalts do not come from a primitive magma. The basalts have high values of Ba (945-1334 ppm), Cu (54-147 ppm), and Zn (123-615 ppm). The contents of Rb (23-57 ppm), Sr (659-810 ppm), Y (26-33 ppm), Zr (148-217 ppm) and Cr (79-98 ppm) are characteristics of rift basalts. Using discrimination diagrams, the basalts plot in the field of within plate, supporting the rifting origin. Outcrops of other basalts, at about 80 to 100 km to the east of the study area, Lomas El

  15. Shallow magma chamber under the Wudalianchi Volcanic Field unveiled by seismic imaging with dense array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiwei; Ni, Sidao; Zhang, Baolong; Bao, Feng; Zhang, Senqi; Deng, Yang; Yuen, David A.

    2016-05-01

    The Wudalianchi Volcano Field (WDF) is a typical intraplate volcano in northeast China with generation mechanism not yet well understood. As its last eruption was around 300 years ago, the present risk for volcano eruption is of particular public interest. We have carried out a high-resolution ambient noise tomography to investigate the location of magma chambers beneath the volcanic cones with a dense seismic array of 43 seismometers and ~ 6 km spatial interval. Significant low-velocity anomalies up to 10% are found at 7-13 km depth under the Weishan volcano, consistent with the pronounced high electrical-conductivity anomalies from previous magnetotelluric survey. We propose these extremely low velocity anomalies can be interpreted as partial melting in a shallow magma chamber with volume at least 200 km3 which may be responsible for most of the recent volcanic eruptions in WDF. Therefore, this magma chamber may pose a serious hazard for northeast China.

  16. Boundary of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field from Laczniak and others (1996), for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system study, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF), an area of thick, regionally distributed volcanic rocks within the...

  17. Field and experimental constraints on the rheology of arc basaltic lavas: the January 2014 Eruption of Pacaya (Guatemala)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, A.; Sehlke, A.; Chigna, G.; Whittington, A.

    2016-06-01

    We estimated the rheology of an active basaltic lava flow in the field, and compared it with experimental measurements carried out in the laboratory. In the field we mapped, sampled, and recorded videos of the 2014 flow on the southern flank of Pacaya, Guatemala. Velocimetry data extracted from videos allowed us to determine that lava traveled at ˜2.8 m/s on the steep ˜45° slope 50 m from the vent, while 550 m further downflow it was moving at only ˜0.3 m/s on a ˜4° slope. Estimates of effective viscosity based on Jeffreys' equation increased from ˜7600 Pa s near the vent to ˜28,000 Pa s downflow. In the laboratory, we measured the viscosity of a representative lava composition using a concentric cylinder viscometer, at five different temperatures between 1234 and 1199 °C, with crystallinity increasing from 0.1 to 40 vol%. The rheological data were best fit by power law equations, with the flow index decreasing as crystal fraction increased, and no detectable yield strength. Although field-based estimates are based on lava characterized by a lower temperature, higher crystal and bubble fraction, and with a more complex petrographic texture, field estimates and laboratory measurements are mutually consistent and both indicate shear-thinning behavior. The complementary field and laboratory data sets allowed us to isolate the effects of different factors in determining the rheological evolution of the 2014 Pacaya flows. We assess the contributions of cooling, crystallization, and changing ground slope to the 3.7-fold increase in effective viscosity observed in the field over 550 m, and conclude that decreasing slope is the single most important factor over that distance. It follows that the complex relations between slope, flow velocity, and non-Newtonian lava rheology need to be incorporated into models of lava flow emplacement.

  18. Cambrian intermediate-mafic magmatism along the Laurentian margin: Evidence for flood basalt volcanism from well cuttings in the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen (U.S.A.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueseke, Matthew E.; Hobbs, Jasper M.; Bulen, Casey L.; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Puckett, Robert E.; Walker, J. Douglas; Feldman, Josh

    2016-09-01

    The Southern Oklahoma Aulocogen (SOA) stretches from southern Oklahoma through the Texas panhandle and into Colorado and New Mexico, and contains mafic through silicic magmatism related to the opening of the Iapetus Ocean during the early Cambrian. Cambrian magmatic products are best exposed in the Wichita Mountains (Oklahoma), where they have been extensively studied. However, their ultimate derivation is still somewhat contentious and centers on two very different models: SOA magmatism has been suggested to occur via [1] continental rifting (with or without mantle plume emplacement) or [2] transform-fault related magmatism (e.g., leaky strike-slip faults). Within the SOA, the subsurface in and adjacent to the Arbuckle Mountains in southern Oklahoma contains thick sequences of mafic to intermediate lavas, intrusive bodies, and phreatomagmatic deposits interlayered with thick, extensive rhyolite lavas, thin localized tuffs, and lesser silicic intrusive bodies. These materials were first described in the Arbuckle Mountains region by a 1982 drill test (Hamilton Brothers Turner Falls well) and the best available age constraints from SOA Arbuckle Mountains eruptive products are ~ 535 to 540 Ma. Well cuttings of the mafic through intermediate units were collected from that well and six others and samples from all but the Turner Falls and Morton wells are the focus of this study. Samples analyzed from the wells are dominantly subalkaline, tholeiitic, and range from basalt to andesite. Their overall bulk major and trace element chemistry, normative mineralogy, and Srsbnd Nd isotope ratios are similar to magmas erupted/emplaced in flood basalt provinces. When compared with intrusive mafic rocks that crop out in the Wichita Mountains, the SOA well cuttings are geochemically most similar to the Roosevelt Gabbros. New geochemical and isotope data presented in this study, when coupled with recent geophysical work in the SOA and the coeval relationship with rhyolites, indicates

  19. Volcanic Hazard Education through Virtual Field studies of Vesuvius and Laki Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, S.; Sigurdsson, H.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose significant hazards to human populations and have the potential to cause significant economic impacts as shown by the recent ash-producing eruptions in Iceland. Demonstrating both the local and global impact of eruptions is important for developing an appreciation of the scale of hazards associated with volcanic activity. In order to address this need, Web-based virtual field exercises at Vesuvius volcano in Italy and Laki volcano in Iceland have been developed as curriculum enhancements for undergraduate geology classes. The exercises are built upon previous research by the authors dealing with the 79 AD explosive eruption of Vesuvius and the 1783 lava flow eruption of Laki. Quicktime virtual reality images (QTVR), video clips, user-controlled Flash animations and interactive measurement tools are used to allow students to explore archeological and geological sites, collect field data in an electronic field notebook, and construct hypotheses about the impacts of the eruptions on the local and global environment. The QTVR images provide 360o views of key sites where students can observe volcanic deposits and formations in the context of a defined field area. Video sequences from recent explosive and effusive eruptions of Carribean and Hawaiian volcanoes are used to illustrate specific styles of eruptive activity, such as ash fallout, pyroclastic flows and surges, lava flows and their effects on the surrounding environment. The exercises use an inquiry-based approach to build critical relationships between volcanic processes and the deposits that they produce in the geologic record. A primary objective of the exercises is to simulate the role of a field volcanologist who collects information from the field and reconstructs the sequence of eruptive processes based on specific features of the deposits. Testing of the Vesuvius and Laki exercises in undergraduate classes from a broad spectrum of educational institutions shows a preference for the

  20. Spatial distribution of cones and satellite-detected lineaments in the Pali Aike Volcanic Field (southernmost Patagonia): insights into the tectonic setting of a Neogene rift system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarini, Francesco; D'Orazio, Massimo

    2003-07-01

    The relationships between the distribution and morphometric features of eruptive structures (scoria and spatter cones, maar, tuff rings) and the fracture network were investigated in the Pliocene-Quaternary Pali Aike Volcanic Field (southernmost Patagonia, Argentina-Chile). The alkali basaltic/basanitic magmas which erupted in this area have nearly primary magma compositions and often bear mantle xenoliths; hence magma ascent from deep-seated reservoirs was probably very fast, with no significant stagnation at crustal levels. Field surveys and satellite image analysis led to the identification of up to 467 eruptive structures and four main NW-SE, NE-SW, E-W and N-S fracture systems. The spatial distribution of eruptive cones and fractures was investigated through the computation of power-law exponents ( Df) for self-similar clustering. The self-similarity of cones and fractures was defined between lower and upper cut-offs which were in turn related to the thickness of the fractured mechanical layer. The fractal character of cones and fracture distribution (clustering) in the Pali Aike Volcanic Field area was thus correlated with crustal thickness. The self-similarity of fractures was used to establish the relative chronology of the detected fracture systems. The self-similar clustering exponent is highest in the E-W and NW-SE fracture systems ( Df=1.78 and 1.77, respectively), and lowest in the N-S system ( Df=1.65). The self-similar clustering of eruptive structures is well defined ( Df=1.45). The intense volcano-tectonic activity in the Pali Aike area marks a major Pliocene-Quaternary phase in the development of the Magellan Neogene Rift System.

  1. The Maar-Diatreme System in a Mixed "Hard/Soft-Rock" Setting: an Example from the Pali Aike Volcanic Field, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpit, S.; Ross, P.

    2009-05-01

    The eruptive processes in diatremes remain poorly understood compared to those at other volcano types, because these processes occur at depth. Except for maar-diatreme volcanoes formed during kimberlitic eruptions, volcanologists agree that these systems are of phreatomagmatic origin. The origin of kimberlitic diatremes is more contentious, but studying non kimberlitic equivalents can be a good approach to better understand kimberlitic diatremes considering their numerous common characteristics. The geometry of maar-diatreme systems is strongly influenced by their setting in "hard-rock" or "soft-rock" environments (Lorenz, 2003, Geolines 15:72-83). Formation of maar-diatreme systems in "hard-rock" environments, like in the West Eifel Volcanic Field of Germany, is largely described in the literature but emplacement in "soft-rock" environments or mixed settings is not. In the case of "hard-rock" environments external water is provided by fracture aquifers. The eruption products are juvenile clasts and country rock fragments. The inner crater walls of the maar, and the diatreme walls, have steep slopes. In the case of "soft- rock" environments, water is contained in the sediment pores and the walls tend to be at lower angles. We recently conducted field work on maars, cinder cones and spatter rings of the Pali Aike Volcanic Field of southern Argentina as part of the Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Project (PASADO). These Quaternary monogenetic volcanoes were emplaced in a mixed "hard/soft-rock" environment containing young glacial sediments, basaltic lava flows, partly consolidated fluviatile sediments, and older indurated sedimentary rocks. The mixed environment of emplacement is reflected in a phreatomagmatic deposit on the inner slope of a tephra ring exposing some lapilli-tuff layers. The lapilli fraction comprises approximately 40% lithics on average (visual estimate): at least half of the fraction is composed of basaltic lava derived from a pre

  2. The Maars of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field: the Example of 'laguna Pizatal'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Hernandez-Cardona, A.; Alvarez del Castillo, E.; Godinez, M.

    2013-12-01

    Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field (TVF), also known as Los Tuxtlas massif, is a structure of volcanic rocks rising conspicuously in the south-central part of the coastal plains of eastern Mexico. The TVF seems related to the upper cretaceous magmatism of the NW part of the Gulf's margin (e.g. San Carlos and Sierra de Tamaulipas alkaline complexes) rather than to the nearby Mexican Volcanic Belt. The volcanism in this field began in late Miocene and has continued in historical times, The TVF is composed of 4 large volcanoes (San Martin Tuxtla, San Martin Pajapan, Santa Marta, Cerro El Vigia), at least 365 volcanic cones and 43 maars. In this poster we present the distribution of the maars, their size and depths. These maars span from a few hundred km to almost 1 km in average diameter, and a few meters to several tens of meters in depth; most of them filled with lakes. As an example on the nature of these structures we present our results of the ongoing study of 'Laguna Pizatal or Pisatal' (18° 33'N, 95° 16.4'W, 428 masl) located some 3 km from the village of Reforma, on the western side of San Martin Tuxtla volcano. Laguna Pisatal is a maar some 500 meters in radius and a depth about 40 meters from the surrounding ground level. It is covered by a lake 200 m2 in extent fed by a spring discharging on its western side. We examined a succession of 15 layers on the margins of the maar, these layers are blast deposits of different sizes interbedded by surge deposits. Most of the contacts between layers are irregular; which suggests scouring during deposition of the upper beds. This in turn suggests that the layers were deposited in a rapid series of explosions, which mixed juvenile material with fragments of the preexisting bedrock. We were unable to find the extent of these deposits since the surrounding areas are nowadays sugar cane plantations and the lake has overspilled in several occassions.

  3. Channel and tube flow features associated with the Twin Craters Lava Flow, Zuni-Bandera Volcanic Field, NM: Insights into similar features on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, R.; deWet, A.; Bleacher, J. E.; von Meerscheidt, H. C.; Hamilton, C.; Garry, W. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Zuni-Bandera Volcanic Field lies near the center of the Jemez lineament that extends from central Arizona to northeastern New Mexico. The Jemez lineament is a result of rifting in the Earth's crust and is associated with volcanic activity that spans the last 16 Ma. The youngest volcanic activity associated with the lineament includes basaltic lava that was erupted 3 ka ago to form the McCartys Flow. The Twin Craters flow is moderately older (18.0 ka), but it also well-preserved and provides an ideal location to investigate volcanic processes and landforms. In this study, we combined detailed field observations and mapping with remote sensing to better understand variations in morphology along the transport system of the flow . The Twin Craters flow is characterized as an aā and tube-fed pāhoehoe flow with braided or branching tubes and channels; and associated aā and pāhoehoe break-outs. It is possible that the variations in morphology along the same transport structure might be related to pre-flow slope, which might have also been variable along flow. Shatter ring features are thought to be related to changes in eruption rate, and therefore, local flux through the system. However, over-pressurization of the tube might also be related to changes in local discharge rate associated with the ponding and release of lava within the transport system that may be due to interactions between the lava and obstacles along the flow's path (see Mallonee et al., this meeting). Many of these features are similar to features present in the Tharsis Montes region of Mars and particularly on the southern apron of Ascraeus Mons. The detailed description of the morphology of the Twin Craters Lava Flow and the understanding of the emplacement mechanisms will be crucial in identifying the processes that formed the Ascraeus flows and channels. This will aid in determining if the lava surface textures are directly related to eruption conditions or if they have been significantly

  4. Groundmass Crystallinities of Proximal and Distal Lavas from Cinder Cone, Lassen Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, M. E.; Teasdale, R.

    2015-12-01

    Cinder Cone is located in the northeast corner of Lassen Volcanic Center, approximately 35 km southeast of Old Station, California. The area consists of a cinder cone constructed of loose scoria, lava flows and a 13-16 km diameter ash deposit. According to radiocarbon ages from trees affected by the lava flows and paleomagnetic data, Cinder Cone erupted in about 1650 AD (1). The youngest products of the Cinder Cone eruption are two Fantastic Lava Beds flows which are basaltic andesite and andesite with olivine (1). Samples were collected along the longest flow from Cinder Cone, the Fantastic Lava Beds Flow 2 (4.5 km) at approximately 0.5 km interval. The samples contain olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene phenocrysts in fine grained groundmass with varying vesicularity. Quartz xenocrysts also occur. SEM-Back Scatter Electron images are used to map and quantify groundmass crystallinities along the length of the Fantastic Lava Beds flow 2 and of tephra units. The average area of groundmass plagioclase crystals increases along the length of the lava flow from 94.7 to 292.6 μm2. The number of groundmass plagioclase crystals per area (μm2) decreases from 0.0045 to 0.0018 from proximal to distal samples. Crystals also become blockier in distal samples along the lava flow. The larger number of crystals per area in near vent samples establishes a baseline from which we interpret crystal growth and nucleation to have occurred in the flow channel. Increasing crystal size and a decrease in the number of crystals per area indicates growth dominated nucleation during cooling and crystallization in the flow channel. Relative cooling rates along the length of the flow from proximal to distal samples can be inferred based on groundmass crystallinities, distance travelled and estimates of flow and crystallization rates. (1) Muffler and Clynne, 2015.

  5. Petrogenesis of Late Cenozoic basaltic rocks from southern Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, A.-Rim; Choi, Sung Hi; Yu, Yongjae; Lee, Der-Chuen

    2017-02-01

    Major and trace element concentrations, and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic compositions of Late Cenozoic (4.1 to 13.8 Ma) basaltic rocks from southern Vietnam have been determined to understand the nature of their mantle source. The volcanic rocks are composed of tholeiite basalt, alkaline basanite, trachybasalt, basaltic trachyandesite, and trachyandesite. The alkaline rocks show light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment, with (La/Yb)N = 10.3-29.8. The tholeiite basalts are distinguished by much lower values (8.8-9.5) of (La/Yb)N. On a primitive mantle-normalized trace element distribution diagram, they show oceanic island basalt (OIB)-like large-ion lithophile element enrichment without high field strength element depletion. However, some samples exhibit positive anomalies in K and Pb and negative anomalies in Sm, suggesting K-rich residual amphibole in the source. The samples contain Sr (87Sr/86Sr = 0.703794-0.704672), Nd (ɛNd = + 1.7-5.7), Hf (ɛHf = + 4.0-10.9), and Pb (206Pb/204Pb = 18.23-18.75; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.53-15.59; 208Pb/204Pb = 38.32-38.88) isotopes, plotting among OIBs, with depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt mantle-enriched mantle type 2 (DMM-EM2) characteristics. There are no discernible isotopic differences between tholeiite and the alkaline series, reflecting the same source. The Nd and Hf isotopic compositions are coupled, and plot along the mantle-crust array, ruling out the possibility of lithospheric mantle in the source. Plots of NiO against the Fo numbers of olivines from the basaltic rocks are within the range of Hainan and Hawaiian basalt olivines, implying that hybrid pyroxenite is present in the source. Also note that the estimated primary melt compositions fall within the experimental field defined by partial melting of silica-poor eclogite and peridotite. The effective melting pressure (Pf) and melting temperature (T) of the primary melts are Pf = 29.6-32.8 kbar and T = 1470-1480 °C. We suggest that Vietnamese basaltic rocks may be produced by

  6. Constraints on the origin and evolution of magmas in the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field, Quaternary Andean Back-arc of Western Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernando, I.R.; Aragón, E.; Frei, R.; González, P.D.; Spakman, W.

    2014-01-01

    The Payún Matrú Volcanic Field (Pleistocene–Holocene) is located in the Andean back-arc of the Southern Volcanic Zone, western Argentina, and is contemporaneous with the Andean volcanic arc at the same latitude. It includes two polygenetic, mostly trachytic volcanoes: Payún Matrú (with a summit cald

  7. Gold-silver mining districts, alteration zones, and paleolandforms in the Miocene Bodie Hills Volcanic Field, California and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikre, Peter G.; John, David A.; du Bray, Edward A.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2015-09-25

    The Bodie Hills is a ~40 by ~30 kilometer volcanic field that straddles the California-Nevada state boundary between Mono Lake and the East Walker River. Three precious metal mining districts and nine alteration zones are delineated in Tertiary-Quaternary volcanic and Mesozoic granitic and metamorphic rocks that comprise the volcanic field. Cumulative production from the mining districts, Bodie, Aurora, and Masonic, is 3.4 million ounces of gold and 28 million ounces of silver. Small amounts of mercury were produced from the Potato Peak, Paramount-Bald Peak, and Cinnabar Canyon-US 395 alteration zones; a native sulfur resource in the Cinnabar Canyon-US 395 alteration zone has been identified by drilling. There are no known mineral resources in the other six alteration zones, Red Wash-East Walker River, East Brawley Peak, Sawtooth Ridge, Aurora Canyon, Four Corners, and Spring Peak. The mining districts and alteration zones formed between 13.4 and 8.1 Ma in predominantly ~15–9 Ma volcanic rocks of the Bodie Hills volcanic field. Ages of hydrothermal minerals in the districts and zones are the same as, or somewhat younger than, the ages of volcanic host rocks.

  8. Preliminary isostatic gravity map of the Sonoma volcanic field and vicinity, Sonoma and Napa Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenheim, V.E.; Roberts, C.W.; McCabe, C.A.; McPhee, D.K.; Tilden, J.E.; Jachens, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    This isostatic residual gravity map is part of a three-dimensional mapping effort focused on the subsurface distribution of rocks of the Sonoma volcanic field in Napa and Sonoma counties, northern California. This map will serve as a basis for modeling the shapes of basins beneath the Santa Rosa Plain and Napa and Sonoma Valleys, and for determining the location and geometry of faults within the area. Local spatial variations in the Earth's gravity field (after accounting for variations caused by elevation, terrain, and deep crustal structure explained below) reflect the distribution of densities in the mid to upper crust. Densities often can be related to rock type, and abrupt spatial changes in density commonly mark lithologic boundaries. High-density basement rocks exposed within the northern San Francisco Bay area include those of the Mesozoic Franciscan Complex and Great Valley Sequence present in the mountainous areas of the quadrangle. Alluvial sediment and Tertiary sedimentary rocks are characterized by low densities. However, with increasing depth of burial and age, the densities of these rocks may become indistinguishable from those of basement rocks. Tertiary volcanic rocks are characterized by a wide range in densities, but, on average, are less dense than the Mesozoic basement rocks. Isostatic residual gravity values within the map area range from about -41 mGal over San Pablo Bay to about 11 mGal near Greeg Mountain 10 km east of St. Helena. Steep linear gravity gradients are coincident with the traces of several Quaternary strike-slip faults, most notably along the West Napa fault bounding the west side of Napa Valley, the projection of the Hayward fault in San Pablo Bay, the Maacama Fault, and the Rodgers Creek fault in the vicinity of Santa Rosa. These gradients result from juxtaposing dense basement rocks against thick Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks.

  9. Short-time electrical effects during volcanic eruption: Experiments and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Ralf; Zimanowski, Bernd; Röder, Helmut

    2000-02-01

    Laboratory experiments on the fragmentation and expansion of magmatic melt have been performed using remelted volcanic rock at magmatic temperatures as magma simulant. A specially designed dc amplifier in combination with high speed data recording was used to detect short-time electrostatic field effects related to the fragmentation and expansion history of the experimental system, as documented by simultaneous force and pressure recording, as well as by high-speed cinematography. It was found that (1) the voltage-time ratio of electrostatic field gradients (100 to 104 V/s) reflects different physical mechanisms of fragmentation and expansion and (2) the maximum voltage measured in 1 m distance (-0.1 to -180 V) can be correlated with the intensity of the respective processes. Based on these experimental results, a field method was developed and tested at Stromboli volcano in Italy. A 0.8 m rod antenna was used to detect the dc voltage against local ground (i.e., the electrostatic field gradient), at a distance of 60 to 260 m from the respective vent. Upwind position of the detection site was chosen to prevent interference caused by contact of charged ash particles with the antenna. A standard 8 Hz geophone was used to detect the accompanying seismicity. Three types of volcanic activity occurred during the surveillance operation; two of these could be clearly related to specific electrical and seismical signals. A typical delay time was found between the electrical and the seismical signal, corresponding to the seismic velocity within the crater deposits. Using a simple first-order electrostatic model, the field measurements were recalibrated to the laboratory scale. Comparison of field and laboratory data at first approximation revealed striking similarities, thus encouraging the further development of this technique for real-time surveillance operation at active volcanoes.

  10. First-order estimate of the Canary Islands plate-scale stress field: Implications for volcanic hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, A.; Martí, J.; Villaseñor, A.

    2016-06-01

    In volcanic areas, the existing stress field is a key parameter controlling magma generation, location and geometry of the magmatic plumbing systems and the distribution of the resulting volcanism at surface. Therefore, knowing the stress configuration in the lithosphere at any scale (i.e. local, regional and plate-scale) is fundamental to understand the distribution of volcanism and, subsequently, to interpret volcanic unrest and potential tectonic controls of future eruptions. The objective of the present work is to provide a first-order estimate of the plate-scale tectonic stresses acting on the Canary Islands, one of the largest active intraplate volcanic regions of the World. In order to obtain the orientation of the minimum and maximum horizontal compressive stresses, we perform a series of 2D finite element models of plate scale kinematics assuming plane stress approximation. Results obtained are used to develop a regional model, which takes into account recognized archipelago-scale structural discontinuities. Maximum horizontal compressive stress directions obtained are compared with available stress, geological and geodynamic data. The methodology used may be easily applied to other active volcanic regions, where a first order approach of their plate/regional stresses can be essential information to be used as input data for volcanic hazard assessment models.

  11. Multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity and epithermal mineralization in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and their relations to magmatic activity, volcanism and regional extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Jackson, M.C. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic rocks of middle Miocene age and underlying pre-Mesozoic sedimentary rocks host widely distributed zones of hydrothermal alteration and epithermal precious metal, fluorite and mercury deposits within and peripheral to major volcanic and intrusive centers of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF) in southern Nevada, near the southwestern margin of the Great Basin of the western United States. Radiometric ages indicate that episodes of hydrothermal activity mainly coincided with and closely followed major magmatic pulses during the development of the field and together spanned more than 4.5 m.y. Rocks of the SWNVF consist largely of rhyolitic ash-flow sheets and intercalated silicic lava domes, flows and near-vent pyroclastic deposits erupted between 15.2 and 10 Ma from vent areas in the vicinity of the Timber Mountain calderas, and between about 9.5 and 7 Ma from the outlying Black Mountain and Stonewall Mountain centers. Three magmatic stages can be recognized: the main magmatic stage, Mountain magmatic stage (11.7 to 10.0 Ma), and the late magmatic stage (9.4 to 7.5 Ma).

  12. Impact of environmental factors on the spectral characteristics of lava surfaces:field spectrometry of basaltic lava flows on Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Long Li; Carmen Solana; Frank Canters; Jonathan C.-W. Chan; Matthieu Kervyn

    2015-01-01

    We report on spectral reflectance measurements of basaltic lava flows on Tenerife Island, Spain. Lava flow surfaces of different ages, surface roughness and elevations were systematically measured using a field spectroradiometer operating in the range of 350–2500 nm. Surface roughness, oxidation and lichen coverage were documented at each measured site. Spectral properties vary with age and morphology of lava. Pre-historical lavas with no biological coverage show a prominent increase in spect...

  13. 玄武岩浆起源和演化的一些基本概念以及对中国东部中-新生代基性火山岩成因的新思路%Generation and Evolution of Basaltic Magmas: Some Basic Concepts and a New View on the Origin of Mesozoic- Cenozoic Basaltic Volcanism in Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛耀龄

    2005-01-01

    减压分熔可合理解释具有软流圈地球化学特征(εNd>0)的新生代中国东部基性火山活动及玄武岩的成因.这些对中国东部中-新生代地质过程的解释,将为更加细致的,以岩石学和地球化学为主的讨论所验证.%Some basic concepts of basaltic magma generation and evolution are discussed in the context of global tectonics. These concepts need better understanding before invoking elusive possibihlities in igneous petrogenesis on all scales and in all tectonic environments. A hypothesis for the Mesozoic lithosphere thinning and Mesozoic-Cenozoic basaltic volcanism in eastern China is presented. This hypothesis is consistent with observations and complies with basic physics. While the eastern China volcanism can bedefined as "intra-plate" volcanism, it is in fact a special consequence of plate tectonics. The Mesozoic lithosphere thinning in eastern China is best explained by a process that “transformed” the deep portion of the lithosphere into convective asthenosphere by hydration. The water that did so may come from dehydration of subducted Pacific (or predecessor) oceanic lithosphere that is presently lying horizontally in the transition zone beneath eastern Chinese continent as detected by seismic tomographic models. The Mesozoic volcanism may be genetically associated with the lithospheric thinning because the basaltic source is ancient isotopically enriched (εNd < 0 ) lithosphere--being converted to the asthenosphere. The NNE-SSW Great Gradient Line (GGL) marked by the sharp altitude, gravity anonaly, crustal thickness, and mantle seismic velocity changes from the plateau west to the hilly plains of eastern China is an expression of variation in lithospheric thickness from probably > 150 ~ 200 km beneath the plateaus in the west to the thin, probably < 80 km, beneath eastern China. The “remote” western Pacific subduction systems induce asthenospheric flow from beneath eastern China towards the

  14. SIR-A radar images of sand dunes and volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, R.; Elachi, C.; Evans, D.

    1982-01-01

    Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) synthetic aperture radar images of sand dunes and volcanic fields are presented and preliminary interpretation provided. The SIR-A images are compared with Seasat images where available. Unvegetated sand dunes are recorded as black areas on SIR-A images due to the specular reflection away from the sensor at the SIR-A incidence angle. Even a very small amount of vegetation provides some backscatter, however. Interdune areas frequently contain rough lag gravels which outline the dunes. Lava flows are typically very rough surfaces which are bright areas on radar images. Cinder cones are smooth and therefore black on the image unless they have a blocky crater rim at the SIR-A incidence angle. Ash dunes and ash fields are smooth and imaged as dark areas.

  15. Paleosecular variation of directions from lava flows of the Xalapa Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Valdivia, Luis; Gonzalez-Rangel, Antonio; Caballero-Miranda, Cecilia; Rodriguez, Sergio; Morales, Wendy

    2010-05-01

    We collected 21 monogenetic type lava flows (316 specimens) in the Xalapa Volcanic Field, eastern part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Geochronological results of twelve Ar-Ar determinations range from late Pleistocene to Holocene. The ages fall into three groups, those older than 2.0 Ma, those between 0.25-0.40 Ma and those less than approximately 0.1 Ma. All the samples were demagnetized by thermal and AF treatment, showing mostly a single stable component of magnetization with unblocking temperature above 530°C and/or 40-60 mT. We calculate the mean direction (D= 359.70°, I=27.4°, k=24, 95=7.7°) and the VGP to compare and integrate with previous paleosecular variation analyses. The paleosecular variation parameter, upper and lower limit are: SF=14.6, SU=17.5 and SL=11.2, respectively. So, the VGP dispersion is consistent with the expected value of latitude-dependent variation of McFadden for the last 5My.

  16. The correlation between geomagnetic field reversals, Hawaiian volcanism, and the motion of the Pacific plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Dong

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between geomagnetic field reversals and volcanism is investigated, according to the speculated consequence on volcanoes of the transient electric currents in the geodynamo, through Joule's heating, before and after every reversal event. We evaluate the temporal variation during the last ~ 70 Ma both of the magma emplacement rate Q(t from the Hawaii hot spot, and of the speed v(t of the Pacific plate, by means of the observed volumes of islands and seamounts along the Hawaii/Emperor Seamounts chain, and their respective radiometric datings. Results confirm expectations. A justification of the volcanic crises that lead to the generation of the large igneous provinces during the last ~ 250 Ma also emerged. We describe in detail the complex pattern of the timings of the different effects. Joule's power is generally responsible for ~ 75-80% of magmatism, and friction power only for ~ 20-25%; but, on some occasions almost ~ 100% is fuelled by friction alone. The visco-elastic coupling between lithosphere and asthenosphere results ~ 96% viscous, and ~ 4% elastic.

  17. PETROGRAPHY-PETROCHEMISTRY OF THE KIZILDAĞ VOLCANICS (DERİNKUYU/NEVŞEHİR-YEŞİLHİSAR/KAYSERİ: PETROGENETIC APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat IŞIK

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kızıldağ volcanics of Quaternary age outcropps widespreadly in small volume bodies around the Derinkuyu (Nevşehir-Yeşilhisar (Kayseri region, middle Anatolian. These volcanics are grayish black, reddish black colored and aphyric basalt composition. They show hypocrystaline-porphyritic, hyalophilitic flow texture and consist of olivine, pyroxene and plagioclase. Kızıldağ volcanics have calc-alkaline character and MORB - normalized spider diagram indicate enrichment of lithophile elements (Sr, K, Ba and depletion of high field stength elements (Zr, Ti, Y. Also lithophile elements and high field stength elements of Kızıldağ volcanics are similar to continental crust, relatively. Kızıldağ volcanics in the Neogene-Quaternary volcanics, located in the inner Taurid belt, interpretad that they are related to the subduction of the Afro-Arabian plate under the Anatolian plate.

  18. New Contributions to the Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale: Paleomagnetic study of Tequila and Ceboruco-San Pedro-Amado Nervo Volcanic Fields (Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Ceja, M.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Alva-Valdivia, L.; Rosas Elguera, J.; Calvo, M.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2005-05-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) is one of the largest continental volcanic arcs of the North American plate. It spans about 1000 km from the Pacific to the Gulf of Mexico. Despite the abundance of thick lava sequences with quite high extrusion rates, the TMVB have been relatively little studied from a paleomagnetic point of view. Previous studies were aimed for tectonic evolution of the region rather than documenting fluctuations of Earth's magnetic field in terms of both directions and intensity. We report a detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic study of Tequila and Ceboruco-San Pedro-Amado Nervo volcanic fields. 350 oriented samples belonging to 31 independent cooling units were collected. All these sites were previously dated by means of the state-of-the-art 40Ar-39Ar geochronological method and span from 1.1 Ma to 2 Ky. Rock-magnetic experiments which included continuous susceptibility, isothermal remanence acquisition and hysteresis measurements point to simple magnetic mineralogy. In most of cases, the remanence is carried by Ti-poor titanomagnetite of pseudo-single-domain magnetic structure. The paleodirections of the flow dated as 819±25 ka correspond to a VGP latitude of 18° N. This anomalous field behaviour apparently recorded prior to the Matuyama-Brunhes reversal may coincide with the geomagnetic event, defined as M-B precursor. Two independent lava flows, dated as 623±91 and 614±16 ka respectively, yield reverse paleodirections and one lava flow dated as 690±29 yields transitional paleodirections. It is possible that these lavas erupted during the worldwide observable Big Lost or Delta events.

  19. Very long pahoehoe inflated basaltic lava flows in the Payenia volcanic province (Mendoza and la Pampa, Argentina Flujos de lava basáltica pahoehoe muy extendidos en la provincia volcánica Payenia (Mendoza y La Pampa, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Pasquarè

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Extremely long basaltic lava flows are here presented and described. The flows originated from the great, polygenetic, fissural Payen Volcanic Complex, in the Andean back-arc volcanic province of Payenia in Argentina. The lava flows outpoured during the Late Quaternary from the summit rift of a shield volcano representing the first volcanic centre of this complex. One of these flows presents an individual tongue-like shape with a length of 181 km and therefore is the longest known individual Quaternary lava flow on Earth. Leaving the flanks of the volcano this flow reached the Salado river valley at La Pampa and, in its distal portion, maintained its narrow and straight shape without any topographic control over a flat alluvial plain. It has a hawaiite composition with low phenocryst content of prevailing olivine and minor plagioclase. Rare Earth element patterns are typical of Na-alkaline basalts, but incompatible trace element patterns and Sr -Nd isotope ratios, suggest a geodynamic setting transitional to the orogenic one. The flow advanced following the thermally efficient "inflation" mechanism, as demonstrated by a peculiar association of well developed morphological, structural and textural features. The temperature of 1130-1160°C and the viscosity of 3-73 Pa*s, calculated by petrochemical data, may be considered, together with a very low cooling rate and a sustained and long lasting effusion rate, the main causes of the extremely long transport system of this flow. Both the extreme length of the flow and the partial lack of topographic control may provide new constraints on the physics of large inflated flows, which constitute the largest volcanic provinces on Earth and probably also on the terrestrial planets.En este trabajo se presentan y describen flujos de lava extremadamente largos. Estos flujos se originaron en el complejo volcánico fisural Payen, dentro de la provincia volcánica Payenia en el retroarco andino. Los flujos de lava

  20. Group II Xenoliths from Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, Central Nevada: Evidence for a Kinked Geotherm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, M.; Mosely, J.; Norris, J.

    2015-12-01

    Group II xenoliths associated with the 140 Ka Easy Chair Crater, Lunar Crater volcanic field, NV, consist of amphibole rich-inclusions including amphibolites, pyroxenites, and gabbros. Abundant minerals in these inclusions are kaersutite, aluminous (7.3-9.7 wt% Al2O3), calcic clinopyroxene, primarily diopside, and olivine (Mg# 69-73) with accessory spinel, sulfide and apatite. Although most apatites are fluor-hydroxyapatite solid solutions, one xenolith contains Cl- and OH-rich apatite suggesting that Cl may have been an important constituent in the parent magma(s) . The xenoliths show abundant evidence for equilibration at relatively low temperatures including amphibole and orthopyroxene exsolution in clinopyroxene, and granules of magnetite in hercynite hosts. If latter texture is due to exsolution, then this particular Group II xenolith equilibrated at temperatures near or below 500oC or at a depth of about 15 km along a conductive geotherm. It may be that all the Group II xenoliths equilibrated at low temperatures given the abundant exsolution textures although Fe-Mg exchange relations suggest equilibration at temperatures in excess of 800oC. Low equilibration temperatures are in conflict with the unusually high equilibration temperatures, >1200oC (Smith, 2000) displayed by Group I xenoliths from this same volcanic field. Taken at face value, the geothermometric results indicate unusually high temperatures in the upper mantle, normal temperatures in the crust and the possibility of a kinked geotherm in the region. Curiously the LCVF lies in an area of "normal" heat flow, south of the Battle Mountain area of high heat flow but the number of heat flow measurements in the Lunar Crater area is very low (Humphreys et al., 2003; Sass, 2005). References: Humphreys et al., 2003, Int. Geol. Rev. 45: 575; Sass et al., 2005, http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1207/; Smith, 2000, JGR 105: 16769.

  1. Paleomagnetism in the Determination of the Emplacement Temperature of Cerro Colorado Tuff Cone, El Pinacate Volcanic Field, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Trejo, A.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Vidal Solano, J. R.; Garcia Amador, B.; Gonzalez-Rangel, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Cerro Colorado Maar is located at the World Heritage Site, biosphere reserve El Pinacate and Gran Desierto del Altar, at the NNW region of Sonora, Mexico (in El Pinacate Volcanic Field). It is a tuff cone, about 1 km diameter, result of several phreatomagmatic episodes during the late Quaternary. We report paleomagnetic and rock magnetic properties from fusiform volcanic bombs obtained from the borders of Cerro Colorado. This study is based in the thermoremanent magnetization TRM normally acquired by volcanic rocks, which can be used to estimate the emplacement temperature range. We performed the experiments on 20 lithic fragments (10 cm to 20 cm approximately), taking 6-8 paleomagnetic cores from each. Rock magnetic experiments (magnetic susceptibility vs. temperature (k-T), hysteresis curves and FORC analysis, shows that the main magnetic mineral carriers of magnetization are titanomagnetite and titanohematite in different levels of intergrowth. The k-T curves suggest in many cases, only one magnetic phase, but also in other cases a second magnetic phase. Thermal demagnetization was used to demagnetize the specimens in detailed short steps and make a well-defined emplacement temperature determination ranges. We found that temperature emplacement determination range for these two magnetic phases is between 350-450 °C, and 550-580 °C, respectively. These results are consistent with those expected in an eruption of Surtsey type, showing a distinct volcanic activity compared to the other craters from El Pinacate volcanic field.

  2. Geochemical characteristics of island-arc volcanic rocks in the Nan-Nam Pat-Phetchabun zone, northern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shangyue; FENG Qinglai; YANG Wenqiang; ZHANG Zhibin; Chongpom Chonglakmani

    2010-01-01

    Late Permian-Early Triassic (P2-T1) volcanic rocks distributed on the eastern side of ocean-ridge and oceanic-island basalts in the Nan-Uttaradit zone were analyzed from aspects of petrographic characteristics, rock assemblage, REE, trace elements, geotectonic setting, etc., indicating that those volcanic rocks possess the characteristic features of island-arc volcanic rocks. The volcanic rock assemblage is basalt-basaltic andesite-andesite. The volcanic rocks are sub-alkaline, dominated by calc-alkaline series, with tholeiite series coming next. The chemical composition of the volcanic rocks is characterized by low TiO2 and K2O and high Al2O3 and Na2O. Their REE patterns are of the flat, weak LREE-enrichment right-inclined type. The trace elements are characterized by the enrichment of large cation elements such as K, Rb and Ba, common enrichment of U and Th, and depletion of Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf. The petrochemical plot falls within the field of volcanic rocks, in consistency with the plot of island-arc volcanic rocks in the Jinsha River zone of China. This island-arc volcanic zone, together with the ocean-ridge/oceanic island type volcanic rocks in the Nan-Uttaradit zone, constitutes the ocean-ridge volcanic rock-island-arc magmatic rock zones which are distributed in pairs, indicating that the oceanic crust of the Nan-Uttaradit zone once was of eastward subduction. This work is of great significance in exploring the evolution of paleo-Tethys in the Nan-Uttaradit zone.

