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Sample records for basal insulin initiation

  1. Basal Insulin Initiation in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Taiwan: A Comparison with Younger Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Nan Chien

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: In elderly people with T2DM in Taiwan who had inadequate glycemic control by OAD, initiation of basal insulin therapy with insulin glargine over 24 weeks provided effective glycemic control similar to the younger population.

  2. Future of newer basal insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Madhu, S. V.; Velmurugan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Basal insulin have been developed over the years. In recent times newer analogues have been added to the armanentarium for diabetes therapy. This review specifically reviews the current status of different basal insulins

  3. Degludec insulin: A novel basal insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Baruah, Manash; Kalra, Bharti

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews a novel insulin analogue, degludec, which has the potential to emerge as an ideal basal insulin. It reviews the limitations of existing basal insulin and analogues, and highlights the need for a newer molecule. The paper discusses the potential advantages of degludec, while reviewing its pharmacologic and clinical studies done so far. The paper assesses the potential role of insulin degludec and degludec plus in clinical diabetes practice.

  4. Basal insulin initiation use and experience among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus with different patterns of persistence: results from a multi-national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Nieves, Magaly; Ivanova, Jasmina I; Hadjiyianni, Irene; Zhao, Chen; Cao, Dachuang; Schmerold, Luke; Kalirai, Samaneh; King, Sarah; DeLozier, Amy M; Birnbaum, Howard G; Peyrot, Mark

    2017-10-01

    People with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) often interrupt basal insulin treatment soon after initiation. This study aimed to describe the experiences during and after basal insulin initiation among people with T2DM with different persistence patterns. Adults with T2DM from France, Germany, Spain, UK, US, Brazil, and Japan were identified from consumer panels for an online survey. Respondents who initiated basal insulin 3-24 months prior to survey date were categorized as continuers (no gaps of ≥7 days in insulin treatment); interrupters (first gap ≥7 days within 6 months of initiation and restarted insulin); and discontinuers (stopped insulin for ≥7 days within 6 months of initiation without restarting). Among 942 participants, continuers were older than interrupters and discontinuers (46, 37, and 38 years, respectively, p insulin initiation than interrupters and discontinuers, while interrupters had the most concerns. Continuers also reported fewer challenges during the first week of insulin use. Continuers were more likely to respond that insulin use had a positive impact on specific aspects of life than interrupters and discontinuers, for example on glycemic control (73.0%, 63.0%, and 61.8%, respectively; p insulin initiation there were significant differences in patient characteristics and experience during and after insulin initiation. Interrupters and discontinuers more frequently reported having concerns and challenges during the initiation process, negative impacts after initiation, and less improvement in glycemic control than continuers.

  5. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins

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    Mannucci E

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Edoardo Mannucci,1 Stefano Giannini,2 Ilaria Dicembrini1 1Diabetes Agency, Careggi Teaching Hospital, Florence, 2Section of Endocrinology, Department of Biomedical Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Florence and Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy Abstract: Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with

  6. Concentrated insulins: the new basal insulins

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    Lamos EM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth M Lamos,1 Lisa M Younk,2 Stephen N Davis3 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, 2Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA Introduction: Insulin therapy plays a critical role in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is still a need to find basal insulins with 24-hour coverage and reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Additionally, with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, the ability to provide clinically necessary high doses of insulin at low volume is also needed. Areas covered: This review highlights the published reports of the pharmacokinetic (PK and glucodynamic properties of concentrated insulins: Humulin-R U500, insulin degludec U200, and insulin glargine U300, describes the clinical efficacy, risk of hypoglycemic, and metabolic changes observed, and finally, discusses observations about the complexity of introducing a new generation of concentrated insulins to the therapeutic market. Conclusion: Humulin-R U500 has a similar onset but longer duration of action compared with U100 regular insulin. Insulin glargine U300 has differential PK/pharmacodynamic effects when compared with insulin glargine U100. In noninferiority studies, glycemic control with degludec U200 and glargine U300 is similar to insulin glargine U100 and nocturnal hypoglycemia is reduced. Concentrated formulations appear to behave as separate molecular entities when compared with earlier U100 insulin analog compounds. In the review of available published data, newer concentrated basal insulins may offer an advantage in terms of reduced intraindividual variability as well as reducing the injection burden in individuals requiring high-dose and large volume insulin therapy. Understanding the PK and pharmacodynamic properties of this new generation of insulins is critical to safe dosing, dispensing, and administration

  7. Early discontinuation and related treatment costs after initiation of Basal insulin in type 2 diabetes patients: a German primary care database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderten, Helmut; Dippel, Franz-Werner; Kostev, Karel

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to compare early discontinuation and related treatment costs in type 2 diabetes in primary care after initiation of insulin glargine or human basal insulin (NPH). Overall, 2765 glargine and 1554 NPH patients from 1072 general practices were analyzed (Disease Analyser). Early discontinuation was defined as switching to a different basal insulin or another insulin treatment regimen within 90 days after first basal insulin prescription (index date, ID). Treatment costs were assessed 365 days prior and post ID in both groups. Propensity score matching and linear regression was used to adjust cost differences (post vs prior ID: discontinued vs continued patients) for age, sex, diabetes duration, antidiabetic comedication, diabetologist care, disease management program participation, costs before ID, and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Within 3 months after ID, 13% of glargine patients switched to other insulin treatment regimens (NPH: 18%; P cost differences in 146 discontinued versus 1342 continued glargine patients were calculated (NPH: 146 vs 1342). Diabetes-related prescription costs were lower among persistent glargine patients compared to persistent NPH patients (EUR-49 [19]; P = .0109). Mean cost difference for diabetes-related prescriptions was lower among those who persisted on glargine compared to those who switched to other treatment regimens (EUR-74 [42], P = .0780). Treatment persistence within 3 months after basal insulin initiation was significantly higher under insulin glargine compared to NPH. Diabetes-related prescription costs were significantly lower among patients who adhered to insulin glargine compared to persistent NPH patients. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  8. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Giannini, Stefano; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane) and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec) differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with regard to cardiovascular safety will provide definitive evidence.

  9. Modern basal insulin analogs: An incomplete story

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Gangopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The currently available basal insulin does not completely mimic the endogenous insulin secretion. This has continued to promote the search for ideal basal insulin. The newer basal insulin have primarily focused on increasing the duration of action, reducing variability, and reducing the incidence of hypoglycemia, particularly nocturnal. However, the changing criteria of hypoglycemia within a short span of a few years along with the surprising introduction of major cardiac events as another ou...

  10. The future of basal insulin supplementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, Airin C. R.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2011-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the candidates for an improved basal insulin in the pharmaceutical pipeline. The first new basal insulin to enter the market is most likely insulin degludec (IDeg), currently reporting in phase 3 of development, from Novo Nordisk (Bagsvaerd, Denmark). IDeg has a

  11. The dynamic relationship between current and previous severe hypoglycemic events: a lagged dependent variable analysis among patients with type 2 diabetes who have initiated basal insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Michael L; Li, Qian; Wintfeld, Neil S; Lee, Yuan-Chi; Sorli, Christopher; Huang, Joanna C

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have found episodes of severe hypoglycemia (SH) to be serially dependent. Those studies, however, only considered the impact of a single (index) event on future risk; few have analyzed SH risk as it evolves over time in the presence (or absence) of continuing events. The objective of this study was to determine the dynamic risks of SH events conditional on preceding SH events among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) who have initiated basal insulin. We used an electronic health records database from the United States that included encounter and laboratory data and clinical notes on T2D patients who initiated basal insulin therapy between 2008 and 2011 and to identify SH events. We used a repeated-measures lagged dependent variable logistic regression model to estimate the impact of SH in one quarter on the risk of SH in the next quarter. We identified 7235 patients with T2D who initiated basal insulin. Patients who experienced ≥1 SH event during any quarter were more likely to have ≥1 SH event during the subsequent quarter than those who did not (predicted probabilities of 7.4% and 1.0%, respectively; p history of SH before starting basal insulin (predicted probabilities of 1.0% and 3.2%, respectively; p history of SH during the titration period (predicted probabilities of 1.1% and 2.8%, respectively; p history of SH events and therefore the value of preventing one SH event may be substantial. These results can inform patient care by providing clinicians with dynamic data on a patient's risk of SH, which in turn can facilitate appropriate adjustment of the risk-benefit ratio for individualized patient care. These results should, however, be interpreted in light of the key limitations of our study: not all SH events may have been captured or coded in the database, data on filled prescriptions were not available, we were unable to adjust for basal insulin dose, and the post-titration follow-up period could have divided into time units other

  12. Clinical and Economic Outcomes Associated With the Timing of Initiation of Basal Insulin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Previously Treated With Oral Antidiabetes Drugs.

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    Levin, Philip; Zhou, Steve; Durden, Emily; Farr, Amanda M; Gill, Jasvinder; Wei, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) not achieving glycemic targets using oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs), studies suggest that timely insulin initiation has clinical benefits. Insulin initiation at the early versus late stage of disease progression has not been explored in detail. This retrospective database analysis investigated clinical and economic outcomes associated with the timing of insulin initiation in patients with T2DM treated with ≥1 OAD in a real-world US setting. This study linked data from the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Commercial database, Medicare Supplemental database, and Quintiles Electronic Medical Records database. A total of 1830 patients with T2DM were included. Patients were grouped according to their OAD use before basal insulin initiation (1, 2, or ≥3 OADs) as a proxy for the timing of insulin initiation. Clinical and economic outcomes were evaluated over 1 year of follow-up. During follow-up the 1 OAD group, compared with the 2 and ≥3 OADs groups, had a greater reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (-1.7% vs -1.0% vs -0.9%, respectively; P health care costs ($21,167 vs $21,060 vs $20,133, respectively). This study shows that early insulin initiation (represented by the 1 OAD group) may be clinically beneficial to patients with T2DM not controlled with OADs, without adding to costs. This supports the call for timely initiation of individualized insulin therapy in this population. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rationale, Design, and Baseline Data of the Insulin Glargine (Lantus) Versus Insulin Detemir (Levemir) Treat-To-Target (L2T3) Study: A Multinational, Randomized Noninferiority Trial of Basal Insulin Initiation in Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinnen, Sanne G. H. A.; Snoek, Frank J.; Dain, Marie-Paule; DeVries, J. Hans; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; Holleman, Frits

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the design and baseline data of the Lantus (R) (sanofi-aventis, Paris, France) versus Levemir (R) (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark) Treat-To-Target (L2T3) study, a multinational, randomized comparison between the basal insulin analogs insulin glargine and insulin detemir.

  14. The future of basal insulin supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Airin C R; DeVries, J Hans

    2011-06-01

    This review presents an overview of the candidates for an improved basal insulin in the pharmaceutical pipeline. The first new basal insulin to enter the market is most likely insulin degludec (IDeg), currently reporting in phase 3 of development, from Novo Nordisk (Bagsvaerd, Denmark). IDeg has a longer duration of action than currently available analogs. Phase 2 studies show comparable efficacy and safety outcomes compared with insulin glargine once daily with less hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes. The final results of phase 3 studies seem to confirm this, also in type 2 diabetes. Biodel (Danbury, CT) has two long-acting basal insulin formulations in the pipeline, both in the preclinical phase of development: BIOD-Adjustable Basal, a modified formulation of insulin glargine, is available in long-, medium-, and short-acting forms and could be mixed, and BIOD-Smart Basal releases insulin proportional to the subcutaneous glucose concentration. Eli Lilly (Indianapolis, IN) is also developing a basal insulin. Phase 2 trials have been completed, but no results are published yet. Clinical trials with the new patch pump from CeQur (Montreux, Switzerland) have recently started in Europe. This patch pump delivers both basal and bolus doses subcutaneously and is intended for people with type 2 diabetes who need multiple daily injection insulin therapy.

  15. Reduction of Sulfonylurea with the Initiation of Basal Insulin in Patients with Inadequately Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Undergoing Long-Term Sulfonylurea-Based Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoree Yang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThere were a limited number of studies about β-cell function after insulin initiation in patients exposed to long durations of sulfonylurea treatment. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the recovery of β-cell function and the efficacy of concurrent sulfonylurea use after the start of long-acting insulin.MethodsIn this randomized controlled study, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, receiving sulfonylurea for at least 2 years with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c >7%, were randomly assigned to two groups: sulfonylurea maintenance (SM and sulfonylurea reduction (SR. Following a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, we administered long-acting basal insulin to the two groups. After a 6-month follow-up, we repeated the OGTT.ResultsAmong 69 enrolled patients, 57 completed the study and were analyzed: 31 in the SM and 26 in the SR group. At baseline, there was no significant difference except for the longer duration of diabetes and lower triglycerides in the SR group. After 6 months, the HbA1c was similarly reduced in both groups, but there was little difference in the insulin dose. In addition, insulin secretion during OGTT was significantly increased by 20% to 30% in both groups. A significant weight gain was observed in the SM group only. The insulinogenic index was more significantly improved in the SR group.ConclusionLong-acting basal insulin replacement could improve the glycemic status and restore β-cell function in the T2DM patients undergoing sulfonylurea-based treatment, irrespective of the sulfonylurea dose reduction. The dose reduction of the concurrent sulfonylurea might be beneficial with regard to weight grain.

  16. Will the next generation of basal insulins offer clinical advantages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, A J

    2014-06-01

    The 21st century has seen the arrival of several insulin analogue products and the refinement of insulin regimens, with widespread advocacy of continuous titration algorithms and earlier initiation of supplementary insulin therapy (predominantly using basal insulins) in type 2 diabetes. Nevertheless, many insulin-treated diabetes patients remain in poor glycaemic control. This might reflect insufficient titration effort or lax adherence, but these issues could in some cases result from concerns about hypoglycaemia. Certainly there is scope for improving the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) profile of basal insulin, and three new products offer this prospect. Insulin degludec, now in clinical use, and PEGylated insulin lispro, in development, have greatly extended action profiles that result from two very different, but unique, mechanisms. With once-daily dosing, these insulins produce stable PK/PD profiles at steady state, associated with a low incidence of hypoglycaemia. The feasibility of varied daily dose timing has also been confirmed with insulin degludec. High strength formulations of insulin glargine and insulin degludec offer the prospect of a reduced injection number/volume in high dose users, and in the case of glargine, the PK/PD profile might also be favourably modified. This review considers critically the clinical evidence and expectations we should have for these new basal insulins. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Comparison of Insulin Detemir and Insulin Glargine for Hospitalized Patients on a Basal-Bolus Protocol

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    Sondra Davis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The primary purpose of this study is to determine whether insulin detemir is equivalent to insulin glargine in controlling hyperglycemia for the adult hospitalized patient on a basal-bolus treatment regimen. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted at two acute care hospitals within the same health system. Patients from both facilities who were initiated on a basal-bolus subcutaneous insulin regimen were included in the study. The basal-bolus regimen consisted of three components: basal, bolus, and corrective insulin with only the data from the first seven days analyzed. Once the basal-bolus protocol was initiated, all previous glycemic agents were discontinued. The target glycemic goal of the study was 100–180 mg/dL. RESULTS: In both groups, 50% of the patients had achieved the target glycemic control goal (100–180 mg/dL by day 2 (p = 0.3. However, on the seventh or last day of basal-bolus treatment, whichever came first, 36.36% of patients receiving insulin detemir (n = 88 achieved the blood glucose reading goal compared to 52.00% in patients receiving insulin glargine (n = 100 (p = 0.03. This corresponded to an adjusted odds ratio of 2.12 (1.08 to 4.15, p = 0.03. The adjusting variables were provider type, whether the patient was hospitalized within 30 days prior and diagnosis of stroke. The mean blood glucose readings for the insulin glargine and the insulin detemir groups while on basal-bolus therapy were 200 mg/dL and 215 mg/dL, respectively (p = 0.05. The total number of blood glucose readings less than 70 mg/dL and less than 45 mg/dL was very low and there were no differences in number of episodes with hypoglycemia between the two groups. CONCLUSION: There was not a statistical difference between the two groups at 2 days, however there was on the seventh day or the last day of basal-bolus treatment. There were nonsignificant hypoglycemia events between basal insulin groups and the results for the last or seventh day

  18. Basal insulin and cardiovascular and other outcomes in dysglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstein, Hertzel C; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R

    2012-01-01

    The provision of sufficient basal insulin to normalize fasting plasma glucose levels may reduce cardiovascular events, but such a possibility has not been formally tested.......The provision of sufficient basal insulin to normalize fasting plasma glucose levels may reduce cardiovascular events, but such a possibility has not been formally tested....

  19. Combining a GLP-1 receptor agonist and basal insulin: study evidence and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carris, Nicholas W; Taylor, James R; Gums, John G

    2014-12-01

    Most patients with diabetes mellitus require multiple medications to achieve glycemic goals. Considering this and the increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes worldwide, the need for effective combination therapy is pressing. Basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are frequently used to treat type 2 diabetes. Though both classes of medication are exclusively injectable, which may cause initial hesitation from providers, evidence for their combined use is substantial. This review summarizes the theoretical benefit, supporting evidence, and implementation of a combined basal insulin-GLP-1 receptor agonist regimen. Basal insulin added to a GLP-1 receptor agonist reduces hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) without weight gain or significantly increased hypoglycemia. A GLP-1 receptor agonist added to basal insulin reduces HbA1c and body weight. Compared with the addition of meal-time insulin to basal insulin, a GLP-1 receptor agonist produces similar or greater reduction in HbA1c, weight loss instead of weight gain, and less hypoglycemia. Gastrointestinal adverse events are common with GLP-1 receptor agonists, especially during initiation and titration. However, combination with basal insulin is not expected to augment expected adverse events that come with using a GLP-1 receptor agonist. Basal insulin can be added to a GLP-1 receptor agonist with a slow titration to target goal fasting plasma glucose. In patients starting a GLP-1 receptor agonist, the dose of basal insulin should be decreased by 20 % in patients with an HbA1c ≤8 %. The evidence from 15 randomized prospective studies supports the combined use of a GLP-1 receptor agonist with basal insulin in a broad range of patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

  20. Common Standards of Basal Insulin Titration in T2DM

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    Arnolds, Sabine; Heise, Tim; Flacke, Frank; Sieber, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus has become a worldwide major health problem, and the number of people affected is steadily increasing. Thus, not all patients suffering from the disease can be treated by specialized diabetes centers or outpatient clinics, but by primary care physicians. The latter, however, might have time constraints and have to deal with many kinds of diseases or with multimorbid patients, so their focus is not so much on lowering high blood glucose values. Thus, the physicians, as well as the patients themselves, are often reluctant to initiate and adjust insulin therapy, although basal insulin therapy is considered the appropriate strategy after oral antidiabetic drug failure, according to the latest international guidelines. A substantial number of clinical studies have shown that insulin initiation and optimization can be managed successfully by using titration algorithms—even in cases where patients themselves are the drivers of insulin titration. Nevertheless, tools and strategies are needed to facilitate this process in the daily life of both primary health care professionals and patients with diabetes. PMID:23759411

  1. Subcutaneous insulin infusion: change in basal infusion rate has no immediate effect on insulin absorption rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, P.; Birch, K.; Jensen, B.M.; Kuehl, C.

    1986-01-01

    Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were simultaneously given subcutaneous infusions (1.12 IU/h each) of 125 I-labeled Actrapid insulin in each side of the abdominal wall. After 24 h of infusion, the size of the infused insulin depots was measured by external counting for 5 h. The basal infusion rate was then doubled in one side and halved in the other for the next 4 h. Finally, 1.12 IU/h of insulin was given in both sides of the abdominal wall for an additional 3 h. The changes in the size of the depots were measured, and the absorption rates for each hour were calculated. During the first 5 h of infusion, the depot size was almost constant (approximately 5 IU) with an absorption rate that equaled the infusion rate. Doubling the infusion rate led to a significant increase in depot size, but the absorption rate remained unchanged for the first 3 h, and only thereafter was a significant increase seen. When the infusion rate was reduced to the initial 1.12 IU/h, the absorption rate remained elevated during the next 3 h. Correspondingly, when the infusion rate was decreased, the depot size also decreased, but the absorption rate remained unchanged for the first 3 h. The results show that a change in the basal insulin infusion rate does not lead to any immediate change in the insulin absorption rate. This should be considered when planning an insulin-infusion program that includes alteration(s) in the basal-rate setting

  2. Challenges and unmet needs in basal insulin therapy: lessons from the Asian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan WB