  3. Eruptive History of the Rhyolitic Guangoche Volcano, Los Azufres Volcanic Field, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel Granados, E.; Arce, J. L.; Macias, J. L.; Layer, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Guangoche is a rhyolitic and polygenetic volcano with a maximum elevation of 2,760 meters above sea level. It is situated to the southwest of the Los Azufres Volcanic Field (LAVF), in the central sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Guangoche volcano is the youngest volcano described within the LAVF. It shows a horseshoe shaped crater open to the south, with a central lava dome. Its eruptive history during late Pleistocene has been intense with six explosive eruptions that consists of: 1) A southwards sector collapse of the volcano that generated a debris avalanche deposit with megablocks of heterogenous composition; 2) A plinian-type eruption that generated a pumice fall deposit and pyroclastic density currents by column collapse at 30.6 ka; 3) A plinian-type eruption "White Pumice Sequence" (29 ka) that developed a 22-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 7.0 x 107 kg/s (vol. = 0.53 km3); 4) A dome-destruction event, "Agua Blanca Pyroclastic Sequence" at 26.7 ka, that deposited a block-and-ash flow deposit; 5) A subplinian-plinian type eruption "Ochre Pyroclastic Sequence" (<26 ka) with an important initial phreatomagmatic phase, that generated pyroclastic density currents and pumice fallouts. The subplinian-plinian event generated a 16-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 1.9 x 107 kg/s, and magma volume of 0.38 km3; 6) The eruptive history ended with a subplinian eruption (<<26 ka), that generated a multilayered fall deposit, that developed a 11-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 2.9 x 106 kg/s and a magma volume of 0.26 km3. Volcanic activity at Guangoche volcano has been intense and future activity should not be discarded. Unfortunately, the last two events have not been dated yet. Guangoche rhyolitic magma is characterized by low-Ba contents suggesting crystal mush extraction for their genesis.

  4. Field Courses for Volcanic Hazards Mapping at Parícutinand Jorullo Volcanoes (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria Morales, A.; Delgado Granados, H.; Roberge, J.; Farraz Montes, I. A.; Linares López, C.

    2007-05-01

    During the last decades, Mexico has suffered several geologic phenomena-related disasters. The eruption of El Chichón volcano in 1982 killed >2000 people and left a large number of homeless populations and severe economic damages. The best way to avoid and mitigate disasters and their effects is by making geologic hazards maps. In volcanic areas these maps should show in a simplified fashion, but based on the largest geologic background possible, the probable (or likely) distribution in time and space of the products related to a variety of volcanic processes and events, according to likely magnitude scenarios documented on actual events at a particular volcano or a different one with similar features to the volcano used for calibration and weighing geologic background. Construction of hazards maps requires compilation and acquisition of a large amount of geological data in order to obtain the physical parameters needed to calibrate and perform controlled simulation of volcanic events under different magnitude-scenarios in order to establish forecasts. These forecasts are needed by the authorities to plan human settlements, infrastructure, and economic development. The problem is that needs are overwhelmingly faster than the adjustments of university programs to include courses. At the Earth Science División of the Faculty of Engineering at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, the students have a good background that permits to learn the methodologies for hazards map construction but no courses on hazards evaluations. Therefore, under the support of the university's Program to Support Innovation and Improvement of Teaching (PAPIME, Programa de Apoyo para la Innovación y Mejoramiento de la Enseñanza) a series of field-based intensive courses allow the Earth science students to learn what kind of data to acquire, how to record, and process in order to carry out hazards evaluations. This training ends with hazards maps that can be used immediately by the

  5. Pyroclastic Density Current Hazards in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, B. D.; Gravley, D.; Clarke, A. B.; Bloomberg, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    The most dangerous phenomena associated with phreatomagmatic eruptions are dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). These are turbulent, ground-hugging sediment gravity currents that travel radially away from the explosive center at up to 100 m/s. The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand, consists of approximately 50 eruptive centers, at least 39 of which have had explosive phreatomagmatic behaviour. A primary concern for future AVF eruptions is the impact of dilute PDCs in and around the Auckland area. We combine field observations from the Maungataketake tuff ring, which has one of the best exposures of dilute PDC deposits in the AVF, with a quantitative model for flow of and sedimentation from a radially-spreading, steady-state, depth-averaged dilute PDC (modified from Bursik and Woods, 1996 Bull Volcanol 58:175-193). The model allows us to explore the depositional mechanisms, macroscale current dynamics, and potential impact on societal infrastructure of dilute PDCs from a future AVF eruption. The lower portion of the Maungataketake tuff ring pyroclastic deposits contains trunks, limbs and fragments of Podocarp trees (strength of the wood, we calculate that dynamic pressures (Pdyn) of 10-75 kPa are necessary to topple trees of this size and composition. Thus the two main criteria for model success based on the field evidence include (a) Pdyn must be >10 kPa nearer than 0.9 km to the vent, and 35 kPa can be expected within 3 km from source, ensuring complete destruction of the area; Pdyn > 15 kPa up to 5 km from source, resulting in heavy structural damage to most buildings and near destruction of weaker buildings; and Pdyn <10 kPa at ~6 km from source, resulting in severe damage to weaker structures at least up to this distance. This exercise illustrates our ability to combine field measurements with numerical techniques to explore controlling parameters of dilute PDC dynamics. These tools can be used to understand and estimate the damage potential and

  6. The eruption characteristics of the Tarim flood basalt

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Integration of field investigation, regional stratigraphic comparison, remote sensing and image interpretation allow us to divide the Tarim Permian flood basalt province into three eruptive cycles listed by decreasing age; Kupukuziman flood basalt (KP), Felsic pyroclastic rocks (FP), Kaipaizileike flood basalt (KZ). KP features flood basalt and tuff; in the outcrop in Keping and Yingmaili areas, it can be differentiated into two units containing three thick layers of basaltic lava flows. Thes...

  7. Managing a Monogenetic Volcanic Field As a World Heritage Nomination: Implications for Science, Outreach, and Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive-Garcia, C.; van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2014-12-01

    Monogenetic volcanoes form a large proportion of the world's volcanoes. They are in all tectonic environments and thus provide a significant link to understand fundamental geological processes such as plate tectonics. The Chaîne des Puys - Limagne fault World Heritage nomination is a prime example of this link where monogenetic volcanism, continental rifting, uplift and erosion are highlighted, and are made understandable to the lay person, though the actions on over 80 aligned monogenetic volcanoes. Such geoheritage is essential for monogenetic and other geological risks to be communicated to the wider public. The current scientific interest on monogenetic volcanoes is quite recent, and because of this, and probably their global distribution but small size, they have not received their due importance from a geoheritage standpoint. Some individual sites and some fields are protected and developed as attractions, but there has been no coherent global strategy for defining monogenetic heritage, or for linking sites. This is starting through the monogenetic commission of IAVCEI, and with wider participation of the IUGS and other bodies. The Chaîne des Puys - Limagne Fault UNESCO project is an example of how public awareness, at a global scale, and be increased through geoheritage. This is done integrating local stakeholders: population, industry, science, landscapers, artists, sports, government. This builds on existing protection and sustainable activities, integrating them with education programs. The result is to create a populace that 'thinks geological', and which leads visitors to also become geologically aware. This is helped by a monogenetic landscape that is easily readable and by links made to other geological sites around the world. We will explain how this process is ongoing. The project started over 35 years ago, and is a long-term vision to develop geological understanding and protection of this unique monogenetic and tectono-volcanic site.

  8. Slab window-related magmatism from southernmost South America: the Late Miocene mafic volcanics from the Estancia Glencross Area (˜52°S, Argentina Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, M.; Agostini, S.; Innocenti, F.; Haller, M. J.; Manetti, P.; Mazzarini, F.

    2001-06-01

    The Estancia Glencross Area (EGA) volcanic rocks form a series of five isolated buttes located at the southern end (˜52°S) of the discontinuous belt of Cenozoic basaltic lava formations occurring in the extra-Andean Patagonia. EGA volcanics are subalkaline basalts and basaltic andesites erupted at 8.0-8.5 Ma in a region closely behind the Andean Cordillera. EGA volcanism predated by about 4-5 my the onset of the volcanism in the nearby Pali Aike Volcanic Field, which produced highly primitive, alkaline lavas. Incompatible trace-element distributions and Sr-Nd isotope compositions of EGA rocks are those typical of within-plate OIB-type basalts and are indicative of minimal interaction of sub-lithospheric magmas with enriched reservoirs. The geochemical characteristics of EGA volcanics, as well as their age and location are consistent with a model of slab window opening beneath this region. The high silica content and the garnet signature of the estimated EGA primary magma are explained by a two-stage process involving the initial production of melts from a garnet lherzolite source followed by the reaction of these melts with harzburgite country rocks during their ascent through the mantle lithosphere. The melt/harzburgite reaction, favoured by a slow melt ascent rate, as well as the low magma production at EGA, are likely related to the dominantly compressive stress regime operating in this area during Late Miocene.

  9. Bibliography of literature pertaining to Long Valley Caldera and associated volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, John W.; Harpel, Christopher J.; Brooks, Suzanna K.; Marcaida, Mae

    2011-01-01

    define the beginning of the Brunhes Chron and helps constrain the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary. The Bishop ash, which was dispersed as far east as Nebraska, Kansas, and Texas, provides an important tephrostratigraphic marker throughout the Western United States. The obsidian domes of both the Mono and Inyo Craters, which were produced by rhyolitic eruptions in the past 40,000 years, have been well studied, including extensive scientific drilling through the domes. Exploratory drilling to 3-km depth on the resurgent dome and subsequent instrumentation of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) have led to a number of important new insights. Scientific drilling also has been done within the Casa Diablo geothermal field, which, aside from drilling, has been commercially developed and is currently feeding 40 MW of power into the Southern California Edison grid. Studies in all the above-mentioned volcanic fields have contributed to the extensive scientific literature published on the Long Valley region. Although most of this scientific literature has been published since 1970, a significant amount of historical literature extends backward to the late 1800s. The purpose of this bibliography is to compile references pertaining to the Long Valley region from all time periods and all Earth science fields into a single listing, thus providing an easily accessible guide to the published literature for current and future researchers.

  10. Climate Throughout Geologic Time Was Cooled by Sequences of Explosive Volcanic Eruptions Forming Aerosols That Reflect and Scatter Ultraviolet Solar Radiation and Warmed by Relatively Continuous Extrusion of Basaltic Lava that Depletes Ozone, Allowing More Solar Ultraviolet Radiation to Reach Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Active volcanoes of all sizes and eruptive styles, emit chlorine and bromine gases observed to deplete ozone. Effusive, basaltic volcanic eruptions, typical in Hawaii and Iceland, extrude large lava flows, depleting ozone and causing global warming. Major explosive volcanoes also deplete ozone with the same emissions, causing winter warming, but in addition eject megatons of water and sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere where they form sulfuric-acid aerosols whose particles grow large enough to reflect and scatter ultraviolet sunlight, causing net global cooling for a few years. The relative amounts of explosive and effusive volcanism are determined by the configuration of tectonic plates moving around Earth's surface. Detailed studies of climate change throughout geologic history, and since 1965, are not well explained by greenhouse-gas theory, but are explained quite clearly at OzoneDepletionTheory.info. Ozone concentrations vary substantially by the minute and show close relationships to weather system highs and lows (as pointed out by Dobson in the 1920s), to the height of the tropopause, and to the strength and location of polar vortices and jet streams. Integrating the effects of volcanism on ozone concentrations and the effects of ozone concentrations on synoptic weather patterns should improve weather forecasting. For example, the volcano Bárðarbunga, in central Iceland, extruded 85 km2 of basaltic lava between August 29, 2014, and February 28, 2015, having a profound effect on weather. Most surprising, more than a week before the March 4 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, substantial amounts of ozone were released in the vicinity of the volcano precisely when surface deformation showed that magma first began moving up from sills below 4 km depth. Ozone similarly appears to have been emitted 3.5 months before the Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Readily available daily maps of ozone concentrations may allow early warning of an imminent volcanic

  11. Holocene Flows of the Cima Volcanic Field, Mojave Desert, Part 2: Flow Rheology from Laboratory Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, T.; Whittington, A. G.; Soldati, A.; Sehlke, A.; Beem, J. R.; Gomez, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Lava flow morphology is often utilized as an indicator of rheological behavior during flow emplacement. Rheological behavior can be characterized by the viscosity and yield strength of lava, which in turn are dependent on physical and chemical properties including crystallinity, vesicularity, and bulk composition. We are studying the rheology of a basaltic lava flow from a monogenetic Holocene cinder cone in the Cima lava field (Mojave Desert, California). The flow is roughly 2.5 km long and up to 700m wide, with a well-developed central channel along much of its length. Samples were collected along seven different traverses across the flow, along with real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS profiles to allow levee heights and slopes to be measured. Surface textures change from pahoehoe ropes near the vent to predominantly jagged `a`a blocks over the majority of the flow, including all levees and the toe. Chemically the lava shows little variation, plotting on the trachybasalt-basanite boundary on the total alkali-silica diagram. Mineralogically the lava is dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine phenocrysts, with abundant flow-aligned plagioclase microcrystals. The total crystal fraction is ~50% near the vent, with higher percentages in the distal portion of the flow. Vesicularity varies between ~10 and more than ~60%. Levees are ~10-15m high with slopes typically ~25-35˚, suggesting a yield strength at final emplacement of ~150,000 Pa. The effective emplacement temperature and yield strength of lava samples will be determined using the parallel-plate technique. We will test the hypothesis that these physical and rheological properties of the lava during final emplacement correlate with spatial patterns in flow morphology, such as average slope and levee width, which have been determined using remote sensing observations (Beem et al. 2014).

  12. The mode of emplacement of Neogene flood basalts in eastern Iceland: Facies architecture and structure of simple aphyric basalt groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Óskarsson, Birgir V.; Riishuus, Morten S.

    2014-12-01

    Simple flows (tabular) in the Neogene flood basalt sections of Iceland are described and their mode of emplacement assessed. The flows belong to three aphyric basalt groups: the Kumlafell group, the Hólmatindur group and the Hjálmadalur group. The groups can be traced over 50 km and originate in the Breiðdalur-Thingmuli volcanic zone. The groups have flow fields that display mixed volcanic facies architecture and can be classified after dominating type morphology. The Kumlafell and the Hólmatindur groups have predominantly simple flows of pāhoehoe and rubbly pāhoehoe morphologies with minor compound or lobate pāhoehoe flows. The Hjálmadalur group has simple flows of rubbly pāhoehoe, but also includes minor compound or lobate flows of rubble and 'a'ā. Simple flows are most common in the distal and medial areas from the vents, while more lobate flows in proximal areas. The simple flows are formed by extensive sheet lobes that are several kilometers long with plane-parallel contacts, some reaching thicknesses of ~ 40 m (aspect ratios inflation structures. Their internal structure consists generally of a simple upper vesicular crust, a dense core and a thin basal vesicular zone. The brecciated flow-top is formed by clinker and crustal rubble, the clinker often welded or agglutinated. The simple flows erupted from seemingly short-lived fissures and have the characteristics of cooling-limited flows. We estimate the effusion rates to be ~ 105 m3/s for the simple flows of the Kumlafell and Hólmatindur groups and ~ 104 m3/s for the Hjálmadalur group. The longest flows advanced 15-20 km from the fissures, with lava streams of fast propagating flows inducing tearing and brecciation of the chilled crust. Compound or lobate areas appear to reflect areas of low effusion rates or the interaction of the lava with topographic barriers or wetlands, resulting in chaotic flowage. Slowing lobes with brecciated flow-tops developed into 'a'ā flows. The groups interdigitated

  13. Impact of reduced near-field entrainment of overpressured volcanic jets on plume development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffaraval, Farhad; Solovitz, Stephen A.; Ogden, Darcy E.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic plumes are often studied using one-dimensional analytical models, which use an empirical entrainment ratio to close the equations. Although this ratio is typically treated as constant, its value near the vent is significantly reduced due to flow development and overpressured conditions. To improve the accuracy of these models, a series of experiments was performed using particle image velocimetry, a high-accuracy, full-field velocity measurement technique. Experiments considered a high-speed jet with Reynolds numbers up to 467,000 and exit pressures up to 2.93 times atmospheric. Exit gas densities were also varied from 0.18 to 1.4 times that of air. The measured velocity was integrated to determine entrainment directly. For jets with exit pressures near atmospheric, entrainment was approximately 30% less than the fully developed level at 20 diameters from the exit. At pressures nearly three times that of the atmosphere, entrainment was 60% less. These results were introduced into Plumeria, a one-dimensional plume model, to examine the impact of reduced entrainment. The maximum column height was only slightly modified, but the critical radius for collapse was significantly reduced, decreasing by nearly a factor of two at moderate eruptive pressures.

  14. Lithosphere versus asthenosphere mantle sources at the Big Pine Volcanic Field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazel, Esteban; Plank, Terry; Forsyth, Donald W.; Bendersky, Claire; Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Hauri, Erik H.

    2012-06-01

    Here we report the first measurements of the H2O content of magmas and mantle xenoliths from the Big Pine Volcanic Field (BPVF), California, in order to constrain the melting process in the mantle, and the role of asthenospheric and lithospheric sources in this westernmost region of the Basin and Range Province, western USA. Melt inclusions trapped in primitive olivines (Fo82-90) record surprisingly high H2O contents (1.5 to 3.0 wt.%), while lithospheric mantle xenoliths record low H2O concentrations (whole rock 500 ka, to cooler (˜1220°C) and shallower melting (˜1 GPa) conditions in younger magmas. The estimated depth of melting correlates strongly with some trace element ratios in the magmas (e.g., Ce/Pb, Ba/La), with deeper melts having values closer to upper mantle asthenosphere values, and shallower melts having values more typical of subduction zone magmas. This geochemical stratification is consistent with seismic observations of a shallow lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (˜55 km depth). Combined trace element and cryoscopic melting models yield self-consistent estimates for the degree of melting (˜5%) and source H2O concentration (˜1000 ppm). We suggest two possible geodynamic models to explain small-scale convection necessary for magma generation. The first is related to the Isabella seismic anomaly, either a remnant of the Farallon Plate or foundered lithosphere. The second scenario is related to slow extension of the lithosphere.

  15. Rhyolite thermobarometry and the shallowing of the magma reservoir, Coso volcanic field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, C.R.; Bacon, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    The compositionally bimodal Pleistocene Coso volcanic field is located at the western margin of the Basin and Range province ~ 60 km north of the Garlock fault. Thirty-nine nearly aphyric high-silica rhyolite domes were emplaced in the past million years: one at 1 Ma from a transient magma reservoir, one at ~ 0.6 Ma, and the rest since ~ 0.3 Ma. Over the past 0.6 My, the depth from which the rhyolites erupted has decreased and their temperatures have become slightly higher. Pre-eruptive conditions of the rhyolite magmas, calculated from phenocryst compositions using the two-oxide thermometer and the Al-in-hornblende barometer, ranged from 740??C and 270 MPa (2.7 kbar; ~ 10 km depth) for the ~ 0.6 Ma magma, to 770??C and 140 MPa (1.4 kbar; ~ 5.5 km) for the youngest (~ 0.04 Ma) magma. Results are consistent with either a single rhyolitic reservoir moving upward through the crust, or a series of successively shallower reservoirs. As the reservoir has become closer to the surface, eruptions have become both more frequent and more voluminous.

  16. Spreading and collapse of big basaltic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Peltier, Aline; Poland, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. In the frame of MED-SVU project, our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at three Supersite volcanoes: Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These

  17. Magnetotelluric Studies of the Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, D. R.; Unsworth, M. J.; Diaz, D.; Pavez, M.; Blanco, B.

    2015-12-01

    Geodetic data has shown that the surface of the Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in central Chile has been moving upwards at rates >20 cm/yr since 2007 over a 200 km2 area. It has been hypothesized that this ground deformation is due to the inflation of a magma body at ~5 km depth beneath the lake (2.8 km b.s.l.). This magma body is a likely source for the large number of rhyolitic eruptions at this location over the last 25 ka. A dense broadband magnetotelluric (MT) array was collected from 2009 to 2015 and included data from a geothermal exploration project. MT phase tensor analysis indicates that the resistivity structure of the region is largely three-dimensional for signals with periods longer than 1 s, which corresponds to depths >5 km. The MT data were inverted using the ModEM inversion algorithm to produce a three-dimensional electrical resistivity model which included topography. Four primary features were identified in the model: 1) A north-south striking, 10 km by 5 km, low-resistivity zone (inflation centre at a depth of ~5 km (2.8 km b.s.l.) is interpreted as a zone of partial melt which may be supplying material via conduits to account for the observed ground deformation; 2) A shallow low-resistivity feature ~400 m beneath the lake surface (1.8 km a.s.l.) and spatially coincident with the inflation centre is interpreted to be a zone of hydrothermal alteration; 3) A thin, low-resistivity feature to the west of LdM at a depth of ~250 m (2.2 km a.s.l.) is interpreted to be the clay cap of a potential geothermal prospect; 4) A large, low-resistivity zone beneath the San Pedro-Tatara Volcanic Complex to the west of LdM at a depth of ~10 km (8 km b.s.l.) is interpreted to be a zone of partial melt. Further MT data collection is planned for 2016 which will expand the current grid of MT stations to better constrain the lateral extent of the observed features and give greater insight into the dynamics of this restless magma system.

  18. Quaternary bimodal volcanism in the Niğde Volcanic Complex (Cappadocia, central Anatolia, Turkey): age, petrogenesis and geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Faruk; Schmitt, Axel K.; Siebel, Wolfgang; Sönmez, Mustafa; Ersoy, Yalçın; Lermi, Abdurrahman; Dirik, Kadir; Duncan, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The late Neogene to Quaternary Cappadocian Volcanic Province (CVP) in central Anatolia is one of the most impressive volcanic fields of Turkey because of its extent and spectacular erosionally sculptured landscape. The late Neogene evolution of the CVP started with the eruption of extensive andesitic-dacitic lavas and ignimbrites with minor basaltic lavas. This stage was followed by Quaternary bimodal volcanism. Here, we present geochemical, isotopic (Sr-Nd-Pb and δ18O isotopes) and geochronological (U-Pb zircon and Ar-Ar amphibole and whole-rock ages) data for bimodal volcanic rocks of the Niğde Volcanic Complex (NVC) in the western part of the CVP to determine mantle melting dynamics and magmatic processes within the overlying continental crust during the Quaternary. Geochronological data suggest that the bimodal volcanic activity in the study area occurred between ca. 1.1 and ca. 0.2 Ma (Pleistocene) and comprises (1) mafic lavas consisting of basalts, trachybasalts, basaltic andesites and scoria lapilli fallout deposits with mainly basaltic composition, (2) felsic lavas consisting of mostly rhyolites and pumice lapilli fall-out and surge deposits with dacitic to rhyolitic composition. The most mafic sample is basalt from a monogenetic cone, which is characterized by 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7038, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.5128, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.80, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.60 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.68, suggesting a moderately depleted signature of the mantle source. Felsic volcanic rocks define a narrow range of 143Nd/144Nd isotope ratios (0.5126-0.5128) and are homogeneous in Pb isotope composition (206Pb/204Pb = 18.84-18.87, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.64-15.67 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.93-38.99). 87Sr/86Sr isotopic compositions of mafic (0.7038-0.7053) and felsic (0.7040-0.7052) samples are similar, reflecting a common mantle source. The felsic rocks have relatively low zircon δ18O values (5.6 ± 0.6 ‰) overlapping mantle values (5.3 ± 0.3 %), consistent with an origin by fractional crystallization

  19. Volcanic sanidinites: an example for the mobilization of high field strength elements (HFSE) in magmatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aßbichler, Donjá; Heuss-Aßbichler, Soraya; Müller, Dirk; Kunzmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In earth science the mobility of high field strength elements (HFSE) is generally discussed in context of hydrothermal processes. Recent investigations mainly address processes in (late) magmatic-, metamorphic- and submarine hydrothermal systems. They have all in common that H2O is main solvent. The transport of HFSE is suggested to be favored by volatiles, like boron, fluorine, phosphate and sulfate (Jiang et al., 2005). In this study processes in magmatic system are investigated. Sanidinites are rare rocks of igneous origin and are found as volcanic ejecta of explosive volcanoes. They consist mainly of sanidine and minerals of the sodalite group. The very porous fabric of these rocks is an indication of their aggregation from a gaseous magmatic phase. The large sanidine crystals (up to several centimeters) are mostly interlocking, creating large cavities between some crystals. In these pores Zr crystallizes as oxide (baddeleyite, ZrO2) or silicate (zircon, ZrSiO4). The euhedral shape of these minerals is a further indication of their formation out of the gas phase. Furthermore, bubbles in glass observed in some samples are evidence for gas-rich reaction conditions during the formation of the sanidinites. The formation of sanidinites is suggested to be an example for solvothermal processes in natural systems. Solvothermal processes imply the solvation, transport and recrystallization of elements in a gas phase. Results obtained from whole rock analysis from sanidinites from Laacher See (Germany) show a positive correlation between LOI, sulfate, Cl, and Na with the HFSE like Zr. Na-rich conditions seem to ameliorate the solvothermal transport of Zr. All these features point to the formation of sanidinites in the upper part of a magma chamber, where fluid consisting of SO3 and Cl compounds in addition to H2O, CO2 and HFSE (high field strength elements) like Zr accumulate.

  20. Stress Field and Dike Propagation within a Partially Submerged Volcanic Edifice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, S.; Taisne, B.; Manga, M.; Pasquet, E.; Limare, A.; Bhat, H.

    2013-12-01

    In order to better understand dike propagation within and flank collapse on volcanic islands, we performed a set of analogue laboratory experiments. We created conic edifices of gelatin and measured their deformation under their own weight whilst we varied the level to which they were partially submerged. In most experiments the lower part of the edifice was submerged in water while the upper part was surrounded by air, but in some cases oil was used as the fluid surrounding the upper part of the edifice in order to change density differences. The gelatin was typically made of a sugar (or glycerol) solution so that it was approximately 10-30% denser than water, and its strength was varied by using different gelatin concentrations. The strain field was visualized from the birefringence pattern created by placing the gelatin between sheets of polarising film with the directions crossed. One first order feature of the strain field is an approximately elliptical shaped extensional region, centered below the summit and at approximately sea-level. The second feature is a region of strong sub-horizontal shear in the lower most part of the edifice, close to the lower, rigid no-slip boundary. We also observed the behaviour of dikes injected into the base of the edifice from below: these dikes were filled with water or salt solution so that they had variable amounts of positive buoyancy with respect to the edifice. If all, or a very large fraction, of the edifice was submerged, the dike typically propagated vertically and erupted at the summit. If the edifice was only partially submerged, however, the dikes typically switched from dominantly vertical to horizontal propagation and erupted on the flanks of the edifice, very often at sea level.

  1. The Records of the Tectonic Evolution From the Volcanics in Qiangtang Basin, Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zhonghua; Yang Deming; Li Cai; Pu Zhongyu

    2000-01-01

    The volcanism in Qiangtang Basin is very frequent due to the divergence and subduction of the various plates. The study indicates that these volcanics are formed in different tectonic settings: 1 )Hercynian volcanics are mainly basalts and are formed in the intraplate and intercontinental rift. 2 ) Indosinian volcanics markedly vary in the distribution and composition and reflect transitional MORB and island are environments respectively. 3) Yanshanian volcanics consist predominantly of basalts, andesites, dacites and rhyolites and are characterized by calc- alkaline volcanic suite, indicating island arc setting. 4)Himalayan volcanics are complicated and associated with intraplate orogency. The volcanism provides important tectonic information for recognizing the evolution of Qiangtang Basin.

  2. Alberca De Guadalupe Maar Crater, Zacapu Basin : A Rare Type of Volcano within the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, P. V.; Siebe, C.; Guilbaud, M. N.; Salinas, S.

    2014-12-01

    Phreato-magmatic vents (esp. maar craters) are rare in the ~40,000 Km2 Plio-Quaternary monogenetic Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (MGVF) located in the central part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. In contrast to >1000 scoria cones, only 2 dozen phreato-magmatic monogenetic vents (e.g. tuff cones, tuff rings, and maars) have been identified. About half of these form a cluster near Valle de Santiago in the Lerma river valley at the northern margin of the MGVF, while the others occur in a rather scattered fashion. Here we discuss the origin of Alberca de Guadalupe maar crater, one of the three phreato-magmatic vents (in addition to El Caracol and Alberca de Los Espinos) that occur within the boundaries of the inter-montane lacustrine Zacapu basin, a tectonic graben bound by an ENE-WSW normal fault system. The maar crater came into existence between 20,000 and 23,000 y BP, forming a 140 m deep hole in the otherwise planar surrounding ground of theearly Pleistocene lava flows of Cerro Pelón.The maar crater has a diameter of ~1 Km and bears a 9 m deep lake. Eruptive products include typical surge deposits that are best exposed around the rim and inner crater walls. They are poorly sorted (Mdø= -1.56 to -3.75, ø= 1.43 to 3.23), rich in accidental lithics (angular andesitic lava and ignimbrite clasts) constituting 51-88% of the deposit with few juveniles (basaltic andesite with phenocrysts of plagioclase, olivine, and pyroxene in a quenched glassy matrix; SiO2=54-58 wt. %). Dry surge units are friable and clast-supported, in contrast the wet surge units are fairly indurated and bear accretionary lapilli. Bedding is frequently distorted by ballistic impact-sag structures. The entire construct is disrupted by an E-W trending regional fault, downthrowing the northern part by ~30 m.The unusual formation of this maar crater in the semi-arid highlands of Zacapu was favored by the local hydrological and topographical conditions. Such conditions still prevail in several

  3. GRAVIMETRIC STUDY OF THE IXTLAN DE LOS HERVORES, GEOTHERMAL AREA, MIDWESTERN MEXICAN VOLCANIC BELT (MVB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, T.; Ortiz, I.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis and interpretation of gravimetric anomalies over the Occidental-Central Mexican Volcanic Belt, sheds new light on the subsurface structure of the Ixtlan de los Hervores, geothermal area. In Mexico, there are several geothermal areas that have been exploited commercially (Cerro Prieto, Los Azufres, Los Humeros, Tres Virgenes fields). However, there are many other known fields that have not been exploited. This is the case in the area of "Ixtlan de los Hervores" in the state of Michoacan. The analyzed region covers a rectangular area, aproximality from 20o N to 20.5° N and 102° W to 102.2°W. In the region there are thick basalt flows. The area is characterized by low and elongated hills formed by volcanic flows and on a smaller scale lacustrian sediments and major normal faults with a NW-SE direction particularly, the Ixtlan-Encinal fault which controls the trace of the Duero River and the Pajacuarán fault. The anomaly map was compared with the surface geology and the anomalies were correlated with major volcanic features, since our main interest was in mapping the subsurface faults and volcanic bodies. Two profiles were selected that cross major anomalies and the geothermal zone of Ixtlan. The Talwani algorithm for 2-D polygonal bodies has been used for calculating the theoretical anomalies. The proposed models adequately explain the main observed geological features. The models are made up of two lithostratigraphic units of volcanic rocks, represented by the Tertiary basalts, which adequately reflect the area's volcanic environment. These basaltic units, corresponding to different volcanic events were cut by the Ixtlan well. Both models reflect the existence of the Ixtlan-Encinal fault, the most important feature in the area which is also responsible for the existence of the geothermal area.

  4. Spectral properties of carbonatized ultramafic mantle xenoliths and their host olivine basalts, Jabal Al Maqtal basin, South Eastern Desert, Egypt, using ASD FieldSpec spectroradiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Madani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the spectral properties of the carbonatized ultramafic mantle xenoliths and their host olivine basalts exposed at Jabal Al Maqtal strike-slip basin, south Eastern Desert, Egypt using portable ASD FieldSpec is the main task of this article. Field data revealed the presence of ultramafic mantle xenoliths at different stratigraphic levels within Jurassic olivine basalts. Ultramafic mantle xenoliths are recorded within highly altered olivine basalt topped by hard, compact brown conglomerate (erosional surface of 1.5 m thick. They have different sizes (5–25 cm and shapes (rounded, sub-rounded and elliptical. The spectral data are collected using ASD FieldSpec in sunny, free-cloud day. Data measurements were resampled as reference-target scan. Nearly all the mineralogical constituents of the studied ultramafic mantle xenoliths were replaced by Mg-Free (<0.5 wt% calcium carbonate (calcite. Spectrally the ultramafic mantle xenoliths can be categorized into two main groups based on their Fe and Mn content which produce absorption features at shorter wavelength regions. The spectral profile of the first group shows a pronounced absorption features around 0.50 μm, 0.65 μm and 0.90 μm wavelength regions. These features are attributed to the electronic processes within the unfilled d-shells of transition Mn2+ and Fe2+ metal cations (MnO and Fe2O3 content are 2.11 wt% and 12.6 wt% respectively as indicated by XRF analyses. The spectral profile of the second group shows a very week absorption features in shorter wavelength regions which is attributed to the low MnO (0.7 wt% and Fe2O3 (2.17 wt% content. Both ultramafic mantle xenoliths groups show pronounced absorption features in longer wavelength regions (1.8–2.55 μm. Inspection of the spectral profiles of the mantle xenoliths revealed the presence of six absorption features around 1.80 μm, 1.95 μm, 2.00 μm, 2.35 μm, 2.4 μm. and 2.5 μm wavelength regions which are

  5. Distribution and Evolution of Volcanism of the Bolaven Plateau, Southern Laos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrin, J. S.; Sieh, K.; Wiwegwin, W.; Charusiri, P.; Singer, B. S.; Singsomboun, K.; Jicha, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Bolaven Plateau of southern Laos hosts a 6000 km2 basaltic volcanic complex erupted through flat-lying Mesozoic non-marine clastic sedimentary rocks. It is among the largest of dozens of isolated intracontinental Neogene-Quaternary volcanic centers in southeast Asia. The most voluminous flow sequences are tholeiitic, but a significant component of alkalic basalt is also present as morphologically younger cinder cones and related flows that cap the Plateau. Two salient aspects of the volcanic field are these: (1) Lava compositions appear to transition temporally from tholeiitic to alkaline, suggesting that the field tapped low-degree partial melts of a fresh mantle source toward the end of its lifespan. Circumstantial evidence for this can be found in abundant spinel lherzolite, wehrlite, and olivine websterite xenoliths within the alkaline basalts. (2) The volcanic center appears to have initiated atop a pre-existing 1000 m high, 90 km wide bedrock plateau, with nearly all visible vents confined to a 30-km wide zone that extends 80-km north to south. Our work on the Bolaven volcanic complex aims at establishment of a geochemical and temporal framework for its evolution. Using field relationships, petrologic and geochemical studies, and 40Ar/39Ar dating, we hope to unravel the genetic and age relationships of these compositionally varied lava sequences. Another objective of our investigation is to assess the possibility that lavas of the Bolaven might mask the heretofore undiscovered impact site of the Australasian tektite strewnfield (see Sieh et al, this meeting). Toward this aim, we will determine whether a sufficient expanse of the volcanic field is younger than the 0.8 Ma tektites. Finally, we intend to constrain the timing of incision of the Bolaven Plateau by the Mekong River and its tributaries.

  6. Hydrothermal alteration in oceanic ridge volcanics: A detailed study at the Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, W.I.; Perfit, M.R.; Josnasson, I.R.; Smith, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field is composed of altered oceanic crust and extinct hydrothermal vents within the eastern Galapagos Rift between 85??49???W and 85??55???W. The discharge zone of the hydrothermal system is revealed along scarps, thus providing an opportunity to examine the uppermost mineralized, and highly altered interior parts of the crust. Altered rocks collected in situ by the submersible ALVIN show complex concentric alteration zones. Microsamples of individual zones have been analysed for major/minor, trace elements, and strontium isotopes in order to describe the complex compositional details of the hydrothermal alteration. Interlayered chlorite-smectite and chlorite with disequilibrium compositions dominate the secondary mineralogy as replacement phases of primary glass and acicular pyroxene. Phenocrysts and matrix grains of plagioclase are unaffected during alteration. Using a modification of the Gresens' equation we demonstrate that the trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) are relatively immobile, and calculate degrees of enrichment and depletion in other elements. Strontium isotopic ratios increase as Sr concentrations decrease from least-altered cores to most-altered rims and cross-cutting veins in individual samples, and can be modeled by open system behaviour under low fluid-rock ratio (< 10) conditions following a period of lower-temperature weathering of volcanics within the rift zone. The complex patterns of element enrichment and depletion and strontium isotope variations indicate mixing between pristine seawater and ascending hot fluids to produce a compositional spectrum of fluids. The precipitation of base-metal sulfides beneath the seafloor is probably a result of fluid mixing and cooling. If, as suggested here, the discharge zone alteration occurred under relatively low fluid-rock ratios, then this shallow region must play an important role in determining the exit composition of vent fluids in marine hydrothermal systems

  7. Combining long- and short-term probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment with cost-benefit analysis to support decision making in a volcanic crisis from the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Laura; Jolly, Gill; Lindsay, Jan; Howe, Tracy; Marzocchi, Warner

    2012-04-01

    By using BET_VH, we propose a quantitative probabilistic hazard assessment for base surge impact in Auckland, New Zealand. Base surges resulting from phreatomagmatic eruptions are among the most dangerous phenomena likely to be associated with the initial phase of a future eruption in the Auckland Volcanic Field. The assessment is done both in the long-term and in a specific short-term case study, i.e. the simulated pre-eruptive unrest episode during Exercise Ruaumoko, a national civil defence exercise. The most important factors to account for are the uncertainties in the vent location (expected for a volcanic field) and in the run-out distance of base surges. Here, we propose a statistical model of base surge run-out distance based on deposits from past eruptions in Auckland and in analogous volcanoes. We then combine our hazard assessment with an analysis of the costs and benefits of evacuating people (on a 1 × 1-km cell grid). In addition to stressing the practical importance of a cost-benefit analysis in creating a bridge between volcanologists and decision makers, our study highlights some important points. First, in the Exercise Ruaumoko application, the evacuation call seems to be required as soon as the unrest phase is clear; additionally, the evacuation area is much larger than what is recommended in the current contingency plan. Secondly, the evacuation area changes in size with time, due to a reduction in the uncertainty in the vent location and increase in the probability of eruption. It is the tradeoff between these two factors that dictates which cells must be evacuated, and when, thus determining the ultimate size and shape of the area to be evacuated.

  8. Petrogenesis of Mt. Baker basalts (Cascade arc): Constraints from thermobarometry, phase equilibria, trace elements and isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, E. K.; McCallum, I. S.

    2010-12-01

    Primitive arc basalts provide information on sub-arc mantle compositions and processes. The relative abundance of basalts in the Cascade arc decreases northward, and basalts are rare in the most northerly segment of the arc (Garibaldi belt) where the Mt. Baker volcanic field (MBVF) is located. Following reconstruction of the compositions of the primary basalts at MBVF (olivine addition ± plag subtraction), we have applied phase equilibria and forward-modeled trace element abundances and isotope ratios to obtain petrogenetic constraints. The most primitive lavas are the Sulphur Cr, Lk Shannon, and Park Butte basalts and the Hogback, Tarn Plateau, and Cathedral Crag basaltic andesites, ranging from 716 to 10 ka. Most erupted peripheral to the major centers. Spinel/olivine and Fe-Ti oxide oxybarometry indicate redox states of ~QFM + 1 corresponding to Fe3+/ΣFe = 0.20. Mg# ranges from 51 to 71. The lavas are medium-K and similar to calc-alkaline basalts and high-Mg basaltic andesites from the High Cascades. MBVF basalts have higher MgO and lower CaO and Al2O3 than typical CAB and HAOT, grading to alkalic compositions with TiO2 and Na2O of up to 1.65 and 5.4 wt%, respectively (Sulphur Cr). Phenocryst contents are 5 to 33% (plag + olivine ± cpx) and the lavas are holo- or hypocrystalline with glass contents of up to 15%. The whole rocks are close to equilibrium with olivine cores (range Fo 87-68). Plagioclase cores range from An 88-68. Reconstructed primary basalt compositions give liquidus T and P values (from olivine-liquid equilibria and silica activities) ranging from 1280°C and 1 GPa (Tarn Plateau) to 1350°C and 1.4 GPa (Sulphur Cr), corresponding to the upper mantle above the core of the mantle wedge. These estimates take into account the 1 to 3 wt% initial H2O contents of the basalts calculated using plagioclase cores. Phase equilibria of the primary basalts indicate a similar pressure range of 1-2 GPa and indicate a residual mantle assemblage of harzburgite

  9. 云南腾冲全新世火山岩地球化学特征及其成因%A study on the geochemical characteristics and petrogenesis of Holocene volcanic rocks in the Tengchong volcanic eruption field, Yunnan Province, SW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李欣; 刘嘉麒

    2012-01-01

    Studies of major element, trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of the Hotocene volcanic rocks in the Tengchong volcanic eruption field, including Heikongshan, Dayingshan and Maanshan volcanic rocks, indicate they are high potassium cale-alkaline series rocks including trachybasalt, basaltic trachyandesite, trachyandensite, and dacite. These rocks are enriched in LILE and LREE, and depleted in Nb-Ta-Ti in mantle-normalized incompatible trace element patterns. They have relatively high "Sr/ "Sr (0.705862-0.710614), low l43Nd/144Nd (0.511941 -0.512526) and relatively high radiogenic Pb isotopes (208Pb/204Pb = 38.962-39. 155, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.620~15.659 and, 206Pb/204Pb = 17. 872-18.269). The geochemical characteristics of the Holocene volcanic rocks in the Tengchong volcanic eruptive field indicate that the magma sources of Heikongshan, Dayingshan, Maanshan are from enriched mantle which possibly resulted from palaeo-oceanic crust subduction. The magma sources of these three volcanoes are same but with different evolution stage. The magma evolution of Dayingshan is higher than that of Heikongshan and Maanshan. The comparison with geochemical characteristics of post - collisional K-rich rocks in South Tibet shows that the magma sources of Holocene volcanic rocks in the Tengchong volcanic eruption field and post-collisional K-rich rocks in South Tibet are different%通过对腾冲火山群的黑空山、打莺山和马鞍山火山岩主量元素、微量元素、Sr-Nd-Pb同位素地球化学的研究表明,腾冲全新世火山岩为高钾钙碱性系列,包括粗面玄武岩、玄武粗安岩、粗面安山岩和英安岩.该套火山岩富集大离子亲石元素和轻稀土元素,亏损Nb-Ta-Ti不相容元素,具有高的87Sr/86Sr比值(0.705862 ~0.710614),低的143Nd/144Nd比值(0.511941~0.512526)和较高的放射性成因Pb同位素组成(208Pb/204Pb =38.962~ 39.155;207Pb/204Pb=15.620 ~ 15.659;206Pb/204Pb=17.872~18.269).主量、微量和同

  10. New geochronological constraints of the Lassen segment's regional volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germa, A.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Malservisi, R.; Tavarez, S.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Clynne, M. A.; Perry, C.; Quidelleur, X.; Ricci, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Lassen region is the southernmost active volcanic field in the Cascade Range. Since ~3.5 Ma distributed mafic to intermediate calc-alkaline magmas continuously built hundreds of cinder cones, lava flows, and a few small shield volcanoes. A set of 10 new unspiked K-Ar ages obtained on groundmass separates help reveal the timing of this regional volcanism. Although most lavas show a high atmospheric contamination level and a low K content, significant ages were obtained with this technique. Shields were dated at about 2.5 Ma (Clynne and Muffler, 2010) and are commonly dissected by erosion. However, we obtained a K-Ar age of 374 ± 25 ka for the late lava flow at the summit of Crater Mountain, which is less eroded than the other shields. This indicates that this regional volcano's activity overlapped that of the Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC), and raises questions regarding the ages of other shields. The Caribou Volcanic field (CVF), at the eastern boundary of the Lassen region, was also contemporaneous with the LVC. The field's activity initiated ~425 ka ago, but does not appear to have extended into the Holocene (Clynne and Muffler, 2010). We obtained a K-Ar age of 296 ± 13 ka on the basaltic andesite of Eleanor Lake, extending further the activity of the Caribou sequence. Our K-Ar age of 59 ± 3 ka on a basaltic flow confirms that the Bidwell Spring Chain was active between 20 and 70 ka as previously shown. We dated the basaltic andesite tuya of Turnaround Lake at 4 ± 5 ka. However, this conflicts with the timing of Tuya chain (15-18 ka). Finally, to the south-west of LVC, basalts of Cold Creek Butte yield an age of 207 ± 26 ka, and we dated a basaltic flow from Inskip Hill at ~5 ka. The new ages obtained, especially the Holocene ones, are consistent with magnetotelluric soundings and gravity data that show mid-crustal anomalies in the back-arc (Tavarez, 2015). These data demonstrate that the CVF is still active and has the potential for future eruptions.