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Wing Bun Chan,1 Jung Fu Chen,2 Su-Yen Goh,3 Thi Thanh Huyen Vu,4 Iris Thiele Isip-Tan,5 Sony Wibisono Mudjanarko,6 Shailendra Bajpai,7 Maria Aileen Mabunay,7 Pongamorn Bunnag8 1Qualigenics Diabetes Centre, Hong Kong SAR, People’s Republic of China; 2Division of Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 3Department of Endocrinology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; 4Out-patient Department and Department of Internal Medicine, National Geriatric Hospital, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam; 5Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University of the Philippines–Philippine General Hospital, Manila, Philippines; 6Diabetes and Nutrition Centre, Dr. Soetomo Hospital, School of Medicine Airlangga University, Surabaya, Indonesia; 7Sanofi, Singapore; 8Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Abstract: Basal insulin therapy can improve glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes. However, timely initiation, optimal titration, and proper adherence to prescribed basal insulin regimens are necessary to achieve optimal glycemic control. Even so, glycemic control may remain suboptimal in a significant proportion of patients. Unique circumstances in Asia (eg, limited resources, management of diabetes primarily in nonspecialist settings, and patient populations that are predominantly less educated coupled with the limitations of current basal insulin options (eg, risk of hypoglycemia and dosing time inflexibility amplify the challenge of optimal basal insulin therapy in Asia. Significant progress has been made with long-acting insulin analogs (insulin glargine 100 units/mL and insulin detemir, which provide longer coverage and less risk of hypoglycemia over intermediate-acting insulin (Neutral Protamine Hagedorn insulin. Furthermore, recent clinical evidence suggests

  3. Correlates of basal insulin persistence among insulin-naïve people with type 2 diabetes: results from a multinational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrot, Mark; Perez-Nieves, Magaly; Ivanova, Jasmina; Cao, Dachuang; Schmerold, Luke; Kalirai, Samaneh; Hadjiyianni, Irene

    2017-10-01

    People with T2DM who initiate basal insulin therapy often stop therapy temporarily or permanently soon after initiation. This study analyzes the reasons for and correlates of stopping and restarting basal insulin therapy among people with T2DM. An online survey was completed by 942 insulin-naïve adults with self-reported T2DM from Brazil, France, Germany, Japan, Spain, UK, and US. Respondents had initiated basal insulin therapy within the 3-24 months before survey participation and met criteria for one of three persistence groups: continuers had no gaps of ≥7 days in basal insulin treatment; interrupters had at least one gap in insulin therapy of ≥7 days within the first 6 months after initiation and had since restarted basal insulin; and discontinuers stopped using basal insulin within the first 6 months after initiation and had not restarted. Physician recommendations and cost were strongly implicated in patients stopping and not resuming insulin therapy. Continuous persistence was lower for patients with more worries about insulin initiation, greater difficulties and weight gain while using insulin, and higher for those using pens and perceiving their diabetes as severe. Repeated interruption of insulin therapy was associated with hyperglycemia and treatment burden while using insulin. Resumption and perceived likelihood of resumption were associated with hyperglycemia upon insulin cessation. Perceived likelihood of resumption among discontinuers was associated with perceived benefits of insulin. Better understanding of the risk factors for patient cessation and resumption of basal insulin therapy may help healthcare providers improve persistence with therapy.

  4. Internalization and localization of basal insulin peglispro in cells.

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    Moyers, Julie S; Volk, Catherine B; Cao, Julia X C; Zhang, Chen; Ding, Liyun; Kiselyov, Vladislav V; Michael, M Dodson

    2017-10-15

    Basal insulin peglispro (BIL) is a novel, PEGylated insulin lispro that has a large hydrodynamic size compared with insulin lispro. It has a prolonged duration of action, which is related to a delay in insulin absorption and a reduction in clearance. Given the different physical properties of BIL compared with native insulin and insulin lispro, it is important to assess the cellular internalization characteristics of the molecule. Using immunofluorescent confocal imaging, we compared the cellular internalization and localization patterns of BIL, biosynthetic human insulin, and insulin lispro. We assessed the effects of BIL on internalization of the insulin receptor (IR) and studied cellular clearance of BIL. Co-localization studies using antibodies to either insulin or PEG, and the early endosomal marker EEA1 showed that the overall internalization and subcellular localization pattern of BIL was similar to that of human insulin and insulin lispro; all were rapidly internalized and co-localized with EEA1. During ligand washout for 4 h, concomitant loss of insulin, PEG methoxy group, and PEG backbone immunostaining was observed for BIL, similar to the loss of insulin immunostaining observed for insulin lispro and human insulin. Co-localization studies using an antibody to the lysosomal marker LAMP1 did not reveal evidence of lysosomal localization for insulin lispro, human insulin, BIL, or PEG using either insulin or PEG immunostaining reagents. BIL and human insulin both induced rapid phosphorylation and internalization of human IR. Our findings show that treatment of cells with BIL stimulates internalization and localization of IR to early endosomes. Both the insulin and PEG moieties of BIL undergo a dynamic cellular process of rapid internalization and transport to early endosomes followed by loss of cellular immunostaining in a manner similar to that of insulin lispro and human insulin. The rate of clearance for the insulin lispro portion of BIL was slower than

  5. Basal insulin analogues in the treatment of diabetes mellitus: What progress have we made?

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, continuous progress has been made in the development of insulin therapy. Basal insulins were developed around 60 years ago. However, existing basal insulins were found to have limitations. An ideal basal insulin should have the following properties viz. longer duration of action, a flat time-action profile, low day-to-day glycaemic variability, and the potential for flexible dosing. Basal insulins have advanced over the years, from lectin and neutral protamine Haged...

  6. New Basal Insulins: a Clinical Perspective of Their Use in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes and Novel Treatment Options Beyond Basal Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Patrick F; Frias, Juan Pablo

    2017-08-18

    The purpose of this review was to review advances in basal insulin formulations and new treatment options for patients with type 2 diabetes not achieving glycemic targets despite optimized basal insulin therapy. Advances in basal insulin formulations have resulted in products with increasingly favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, including flatter, peakless action profiles, less inter- and intra-patient variability, and longer duration of activity. These properties have translated to significantly reduced risk of hypoglycemia (particularly during the night) compared with previous generation basal insulins. When optimized basal insulin therapy is not sufficient to obtain or maintain glycemic goals, various options exist to improve glycemic control, including intensification of insulin therapy with the addition of prandial insulin or changing to pre-mixed insulin and, more recently, the addition of a GLP-1 receptor agonist, either as a separate injection or as a component of one of the new fixed-ratio combinations of a basal insulin and GLP-1 RA. New safer and often more convenient basal insulins and fixed ratio combinations containing basal insulin (and GLP-1 receptor agonist) are available today for patients with type 2 diabetes not achieving glycemic goals. Head-to-head studies comparing the latest generation basal insulins are underway, and future studies assessing the fixed-ratio combinations will be important to better understand their differentiating features.

  7. Switching from basal or basal-bolus insulin to biphasic insulin aspart 30: Results from the Indian cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpandev Bhattacharyya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the safety and efficacy of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30 therapy in the Indian patients with type 2 diabetes previously on basal or basal-bolus insulin therapies. Materials and Methods: Patients switching from insulin glargine, neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH insulin, or basal-bolus insulin to BIAsp 30 in the Indian cohort of the A 1 chieve study were included. Safety and efficacy of treatment was evaluated over 24 weeks. Results: A total of 422 patients (pre-study basal-bolus insulin, 49; NPH insulin, 157; insulin glargine, 216 switched to BIAsp 30. Pre-study insulin doses were 0.61 ± 0.26 U/kg, 0.34 ± 0.2 U/kg and 0.40 ± 0.21 U/kg and the mean week 24 BIAsp 30 doses were 0.50 ± 0.21 U/kg, 0.35 ± 0.15 U/kg and 0.42 ± 0.16 U/kg in the prior basal-bolus insulin, NPH insulin and insulin glargine groups, respectively. No serious adverse drug reactions, major or nocturnal hypoglycemia were reported. The proportion of patients experiencing overall hypoglycemia was significantly lower from baseline (5.6% to week 24 (1.0% in the pre-study insulin-glargine group and appeared to be lower in pre-study NPH insulin and basal-bolus insulin groups. Glycemic control improved significantly from baseline week 24 in the pre-study NPH insulin and insulin-glargine groups (P < 0.001, while it appeared to improve in the pre-study basal-bolus group. Quality of life was positively impacted after 24 weeks in all 3 groups. Conclusion: The switch from basal or basal-bolus insulin to BIAsp 30 was safe, well tolerated and improved the glycemic control in this Indian cohort.

  8. Lixisenatide as add-on therapy to basal insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown DX

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dominique Xavier Brown, Emma Louise Butler, Marc Evans Diabetes Department, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff, UK Abstract: Many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus do not achieve target glycosylated hemoglobin A1c levels despite optimally titrated basal insulin and satisfactory fasting plasma glucose levels. Current evidence suggests that HbA1c levels are dictated by both basal glucose and postprandial glucose levels. This has led to a consensus that postprandial glucose excursions contribute to poor glycemic control in these patients. Lixisenatide is a once-daily, prandial glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 receptor agonist with a four-fold affinity for the GLP-1 receptor compared with native GLP-1. Importantly, lixisenatide causes a significant delay in gastric emptying time, an important determinant of the once-daily dosing regimen. An exendin-4 mimetic with six lysine residues removed at the C-terminal, lixisenatide has pronounced postprandial glucose-lowering effects, making it a novel incretin agent for use in combination with optimally titrated basal insulin. Lixisenatide exerts profound effects on postprandial glucose through established mechanisms of glucose-dependent insulin secretion and glucagon suppression in combination with delayed gastric emptying. This review discusses the likely place that lixisenatide will occupy in clinical practice, given its profound effects on postprandial glucose and potential to reduce glycemic variability. Keywords: lixisenatide, add-on therapy, insulin, GLP-1 receptor agonist, postprandial glucose, pharmacodynamics

  9. Basal plasma insulin and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) are indicators of insulin sensitivity in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, D J; Rand, J S; Sunvold, G D

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare simpler indices of insulin sensitivity with the minimal model-derived insulin sensitivity index to identify a simple and reliable alternative method for assessing insulin sensitivity in cats. In addition, we aimed to determine whether this simpler measure or measures showed consistency of association across differing body weights and glucose tolerance levels. Data from glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests performed in 32 cats with varying body weights (underweight to obese), including seven cats with impaired glucose tolerance, were used to assess the relationship between Bergman's minimal model-derived insulin sensitivity index (S(I)), and various simpler measures of insulin sensitivity. The most useful overall predictors of insulin sensitivity were basal plasma insulin concentrations and the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), which is the product of basal glucose and insulin concentrations divided by 22.5. It is concluded that measurement of plasma insulin concentrations in cats with food withheld for 24 h, in conjunction with HOMA, could be used in clinical research projects and by practicing veterinarians to screen for reduced insulin sensitivity in cats. Such cats may be at increased risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Early detection of these cats would enable preventative intervention programs such as weight reduction, increased physical activity and dietary modifications to be instigated.