  11. Using 40Ar/39Ar ages of intercalated silicic tuffs to date flood basalts: Precise ages for Steens Basalt Member of the Columbia River Basalt Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahood, Gail A.; Benson, Thomas R.

    2017-02-01

    To establish causality between flood basalt eruptions and extinction events and global environmental effects recorded by isotopic excursions in marine sediments, highly accurate and precise ages for the flood basalts are required. But flood basalts are intrinsically difficult to date. We illustrate how 40Ar/39Ar feldspar ages for silicic tuffs intercalated with and overlying sections of Steens Basalt, the earliest lavas of the Middle Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group in the northwestern United States, provide high-precision ages that, for the first time, make it possible to resolve age differences with stratigraphic position within a section of these flood lavas. The stratigraphically lowest rhyolitic tuff, a fall deposit, yielded an age of 16.592 ± ± 0.028 Ma (FCs = 28.02 Ma), and the uppermost, the alkali rhyolite ignimbrite Tuff of Oregon Canyon, is 16.468 ± ± 0.014 Ma. The argon and stratigraphic data indicate that Steens Basalt eruptions occurred from ∼16.64 to 16.43 Ma in the southern end of its distribution. We estimate that the Steens Mountain geomagnetic reversal occurred at 16.496 ± ± 0.028 Ma (±0.18 Ma total error). Our estimates of the timing for initiation of volcanism and volumetric eruptive rates do not seem to support volcanic forcing by the initial stages of Columbia River Basalt Group eruptions as an explanation for the abrupt warming and carbonate dissolution at the beginning of the Miocene Climatic Optimum.

  12. A Disequilibrium Melting Spectrum: Partially Melted Crustal Xenoliths from the Wudalianchi Volcanic Field, NE China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, C. L.; McGee, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Disequilibrium melting has been established as a common process occurring during crustal anatexis and thus demonstrates that crustal assimilation by ascending mantle-derived magmas is likley not a closed system. Observations of extreme compositional heterogeneity within partial melts derived from crustal xenoliths have been documented in several recent examples, however, the retention or transfer of elements to and from residues and glasses, and their relative contributions to potential crustal contaminants warrants further investigation. Sampled lavas from the Huoshaoshan volcano in the Holocene Wudalianchi volcanic field of Northeast China contain crustal xenoliths which preserve a spectrum of partial melting both petrographically and geochemically, thus providing an excellent, natural example of crustal anatexis. Correlations exist between the volume of silicic glass preserved within the xenoliths and bulk rock SiO2 (70-83 wt%), Al2O3 (16-8 wt%), glass 87Sr/86Sr (0.715-0.908), abundances of elements common in feldspars and micas (Sr, Ba, Rb) and elements common in accessory minerals (Y, Zr, Nb). These correlations are likely associated with the consumption of feldspars and micas and the varying retention of accessory phases during partial melting. The xenoliths which contain the greater volumes of silicic glass and residual quartz (interpreted as being the most melted) were found within pahoehoe lava, whilst the least melted xenoliths were found within scoria of the summit cone of Huoshaoshan; thus it is interpreted that the extent of melting is linked to the immersion time in the lava. Small-scale (mm) mingling and transfer of material from the enclosing lava to the xenolith is observed, however, modelling of potential contaminant compositions is inconsistent with crustal contamination during lava petrogenesis. It is inferred that crustal contamination in sampled lavas is localized within the open magmatic system and most likely occurs at the contact zone

  13. A geostatistical method applied to the geochemical study of the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robidoux, P.; Roberge, J.; Urbina Oviedo, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    The origin of magmatism and the role of the subducted Coco's Plate in the Chichinautzin volcanic field (CVF), Mexico is still a subject of debate. It has been established that mafic magmas of alkali type (subduction) and calc-alkali type (OIB) are produced in the CVF and both groups cannot be related by simple fractional crystallization. Therefore, many geochemical studies have been done, and many models have been proposed. The main goal of the work present here is to provide a new tool for the visualization and interpretation of geochemical data using geostatistics and geospatial analysis techniques. It contains a complete geodatabase built from referred samples over the 2500 km2 area of CVF and its neighbour stratovolcanoes (Popocatepetl, Iztaccihuatl and Nevado de Toluca). From this database, map of different geochemical markers were done to visualise geochemical signature in a geographical manner, to test the statistic distribution with a cartographic technique and highlight any spatial correlations. The distribution and regionalization of the geochemical signatures can be viewed in a two-dimensional space using a specific spatial analysis tools from a Geographic Information System (GIS). The model of spatial distribution is tested with Linear Decrease (LD) and Inverse Distance Weight (IDW) interpolation technique because they best represent the geostatistical characteristics of the geodatabase. We found that ratio of Ba/Nb, Nb/Ta, Th/Nb show first order tendency, which means visible spatial variation over a large scale area. Monogenetic volcanoes in the center of the CVF have distinct values compare to those of the Popocatepetl-Iztaccihuatl polygenetic complex which are spatially well defined. Inside the Valley of Mexico, a large quantity of monogenetic cone in the eastern portion of CVF has ratios similar to the Iztaccihuatl and Popocatepetl complex. Other ratios like alkalis vs SiO2, V/Ti, La/Yb, Zr/Y show different spatial tendencies. In that case, second

  14. The tropospheric processing of acidic gases and hydrogen sulphide in volcanic gas plumes as inferred from field and model investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aiuppa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the constraints on the atmospheric fate and depletion rates of acidic compounds persistently emitted by non-erupting (quiescent volcanoes is important for quantitatively predicting the environmental impact of volcanic gas plumes. Here, we present new experimental data coupled with modelling studies to investigate the chemical processing of acidic volcanogenic species during tropospheric dispersion. Diffusive tube samplers were deployed at Mount Etna, a very active open-conduit basaltic volcano in eastern Sicily, and Vulcano Island, a closed-conduit quiescent volcano in the Aeolian Islands (northern Sicily. Sulphur dioxide (SO2, hydrogen sulphide (H2S, hydrogen chloride (HCl and hydrogen fluoride (HF concentrations in the volcanic plumes (typically several minutes to a few hours old were repeatedly determined at distances from the summit vents ranging from 0.1 to ~10 km, and under different environmental conditions. At both volcanoes, acidic gas concentrations were found to decrease exponentially with distance from the summit vents (e.g., SO2 decreases from ~10 000 μg/m3at 0.1 km from Etna's vents down to ~7 μg/m3 at ~10 km distance, reflecting the atmospheric dilution of the plume within the acid gas-free background troposphere. Conversely, SO2/HCl, SO2/HF, and SO2/H2S ratios in the plume showed no systematic changes with plume aging, and fit source compositions within analytical error. Assuming that SO2 losses by reaction are small during short-range atmospheric transport within quiescent (ash-free volcanic plumes, our observations suggest that, for these short transport distances, atmospheric reactions for H2S and halogens are also negligible. The one-dimensional model MISTRA was used to simulate quantitatively the evolution of halogen and sulphur compounds in the plume of Mt. Etna. Model predictions support the hypothesis of minor HCl chemical processing during plume transport, at least in cloud-free conditions. Larger

  15. Melding Research on the Navajo Volcanic Field into Undergraduate Curriculum to Promote Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation highlights the curricular design and preliminary outcomes of undergraduate research in the Department of Geosciences at Fort Lewis College (FLC), supported by an NSF-RUI project on the Navajo volcanic field (NVF). A prime impact of this project was to support the education and career development of undergraduate students by further developing basic knowledge and skills in the context of authentic inquiry on petrologic-based research topics. Integrating research into the curriculum promoted scientific habits of mind by engaging students as "active agents" in discovery, and the creative development and testing of ideas. It also gave students a sense of ownership in the scientific process and knowledge construction. The initial phase of this project was conducted in Igneous Petrology at FLC in 2010. Eleven students were enrolled in this course which allowed them to work as a team in collaboration with the PI, and engage in all aspects of research to further develop and hone their skills in scientific inquiry. This course involved a small component of traditional lecture in which selected topics were discussed to provide students with a foundation to understand magmatic processes. This was complemented by a comprehensive review of the literature in which students read and discussed a spectrum of articles on Tertiary magmatism in the western United States and the NVF. Invited lectures by leading-scientists in geology provided opportunities for discussions and interaction with professional geologists. All of the students in the class engaged in the active collection of petrologic data in the field and laboratory sessions, and were introduced to the use of state-of-the art analytical tools as part of their experiences. Four students were recruited from the course to design, develop, and conduct long-term research projects on selected petrologic topics in the NVF. This research allowed these students to engage in the "messy" process of testing existing

  16. Paleomagnetic Study of a Miocene Deformation in a Region Close to the Camargo Volcanic Field, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogau-Chong, K.; Bohnel, H.; Aranda Gomez, J.

    2009-05-01

    The Sierra the Aguachile is a Miocene volcanic sequence located in the SE of Chihuahua State NW of the Camargo volcanic field and belongs to the Agua Mayo Group, which unconformably overlays Mesozoic calcareous units. The Sierra de Aguachile sequence defines a structure that may be interpreted as a plunging fold, which could be the result of a reactivation of the San Marcos Fault. This major fault is well known more to the east but may extend into the study area where it would be covered by the younger volcanic sequences; its main activity has been reported to be during the the Neocomian with reactivation phases in the Paleogene and Miocene. To test if the observed structure is the result of a tectonic deformation that happened after the emplacement of the volcanic sequence, a paleomagnetic study was carried out. A total of 14 sites were sampled from different parts of the structure, all in the capping ignimbrite layers. Site mean directions were determined using AF demagnetization. The fold test was applied to analyze if the remanence was acquired in situ or before the proposed folding. Precision parameters k before and after application of the tectonic corrections are 25.38 and 31.43, respectively. This indicates that the Sierra de Aguachile indeed was folded after emplacement of the ignimbrites, which restricts the age of the corresponding tectonic event to be younger than 31.3 +/- 0.7 Ma. Due to the gentle folding though, the difference in precision parameters is not significant at the 95% probability level.

  17. Revisiting the Jurassic Geomagnetic Reversal recorded in the Lesotho Basalt (Southern Africa)

    CERN Document Server

    Prévot, M; Thompson, J; Faynot, L; Perrin, M; Camps, P; Prevot, Michel; Roberts, Neil; Thompson, John; Faynot, Liliane; Perrin, Mireille; Camps, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    We carried out a detailed and continuous paleomagnetic sampling of the reversed to normal geomagnetic transition recorded by some 60 consecutive flow units near the base of the Lesotho Basalt (183  1 Ma). After alternating field or thermal cleaning the directions of remanence are generally well clustered within flow units. In contrast, the thermal instability of the samples did not allow to obtain reliable paleointensity determinations. The geomagnetic transition is incompletely recorded due to a gap in volcanic activity attested both by eolian deposits and a large angular distance between the field directions of the flows underlying or overlying these deposits. The transition path is noticeably different from that reported in the pioneer work of van Zijl et al. (1962). The most transitional Virtual Geomagnetic Poles are observed after the volcanic hiatus. Once continents are replaced in their relative position 180 Ma ago, the post-hiatus VGP cluster over Russia. However, two successive rebounds f...

  18. Style of Plate Spreading Derived from the 2008-2014 Velocity Field Across the Northern Volcanic Zone of Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, V.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Ofeigsson, B.; Sturkell, E.; Einarsson, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ) of Iceland is a subaerial part of the divergent boundary between the North-American and Eurasian Plates. At this latitude, the full spreading between the plates is accommodated by the NVZ. We derived the plate boundary velocity field from GPS campaign and continuous measurements between 2008 and 2014, a time period free of any magma intrusion. Average velocities were estimated in the ITRF08 reference frame. The overall extension is consistent with 18 mm/yr in the 104°N direction spreading, in accordance with the MORVEL2010 plate motion model. We find that a 40km-wide band along the plate boundary accommodates about 75% of the full plate velocities. Within this zone, the average strain rate is approximately 0.35 μstrain/yr. The deformation field and the strain rate are, however, much affected by other sources of deformations in the NVZ. These include magmatic sources at the most active volcanic centers, glacial rebound near the ice-caps and geothermal power-plant water extraction. Magmatic sources include a shallow magma chamber deflation under Askja caldera, as well as under Þeistareykir and eventual deep magma inflation north of Krafla volcano. Vatnajökull ice cap melting causes large uplift and outward displacements in the southern part of the NVZ. The two geothermal power-plants near Krafla are inducing local deflations. Our GPS velocities show a 35° change in the direction of the plate boundary axis north of Askja volcano that we infer to be linked to the geometric arrangement of volcanic systems within the NVZ.We use a simple arctangent model to describe the plate spreading to provide constraints on the location and the locking depth of the spreading axis. For that purpose we divided the area in short overlapping segments having the same amount of GPS points along the plate spreading direction and inverted for the location of the center of the spreading axis and locking depth. With this simple model we can account for most

  19. Martian Habitability Studies in Two Field Earth Analogues: the Permafrost in the Imuruk Lake Basaltic Field (alaska) and the Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gómez, Felipe; Rodriguez-Manfredi, Jose-Antonio; Perez, Lidia; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Amils, Ricardo; Gomez-Elvira, Javier

    We are developing a Universal Habitability Index for life prospection studies in space missions. Authors will present in this abstract the results of the application of the habitability index in two field case studies: Alaskan permafrost and Atacama Desert. We are using extreme envi-ronments as test facilities from an Astrobiological perspective, in order to reach three main objectives: 1) Define preservation patterns of biosignatures in extreme environments (cold, low water stress, high radiation. . . ) that may be used in future space exploration missions; 2) develop new instrumentation for detecting life in situ or remotely, and for new instrumenta-tion for detection and mapping of extreme niches where life (or biochemical tracers of past life) may be preserved and 3) develop an Universal Habitability Index for space astrobiolog-ical mission application (Mars or Europa life prospection). These aims will be achieved by selected site characterization using geophysical sounding and drilling, atmospheric characteri-zation by meteorological analysis, soil water and temperature profile analysis and, finally, by sampling different levels of the rock cores and analyzing their mineralogy, geochemistry and microbiology in laboratory. First case: studying the permafrost in the Imuruk lake volcanic field area (Alaska): In order to map the permafrost underground, electric tomography sounding was performed. Resulting tomographic data indicate that the permafrost of the studied area is at a mean depth of 0.50 meter from the surface, sometimes even shallower. Drilling points were selected depending on the permafrost depth known from the tomographic data analysis. Three perforations were done all along the hill. Samples were collected at several depths in the three holes for mineralogical, geochemical and biological analysis. They were in situ fixed with formaldehyde in order to be maintained till laboratory analysis was developed. Several growth fresh media were inoculated with

  20. Feasibility of using the magnetotelluric method for sub- basalt imaging at Kachchh, India%利用大地电磁资料对玄武岩成像的可行性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dhananjai Pandey; Lucy MacGregor; Martin Sinha; Satish Singh

    2008-01-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method has been among the favorite supporting tools for seismic imaging of sub-salt and sub-basalt targets. In this paper we present an example from Kachchh, India (where basaltic rocks overlie Mesozoic sedimentary rocks), and discuss the feasibility of using MT method as an exploration tool in this geological setting. Our results highlight the difference in magnetotelluric response caused by the thin intra-basalt layering. The key issue addressed in this paper is what MT can and cannot provide in such geological settings. First, we compute apparent resistivity and phase response curves using representative resistivity-depth models and borehole data from the study area. Later, we compare these results to assess the plausibility of using MT to image the sub-volcanic sediments at Kachchh. Finally, we substantiate our discussion through one-dimensional inversion of the field observed MT data from this region that exhibits poor sensitivity of MT for thin basalt layers.

  1. Geochemical characteristics of the oceanic island- type volcanic rocks in the Chiang Mai zone, northern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shangyue; FENG Qinglai; ZHANG Zhibin; CHONGPAN Chonglakmani

    2009-01-01

    The oceanic island volcanic rocks in the Chiang Mai zone, northern Thailand, are usually covered by Lower Carboniferous and Upper Permian shallow-water carbonate rocks, with the Hawaii rocks and potash trachybasalt being the main rock types. The alkaline series is dominant with sub-alkaline series occurring in few cases. The geochemical characteristics are described as follows: the major chemical compositions are characterized by high TiO2, high P2O5 and medium K2O; the rare-earth elements are characterized by right-inclined strong LREE-enrichment patterns; the trace element patterns are of the upward-bulging K-Ti enrichment type; multi-component plots falling within the fields of oceanic island basalts and alkali basalts, belonging to the oceanic island-type volcanic rocks, which are similar to the equivalents in Deqin and Gengma (the Changning-Menglian zone) of Yunnan Province, China.

  2. Evolution and genesis of volcanic rocks from Mutnovsky Volcano, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Robertson, K.; Smith, E.; Selyangin, O.; Kiryukhin, A.; Mulcahy, S. R.; Walker, J. D.

    2014-10-01

    This study presents new geochemical data for Mutnovsky Volcano, located on the volcanic front of the southern portion of the Kamchatka arc. Field relationships show that Mutnovsky Volcano is comprised of four distinct stratocones, which have grown over that past 80 ka. The youngest center, Mutnovsky IV, has produced basalts and basaltic andesites only. The three older centers (Mutnovsky I, II, III) are dominated by basalt and basaltic andesite (60-80% by volume), but each has also produced small volumes of andesite and dacite. Across centers of all ages, Mutnovsky lavas define a tholeiitic igneous series, from 48-70% SiO2. Basalts and basaltic andesites have relatively low K2O and Na2O, and high FeO* and Al2O3 compared to volcanic rocks throughout Kamchatka. The mafic lavas are also depleted in the light rare earth elements (REEs), with chondrite-normalized La/Sm arc volcanic rocks worldwide. Radiogenic isotope ratios (Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf) are similar for samples from all four eruptive centers, and indicate that all samples were produced by melting of a similar source mixture. No clear age-progressive changes are evident in the compositions of Mutnovsky lavas. Mass balance and assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) modeling of major and rare earth elements (REEs) indicate that basaltic andesites were produced by FC of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine from a parental basalt, combined with assimilation of a melt composition similar to dacite lavas present at Mutnovsky. This modeling also indicates that andesites were produced by FC of plagioclase from basaltic andesite, combined with assimilation of dacite. Dacites erupted from Mutnovsky I and II have low abundances of REEs, and do not appear to be related to mafic magmas by FC or AFC processes. These dacites are modeled as the products of dehydration partial melting at mid-crustal levels of a garnet-free, amphibole-bearing basaltic rock, which itself formed in the mid-crust by emplacement of magma that

  3. Origin of High-Alumina Basalt, Andesite, and Dacite Magmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W

    1964-10-30

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it.

  4. Heterogeneous source components of intraplate basalts from NE China induced by the ongoing Pacific slab subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan; Xia, Qun-Ke; Ingrin, Jannick; Deloule, Etienne; Bi, Yao

    2017-02-01

    The subduction of oceanic slabs is widely accepted to be a main reason for chemical heterogeneities in the mantle. However, determining the contributions of slabs in areas that have experienced multiple subduction events is often difficult due to possible overlapping imprints. Understanding the temporal and spatial variations of source components for widespread intraplate small volume basalts in eastern China may be a basis for investigating the influence of the subducted Pacific slab, which has long been postulated but never confirmed. For this purpose, we investigated the Chaihe-aershan volcanic field (including more than 35 small-volume Quaternary basaltic volcanoes) in NE China and measured the oxygen isotopes and water content of clinopyroxene (cpx) phenocrysts using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. The water content of magma was then estimated based on the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and the basaltic melt. The δ18O of cpx phenocrysts (4.28‰ to 8.57‰) and H2O content of magmas (0.19 wt.%-2.70 wt.%) show large variations, reflecting the compositional heterogeneity of the mantle source. The δ18O values and H2O content within individual samples also display considerable variation, suggesting the mixing of magmas and that the magma mixing occurred shortly before the eruption. The relation between the δ18O values of cpx phenocrysts and the H2O/Ce ratio, Ba/Th ratio and Eu anomaly of whole rocks demonstrates the contributions of three components to the mantle source (hydrothermally altered upper oceanic crust and marine sediments, altered lower gabbroic oceanic crust, and ambient mantle). The proportions of these three components have varied widely over time (∼1.37 Ma to ∼0.25 Ma). The Pacific slab is constantly subducted under eastern Asia and continuously transports recycled materials to the deep mantle. The temporal heterogeneity of the source components may be caused

  5. The VORISA Project: An Integrated Approach to Assessing Volcanic Hazard and Risk in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, J. M.; Moufti, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has numerous large monogenetic volcanic fields, known locally as 'Harrat'. The largest of these, Harrat Rahat, produced a basaltic fissure eruption in 1256 AD with lava flows travelling within 20 km of the Islamic holy city Al-Madinah. With over 900 visible basaltic and trachytic vents and periodic seismic swarms indicating stalled eruptions, an understanding of the risk of future eruptions in this volcanic field is vital. To systematically address this need we developed the Volcanic Risk in Saudi Arabia (VORISA) Project, a 3-year, multi-disciplinary international research collaboration that integrates geological, geophysical, hazard and risk studies. Detailed mapping and geochemical studies are being combined with new and existing age determinations to determine the style and sequence of events during past basaltic and trachytic eruptions. Data from gravity and magnetotelluric surveys are being integrated with microearthquake data from an 8-station borehole seismic research array to geophysically characterise the structure and nature of the crust, and thus constrain possible physical controls on magma propagation. All available data are being synthesised in hazard models to determine patterns in eruption frequency, magnitude, and style of past activity, as well as the probable location and style of a future event. Combined with geospatial vulnerability data, these hazard models, which include a reconstruction of the 1256 AD eruption, enable us to calculate and communicate volcanic risk to the city of Al-Madinah.

  6. Can we identify source lithology of basalt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zong-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The nature of source rocks of basaltic magmas plays a fundamental role in understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the solid earth. However, identification of source lithology of basalts remains uncertainty. Using a parameterization of multi-decadal melting experiments on a variety of peridotite and pyroxenite, we show here that a parameter called FC3MS value (FeO/CaO-3*MgO/SiO2, all in wt%) can identify most pyroxenite-derived basalts. The continental oceanic island basalt-like volcanic rocks (MgO>7.5%) (C-OIB) in eastern China and Mongolia are too high in the FC3MS value to be derived from peridotite source. The majority of the C-OIB in phase diagrams are equilibrium with garnet and clinopyroxene, indicating that garnet pyroxenite is the dominant source lithology. Our results demonstrate that many reputed evolved low magnesian C-OIBs in fact represent primary pyroxenite melts, suggesting that many previous geological and petrological interpretations of basalts based on the single peridotite model need to be reconsidered.

  7. Monogenetic volcanoes fed by interconnected dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Navajo Nation, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, James D.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Re, Giuseppe; White, James D. L.; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Although monogenetic volcanic fields pose hazards to major cities worldwide, their shallow magma feeders (volcanic field, Arizona, to shed light on the nature of its magma feeder system. Shallow exposures reveal a transition zone between intrusion and eruption within 350 m of the syn-eruptive surface. Using a combination of field- and satellite-based observations, we have identified three types of shallow magma systems: (1) dike-dominated, (2) sill-dominated, and (3) interconnected dike-sill networks. Analysis of vent alignments using the pyroclastic massifs and other eruptive centers (e.g., maar-diatremes) shows a NW-SE trend, parallel to that of dikes in the region. We therefore infer that dikes fed many of the eruptions. Dikes are also observed in places transforming to transgressive (ramping) sills. Estimates of the observable volume of dikes (maximum volume of 1.90 × 106 m3) and sills (minimum volume of 8.47 × 105 m3) in this study reveal that sills at Hopi Buttes make up at least 30 % of the shallow intruded volume (∼2.75 × 106 m3 total) within 350 m of the paeosurface. We have also identified saucer-shaped sills, which are not traditionally associated with monogenetic volcanic fields. Our study demonstrates that shallow feeders in monogenetic fields can form geometrically complex networks, particularly those intruding poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. We conclude that the Hopi Buttes eruptions were primarily fed by NW-SE-striking dikes. However, saucer-shaped sills also played an important role in modulating eruptions by transporting magma toward and away from eruptive conduits. Sill development could have been accompanied by surface uplifts on the order of decimeters. We infer that the characteristic feeder systems described here for the Hopi Buttes may underlie monogenetic fields elsewhere, particularly where magma intersects shallow, and often weak, sedimentary rocks. Results from this study support growing evidence of the

  8. Fracture development within a stratovolcano: The Karaha-Telaga Bodas geothermal field, Java volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemcok, M.; Moore, J.N.; Allis, R.; McCulloch, J.

    2004-01-01

    Karaha-Telaga Bodas, a vapour-dominated geothermal system located in an active volcano in western Java, is penetrated by more than two dozen deep geothermal wells reaching depths of 3 km. Detailed paragenetic and fluid-inclusion studies from over 1000 natural fractures define the liquid-dominated, transitional and vapour-dominated stages in the evolution of this system. The liquid-dominated stage was initiated by ashallow magma intrusion into the base of the volcanic cone. Lava and pyroclastic flows capped a geothermal system. The uppermost andesite flows were only weakly fractured due to the insulating effect of the intervening altered pyroclastics, which absorbed the deformation. Shear and tensile fractures that developed were filled with carbonates at shallow depths, and by quartz, epidote and actinolite at depths and temperatures over 1 km and 300??C. The system underwent numerous cycles of overpressuring, documented by subhorizontal tensile fractures, anastomosing tensile fracture patterns and implosion breccias. The development of the liquidsystem was interrupted by a catastrophic drop in fluid pressures. As the fluids boiled in response to this pressure drop, chalcedony and quartz were selectively deposited in fractures that had the largest apertures and steep dips. The orientations of these fractures indicate that the escaping overpressured fluids used the shortest possible paths to the surface. Vapour-dominated conditions were initiated at this time within a vertical chimney overlying the still hot intrusion. As pressures declined, these conditions spread outward to form the marginal vapour-dominated region encountered in the drill holes. Downward migration of the chimney, accompanied by growth of the marginal vapour-dominated regime, occurred as the intrusion cooled and the brittle-ductile transition migrated to greater depths. As the liquids boiled off, condensate that formed at the top of the vapour-dominated zone percolated downward and low

  9. Petrology and Geochemistry of Hydrothermally Altered Volcanic Rocks in the Iheya North Hydrothermal Field, Middle Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Iheya North hydrothermal field is located in the middle Okinawa Trough, a young and actively spreading back-arc basin extending behind the Ryukyu arc-trench system in the southeastern margin of the East China Sea. In this hydrothermal field, two scientific drilling expeditions (IODP Exp 331 and SIP CK14-04) were conducted using a deep-sea drilling vessel "Chikyu," and samples from a total of 27 holes were taken. Through these expeditions, Kuroko-type volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits (VMS), hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks, and pumiceous and pelagic sediments were recovered. The recovered core provided important information about the relationship between hydrothermal activity, alteration, and ore mineralization. Whole-rock major element composition and trace element (TE) patterns of pumices were very similar to those of rhyolites in the middle Okinawa Trough (RMO). However, pumices were relatively enriched in chalcophile elements Sr and Nb, which suggest incipient mineralization. Volcanic rock generally demonstrated strong silicification and was greenish pale gray in color. Regardless of severe alteration, some rock displayed major element composition broadly similar to the RMO. Alteration was evidenced by an increase in the content of SiO2 and MgO, and decrease in Al2O3, Na2O, and K2O content. The most striking geochemical feature of altered volcanic rock was the discordance between texture and the degree of modification of TEs. Some samples showed decussate texture occupied by petal-like quartz with severe silicification, but no prominent disturbance of concentration and patterns of TEs were observed. In contrast, samples with well-preserved igneous porphyritic texture showed very low TE content and modification of TE patterns. These results suggest that the modification of texture and composition of TEs, as well as silicification, do not occur by a uniform process, but several processes. This may reflect the differences in temperature and the

  10. Recent eruptive episodes of the Rungwe volcanic field (Tanzania) recorded in lacustrine sediments of the Northern malawi rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T. M.; Henney, P. J.; Owen, R. B.

    1993-07-01

    Discrete ash horizons in Holocene sediments from northern Lake Malawi provide evidence of six eruptive episodes within the nearby Rungwe Volcanic Field between c.9000-360 BP. Rare earth element (REE) analyses show the ash layers to be strongly enriched in La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Tb, Dy, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu, with low Eu/Eu∗ and high La N/Sm N values, relative to the surrounding muds. Mixing calculations suggest possible affinities between the Rungwe ash emissions and silicic volcanics from other important Quaternary centres (e.g. Naivasha) with respect to HREE geochemistry. The LREE spectra are less comparable and may indicate a less fractionated ash assemblage for Rungwe Field. In the absence of clear in situ evidence regarding the timing and frequency of Holocene eruptions at Rungwe, the Lake Malawi sediments may prove a valuable reconstructive tool. However, the direction and extent of ash dispersal is strongly controlled by wind/climatic factors and the retention of a complete record at any single location is unlikely.

  11. The Cerro Bitiche Andesitic Field: petrological diversity and implications for magmatic evolution of mafic volcanic centers from the northern Puna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maro, Guadalupe; Caffe, Pablo J.

    2016-07-01

    The Cerro Bitiche Andesitic Field (CBAF) is one of the two largest mafic volcanic fields in northern Puna (22-24° S) and is spatially and temporally associated with ignimbrites erupted from some central Andean Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex calderas. The CBAF comprises seven scoria cones and widespread high-K calcalkaline lava flows that cover an area of 200 km2. Although all erupted rocks have a relatively narrow chemical range (56-62 % SiO2, 3-6 % MgO), there is a broad diversity of mineral compositions and textures. The least evolved lavas (˜58-61 % SiO2) are high-Mg andesites with scarce (andesites (˜62 wt% SiO2), on the other hand, are porphyritic rocks with plagioclase + orthopyroxene + biotite and ubiquitous phenocryst disequilibrium textures. These magmas were likely stored in crustal reservoirs, where they experienced convection caused by mafic magma underplating, magma mixing, and/or assimilation. Trace element and mineral compositions of CBAF lavas provide evidence for complex evolution of distinct magma batches.

  12. Geochemical Characteristics and Metallogenesis of Volcanic Rocks as Exemplified by Volcanic Rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁庚; 叶霖

    1997-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang,occurring in the collision zone between the Siberia Plate and the Junggar Plate,are distributed along the Eritix River Valley in northern Xinjiang.The volcanic rocks were dated at Late Paleozoic and can be divided into the spilite-keratophyre series and the basalt-andesite series.The spilite-keratophyre series volcanic rocks occur in the Altay orogenic belt at the southwest margin of the Siberia Plate.In addition to sodic volcanic rocks.There are also associated potassic-sodic volcanic rocks and potassic volcanic rocks.The potassic-sodic volcanic rocks occur at the bottom of the eruption cycle and control the distribution of Pb and Zn deposits.The potassic volcanic rocks occur at the top of the eruption cycle and are associated with Au and Cu mineralizations.The sodic volcanic rocks occur in the middle stage of eruption cycle and control the occurrence of Cu(Zn) deposits.The basalt-andesite series volcanic rocks distributed in the North Junggar orogenic belt at the north margin of the Junggar-Kazakstan Plate belong to the potassic sodic volcain rocks.The volcanic rocks distributed along the Ulungur fault are relatively rich in sodium and poor in potassium and are predominated by Cu mineralization and associated with Au mineralization.Those volcanic rocks distributed along the Ertix fault are relatively rich in K and poor in Na,with Au mineralization being dominant.

  13. Recurrence models of volcanic events: Applications to volcanic risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Picard, R.; Valentine, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Perry, F.V. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-03-01

    An assessment of the risk of future volcanism has been conducted for isolation of high-level radioactive waste at the potential Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada. Risk used in this context refers to a combined assessment of the probability and consequences of future volcanic activity. Past studies established bounds on the probability of magmatic disruption of a repository. These bounds were revised as additional data were gathered from site characterization studies. The probability of direct intersection of a potential repository located in an eight km{sup 2} area of Yucca Mountain by ascending basalt magma was bounded by the range of 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}10} yr{sup {minus}1 2}. The consequences of magmatic disruption of a repository were estimated in previous studies to be limited. The exact releases from such an event are dependent on the strike of an intruding basalt dike relative to the repository geometry, the timing of the basaltic event relative to the age of the radioactive waste and the mechanisms of release and dispersal of the waste radionuclides in the accessible environment. The combined low probability of repository disruption and the limited releases associated with this event established the basis for the judgement that the risk of future volcanism was relatively low. It was reasoned that that risk of future volcanism was not likely to result in disqualification of the potential Yucca Mountain site.

  14. Neogene volcanism in Gutai Mts. (Eastern Carpathains: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinel Kovacs

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Two types of volcanism developed in Gutâi Mts. (inner volcanic chain of Eastern Carpathians: a felsic, extensional/“back-arc” type and an intermediate, arc type. The felsic volcanism of explosive origin, consisting of caldera-related rhyolitic ignimbrites and resedimented volcaniclastics, had taken place during Early-Middle Badenian and Early Sarmatian. The intermediate volcanism, consisting of extrusive (effusive and explosive and intrusive activity, had developed during Sarmatian and Pannonian (13.4-7.0 Ma. It is represented by typical calc-alkaline series, from basalts to rhyolites. Lava flows of basaltic andesites and andesites are predominant, often emplaced in subaqueous environment. Extrusive domes, mainly composed of dacites, are associated to the andesitic volcanic structures. The intermediate volcanism, consisting of extrusive (effusive and explosive and intrusive activity, had developed during Sarmatian and Pannonian (13.4-7.0 Ma. It is represented by typical calc-alkaline series, from basalts to rhyolites. Lava flows of basaltic andesites and andesites are predominant, often emplaced in subaqueous environment. Extrusive domes, mainly composed of dacites, are associated to the andesitic volcanic structures. The geochemical study on the volcanic rocks shows the calc-alkaline character of both felsic and intermediate volcanism and typical subduction zones geochemical signatures for the intermediate one. The felsic volcanism shows affinities with subduction-related rocks as well. The main petrogenetic process in Gutâi Mts. was crustal assimilation, strongly constrained by trace element and isotope geochemistry.

  15. Geochemical variations in the Quaternary Andean back-arc volcanism, southern Mendoza, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espanon, Venera R.; Chivas, Allan R.; Kinsley, Leslie P. J.; Dosseto, Anthony

    2014-11-01

    The Payenia Basaltic Province (PBP) is located 450 km east of the Chile-Peru trench in central west Argentina, behind the Andean arc front, constituting the back-arc. In order to evaluate the influence of the subducting slab as well as the magmatic source of this region, two volcanic fields located at comparable distance to the trench, having abundant basaltic products and similar eruptive timeframes were chosen. The Llancanelo (LLVF) and the Payún Matrú (PMVF) volcanic fields are part of the PBP and exhibit abundant basaltic activity during the Pleistocene. The geochemical data suggest that the LLVF has some arc signatures which have been described as weak as they are not as pronounced as in the Andean arc. The weak arc signature is not derived from slab dehydration as high Th enrichment relative to U cannot be explained by this process. We relate the Th enrichment as well as the lack of large residual garnet signatures, to slab sediments in the source. In the case of the PMVF, no arc signature has been inferred despite being only 30 km south of the LLVF. However the PMVF has a composition similar to that of the local intraplate end member, represented by the Rio Colorado volcanic field. The two volcanic fields, LLVF and PMVF, show indications of lower crustal assimilation as they trend towards the lower continental crust end member in Nb/U vs Ce/Pb and Nb/Yb vs Th/Yb diagrams. The geochemical differences between the LLVF and the PMVF as well as between several volcanic fields are illustrated using spatial distribution maps of geochemical ratios. Using this new approach, the decrease in arc signature can be traced in the back-arc and the higher enrichment in high field strength elements (HFSE) relative to large ion lithophile elements (LILE) in the PMVF compared to the LLVF is explicitly shown. These geospatial maps provide a graphical manner to illustrate the presence of two distinct types of volcanism (OIB-like and arc-like) occurring in the same Quaternary

  16. Late Tertiary andesites and basaltic andesites from Khangai, Khingan, and Vitim Plateau: geochemical similarities and differences of sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudneva, Nadezhda; Chuvashova, Irina; Rasskazov, Sergei; Yasnygina, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    Andesite is a typical rock of island arcs and active continental margins. This kind of volcanic rocks is not characteristic for inner parts of continents. Andesites and associated rocks (basaltic andesites, trachyandesites, basaltic trachyandesites) were identified, however, in many Cenozoic volcanic fields of Inner Asia, which was never referred to the mentioned geodynamic settings. To define geodynamic meaning of andesites and related rocks, we present isotopic and geochemical systematics of their sources for three key areas: Khangai, Khingan, and Vitim Plateau. Low-K andesite and basaltic trachyandesite lavas from East Khangai erupted at about 7-6 Ma from lower crustal source with enriched isotopic signatures of Nd and Sr and were followed by high-K mantle-derived basaltic lavas at 5.5-4.8 Ma that show depleted signature in terms of Sr isotopes and enriched one in terms of Nd isotopes. This lava sequence is indicative for delamination of the lower lithosphere beneath the East Khangai orogenic province. Andesite, basaltic andesite, trachyandesite, and basalt lavas from Greater and Lesser Khingan, which are characterized by wide variations of K2O/Na2O ratios, erupted in different areas of the Greater and Lesser Khingan in the time interval from 22 to 1 Ma from heterogeneous crustal and mantle sources with enriched isotopic signatures of Nd and Sr. Unlike the crust-mantle magma-generated processes beneath East Khangai, those beneath Khingan were dispersed in time and space. Basaltic andesite lavas from Vitim Plateau, erupted at 14-13 Ma after high-Mg basanites and picrobasalts, show depleted isotopic signatures of Nd and Sr. In terms of trace-element modeling, lavas of this unit were derived through high-degree partial melting (15-20 %) in the shallow (garnet-free) mantle lithospheric source. The found geochemical grouping of rocks is considered as the basis for systematics of shallow mantle and crustal sources of Cenozoic volcanic rocks from different regions of

  17. Lava tubes from the Paraná-Etendeka Continental Flood Basalt Province: Morphology and importance to emplacement models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waichel, Breno L.; Tratz, Eliza B.; Pietrobelli, Gisele; Jerram, Dougal A.; Calixto, Geovane R.; Bacha, Rafael R.; Tomazzolli, Edison R.; da Silva, Wellington B.

    2013-12-01

    Lava tubes are a common feature in active volcanic areas around the world. They are related to pahoehoe and 'a'ā lava flow fields, that are predominantly basaltic, and form as the most efficient mechanism to transport lava in insulated fedder pathways. Continental Flood Basalt Provinces (CFBs) are thick volcanic sequences of predominantly basaltic lava flows and flow fields, which cover huge areas and are often related to continental breakup. The proposed emplacement model for CFB's is synonymous with the inflation processes observed in modern active flows. Although pahoehoe and 'a'ā lava flows are recognized in CFB's provinces, good examples of lava tubes, pipes or tube systems are rarely reported. Lava feeder systems (tube/pipes) are a common feature of modern pahoehoe flow systems so it would be expected to find good examples in CFB's provinces formed by the same emplacement processes. Here we describe the morphology of two lava tube systems discovered in the Paraná CFB Province in Southern Brazil. Comparisons are made with active systems and the importance of CFB lava tube systems, and their recognition in the rock record, are discussed in the context of the current emplacement model.

  18. H 2O in basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions from four subduction-related volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, T. W.; Layne, G. D.

    1993-06-01

    Total dissolved H 2O and major element abundances were measured in basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions in olivine phenocrysts from Quaternary eruptions of four subduction-related volcanoes to test the hypothesis that low-MgO high-alumina basalts contain high H 2O at depth [1] and to reveal any petrogenetically significant correlations between arc basalt compositions and H 2O contents. Total dissolved H 2O (combined molecular H 2O and OH groups) measured by ion microprobe in mafic glass inclusions from the 1974 eruption of Fuego, Guatemala, reaches 6.2 wt.%. Dissolved H 2O contents decrease in more evolved Fuego glasses. Correlations of H 2O with MgO, Na 2O, K 2O, S and Cl indicate that aqueous fluid exsolution during magma ascent forced crystallization and differentiation of residual liquids. Low-K 2O magnesian high-alumina basalt glass inclusions from the 3 ka eruption of Black Crater (Medicine Lake volcano, California) have low H 2O contents, near 0.2 wt.%, which are consistent with the MORB-like character of these and other primitive lavas of the Medicine Lake region. Basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions from Copco Cone and Goosenest volcano on the Cascade volcanic front north of Mt. Shasta have H 2O contents of up to 3.3 wt.%. The range of H 2O contents in Cascade mafic magmas is too large to have resulted solely from enrichment by crystallization and indicates the participation of an H 2O-rich component in magma generation or crustal-level modification. Whereas fluid-absent melting of amphibole-bearing peridotite can account for the H 2O in most mafic arc liquids, the very high H 2O/alkali ratios of the 1974 Fuego eruptives suggest that an aqueous fluid was involved in the generation of Fuego basalts.

  19. Naming Lunar Mare Basalts: Quo Vadimus Redux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, G.

    1999-01-01

    and ordering. Classification functions as a primary tool of perception, opening up ways of seeing things and sealing off others. Lacking a classification, mare-basalt petrology appears immature with little consensual perception of the qualities and signifigances of the basalts. The appearance may or may not be the reality, but it demonstrates a need for a functioning, communicatory classification, in particular for the dissemination of ideas and the furtherance of studies. Names are inconsistent both among lunar rocks and between lunar and terrestrial rocks. Samples are labeled by elements, chemistry with tags, chemistry cast into mineralogy, or a mineralogical attribute (respective examples A 14 VHK A 17 high-Ti Group B 1, A 15 quartz-normative, A-12 pigeonite). Such inconsistency is bound to lead to confusion. Chemical descriptions mean different things in mildly different contexts: A low-K Fra Mauro basalt (not a basalt!) contains slightly more K than an Apollo 11 high-K basalt. High-alumina means more than about 11% Al2O3 for mare basalts, but 21% for highlands "basalts." Volcanic KREEP basalts, about 18% Al2O3, are not (usually) qualified with "high-alumina." Yet for terrestrial basalts, high-alumina means more than about 17% Al2O3, Further, even very-low-Ti mare basalts have Ti abundances (about 0.5-1.5% Ti02) as great as typical terrestrial basalts. Thus, parallels between lunar and terrestrial nomenclatures are nonexistent (reinforced by the fact that a mare-basalt composition found on Earth would be too ultramafic to name basalt at all). A separate type of name exists for mare-basalt glasses, which are identified by site, color, and a letter for any subsequent distinctions, e.g., A15 Green Glass C. While the inconsistencies cited above by themselves make nomenclature arcane, a greater source of difficulty is the common use of acronyms such as VHK and VLT. Most of these are partly chemical acronyms, but degrading the symbol Ti to T (for instance) makes them

  20. Tracing volatile loss during the eruption of individual flood basalt flows in the Columbia River Flood Basalt Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, K. W.; Vye, C.; Gannoun, A.; Self, S.

    2010-12-01

    Continental flood basalt (CFB) volcanism is characterised by the repeated eruption of huge batches of magma, producing enormous basalt provinces (105-106 km3) over relatively brief intervals of time, and delivering large masses of volcanic gas to the atmosphere. The release of gases and aerosols during CFB volcanism is thought to have had a significant impact on the atmosphere, ocean chemistry and climate [1-3]. The key factors influencing atmospheric chemistry and the environmental impact of CFB eruptions are the timing, mechanism and duration of volatile release during individual eruptions, but for the most part such information remains poorly known. The 187Re-187Os isotope system offers a highly sensitive tracer of the evolution of melt chemistry, and of the timing and mechanism of volatile release. This is partly because the contrasting behaviour of Re and Os during melting results in the extreme fractionation of parent/daughter (Re/Os) isotope ratios, thus magmatic phases can yield precise chronological information, and crustal rocks develop highly radiogenic isotope compositions that can be readily traced if assimilated [4]. Partly also because Re behaves as a highly volatile element during sub-aerial volcanism [5]. This study presents 187Re-187Os isotope data for rocks and minerals from two flows in the Columbia River Flood Basalt Group, one of the youngest flood basalt provinces that formed over a 2 million year interval in the Mid-Miocene. The 2,660 km3 Sand Hollow flow field displays small major and trace element variations, both laterally and vertically across the flow, indicative of fractional crystallisation, but the elemental data cannot be used to distinguish source variations and/or crustal contamination. However, Os isotopes indicate systematic crustal contamination over the timescale of an individual eruption, where the earliest formed lavas show the greatest degree of contamination. Isotope and elemental data for phenocryst phases from the 40

  1. Plio-Pleistocene paleomagnetic secular variation and time-averaged field: Ruiz-Tolima volcanic chain, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Duque, A.; Mejia, V.; Opdyke, N. D.; Huang, K.; Rosales-Rivera, A.

    2016-02-01

    Paleomagnetic results obtained from 47 Plio-Pleistocene volcanic flows from the Ruiz-Tolima Volcanic Chain (Colombia) are presented. The mean direction of magnetization among these flows, which comprise normal (n = 43) and reversed (n = 4) polarities, is Dec = 1.8°, Inc = 3.2°, α95 = 5.0°, and κ = 18.4. This direction of magnetization coincides with GAD plus a small persistent axial quadrupolar component (around 5%) at the site-average latitude (4.93°). This agreement is robust after applying several selection criteria (α95 < 10º α95 < 5.5º polarities: normal, reversed, and tentatively transitional). The data are in agreement with Model G proposed by McElhinny and McFadden (1997) and the fit is improved when sites tentatively identified as transitional (two that otherwise have normal polarity) are excluded from the calculations. Compliance observed with the above mentioned time-averaged field and paleosecular variation models, is also observed for many recent similar studies from low latitudes, with the exception of results from Galapagos Islands that coincide with GAD and tend to be near sided.

  2. Climate-dependent sediment production: numerical modeling and field observations of variable grain size distributions from heterogeneous hillslope weathering of fractured basalt flows, Kohala Peninsula, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B. P.; Johnson, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    We present a numerical model for hillslope sediment production that includes climate-dependent chemical weathering rates and bedrock fracture spacings, and predicts how grain size distributions vary with climate and hillslope erosion rate. Understanding sediment preparation, or the in situ reduction of fractured bedrock to coarse sediment by heterogeneous weathering on hillslopes, is critical to understanding the evolution of mountainous landscapes, as sediment supply rates and size distributions can strongly influence river incision rates. The majority of soil production models assume a homogenous substrate and uniform weathering front, and therefore do not track the size of rock fragments and corestones, which become the sediment supplied to channels by hillslope erosion. Our model is inspired by the Kohala Peninsula on the big island of Hawaii, which has a gradient of mean annual precipitation (MAP) spanning over an order of magnitude that has been shown to influence the weathering rates of the basalt. Previous geochemical studies have constrained climate-dependent weathering rates for local soil production. Using these inputs, we developed a kinetics-based numerical model for the chemical weathering of initially fractured basalt into soil and coarse sediment over 150ky. Following first-order reaction kinetics, chemical weathering in the model decreases exponentially with both depth below the surface and time. The model starts with a column of repeating basalt flows (typically 1 m thick), each with fracture spacing distributions consistent with thermal-mechanical cooling characteristics. Each individual fracture-bound block is assumed to weather from the surface inwards, similar in form to a weathering rind. Since the model is constructed of discrete blocks, larger blocks remain as unweathered corestones (the "sediment"), surrounded by weathered material. In addition to a MAP-dependent initial surface weathering rate and rate constant, climate is also reflected

  3. Geochemical characteristics of Bikou volcanic group and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic composition: Evidence for breakup event in the north margin of Yangtze plate, Jining era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; YongFei; LAI; ShaoCong; QIN; JiangFeng; LIU; Xin; WANG; Juan

    2007-01-01

    The geodynamic setting of the Bikou volcanic group is a critical question to trace the Precambrain tectonic framework and evolution for the Yangtze plate. This study has suggested that the Bikou volcanic group is composed of several residual oceanic crust units: MORB (mid-ocean ridge basalt), Alk-OIB (alkaline ocean island basalt) and Th-OIB (tholeiitic ocean island basalt) as well as subduction-related volcanic rocks. According to field observation, those distinct rocks occurred collectively in form of tectonic contact, implying that the Bikou volcanic group was an ophiolitic mélange. Coupled with geochronological data, a perished oceanic basin at the northern margin of the Yangtze block during Neoproterozoic was tested by this ophiolitic mélange. Meanwhile, the isogeochemical data suggest that the ocean occurred in the Southern Hemisphere identical to Indian, South Atlantic and South Pacific oceans in terms of their Dupal anomalies, and the original source of the rocks could be probably mixing by EMⅠand EMⅡ component caused by dehydration melting of subducting oceanic crust during subduction process. On the basis of geochemical characteristics of the studied rocks, the Bikou volcanic group could imply that a partial breakup event occurred in the northern margin of Yangtze plate during the Neoproterozoic era.

  4. A Study on the Forming Conditions of Basalts in Seamounts of the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兆麟; 梁德华; 等

    1994-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in seamounts of the South China Sea consist mainly of alkali basalt, tholeiitic basalt, trachyandesitic pumice, dacite, etc.Inclusions in the minerals of the volcanic rocks are main-ly amorphors melt inclusions, which reflects that the volcanic rocks are characterized by submarine eruption and rapid cooling on the seafloor .Furthermore, fluid-melt inclusions have been discovered for the first time in alkali basalts and mantle-derived xenoliths,indicating a process of differentiation between magma and fluid in the course of mantle partial melting .Alkali basalts and inclusions may have been formed in this nonhomogeneous system.Rock-forming temperatures of four seamouns estimated as follows:the Z hongnan seamount alkali basalt 1155-1185℃; the Xianbei seamount alkali basalt 960-1200℃; tholeiitic basalt 1040-1230℃; the Daimao seamount tholeiitic basalt 1245-1280℃; and the Jianfeng seamount trachandestic prmice 880-1140℃. Equilibrium pressures of alkali basalts in the Zhongnan and Xianbei seamounts are 13.57 and 8.8×108 Pa ,respectively. Pyroxene equilibrium tem-peratures of mantle xenoliths from the Xianbei seamount were estimated at 1073-1121℃, and pres-sures ar (15.58-22.47)×108Pa, suggesting a deep-source (e.g.the asthenosphere )for the alkalibasalts.

  5. An ancient recipe for flood-basalt genesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew G; Carlson, Richard W

    2011-07-27

    Large outpourings of basaltic lava have punctuated geological time, but the mechanisms responsible for the generation of such extraordinary volumes of melt are not well known. Recent geochemical evidence suggests that an early-formed reservoir may have survived in the Earth's mantle for about 4.5 billion years (ref. 2), and melts of this reservoir contributed to the flood basalt emplaced on Baffin Island about 60 million years ago. However, the volume of this ancient mantle domain and whether it has contributed to other flood basalts is not known. Here we show that basalts from the largest volcanic event in geologic history--the Ontong Java plateau--also exhibit the isotopic and trace element signatures proposed for the early-Earth reservoir. Together with the Ontong Java plateau, we suggest that six of the largest volcanic events that erupted in the past 250 million years derive from the oldest terrestrial mantle reservoir. The association of these large volcanic events with an ancient primitive mantle source suggests that its unique geochemical characteristics--it is both hotter (it has greater abundances of the radioactive heat-producing elements) and more fertile than depleted mantle reservoirs-may strongly affect the generation of flood basalts.

  6. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is

  7. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is

  8. Geochemistry of meta-volcanic rocks from the Longbohe Cu deposit, Yunnan Province, China: Implications for the genesis and tectonic setting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Yinliang; QING Dexian; CHEN Yaoguang

    2007-01-01

    The Longbohe Cu deposit, which is located in the southern part of the Honghe ore-forming zone, Yunnan Province, China, belongs to a typical ore field where volcanic rocks are of wide distribution and are associated with Cu mineralization in time and space. The volcanic rocks in the ore field, which have experienced varying degree of alteration or regional metamorphism, can be divided into three types, i.e., meta-andesite, meta-subvolcanic rock and meta-basic volcanic rock in accordance with their mineral assemblages. These three types of volcanic rocks in the ore field are relatively rich in Na and the main samples plot in the area of alkali basalts in the geochemical classification diagram. With the exception of very few elements, these three types of volcanic rocks are similar in the content of trace elements. In comparison to the basalts of different tectonic settings, the meta-volcanic rocks in the ore field are rich in high field strength elements (HFSE) such as Th, Nb, etc. and depleted in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) such as Sr, Ba, etc. and their primary mantle-normalized trace element patterns show remarkable negative Th and Nb anomalies and negative Sr and Ba anomalies. These three types of volcanic rocks are similar in REE content range and chondrite-normalized REE patterns with the exception of Eu anomaly. Various lines of evidence show that these three types of volcanic rocks in the ore field have the same source but are the products of different stages of magmatic evolution, their original magma is a product of partial melting of the metasomatically enriched mantle in the tensional tectonic setting within the continent plate, and the crystallization differentiation plays an important role in the process of magmatic evolution.

  9. Timing and composition of continental volcanism at Harrat Hutaymah, western Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Robert A; Kent, Adam J R; Thornber, Carl; Schliedler, Tyler D; Al-Amri, Abdullah M

    2016-01-01

    Harrat Hutaymah is an alkali basalt volcanic field in north-central Saudi Arabia, at the eastern margin of a large Neogene continental, intraplate magmatic province. Lava flow, tephra and spatter cone compositions in the field include alkali olivine basalts and basanites. These compositions contrast with the predominantly tholeiitic, fissure-fed basalts found along the eastern margin of the Red Sea. The Hutaymah lava flows were erupted through Proterozoic arc-associated plutonic and meta-sedimentary rocks of the Arabian shield, and commonly contain a range of sub-continental lithospheric xenoliths, although the lavas themselves show little indication of crustal contamination. Previous radiometric dating of this volcanic field (a single published K–Ar age; 1.8 Ma) is suspiciously old given the field measurement of normal magnetic polarity only (i.e. Brunhes interval, ≤ 780 Ka). We report new age determinations on 14 lava flows by the 40Ar–39Ar laser step heating method, all younger than ~ 850 Ka, to better constrain the time frame of volcanism, and major, trace and rare earth element compositions to describe the chemical variation of volcanic activity at Harrat Hutaymah. Crystal fractionation was dominated by olivine ± clinopyroxene at a range of upper mantle and crustal pressures. Rapid ascent and eruption of magma is indicated by the array of lower crustal and lithospheric xenoliths observed in lava flows and tephra. Modeling suggests 1–7% melting of an enriched asthenospheric mantle source occurred beneath Harrat Hutaymah under a relatively thick lithospheric cap (60–80 km).

  10. Timing and composition of continental volcanism at Harrat Hutaymah, western Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Robert A.; Kent, Adam J. R.; Thornber, Carl R.; Schlieder, Tyler D.; Al-Amri, Abdullah M.

    2016-03-01

    Harrat Hutaymah is an alkali basalt volcanic field in north-central Saudi Arabia, at the eastern margin of a large Neogene continental, intraplate magmatic province. Lava flow, tephra and spatter cone compositions in the field include alkali olivine basalts and basanites. These compositions contrast with the predominantly tholeiitic, fissure-fed basalts found along the eastern margin of the Red Sea. The Hutaymah lava flows were erupted through Proterozoic arc-associated plutonic and meta-sedimentary rocks of the Arabian shield, and commonly contain a range of sub-continental lithospheric xenoliths, although the lavas themselves show little indication of crustal contamination. Previous radiometric dating of this volcanic field (a single published K-Ar age; 1.8 Ma) is suspiciously old given the field measurement of normal magnetic polarity only (i.e. Brunhes interval, ≤ 780 Ka). We report new age determinations on 14 lava flows by the 40Ar-39Ar laser step heating method, all younger than ~ 850 Ka, to better constrain the time frame of volcanism, and major, trace and rare earth element compositions to describe the chemical variation of volcanic activity at Harrat Hutaymah. Crystal fractionation was dominated by olivine ± clinopyroxene at a range of upper mantle and crustal pressures. Rapid ascent and eruption of magma is indicated by the array of lower crustal and lithospheric xenoliths observed in lava flows and tephra. Modeling suggests 1-7% melting of an enriched asthenospheric mantle source occurred beneath Harrat Hutaymah under a relatively thick lithospheric cap (60-80 km).

  11. Oxidation state of Paleozoic subcontinental lithospheric mantle below the Pali Aike volcanic field in southernmost Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Hattori, Keiko H.; Li, Jianping; Stern, Charles R.

    2008-09-01

    Mantle xenoliths in the Quaternary Pali Aike alkaline basalts of southernmost Patagonia include lherzolites and harzburgites with and without garnet. The values of fO 2 for all xenoliths range from 0.33 logarithmic unit below the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer (FMQ - 0.33) to FMQ + 0.75, which overlap those for abyssal peridotites. The fO 2 data, together with the bulk rock and mineral compositions, suggest that the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) below Pali Aike formed through the accretion of oceanic lithosphere. The oceanic accretion likely occurred in mid to late Paleozoic time when the southern Patagonian terrane formed along the southwest margin of Gondwana. Relict spinel inclusions in garnet suggest that garnet-facies peridotites formed from spinel-facies peridotites most likely in response to pressure increase during the accretion. Comparable fO 2 for garnet- and spinel-facies peridotites suggests that this spinel-garnet transformation was not accompanied by changes in fO 2. Metasomatism by asthenosphere-derived melt through a slab window resulted in the formation of Ti-bearing minerals, and lowering of Mg and enrichment of Ti in bulk rocks and minerals. The replacement of olivine by orthopyroxene formed orthopyroxenites in extreme cases. No significant change in fO 2 is associated with this metasomatism since similar oxidation state is observed between un-metasomatized (FMQ - 0.23 to + 0.48) and metasomatized (FMQ - 0.33 to + 0.75) samples. This is explained by the fO 2 of the asthenospheric melt (~ FMQ - 0.50) similar to the SCLM prior to the metasomatism.

  12. Thermal, radioactive and magnetic properties of the lavas of the Mt Melbourne Volcanic Field (Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidio Armadillo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of measurements of physical properties carried out on mafic lavas from the Mt Melbourne
    Volcanic Field, useful for interpretation of geophysical surveys designed to shed light on the structure of the
    crust. The thermal conductivity is comparable to that of glass and shows a clear negative dependence on porosity.
    The volume heat capacity and the thermal diffusivity are less variable. The concentration of the thermally
    important natural radioactive isotopes was determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Lavas denoted a rather low
    heat-production rate, and the largest concentration of heat-producing elements (potassium, uranium, thorium
    was found in the trachyte samples. The magnetic susceptibility is more variable than the other physical properties
    and, among the several iron-titanium oxides, it appears primarily controlled by the ulvöspinel-magnetite solid
    solution series.

  13. Stability Evaluation of Volcanic Slope Subjected to Rainfall and Freeze-Thaw Action Based on Field Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Kawamura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall-induced failures of natural and artificial slopes such as cut slopes, which are subjected to freezing and thawing, have been frequently reported in Hokkaido, Japan. In particular, many failures occur intensively from spring to summer seasons. Despite numerous field studies, explanation of their mechanical behavior based on in situ data has not yet been completely achieved due to the difficulty in grasping failure conditions. This study aims at clarifying the aspects of in-situ volcanic slopes subjected to rainfall and freeze-thaw action. The changes in soil moisture, pore pressure, deformations, and temperatures in the slope were investigated using soil moisture meters, tensiometers, thermocouple sensors, clinometers, settlement gauges, an anemovane, a snow gauge, and a rainfall gauge. The data generated from these measures indicated deformation in the slope examined mainly proceeded during the drainage process according to changes in soil moisture. Based on this data, a prediction method for failures is discussed in detail.

  14. Improved techniques in data analysis and interpretation of potential fields: examples of application in volcanic and seismically active areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Florio

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Geopotential data may be interpreted by many different techniques, depending on the nature of the mathematical equations correlating specific unknown ground parameters to the measured data set. The investigation based on the study of the gravity and magnetic anomaly fields represents one of the most important geophysical approaches in the earth sciences. It has now evolved aimed both at improving of known methods and testing other new and reliable techniques. This paper outlines a general framework for several applications of recent techniques in the study of the potential methods for the earth sciences. Most of them are here described and significant case histories are shown to illustrate their reliability on active seismic and volcanic areas.

  15. Late Miocene volcanism and intra-arc tectonics during the early development of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Luca; Conticelli, Sandro; Vaggelli, Gloria; Petrone, Chiara M.; Manetti, Piero

    2000-03-01

    The early stage of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (hereafter TMVB) is marked by widespread, mafic to intermediate, volcanism emplaced between 11 and 7 Ma from the Pacific coast to the longitude of Mexico City, to the north of the modern volcanic arc. Petrological and geochronological data support the hypothesis that this volcanism made up a unique late Miocenic central Mexican comagmatic province. Mafic lavas at the mouth of the Gulf of California and along the northwestern sector of the TMVB made up the Nayarit district, which includes calc-alkaline to transitional varieties. The central sector of the TMVB is characterized by two basaltic districts: the Jalisco-Guanajuato and the Queretaro-Hidalgo, which are distinguished from the westernmost ones by their lower Nb/La and generally lower HFSE/LILE values, as well as by spider diagrams characterized by larger negative spikes at Th, Ta, Nb, and Ti. The surface occurrence of the late Miocene basalts appears to be controlled by pre-existing zones of crustal weakness that channeled the mafic magmas. Field observations suggest that these structures have been reactivated in a transtensional fashion induced by differential tectonic motion of crustal blocks to the south and to the north of the TMVB. Starting from ˜12 Ma the TMVB separates a northern tectonic domain, subject to the developing divergent Pacific-North America plate boundary, from a southern tectonic domain, characterized by oblique subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates. Apparently, far field stresses related to these complex plate boundaries reactivated older suture zones, allowing rapid uprise of mantle-derived magmas. The subduction-related signature shown by Miocene mafic lavas of the Jalisco-Guanajuato district argues against the existence of mantle plumes beneath this sector of the North America plate. On the other hand, the occurrence in the western TMVB and in the Guadalajara region of a large volume of mafic magmas, which sometimes show

  16. Geomagnetic imprint of the Persani volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Seghedi, Ioan; Zlagnean, Luminita; Atanasiu, Ligia; Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Pomeran, Mihai; Visan, Madalina

    2016-04-01

    The Persani small volume volcanism is located in the SE corner of the Transylvanian Depression, at the north-western edge of the intra-mountainous Brasov basin. It represents the south-easternmost segment of the Neogene-Quaternary volcanic chain of the East Carpathians. The alkaline basalt monogenetic volcanic field is partly coeval with the high-K calc-alkaline magmatism south of Harghita Mountains (1-1.6 Ma). Its eruptions post-dated the calc-alkaline volcanism in the Harghita Mountains (5.3-1.6 Ma), but pre-dated the high-K calc-alkaline emissions of Ciomadul volcano (1.0-0.03 Ma). The major volcanic forms have been mapped in previous geological surveys. Still, due to the small size of the volcanoes and large extent of tephra deposits and recent sediments, the location of some vents or other volcanic structures has been incompletely revealed. To overcome this problem, the area was subject to several near-surface geophysical investigations, including paleomagnetic research. However, due to their large-scale features, the previous geophysical surveys proved to be an inappropriate approach to the volcanological issues. Therefore, during the summers of 2014 and 2015, based on the high magnetic contrast between the volcanic rocks and the hosting sedimentary formations, a detailed ground geomagnetic survey has been designed and conducted, within central Persani volcanism area, in order to outline the presence of volcanic structures hidden beneath the overlying deposits. Additionally, information on the rock magnetic properties was also targeted by sampling and analysing several outcrops in the area. Based on the acquired data, a detailed total intensity scalar geomagnetic anomaly map was constructed by using the recent IGRF12 model. The revealed pattern of the geomagnetic field proved to be fully consistent with the direction of magnetisation previously determined on rock samples. In order to enhance the signal/noise ratio, the results were further processed by

  17. Payenia volcanic province, southern Mendoza, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina; Holm, Paul Martin; Llambias, Eduardo Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The Pleistocene to Holocene Payenia volcanic province is a backarc region of 60,000 km2 in Mendoza, Argentina, which is dominated by transitional to alkaline basalts and trachybasalts. We present major and trace element compositions of 139 rocks from this area of which the majority are basaltic...... basalts, trace element variations suggest a significant contribution from lower crustal melts, possibly up to 70% in the most extreme cases. The contaminating lower crustal rocks must have been depleted mafic rocks with a plagioclase component. The extensive melting of lower crust is probably related...

  18. A New Geomagnetic Field Model for the last 2k years based on high quality archaeomagnetic and volcanic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Saioa A.; Gómez-Paccard, Miriam; Pavón-Carrasco, Francisco Javier; Osete, María Luisa

    2016-04-01

    The knowledge of the ancient Earth's magnetic field is crucial to understand its origin and future evolution. In this context, the palaeomagnetic studies provide useful information about the past geomagnetic field registered in rocks, lava flows, sediments or archaeological materials. The continuous upgrade of the palaeomagnetic database during the last decade has allowed the generation of global geomagnetic field models based on different palaeomagnetic data and techniques (such as the SHA.DIF.14K, ARCH3K.1, CALS3K.4b, pfm9k.1a models, among others). Some recent studies have pointed out that the archaeointensity database might not be reliable enough, by observing high scatter in the records. Here, we present a new global geomagnetic model for the last 2000 years, SHAQ2K, based on high quality archaeomagnetic and volcanic intensity data. For this purpose we classify the palaeointensity data in two quality categories following widely accepted palaeomagnetic criteria based on the methodology used during the laboratory treatment of the samples and on the number of specimens finally used to calculate the mean intensities. Respect to the modelling process, we use the spherical harmonic analysis in space and cubic b-splines in time, also applying a spatial and temporal regularization which minimizes the energy of the geomagnetic field at the core-mantle boundary. The implications of the differences between this new model and other previously published global geomagnetic models are discussed.

  19. Seismic activity and stress tensor inversion at Las Tres Vírgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field (México)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antayhua-Vera, Yanet; Lermo-Samaniego, Javier; Quintanar-Robles, Luis; Campos-Enríquez, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    We analyze local earthquakes occurring between 2003 and 2012 at the Las Tres Vírgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field (TVVGF) to establish their temporal and spatial distribution, and relationships with local and regional fault systems, water injection, acid stimulation and steam production tests. We obtained focal mechanisms and inverted data for the stress tensor to understand the local and regional stress fields. We analyzed 423 local earthquakes with magnitudes between 0.1 and 2.9 Mc and hypocentral depths from 0.2 to 7.4 km b.s.l. The cutoff depth at ~ 7.4 km possibly delineates the brittle-ductile transition zone. We identified seven swarms (from 1 to 7). Swarms 1 (December 2009), 2 (May 2010), 3 (June-July 2010) and 7 (December 2012) are strongly correlated with injection processes; whereas swarms 5 (April 2012) and 6 (September 2012) are correlated with local tectonic faults. Stress inversion showed NW-SE, E-W and NE-SW extensional orientations (Shmin), in agreement with the local tectonic stress field; while NE-SW compressional orientations (SHmax) are correlated with the regional tectonic stress field.

  20. UNCOVERING BURIED VOLCANOES: NEW DATA FOR PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.V. Perry

    2005-10-13

    drill holes are planned with the goal of sampling each geographic subpopulation of magnetic anomalies in the region (Figure 1). This will result in a more complete characterization of the location, age, volume and composition of buried basaltic features for the purpose of updating the volcanic hazard assessment. Smith and Keenan (2005) suggested that volcanic hazard estimates might be 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than estimated by the DOE expert elicitation in 1996, based on (1) a proposed relationship between recurrence rates in the YMR and the Reveille-Lunar Crater volcanic field to the north, and (2) the implication that a number of so-far-undiscovered buried volcanoes would have a significant impact on hazard estimates. This article presents the new aeromagnetic data and an interpretation of the data that suggests magnetic anomalies nearest the proposed repository site represent buried Miocene basalt that will likely have only a minor impact on the volcanic hazard.

  1. Using high-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to understand volcanic hazards within the Rio Grande rift and along the Jemez lineament, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerer, M. J.; McIntosh, W. C.; Heizler, M. T.; Lafferty, J.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Ar/Ar ages were generated for late Quaternary volcanic fields in the Rio Grande rift and along the Jemez Lineament, New Mexico, to assess the time-space patterns of volcanism and begin quantifying volcanic hazards for the region. The published chronology of most late Quaternary volcanic centers in the region is not sufficiently precise, accurate, or complete for a comprehensive volcanic hazard assessment. Ar/Ar ages generated as part of this study were determined using the high-sensitivity, multi-collector ARGUS VI mass spectrometer, which provides about an order of magnitude more precise isotopic measurements compared to older generation, single-detector mass spectrometers. Ar/Ar ages suggest an apparent increase in eruption frequency during the late Quaternary within the Raton-Clayton volcanic field, northeastern NM. Only four volcanoes erupted between 426±8 and 97±3 ka. Contrastingly, four volcanoes erupted between 55±2 and 32±5 ka. This last eruptive phase displays a west to east migration of volcanism, has repose periods of 0 to 17 ka, and an average recurrence rate of 1 eruption per 5750 ka. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, west-central NM, is composed of the ~100 late Quaternary basaltic vents. Preliminary results suggest that most of the Chain of Craters, the largest and oldest part of the Zuni-Bandera field, erupted between ~100 and 250 ka. Volcanism then migrated to the east, where published ages indicate at least seven eruptions between 50 and 3 ka. Both volcanic fields display a west to east migration of volcanism during the last ~500 ka, although the pattern is more pronounced in the Zuni-Bandera field. A reassessment of low-precision published ages for other late Quaternary volcanic fields in region indicates that most fields display a similar west to east migration of volcanism during the last ~500 ka. One possible mechanism to explain the observed patterns of volcanism is the westward migration of the North American plate relative

  2. Large magnitude silicic volcanism in north Afar: the Nabro Volcanic Range and Ma'alalta volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiart, Pierre; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2005-02-01

    Much of the volcanological work carried out in north Afar (Ethiopia and Eritrea) has focused on the nature of Quaternary basaltic volcanic ranges, which have been interpreted by some as incipient oceanic ridges. However, we show here that comparable volumes of silicic magmas have been erupted in the region. In particular, the virtually undocumented Nabro Volcanic Range, which runs NNE for more than 100 km from the margin of the Danakil Depression to the Red Sea coast, has a subaerial volume of the order of 550 km3, comparable to the volume of the much better known Erta’Ale axial volcanic range. Nabro volcano itself forms part of an enigmatic double caldera structure with a neighbouring volcano, Mallahle. The twin caldera may have formed simultaneously with the eruption of between 20 and 100 km3 of ignimbrite, which is readily identified in Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery. This may have been the largest explosive eruption in north Afar, and is certain to have deposited a regionally distributed tephra layer which could in the future be located in distal sections as a stratigraphic marker. An integrated analysis of optical and synthetic aperture radar imagery, digital topographic data, field observations and limited geochemical measurements, permits here descriptions and first order inferences about the structure, stratigraphy and compositions of several major volcanoes of the Afar Triangle, and a reappraisal of their regional significance.

  3. Carbonatite associated with ultramafic diatremes in the Avon Volcanic District, Missouri, USA: Field, petrographic, and geochemical constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, Ethan J.; Ghulam, Abduwasit; Encarnacion, John; Bridges, David L.; Luetkemeyer, P. Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Here we report field, petrographic, and geochemical analyses of the southeast Missouri Avon Volcanic District intrusive rocks and present the first combined textural and geochemical evidence for the presence of a primary magmatic carbonatite phase among ultramafic dikes, pipes, and diatremes of olivine melilitite, alnöite, and calciocarbonatite. The δ13CVPDB values measured for primary calciocarbonatite as well as carbonates in olivine melilitite and alnöite rocks range from - 3.8‰ to - 8.2‰, which are within the typical range of mantle values and are distinct from values of the carbonate country rocks, 0.0‰ to - 1.3‰. The carbonate oxygen isotope compositions for the intrusive lithologies are in the range of 21.5‰ to 26.2‰ (VSMOW), consistent with post-emplacement low temperature hydrothermal alteration or kinetic fractionation effects associated with decompression and devolatilization. Metasomatized country rock and breccia-contaminated igneous lithologies have carbonate δ13CVPDB values gradational between primary carbonatite values and country rock values. Unaltered sedimentary dolomite breccia and mafic spheroids entrained by calciocarbonatite and the lack of microstratigraphic crystal growth typical of carbonate replacement, also exclude the possibility of hydrothermal replacement as the cause of the magmatic-textured carbonates. Rare earth element (REE) patterns for the alnöite, olivine melilitite, and carbonatite are similar to each other with strong light REE enrichment and heavy REE depletion relative to MORB. These patterns are distinct from those of country rock rhyolite and sedimentary carbonate. These data suggest that rocks of the Avon Volcanic District represent a single ultramafic-carbonatite intrusive complex possibly derived from a single mantle source.

  4. Linking hydropedology and ecosystem services: differential controls of surface field saturated hydraulic conductivity in a volcanic setting in central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gómez-Tagle

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the variation of field saturated soil hydraulic conductivity (Kfs as key control variable and descriptor of infiltration was examined by means of a constant head single ring infiltrometer. The study took place in five coverage types and land uses in a volcanic setting in central Mexico. The tested hypothesis was that there exist a positive relationship between plant cover and surface Kfs for the study area. The examined coverage types included; Second growth pine-oak forest, pasture land, fallow land, gully and Cupresus afforestation. Results indicate that Kfs did not depend exclusively of plant cover; it was related to surface horizontal expression of the unburied soil horizons and linked to land use history. Therefore the Kfs measured at a certain location did not depend exclusively of the actual land use, it was also influenced by soil bioturbation linked to plant succession patterns and land use management practices history. The hypothesis accounts partially the variation between sites. Kfs under dense plant cover at the Cupresus afforestation was statistically equal to that measured at the fallow land or the gully sites, while second growth pine-oak forest Kfs figures were over an order of magnitude higher than the rest of the coverage types. The results suggest the relevance of unburied soil horizons in the soil hydrologic response when present at the surface. Under these conditions loosing surface soil horizons due to erosion, not only fertility is lost, but environmental services generation potential. A conceptual model within the hydropedological approach is proposed. It explains the possible controls of Kfs, for this volcanic setting. Land use history driven erosion plays a decisive role in subsurface horizon presence at the surface and soil matrix characteristic determination, while plant succession patterns seem to be strongly linked to soil bioturbation and

  5. Mapping the edge of the Cerros del Rio volcanic field, New Mexico: a piece of the puzzle to understanding a potential geothermal resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, L.; Gallegos, M.; Goebel, M.; Murphy, B. S.; Smith, J.; Soto, D.; Swiatlowski, J.; Volk, C.; Welch, M.; Feucht, D. W.; Hollingshaus, B.; Bedrosian, P. A.; McPhee, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    The Cerros del Rio volcanic field located west of Santa Fe, New Mexico spans the southwestern part of the Espanola Basin with the Rio Grande to the west. Underlying the volcanics are the Santa Fe Group sediments, which contain the Ancha Formation, an important aquifer in the region. High temperature gradients in water wells reveal a potential geothermal prospect. In 2012 the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) program acquired transient electromagnetic (TEM), audiomagnetotelluric (AMT), gravity and ground magnetic data to determine the buried eastern margin of the volcanic field and the connectivity related to the underlying sediments. The roughly EW 5-km long transect was sited from USGS aeromagnetic data to cross the boundary of the Cerros del Rio volcanic field. TEM data collected at ten stations, at 200-400 m spacing, along the transect employed an in-loop configuration with a square 100 m x 100 m transmitter loop and both a Zonge receiver coil and a 5 m square receiver loop. The 5 m loop allowed for the recovery of early-time data that was saturated when using the Zonge coil. AMT data were acquired at eight stations, at 400-500 m spacing, using the Geometric Stratagem system recording from 92 kHz to 10 Hz; a horizontal magnetic dipole transmitter was used to augment low signal strength at around 1 kHz. Gravity data along the profile were acquired using CG-3 and CG-5 Scintrex gravimeters with a station interval >250 m. Magnetic data were acquired with a Geometrics Cesium vapor G-858 magnetometer for about 3500 m along the profile at a 0.5 second sampling rate. Two volcanic flows interbedded with Ancha Formation and overlying Santa Fe Group sediments were identified in both the TEM and AMT modeling. High surface resistivity zones (>300 ohm-m) with depths ranging from ~100 to 300 m define the volcanic flows and correspond to high densities (2.3 to 2.55 g/cm3), while low resistivity zones (<30 ohm-m) correspond to lower densities (~2.1 g/cm3). High

  6. AMS analysis and flow source relationship of lava flows and ignimbrites from the eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, C. I.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Morales-Barrera, W.; Rodríguez, S. R.

    2013-05-01

    The results of an AMS analysis carried on 36 sites from a late Miocene - Holocene volcanic stratigraphic sequence from the eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt is presented. 22 sites (450 samples) belong to lava flows, mainly of basaltic composition, from different emission centers from the Xalapa Monogenitc Volcanic Field, (Rodríguez et al 2010, González-Mercado, 2005), "Cofre de Perote Vent Cluster" (CPVC), "Naolinco Volcanic Field" (NVF), (Siebert and Carrasco-Núñez, 2002), and the Chiconquiaco-Palma Sola volcanic complex (López-Infanzón, 1991; Ferrari et al., 2005). 14 sites belong to the widely distributed El Castillo rhyolitic ignimbrite dated 2.44 to 2.21 Ma (Morales-Barrera, 2009) which is a non-welded to welded ignimbrite. AMS measurements were performed with a KLY2 Kappabridge and processed with Anisoft software using Jelinek statistics. Sometimes a density distribution analysis was also performed when magnetic fabric showed more dispersed distribution patterns. AMS ellipsoids from basalt sites show mostly prolate shapes, while those from ignimbrites show mostly oblate shapes, which may partly due to magnetic mineralogy and also to flow dynamics. Flow directions were mostly obtained from the imbrication angle of magnetic foliation (evaluated from kmin axis mean as corresponding to its pole) and considering the symmetry of the axes distribution. Flow direction inferences are discussed in relation with flow source when it is clearly evident from geologic field observations, as it is usually the case with basalt lava flows. While in ignimbrites, flow inferences from petrographic and facies distributions are compared with AMS flow inferences, showing agreement between them in some cases but not in others, may be due to local tilting occurring after ignimbrite emplacement.

  7. Geology of the Sabie River Basalt Formation in the Southern Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.J. Sweeney

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sabie River Basalt Formation (SRBF in the central Lebombo is a virtually continuous sequence of basaltic lavas some 2 500 m thick that was erupted 200 - 179 Ma ago. Flows are dominantly pahoehoe in character and vary from 2 m to 20 m in thickness. Dolerite dykes cross-cutting the basalt sequence probably represent feeders to this considerable volcanic event. Volcanological features observed within the SRBF are described. Two chemically distinct basaltic magma types are recognised, the simultaneous eruption of which presents an intriguing geochemical problem as to their origins.