  10. Basal insulin analogues in the treatment of diabetes mellitus: What progress have we made?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, continuous progress has been made in the development of insulin therapy. Basal insulins were developed around 60 years ago. However, existing basal insulins were found to have limitations. An ideal basal insulin should have the following properties viz. longer duration of action, a flat time-action profile, low day-to-day glycaemic variability, and the potential for flexible dosing. Basal insulins have advanced over the years, from lectin and neutral protamine Hagedorn to the currently available insulin degludec. Currently, the focus is on developing a basal insulin that can give coverage for the entire day, with lesser variability and flexible administration. Insulin degludec has been a significant leap in that direction. In addition, U300 insulin glargine and pegylated lispro represent further developments in basal insulin pharmacotherapeutics.

  11. Comparison between basal insulin glargine and NPH insulin in patients with diabetes type 1 on conventional intensive insulin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin analog that mimics normal basal insulin secretion without pronounced peaks. The aim of this study was to compare insulin glargine with isophane insulin (NPH insulin for basal insulin supply in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods. A total of 48 type 1 diabetics on long term conventional intensive insulin therapy (IIT were randomized to three different regimens of basal insulin substitution: 1. continuation of NPH insulin once daily at bedtime with more intensive selfmonitoring (n = 15; 2. NPH insulin twice daily (n = 15; 3. insulin glargine once daily (n = 18. Meal time insulin aspart was continued in all groups. Results. Fasting blood glucose (FBG was lower in the glargine group (7.30±0.98 mmol/l than in the twice daily NPH group (7.47±1.06 mmol/l, but without significant difference. FBG was significantly higher in the once daily NPH group (8.44±0.85 mmol/l; p < 0.05. HbA1c after 3 months did not change in the once daily NPH group, but decreased in the glargine group (from 7.72±0.86% to 6.87±0.50%, as well as in the twice daily NPH group (from 7.80±0.83% to 7.01±0.63%. Total daily insulin doses were similar in all groups but only in the glargine group there was an increase of basal and decrease of meal related insulin doses. The frequency of mild hypoglycemia was significantly lower in the glargine group (6.56±2.09 than in both NPH groups (9.0±1.65 in twice daily NPH group and 8.13±1.30 in other NPH group (episodes/patients-month, p < 0.05. Conclusion. Basal insulin supplementation in type 1 diabetes mellitus with either twice daily NPH insulin or glargine can result in similar glycemic control when combined with meal time insulin aspart. However, with glargine regimen FBG, HbA1c and frequency of hypoglycemic event are lower. These facts contribute to better patients satisfaction with insulin glargine versus NPH insulin in IIT in type 1 diabetics.

  12. Continuation versus discontinuation of insulin secretagogues when initiating insulin in type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinnen, S. G.; Dain, M.-P.; Mauricio, D.; DeVries, J. H.; Hoekstra, J. B.; Holleman, F.

    2010-01-01

    We compared the combined use of basal insulin, metformin and insulin secretagogues with a combination of basal insulin and metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes starting basal insulin analogue therapy. This analysis was part of a 24-week trial, in which 964 insulin-naive patients with type 2

  13. Validation of Algorithms for Basal Insulin Rate Reductions in Type 1 Diabetic Patients Practising Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Type 1 Diabetes With a Subcutaneous Insulin Pump; Adjustment of the Recommended Basal Insulin Flow Rate in the Event of Physical Activity; Adjustment of the Recommended Prandial Insulin in the Event of Physical Activity

  14. Rationale for, Initiation and Titration of the Basal Insulin/GLP-1RA Fixed-Ratio Combination Products, IDegLira and IGlarLixi, for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Virginia; Goldman, Jennifer; Shubrook, Jay H

    2017-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a progressive disease affecting glucose regulation and a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Many patients are not escalated up the treatment ladder appropriately despite failing to achieve glycemic control, with barriers such as fear of hypoglycemia, weight gain, and treatment burden recognized as factors. Exogenous basal insulin is titrated to address control of fasting plasma glucose and may preserve residual β-cell function, thus promoting a greater endogenous prandial insulin response. Native glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a peptide hormone secreted by the gut in response to nutrient ingestion; it increases insulin secretion, inhibits glucagon secretion, and prolongs gastric emptying, thereby lowering overall food intake. As its glucose-lowering action is glucose dependent, a GLP-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) achieves these benefits with a lower risk of hypoglycemia compared with other diabetes therapies. Two products, an insulin degludec/liraglutide combination (IDegLira) and an insulin glargine/lixisenatide combination (IGlarLixi), were approved for use in adults with T2D by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2016. The efficacy and safety of these two basal insulin/GLP-1RA combination products were studied in the DUAL program (NCTs 01336023, 01392573, 01676116, 01618162, 01952145, and 02298192) and the LixiLan program (NCTs 02058160 and 02058147). Compared with basal insulin, insulin/GLP-1RA fixed-ratio combinations are superior at reducing HbA 1c with weight neutrality or weight loss rather than weight gain, as well as reduced hypoglycemia rates, and reduced insulin-dose requirement with IDegLira. A combination of different medications may often be required to achieve glycemic control, and fixed-ratio combination products allow such therapies to be given in simple regimens. Clinical trial data for these products highlight the great potential of these agents, not merely their efficacy and safety but also their

  15. Insulin glargine 300 units/mL: A new basal insulin product for diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Jennifer N; Bello, Larkin

    2016-03-15

    The pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of U-300 insulin glargine for the management of diabetes are reviewed. U-300 (300 units/mL) insulin glargine is a long-acting basal insulin with low within-day variability, high day-to-day reproducibility, longer duration, and constant pharmacokinetic profile compared with U-100 (100 units/mL) insulin glargine. U-300 was evaluated in six randomized, active-comparator, open-label, Phase III clinical studies (EDITION trials) among patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes. The primary endpoint for all EDITION studies was the reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin from baseline to six months. Safety endpoints included confirmed or nocturnal hypoglycemia between week 9 and month 6 and the change in weight from baseline. For hypoglycemic episodes, U-300 insulin glargine was superior to U-100 insulin glargine when comparing the risk of hypoglycemia. U-300 insulin glargine is supplied in a prefilled device (for safety purposes) and packaged in boxes of three or five pens. It is still early to determine the role of U-300 insulin glargine in diabetes management. When compared with U-100 insulin glargine, U-300 insulin glargine appeared to be associated with a lower risk of hypoglycemia and nocturnal hypoglycemia, most likely due to its pharmacokinetics. The wholesale average cost of U-300 insulin glargine is $335.48 per box of three pens. The efficacy outcomes of U-300 insulin glargine were similar to those of U-100 insulin glargine, but the constant pharmacokinetic profile and longer duration of action of U-300 insulin glargine may help certain patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes achieve better glycemic control. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A randomized trial of insulin aspart with intensified basal NPH insulin supplementation in people with Type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeVries, J. H.; Lindholm, A.; Jacobsen, J. L.; Heine, R. J.; Home, P. D.

    2003-01-01

    Aims Insulin aspart has been shown to improve post-prandial and overall glycaemic control in people with Type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that insulin aspart with intensified basal NPH insulin supplementation would result in better overall glycaemic control than human regular insulin with standard

  17. Review of basal-plus insulin regimen options for simpler insulin intensification in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raccah, D; Huet, D; Dib, A; Joseph, F; Landers, B; Escalada, J; Schmitt, H

    2017-09-01

    To identify simple insulin regimens for people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus that can be accepted and implemented earlier in primary and specialist care, taking into consideration each individual's needs and capabilities. Using randomized clinical trials identified by a search of the PubMed database, as well as systematic reviews, meta-analyses and proof-of-concept studies, this review addresses topics of interest related to the progressive intensification of a basal insulin regimen to a basal-plus regimen (one basal insulin injection plus stepwise addition of one to three preprandial short-acting insulin injections/day) vs a basal-bolus regimen (basal insulin plus three short-acting insulin injections per day) in people with Type 2 diabetes. The review explores approaches that can be used to define the meal for first prandial injection with basal-plus regimens, differences among insulin titration algorithms, and the importance of self-motivation and autonomy in achieving optimum glycaemic control. A basal-plus regimen can provide glycaemic control equivalent to that obtained with a full basal-bolus regimen, with fewer injections of prandial insulin. The first critical step is to optimize basal insulin dosing to reach a fasting glucose concentration of ~6.7 mmol/l; this allows ~40% of patients with baseline HbA 1c >75 mmol/mol (9%) to be controlled with only one basal insulin injection per day. Compared with a basal-bolus regimen, a basal-plus insulin regimen is as effective but more practical, and has the best chance of acceptance and success in the real world. © 2017 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  18. Addition of insulin aspart with basal insulin is associated with improved glycemic control in Indian patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus: the A1chieve observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Samar; Maji, Debasish; Baruah, Manash

    2013-01-01

    Insulin aspart (IAsp) has been used in patients for more than a decade. A plethora of data is available, from clinical trials, to document its efficacy and safety and suggest that IAsp is a favorable choice to be used in a basal-bolus regimen. The A1chieve@ was a non-interventional study that explored the safety and effectiveness of initiating or switching to insulin analogues in routine clinical practice in more than 60,000 patients from 28 different countries. In this manuscript, we discuss the findings from the subgroup of the Indian cohort who were treated with insulin aspart (IAsp), in addition to a basal insulin analogue (insulin detemir, IDet). In a cohort of 343, who were on IAsp + IDet, 175 (51%) were insulin naive and 168 (49%) had been on insulin therapy earlier. Glycaemic parameters were high at baseline. Mean HbA1c was 9.3% in them and was comparable in both insulin naive and insulin experienced groups. After 24 weeks of therapy with IAsp + basal insulin, there were reductions in HbA1c in both the insulin naive group, (-1.6) and insulin experienced group (-1.5). Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) levels were also reduced significantly from baseline (-77 and - 110 mg/dL, respectively, p IAsp with a basal insulin in patients with poor glycaemic control leads to an improvement in glycaemic profile with no major hypoglycaemia or clinically significant weight gain along with an improvement in the quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  19. Combining Basal Insulin Analogs with Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Mimetics

    OpenAIRE

    Perfetti, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Basal insulin analogs are recognized as an effective method of achieving and maintaining glycemic control for patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the progressive nature of the disease means that some individuals may require additional ways to maintain their glycemic goals. Intensification in these circumstances has traditionally been achieved by the addition of short-acting insulin to cover postprandial glucose excursions that are not targeted by basal insulin. However, intensive insulin ...

  20. Severe hypoglycemia rates and associated costs among type 2 diabetics starting basal insulin therapy in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Michael L; Wintfeld, Neil S; Li, Qian; Lee, Yuan-Chi; Gatt, Elyse; Huang, Joanna C

    2014-10-01

    To derive current real-world data on the rates and costs of severe hypoglycemia (SH) for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) who have initiated basal insulin therapy and to examine differences in SH rates and costs stratified by history of prior SH events. We used a nation-wide electronic health records database that included encounter and laboratory data, as well as clinical notes, to estimate the rates and costs of SH events among adults with T2D who initiated basal insulin between 2008 and 2011. Unadjusted and regression-adjusted rates and quarterly costs were calculated for all patients as well as stratified by history of a SH event before starting basal insulin and history of a SH event during the basal insulin titration period. We identified 7235 incident cases of basal insulin use among patients with T2D who did not use insulin during the previous 12 months. Regression-adjusted incidence and total event rates were 10.36 and 11.21 per 100 patient-years, respectively. A history of SH events during the pre-index baseline and post-index titration periods were statistically significantly associated with both the incidence and total event rates (p history of previous SH or SH events during the titration period were not statistically significantly associated with costs. These results suggest that the real-world burden of SH is high among people with T2D who start using basal insulin and that history of previous SH events, both before starting insulin and during the insulin titration period, influences future SH. These results can also provide insights into interventions that can prevent or delay SH. These results should, however, be interpreted in light of the key limitations of our study: not all SH events may have been captured or coded in the database, data on filled prescriptions were not available, and the post-titration follow-up period could have been divided into time units other than quarters (3 month blocks) resulting in potentially different

  1. Insulin degludec as an ultralong-acting basal insulin once a day: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Surh, Justine; Kaur, Manmeet

    2012-01-01

    Background Insulin degludec (IDeg) is a neutral, ultralong-acting new generation basal insulin analog developed by NovoNordisk currently in Phase III clinical development. IDeg offers a duration of action of more than 42 hours in adults, much longer than current basal insulin formulations. Objective The aim of this review is to assess the efficacy and safety data of IDeg in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods Relevant English language articles from 2010 to 2012 were identified through MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, BIOSIS, and Google Scholar. Online conference proceedings of the 71st ADA Scientific Sessions and the 47th EASD Annual Meeting were reviewed. Studies were compared in terms of their study designs, primary and secondary efficacy parameters, and tolerability data. Results There are a total of nine published trials investigating the clinical efficacy and safety of IDeg in over 3000 subjects with type 1 and 2 diabetes. Only three trials were published in full. All were open-label, randomized multicenter trials with durations of 16 to 52 weeks. IDeg and coformulations of IDeg with insulin aspart (IAsp) were compared to insulin glargine (IGlar), detemir, and biphasic IAsp 30 (BIAsp 30). Conclusion Based upon the available evidence, there appear to be no reported differences between IDeg and IGlar, detemir, or BIAsp 30 in the reduction of the primary efficacy end-points of HbA1c and mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG) concentrations. Only flexible dosing of IDeg provided a significant reduction in FPG compared to IGlar. IDeg demonstrated a significant reduction in nocturnal hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, IDeg reduced the incidence of hypoglycemia by 18% and 58% compared to IGlar and BIAsp 30, respectively. PMID:22826637

  2. Insulin degludec as an ultralong-acting basal insulin once a day: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Fei Wang,1 Justine Surh,1 Manmeet Kaur21University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Storrs, 2Joslin Diabetes Center Affiliate, Hospital of Central Connecticut, New Britain, CT, USABackground: Insulin degludec (IDeg is a neutral, ultralong-acting new generation basal insulin analog developed by NovoNordisk currently in Phase III clinical development. IDeg offers a duration of action of more than 42 hours in adults, much longer than current basal insulin formulations.Objective: The aim of this review is to assess the efficacy and safety data of IDeg in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.Methods: Relevant English language articles from 2010 to 2012 were identified through MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, BIOSIS, and Google Scholar. Online conference proceedings of the 71st ADA Scientific Sessions and the 47th EASD Annual Meeting were reviewed. Studies were compared in terms of their study designs, primary and secondary efficacy parameters, and tolerability data.Results: There are a total of nine published trials investigating the clinical efficacy and safety of IDeg in over 3000 subjects with type 1 and 2 diabetes. Only three trials were published in full. All were open-label, randomized multicenter trials with durations of 16 to 52 weeks. IDeg and coformulations of IDeg with insulin aspart (IAsp were compared to insulin glargine (IGlar, detemir, and biphasic IAsp 30 (BIAsp 30.Conclusion: Based upon the available evidence, there appear to be no reported differences between IDeg and IGlar, detemir, or BIAsp 30 in the reduction of the primary efficacy end-points of HbA1c and mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG concentrations. Only flexible dosing of IDeg provided a significant reduction in FPG compared to IGlar. IDeg demonstrated a significant reduction in nocturnal hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, IDeg reduced the incidence of hypoglycemia by 18% and 58% compared to IGlar and

  3. Safety and efficacy of a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist added to basal insulin therapy versus basal insulin with or without a rapid-acting insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes: results of a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysham, Carol H; Lin, Jay; Kuritzky, Louis

    2017-05-01

    To consolidate the evidence from randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) as add-on to basal insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. We searched the EMBASE® and NCBI PubMed (Medline) databases and relevant congress abstracts for randomized controlled trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of GLP-1 RAs as add-on to basal insulin compared with basal insulin with or without rapid-acting insulin (RAI) through 23 May 2016. The pooled data were analyzed using a random-effects meta-analysis model. A subanalysis was performed for trials investigating basal insulin plus GLP-1 RAs versus basal insulin plus RAI. Of the 2617 retrieved records, 19 randomized controlled trials enrolling 7,053 patients with T2D were included. Compared with basal insulin ± RAI, reduction in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) from baseline (difference in means: -0.48% [95% confidence interval (CI), -0.67 to -0.30]; p GLP-1 RA. The subanalysis similarly showed significant results for change in HbA1c from baseline and for weight loss, as well as a significantly lower risk of symptomatic hypoglycemia in patients treated with basal insulin plus GLP-1 RA versus basal insulin plus RAI (odds ratio, 0.52 [95% CI, 0.42 to 0.64]; p GLP-1 RA to basal insulin provided improved glycemic control, led to weight reduction and similar hypoglycemia rates versus an intensified insulin strategy; however, symptomatic hypoglycemia rates were significantly lower when compared with a basal insulin plus RAI.

  4. Insulin glargine 300 U/mL for basal insulin therapy in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau IT

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ip Tim Lau,1 Ka Fai Lee,2 Wing Yee So,3 Kathryn Tan,4 Vincent Tok Fai Yeung5 1Department of Medicine, Tseung Kwan O Hospital, 2Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Kwong Wah Hospital, 3Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, 4Department of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong, 5Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Our Lady of Maryknoll Hospital, Hong Kong, China Objective: To review published clinical studies on the efficacy and safety of new insulin glargine 300 units/mL (Gla-300, a new long-acting insulin analog, for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, T2DMMaterials and methods: Data sources comprised primary research articles on Gla-300, including pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and clinical studies.Results: In pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies, Gla-300 showed a flatter time–action profile and longer duration of action than Gla-100. Noninferiority of Gla-300 versus Gla-100 for lowering of glycated hemoglobin was demonstrated in Phase III clinical studies covering a range of T1DM and T2DM patient populations. Over 6–12 months of follow-up, Gla-300 consistently showed comparable glycemic efficacy with less hypoglycemia vs Gla-100, even during the first 8 weeks of treatment. Although titrated insulin doses were 11%–17% higher with Gla-300 vs Gla-100, changes in body weight were similar or favored Gla-300.Conclusion: Clinical studies provide evidence that the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of Gla-300 may translate into clinical benefits in both T1DM and T2DM. Gla-300 may provide a new option for people initiating basal insulin, those requiring higher basal insulin doses, those with T1DM, and those who may be at increased risk for hypoglycemia, such as people with chronic kidney disease, the elderly, and those with cardiovascular comorbidities. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, long-acting insulin, insulin glargine

  5. Basal hepatic glucose production is regulated by the portal vein insulin concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, D K; Chu, C A; Venson, P; Donahue, E P; Neal, D W; Cherrington, A D

    1998-04-01

    The ability of portal vein insulin to control hepatic glucose production (HGP) is debated. The aim of the present study was to determine, therefore, if the liver can respond to a selective decrease in portal vein insulin. Isotopic ([3H]glucose) and arteriovenous difference methods were used to measure HGP in conscious overnight fasted dogs. A pancreatic clamp (somatostatin plus basal portal insulin and glucagon) was used to control the endocrine pancreas. A 40-min control period was followed by a 180-min test period. During the latter, the portal vein insulin level was selectively decreased while the arterial insulin level was not changed. This was accomplished by stopping the portal insulin infusion and giving insulin peripherally at half the basal portal rate (PID, n=5). In a control group (n=5), the portal insulin infusion was not changed and glucose was infused to match the hyperglycemia that occurred in the PID group. A selective decrease of 120 pmol/l in portal vein insulin was achieved (basal, 150+/-36 to last 30 min, 30+/-12 pmol/l) in the absence of a change in the arterial insulin level (basal, 30+/-3 to last 30 min, 36+/-4 pmol/l). Neither arterial nor portal insulin levels changed in the control group (30+/-6 and 126+/-30 pmol/l, respectively). In response to the selective decrease in portal vein insulin, net hepatic glucose output (NHGO) increased significantly, from 8+/-1 (basal) to 30+/-6 and 14+/-2 micromol x kg(-1) x min(-1) by 15 min and the last 30 min (P glycogenolysis. These studies indicate that after an overnight fast, basal HGP (glycogenolysis) is highly sensitive to the hepatic sinusoidal insulin level.