  8. Paleomagnetism, rock-magnetism and geochemical aspects of early Cretaceous basalts of the Paraná Magmatic Province, Misiones, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Mabel; Orgeira, María Julia; Lagorio, Silvia

    2006-10-01

    The basalts of the Posadas Formation were extruded during the huge continental volcanism that affected the Paraná Basin in the Lower Cretaceous. We have carried out a paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic study on samples collected along a basalt outcrop section in Misiones, Argentina and determined that rocks classified as tholeiitic basalts and andesi-basalts are characterized by a low to intermediate content of Ti. Paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic studies suggest that the main magnetic mineral is low-Ti titanomagnetite of superparamagnetic (SP) to single-domain (SD) sizes, and very low amounts of multi-domain (MD) particles. The stable magnetic remanence enabled us to define characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRMs) with a maximum angular deviation (MAD) <5° in most cases; and in all the cases, a MAD <10°. The sequence has registered at least two polarity reversions, starting from a normal polarity at the base. The calculated virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) present an elongated distribution similar to other distributions of VGPs published for the Paraná Magmatic Province. The elongated distribution of the VGPs could be a real feature of the geomagnetic field at a time of frequent changes of polarity.

  9. Study on lithogeochemistry of Middle Jurassic basalts from southern China represented by the Fankeng basalts from Yongding of Fujian Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU; Jincheng; JIANG; Shaoyong; WANG; Xiaolei; YANG; Jinghong; ZHANG; Mengqun

    2006-01-01

    There exists an E-W trending Middle Jurassic volcanic zone in southern China. The Fankeng basalts in the Yongding basin of Fujian Province are considered to be a typical example. The Fankeng basalts have TiO2 contents in the range of 1.92%-3.21%. They are classified as high-Ti basalts. They also have higher total Fe (averaging FeO*= 11.09%). The Middle Jurassic Fankeng basalts from southwestern Fujian have obvious distinctive lithogeochemical features from early Cretaceous basalts from southeastern coast of China. They have higher HFSE, such as Th, Nb, Ta, Zr and Ti. Their element ratios related with HFSE, such as Zr/Ba, La/Nb, La/Ta ,Zr/Y, Ti/Y, Ba/Nb, K/Ti and Rb/Zr are similar to those of OIB. The most samples have εNd(T) of -0.70-0.24, which are near chondrite. Some samples have higher εNd(T) of 1.87-3.55.Therefore, these basaltic magmas might be derived from depleted asthenospheric mantle. The lithogeochemical characteristics of the Fankeng basalts may be caused by interaction between asthenosphere and lithosphere at the time. The (Early-)Middle Jurassic basalts and gabbros from southeastern Hunan, southern Jiangxi and northern Guangdong provinces show similar geochemical features to those of the Fankeng basalts from the Yongding of Fujian. Occurrence of these OIB-type basalts in the area may be regarded as the petrological mark of upwelling of asthenosphere at the time. Upwelling of asthenosphere has led to tectonic extension and the formation of rifted basin in the area.

  10. The Geologic Basis for Volcanic Hazard Assessment for the Proposed High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Perry

    2002-10-15

    Studies of volcanic risk to the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain have been ongoing for 25 years. These studies are required because three episodes of small-volume, alkalic basaltic volcanism have occurred within 50 km of Yucca Mountain during the Quaternary. Probabilistic hazard estimates for the proposed repository depend on the recurrence rate and spatial distribution of past episodes of volcanism in the region. Several independent research groups have published estimates of the annual probability of a future volcanic disruption of the proposed repository, most of which fall in the range of 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -9} per year; similar conclusions were reached. through an extensive expert elicitation sponsored by the Department of Energy in 1995-1996. The estimated probability values are dominated by a regional recurrence rate of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} volcanic events per year (equating to recurrence intervals of several hundred thousand years). The recurrence rate, as well as the spatial density of volcanoes, is low compared to most other basaltic volcanic fields in the western United States, factors that may be related to both the tectonic history of the region and a lithospheric mantle source that is relatively cold and not prone to melting. The link between volcanism and tectonism in the Yucca Mountain region is not well understood beyond a general association between volcanism and regional extension, although areas of locally high extension within the region may control the location of some volcanoes. Recently, new geologic data or hypotheses have emerged that could potentially increase past estimates of the recurrence rate, and thus the probability of repository disruption. These are (1) hypothesized episodes of anomalously high strain rate, (2) hypothesized presence of a regional mantle hotspot, and (3) new aeromagnetic data suggesting as many as twelve previously unrecognized volcanoes buried in alluvial-filled basins near

  11. Volcanic ash particles as carriers of remanent magnetization in deep-sea sediments from the Kerguelen Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Franz; Ko¨rner, Ulrike; Bitschene, Peter

    1993-07-01

    Carbonate sediments from the Kerguelen Plateau (ODP Leg 120) of Eocene to Pliocene age were investigated with rock magnetic, petrographic and geochemical methods to determine the carriers of remanent magnetization. Magnetic methods showed that the major magnetic minerals were titanomagnetites slightly larger than single domain particles. Submicrometre to micrometre-size grains of titanomagnetite were identified as inclusions in volcanic glass particles or as crystals in lithic clasts. Volcanic fallout ash particles formed the major fraction of the magnetic extract from each sediment sample. Three groups of volcanic ashes were identified: trachytic ashes, basaltic ashes with sideromelane and tachylite shards, and palagonitic ashes. These three groups could be equally well defined based on their magnetic hysteresis properties and alternating field demagnetization curves. The highest coercivities of all samples were found for the tachylite, due to the submicrometre-size titanomagnetite inclusions in the matrix. Trachytic ashes had intermediate magnetic properties between the single-domain-type tachylites and the palagonitic (altered) basaltic ashes with low coercivities. Samples which contained mixtures of these different volcanic ashes could be distinguished from the three types of ashes based on their magnetic characteristics. There was neither evidence of biogenic magnetofossils in the transmission electron micrographs nor did we find magnetic particles derived from continental Antarctica. The presence of dispersed volcanic fallout ashes between visible ash layers suggests continuous explosive volcanic activity on the Kerguelen Plateau in the South Indian Ocean since the early Eocene. The continuous fallout of volcanic ash from explosive volcanism on the Kerguelen Archipelago is the source of the magnetic particles and thus responsible for the magnetostratigraphy of the nannofossil oozes drilled during Leg 120.

  12. 40Ar/39Ar dates from the West Siberian Basin: Siberian flood basalt province doubled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichow, Marc K; Saunders, Andrew D; White, Rosalind V; Pringle, Malcolm S; Al'Mukhamedov, Alexander I; Medvedev, Alexander I; Kirda, Nikolay P

    2002-06-07

    Widespread basaltic volcanism occurred in the region of the West Siberian Basin in central Russia during Permo-Triassic times. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on plagioclase grains from deep boreholes in the basin reveal that the basalts were erupted 249.4 +/- 0.5 million years ago. This is synchronous with the bulk of the Siberian Traps, erupted further east on the Siberian Platform. The age and geochemical data confirm that the West Siberian Basin basalts are part of the Siberian Traps and at least double the confirmed area of the volcanic province as a whole. The larger area of volcanism strengthens the link between the volcanism and the end-Permian mass extinction.

  13. Volcanic edifice alignment detection software in MATLAB: Test data and preliminary results for shield fields on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Bradley J.; Lang, Nicholas P.

    2016-08-01

    The scarcity of impact craters on Venus make it difficult to infer the relative ages of geologic units. Stratigraphic methods can be used to help infer the relative ordering of surface features, but the relatively coarse resolution of available radar data means ambiguity about the timing of certain features is common. Here we develop a set of statistical tools in MATLAB to help infer the relative timing between clusters of small shield volcanoes and sets of fractures in the surrounding terrain. Specifically, we employed two variants of the two-point azimuth method to detect anisotropy in the distribution of point-like features. The results of these methods are shown to successfully identify anisotropy at two spatial scales: at the whole-field level and at scales smaller than a set fraction of the mean value. Initial results on the test cases presented here are promising, at least for volcanic fields emplaced under uniform conditions. These methods could also be used for detecting anisotropy in other point-like geologic features, such as hydrothermal vents, springs, and earthquake epicenters.

  14. Geochemistry and Petrogenesis of Volcanic Rocks in the Yeba Formation on the Gangdise Magmatic Arc, Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geng Quanru; Pan Guitang; Jin Zhenmin; Wang Liquan; Liao Zhongli

    2005-01-01

    The Early Jurassic bimodal volcanic rocks in the Yeba Formation, situated between Lhasa, Dagzê and Maizhokunggar, composed of metabasalt, basaltic ignimbrite, dacite, silicic tuff and volcanic breccia, are an important volcanic suite for the study of the tectonic evolution of the Gangdise magmatic arc and the Mesozoic Tethys. Based on systematic field investigations, we carried out geochemical studies on representative rock samples. Major and trace element compositions were analyzed for these rock samples by XRF and ICP-MS respectively, and an isotope analysis of Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd was carried out by a MAT 262 mass spectrograph. The results show that the SiO2 contents in lava rocks are 41 %-50.4 % and 64 %-69 %, belonging to calc-alkaline basalt and dacite. One notable feature of the basalt is its low TiO2 content, 0.66 %-1.01 %, much lower than those of continental tholeiite. The ΣREE contents of basalt and dacite are 60.3-135 μg/g and 126.4-167.9 μg/g respectively. Both rocks have similar REE and other trace element characteristics, with enriched LREE and LILE relative to HREE and HFS, similar REE patterns without Eu anomaly. The basalts have depleted Ti, Ta and Nb and slightly negative Nb and Ta anomalies, with Nb*=0.54-1.17 averaging 0.84. The dacites have depleted P and Ti and also slightly negative Nb and Ta anomalies, with Nb*=0.74-1.06 averaging 0.86. Major and trace elemental and isotopic studies suggest that both basalt and dacite originated from the partial melting of the mantle wedge at different degrees above the subduction zone. The spinal lherzolite in the upper mantle is likely to be their source rocks, which might have been affected by the selective metasomatism of fluids with crustal geochemistry. The LILE contents of both rocks were affected by metamorphism at later stages. The Yeba bimodal volcanic rocks formed in a temporal extensional situation in a mature island arc resulting from the Indosinian Gangdise magmatic arc.

  15. Geochemistry of basalts from small eruptive centers near Villarrica stratovolcano, Chile: Evidence for lithospheric mantle components in continental arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey-Vargas, R.; Sun, M.; Holbik, S.

    2016-07-01

    In the Central Southern Volcanic Zone (CSVZ) of the Andes, the location of stratovolcanoes and monogenetic small eruptive centers (SEC) is controlled by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ), a trench-parallel strike-slip feature of over 1000 km length. The geochemistry of basalts from SEC is different from those of stratovolcanoes, and are termed Type 2 and Type 1 basalts, respectively. In the region of Villarrica stratovolcano, contemporaneous SEC are more MgO-rich, and have greater light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment, lower 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd, and lower ratios of large ion lithophile elements (LILE) to LREE and high field strength elements (HFSE). A unique finding in this region is that basalts from one SEC, San Jorge, has Type 1 character, similar to basalts from Villarrica stratovolcano. Type 1 basalts from Villarrica and San Jorge SEC have strong signals from time-sensitive tracers of subduction input, such as high 10Be/9Be and high (238U/230Th), while Type 2 SEC have low 10Be/9Be and (238U/230Th) near secular equilibrium. Based on new trace element, radiogenic isotope and mineral analyses, we propose that Type 1 basaltic magma erupted at San Jorge SEC and Villarrica stratovolcano forms by melting of the ambient actively subduction-modified asthenosphere, while Type 2 SEC incorporate melts of pyroxenite residing in the supra-subduction zone mantle lithosphere. This scenario is consistent with the close proximity of the volcanic features and their inferred depths of magma separation. The pyroxenite forms from arc magma produced during earlier episodes of subduction modification and magmatism, which extend back >300 Ma along this segment of the western South American margin. Type 2 basaltic magmas may reach the surface during LOFZ-related decompression events, and they may also be a normal but episodic part of the magma supply to large stratovolcanoes, resulting in cryptic geochemical variations over time. The presence and mobilization of stored

  16. Derivation of Apollo 14 High-Al Basalts at Discrete Times: Rb-Sr Isotopic Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui. Hejiu; Neal, Clive, R.; Shih, Chi-Yu; Nyquist, Laurence E.

    2012-01-01

    Pristine Apollo 14 (A-14) high-Al basalts represent the oldest volcanic deposits returned from the Moon [1,2] and are relatively enriched in Al2O3 (>11 wt%) compared to other mare basalts (7-11 wt%). Literature Rb-Sr isotopic data suggest there are at least three different eruption episodes for the A-14 high-Al basalts spanning the age range approx.4.3 Ga to approx.3.95 Ga [1,3]. Therefore, the high-Al basalts may record lunar mantle evolution between the formation of lunar crust (approx.4.4 Ga) and the main basin-filling mare volcanism (basalts were originally classified into five compositional groups [5,6], and then regrouped into three with a possible fourth comprising 14072 based on the whole-rock incompatible trace element (ITE) ratios and Rb-Sr radiometric ages [7]. However, Rb-Sr ages of these basalts from different laboratories may not be consistent with each other because of the use of different 87Rb decay constants [8] and different isochron derivation methods over the last four decades. This study involved a literature search for Rb-Sr isotopic data previously reported for the high-Al basalts. With the re-calculated Rb-Sr radiometric ages, eruption episodes of A-14 high-Al basalts were determined, and their petrogenesis was investigated in light of the "new" Rb-Sr isotopic data and published trace element abundances of these basalts.

  17. Exploration of the Rotokawa geothermal field, Taupo volcanic zone, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, P.R.L. (Univ. of Auckland (New Zealand))

    1988-11-10

    The Rotokawa geothermal field is located 7 km east of Wairakei, New Zealand, and has been investigated for its sulphur resources and power potential over the past 50 years. Exploration of the field has slow and mostly unsystematic. The depths of the drill holes are less than 50 m until 1964. Since 1965 the exploration has been carried out systematically. Three, one and four exploration wells were drilled in 1965-66, 1977, and 1984-86 respectively. Finding Jurassic greywackes and argillites at a depth of 2200 m below a thick (ca. 900 m)sequence of two pyroxene andesite lava flows had an important significance, because the Jurassic rocks are the basement rocks for the North Island. The Rotokawa geothermal field represents an important resource with an assessed potential of 49 MW (proven), 100 MW (probable) and 200 MW (possible), though these figures are considered to be probably optimistic. Further exploratory drilling is needed. The main development problems at this stage are: (1) encountering good subsurface permeability, (2) identifying and combating corrosive CO{sub 2}-rich fluids, (3) determining the most favorable reinjection conditions; this is a problem, ironically enhanced by the hot temperature and the consequently high silica contents of the thermal fluids, (4) establishing an acceptable development plan for the field which accommodates the requirements of both the sulphur mining interests, the power producers, and especially the Ngati Tahu maori owners of the land. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Petrographic analysis and correlation of volcanic rocks in Bostic 1-A well near Mountain Home, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arney, B.H.; Gardner, J.N.; Belluomini, S.G.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed examination of volcanic rock cuttings from the Bostic 1-A well near Mountain Home, Idaho, provides data that correlate the stratigraphy of the well with the regional stratigraphy of the western Snake River Plain. The Bostic 1-A well penetrates basalt of the Middle Pleistocene Bruneau Formation and underlying sedimentary rocks of the Upper Pliocene Glenns Ferry Formation. Basalt underlying the Glenns Ferry Formation is most likely Banbury Basalt of Middle Pliocene age or Banbury equivalent. A 350-ft interval of felsic volcanics is then intersected above another 600 ft of basalt. The well bottoms in altered felsic volcanics. The lowest 600 ft of basalt flows has not been correlated with any basalt observed on the surface. From the established stratigraphy of the region, and from petrographic evidence, the silicic volcanic rocks occurring both above and below the lowermost basalts in the well are probably lower Pliocene Idavada Volcanics. North of the well, in the Mt. Bennett Hills, Idavada Volcanics overlie crystalline rocks of the Idaho batholith. No estimate of depth to plutonic bedrock can be made from the well data alone. Stratigraphic comparisons suggest as little as 0.2 to 0.3 km more of Idavada lie beneath the Bostic 1-A well. Results of geophysical studies suggest additional basalt lies beneath the Bostic 1-A rather than granitic rocks of the batholith.

  19. The morphology and evolution of the Stromboli 2002-2003 lava flow field--An example of a basaltic flow field emplaced on a steep slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodato, Luigi; Harris, A.; Spampinato, L.; Calvari, Sonia; Dehn, J.; Patrick, M.

    2007-01-01

    The use of a hand-held thermal camera during the 2002–2003 Stromboli effusive eruption proved essential in tracking the development of flow field structures and in measuring related eruption parameters, such as the number of active vents and flow lengths. The steep underlying slope on which the flow field was emplaced resulted in a characteristic flow field morphology. This comprised a proximal shield, where flow stacking and inflation caused piling up of lava on the relatively flat ground of the vent zone, that fed a medial–distal lava flow field. This zone was characterized by the formation of lava tubes and tumuli forming a complex network of tumuli and flows linked by tubes. Most of the flow field was emplaced on extremely steep slopes and this had two effects. It caused flows to slide, as well as flow, and flow fronts to fail frequently, persistent flow front crumbling resulted in the production of an extensive debris field. Channel-fed flows were also characterized by development of excavated debris levees in this zone (Calvari et al. 2005). Collapse of lava flow fronts and inflation of the upper proximal lava shield made volume calculation very difficult. Comparison of the final field volume with that expecta by integrating the lava effusion rates through time suggests a loss of ~70% erupted lava by flow front crumbling and accumulation as debris flows below sea level. Derived relationships between effusion rate, flow length, and number of active vents showed systematic and correlated variations with time where spreading of volume between numerous flows caused an otherwise good correlation between effusion rate, flow length to break down. Observations collected during this eruption are useful in helping to understand lava flow processes on steep slopes, as well as in interpreting old lava–debris sequences found in other steep-sided volcanoes subject to effusive activity.

  20. Volcanostratigraphic Sequences of Kebo-Butak Formation at Bayat Geological Field Complex, Central Java Province and Yogyakarta Special Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Mulyaningsih

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bayat Complex is usually used as a work field for students of geology and other geosciences. The study area is located in the southern part of the Bayat Complex. Administratively, it belongs to Central Java Province and Yogyakarta Special Province. The lithology of Bayat is very complex, composed of various kinds of igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks. Most of previous researchers interpreted Bayat as a melange complex constructed within a subduction zone. Kebo-Butak is one of formations that forms the Bayat field complex. The formation is composed of basalt, layers of pumice, tuff, shale, and carbonaceous tuff. Most of them are known as volcanic rocks. These imply that volcanic activities are more probable to construct the geology of Bayat rather than the subducted melange complex. The geological mapping, supported by geomorphology, petrology, stratigraphy, and geological structures, had been conducted in a comprehensive manner using the deduction-induction method. The research encounters basalt, black pumice, tuff with basaltic glasses fragments, zeolite, argilic clay, as well as feldspathic- and pumice tuff. Petrographically, the basalt is composed of labradorite, olivine, clinopyroxene, and volcanic glass. Black pumice and tuff contain prismatic clinopyroxene, granular olivine, and volcanic glasses. Feldspathic tuff and pumice tuff are crystal vitric tuff due to more abundant feldspar, quartz, and amphibole than volcanic glass. Zeolite comprises chlorite and altered glasses as deep sea altered volcanic rocks. The geologic structure is very complex, the major structures are normal faults with pyrite in it. There were two deep submarine paleovolcanoes namely Tegalrejo and Baturagung. The first paleovolcano erupted effusively producing basaltic sequence, while the second one erupted explosively ejecting feldspathic-rich pyroclastic material. The two paleovolcanoes erupted simultaneously and repeatedly.

  1. Metasomatic origin of garnet orthopyroxenites in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle underlying Pali Aike volcanic field, southern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Hattori, Keiko H.; Stern, Charles R.

    2008-11-01

    Garnet-bearing orthopyroxenites occur as both discrete xenoliths and as veinlets in peridotite xenoliths that were brought to the surface by Quaternary Pali Aike alkali basalts in the southernmost of the Patagonian plateau lava fields in southern South America. Orthopyroxenites commonly contain Ti-rich minerals and also relict grains of olivine (Ol) and clinopyroxene (Cpx) occurring as inclusions in secondary orthopyroxene (Opx). The secondary Opx contains high TiO2 (0.20-0.59 wt.%), moderate Al2O3 (2.87-5.10 wt.%) and low magnesium numbers (Mg#, 84.5-89.2) compared with Opx in garnet-bearing peridotites. This suggests that secondary Opx formed at the expense of Ol and Cpx during metasomatism by an evolved Ti-rich melt. The orthopyroxenites contain bulk-rock concentrations of Cr, Ni and platinum group elements similar to peridotites, suggesting that these metals were essentially immobile during metasomatism, and that the metasomatizing melt did not introduce these elements. Instead, the metasomatizing melt contributed alkalis, Ti, Si, Al, and S to the orthopyroxenites based on increased concentrations of these elements and mineralogy. Secondary Opx has also been documented in mantle peridotite xenoliths derived from beneath both active arcs and ancient cratons. In comparison with such Opx in these mantle samples, the secondary Opx in the Pali Aike xenoliths contains relatively high Ti and Al and low Mg. High Ti and low Mg in these samples reflect the evolved nature of the metasomatizing melt that originated from the underlying asthenospheric mantle. The type of secondary Opx, typified by these samples, may be common elsewhere in subcontinental mantle lithosphere (SCLM) affected by asthenospheric upwelling.

  2. Examining Volcanic Terrains Using In Situ Geochemical Technologies; Implications for Planetary Field Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K. E.; Bleacher, J. E.; Evans, C. A.; Rogers, A. D.; Ito, G.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Gendreau, K.

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of the target destination for the next manned planetary mission, the crew will require technology with which to select samples for return to Earth. The six Apollo lunar surface missions crews had only the tools to enable them to physically pick samples up off the surface or from a boulder and store those samples for return to the Lunar Module and eventually to Earth. Sample characterization was dependent upon visual inspection and relied upon their extensive geology training. In the four decades since Apollo however, great advances have been made in traditionally laboratory-based instrument technologies that enable miniaturization to a field-portable configuration. The implications of these advancements extend past traditional terrestrial field geology and into planetary surface exploration. With tools that will allow for real-time geochemical analysis, an astronaut can better develop a series of working hypotheses that are testable during surface science operations. One such technology is x-ray fluorescence (XRF). Traditionally used in a laboratory configuration, these instruments have now been developed and marketed commercially in a field-portable mode. We examine this technology in the context of geologic sample analysis and discuss current and future plans for instrument deployment. We also discuss the development of the Chromatic Mineral Identification and Surface Texture (CMIST) instrument at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Testing is taking place in conjunction with the RIS4E (Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration) SSERVI (Solar System Exploration and Research Virtual Institute) team activities, including field testing at Kilauea Volcano, HI..

  3. Early Cretaceous bimodal volcanic rocks in the southern Lhasa terrane, south Tibet: Age, petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Ding, Lin; Liu, Zhi-Chao; Zhang, Li-Yun; Yue, Ya-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Limited geochronological and geochemical data from Early Cretaceous igneous rocks of the Gangdese Belt have resulted in a dispute regarding the subduction history of Neo-Tethyan Ocean. To approach this issue, we performed detailed in-situ zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic, whole-rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic analyses on Late Mesozoic volcanic rocks exposed in the Liqiongda area, southern Lhasa terrane. These volcanic rocks are calc-alkaline series, dominated by basalts, basaltic andesites, and subordinate rhyolites, with a bimodal suite. The LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb dating results of the basaltic andesites and rhyolites indicate that these volcanic rocks erupted during the Early Cretaceous (137-130 Ma). The basaltic rocks are high-alumina (average > 17 wt.%), enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and light rare earth elements (LREEs), and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs), showing subduction-related characteristics. They display highly positive zircon εHf(t) values (+ 10.0 to + 16.3) and whole-rock εNd(t) values (+ 5.38 to + 7.47). The silicic suite is characterized by low Al2O3 (extracted from a source metasomatized by slab-derived components for the petrogenesis of mafic rocks, whereas the subsequent mafic magma underplating triggered partial melting of the juvenile crust to generate acidic magma. Our results confirm the presence of Early Cretaceous volcanism in the southern Lhasa terrane. Combined with the distribution of the contemporary magmatism, deformation style, and sedimentary characteristics in the Lhasa terrane, we favor the suggestion that the Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere was flat-lying beneath the Lhasa terrane during the Early Cretaceous.

  4. 231Pa systematics in postglacial volcanic rocks from Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Simon; Kokfelt, Thomas; Hoernle, Kaj; Lundstrom, Craig; Hauff, Folkmar

    2016-07-01

    Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of combined 238U-230Th and 235U-231Pa systematics to constrain upwelling rates and the role of recycled mafic lithologies in mantle plume-derived basalts. Accordingly, we present measurements of the 231Pa concentrations from 26 mafic volcanic rocks from Iceland, including off-axis basalts from the Snaefellsnes Peninsula, to complement previously published 238U-230Th-226Ra data. 231Pa concentrations vary from 27 to 624 fg/g and (231Pa/235U) ratios from 1.12 to 2.11 with the exception of one anomalous sample from the Southeast Rift which has a 231Pa deficit with (231Pa/235U) = 0.86. An important new result is that basalts from the Southeast Rift and the Snaefellsnes Peninsula define a trend at relatively low (231Pa/235U) for a given (230Th/238U) ratio. Many of the remaining samples fall in or around the global field for ocean island basalts but those from the Mid-Iceland Belt and the Southwest Rift/Reykjanes Peninsula extend to higher (231Pa/235U) ratios at a given (230Th/238U), similar to mid-ocean ridge basalts. In principle, these lavas could result from melting of peridotite at lower pressures. However, there is no reason to suspect that the Mid-Iceland Belt and the Southwest Rift lavas reflect shallower melting than elsewhere in Iceland. In our preferred model, these lavas reflect melting of garnet peridotite whereas those from the Southeast Rift and the Snaefellsnes Peninsula contain a significant contribution (up to 20%) of melt from garnet pyroxenite. This is consistent with incompatible trace element and radiogenic isotope evidence for recycled oceanic crust in these lavas. There is increasing agreement that the displacement of ocean island basalts to lower (231Pa/235U) ratios at a given (230Th/238U), compared to mid-ocean ridge basalts, reflects the role of recycled mafic lithologies such as garnet pyroxenite as well as higher average pressures of melting. It now seems likely that this interpretation may

  5. Crater lakes of the Pali Aike Volcanic Field as key sites for paleoclimatic and paleoecological reconstructions in southern Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolitschka, Bernd; Schäbitz, Frank; Lücke, Andreas; Corbella, Hugo; Ercolano, Bettina; Fey, Michael; Haberzettl, Torsten; Janssen, Stephanie; Maidana, Nora; Mayr, Christoph; Ohlendorf, Christian; Oliva, Gabriel; Paez, Marta M.; Schleser, Gerhard H.; Soto, Julio; Tiberi, Pedro; Wille, Michael

    2006-07-01

    Sedimentary records from crater lakes are of major scientific interest because they provide continuous high-resolution climatic and environmental archives. From a limnogeological survey of crater lakes performed in the Pali Aike Volcanic Field (52°S, southeastern Patagonia, Santa Cruz, Argentina), two deep crater lakes have been recognized: Laguna Potrok Aike (100 m water depth) and Laguna Azul (56 m water depth). Physico-chemical analyses of these closed lake systems demonstrate that Laguna Azul has a dimictic and thermally stratified freshwater body, whereas Laguna Potrok Aike is a subsaline polymictic lake. Both have an oxygen-rich water column from top to bottom. Laguna Potrok Aike in particular is enriched in Na, P, and Cl. The morphometry suggests that Laguna Azul is of Holocene age, whereas the potential sediment infill of Laguna Potrok Aike may comprise 250 m to a mid-Pleistocene age (770 ka). Several aerial and subaquatic lake level terraces at Laguna Potrok Aike point to lake level fluctuations triggered by prior hydrological changes. Although fine-grained sediments of both lakes are not varied, they may eventually provide a detailed terrestrial record of past environmental and climatic variations for this southern mid-latitude region.

  6. Volcanic hazard studies for the Yucca Mountain project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.; Harrington, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Turrin, B.; Champion, D. [US Geological Survey (US); Wells, S.; Perry, F.; McFadden, L.; Renault, C. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA)

    1989-12-31

    Volcanic hazard studies are ongoing to evaluate the risk of future volcanism with respect to siting of a repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste at the Yucca Mountain site. Seven Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers are located between 8 and 47 km from the outer boundary of the exploration block. The conditional probability of disruption of a repository by future basaltic volcanism is bounded by the range of 10-8 to 10-10 yr-1. These bounds are currently being reexamined based on new developments in the understanding of the evolution of small volume, basaltic volcanic centers including: Many of the volcanic centers exhibit brief periods of eruptive activity separated by longer periods of inactivity, The centers may be active for time spans exceeding 105 yrs, There is a decline in the volume of eruptions of the centers through time, and Small volume eruptions occurred at two of the Quaternary centers during latest Pleistocene or Holocene. The authors classify the basalt centers as polycyclic, and distinguish them from polygenetic volcanoes. Polycyclic volcanism is characterized by small volume, episodic eruptions of magma of uniform composition over time spans of 103 to 105 yrs. magma eruption rates are low and the time between eruptions exceeds the cooling time of the magma volumes.

  7. Volcanic hazard studies for the Yucca Mountain project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.; Turrin, B.; Wells, S.; Perry, F.; McFadden, L.; Renault, C.E.; Champion, D.; Harrington, C.

    1989-05-01

    Volcanic hazard studies are ongoing to evaluate the risk of future volcanism with respect to siting of a repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste at the Yucca Mountain site. Seven Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers are located a minimum distance of 12 km and a maximum distance of 47 km from the outer boundary of the exploration block. The conditional probability of disruption of a repository by future basaltic volcanism is bounded by the range of 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}10} yr{sup {minus}1}. These values are currently being reexamined based on new developments in the understanding of the evaluation of small volume, basaltic volcanic centers including: (1) Many, perhaps most, of the volcanic centers exhibit brief periods of eruptive activity separated by longer periods of inactivity. (2) The centers may be active for time spans exceeding 10{sup 5} yrs, (3) There is a decline in the volume of eruptions of the centers through time, and (4) Small volume eruptions occurred at two of the Quaternary centers during latest Pleistocene or Holocene time. We classify the basalt centers as polycyclic, and distinguish them from polygenetic volcanoes. Polycyclic volcanism is characterized by small volume, episodic eruptions of magma of uniform composition over time spans of 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} yrs. Magma eruption rates are low and the time between eruptions exceeds the cooling time of the magma volumes. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Petrochemistry and origin of basalt breccia from Ban Sap Sawat area, Wichian Buri, Phetchabun, central Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phisit Limtrakun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Thailand is usually considered to be controlled by escape tectonics associated with India-Asia collision during theLate Cenozoic, and basaltic volcanism took place in this extensional period. This volcanism generated both subaqueous andsubaerial lava flows with tholeiitic to alkalic basaltic magma. The subaqueous eruptions represented by the studied WichianBuri basalts, Ban Sap Sawat in particular, are constituted by two main types of volcanic lithofacies, including lava flows andbasalt breccias. The lava flows are commonly porphyritic with olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts and microphenocrysts,and are uncommonly seriate textured. The basalt breccias are strongly vitrophyric texture with olivine and plagioclasephenocrysts and microphenocrysts. Chemical analyses indicate that both lava flows and basalt breccias have similar geochemical compositions, signifying that they were solidified from the same magma. Their chondrite normalized REE patternsand N-MORB normalized patterns are closely analogous to the Early to Middle Miocene tholeiites from central Sinkhote-Alinand Sakhalin, northeastern margin of the Eurasian continent which were erupted in a continental rift environment. The originfor the Wichian Buri basalts show similarity of lava flows and basalt breccias, in terms of petrography and chemical compositions, signifying that they have been formed from the same continental within-plate, transitional tholeiitic magma.

  9. Emplacement dynamics and lava field evolution of the flood basalt eruption at Holuhraun, Iceland: Observations from field and remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Gro; Höskuldsson, Armann; Riishuus, Morten S.; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Thórdarson, Thorvaldur; Dürig, Tobias; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Durmont, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    The Holuhraun eruption (Aug 2014- Feb 2015) is the largest effusive eruption in Iceland since the Laki eruption in 1783-84, with an estimated lava volume of ~1.6 km3 covering an area of ~83 km2. The eruption provides an unprecedented opportunity to study i) lava morphologies and their emplacement styles, ii) Morphological transitions iii) the transition from open to closed lava pathways and iv) the implication of lava pond formation. This study is based on three different categories of data; field data, airborne data and satellite data. The field data include tracking of the lava advancement by Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements and georeferenced GoPro cameras allowing classification of the lava margin morphology. Furthermore, video footage on-site documented lava emplacement. Complimentary observations have been provided from aircraft platforms and by satellite data. Of particular importance for lava morphology observations are 1-12 m/pixel airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images (x-band), as well as SAR data from TerraSAR-X and COSMO-SkyMed satellites. The Holuhraun lava field comprises a continuum of morphologies from pāhoehoe to 'a'ā, which have varied temporally and spatially. Shelly pāhoehoe lava was the first morphology to be observed (08-29). Spatially, this lava type was not widely distributed, but was emplaced throughout the eruption close to the vent area and the lava channels. Slabby pāhoehoe lava was initially observed the 08-31 and was observed throughout most of the eruption during the high-lava-flux phase of new lava lobe emplacement. 'A'ā lavas were the dominating morphology the first three months of the eruption and was first observed 09-01 like Rubbly pāhoehoe lava. Finally, Spiny pāhoehoe lava was first observed the 09-05 as a few marginal outbreaks along the fairly inactive parts of the 'a'ā lava lobe. However, throughout the eruption this morphology became more important and from mid-November/beginning of December the

  10. Comparing and Reconciling Traditional Field and Photogeologic Mapping Techniques: Lessons from the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, J. A., Jr.; Eppler, D. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Janoiko, B.; Whitson, P.

    2014-01-01

    Cartographic products and - specifically - geologic maps provide critical assistance for establishing physical and temporal frameworks of planetary surfaces. The technical methods that result in the creation of geologic maps vary depending on how observations are made as well as the overall intent of the final products [1-3]. These methods tend to follow a common linear work flow, including the identification and delineation of spatially and temporally discrete materials (units), the documentation of their primary (emplacement) and secondary (erosional) characteristics, analysis of the relative and absolute age relationships between these materials, and the collation of observations and interpretations into an objective map product. The "objectivity" of a map is critical cross comparison with overlapping maps and topical studies as well as its relevance to scientific posterity. However, the "accuracy" and "correctness" of a geologic map is very subject to debate. This can be evidenced by comparison of existing geologic maps at various scales, particularly those compiled through field- and remote-based mapped efforts. Our study focuses on comparing the fidelity of (1) "Apollo-style" geologic investigations, where typically non-geologist crew members follow static traverse routes established through pre-mission planning, and (2) "traditional" field-based investigations, where geologists are given free rein to observe without preplanned routes. This abstract summarizes the regional geology wherein our study was conducted, presents the geologic map created from traditional field mapping techniques, and offers basic insights into how geologic maps created from different tactics can be reconciled in support of exploratory missions. Additional abstracts [4-6] from this study discuss various exploration and science results of these efforts.

  11. Geochemical characterization of oceanic basalts using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Sridhar D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The geochemical discriminate diagrams help to distinguish the volcanics recovered from different tectonic settings but these diagrams tend to group the ocean floor basalts (OFB under one class i.e., as mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORB. Hence, a method is specifically needed to identify the OFB as normal (N-MORB, enriched (E-MORB and ocean island basalts (OIB. We have applied Artificial Neural Network (ANN technique as a supervised Learning Vector Quantisation (LVQ to identify the inherent geochemical signatures present in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB basalts. A range of N-MORB, E-MORB and OIB dataset was used for training and testing of the network. Although the identification of the characters as N-MORB, E-MORB and OIB is completely dependent upon the training data set for the LVQ, but to a significant extent this method is found to be successful in identifying the characters within the CIOB basalts. The study helped to geochemically delineate the CIOB basalts as N-MORB with perceptible imprints of E-MORB and OIB characteristics in the form of moderately enriched rare earth and incompatible elements. Apart from the fact that the magmatic processes are difficult to be deciphered, the architecture performs satisfactorily.

  12. Geochemical characterization of oceanic basalts using Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pranab; Iyer, Sridhar D

    2009-12-23

    The geochemical discriminate diagrams help to distinguish the volcanics recovered from different tectonic settings but these diagrams tend to group the ocean floor basalts (OFB) under one class i.e., as mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORB). Hence, a method is specifically needed to identify the OFB as normal (N-MORB), enriched (E-MORB) and ocean island basalts (OIB). We have applied Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique as a supervised Learning Vector Quantisation (LVQ) to identify the inherent geochemical signatures present in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) basalts. A range of N-MORB, E-MORB and OIB dataset was used for training and testing of the network. Although the identification of the characters as N-MORB, E-MORB and OIB is completely dependent upon the training data set for the LVQ, but to a significant extent this method is found to be successful in identifying the characters within the CIOB basalts. The study helped to geochemically delineate the CIOB basalts as N-MORB with perceptible imprints of E-MORB and OIB characteristics in the form of moderately enriched rare earth and incompatible elements. Apart from the fact that the magmatic processes are difficult to be deciphered, the architecture performs satisfactorily.

  13. SHRIMP dating of volcanic rock in the Zhangwu-Heishan area, West Liaoning province, China: Its relationship with coal-bearing strata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Houan; Xu Debin; Li Baofang; Shao Longyi

    2011-01-01

    The Zhangwu-Heishan area is located to the east of the Fuxin-Yixian Basin and is mostly covered with volcanic rock.At various periods,different geologists had varying opinions about their age and periods of volcanic eruptions,especially on sequences between volcanic rock and main coal-beating strata,which affect the direction of searching for coal,as well as prospecting the entire research area.During our study,we carried out detailed field investigations in this research area; observed and recorded the main representative outcrops of volcanic rock.We collected over 20 volcanic rock samples and tested the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe Ⅱ (SHRIMP Ⅱ) U-Pb isotope age of 11 samples.The age of our volcanic rock samples ranged between 56.0 ± 2.9 and 132.3 ± 2.3 Ma.After taking earlier investigations into consideration,we concluded that,except for a suite of paleogene olivine basalt,the volcanic rock in the Zhangwu-Heishan area is younger than the coal-beating Shahai Formation.It is therefore most unlikely to find coal seams equivalent to those of the early Cretaceous Shahai Formation in Fuxin Basin below volcanic rock.

  14. Database compilation for the geologic map of the San Francisco volcanic field, north-central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Joseph A.; Ramsey, David W.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Ulrich, George E.; Newhall, Christopher G.; Moore, Richard B.; Bailey, Norman G.; Holm, Richard F.

    2016-01-08

    The main component of this publication is a geologic map database prepared using geographic information system (GIS) applications. The geodatabase of geologic points, lines, and polygons was produced as a compilation from five adjoining map sections originally published as printed maps in 1987 (see references in metadata). Four of the sections (U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Maps MF–1957, MF–1958, MF–1959, MF–1960) were created by scanning and geo-referencing stable base map material consisting of mylar positives. The final section (MF–1956) was compiled by hand tracing an enlargement of the available printed paper base map onto mylar using a #00 rapidograph pen, the mylar positive was then digitally scanned and geo-referenced. This method was chosen because the original basemap materials (mylar positives) for the MF–1956 section were unavailable at the time of this publication. Due to the condition of the available MF–1956 map section used as the base (which had previously been folded) the accuracy within the boundary of the MF–1956 section is presumed to be degraded in certain areas. The locations of the degraded areas and the degree of degradation within these areas is unclear. Final compilation of the database was completed using the ArcScan toolset, and the Editor toolset in ESRI ArcMap 10.1. Polygon topology was created from the lines and labels were added to the resultant geological polygons, lines, and points. Joseph A. Bard and David W. Ramsey updated and corrected the geodatabase, created the metadata and web presence, and provided the GIS-expertise to bring the geodatabase and metadata to completion. Included are links to files to view or print the original map sheets and the accompanying pamphlets.