  6. A randomized clinical trial comparing the effect of basal insulin and inhaled mealtime insulin on glucose variability and oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegelaar, S. E.; Kulik, W.; van Lenthe, H.; Mukherjee, R.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; DeVries, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the effect of three times daily mealtime inhaled insulin therapy compared with once daily basal insulin glargine therapy on 72-h glucose profiles, glucose variability and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetes patients. In an inpatient crossover study, 40 subjects with type 2 diabetes were

  7. Combining basal insulin analogs with glucagon-like peptide-1 mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, Riccardo

    2011-09-01

    Basal insulin analogs are recognized as an effective method of achieving and maintaining glycemic control for patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the progressive nature of the disease means that some individuals may require additional ways to maintain their glycemic goals. Intensification in these circumstances has traditionally been achieved by the addition of short-acting insulin to cover postprandial glucose excursions that are not targeted by basal insulin. However, intensive insulin regimens are associated with a higher risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain, which can contribute to a greater burden on patients. The combination of basal insulin with a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetic is a potentially attractive solution to this problem for some patients with type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 mimetics target postprandial glucose and should complement the activity of basal insulins; they are also associated with a relatively low risk of associated hypoglycemia and moderate, but significant, weight loss. Although the combination has not been approved by regulatory authorities, preliminary evidence from mostly small-scale studies suggests that basal insulins in combination with GLP-1 mimetics do provide improvements in A1c and postprandial glucose with concomitant weight loss and no marked increase in the risk of hypoglycemia. These results are promising, but further studies are required, including comparisons with basal-bolus therapy, before the complex value of this association can be fully appreciated.

  8. All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality among Users of Basal Insulins NPH, Detemir, and Glargine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arto Y Strandberg

    Full Text Available Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes may increase mortality and cancer incidence, but the impact of different types of basal insulins on these endpoints is unclear. Compared to the traditional NPH insulin, the newer, longer-acting insulin analogues detemir and glargine have shown benefits in randomized controlled trials. Whether these advantages translate into lower mortality among users in real life is unknown.To estimate the differences in all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates between new users of basal insulins in a population-based study in Finland.23 751 individuals aged ≥40 with type 2 diabetes, who initiated basal insulin therapy in 2006-2009 were identified from national registers, with comprehensive data for mortality, causes of death, and background variables. Propensity score matching was performed on characteristics. Follow-up time was up to 4 years (median 1.7 years.2078 deaths incurred. With NPH as reference, the adjusted HRs for all-cause mortality were 0.39 (95% CI, 0.30-0.50 for detemir, and 0.55 (95% CI, 0.44-0.69 for glargine. As compared to glargine, the HR was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.54-0.93 among detemir users. Compared to NPH, the mortality risk for both cardiovascular causes as well as cancer were also significantly lower for glargine, and especially for detemir in adjusted analysis. Furthermore, the results were robust in various sensitivity analyses.In real clinical practice, mortality was substantially higher among users of NPH insulin as compared to insulins detemir or glargine. Considering the large number of patients who require insulin therapy, this difference in risk may have major clinical and public health implications. Due to limitations of the observational study design, further investigation using an interventional study design is warranted.

  9. All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality among Users of Basal Insulins NPH, Detemir, and Glargine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Arto Y; Hoti, Fabian J; Strandberg, Timo E; Christopher, Solomon; Haukka, Jari; Korhonen, Pasi

    2016-01-01

    Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes may increase mortality and cancer incidence, but the impact of different types of basal insulins on these endpoints is unclear. Compared to the traditional NPH insulin, the newer, longer-acting insulin analogues detemir and glargine have shown benefits in randomized controlled trials. Whether these advantages translate into lower mortality among users in real life is unknown. To estimate the differences in all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates between new users of basal insulins in a population-based study in Finland. 23 751 individuals aged ≥40 with type 2 diabetes, who initiated basal insulin therapy in 2006-2009 were identified from national registers, with comprehensive data for mortality, causes of death, and background variables. Propensity score matching was performed on characteristics. Follow-up time was up to 4 years (median 1.7 years). 2078 deaths incurred. With NPH as reference, the adjusted HRs for all-cause mortality were 0.39 (95% CI, 0.30-0.50) for detemir, and 0.55 (95% CI, 0.44-0.69) for glargine. As compared to glargine, the HR was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.54-0.93) among detemir users. Compared to NPH, the mortality risk for both cardiovascular causes as well as cancer were also significantly lower for glargine, and especially for detemir in adjusted analysis. Furthermore, the results were robust in various sensitivity analyses. In real clinical practice, mortality was substantially higher among users of NPH insulin as compared to insulins detemir or glargine. Considering the large number of patients who require insulin therapy, this difference in risk may have major clinical and public health implications. Due to limitations of the observational study design, further investigation using an interventional study design is warranted.

  10. Combination therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus: adding empagliflozin to basal insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ahmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM management is complex, with few patients successfully achieving recommended glycemic targets with monotherapy, most progressing to combination therapy, and many eventually requiring insulin. Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors are an emerging class of antidiabetes agents with an insulin-independent mechanism of action, making them suitable for use in combination with any other class of antidiabetes agents, including insulin. This review evaluates a 78-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating the impact of empagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, as add-on to basal insulin in patients with inadequate glycemic control on basal insulin, with or without metformin and/or a sulfonylurea. Empagliflozin added on to basal insulin resulted in significant and sustained reductions in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels compared with placebo. Empagliflozin has previously been shown to induce weight loss, and was associated with sustained weight loss in this study. This combination therapy was well tolerated, with similar levels of hypoglycemic adverse events in the empagliflozin and placebo groups over the 78-week treatment period. Urinary tract infections and genital infections, side effects associated with SGLT2 inhibitors, were reported more commonly in the empagliflozin group; however, such events led to treatment discontinuation in very few patients. These findings suggest that, with their complementary mechanisms of action, empagliflozin added on to basal insulin may be a useful treatment option in patients on basal insulin who need additional glycemic control without weight gain.

  11. Insulin initiation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaag, Allan; Lund, Søren

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses the apparent disconnect between international guideline recommendations, real-life clinical practice and the results of clinical trials, with regard to the initiation of insulin using basal (long-acting) or premixed insulin analogues in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D...... are inadequate. The evidence presented suggests that a major component of the HbA1c not being attained in every day clinical practice may be a result of factors that are not adequately addressed in forced titration trials of highly motivated patients, including failure to comply with complex treatment...... and monitoring regimens. Enforced intensification of unrealistic complex treatment regimens and glycaemic targets may theoretically worsen the psychological well-being in some patients. More simple and sustainable treatment regimens and guidelines are urgently needed. As for the use of insulin in T2D...

  12. Switching basal insulins in type 2 diabetes: practical recommendations for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sarah L; Trujillo, Jennifer M; Anderson, John E; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2017-12-27

    Basal insulin remains the mainstay of treatment of type 2 diabetes when diet changes and exercise in combination with oral drugs and other injectable agents are not sufficient to control hyperglycemia. Insulin therapy should be individualized, and several factors influence the choice of basal insulin; these include pharmacological properties, patient preferences, and lifestyle, as well as health insurance plan formularies. The recent availability of basal insulin formulations with longer durations of action has provided further dosing flexibility; however, patients may need to switch agents throughout therapy for a variety of personal, clinical, or economic reasons. Although a unit-to-unit switching approach is usually recommended, this conversion strategy may not be appropriate for all patients and types of insulin. Glycemic control and risk of hypoglycemia must be closely monitored by health care providers during the switching process. In addition, individual changes in care and formulary coverage need to be adequately addressed in order to enable a smooth transition with optimal outcomes.

  13. A review of the new GLP-1 receptor agonist/basal insulin fixed-ratio combination products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuffer, Wesley; Guesnier, Ashley; Trujillo, Jennifer M

    2018-03-01

    There have been several new treatment approaches established for the management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes (T2D), with treatment guidelines listing both glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) and basal insulin therapies as considerations for patients who have failed to control their blood glucose with oral antidiabetic agents. New studies have highlighted the importance of initiating combination therapy earlier in the T2D disease process to avoid clinical inertia and prevent the long-term complications arising from uncontrolled diabetes. Until recently, both GLP-1 RAs and basal insulin therapies were only available as single agents, but there are now two combination pen devices that deliver both a GLP-1 RA and basal insulin simultaneously. This article reviews the current clinical evidence evaluating the use of these combination GLP-1 RA/basal insulin preparations to treat T2D, presents both potential benefits as well as possible downsides with the use of these agents, and discusses the current place in therapy these products represent in the management of T2D.

  14. Two-way crossover comparison of insulin glargine and insulin detemir in basal-bolus therapy using continuous glucose monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abe S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Shinya Abe1,2, Gaku Inoue1,2, Satoru Yamada1,3, Junichiro Irie1,3, Hiroyuki Nojima2, Kaoru Tsuyusaki2, Kensuke Usui2, Koichiro Atsuda2, Toshikazu Yamanouchi41Diabetes Center, Kitasato Institute Hospital, 2Center for Clinical Pharmacy and Clinical Sciences, Kitasato University, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, 4Department of Internal Medicine, University of Teikyo School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanObjective: This study aimed to compare the glucose-lowering effect and glycemic variability of insulin glargine with those of insulin detemir.Material and methods: This was an open-label, single-center, randomized, two-way crossover study in patients with diabetes on basal-bolus insulin therapy, with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH insulin as basal insulin. Patients switched from NPH insulin to a course either of insulin glargine followed by insulin detemir, or insulin detemir followed by insulin glargine, continuing the same dose of the prior bolus of insulin. To evaluate the glucose-lowering effect, daily glycemic profiles were recorded for 72 hours by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM in an outpatient setting. The mean amplitude of glycemic excursions, standard deviation (SD, and the mean of daily difference (MODD were used to assess intraday and day-to-day glycemic variability.Results: Eleven patients were enrolled and nine completed the study. Mean blood glucose calculated from CGM values was significantly lower with insulin glargine compared with insulin detemir (9.6 ± 2.4 mmol/L versus 10.4 ± 2.8 mmol/L, P = 0.038. The SD was significantly lower with insulin glargine versus insulin detemir (2.5 ± 0.9 mmol/L vs 3.5 ± 1.6 mmol/L, P = 0.011. The MODD value was significantly lower with insulin glargine than with insulin detemir (2.2 ± 1.1 mmol/L vs 3.6 ± 1.7 mmol/L, P = 0.011. There was no significant difference between the two insulin analogs in terms of hypoglycemia.Conclusion: This study suggests that

  15. Additional lunchtime basal insulin during insulin lispro intensive therapy in a randomized, multicenter, crossover study in adults - A real-life design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stades, Aline M. E.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; van den Tweel, Ingeborg; Erkelens, D. Willem; Holleman, Frits