  15. How Volcanism Controls Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Large explosive volcanoes eject megatons of sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere where it spreads around the world within months and is oxidized slowly to form a sulfuric-acid aerosol with particle sizes that grow large enough to reflect and scatter solar radiation, cooling Earth ~0.5C for up to 3 years. Explosive eruptions also deplete total column ozone ~6% causing up to 3C winter warming at mid-latitudes over continents. Global cooling predominates. Extrusive, basaltic volcanoes deplete ozone ~6% but do not eject much sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere, causing net global warming. Anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) deplete ozone ~3% for up to a century while each volcanic eruption, even small ones, depletes ozone twice as much but for less than a decade through eruption of halogens and ensuing photochemical processes. The 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, the 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn, plus anthropogenic CFCs depleted ozone over Toronto Canada 14% in 2012, causing an unusually warm winter and drought. Total column ozone determines how much solar ultraviolet energy with wavelengths between 290 and 340 nanometers reaches Earth where it is absorbed most efficiently by the ocean. A 25% depletion of ozone increases the amount of this radiation reaching Earth by 1 W m-2 for overhead sun and 0.25 W m-2 for a solar zenith angle of 70 degrees. The tropopause is the boundary between the troposphere heated from below by a sun-warmed Earth and the stratosphere heated from above by the Sun through photodissociation primarily of oxygen and ozone. The mean annual height of the tropopause increased ~160 m between 1980 and 2004 at the same time that northern mid-latitude total column ozone was depleted by ~4%, the lower stratosphere cooled ~2C, the upper troposphere warmed ~0.1C, and mean surface temperatures in the northern hemisphere rose ~0.5C. Regional total ozone columns are observed to increase as rapidly as 20% within 5 hours with an associated 5

  16. CHARACTERISTICS OF CARBONIFEROUS VOLCANIC RESERVOIRS IN THE 6th AND 7th AREAS OF KARAMAY OIL FIELD%克拉玛依油田六七区石炭系火山岩储层特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗雪; 罗明高; 林军; 袁述武; 乐园; 陈忠云

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of lithology,physical and pore structure of the Carboniferous volcanic rocks in the 6th and the 7th districts of Karamay oil field are studied through observation and analysis of drilling cores of 665.56 meters long from 32 drilling wells,470 thin sections,666 physical analysis samples and 82 drilling wells logging data.It is showed that burial depth of layers,lithology and fractures are 3 main factors influencing the reservoirs in this area,and the most favorable reservoir is located in the south of the 6 district and the middle of the 7 district.Pyroclastic rock and sedimentary rock are the main rock types in the area and the major lithology of volcanic rock reservoir is breccias lava and basalt characteristic of low porosity and permeability.Reservoir space is dominated by stoma,intercrystal pore,vug and pre-existing fractures.The favorable reservoir mainly distributes in the south and northwest of 6 district and in the middle of 7 district.%针对32口井665.56 m岩心、470块岩矿薄片、666个物性分析样品以及82口井测井等资料,对克拉玛依油田六七区石炭系火山岩的岩性、物性以及孔隙结构特征进行了研究,结果表明该区影响火山岩储层的主要因素主要有地层埋深、岩性以及裂缝影响,最有利的储集区位于六区南部和七中区.研究区岩石类型主要为火山熔岩类、火山碎屑岩类和沉积岩类,火山岩储层主要岩性为角砾熔岩和玄武岩;孔隙度、渗透率较低;储集空间以气孔、晶间孔、溶蚀孔和原生裂缝为主;有利火山岩储层主要分布于六区南部、西北部以及七中区.

  17. Detrital zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology of intercalated baked sediments: a new approach to dating young basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, F. J.; van Soest, M. C.; Hodges, K.

    2009-12-01

    Placing accurate age constraints on young volcanic eruptions, particularly in populated areas such as New Mexico, is important for not only tectonic and climate studies, but also for geohazard analysis. A primary lack of zircon and apatite crystals in basaltic rocks leaves K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating as the most favored methods, though extraneous Ar and low K contents can often reduce precision. Alternative techniques suggested in recent years include (U-Th)/He dating of U and Th rich inclusions in olivine phenocrysts and other phenocrysts (Min et al., 2006; Aciego et al., 2007), (U-Th)/He dating of zircon xenocrysts (Blondes et al., 2007), and (U-Th)/He dating of magnetite phenocrysts (Blackburn et al., 2007). Unfortunately, zircon xenocrysts are not very abundant in basalts, and not all basalts contain suitably sized olivine, magnetite, or other phenocrysts. Here, we present a new application of the (U-Th)/He method to dating young volcanic eruptions in an area where the emplacement of basalt flows has reset the (U-Th)/He systematics of zircons and apatites in intercalated baked sediments. The Taos Plateau volcanic field (TPVF) in New Mexico formed in Middle to Late Miocene time in association with extensional processes in the Rio Grande Rift. The voluminous (>200 km3) basalt flows of the TPVF have been carefully dated with 40Ar/39Ar (Appelt, 1998) and therefore provide a sound basis for comparison with the (U-Th)/He results. Two fluvial sand and gravel samples were collected from directly beneath the Upper member of the Servilleta Basalt (40Ar/39Ar age: 3.57 ± 0.19 Ma [2 S.E., n = 3]; Appelt, 1998) in the Rio Grande River Gorge just west of Taos. These two samples yielded a distinct population of single-crystal (U-Th)/He zircon and apatite ages of 3.54 ± 0.11 Ma [2 S.E., n = 4] and 3.44 ± 0.25 Ma [2 S.E., n = 2] respectively. Sixteen additional grains (6 zircons and 10 apatites) gave significantly older dates (~ 9 to 27 Ma). We interpret the older dates as

  18. Geochemical and isotopic characteristics of volcanic rocks from the northern East China Sea shelf margin and the Okinawa Trough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Zhigang; YU Shaoxiong; WANG Xiaoyuan; FU Yongtao; YIN Xuebo; ZHANG Guoliang; WANG Xiaomei; CHEN Shuai

    2010-01-01

    Volcanic rocks both from the northern East China Sea (NECS) shelf margin and the northern Okinawa Trough are subalkaline less aluminous,and lower in High Field Strength Elements (HFSE).These rocks are higher in Large Ion Lithophile Elements (LILE),thorium and uranium contents,positive lead anomalies,negative Nb-Ta anomalies,and enrichment in Light Rare Earth Elements (LREE).Basalts from the NECS shelf margin are akin to Indian Ocean Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB),and rhyolites from the northern Okinawa Trough have the highest 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios.The NECS shelf margin basalts have lower 87Sr/86Sr ratios,εNd and σ18O than the northern Okinawa Trough silicic rocks.According to 40K-40Ar isotopic ages of basalts from the NECS shelf margin,rifting of the Okinawa Trough may have been active since at least 3.65-3.86 Ma.The origin of the NECS shelf margin basalt can be explained by the interaction of melt derived from Indian Ocean MORB-like mantle with enriched subcontinental lithosphere.The basalts from both sides of the Okinawa Trough may have a similar origin during the initial rifting of the Okinawa Trough,and the formation of basaltic magmas closely relates to the thinning of continental crust.The source of the formation of the northern Okinawa Trough silicic rocks was different from that of the middle Okinawa Trough,which could have been generated by the interaction of basaltic melt with an enriched crustal component.From the Ryukyu island arc to East China,the Cenozoic basalts have apparently increasing trends of MgO contents and ratios of LREE to Heavy Rare Earth Elements (HREE),suggesting that the trace element variabilities of basalts may have been influenced by the subduction of the Philippine Sea plate,and that the effects of subduction of the Philippine Sea plate on the chemical composition of basaltic melts have had a decreasing effect from the Ryukyu island arc to East China.

  19. Holocene flows of the Cima volcanic field, Mojave Desert (California), Part 1: Remote sensing and multi-scale morphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem, J. R.; Luecke, A.; Polun, S. G.; Robertson, T.; Savage, A.; Soldati, A.; Whittington, A. G.; Gomez, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Lava flow morphology and texture can provide insight into rheological and other physical properties of the flow. Studies of terrestrial and extra-terrestrial lava flows rely heavily on remotely sensed observations. This research aims to quantify micromorphology and texture of a Holocene lava flow in the Cima volcanic field (eastern California) using digital elevation models and radar backscatter imagery. We are testing the hypothesis that spatial patterns in morphometry and backscatter roughness correspond with varying rheological conditions during emplacement. The site is ideally suited for morphological study owing to the youthfulness of the flow, as well as the lack of vegetation and minimal surface erosion resulting from the high desert climate. The studied lava flow spans approximately 2.5 km and exhibits well defined lobate forms and lava ropes with clear A'a' to Pahoehoe transitions. This study assesses lava flow micromorphology using a very high resolution (5 cm pixel) digital elevation model (DEM). The DEM was constructed from low-altitude aerial photos acquired using a remotely-controlled model aircraft. In addition to the DEM, the resulting orthoimagery provided a basis for distinguishing pristine lava flow surfaces from areas covered by vegetation and/or eolian deposits. Longer-wavelength morphology (spatial scales greater than 1 meter) is analyzed using a 50 cm pixel DEM produced using stereoscopic NAPP aerial photographs. Roughness estimates are compared with radar backscatter images including steeply incident C-band (5.6 cm wavelength) and L-band (24 cm wavelength) satellite data, as well as shallow incidence Ku-band data (1.7 cm wavelength) acquired using a ground-based imaging radar from an adjacent cinder cone. Photogrammetry and radar provide complementary information on lava flow morphology and micromorphological roughness, which are assessed at different spatial scales using general statistics, as well as the local hypsometric integral.

  20. A Study by Remote Sensing Methods of Volcanism at Craters of the Moon National Park, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberle, C. W.; Hughes, S. S.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Lim, D. S. S.; Garry, B.; Sears, D. W. G.; Downs, M.; Busto, J.; Skok, J. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Kobayashi, L.; Heldmann, J. L.; Christensen, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Craters of the Moon (COTM) National Park, on the eastern Snake River Plain, and its associated lava fields are currently a focus of the NASA SSERVI FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team. COTM was selected for study owing to similarities with volcanic features observed on the Moon, Mars and Vesta. The COTM basaltic lava fields emanate from an 80 km long rift zone where at least eight eruptive episodes, occurring 15,000 to 2,000 BP, have created an expansive volcanic field covering an area of approximately 1,650 km2. This polygenetic volcanic field hosts a diverse collection of basaltic volcanic edifices such as phreatic explosion craters, eruptive fissures, cinder cones, spatter cones, shield volcanoes and expansive lava flows. Engineering challenges and high cost limit the number of robotic and human field investigations of planetary bodies and, due to these constraints, exhaustive remote sensing investigations of planetary surface properties are undertaken prior to field deployment. This creates an unavoidable dependence upon remote sensing, a critical difference between field investigations of planetary bodies and most terrestrial field investigations. Studies of this nature have utility in terrestrial investigations as they can help link spatially encompassing datasets and conserve field resources. We present preliminary results utilizing Earth orbital datasets to determine the efficacy of products derived from remotely sensed data when compared to geologic field observations. Multispectral imaging data (ASTER, AVIRIS, TIMS) collected at a range of spatial and spectral resolutions are paired with high resolution imagery from both orbit and unmanned aircraft systems. This enables the creation of derived products detailing morphology, compositional variation, mineralogy, relative age and vegetation. The surface morphology of flows within COTM differs from flow to flow and observations of these properties can aid in

  1. Semi-automatic delimitation of volcanic edifice boundaries: Validation and application to the cinder cones of the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region (Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Traglia, Federico; Morelli, Stefano; Casagli, Nicola; Garduño Monroy, Victor Hugo

    2014-08-01

    The shape and size of monogenetic volcanoes are the result of complex evolutions involving the interaction of eruptive activity, structural setting and degradational processes. Morphological studies of cinder cones aim to evaluate volcanic hazard on the Earth and to decipher the origins of various structures on extraterrestrial planets. Efforts have been dedicated so far to the characterization of the cinder cone morphology in a systematic and comparable manner. However, manual delimitation is time-consuming and influenced by the user subjectivity but, on the other hand, automatic boundary delimitation of volcanic terrains can be affected by irregular topography. In this work, the semi-automatic delimitation of volcanic edifice boundaries proposed by Grosse et al. (2009) for stratovolcanoes was tested for the first time over monogenetic cinder cones. The method, based on the integration of the DEM-derived slope and curvature maps, is applied here to the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region of the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (Mexico), where 309 Plio-Quaternary cinder cones are located. The semiautomatic extraction allowed identification of 137 of the 309 cinder cones of the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region, recognized by means of the manual extraction. This value corresponds to the 44.3% of the total number of cinder cones. Analysis on vent alignments allowed us to identify NE-SW vent alignments and cone elongations, consistent with a NE-SW σmax and a NW-SE σmin. Constructing a vent intensity map, based on computing the number of vents within a radius r centred on each vent of the data set and choosing r = 5 km, four vent intensity maxima were derived: one is positioned in the NW with respect to the Volcano Tancitaro, one in the NE, one to the S and another vent cluster located at the SE boundary of the studied area. The spacing of centroid of each cluster (24 km) can be related to the thickness of the crust (9-10 km) overlying the magma reservoir.

  2. Late Pleistocene to Holocene soil development and environments in the Long Gang Volcanic Field area, Jilin Province, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Daniela; Zhang, Xinrong; Knöbel, Jette; Maerker, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Late Pleistocene to Holocene shifts of climate and vegetation in the Long Gang Volcanic Field in NE China have been reconstructed, e. g. by Steblich et al. (2009), based on Maar lake sediment cores. In this study, we investigated soil development during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene and linked it to the climate and vegetation reported in the literature. Three pedons were described and analyzed on a crater wall surrounding a maar. The lower part of the slope is covered by basic pyroclastics that are obviously younger than the maar itself. Pedon 1 is located on the upper slope, where the younger pyroclastics are not present; thus it developed over the entire Holocene and part of the Late Pleistocene. Pedon 2 is on the toe slope and developed from the young basic pyroclastics. Vegetation remains, charred by fire that was caused by the volcanic ash fall, were found in the lowermost part of the pyroclastics layer, on top of a paleosol. Charcoal fragments were dated to 18950-18830 cal BP (using INTCAL 09). Thus, pedon 2 developed since around 18.9 ka BP, whereas the development of the paleosol that was buried under the pyroclastics (pedon 3), was stopped at this time. Pedons 1 and 2 are Vitric Andosols, developed mainly from basic pyroclastics, as evidenced by the composition of rock fragments in the soils, comprising 78 / 81 mass % lapilli and 22 / 19 mass % gneiss fragments, respectively. Pedon 3 is a Cutanic Luvisol (Chromic) that developed entirely from gneiss fragments produced by the maar explosion. Lab data suggest increasing intensity of pedogenesis in the direction: Pedon 3 (paleosol) < Pedon 2 < Pedon 1, reflected e. g. in increasing Fed/Fet ratios, decreasing molar ratios of (Ca+K+Na)/Al, and decreasing pH. However, it needs to be considered that lapilli are more readily weatherable than gneiss fragments. The profile morphology of the paleosol, characterized by reddish-brown color (7.5YR), strong angular blocky structure and well-expressed illuvial clay

  3. Continuous in-situ measurements of volcanic gases at Pisciarelli-Phelgrean Field (Italy): a new experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersberg, T.; Somma, R.; Rocco, A.; Quattrocchi, F.; Zimmer, M.; de Natale, G.; de Natale, P.; Boschi, E.

    2009-04-01

    We present a new experimental approach for continuous real-time monitoring of volcanic gases. The realization of this new set-up based on the experience derived from several earlier short-time gas monitoring campaigns carried out in 2006, 2007 and 2008 at different sites (Tor Caldara, Latium Region, Central Italy; Solfatara and Pisciarelli, Campania Region, Souther Italy). The monitoring station is now implemented at a fumarole field in Pisciarelli, about 1 km SE of the Solfatara volcano. Fumarolic gas is continuously pumped through 200m Teflon © tube with a membrane pump (pumping rate 400cc/min) into a small field laboratory, where the gas phase is analyzed minutely by means of a quadrupole mass spectrometer for H2, H2S, CH4, N2, O2, Ar, He, and CO2 and with a tuneable diode laser spectrometer. Further analytical devices may be added in the future. Off-line gas samples are taken regularly to crosscheck the gas composition with a gas chromatograph and for noble gas analysis. Prior to gas analysis, gaseous water is condensed in a water trap placed in a cooling box in close vicinity to the fumarole. The water is removed from the trap in regular intervals (2 h) by a peristaltic pump. The amount of water is determined directly in the trap by measuring the rise of the water level in intervals of 5 minutes. Knowledge of the gas flow and the amount of water would enables us to determine the gas/water ratio of fumarolic gases, however, the actual fumarole temperature (December 2008) at Pisciarelli is 95.8°C, thus water condensation has already occurred prior to gas sampling. The gas from the Pisciarelli fumarole is dominated by CO2 (>98.5 vol.-%), followed by N2, H2S, O2, H2, Ar, CH4 and He. O2 and partly N2 and Ar are due to atmospheric contamination of the system. The air-free calculated gas composition is in good agreement with already published gas composition data. Within the time of investigation, no significant variations were detected in the composition of the

  4. Mylonitic volcanics near Puging, Upper Siang district, Arunachal Pradesh: Evidence of oblique-slip thrusting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Goswami; P Bhattacharyya; D Bezbaruah

    2016-08-01

    The Abor volcanics of the continental flood basalt affinity are extensively exposed in different parts of the Siang valley. These are associated with Yinkiong Group of rocks of Paleocene–Eocene age and represent syn-sedimentary volcanism in a rift setting. Subsequent folding and thrusting of the Siyom and Rikor sequences above the Yinkiong Group of rocks represent changes from syn-to-post collisionalbrittle-ductile tectonic episodes. Mylonitic Abor volcanics in the thrust contacts are studied at several locations in the north and south of Puging in the Siang valley. Both the Abor volcanics and associated Rikor and Yinkiong Group of rocks preserve meso to micro-scale fabric asymmetries indicating that the thrust contacts are shear zones of brittle-ductile nature containing mylonitic textures of high shear strain.Two distinct hitherto unrecognised shear zones in the north and south of Puging are named as North Puging Shear Zone (NPSZ) and South Puging Shear Zone (SPSZ). The kinematic indicators along the thrust contact indicate oblique slip thrusting of the Rikor and Siyom thrust sheets above the Yinkiong Group of rocks. This paper provides field evidence proving that the compression due the Burmese plate made oblique slip thrusting and zones of mylonitised volcanics possible and associated metasediments were formed. The kinematic indicators in the NPSZ and SPSZ respectively indicate top-to-SSE and top-to-NNW sense of shears.

  5. Putative cryptoendolithic life in Devonian pillow basalt, Rheinisches Schiefergebirge, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckmann, J; Bach, W; Behrens, K; Reitner, J

    2008-03-01

    Middle Devonian (Givetian) pillow basalt and inter-pillow breccia from the Rheinisches Schiefergebirge in Germany were found to contain putative biogenic filaments that indicate that life once proliferated within these volcanic rocks. Mineralized filaments are found in carbonate amygdules (vesicles filled by carbonate cement) in the volcanic rock, where they started to form on the internal surface of the once water-filled vesicles. Biogenicity of the filaments is indicated by (1) their size and shape resembling modern microorganisms including a constant diameter along the length of curved filaments, (2) their independence of crystal faces or cleavage planes, (3) branching patterns reminiscent of modern microorganisms, and (4) their spatial clustering and preferential occurrence close to the margin of pillows and in the inter-pillow breccias. A time lag between the deposition of pillow basalt and the activity of endoliths is revealed by the sequence of carbonate cements filling the amygdules. The putative filamentous microorganisms thrived after the formation of early fibrous rim cement, but before later equant calcite spar filled most of the remaining porosity. Microbial clay authigenesis analogous to the encrustation of prokaryotes in modern iron-rich environments led to the preservation of filaments. The filaments predominantly consist of the clay minerals chamosite and illite. Having dwelled in water-filled vesicles, the Devonian basalt-hosted filaments apparently represent cryptoendoliths. This finding suggests that a previously unrecognized niche for life exists within volcanic rock.

  6. CO2 sequestration in basalts: laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otheim, L. T.; Adam, L.; van Wijk, K.; McLing, T. L.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 is proposed as the only promising large-scale method to help reduce CO2 gas emission by its capture at large point sources and subsequent long-term storage in deep geologic formations. Reliable and cost-effective monitoring will be important aspect of ensuring geological sequestration is a safe, effective, and acceptable method for CO2 emissions mitigation. Once CO2 injection starts, seismic methods can be used to monitor the migration of the carbon dioxide plume. To calibrate changes in rock properties from field observations, we propose to first analyze changes in elastic properties on basalt cores. Carbon dioxide sequestration in basalt rocks results in fluid substitution and mixing of CO2 with water and rock mineralizations. Carbon dioxide sequestration in mafic rocks creates reactions such as Mg2SiO 4 + CaMgSi2O 6 + 4CO2 = Mg 3Ca(CO 3) 4 + 3SiO2 whereby primary silicate minerals within the basalt react with carbonic acid laden water to creating secondary carbonate minerals and silicates. Using time-lapse laboratory scale experiments, such as laser generated ultrasonic wave propagation; it is possible to observe small changes in the physical properties of a rock. We will show velocity and modulus measurements on three basalt core samples for different saturation. The ultimate goal of the project is to track seismic changes due to fluid substitution and mineralization. The porosity of our basalts ranges from 8% to 12%, and the P-wave velocity increases by 20% to 40% from dry to water saturated conditions. Petrographic analysis (CT-scans, thin sections, XRF, XRf) will aid in the characterization of the mineral structure in these basalts and its correlation to seismic properties changes resulting from fluid substitution and mineralization.

  7. Age, petrogenesis, and tectonic setting of the Permian bimodal volcanic rocks in the eastern Jiamusi Massif, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jun-Hui; Ge, Wen-Chun; Yang, Hao; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Dong, Yu; Liu, Xi-Wen; Ji, Zheng

    2017-02-01

    We present new in situ zircon U-Pb and Hf isotope, whole-rock geochemical, and Sr-Nd isotopic data for volcanic rocks from the Jiejinkou and Baoqing areas in the eastern Jiamusi Massif. These volcanic rocks are bimodal and consist of basalts, basaltic andesites, rhyolites, and rhyolitic tuffs that can be subdivided into mafic and silicic groups. Zircon U-Pb dating by LA-ICP-MS indicates that these volcanic rocks were erupted between the Early and Middle Permian (290-267 Ma). The mafic rocks in this area have positive εNd(t) (+0.07 to +6.43) values, and are enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and depleted in heavy REE, Nb, and Ta. From these rocks, the meta-basalt of Jinlu and basaltic andesite of Taipinggou and Haojiatun were derived from parental magmas generated by the partial melting of depleted mantle wedge material that was metasomatized by subduction-related melts. These magmas then underwent variable degrees of fractional crystallization and assimilated insignificant amounts of crustal material. The meta-basalt of Liming likely originated from the metasomatized mantle-derived melts hybridized by the convective asthenosphere during the evolution of the magmas. In comparison, the silicic rocks have negative εNd(t) and variable zircon εHf(t) values, are enriched in the large-ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and LREE, and are depleted in high-field-strength elements (e.g., Nb, Ta, and Ti), yielding arc-like geochemical signatures. The geochemical and zircon εHf(t) characteristics of Jiangfeng and Longtouqiao rhyolites are indicative of formation from magmas generated by the partial melting of mafic lower crustal material, whereas the Liming meta-rhyolite was probably produced from a source involving some depleted mantle components. The bimodal volcanic rocks provide convincing evidence that the Early-Middle Permian volcanism in the Jiamusi Massif occurred in an extensional environment probably associated with slab break-off during the westward

  8. East Mariana Basin tholeiites: Cretaceous intraplate basalts or rift basalts related to the Ontong Java plume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, P.R.; Pringle, M.S.; Carlson, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Studies of seafloor magnetic anomaly patterns suggest the presence of Jurassic oceanic crust in a large area in the western Pacific that includes the East Mariana, Nauru and Pigafetta Basins. Sampling of the igneous crust in this area by the Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) allows direct evaluation of the age and petrogenesis of this crust. ODP Leg 129 drilled a 51 m sequence of basalt pillows and massive flows in the central East Mariana Basin. 40Ar 39Ar ages determined in this study for two Leg 129 basalts average 114.6 ?? 3.2 Ma. This age is in agreement with the Albian-late Aptian paleontologic age of the overlying sediments, but is distinctively younger than the Jurassic age predicted by magnetic anomaly patterns in the basin. Compositionally, the East Mariana Basin basalts are uniformly low-K tholeiites that are depleted in highly incompatible elements compared to moderately incompatible ones, which is typical of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) erupted near hotspots. The Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of the tholeiites ( 87Sr 86Srinit = 0.70360-0.70374; 143Nd 144Ndinit = 0.512769-0.512790; 206Pb 204Pbmeas = 18.355-18.386) also overlap with some Indian Ocean Ridge MORB, although they are distinct from the isotopic compositions of Jurassic basalts drilled in the Pigafetta Basin, the oldest Pacific MORB. The isotopic compositions of the East Mariana Basin tholeiites are also similar to those of intraplate basalts, and in particular, to the isotopic signature of basalts from the nearby Ontong Java and Manihiki Plateaus. The East Mariana Basin tholeiites also share many petrologic and isotopic characteristics with the oceanic basement drilled in the Nauru Basin at DSDP Site 462. In addition, the new 110.8 ?? 1.0 Ma 40Ar 39Ar age for two flows from the bottom of Site 462 in the Nauru Basin is indistinguishable from the age of the East Mariana Basin flows. Thus, while magnetic anomaly patterns predict that the igneous

  9. Assessing the potential for luminescence dating of basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Duller, G.A.T.; Wintle, A.G.; Muhs, D.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of dating basalt using luminescence was tested on four samples with independent age control from Cima volcanic field, California, with the ultimate aim of assessing whether the technique could be used to date sediments on the surface of Mars. Previous analysis of these samples had demonstrated that the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signal is most suitable for dating as it showed the lowest fading rate among various luminescence signals. In this study, changes in equivalent dose as a function of preheat are described. The ages for the two youngest Cima samples agree with the independent ages based on cosmogenic nuclide measurements (12.0 ?? 0.8 ka). In the two older samples (dated to 320 and 580 ka by K-Ar), the luminescence behaviour is more complex and the form of the IRSL decay curve is seen to vary with dose. Mathematical fitting is used to isolate two components and their intensities are used to produce dose response curves. The slower component yields a larger equivalent dose. However, even using this component and after correction for fading, the ages obtained for the older samples are younger than the K-Ar ages. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Petrology, Geochemistry and Nd-Sr-Pb Isotopic Properties of Volcanic Rocks in Daheishan Island, Penglai, Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yongtao; Li Anchun

    2003-01-01

    The major elements, trace elements, K-Ar age and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic systems of the Cenozoic volcanic rocks in Daheishan Island and Cishan, Penglai, Shandong Province are measured. The volcanic rocks ( olivine-nephelinite and nepheline-basanite ) in Daheishan Island erupted periodically in an interval of 0.32 Ma, from 8.72 Ma, 8.39 Ma, 8.08 Ma to 7.73 Ma. The volcanic rocks are all rich in light REEs. They are similar to the OIB-type alkali basalt in the trace elements normalized model by primordial mantle: rich in high field elements such as Nb and Ta, and imcompatible elements such as Cs, Rb, Ba, Th, U. The volcanic rocks show a depletion of K and Rb elements. It is suggested by the trace elements that the olivine-nephelinite in Daheishan Island is originated from deep resources under the continental mantle. ε Nd (0) values of the volcanic rocks in Daheishan Island and Cisban are 5.31 ~ 8.51 and 7.33 respectively, suggesting that the volcanic rocks are from the depleted mantle resources, which have higher Sm/Nd ratios than the CHUR. 143Nd /144Nd ratios of Daheishan Island olivine-nephelinite and Cishan alkali basalts are 0.512 910 ~ 0.513 074 and 0.513 014 respectively. The 87Sr /86Sr of Daheishan Island volcanic rocks are lower than that of Cishan, 0.703 427 ~ 0.703 482 and 0.703 895 respectively. The Daheishan Island olivinenephelinite has the Pb isotopic values as follows: 206Pb /204pb = 18.028 9 ~ 17.972 8, 207Pb /204pb= 15.435 8 ~ 15.402 2 and 208Pb /204Pb = 38.087 6 ~ 37.997 5, lower than those of Cishan basanite. The Cishan basanite has 206Pb /204pb = 18.240 1, 207Pb /204Pb = 15.564 5 and 208Pb /204pb = 38.535. The authors suggest that the olivine-nephelinite in Daheishan Island is similar to the E-type MORB or Hawaii OIB, and the alkali basalts in Cishan similar to the Kerguelen OIB. The dominant mantle components of DM+PREMA and perhaps DM ( Dupal type ) are the dominant mantle components for volcanic rocks in Daheishan Island and Cishan. The

  11. Vent 7504 of the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), Arizona: Sample Geochemistry and Implications for Cone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, D. H.; Eppler, D. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Whitson, P. A.; Janoiko, B. A.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Vent 7504 is a complex structure in the SFVF that has 3 unit classes: a central cone with exposed dikes and cinder-covered rheomorphic facies; a SE/NW-trending ridge north of the cone with cinder-covered rheomorphic facies; and three discrete lava flows that emanate to the N from the ridge and to the SW and NW from the cone. Field observations suggest the ridge was the northern crest of an initial, larger cone. The NW portion of this cone was most likely disrupted during a catastrophic breach of lava that had accumulated within the cone; this third of three lava flows carried rafted packages of the rheomorphic cone facies to the NW, forming the linear N ridge. The final phase of pyroclastic activity was concentrated in the SW portion of the original cone, covering the top of the cone with cinders and forming the more traditional conic-shaped construct observed today. This study describes the geochemistry of 9 samples collected from the mapped units (2 from the cone, 1 from the N ridge, 1 from the N lava flow, 2 from the SW lava flow, and 3 from the NW lava flow) to further constrain the formation of Vent 7504. Geochemical analyses including back-scatter electron scanning electron microscopy and laboratory X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy were conducted on the 9 collected samples to measure bulk rock and olivine phenocryst compositions. Major element concentrations in the bulk rock and olivine compositions are strongly clustered in all samples, indicating they likely originated from a single magmatic source. Bulk rock SiO2 (~47.5 wt%) and alkali (Na2O + K2O, ~2.7 wt% + 0.71 wt%) concentrations are consistent with a basaltic classification for these samples. Trends in major elements relative to MgO are observed for the olivine phenocrysts: SiO2, Al2O3, Na2O, and TiO2 remain constant relative to MgO, but strong linear trends are observed in MnO, FeO, and NiO relative to MgO. These linear trends are expected given the potential for bivalent cation exchanges in the

  12. Space-Time-Isotopic Trends of Snake River Plain Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, M. M.; Hanan, B. B.; Shervais, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Snake River Plain (SRP) volcanic province is an 800 km track of basalt extending from the Owyhee Plateau to its current terminus, the Yellowstone Plateau. It is one of several late-Tertiary magmatic terranes that also include the Cascades magmatic arc, the Columbia River basalts, and the Oregon Plateau basalts; all of which are adjacent to the Basin and Range Province extensional system (Hughes and McCurry, 2002). This province represents the track of the Yellowstone plume and consists of basalt that is compositionally similar to ocean-island basalt. This basalt overlies a series of rhyolitic eruptive centers (overlapping caldera complexes, ignimbrites, and caldera-filling eruptions) that signal the arrival of the plume head (Christiansen, 2001) and herald the onset of plume-related rhyolitic and basaltic volcanism (Pierce et al., 2002). Observed within the SRP are two basalt types: the dominant low-K olivine tholeiites and less common high-K alkaline basalts. We report new Sr-, Nd-, and Pb-isotopic analyses of these two basalt types from all three SRP provinces: eastern, central, and western. Low-K tholeiites are enriched in 143Nd/144Nd and 86Sr/87Sr and forms a quasi-linear array in Pb-isotope space, along with Craters of the Moon and eastern SRP basalts. High-K lavas are found largely in the western plain, and have a uniquely different isotopic signature. They are depleted in 143Nd/144Nd and 86Sr/87Sr, relative to the low-K tholeiites, and plot closer to the BSE component of Zindler and Hart (1986). They also share the same Pb-isotopic space with high-K basalts from Smith Prairie (Boise River Group 2 of Vetter and Shervais, 1992). One low-K tholeiite - Eureka North, plots with these high alkali basalts. Mass balance models have demonstrated an increasing plume component from the Yellowstone caldera in the east to the craton edge in the west. The lavas analyzed in this study conform remarkably to this model. The mass fraction of plume component in western

  13. Age and Duration of the Paraná-Etendeka Flood Basalts and Related Plumbing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renne, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Paraná-Etendeka Igneous Province (PEIP) comprises a large volume sequence of continental flood basalts presently distributed assymetrically between South America (mainly southern Brazil but also parts of Uruguay, Paraguay and Argentina) and southwestern Africa (Namibia, Angola), following opening of the South Atlantic ocean. The PEIP is dominated by tholeiitic basalts to basaltic andesites, with subordinate silicic rocks spanning the dacite-trachyte-rhyolite fields, which occur as lava flows, sills and dike swarms as well as intrusive complexes closely related to the eruptive rocks. The PEIP has long been subject of 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic and paleomagnetic studies which led to conclude its rapid formation near the Hauterivian stage (~133 Ma) with onward progression to Barremian from the intrusive equivalents exposed northwards. Two decades after publication of the first 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Paraná flood basalts (Renne et al., 1992) we report here an updated study of the age and duration of this magmatic event. We calibrated a set of sixty published and new results to the calibration of Renne et al. (2011), which indicates an inception age of the volcanism now estimated at 135 ± 1 Ma, before the initiation of sea floor spreading. Lava extrusion progressed over ~2 Ma from south to north. A protracted duration of ~10 Ma inferred by Stewart et al. (1996) for PEIP volcanism is clearly incorrect, as also concluded by Thiede and Vasconcelos (2010). Low-Ti mafic magmas prevailed during the earlier stages followed over time by enhanced dominance of their silicic equivalents. Eruption of the high-Ti (mafic and silicic) magmas initiated simultaneously ~0.5 m.y. later, continuing up to ~133 Ma with injection of the Ponta Grossa dyke swarm. Despite several paleomagnetic polarity intervals recorded by the lava piles in the southern (> 27°S) and central (latitudes of ~24-27°S) domains of the Brazilian PEIP, the paleomagnetic data show small dispersion in agreement

  14. Newly developed evidence for the original Tethysan island-arc volcanic rocks in the southern segment of the South Lancangjiang Belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper re-describes the characteristics of pre-Ordovician (Pt3) metamorphic volcanic rocks in the Huimin-Manlai region of Yunnan Province from the aspects of petrographic characteristics, rock assemblage, petrochemistry, REE, trace elements, lead isotopes and geotectonic setting. The metamorphic volcanic rocks maintain blasto-intergranular and blasto-andesitic textures; the volcanic rocks are characterized by a basalt-andesite-dacite assemblage; the volcanic rocks are basic-intermediate-intermediate-acid in chemical composition, belonging to semi-alkaline rocks, with calc-alkaline series and tholeiite series coexisting, and they are characterized by low TiO2 contents; their REE distribution patterns are of the LREE-enrichment right-inclined type; the volcanic rocks are enriched in large cation elements and commonly enriched in Th and partly depleted in Ti, Cr and P, belonging to the Gondwana type as viewed from their Pb isotopic composition; petrochemically the data points fall mostly within the field of island-arc volcanic rocks. All these characteristics provided new evidence for the existence of original Tethysan island-arc volcanic rocks in the region studied.

  15. Laser step-heating 40Ar/39Ar dating on young volcanic rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fei; HE Huaiyu; ZHU Rixiang; YANG Liekun; SANG Haiqing; WANG Yinglan

    2006-01-01

    An attempt was made to use CO2 laser step-heating method to date the late Pleistocene basaltic groundmass (DF-2) from Tengchong volcanic field. Among the fourteen heating steps, ten define a good inverse isochron (MSWD = 1.4) with an age of 32.2 ± 7.1 ka (2 σ).The inverse isochron also shows that the initial argon isotopic ratio is 297.1±2.0 (2σ)which is the same as the atmospheric argon at the 2σ error level. Study indicates that it is a useful means to date young volcanic groundmass with low K content by using CO2 laser step-heating 40Ar/39Ar method.

  16. Petrology and petrogenesis of the Eocene Volcanic rocks in Yildizeli area (Sivas), Central Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğa Topbay, C.; Karacık, Zekiye; Genç, S. Can; Göçmengil, Gönenç

    2015-04-01

    Yıldızeli region to the south of İzmir Ankara Erzincan suture zone is situated on the large Sivas Tertiary sedimentary basin. After the northern branch of the Neotethyan Ocean was northerly consumed beneath the Sakarya Continent, a continent - continent collision occurred between the Anatolide- Tauride platform and Pontides and followed a severe intermediate magmatism during the Late Cretaceous- Tertiary period. This created an east-west trending volcanic belt along the whole Pontide range. In the previous studies different models are suggested for the Eocene volcanic succession such as post-collisional, delamination and slab-breakoff models as well as the arc model for its westernmost parts. We will present our field and geochemical data obtained from the Yıldızeli and its surroundings for its petrogenesis, and will discuss the tectonic model(s) on the basis of their geochemical/petrological aspects. Cenozoic volcanic sequences of Yıldızeli region which is the main subject of this study, overlie Pre-Mesozoic crustal meta-sedimentary group of Kırşehir Massif, Ophiolitic mélange and Cretaceous- Paleocene? flysch-like sequences. In the northern part of Yıldızeli region, north vergent thrust fault trending E-W seperates the ophiolitic mélange complex from the Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene and Tertiary formations. Volcano-sedimentary units, Eocene in age, of the Yıldızeli (Sivas-Turkey) which are intercalated with sedimentary deposits related to the collision of Anatolide-Tauride and a simultaneous volcanic activity (i.e. the Yıldızeli volcanics), exposed throughout a wide zone along E-W orientation. Yıldızeli volcanics consist of basalts, basaltic-andesites and andesitic lavas intercalated flow breccias and epiclastic, pyroclastic deposits. Basaltic andesite lavas contain Ca-rich plagioclase + clinopyroxene ± olivine with minor amounts of opaque minerals in a matrix comprised of microlites and glass; andesitic lavas are generally contain Ca

  17. Crustal Magnetization and Magnetic Petrology in Basalts - What Can We Learn from Scientific Drillings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontny, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Rock magnetic and magneto-mineralogical data from scientific drillings contribute to our understanding of the growth history and tectonic evolution of volcanic structures and allows for an improved interpretation of magnetic anomaly data. Such data are not only important for the magnetic structure of volcanic buildings and spreading ridges on Earth but may also provide basic data for the interpretation of extraterrestrial magnetic anomalies like on Mars. Crustal magnetization of basalts is well studied since decades and in general, the amplitude of magnetic anomalies is mainly related to the induced and remanent magnetization. Direct measurements of the magnetic field and measurements of magnetic properties of oceanic and continental crust have indicated that the crustal magnetization is very complex and depends on different factors like e.g. magma composition, cooling rate, age and hydrothermal alteration. Generally a high oxygen fugacity (above the NNO buffer) and a low Ti/(Ti+Fe) ratio of the basaltic melt are suggested as a precondition for high concentration of magnetic minerals and therefore high primary TRM. High temperature subsolidus reactions and hydrothermal alteration as e.g. observed in the strongly magnetic basalts from the Stardalur drill core, Iceland, seems to increase NRM intensity and magnetic susceptibility due to creation of small, secondary magnetite (Vahle et al. 2007). Probably the increase occurred after the extinction of the hydrothermal system because active high-temperature (>150 °C) geothermal areas like the Krafla caldera, NE-Iceland, often show distinct magnetic lows in aeromagnetic anomaly maps suggesting a destruction of magnetic minerals by hydrothermal activity (Oliva-Urcia et al. 2011). The destruction explains the significant magnetization loss, which is seen in many local magnetic anomaly lows within the oceanic crust and volcanic islands like Iceland or Hawaii. Borehole and core magnetic susceptibility measurements in

  18. Geochemical characteristics and petrogenesis of Mesozoic basalts from the North China Craton: A case study in Fuxin, Liaoning Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Occurrence of Cretaceous basalts in Fuxin County, Liaoning Province provides us an opportunity to understand Mesozoic mantle processes beneath the northern margin of the North China Craton (NNCC). Fuxin Jianguo basalts occur as volcanic channel phases with well-developed columnar jointings and contain few spinel lherzolite and pyroxenite xenoliths. They are poor in silica and rich in alkalis, Ti and Al, belonging to alkaline basalts. In trace element compositions, Jianguo basalts are moderately enriched in LREE and LILE, but not depleted in HFSE. They have low Sr and high Nd and Pb isotopic ratios. These geochemical characteristics suggest that Jianguo basalts originated from the depleted asthenosphere, representing an undifferentiated and uncontaminated primitive magma. Presence of these basalts indicates that the lithosphere beneath the region had thickness less than 65 km at the time of basalt eruption and was mainly composed of fertile pargasite-bearing spinel lherzolite and plagioclase pyroxenite. The voluminous basaltic-andesitic magmatism during the early Jurassic-late Cretaceous time indicates that the commencement and accomplishment of lithosphere thinning in the NNCC was much earlier than that in the southern margin, since the mafic-intermediate volcanism only occurred at the Cretaceous time in the southern margin and the basalts with an asthenosphere isotopic signature at the Tertiary. This shows that highly spatial and temporal heterogeneity existed in the Mesozoic lithosphere evolution.

  19. Magma chamber processes in central volcanic systems of Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Þórarinsson, Sigurjón Böðvar; Tegner, Christian

    2009-01-01

    New field work and petrological investigations of the largest gabbro outcrop in Iceland, the Hvalnesfjall gabbro of the 6-7 Ma Austurhorn intrusive complex, have established a stratigraphic sequence exceeding 800 m composed of at least 8 macrorhythmic units. The bases of the macrorhythmic units...... olivine basalts from Iceland that had undergone about 20% crystallisation of olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene and that the macrorhythmic units formed from thin magma layers not exceeding 200-300 m. Such a "mushy" magma chamber is akin to volcanic plumbing systems in settings of high magma supply...... rate including the mid-ocean ridges and present-day magma chambers over the Iceland mantle plume. The Austurhorn central volcano likely formed in an off-rift flank zone proximal to the Iceland mantle plume during a major rift relocation....

  20. An assessment of future volcanic hazard at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, W.R. [WRH Associates, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Preliminary results and methods of a volcanic-hazards assessment for the proposed high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain are given. The most significant hazards are potential intersection of the repository by a basaltic dike, or structural disruption associated with dike intrusion. Two approaches are taken, which give similar results: homogeneous volcanic-source zones and spatial smoothing. The preliminary computed probabilities of intersection of the Yucca Mountain repository by a basaltic dike are in the range 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -8} per year.

  1. Depositional model of Permian Luodianian volcanic island and its impact on the distribution of fusulinid assemblage in southern Qinghai, Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU ZhiJun; XU AnWu; WANG JianXiong; DUAN QiFa; ZHAO XiaoMing; YAO HuaZhou

    2008-01-01

    Pan-riftizational tectonic activity reached climax at Luodianian (Permian) in the East Tethyan Domain,Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Because of eruptive volcanics and influence of terrigenous materials, a complex volcanic-sedimentary landform formed on the sea floor in southern Qinghai. Four sedimentary facies types were recognized based on detailed field mapping. Spatially, platform facies volcanic-limestone type was located at the center belt approximately trending NWW, surrounded by shallow water slope facies tuff/tuffite type at the two flanks and deep water slope facies breccia/calcirudite at the most outside. The depression facies sandstone-mudstone type, which comprised mainly mudstone, deposited between volcanic islands (platform facies volcanic-limestone type). Based on the field mapping and stratigraphic section data, seven rift-related sedimentary facies were recognized and a depositional model for volcanic island was proposed. It is revealed that some volcanic island chain formed quickly and intermittently in the Qamdo Block during violent eruption, and small carbonate reef, shoal,platform occurred above or on edge of volcanic island, and some slope sedimentary facies surrounded volcano island chain during dormant period of volcanic activities. Three types of fusulinid assemblages were distinguished in the carbonate rocks, which deposited in varied positions of a palaeo-volcanic island: (1) Misellina- Schwagerina assemblage occurred above or on edge of volcanic island, (2) Parafusulina assemblage was located at restricted depression facies among volcanic islands or carbonate platform, and (3) the reworked Pseudofusulina-Schwagerina assemblage occurred at slope facies near margin of volcanic island, which originally deposited in the shallow-water carbonate platform, then collapsed along the volcanic island margin with fusulinid-bearing grain-supported carbonate conglomerate or calcirudite, and finally re-deposited on the deeper slope. The sedimentary sequence

  2. Depositional model of Permian Luodianian volcanic island and its impact on the distribution of fusulinid assemblage in southern Qinghai,Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Pan-riftizational tectonic activity reached climax at Luodianian (Permian) in the East Tethyan Domain, Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Because of eruptive volcanics and influence of terrigenous materials, a complex volcanic-sedimentary landform formed on the sea floor in southern Qinghai. Four sedimentary facies types were recognized based on detailed field mapping. Spatially, platform facies volcanic-limestone type was located at the center belt approximately trending NWW, surrounded by shallow water slope facies tuff/tuffite type at the two flanks and deep water slope facies breccia/calcirudite at the most outside. The depression facies sandstone-mudstone type, which comprised mainly mudstone, de-posited between volcanic islands (platform facies volcanic-limestone type). Based on the field map-ping and stratigraphic section data, seven rift-related sedimentary facies were recognized and a depo-sitional model for volcanic island was proposed. It is revealed that some volcanic island chain formed quickly and intermittently in the Qamdo Block during violent eruption, and small carbonate reef, shoal, platform occurred above or on edge of volcanic island, and some slope sedimentary facies surrounded volcano island chain during dormant period of volcanic activities. Three types of fusulinid assemblages were distinguished in the carbonate rocks, which deposited in varied positions of a palaeo-volcanic island: (1) Misellina-Schwagerina assemblage occurred above or on edge of volcanic island, (2) Para-fusulina assemblage was located at restricted depression facies among volcanic islands or carbonate platform, and (3) the reworked Pseudofusulina-Schwagerina assemblage occurred at slope facies near margin of volcanic island, which originally deposited in the shallow-water carbonate platform, then collapsed along the volcanic island margin with fusulinid-bearing grain-supported carbonate con-glomerate or calcirudite, and finally re-deposited on the deeper slope. The sedimentary

  3. Surface heat flow and CO2 emissions within the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissmann, C.; Christenson, B.; Werner, C.; Leybourne, M.; Cole, J.; Gravley, D.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions and heat flow have been determined from the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand following 20a of production (116MW e). Soil CO2 degassing was quantified with 2663 CO2 flux measurements using the accumulation chamber method, and 2563 soil temperatures were measured and converted to equivalent heat flow (Wm -2) using published soil temperature heat flow functions. Both CO2 flux and heat flow were analysed statistically and then modelled using 500 sequential Gaussian simulations. Forty subsoil CO 2 gas samples were also analysed for stable C isotopes. Following 20a of production, current CO2 emissions equated to 111??6.7T/d. Observed heat flow was 70??6.4MW, compared with a pre-production value of 122MW. This 52MW reduction in surface heat flow is due to production-induced drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows (61.5MW) and steam-heated pools (8.6MW) within the Ohaaki West thermal area (OHW). The drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows at Ohaaki means that the soil zone is now the major natural pathway of heat release from the high-temperature reservoir. On the other hand, a net gain in thermal ground heat flow of 18MW (from 25MW to 43.3??5MW) at OHW is associated with permeability increases resulting from surface unit fracturing by production-induced ground subsidence. The Ohaaki East (OHE) thermal area showed no change in distribution of shallow and deep soil temperature contours despite 20a of production, with an observed heat flow of 26.7??3MW and a CO 2 emission rate of 39??3T/d. The negligible change in the thermal status of the OHE thermal area is attributed to the low permeability of the reservoir beneath this area, which has limited production (mass extraction) and sheltered the area from the pressure decline within the main reservoir. Chemistry suggests that although alkali-Cl outflows once contributed significantly to the natural surface heat flow (~50%) they contributed little (99% of the original CO 2

  4. Determination of properties of Proterozoic continental flood basalts of western part from North Qilian Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏林圻; 夏祖春; 赵江天; 徐学义; 杨合群; 赵东宏

    1999-01-01

    Proterozoic volcanic rocks of the western part from the North Qilian Mountains are the products of continental rift volcanism, belonging to continental flood basalts, the petrogeochemistry of which apears to suggest that they are derived from sub-lithospheric mantle plume sources, but that they also show evidence of continental lithosphere components involvement. Their formation is the consequences of plume-lithosphere interactions and is precursive to the opening of the North Qilian Early-Paleozoic ocean basin.

  5. Assessment of planetary geologic mapping techniques for Mars using terrestrial analogs: The SP Mountain area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K.L.; Skinner, J.A.; Crumpler, L.S.; Dohm, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    We photogeologically mapped the SP Mountain region of the San Francisco Volcanic Field in northern Arizona, USA to evaluate and improve the fidelity of approaches used in geologic mapping of Mars. This test site, which was previously mapped in the field, is chiefly composed of Late Cenozoic cinder cones, lava flows, and alluvium perched on Permian limestone of the Kaibab Formation. Faulting and folding has deformed the older rocks and some of the volcanic materials, and fluvial erosion has carved drainage systems and deposited alluvium. These geologic materials and their formational and modificational histories are similar to those for regions of the Martian surface. We independently prepared four geologic maps using topographic and image data at resolutions that mimic those that are commonly used to map the geology of Mars (where consideration was included for the fact that Martian features such as lava flows are commonly much larger than their terrestrial counterparts). We primarily based our map units and stratigraphic relations on geomorphology, color contrasts, and cross-cutting relationships. Afterward, we compared our results with previously published field-based mapping results, including detailed analyses of the stratigraphy and of the spatial overlap and proximity of the field-based vs. remote-based (photogeologic) map units, contacts, and structures. Results of these analyses provide insights into how to optimize the photogeologic mapping of Mars (and, by extension, other remotely observed planetary surfaces). We recommend the following: (1) photogeologic mapping as an excellent approach to recovering the general geology of a region, along with examination of local, high-resolution datasets to gain insights into the complexity of the geology at outcrop scales; (2) delineating volcanic vents and lava-flow sequences conservatively and understanding that flow abutment and flow overlap are difficult to distinguish in remote data sets; (3) taking care to

  6. UPDATING AN EXPERT ELICITATION IN THE LIGHT OF NEW DATA: TEN YEARS OF PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ANALYSIS FOR THE PROPOSED HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.V. Perry; A. Cogbill; R. Kelley

    2005-08-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) considers volcanism to be a potentially disruptive class of events that could affect the safety of the proposed high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Volcanic hazard assessment in monogenetic volcanic fields depends on an adequate understanding of the temporal and spatial pattern of past eruptions. At Yucca Mountain, the hazard is due to an 11 Ma-history of basaltic volcanism with the latest eruptions occurring in three Pleistocene episodes to the west and south of Yucca Mountain. An expert elicitation convened in 1995-1996 by the DOE estimated the mean hazard of volcanic disruption of the repository as slightly greater than 10{sup -8} dike intersections per year with an uncertainty of about two orders of magnitude. Several boreholes in the region have encountered buried basalt in alluvial-filled basins; the youngest of these basalts is dated at 3.8 Ma. The possibility of additional buried basalt centers is indicated by a previous regional aeromagnetic survey conducted by the USGS that detected approximately 20 magnetic anomalies that could represent buried basalt volcanoes. Sensitivity studies indicate that the postulated presence of buried post-Miocene volcanoes to the east of Yucca Mountain could increase the hazard by an order of magnitude, and potentially significantly impact the results of the earlier expert elicitation. Our interpretation of the aeromagnetic data indicates that post-Miocene basalts are not present east of Yucca Mountain, but that magnetic anomalies instead represent faulted and buried Miocene basalt that correlates with nearby surface exposures. This interpretation is being tested by drilling. The possibility of uncharacterized buried volcanoes that could significantly change hazard estimates led DOE to support an update of the expert elicitation in 2004-2006. In support of the expert elicitation data needs, the DOE is sponsoring (1) a new higher-resolution, helicopter-borne aeromagnetic survey

  7. Petrology and U-Pb zircon geochronology of bimodal volcanic rocks from the Maierze Group, northern Tibet: Constraints on the timing of closure of the Banggong-Nujiang Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jian-Jun; Li, Cai; Xie, Chao-Ming; Wang, Ming; Chen, Jing-Wen

    2015-06-01

    We present new zircon U-Pb dates, major and trace element chemistry, and Hf isotopic compositions for bimodal volcanic rocks of the Maierze Group (MG) in the Maierze area of the Southern Qiangtang-Baoshan block, northern Tibet. We discuss the implications of these data for the evolution of this region. The MG bimodal volcanic rocks consist of basalts and dacites that yield LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb ages of 122 and 120 Ma, respectively. The MG basalts have light rare earth element (LREE)-enriched chondrite-normalized REE patterns (LaN/YbN = 13-14), high Ti/V ratios (45-64), high Zr (190-270 ppm) and Nb (22-41 ppm) concentrations, and Zr/Y ratios (7-9) that are similar to those of within-plate basalts. The MG basalts also have low MgO and total Fe2O3 (TFe2O3) concentrations, significant enrichments in the LREE and the light ion lithophile elements (LILEs; Rb, Ba, Th, U and Pb), and weak depletions in the high field strength elements (HFSE; Nb, Ta, and Ti), all of which are clearly evident in primitive-mantle-normalized multi-element variation diagrams. The MG dacites are more enriched in the LILE (e.g., Rb, Ba, Th, U, K, and Pb) and more depleted in the HFSE (e.g., Nb, Ta, and Ti) than the MG basalts. Moreover, the dacites have variable zircon εHf(t) values (- 6.3 to + 6.3). These features indicate that the parental magma for the MG basalts was likely derived from an enriched lithospheric mantle source that was contaminated by subduction-related fluids or melts. In contrast, the MG dacites were derived from mixing of the MG basaltic magma with a second magma derived from partial melting of the continental crust. The geochemical and Hf isotopic characteristics of the MG bimodal volcanic rocks suggest that they formed during the initial stages of development of a back-arc basin. From south to north, the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, the Duolong gold-rich porphyry copper deposit, and the Maierze bimodal rocks are interpreted to represent a remnant of a complete volcanic arc

  8. Volcanism and sedimentation along the western margin of the Rio Grande rift between caldera-forming eruptions of the Jemez Mountains volcanic field, north-central New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Elaine P.; WoldeGabriel, Giday; Kelley, Shari A.; Broxton, David; Ridley, John

    2016-11-01

    The Cerro Toledo Formation (CTF), a series of intracaldera rhyolitic dome complexes and their associated extracaldera tephras and epiclastic sedimentary deposits, records the dynamic interplay between volcanic, tectonic, and geomorphic processes that were occurring along the western margin of the Rio Grande rift between major caldera-forming eruptions of the Bandelier Tuff 1.65-1.26 Ma. The Alamo Canyon and Pueblo Canyon Members differ significantly despite deposition within a few kilometers of each other on the Pajarito Plateau. These differences highlight spatial distinctions in vent sources, eruptive styles, and depositional environments along the eastern side of the Jemez Mountains volcanic field during this ca. 400,000 year interval. Intercalated pyroclastic fall deposits and sandstones of the Pueblo Canyon Member reflect deposition with a basin. Thick Alamo Canyon Member deposits of block-and-ash-flow tuff and pyroclastic fall deposits fill a paleovalley carved into coarse grained sedimentary units reflecting deposition along the mountain front. Chemistry and ages of glass from fall deposits together with clast lithologies of sedimentary units, allow correlation of outcrops, subsurface units, and sources. Dates on pyroclastic fall deposits from Alamo Canyon record deep incision into the underlying Otowi Member in the southern part of the Pajarito Plateau within 100 k.y. of the Toledo caldera-forming eruption. Reconstruction of the CTF surface shows that this period of rapid incision was followed by aggradation where sediments largely filled pre-existing paleocanyons. Complex sequences within the upper portion of the Otowi Member in outcrop and in the subsurface record changes in the style of eruptive activity during the waning stages of the Toledo caldera-forming eruption.

  9. Paleoproterozoic andesitic volcanism in the southern Amazonian craton (northern Brazil); lithofacies analysis and geodynamic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roverato, Matteo; Juliani, Caetano; Capra, Lucia; Dias Fernandes, Carlos Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    Precambrian volcanism played an important role in geological evolution and formation of new crust. Most of the literature on Precambrian volcanic rocks describes settings belonging to subaqueous volcanic systems. This is likely because subaerial volcanic rocks in Proterozoic and Archean volcano-sedimentary succession are poorly preserved due to erosive/weathering processes. The late Paleoproterozoic Sobreiro Formation (SF) here described, seems to be one of the rare exceptions to the rule and deserves particular attention. SF represents the subaerial expression of an andesitic magmatism that, linked with the upper felsic Santa Rosa F., composes the Uatumã Group. Uatumã Group is an extensive magmatic event located in the Xingú region, southwestern of Pará state, Amazonian Craton (northern Brazil). The Sobreiro volcanism is thought to be related to an ocean-continent convergent margin. It is characterized by ~1880 Ma well-preserved calc-alkaline basaltic/andesitic to andesitic lava flows, pyroclastic rocks and associated reworked successions. The superb preservation of its rock-textures allowed us to describe in detail a large variety of volcaniclastic deposits. We divided them into primary and secondary, depending if they result from a direct volcanic activity (pyroclastic) or reworked processes. Our study reinforces the importance of ancient volcanic arcs and rocks contribution to the terrestrial volcaniclastic sedimentation and evolution of plate tectonics. The volcanic activity that produced pyroclastic rocks influenced the amount of detritus shed into sedimentary basins and played a major role in the control of sedimentary dispersal patterns. This study aims to provide, for the first time, an analysis of the physical volcanic processes for the subaerial SF, based in field observation, lithofacies analysis, thin section petrography and less geochemical data. The modern volcanological approach here used can serve as a model about the evolution of Precambrian

  10. Spatial and Alignment Analyses for a Field of Small Volcanic Vents South of Pavonis Mons and Implications for the Tharsis Province, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Glaze, Lori S.; Greeley, Ronald; Hauber, Ernst; Baloga, Stephen; Sakimoto, Susan E. H.; Williams, David A.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    A field of small volcanic vents south of Pavonis Mons was mapped with each vent assigned a two-dimensional data point. Nearest neighbor and two-point azimuth analyses were applied to the resulting location data. Nearest neighbor results show that vents within this field are spatially random in a Poisson sense, suggesting that the vents formed independently of each other without sharing a centralized magma source at shallow depth. Two-point azimuth results show that the vents display north-trending alignment relationships between one another. This trend corresponds to the trends of faults and fractures of the Noachian-aged Claritas Fossae, which might extend into our study area buried beneath more recently emplaced lava flows. However, individual elongate vent summit structures do not consistently display the same trend. The development of the volcanic field appears to display tectonic control from buried Noachian-aged structural patterns on small, ascending magma bodies while the surface orientations of the linear vents might reflect different, younger tectonic patterns. These results suggest a complex interaction between magma ascension through the crust, and multiple, older, buried Tharsis-related tectonic structures.

  11. Magma genesis of the acidic volcanism in the intra-arc rift zone of the Izu volcanic arc, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, S.; Tokuyama, H.; Ishii, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Izu volcanic arc extends over 550 km from the Izu Peninsula, Japan, to the Nishinoshima Trough or Sofugan tectonic line. It is the northernmost segment of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc system, which is located at the eastern side of the Philippine Sea Plate. The recent magmatism of the Izu arc is bimodal and characterized by basalt and rhyolite (e.g. Tamura and Tatsumi 2002). In the southern Izu arc, volcanic front from the Aogashima to the Torishima islands is characterized by submarine calderas and acidic volcanisms. The intra-arc rifting, characterized by back-arc depressions, small volcanic knolls and ridges, is active in this region. Volcanic rocks were obtained in 1995 during a research cruise of the R/V MOANA WAVE (Hawaii University, cruise MW9507). Geochemical variation of volcanic rocks and magma genesis was studied by Hochstaedter et al. (2000, 2001), Machida et al (2008), etc. These studies focused magma and mantle dynamics of basaltic volcanism in the wedge mantle. Acidic volcanic rocks were also dredged during the curies MW9507. However, studies of these acidic volcanics were rare. Herein, we present petrographical and chemical analyses of these acidic rocks, and compare these results with those of other acidic rocks in the Izu arc and lab experiments, and propose a model of magma genesis in a context of acidic volcanism. Dredge sites by the cruise MW9507 are 120, and about 50 sites are in the rift zone. Recovered rocks are dominated by the bimodal assemblage of basalt-basaltic andesite and dacite-rhyolite. The most abundant phase is olivine basalt, less than 50 wt% SiO2. Andesites are minor in volume and compositional gap from 56 to 65 wt% SiO2 exists. The across-arc variation of the HFSE contents and ratios, such as Zr/Y and Nb/Zr of rhyolites exhibit depleted in the volcanic front side and enriched in reararc side. This characteristic is similar to basaltic volcanism pointed out by Hochstaedter et al (2000). The petrographical features of rhyolites

  12. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age and significance of Early Paleozoic volcanic rocks in East Kunlun orogenic belt, Qinghai Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Early Paleozoic volcanic rocks in Nuomuhong area occurred as basalt slice and meta-volcanic slice. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating of the basalt slice and the meta-volcanic slice show that the age of the basalt slice is 419±5 Ma, and that of the meta-volcanic slice is 401± 6 Ma. These ages directly testify that there existed Early Paleozoic ocean-continent transform in East Kunlun, the basalt slice was formed in an extensional mid-ocean ridge setting and the meta-volcanic rock slice was formed in an extrusion subduction and collision setting. The inherited zircon age of 1734 Ma in volcanic rocks reflects that the base of East Kunlun may be Middle Proterozoic.

  13. Petrography and petrology of Quaternary volcanic rocks from Ghezel Ghaleh, northwest Qorveh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Bajelan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In the east and northeast of Sanandaj in the Qorveh-Bijar-Takab axis, there are series of basaltic composition volcanoes with Quaternary age. The study area is part of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone and is located between 47°52' and 47°57' E longitudes and 35°26 and '35°30' N latitudes. Due to the location of the volcanic cone on Pliocene clastic sediments and Quaternary travertine, the age of these volcanoes is considered to be Quaternary. The cones mostly consist of low scoria, ash, volcanic bombs, lapilli deposits and basaltic lava (Moein Vaziri and Aminsobhani, 1985. Petrological and geochemical studies have been carried out to evaluate Quaternary magmatism in the area and to determine the nature of the lithological characteristics, such as the evaluation of source rocks and magma type, degree of partial melting and the tectonic setting of Ghezel Ghaleh rocks (Moein Vaziri, 1997. Simplified geological map of the study area is characterized by ER-Mapper software. Materials and methods In the course of field studies in the region, 40 samples were taken, 30 thin sections were prepared and polished. XRD analyses were performed on some whole rock samples. All major, minor and trace elements were assessed by ICP-MS at Lab Weft Laboratory in Australia. Results Based on the classification of structural zones, the area is located in the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, hundred kilometers away from the main Zagros thrust along the NW-SE direction. After early Cimmerian orogeny, andesitic volcanic activity took place (Moein Vaziri and Aminsobhani, 1985. A major secondary mineral in these rocks is iddingsite, formed by hydration and oxidation of the olivine (Shelley, 1993. According to SiO2 against Na2O + K2O (TAS diagram (Irvine and Baragar , 1971 and cationic R1 and R2 diagram (De La Roche et el., 1980, volcanic rocks of the area indicate alkaline series. Discussion To obtain more information on the tectonic setting of these rocks, the Zr/Y-Zr diagram

  14. Quaternary volcanic-sedimentary sequences and evolution of the Llancanelo Lake region (Southern Mendoza, Western Argentina) evidenced from geoelectric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega, Matias; Lopez, Ernesto; Osella, Ana; Rovere, Elizabeth I.; Violante, Roberto A.

    2012-12-01

    Llancanelo Lake region (Southern Mendoza Province, Western Argentina) is a key area for investigating the regional evolution of a tectonic basin affected by intense arc- and back-arc volcanism. However, the lack of enough outcrops makes it difficult to perform such reconstructions. In order to solve this problem, and with the aim of depicting the subsurface stratigraphy, 22 geoelectric surveys reaching more than 100 m depth were performed. The applied methodology, that combined geoelectrical measurements and field observations, is a continuation of previous works carried out in the region, and allowed for the first time to establish a near-surface stratigraphy that records the last evolutive stages of the lake. The studied region is mainly composed of Quaternary volcanic and sedimentary sequences. Four units were recognized on the basis of the geoelectrical differences (resistivity signal) supported by field observations where they crop out. Two of them have very high resistivity and are composed of basaltic lava flows, hence indicating the volcanic influence in the region. The other two have very low resistivity and correspond to sedimentary deposits, being the uppermost one composed of lacustrine sediments. The units were named according to the well-known stratigraphic scheme valid for the region. The studied stratigraphic sequence encompasses the time-span from the Pliocene to the present, and its interpretation allowed to establish the main evolutive stages, characterized by a complex interaction among tectonic, volcanic and climatic factors. The damming of the lake by basaltic flows and the consequent reduction of the lake's extension at times of intensive volcanic activity is one of the most significant events in its evolution.

  15. Basaltic Martian analogues from the Baikal Rift Zone and Mongolian terranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgurewicz, J.; Kostylew, J.

    2007-08-01

    In order to compare the results of studies of the western part of the Valles Marineris canyon on Mars there have been done field works on terrestrial surface areas similar with regard to geological setting and environmental conditions. One of the possible terrestrial analogues of the Valles Marineris canyon is the Baikal Rift Zone [1]. Field investigations have been done on the south end of the Baikal Lake, in the Khamar-Daban massif, where the outcrops of volcanic rocks occur. The second part of the field works has been done in the Mongolian terranes: Mandalovoo, Gobi Altay and Bayanhongor, because of environmental conditions being similar to those on Mars. The Mandalovoo terrane comprises a nearly continuous Paleozoic islandarc sequence [2]. In the Gobi Altay terrane an older sequence is capped by younger Devonian-Triassic volcanic-sedimentary deposits [2]. The Bayanhongor terrane forms a northwest-trending, discontinuous, narrow belt that consists of a large ophiolite allochton [3]. The collected samples of basalts derive from various geologic environments. The CORONA satellite-images have been used for the imaging of the Khamar-Daban massif and the Mandalovoo terrane. These images have the same spatial resolution and range as the Mars Orbiter Camera images of the Mars Global Surveyor mission. In the Mandalovoo terrane these images allowed to find an area with large amounts of tectonic structures, mainly faults (part of the Ongi massif), similar to the studied area on Mars. Microscopic observations in thin sections show diversification of composition and structures of basalts. These rocks have mostly a porphyric structure, rarely aphyric. The main components are plagioclases, pyroxenes and olivines phenocrysts, in different proportions. The groundmass usually consist of plagioclases, pyroxenes and opaques. The most diversified are basalts from the Mandalovoo terrane. Infrared spectroscopy has been used to analyse the composition of the rock material and compare

  16. Petrographic and geochemical characterization of the Triassic and Jurassic magmatic and volcanic rocks of southeastern Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villares, Fabián; Eguez, Arturo; Yanez, Ernesto

    2014-05-01

    Formely, the subandean zone in the southeastern Ecuador involved large volcanic and magmatic rocks included in the Misahualli Formation and Zamora batholith, both as expression of the Jurassic cal-alcaline volcanic arc. The aim of the project carried out by the INIGEMM (Instituto Nacional de Investigación Geológico Minero Metalúrgico) was discriminate the volcanic products including a continuous set going from basalts to ryolithes and volcanoclastic rocks. Geochemical characterization was done using representative 16 whole - rock chemical analysis. The oldest rocks of the investigated area called Pachicutza Unit, include greenish to black, massive basalts and basaltic andesites, locally showing pillows structures. The texture is aphanitic to microporphyritic with slight crystal growth of plagioclase and pyroxenes. The Unit include also local pyroclastic breccias and tuffs showing variable skarnification related to the intrusion of the jurassic Zamora Batholith. Two samples of basalts show tholeiitic affinity, corresponding to an N- MORB, probably representing an early stage in opening of a regional Triassic rift reported since Colombia to Peru in the Andes. These geochemical characteristics are similar to the amphibolites of Monte Olivo Unit in the Real Cordillera. The Jurassic large volcanic assembly of the Misahualli Formation was also differenciated. Basal volcanics include green, subporphyritic andesites and volcanic breccias possibly generated at an early stage of the volcanic arc, caused by a change of extensive to compressive regime. Continental volcano sedimentary and sedimentary rock were discriminate as Nueva Esperanza and Suarez Units, respectively. The volcanosedimentary sequence include massive to laminate tuffs and tuffites of intermediate composition. The sediments of the Suarez Unit include dominant conglomerats and sandstones of fluvial domain. The regional volcanic sequence is completed by the Las Peñas Unit that includes aphanitic to

  17. Multiple Volcanic Episodes of Flood Basalts Caused by Underplating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Dan; XU Yi-gang; SONG Xie-yang; HU Rui-zhong

    2008-01-01

    @@ Most Large igneous provinces (LIPs) are emplaced within <10 Ma, with a main pulse of the magmatism in<1 Ma[1]. For example, the Siberian Traps [2] and the Deccan Traps [3] were probably erupted within one million years. Many events, such as the Columbia River event, feature a single pulse of magmatism, followed by a protrac-ted period of magmatism at a much lower rate that is linked to a plume tail[4].

  18. Bimodal volcanism in a tectonic transfer zone: Evidence for tectonically controlled magmatism in the southern Central Andes, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrinovic, I. A.; Riller, U.; Brod, J. A.; Alvarado, G.; Arnosio, M.

    2006-04-01

    This field-based and analytical laboratory study focuses on the genetic relationship between bimodal volcanic centres and fault types of an important tectonic transfer zone in the southern Central Andes, the NW-SE striking Calama-Olacapato-Toro (COT) volcanic belt. More specifically, tectono-magmatic relationships are examined for the 0.55 Ma Tocomar, the 0.78 Ma San Jerónimo and the 0.45 Ma Negro de Chorrillos volcanic centres in the Tocomar area (66°30 W-24°15 S). Structures of the COT volcanic belt, notably NW-SE striking strike-slip faults and NE-SW trending normal faults, accommodated differential shortening between major N-S striking thrust faults on the Puna Plateau. We present evidence that bimodal volcanism was contemporaneous with activity of these fault types in the COT volcanic belt, whereby eruption and composition of the volcanic rocks in the Tocomar and San Jerónimo-Negro de Chorrillos areas appear to have been controlled by the kinematics of individual faults. More specifically, rhyolitic centres such as the Tocomar are associated with normal faults, whereas shoshonitic-andesitic monogenetic volcanoes, e.g., the San Jerónimo and Negro de Chorrillos centres, formed at strike-slip dominated faults. Thus, the eruption of higher viscous rhyolite magmas appears to have been facilitated in tectonic settings characterized by horizontal dilation whereas ascent and effusive volcanic activity of less viscous and hot basaltic andesites to shoshonites were controlled by subvertical strike-slip faults. While the Tocomar rhyolites are interpreted to be derived from an anatectic crustal source, geochemical characteristics of the San Jerónimo and Negro de Chorrillos shoshonitic andesites are in agreement with a deeper source. This suggests that the composition of erupted volcanic rocks as well as their spatial distribution in the Tocomar area is controlled by the activity of specific fault types. Such volcano-tectonic relationships are also evident from older

  19. Geochemical Characteristics of Cenozoic Jining Basalts of the Western North China Craton: Evidence for the Role of the Lower Crust, Lithosphere, and Asthenosphere in Petrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Suan Ho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Jining volcanic field located in the southern margin of the Mongolian plateau and the western North China Block consists of four rock types: quartz tholeiite, olivine tholeiite, alkali olivine basalt and basanite. These rocks have a wide range of K-Ar ages from ~36 to < 0.2 Ma. The early volcanism was voluminous and dominated by flood-type fissure eruptions of tholeiites, whereas the later phase was represented by sparse eruptions of basanitic lavas. Thirty-six samples analyzed in this study show a wide range in SiO2 contents from 44% ~ 54%. They all are sodium-rich and high-Ti basalts that, however, show marked isotopic variations between two end-members: (1 tholeiites that have higher 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7048 ~ 0.7052, and lower £`Nd of -0.8 to -2.4 and Pb isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb of 16.9 ~ 17.2, 207Pb/204Pb of 15.3 ~ 15.4 and 208Pb/204Pb of 37.1 ~ 37.7; and (2 basanites that have lower 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7035 ~ 0.7044, and higher £`Nd of +1.3 to +4.9 and Pb isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb of 17.7 ~ 18.0, 207Pb/204Pb of 15.4 ~ 15.5 and 208Pb/204Pb of 37.8 ~ 38.2. Alkali olivine basalt that occurs as a subordinate rock type is geochemically similar to the basanites, but isotopically similar to the tholeiites, characterized by the highest 87Sr/86Sr ratio among the three basaltic suites, coupled with a low Nb/U value (~33.

  20. Geochemical Characteristics of Cenozoic Jining Basalts of the Western North China Craton: Evidence for the Role of the Lower Crust, Lithosphere, and Asthenosphere in Petrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Suan Ho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Jining volcanic field located in the southern margin of the Mongolian plateau and the western North China Block consists of four rock types: quartz tholeiite, olivine tholeiite, alkali olivine basalt and basanite. These rocks have a wide range of K-Ar ages from ~36 to < 0.2 Ma. The early volcanism was voluminous and dominated by flood-type fissure eruptions of tholeiites, whereas the later phase was represented by sparse eruptions of basanitic lavas. Thirty-six samples analyzed in this study show a wide range in SiO2 contents from 44% ~ 54%. They all are sodium-rich and high-Ti basalts that, however, show marked isotopic variations between two end-members: (1 tholeiites that have higher 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7048 ~ 0.7052, and lower _ of -0.8 to -2.4 and Pb isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb of 16.9 ~ 17.2, 207Pb/204Pb of 15.3 ~ 15.4 and 208Pb/204Pb of 37.1 ~ 37.7; and (2 basanites that have lower 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7035 ~ 0.7044, and higher _ of +1.3 to +4.9 and Pb isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb of 17.7 ~ 18.0, 207Pb/204Pb of 15.4 ~ 15.5 and 208Pb/204Pb of 37.8 ~ 38.2. Alkali olivine basalt that occurs as a subordinate rock type is geochemically similar to the basanites, but isotopically similar to the tholeiites, characterized by the highest 87Sr/86Sr ratio among the three basaltic suites, coupled with a low Nb/U value (~33. In Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic plots, the tholeiites extend toward the EM1 (i.e., enriched mantle type 1 component, whereas the basanites trend toward the Indian Ocean mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB field. Adopting the _ model by Morris and Hart (1983, we suggest that the Oligocene tholeiites were generated by high degree melting of an ascended asthenospheric mantle that was contaminated with a large amount of EM1-type continental lithospheric material during the early Cenozoic. On the other hand, the late Tertiary and Quaternary basanites may have originated predominantly from a depleted asthenosphere component with small but variable degrees of

  1. Structure and petrology of newly discovered volcanic centers in the northern Kermadec-southern Tofua arc, South Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Ian J.; Reyes, Agnes G.; Wright, Ian C.; Peckett, Kimberley M.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Arculus, Richard J.

    2008-08-01

    The NZAPLUME III expedition of September-October 2004 to the northern Kermadec-southern Tofua (NKST) arc, between 28°52'S and 25°07'S, resulted in the discovery of at least seven new submarine volcanic centers and a substantial caldera complex adjacent to the previously known Monowai Seamount. The volcanic centers form a sublinear chain that coincides with the Kermadec Ridge crest in the south (Hinetapeka) and diverges ˜45 km westward of the ridge crest in the north ("V") just to the south of where the Louisville Ridge intersects with the arc. All of the centers contain calderas or caldera-like structures, as well as multiple cones, domes, fissure ridges, and vent fields. All show signs of recent eruptive and current hydrothermal activity. There are strong structural controls on edifice location, with cones and fissure ridges typically associated with faulting parallel to the regional ˜12° strike of the arc front. Several of the calderas are ellipsoidal, orientated northwest-southeast in the general direction of least compressive stress. Sampled volcanic rocks, representing the most recently erupted lavas, are all low-K tholeiites. Two of the centers, Gamble and Rakahore, yielded only high-silica dacite to rhyolite (69-74 wt% silica), whereas two others, Monowai and "V," yielded only basalt to andesite (48-63 wt% silica). Mineral assemblages are plagioclase-pyroxene dominated, with accessory Fe-Ti oxides, apatite, olivine, and quartz/tridymite/cristobalite, typical of dry volcanic arc systems. Hornblende occurs only in a felsitic rhyolite from Hinepuia volcanic center, and zircon is absent. Glass contents range to 57% in basalts-andesites (mean 20%), and 97% in andesites-rhyolites (mean 59%) and other quench textures, including swallow-tailed, plumose, or dendritic crystal forms and crystallites, are common. Most lavas are highly vesicular (≤63%; mean 28%) and have low volatile contents (mostly cristobalite, indicates explosive eruption and rapid cooling

  2. Geochemical and 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the evolution of volcanism in the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Joseph P.

    The tectonic mechanisms producing Pliocene to active volcanism in eastern Papua New Guinea (PNG) have been debated for decades. In order to assess mechanisms that produce volcanism in the Woodlark Rift, we evaluate the evolution of volcanism in eastern PNG using 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology and whole rock geochemistry. Active volcanism in southeastern Papua New Guinea occurs on the Papuan Peninsula (Mt. Lamington, Mt. Victory and Waiwa), in the Woodlark Rift (Dobu Island, SE Goodenough Island, and Western Fergusson Island), and in the Woodlark Basin. In the Woodlark Basin, seafloor spreading is active and decompression melting of the upper mantle is producing basaltic magmatism. However, the cause of Pliocene and younger volcanism in the Woodlark Rift is controversial. Two hypotheses for the tectonic setting have been proposed to explain Pliocene and younger volcanism in the Woodlark Rift: (1) southward subduction of Solomon Sea lithosphere beneath eastern PNG at the Trobriand Tough and (2) decompression melting of mantle, previously modified by subduction, as the lithosphere undergoes extension associated with the opening of the Woodlark Basin. A comparison of 40Ar/39Ar ages with high field strength element (HFSE) concentrations in primary magmas indicates that HFSE concentrations correlate with age in the Woodlark rift. These data support the hypothesis that Pliocene to active volcanism in the Woodlark Rise and D'Entrecasteaux Islands results from decompression melting of a relict mantle wedge. The subduction zone geochemical signatures (negative HFSE anomalies) in Woodlark Rift lavas younger than 4 m.y. are a relict from older subduction beneath eastern Papua, likely in the middle Miocene. As the lithosphere is extended ahead of the tip of the westward propagating seafloor spreading center in the Woodlark Basin, the composition of volcanism is inherited from prior arc magmatism (via flux melting) and through time evolves toward magmatism associated with a rifting

  3. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-09

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition.

  4. Pillow basalts of the Angayucham terrane: Oceanic plateau and island crust accreted to the Brooks Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, John S.; Budahn, James R.; Murchey, Benita L.

    1989-11-01

    The Angayucham Mountains (north margin of the Yukon-Koyukuk province) are made up of an imbricate stack of four to eight east-west trending, steeply dipping, fault slabs composed of Paleozoic (Devonian to Mississippean), Middle to Late Triassic, and Early Jurassic oceanic upper crustal rocks (pillow basalt, subordinate diabase, basaltic tuff, and radiolarian chert). Field relations and geochemical characteristics of the basaltic rocks suggest that the fault slabs were derived from an oceanic plateau or island setting and were emplaced onto the Brooks Range continental margin. The basalts are variably metamorphosed to prehnite-pumpellyite and low-greenschist facies. Major element analyses suggest that many are hypersthene-normative olivine tholeiites. Classification based on immobile trace elements confirms the tholeiitic character of most of the basalts but suggests that some had primary compositions transitional to alkali basalt. Although field and petrographic features of the basalts are similar, trace element characteristics allow definition of geographically distinct suites. A central outcrop belt along the crest of the mountains is made up of basalt with relatively flat rare earth element (REE) patterns. This belt is flanked to the north and south by LREE (light rare earth element)-enriched basalts. Radiolarian and conodont ages from interpillow and interlayered chert and limestone indicate that the central belt of basalts is Triassic in age, the southern belt is Jurassic in age, and the northern belt contains a mixture of Paleozoic and Mesozoic ages. Data for most of the basalts cluster in the "within-plate basalt" fields of trace element discriminant diagrams; none have trace-element characteristics of island arc basalt. The Triassic and Jurassic basalts are geochemically most akin to modern oceanic plateau and island basalts. Field evidence also favors an oceanic plateau or island setting. The great composite thickness of pillow basalt probably resulted

  5. Accessory mineral U-Th-Pb ages and 40Ar/39Ar eruption chronology, and their bearing on rhyolitic magma evolution in the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J.I.; Vazquez, J.A.; Renne, P.R.; Schmitt, A.K.; Bacon, C.R.; Reid, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    We determined Ar/Ar eruption ages of eight extrusions from the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, a long-lived series of small volume rhyolitic domes in eastern California. Combined with ion-microprobe dating of crystal ages of zircon and allanite from these lavas and from granophyre geothermal well cuttings, we were able to track the range of magma-production rates over the past 650 ka at Coso. In ??? 230 ka rhyolites we find no evidence of protracted magma residence or recycled zircon (or allanite) from Pleistocene predecessors. A significant subset of zircon in the ???85 ka rhyolites yielded ages between ???100 and 200 Ma, requiring that generation of at least some rhyolites involves material from Mesozoic basement. Similar zircon xenocrysts are found in an ???200 ka granophyre. The new age constraints imply that magma evolution at Coso can occur rapidly as demonstrated by significant changes in rhyolite composition over short time intervals (???10's to 100's ka). In conjunction with radioisotopic age constraints from other young silicic volcanic fields, dating of Coso rhyolites highlights the fact that at least some (and often the more voluminous) rhyolites are produced relatively rapidly, but that many small-volume rhyolites likely represent separation from long-lived mushy magma bodies. ?? The Author(s) 2009.