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - This study vas performed to evaluate whether an additional dose of NPH insulin at lunchtime might overcome the deleterious effects of waning basal insulinemia on pre-dinner and evening glucose values during insulin lispro intensive therapy with once daily basal insulin at night, RESEARCH

  16. Insulin pump basal adjustment for exercise in type 1 diabetes: a randomised crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Sybil A; Horsburgh, Jodie C; Ward, Glenn M; La Gerche, André; Gooley, Judith L; Jenkins, Alicia J; MacIsaac, Richard J; O'Neal, David N

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise, vs rest, on circulating insulin and glucose, following pre-exercise insulin pump basal rate reduction. This was an open-label, two-stage randomised crossover study of 14 adults (seven women, seven men) with type 1 diabetes established on insulin pump therapy. In each stage, participants fasted and insulin delivery was halved following a single insulin basal rate overnight. Exercise (30 min moderate-intensity stationary bicycle exercise, starting 60 min post-basal reduction) and rest stages were undertaken in random order at a university hospital. Randomisation was computer-generated, and allocation concealed via sequentially numbered sealed opaque envelopes. Venous blood was collected at 15 min intervals from 60 min pre- until 210 min post-basal rate reduction. Changes in plasma free insulin (the primary outcome), and changes in plasma glucose, with exercise were compared with changes when resting. Outcomes were assessed blinded to group assignment. Following basal rate reduction when rested, mean (± SE) free insulin decreased by 4.9 ± 2.9%, 16.2 ± 2.6% and 18.6 ± 3.2% at 1, 2 and 3 h, respectively (p insulin increased by 6 ± 2 pmol/l after 15 min and 5 ± 2 pmol/l after 30 min (p insulin rate 1 h prior to exercise did not significantly reduce circulating free insulin by exercise commencement. Exercise itself transiently increased insulin levels. In participants with low-normal glucose pre-exercise, hypoglycaemia was not prevented by insulin basal rate reduction alone. Greater insulin basal rate reduction and supplemental carbohydrate may be required to prevent exercise-induced hypoglycaemia. ANZCTR.org.au ACTRN12613000581763 FUNDING: Australian Diabetes Society, Hugh DT Williamson Foundation, Lynne Quayle Charitable Trust Fund.

  17. Insulin initiation and intensification in patients with T2DM for the primary care physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jeff UngerCatalina Research Institute, Chino, CA, USAAbstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is characterized by both insulin resistance and inadequate insulin secretion. All patients with the disease require treatment to achieve and maintain the target glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C level of 6.5%–7%. Pharmacological management of T2DM typically begins with the introduction of oral medications, and the majority of patients require exogenous insulin therapy at some point in time. Primary care physicians play an essential role in the management of T2DM since they often initiate insulin therapy and intensify regimens over time as needed. Although insulin therapy is prescribed on an individualized basis, treatment usually begins with basal insulin added to a background therapy of oral agents. Prandial insulin injections may be added if glycemic targets are not achieved. Treatments may be intensified over time using patient-friendly titration algorithms. The goal of insulin intensification within the primary care setting is to minimize patients' exposure to chronic hyperglycemia and weight gain, and reduce patients' risk of hypoglycemia, while achieving individualized fasting, postprandial, and A1C targets. Simplified treatment protocols and insulin delivery devices allow physicians to become efficient prescribers of insulin intensification within the primary care arena.Keywords: diabetes, basal, bolus, regimens, insulin analogs, structured glucose testing

  18. Initiating insulin therapy in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Kumar Wangnoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary clinical goals to be achieved with insulin initiation are elimination of ketosis and hyperglycemia with prevention of chronic complications. Insulin therapy is the mainstay in management of type 1 diabetes, which should be aimed at achieving good glycemic control, with achievement of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c <7.5%, pre-meal self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG of 90-130 mg/dL, bed time SMBG of 100-140 mg/dL, mean blood glucose level of 120-160 mg/dL and no ketonuria. Two classes of insulin are available for use in T1DM viz. bolus/prandial insulins (rapid-acting insulins and short-acting insulins and basal insulins (intermediate-acting insulin and long-acting insulin. Insulin glargine and glulisine can be used in children above 6 years, lispro in children above 3 years and detemir and aspart in children above 2 years. The caution for hypoglycemia should be exercised while prescribing them. Degludec is currently not approved for pediatric use. The initial insulin regimen should comprise of ≥2 daily bolus and ≥1 basal insulin injections. Insulin intensification would be required if the initial regimen fails, which can be achieved by increasing frequency of long and rapid acting insulin analogues. The American Diabetes Association guidelines recommend HbA1c targets of <8.0% for children <6 years of age, ≤7.5% for children 6 to 12 years of age, and ≤7.0% for adolescents, 12-18 years of age. However, the evidence is now in favor of a single target HbA1c of ≤7.5% for all children and adolescents <19 years of age.

  19. Exercise Increases Insulin Content and Basal Secretion in Pancreatic Islets in Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Hung Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise appears to improve glycemic control for people with type 1 diabetes (T1D. However, the mechanism responsible for this improvement is unknown. We hypothesized that exercise has a direct effect on the insulin-producing islets. Eight-week-old mice were divided into four groups: sedentary diabetic, exercised diabetic, sedentary control, and exercised control. The exercised groups participated in voluntary wheel running for 6 weeks. When compared to the control groups, the islet density, islet diameter, and β-cell proportion per islet were significantly lower in both sedentary and exercised diabetic groups and these alterations were not improved with exercise. The total insulin content and insulin secretion were significantly lower in sedentary diabetics compared to controls. Exercise significantly improved insulin content and insulin secretion in islets in basal conditions. Thus, some improvements in exercise-induced glycemic control in T1D mice may be due to enhancement of insulin content and secretion in islets.

  20. Impact of empagliflozin added on to basal insulin in type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on basal insulin: a 78-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstock, J; Jelaska, A; Zeller, C; Kim, G; Broedl, U C; Woerle, H J

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the efficacy and tolerability of empagliflozin added to basal insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. Patients inadequately controlled [glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) >7 to ≤10% (>53 to ≤86 mmol/mol)] on basal insulin (glargine, detemir, NPH) were randomized to empagliflozin 10 mg (n = 169), empagliflozin 25 mg (n = 155) or placebo (n = 170) for 78 weeks. The baseline characteristics were balanced among the groups [mean HbA1c 8.2% (67 mmol/mol), BMI 32.2 kg/m(2) ]. The basal insulin dose was to remain constant for 18 weeks, then could be adjusted at investigator's discretion. The primary endpoint was change from baseline in HbA1c at week 18. Key secondary endpoints were changes from baseline in HbA1c and insulin dose at week 78. At week 18, the adjusted mean ± standard error changes from baseline in HbA1c were 0.0 ± 0.1% (-0.1 ± 0.8 mmol/mol) for placebo, compared with -0.6 ± 0.1% (-6.2 ± 0.8 mmol/mol) and -0.7 ± 0.1% (-7.8 ± 0.8 mmol/mol) for empagliflozin 10 and 25 mg, respectively (both p empagliflozin 10 and 25 mg significantly reduced HbA1c, insulin dose and weight vs placebo (all p empagliflozin 10 mg significantly reduced systolic blood pressure vs placebo (p = 0.004). Similar percentages of patients had confirmed hypoglycaemia in all groups (35-36%). Events consistent with urinary tract infection were reported in 9, 15 and 12% of patients on placebo, empagliflozin 10 and 25 mg, and events consistent with genital infection were reported in 2, 8 and 5%, respectively. Empagliflozin for 78 weeks added to basal insulin improved glycaemic control and reduced weight with a similar risk of hypoglycaemia to placebo. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Anticipatory guidance in type 2 diabetes to improve disease management; next steps after basal insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric L; Frias, Juan P; Trujillo, Jennifer M

    2018-03-23

    The alarming rise in the number of people living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) presents primary care physicians with increasing challenges associated with long-term chronic disease care. Studies have shown that the majority of patients are not achieving or maintaining glycemic goals, putting them at risk of a wide range of diabetes-related complications. Disease- and self-management programs have been shown to help patients improve their glycemic control, and are likely to be of particular benefit for patients with diabetes dealing with these issues. Anticipatory guidance is an individualized, proactive approach to patient education and counseling by a health-care professional to support patients in better coping with problems before they arise. It has been shown to improve disease outcomes in a variety of chronic conditions, including diabetes. While important at all stages, anticipatory guidance may be of particular importance during changes in treatment regimens, and especially during transition to, and escalation of, insulin-based regimens. The aim of this article is to provide advice to physicians on anticipatory guidance for basal-insulin dosing, focusing on appropriate basal-insulin-dose increase and prevention of potentially deleterious basal-insulin doses, so called overbasalization. It also provides an overview of new treatment options for patients with T2D who are not well controlled on basal-insulin therapy, fixed-ratio combinations of basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, and advice on the type of anticipatory guidance needed to ensure safe and appropriate switching to these therapies.

  2. OPTIMAL REGIMENS OF THE BASAL-BOLUS INSULIN THERAPY IN ADOLESCENTS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Galkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to determine peculiarities in regimens of the pump insulin therapy and to reveal the optimal basal-to-bolus insulin ratio that are necessary for achieving optimal glycemic control in adoles-cents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM.  82 adolescents at the age of 14–18 with T1DM, using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII from 5 months to 7.5 years were monitored with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM system «Guar-dian Real Time» or CGM system, built in MiniMed Paradigm Revel System 722 (Medtronic Minimed, USA. Assessing the quality of glycaemic control was based on the level of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c. The results of CGM were reviewed and average for 3 days performances: total daily dose of insulin, dose of basal and bolus insulin, basal-to-bolus insulin ratio, carbohydrate content of the meal, expressed in BE, carbohydrate ratio, insulin sensitivity factor were determined. The patients were subdivided into 2 groups: group 1 – adolescents with the optimal/suboptimal glycemic control (n = 55, 2 – adolescents with long-standing poorly controlled T1DM (n = 27. Average total daily dose of basal insulin (U in a day, U per kg in a day in adolescents group 1 was significantly higher, com-pared with patients in group 2 (р = 0.043; р = 0.038 respectively. Patients in group 2 received more car-bohydrates with a meal intake and had higher doses of average total daily bolus insulin. The average ba-sal-to-bolus ratio from group 1 patients was 51/49%, compared with group 2 patients – 45/55% (р = 0.026.  An important condition for achieving optimal glycemic control is a high level of compliance and skills of adolescents. Optimal well-balanced basal-to-bolus insulin ratio in adolescents with T1DM on CSII, which can provide improvements in blood glucose management and reducing the risk of complications of the disease, is 51/49%. 