  6. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distinguishing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  7. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distingushing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Lava Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts [1-3]. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  8. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the

  9. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the

  10. Terminal Pleistocene to early Holocene volcanic eruptions at Zuni Salt Lake, west-central New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onken, Jill; Forman, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Zuni Salt Lake (ZSL) is a large maar in the Red Hill-Quemado volcanic field located in west-central New Mexico in the southwestern USA. Stratigraphic analysis of sections in and around the maar, coupled with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating, indicate that ZSL volcanic activity occurred between ˜13.4 and 9.9 ka and was most likely confined to a ≤500-year interval sometime between ˜12.3 and 11.0 ka. The basal volcanic unit consists of locally widespread basaltic ash fallout interpreted to represent a violent or wind-aided strombolian eruption tentatively attributed to Cerro Pomo, a scoria cone ˜10 km south of ZSL. Subsequent eruptions emanated from vents near or within the present-day ZSL maar crater. Strombolian eruptions of multiple spatter and scoria cones produced basaltic lava and scoria lapilli fallout. Next, a phreatomagmatic eruption created the maar crater and surrounding tephra rim and apron. ZSL eruptions ended with strombolian eruptions that formed three scoria cones on the crater floor. The revised age range of ZSL is younger and more precise than the 190-24 ka 2-sigma age range derived from previous argon dating. This implies that other morphologically youthful, argon-dated volcanoes on the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau might be substantially younger than previously reported.

  11. Remote Sensing as a First Step in Geothermal Exploration in the Xilingol Volcanic Field in NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, F.; Huang, S.; Xiong, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable and low-carbon energy source independent of climate change. It is most abundant in Cenozoic volcanic areas where high temperature can be obtained within a relatively shallow depth. Geological structures play an important role in the transfer and storage of geothermal energy. Like other geological resources, geothermal resource prospecting and exploration require a good understanding of the host media. Remote sensing (RS) has the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution and broad spatial coverage over the conventional geological and geophysical prospecting techniques, while geographical information system (GIS) has intuitive, flexible, and convenient characteristics. In this study, RS and GIS techniques are utilized to prospect the geothermal energy potential in Xilingol, a Cenozoic volcanic area in the eastern Inner Mongolia, NE China. Landsat TM/ETM+ multi-temporal images taken under clear-sky conditions, digital elevation model (DEM) data, and other auxiliary data including geological maps of 1:2,500,000 and 1:200,000 scales are used in this study. The land surface temperature (LST) of the study area is retrieved from the Landsat images with a single-channel algorithm. Prior to the LST retrieval, the imagery data are preprocessed to eliminate abnormal values by reference to the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the improved normalized water index (MNDWI) on the ENVI platform developed by ITT Visual Information Solutions. Linear and circular geological structures are then inferred through visual interpretation of the LST maps with references to the existing geological maps in conjunction with the computer automatic interpretation features such as lineament frequency, lineament density, and lineament intersection. Several useful techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA), image classification, vegetation suppression, multi-temporal comparative analysis, and 3D Surface View based on DEM data are

  12. Uranium Series Chronology of the Late Pleistocene Basalt from the Longgang Volcanoes, Jilin Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Fusheng; HAN Song; MA Zhibang; XIE Ruijie

    2005-01-01

    The Longgang volcanic cluster located in Jilin Province belongs to one of the active volcanic regions in northeast China, and has been active in modem times. In view of the multiple eruptions in history, it is very important to determine the age of each eruption for evaluating the volcanic hazards. Two alkaline basalt samples taken from Dayizishan and Diaoshuihu were analyzed with the U-series component dating after magnetic separation. The ages of the two samples are (71±9) ka and (106±13) ka B.P., respectively. These data indicate that there existed intensive eruption activities during the late Pleistocene.

  13. Bacterial diversity and successional patterns during biofilm formation on freshly exposed basalt surfaces at diffuse-flow deep-sea vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulmann, Lara K; Beaulieu, Stace E; Shank, Timothy M; Ding, Kang; Seyfried, William E; Sievert, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Many deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems are regularly impacted by volcanic eruptions, leaving fresh basalt where abundant animal and microbial communities once thrived. After an eruption, microbial biofilms are often the first visible evidence of biotic re-colonization. The present study is the first to investigate microbial colonization of newly exposed basalt surfaces in the context of vent fluid chemistry over an extended period of time (4-293 days) by deploying basalt blocks within an established diffuse-flow vent at the 9°50' N vent field on the East Pacific Rise. Additionally, samples obtained after a recent eruption at the same vent field allowed for comparison between experimental results and those from natural microbial re-colonization. Over 9 months, the community changed from being composed almost exclusively of Epsilonproteobacteria to a more diverse assemblage, corresponding with a potential expansion of metabolic capabilities. The process of biofilm formation appears to generate similar surface-associated communities within and across sites by selecting for a subset of fluid-associated microbes, via species sorting. Furthermore, the high incidence of shared operational taxonomic units over time and across different vent sites suggests that the microbial communities colonizing new surfaces at diffuse-flow vent sites might follow a predictable successional pattern.

  14. Basalt Magma, Whisky and Tequila: finely-crafted mixes of small liquid batches that defy the parent liquid concept but whose complexities teach us much

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, K. H.; Sinton, J. M.; Perfit, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Basalt is the most ubiquitous magma type we know of in the solar system. It comes in various varieties manifested as compositional sub groups, erupts from a wide variety of volcanic systems and tectonic settings, and its eruptions span many order of magnitude in duration and volume. Igneous petrology, thermodynamics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modelling have been used to develop a sophisticated understanding of source lithologies, compositions and formation conditions (e.g., pressure and temperature) for parent melts and their subsequent transport, storage and evolution. These demonstrate some striking systematics as a function of volcano tectonic setting (on Earth). Yet much like Whisky, what makes it into the bottle, or the eruption, is a mixture of different liquids with unique characteristics, sometimes stirred so well that successive batches are indistinguishable, and sometimes stirred more incompletely, preserving small batch characters that are unique. Recently, geochemical and petrological studies in high spatial density within the products of individual eruptions have shown chemical and mineralogical evidence for incompletely mixed heterogeneous magmas in a majority of systems examined, begging the question of when, if ever, is it realistic to speak of a single parent magma composition, and even in cases where it apparently is, if these are instead just more thoroughly stirred multi-parent magmas. For instance, do monogenetic fields really erupt basalts of more varied parent melt compositions than large hot spot and flood basalt eruptions, or are they just more poorly stirred? This presentation will focus on work by ourselves and others constraining spatial and temporal single-eruption basaltic magma histories at different settings, using them to unravel the time and space scales of magma formation and mixing, how these translate to the assembly of an erupted basalt magma, and the implications for deducing things about and from presumed parents.

  15. Major element, REE, and Pb, Nd and Sr isotopic geochemistry of Cenozoic volcanic rocks of eastern China: implications for their origin from suboceanic-type mantle reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, A.R.; Wang, Junwen; Huang, Wankang; Xie, Guanghong; Tatsumoto, M.

    1991-01-01

    Major- and rare-earth-element (REE) concentrations and UThPb, SmNd, and RbSr isotope systematics are reported for Cenozoic volcanic rocks from northeastern and eastern China. These volcanic rocks, characteristically lacking the calc-alkaline suite of orogenic belts, were emplaced in a rift system which formed in response to the subduction of the western Pacific plate beneath the eastern Asiatic continental margin. The rocks sampled range from basanite and alkali olivine basalt, through olivine tholeiite and quartz tholeiite, to potassic basalts, alkali trachytes, pantellerite, and limburgite. These rock suites represent the volcanic centers of Datong, Hanobar, Kuandian, Changbaishan and Wudalianchi in northeastern China, and Mingxi in the Fujian Province of eastern China. The major-element and REE geochemistry is characteristic of each volcanic suite broadly evolving through cogenetic magmatic processes. Some of the outstanding features of the isotopic correlation arrays are as follows: (1) NdSr shows an anticorrelation within the field of ocean island basalts, extending from the MORB end-member to an enriched, time-averaged high Rb Sr and Nd Sr end-member (EM1), (2) SrPb also shows an anticorrelation, similar to that of Hawaiian and walvis Ridge basalts, (3) NdPb shows a positive correlation, and (4) the 207Pb 204Pb vs 206Pb 204Pb plot shows linear arrays parallel to the general trend (NHRL) for MORB on both sides of the geochron, although in the 208Pb 204Pb vs 206Pb 204Pb plot the linear array is significantly displaced above the NHRL in a pattern similar to that of the oceanic island basalts that show the Dupal signatures. In all isotope correlation patterns, the data arrays define two different mantle components-a MORB-like component and an enriched mantle component. The isotopic data presented here clearly demonstrate the existence of Dupal compositions in the sources of the continental volcanic rocks of eastern China. We suggest that the subcontinental mantle

  16. Origin of Miocene andesite and dacite in the Goldfield-Superstition volcanic province, central Arizona: Hybrids of mafic and silicic magma mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, R. V.; Johnson, Kelly G.

    2016-07-01

    The Miocene Goldfield-Superstition volcanic province (G-SVP), ∼8000 km2 in central Arizona, is composed largely of silicic pyroclastic rocks and lavas, and smaller volumes of alkalic basalt and intermediate-composition lavas. Volcanism began ∼20.5 Ma as sparse rhyolitic and mainly basaltic lavas followed by intermediate lavas, lasting until ∼19 Ma. At that time, ∼1 m.y. of silicic eruptions began, creating most of the G-SVP. Petrologic studies are available for basalts and some for silicic rocks, but petrologic/geochemical information is sparse for intermediate-composition lavas. These latter, andesites and dacites, are the focus of this study, in which we present the processes and sources responsible for their origins. Goldfield-Superstition andesites and dacites have SiO2 ∼56-70 wt.% and Na2O + K2O that qualifies some as trachy-andesite and -dacite. A prominent petrographic feature is plagioclase-phyric texture (∼11-30 vol% plagioclase), where oligoclase-andesine phenocrysts have cores surrounded by corroded, or reacted, zones, mantled by higher An% plagioclase. Where corroded zones are absent, margins are etched, curved, or embayed. Groundmass plagioclase is labradorite, also more calcic than the phenocrysts. Other minerals are quartz (subrounded; embayed), clinopyroxene, amphibole, biotite, and rare titanite and zircon. A salient compositional characteristic that provides insight to andesite-dacite origins with respect to other G-SVP rocks is revealed when using SiO2 as an index. Namely, abundances of many incompatible elements, mainly HFSE and REE, decrease over the low to high SiO2 range (i.e., abundances are lower in dacites than in co-eruptive andesites and underlying alkalic basalts). As examples: G-SVP basalts have ∼50-70 ppm La, and andesites-dacites have ∼59-22 ppm La; for Zr, basalts have ∼225-170 ppm, but most andesites-dacites have ∼180-50; for Y, basalts >20 ppm, andesites-dacites ∼18-9 ppm. To understand these trends of lower

  17. Volcanic Rocks As Targets For Astrobiology Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, N.

    2010-12-01

    Almost two decades of study highlight the importance of terrestrial subaqueous volcanic rocks as microbial habitats, particularly in glass produced by the quenching of basaltic lava upon contact with water. On Earth, microbes rapidly begin colonizing glassy surfaces along fractures and cracks exposed to water. Microbial colonization of basaltic glass leads to enhanced alteration through production of characteristic granular and/or tubular bioalteration textures. Infilling of formerly hollow alteration textures by minerals enable their preservation through geologic time. Basaltic rocks are a major component of the Martian crust and are widespread on other solar system bodies. A variety of lines of evidence strongly suggest the long-term existence of abundant liquid water on ancient Mars. Recent orbiter, lander and rover missions have found evidence for the presence of transient liquid water on Mars, perhaps persisting to the present day. Many other solar system bodies, notably Europa, Enceladus and other icy satellites, may contain (or have once hosted) subaqueous basaltic glasses. The record of terrestrial glass bioalteration has been interpreted to extend back ~3.5 billion years and is widespread in modern oceanic crust and its ancient metamorphic equivalents. The terrestrial record of glass bioalteration strongly suggests that glassy or formerly glassy basaltic rocks on extraterrestrial bodies that have interacted with liquid water are high-value targets for astrobiological exploration.

  18. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  19. Linking magma composition with volcano size and eruptive style in basaltic monogenetic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I. E.; McGee, L. E.; Cronin, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magma composition, volcano size and eruptive style (together with vent locations) are the definitive parameters of basaltic monogenetic systems. These variables are not independent, but the relationships between them are complex. Monogenetic volcano fields that episodically erupt small-volume, discrete magma batches such as the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF, northern New Zealand), typically represent primary mantle melts variably modified by near source processes. In such cases, where the volume of magma is small, eruption styles are strongly controlled by the interaction of magma with the surficial environment and this is determined by both magma volume and its rise rate. The magmatic compositional extremes of primitive magmas in the AVF define a spectrum ranging from strongly silica-undersaturated nephelinite to sub-alkalic basalt. Nephelinites are low SiO2 (~40 wt.%), highly incompatible-element enriched compositions, representing very low degrees of partial melting (indicates that all of these magmas are sourced within the same general mantle region at depths of 80-70 km. The two compositional extremes also define extremes in volume of magma and ultimately magma flux at the surface. The surficial environment of the AVF is characterized by highly water saturated sediments of variable competency and many pressurized aquifer systems. Where there is a combination of small volumes and low flux rates, environmental factors dominate and phreatomagmatic explosive eruptions ensue, forming tuff cones, rings and maars. Larger volumes and flux rates result in dry eruptions forming cinder cones and lava fields. Thus at a fundamental level defining magma source characteristics and temporal or spatial variation in these (such as cyclic or evolutionary trends) can inform better long term forecasts of surface eruption processes and thus should be more closely examined in hazard studies of monogentic fields.

  20. Clinopyroxene with diverse origins in alkaline basalts from the western Pannonian Basin: Implications from trace element characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovics, M. Éva; Taracsák, Zoltán; Dobosi, Gábor; Embey-Isztin, Antal; Batki, Anikó; Harangi, Szabolcs; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Clinopyroxene crystals of various origins occur in the unusually crystal- and xenolith-rich alkaline basalts of the Bondoró-hegy and the Füzes-tó scoria cone, which are the youngest eruptive centres in the Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field, western Pannonian Basin. The clinopyroxenes show diverse textural and zoning features as well as highly variable major and trace element chemistry. Xenocryst, megacryst and phenocryst crystal populations can be distinguished on the basis of their compositional differences. The trace element patterns of green clinopyroxene cores display a large range in composition and indicate that most of them have a metamorphic origin. Most of them were incorporated from lower crustal mafic granulite wall rocks, while only a few of them are of magmatic origin representing pyroxenite (Type II) cumulates. The colourless clinopyroxene xenocrysts reflect the texturally and geochemically diverse nature of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath the studied area, mainly representing regions characterised by various stages of metasomatism. The colourless and green megacrysts are genetically related to each other, having crystallised as early and late crystallisation products, respectively, from petrogenetically related melts as part of a fractional crystallisation sequence. These melts represent earlier alkaline basaltic magmas (as represented by the Type II xenoliths), having stalled and crystallised near the crust-mantle boundary in the uppermost part of the mantle. This serves as evidence that the deep magmatic systems beneath monogenetic volcanic fields are complex, involving several phases of melt generation, accumulation and fractionation at variable depths. We show that in situ trace element analysis is necessary in order to unravel the origins and relationships of the diverse clinopyroxene populations. Such studies significantly contribute to our understanding of the ascent histories of alkaline basaltic magmas and provide

  1. The Origin of ‘OIB-Type’ Magmas in the Central Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, S. M.; Gomez-Tuena, A.; Zellmer, G. F.; Cai, Y.; Stuart, F. M.; Espinasa-Perena, R.; Langmuir, C. H.; Goldstein, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    Many models consider a primary mantle origin of high-Mg andesites, but the subarc mantle of arcs producing high-Mg andesites remains poorly defined. In the monogenetic volcanic field of Sierra Chichinautzin (central Mexican Volcanic Belt), high-Mg andesites are spatially and temporally intimately associated with mildly alkaline basalts and basaltic andesites, variously referred to as ‘OIB-type’, ‘intraplate’ or ‘high-Nb arc basalts’ (Wallace and Carmichael 1999, Contrib Mineral Petrol; Schaaf et al. 2005, J Petrol). ‘OIB-type’ magmas and high-Mg andesites have erupted within a few hundreds to thousands of years from vents only a few kilometers apart, or may even have erupted jointly from single vents. It has been suggested that these ‘OIB-type’ magmas were melts from subarc mantle yet unmodified by subduction fluxes while high-Mg andesites were produced from mantle sources residual to the ‘OIB-type’ magmas. In order to test this model, we investigated ‘OIB-type’ magmas erupting from three young and closely spaced monogenetic volcanoes in the Sierra Chichinautzin Volcanic Field (V. Chichinautzin, V. Suchiooc, Cuescomates vent). The primitive olivine-phyric alkaline basalts and basaltic andesites (SiO2 = 49.6-53.5 wt%; Mg#=62-68 and MgO= 6.5-8.3 wt%) have high Ni (97-179 ppm), Nb (18-34 ppm), Nb/La (0.9-1.2) and 3He/4He ratios (R/Ra = 7.3-8.0) typical of near-primary mantle magmas unaffected by the passage through the ~47 km thick continental crust. However, all ‘OIB-type’ magmas contain high-Ni olivines that are indicative of siliceous slab melts infiltrating and reacting with peridotite mantle (Straub et al., 2008, G-cubed; Wang & Gaetani 2008, Contrib Mineral Petrol). Significant slab additions to the mantle source of the ‘OIB-type’ magmas are further confirmed by Sr-Nd-Pb systematics. We suggest that ‘OIB-type’ arc magmas reflect fertilization of a pre-existing MORB-type subarc mantle by enriched, little fractionated slab

  2. A study on the geochemical characteristics of Upper Permian continental marginal arc volcanic rocks in the northern segment of South Lancangjiang Belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shangyue; FENG Qinglai; WEI Qirong; ZHANG Zhibin; ZHANG Hu

    2006-01-01

    Geochemical characteristics of the Upper Permian ( P2 ) continental marginal arc volcanic rocks are described, which have been found recently around the areas of Xiaodingxi and Zangli on the eastern side of the Yunxian-Lincang granite, in terms of rock assemblage, petrochemistry, REE, trace elements, Pb isotopes, geotectonic environment and so on. The volcanic rock assemblage is dominated by basalt-andesite-dacite, with minor trachyte andecite-trachyte; the volcanic rock series is predominated by the calc-alkaline series, with minor tholleiite series and alkaline series rocks; the volcanic rocks are characterized by high Al2O3 and low TiO2 , with K2O contents showing extremely strong polarity; the REE distribution patterns are characterized by LREE enrichment and right-inclined type; trace elements and large cation elements are highly enriched, Ti and Cr are depleted, and P and Nb are partially depleted; the Pb composition is of the Gondwana type; the petrochemical points mostly fall within the field of island-arc volcanic rocks, in consistency with the projection of data points of continental marginal volcanic rocks in the southern segment of the South Lancangjiang Belt and the North Lancangjiang Belt. This continental marginal arc volcanic rock belt, together with the ocean-ridge and ocean-island volcanic rocks and ophiolites in the Changning-Menglian Belt, constitute the ocean-ridge volcanic rock, ophiolite-arc rock-magmatic rock belts which are distributed in pairs, indicating that the Lancangjiang oceanic crust subducted eastwards. This result is of great importance in constraining the evolution of the paleo-Tethys in the Lancangjiang Belt.

  3. Exceptional Volumes of Rejuvenated Volcanism in Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konter, J. G.; Jackson, M.; Storm, L.

    2010-12-01

    The internal structure of within-plate volcanoes is typically compared to the stages of volcanic evolution in Hawaii. In Samoa, these stages show some differences with the Hawaiian model, in terms of the duration, volume and geochemical composition of the stages. Particularly, the rejuvenated stage of volcanism in Samoa is significantly more voluminous, with increasing geographic coverage with age, completely repaving the island of Savai’i. This unusual outpouring of rejuvenated lavas has previously been proposed to be related to the tectonic setting, near the northern terminus of the Tonga Trench. Therefore, Samoan volcanism might be caused by lithospheric fracturing, a mantle plume, or potentially a combination of the two. We collected new samples from a deeply eroded canyon on Savai’i to determine a time evolution of the transition from shield to eventual rejuvenated lavas. The canyon exposes several hundred meters of lavas, and we collected samples about 200m vertically down into the canyon. These samples are dominantly olivine basalts, and their Pb isotope compositions fall within the compositional field of young rejuvenated lavas on Savai’i and Upolu. This canyon section, therefore, represents a minimum thickness for the rejuvenated lavas of 200m. Assuming eruption of rejuvenated lavas only occurred subaerially, with a universal thickness of 200m, the new data suggest more than one percent of the volume of Savai’i consists of rejuvenated lavas. This is an order of magnitude greater than the largest relative volumes in Hawaii (Kauai), and implies a different cause for rejuvenated volcanism in Samoa. Another feature that suggests different processes may be important is the transition between the shield and rejuvenated stage. Although Samoan volcanoes do not seem to erupt exactly the same rock types as characteristic Hawaiian post-shield stage lavas, there is a definite shift to more evolved compositions (including trachytes) during the later stages of

  4. Geologic Map of Lassen Volcanic National Park and Vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L.J. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The geologic map of Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP) and vicinity encompasses 1,905 km2 at the south end of the Cascade Range in Shasta, Lassen, Tehama, and Plumas Counties, northeastern California (fig. 1, sheet 3). The park includes 430 km2 of scenic volcanic features, glacially sculpted terrain, and the most spectacular array of thermal features in the Cascade Range. Interest in preserving the scenic wonders of the Lassen area as a national park arose in the early 1900s to protect it from commercial development and led to the establishment in 1907 of two small national monuments centered on Lassen Peak and Cinder Cone. The eruptions of Lassen Peak in 1914-15 were the first in the Cascade Range since widespread settling of the West in the late 1800s. Through the printed media, the eruptions aroused considerable public interest and inspired renewed efforts, which had languished since 1907, to establish a national park. In 1916, Lassen Volcanic National Park was established by combining the areas of the previously established national monuments and adjacent lands. The southernmost Cascade Range is bounded on the west by the Sacramento Valley and the Klamath Mountains, on the south by the Sierra Nevada, and on the east by the Basin and Range geologic provinces. Most of the map area is underlain by middle to late Pleistocene volcanic rocks; Holocene, early Pleistocene, and late Pliocene volcanic rocks (radiometric dating, photographs of geologic features, and links to related data or web sites. Data contained in the CD-ROM are also available on this Web site. The southernmost Cascade Range consists of a regional platform of basalt and basaltic andesite, with subordinate andesite and sparse dacite. Nested within these regional rocks are 'volcanic centers', defined as large, long-lived, composite, calc-alkaline edifices erupting the full range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite, but dominated by andesite and dacite. Volcanic centers are produced by the

  5. Models of volcanic eruption hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

  6. Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2004-07-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by active volcanoes provide valuable insight into the eruption dynamics. Because the infrasonic pressure field may be directly associated with the flux rate of gas released at a volcanic vent, infrasound also enhances the efficacy of volcanic hazard monitoring and continuous studies of conduit processes. Here we present new results from Erebus, Fuego, and Villarrica volcanoes highlighting uses of infrasound for constraining quantitative eruption parameters, such as eruption duration, source mechanism, and explosive gas flux.

  7. A Conceptual Model to Link Anomalously High Temperature Gradients in the Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field to Regional Flow in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingham, E. J.; Keller, S. N.; McCullough, K. R.; Watters, J.; Weitering, B.; Wilce, A. M.; Folsom, M.; Kelley, S.; Pellerin, L.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature-depth well data along with electromagnetic (EM) data were collected by students of the Summer of Applied Geophysics Experience (SAGE) 2015 field season in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico. The data from this year, in addition to data acquired since 2013, were used to construct a conceptual east-west cross-section of the Espanola Basin and the adjacent highlands in order to evaluate the regional flow system. Vertical geothermal gradients from several monitoring wells were measured using a thermistor. Anomalously warm geothermal gradients were mapped in the Cerros del Rio volcanic field in the basin just east of the Rio Grande. Temperature gradients are up to 70℃/km, while the background geothermal gradients in the Rio Grande rift zone generally show 28℃-35℃/km. This anomaly extends to the Buckman well field, which supplies water to the city of Santa Fe. Overpumping of this well field has led to subsidence in the past. However, discharge temperature plots indicate that the temperature gradients of the Buckman field may be rebounding as pumping is reduced. Audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) and transient electromagnetic (TEM) data were acquired in the vicinity of three monitoring wells. TEM and AMT methods complement each other with the former having depths of investigation of less than ten to hundreds of meters and AMT having depths of investigation comparable to the wells deeper than 500m. These datasets were used collectively to image the subsurface stratigraphy and, more specifically, the hydrogeology related to shallow aquifers. The EM data collected at these wells showed a trend indicating a shallow aquifer with a shallower resistive layer of approximately 100 ohm-m at 70-100 meters depth. Beneath this resistive layer we resolved a more conductive, clay-rich layer of 10 ohm-m. These resistivity profiles compliment the electrical logs provided by Jet West, which indicate shallower sandstone interbedded with silt on top of more silt-dominant layers. Our

  8. Lunar volcanism in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J. W., III

    1976-01-01

    The role of lunar volcanism in the history of the moon is documented using lunar-orbit and earth-based data along with characterizations derived from Apollo and Luna sample-return missions. Characteristics of mare and highland volcanic features are described, Apollo and Luna results are discussed, and the characteristics of other mare deposits and of other highland features of possible volcanic origin are summarized. Major conclusions are that: (1) there is little unequivocal morphologic evidence for highland volcanism, (2) lunar mare lavas appear to have originated from depths of 100 to 500 km, (3) impact melting does not appear to have been a factor in the generation of mare lavas, (4) mare volcanism was characterized by massive outpourings of very fluid volatile-poor lava analogous to terrestrial flood basalts, (5) mare volcanism took place from 3.83 to about 2.5 billion years ago, (6) the preferential occurrence of mare deposits in large impact basins appears to be generically unrelated to basin formation, and (7) a thicker farside crust may be responsible for the distinctive nearside-farside asymmetry of mare deposits.

  9. Nanoparticulate mineral matter from basalt dust wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Querol, Xavier; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Taffarel, Silvio R; Moreno, Teresa; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-02-01

    Ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been the subject of some concern recently around the world for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the mining district of Nova Prata in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, Zn that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and could so present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in typical BDW samples highlights the need to develop cleaning procedures to minimise exposure to these natural fertilizing basalt dust wastes and is thus of direct relevance to both the industrial sector of basalt mining and to agriculture in the region.

  10. Paleomagnetism and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Plio-Pleistocene Boring Volcanic Field: Implications for the geomagnetic polarity time scale and paleosecular variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; Fleck, Robert J.; Evarts, Russell C.; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2017-01-01

    Paleomagnetic directions and 40Ar/39Ar ages have been determined for samples of lava flows from the same outcrops, where possible, for 84 eruptive units ranging in age from 3200 ka to 60 ka within the Boring Volcanic Field (BVF) of the Pacific Northwest, USA. This study expands upon our previous results for the BVF, and compares the combined results with the current geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS). Lava flows with transitional directions were found within the BVF at the Matuyama-Brunhes and Jaramillo-Matuyama polarity boundaries, and replicate ages corresponding to these and other boundaries have been newly ascertained. Although the BVF data generally agree with GPTS chronozone boundaries, they indicate that onset of the Gauss-Matuyama transition and Olduvai subchron occurred significantly earlier than given in the current time scale calibration. Additional comparisons show that the BVF results are consistent with recent statistical models of geomagnetic paleosecular variation.

  11. Revised ages for tuffs of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field: Assignment of the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff to a new geomagnetic polarity event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Christiansen, R.L.; Izett, G.A.; Obradovich, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages were determined on the three major ash-flow tuffs of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field in the region of Yellowstone National Park in order to improve the precision of previously determined ages. Total-fusion and incremental-heating ages of sanidine yielded the following mean ages: Huckleberry Ridge Tuff-2.059 ?? 0.004 Ma; Mesa Falls Tuff-1.285 ?? 0.004 Ma; and Lava Creek Tuff-0.639 ?? 0.002 Ma. The Huckleberry Ridge Tuff has a transitional magnetic direction and has previously been related to the Reunion Normal-Polarity Subchron. Dating of the Reunion event has been reviewed and its ages have been normalized to a common value for mineral standards. The age of the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff is significantly younger than lava flows of the Reunion event on Re??union Island, supporting other evidence for a normal-polarity event younger than the Reunion event.

  12. Late Cretaceous lithospheric extension in SE China: Constraints from volcanic rocks in Hainan Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun; Liang, Xinquan; Kröner, Alfred; Cai, Yongfeng; Shao, Tongbin; Wen, Shunv; Jiang, Ying; Fu, Jiangang; Wang, Ce; Dong, Chaoge

    2015-09-01

    Petrological, geochemical and in-situ zircon U-Pb dating and Hf-isotope analyses have been carried out on a suite of basalt-andesite-rhyolite volcanic rocks exposed in the Liuluocun area, Hainan Island, SE China. Zircon analyses show that these volcanic rocks crystallized in the Early Cretaceous (ca. 102 Ma). The basalts are characterized by low MgO contents and mg-numbers but high rare earth element, high field strength element and large ion lithophile element contents and Nb-Ta negative anomalies. They have relatively uniform Sr-Nd isotope compositions with εNd(t) values of - 4.09 to - 3.63. The andesites show enrichment of high field strength element and rare earth element with negligible Eu anomalies. They have εNd(t) values of - 2.35 to - 3.88 and εHf(t) values of - 9.73 to - 1.13. The rhyolites have high K2O and SiO2 contents. They are characterized by prominent Eu, P and Ti negative anomalies and enrichment in large ion lithophile element, and show εHf(t) values of - 7.51 to + 0.47 and εNd(t) values of - 2.49 to - 2.69. Petrogenetic analysis indicates that the Liuluocun volcanic rocks were produced by incomplete reaction of the mantle wedge peridotite with felsic melts derived from partial melting of subducted sediment. All these characteristics, combined with geological observations, suggest that their formation was related to regional lithospheric extension in the South China Craton during the Early Cretaceous, which may have been caused by subduction of the Paleo-Pacific plate beneath the continental plate of China.

  13. Volcanic Catastrophes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The big news from 20th century geophysics may not be plate tectonics but rather the surprise return of catastrophism, following its apparent 19th century defeat to uniformitarianism. Divine miracles and plagues had yielded to the logic of integrating observations of everyday change over time. Yet the brilliant interpretation of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary iridium anomaly introduced an empirically based catastrophism. Undoubtedly, decades of contemplating our own nuclear self-destruction played a role in this. Concepts of nuclear winter, volcanic winter, and meteor impact winter are closely allied. And once the veil of threat of all-out nuclear exchange began to lift, we could begin to imagine slower routes to destruction as "global change". As a way to end our world, fire is a good one. Three-dimensional magma chambers do not have as severe a magnitude limitation as essentially two-dimensional faults. Thus, while we have experienced earthquakes that are as big as they get, we have not experienced volcanic eruptions nearly as great as those preserved in the geologic record. The range extends to events almost three orders of magnitude greater than any eruptions of the 20th century. Such a calamity now would at the very least bring society to a temporary halt globally, and cause death and destruction on a continental scale. At maximum, there is the possibility of hindering photosynthesis and threatening life more generally. It has even been speculated that the relative genetic homogeneity of humankind derives from an evolutionary "bottleneck" from near-extinction in a volcanic cataclysm. This is somewhat more palatable to contemplate than a return to a form of Original Sin, in which we arrived at homogeneity by a sort of "ethnic cleansing". Lacking a written record of truly great eruptions, our sense of human impact must necessarily be aided by archeological and anthropological investigations. For example, there is much to be learned about the influence of

  14. Dating of Quaternary basalts using the cosmogenic 3He and 14C methods with implications for excess 40Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, A. William; Poths, Jane; Healey, Heather A.; Reneau, Steven; Woldegabriel, Giday

    1994-02-01

    Concordant radiocarbon and cosmogenic 3He dates of 3 and 11 ka on basalt flows and associated scoria deposits from the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in New Mexico further substantiate published production rates and latitudinal and altitudinal corrections for 3He. Identical 3He concentrations in coexisting olivine and clinopyroxene confirm that these two minerals have very similar production rates. A cosmogenic 3He date of 57 ka on another flow is concordant with a U-series date and is younger than two K-Ar dates, suggesting that this flow contains excess 40Ar. This excess 40Ar is also evident in gases released by vacuum crushing of olivine-clinopyroxene fractions from all three flows.

  15. Geology and stratigraphy of the Challis Volcanic Group and related rocks, Little Wood River area, south-central Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Richard F.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    2005-01-01

    The southwestern part of the Challis volcanic field occupies the valley of the Little Wood River and its tributaries in the Hailey and Idaho Falls 1??2? quadrangles of south-central Idaho. The Little Wood River area is a structurally controlled topographic basin that is partly filled by Eocene Challis Volcanic Group and younger rocks. Rock types in the Challis Volcanic Group of the Little Wood River area include, in order of decreasing abundance, andesite lava flows and tuff breccia, dacite lava flows and flow breccia, volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks, lithic tuff, nonvolcanic conglomerate, and rhyolite dikes. A basal nonvolcanic conglomerate, that locally rests on upper Paleozoic sedimentary rocks at a regional unconformity, was deposited prior to eruption of volcanic rocks. Andesite was the first volcanic rock erupted and is a voluminous sequence as thick as 3,000 ft (1,000 m). Locally thick volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks accumulated in topographic lows. A sharp transition marks the beginning of dacite eruption from fissures and flow-dome complexes. Dacite flows and breccias are as thick as 2,000 ft (600 m). An upper volcaniclastic unit was deposited in paleotopographic lows following emplacement of the main dacite unit. Next, a widespread, distinctive, lithic rich ash flow tuff, correlated with the tuff of Stoddard Gulch, was deposited over much of the area. Deposition of the tuff was followed by eruption of thin andesite and dacite lava flows and deposition of conglomeratic sedimentary rocks. The entire sequence was then intruded by a dacite flow-dome complex composed of at least three separate intrusions. The Challis Volcanic Group in the study area is calcalkaline. Andesitic rocks are typically high potassium basaltic andesite, high potassium andesite, shoshonite, and banakite (latite). Dacitic rocks are high potassium dacite and trachyte. Tuffs and vitrophyres range in composition from basaltic andesite to trachyte. The paleotopographic basin in which the

  16. Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan. Final report, May 1, 1995--November 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Pritchett, J.W. [and others

    1997-07-01

    The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. This comprehensive report describes the work accomplished during FY 1993-1996. A brief review of the geological and geophysical surveys at the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is presented (Section 2). Chemical data, consisting of analyses of steam and water from Sumikawa wells, are described and interpreted to indicate compositions and temperatures of reservoir fluids (Section 3). The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures (Section 4). Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter (Section 5). New interpretations of pressure transient data from several wells are discussed (Section 6). The available data have been synthesized to formulate a conceptual model for the Sumikawa Geothermal Field (Section 7).

  17. Magma displacements under insular volcanic fields, applications to eruption forecasting: El Hierro, Canary Islands, 2011-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, A.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Berrocoso, M.; Marrero, J. M.; Prates, G.; De la Cruz-Reyna, S.; Ortiz, R.

    2014-04-01

    Significant deformations, followed by increased seismicity detected since 2011 July at El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain, prompted the deployment of additional monitoring equipment. The climax of this unrest was a submarine eruption first detected on 2011 October 10, and located at about 2 km SW of La Restinga, southernmost village of El Hierro Island. The eruption ceased on 2012 March 5, after the volcanic tremor signals persistently weakened through 2012 February. However, the seismic activity did not end with the eruption, as several other seismic crises followed. The seismic episodes presented a characteristic pattern: over a few days the number and magnitude of seismic event increased persistently, culminating in seismic events severe enough to be felt all over the island. Those crises occurred in 2011 November, 2012 June and September, 2012 December to 2013 January and in 2013 March-April. In all cases the seismic unrest was preceded by significant deformations measured on the island's surface that continued during the whole episode. Analysis of the available GPS and seismic data suggests that several magma displacement processes occurred at depth from the beginning of the unrest. The first main magma movement or `injection' culminated with the 2011 October submarine eruption. A model combining the geometry of the magma injection process and the variations in seismic energy release has allowed successful forecasting of the new-vent opening.

  18. High northern geomagnetic field behavior and new constraints on the Gilsá event: Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar results of ∼0.5-3.1 Ma basalts from Jökuldalur, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Døssing, Arne; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Supakulopas, Radchagrit; Riishuus, Morten S.; Mac Niocaill, Conall

    2016-12-01

    Recent paleomagnetic results of extrusive rocks from high southern latitudes (>60°S) and high northern latitudes (>60°N) have been suggested to reflect a hemispheric asymmetry of the geomagnetic field on time-scales of 105 to 106 yrs, with higher and more stable fields in the north. This interpretation, however, is based on only a few modern-standard paleodirectional data sets and on high northern stable field paleointensity data of rocks that are mainly younger than 100 kyr. The sparsity of modern-standard data questions the validity (and age range) of this potential geomagnetic asymmetry. In 2013 and 2014, we sampled basaltic lava flows in Jökuldalur, north-eastern Iceland, to obtain high-standard paleodirectional and paleointensity data at relatively high-northern latitudes (65.2°N). On average, we sampled >15 cores per site at 51 sites of predominantly Matuyama age. Complete demagnetization was carried out on all samples using AF or thermal demagnetization. We present 45 distinct paleomagnetic directions based on overall N > 10 ChRMs per site and α 95 age data. The dispersion SB overall supports the interpretation of a dependence of SB on latitude during the Matuyama, while the negligible ΔI suggests little deviation from a GAD field. Based on relatively strict cut-off criteria we also present six new field strength estimates from the time interval ∼1.2-1.83 Ma, thus filling a large data gap of the high-northern stable field behavior. We obtain a median VADM of 57 ± 3ZAm2 (VDM of 60 ± 5Am2), which is higher than the median VADM of 16 intensity estimates from Antarctica (39 ± 7 ZAm2) from the same period. A higher northern field is also found when using less strict cut-off criteria resulting in 14 field estimates from Jökuldalur, i.e. we find support for higher field strength in the northern hemisphere as compared to the southern hemisphere during the Matuyama. Finally, we deliver a revised magneto-chronostratigraphic model of Jökuldalur and conduct

  19. Facies-controlled volcanic reservoirs of northern Songliao Basin, NE China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Volcanic rocks of the late Mesozoic are very important reservoirs for the commercial natural gases including hydrocarbon, carbon dioxide and rare gases in the northern Songliao Basin. The reservoir volcanic rocks include rhyolite,andesite, trachyte, basalt and tuff. Facies of the volcanic rocks can be classified into 5 categories and 15 special types.Porosity and permeability of the volcanic reservoirs are facies-controlled. Commercial reservoirs were commonly found among the following volcanic subfacies: volcanic neck (Ⅰ1), underground-explosive breccia (Ⅰ3), pyroclastic-bearing lava flow (Ⅱ3), upper effusive (Ⅲ3) and inner extrusive ones (Ⅳ1). The best volcanic reservoirs are generally evolved in the interbedded explosive and effusive volcanics. Rhyolites show in general better reservoir features than other types of rocks do.

  20. Surface Textures and Features Indicative of Endogenous Growth at the McCartys Flow Field, NM, as an Analog to Martian Volcanic Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Garry, W. B.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Self, S.; Aubele, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic lavas typically form channels or tubes, which are recognized on the Earth and Mars. Although largely unrecognized in the planetary community, terrestrial inflated sheet flows also display morphologies that share many commonalities with lava plains on Mars. The McCartys lava flow field is among the youngest (approx.3000 yrs) basaltic flows in the continental United States. The southwest sections of the flow displays smooth, flat-topped plateaus with irregularly shaped pits and hummocky inter-plateau units that form a polygonal surface. Plateaus are typically elongate in map view, up to 20 m high and display lineations within the glassy crust. Lineated surfaces occasionally display small < 1m diameter lava coils. Lineations are generally straight and parallel each other, sometimes for over 100 meters. The boundaries between plateaus and depressions are also lineated and tilted to angles sometimes approaching vertical. Plateau-parallel cracks, sometimes containing squeeze-ups, mark the boundary between tilted crust and plateau. Some plateau depressions display level floors with hummocky surfaces, while some are bowl shaped with floors covered in broken lava slabs. The lower walls of pits sometimes display lateral, sagged lava wedges. Infrequently, pit floors display the upper portion of a tumulus from an older flow. In some places the surface crust has been disrupted forming a slabby texture. Slabs are typically on the scale of a meter or less across and no less than 7-10 cm thick. The slabs preserve the lineated textures of the undisturbed plateau crust. It appears that this style of terrain represents the emplacement of an extensive sheet that experiences infl