  3. Refining basal insulin therapy: what have we learned in the age of analogues?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeVries, J. H.; Nattrass, M.; Pieber, T. R.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The basal insulin analogues glargine and detemir have been subject to a series of trials comparing their clinical profiles to the conventional preparation, neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH). Careful review of these trials provides opportunities to learn clinically useful lessons about

  4. The Effect of Basal Analog Insulin on the Glycemic Variability in Type 2 Diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Cander

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of insulin detemir and glargine on glycemic variability as determined by capillary blood glucose measurements in Type 2 diabetics treated with oral antidiabetic drugs. Material and Method: A total of 64 insulin-naive type 2 diabetics with a HbA1c level of 7.5%-10% were included in the study. The patients were randomized into 3 groups according to the basal insulin analog started; Group 1 (n=22 was started on once-daily detemir, Group 2 (n=22 twice-daily detemir, and Group 3 (n=20 insulin glargine. Basal insulin doses were titrated according to the morning/evening fasting capillary blood glucose levels. Standard deviations of the 8-point intraday fasting and postprandial blood glucose values were compared. Results: The fasting blood glucose intraday standard deviation values showed an improvement of 22.4% in Group 1, 21.4% in Group 2, and 26.4% in Group 3, while the intraday standard deviation for the postprandial values showed an improvement of 14.4%, 15.2%, and 38.7%, respectively (p>0.05. The standard deviation values did not show statistical significance when the groups were compared with each other. Baseline HbA1c values and insulin doses negatively correlated with the glycemic variability. Dicussion: Basal insulin added to treatment in Type 2 diabetics provided an improvement of 14.4% to 38.7% in glycemic variability. There was no significant difference between insulin glargine and detemir regarding this effect. Turk Jem 2014; 2: 33-38

  5. Intensifying insulin regimen after basal insulin optimization in adults with type 2 diabetes: a 24-week, randomized, open-label trial comparing insulin glargine plus insulin glulisine with biphasic insulin aspart (LanScape).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, J; Cohen, N; Evans, M; Hockey, A; Speight, J; Whately-Smith, C

    2015-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that a 'basal plus' regimen--adding once-daily main-meal fast-acting insulin to basal insulin once daily--would be non-inferior to biphasic insulin twice daily as assessed by glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) concentration (predefined as ≤0.4%), but would provide superior treatment satisfaction. This open-label trial enrolled adults to an 8- or 12-week run-in period, during which oral therapies except metformin were stopped and insulin glargine dose was titrated. Those with fasting glucose 7% (53 mmol/mol) were randomized to insulin glargine/glulisine once daily (n = 170) or insulin aspart/aspart protamine 30/70 twice daily (n = 165) for 24 weeks, with dose titration to glucose targets using standardized algorithms. For HbA1c, the basal plus regimen was non-inferior to biphasic insulin (least squares mean difference, 0.21%, upper 97.5% confidence limit 0.38%) meeting the predefined non-inferiority margin of 0.4%. Treatment satisfaction (Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire change version and Insulin Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire total scores) significantly favoured basal plus. No difference was observed between the basal plus and the biphasic insulin groups in responders (HbA1c <7%, 20.6 vs 27.9%; p = 0.12), weight gain (2.06 vs 2.50 kg; p = 0.2), diabetes-specific quality of life (Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life average weighted impact (AWI) score) and generic health status (five-dimension European Quality of Life questionnaire). Overall hypoglycaemia rates were similar between groups (15.3 vs 18.2 events/patient-year; p = 0.22); nocturnal hypoglycaemia was higher with the basal plus regimen (5.7 vs 3.6 events/patient-year; p = 0.02). In long-standing type 2 diabetes with suboptimal glycaemia despite oral therapies and basal insulin, the basal plus regimen was non-inferior to biphasic insulin for biomedical outcomes, with a similar overall hypoglycaemia rate but more nocturnal events.

  6. Exenatide versus Insulin Lispro Added to Basal Insulin in a Subgroup of Korean Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Ho Yoon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and obesity is increasing in Korea. Clinical studies in patients with T2DM have shown that combining the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist exenatide twice daily with basal insulin is an effective glucose-lowering strategy. However, these studies were predominantly conducted in non-Asian populations.MethodsWe conducted a subgroup analysis of data from a multinational, 30-week, randomized, open-label trial to compare the effects of exenatide twice daily (n=10 or three times daily mealtime insulin lispro (n=13 among Korean patients with T2DM inadequately controlled (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] >7.0% on metformin plus optimized insulin glargine.ResultsExenatide twice daily and insulin lispro both reduced HbA1c (mean −1.5% and −1.0%, respectively; P<0.01 vs. baseline. Fasting glucose and weight numerically decreased with exenatide twice daily (−0.7 mmol/L and −0.7 kg, respectively and numerically increased with insulin lispro (0.9 mmol/L and 1.0 kg, respectively. Minor hypoglycemia occurred in four patients receiving exenatide twice daily and three patients receiving insulin lispro. Gastrointestinal adverse events were the most common with exenatide twice daily treatment.ConclusionThis analysis found treatment with exenatide twice daily improved glycemic control without weight gain in Korean patients with T2DM unable to achieve glycemic control on metformin plus basal insulin.

  7. [Basal insulin glargine using a basal-bolus regimen in a common clinical practice: observational, non-interventional, multicenter, national project LINDA (Lantus in daily practice - safety and efficacy in basal bolus regimen)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zďarská, Denisa Janíčková; Brož, Jan; Křivská, Bohumila; Rušavý, Zdeněk; Kvapil, Milan

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of basal insulin glargine using a basal-bolus regimen in a common clinical practice setting in the Czech Republic. The LINDA project was a non-interventional, multicenter (n = 255), national, observational project. A total of 4,998 patients with Type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, T2DM) with predominantly insulin therapy (99,7 %), after switch on insulin glargine at basal-bolus regimen, were enrolled in this project. The patients were followed up for 6 months after initiation of the therapy with insulin glargine. The primary objective of the project was to investigate the incidence of severe hypoglycemic episodes during the treatment with basal insulin analogue glargine (Lantus®) in a common clinical practice setting. The se-condary endpoints were changes in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), body weight, insulin dose, change of number of hypoglycemic episodes in comparison the previous therapy and the frequency of adverse effects. Severe hypoglycaemia were observed during treatment with insulin glargine at 0.8 % patients. When comparing the incidence of hypoglycemia with the previous therapy, we demonstrated a clinically and statistically significant reduction in their frequencies. The percentage of patients with hypoglycemic episodes (17.6 %), severe hypoglycemia (0.8 %) and severe nocturnal hypoglycemia (0.3 %) over the last month of treatment with insulin glargine using the basal-bolus regimen was consistently lower compared to the last month of treatment before initiation of this therapy (42.5 %, 17.6 %, and 13.8 % of the patients, respectively). In patients with T1DM, the incidence of hypoglycemia decreased from 37.80 ± 15.95 episodes/patient/year to 8.76 ± 4.38 epi-sodes/patient/year (p < 0.001) for all hypoglycemic episodes; from 5.64 ± 3.27 episodes/patient/year to 0.0396 ± 0.012 episodes/patient/year (p < 0.001) for severe hypoglycemia; and from 3.84 ± 2.04 episodes

  8. Insights into optimal basal insulin titration in type 2 diabetes: Results of a quantitative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, Lori; Bonnemaire, Mireille; Mical, Marie; Edelman, Steve

    2018-02-01

    Basal insulin (BI) treatment initiation and dose titration in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are often delayed. Such "clinical inertia" results in poor glycaemic control and high risk of long-term complications. This survey aimed to determine healthcare professional (HCP) and patient attitudes to BI initiation and titration. An online survey (July-August 2015) including HCPs and patients with T2DM in the USA, France and Germany. Patients were ≥18 years old and had been on BI for 6 to 36 months, or discontinued BI within the previous 12 months. Participants comprised 386 HCPs and 318 people with T2DM. While >75% of HCPs reported discussing titration at the initiation visit, only 16% to 28% of patients remembered such discussions, many (32%-42%) were unaware of the need to titrate BI, and only 28% to 39% recalled mention of the time needed to reach glycaemic goals. Most HCPs and patients agreed that more effective support tools to assist BI initiation/titration are needed; patients indicated that provision of such tools would increase confidence in self-titration. HCPs identified fear of hypoglycaemia, failure to titrate in the absence of symptoms, and low patient motivation as important titration barriers. In contrast, patients identified weight gain, the perception that titration meant worsening disease, frustration over the time to reach HbA1c goals and fear of hypoglycaemia as major factors. A disconnect exists between HCP- and patient-perceived barriers to effective BI titration. To optimize titration, strategies should be targeted to improve HCP-patient communication, and provide support and educational tools. © 2017 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Insulin degludec/insulin aspart in Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Distinct prandial and basal glucose-lowering effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Hanne; Sasaki, Tomio; Bardtrum, Lars; Ikushima, Ippei

    2016-07-01

    Insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) is a soluble co-formulation of long-acting insulin degludec (IDeg) and rapid-acting insulin aspart (IAsp). The present study investigated the pharmacodynamic properties of IDegAsp in Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. In this randomized, double-blind, two-period, cross-over trial, 21 Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus received single doses of 0.5 U/kg IDegAsp and biphasic insulin aspart 30 in a randomized sequence (13-21 days washout between treatments). The pharmacodynamic response was evaluated in a 26-h euglycemic glucose clamp (target 5.5 mmol/L). Single-dose IDegAsp glucose infusion rate (GIR) profiles were extrapolated to steady state using modeling. The IDegAsp single-dose GIR profile showed a clear distinction between the effects of the bolus (IAsp) and basal (IDeg) components in IDegAsp. When simulated to steady state, the GIR profile of IDegAsp was shifted upwards compared with the single-dose profile, and showed a rapid onset of action and a distinct peak from the IAsp component followed by a separate and sustained basal action from the long-acting IDeg component. For biphasic insulin aspart 30, the initial shape of the GIR profile was similar to IDegAsp, but GIR continuously decreased from maximum and reached zero 18-20 h post-dosing. The characteristics of the GIR profile for IDegAsp were retained when simulated to steady state in a twice-daily dosing regimen. In Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, the pharmacodynamic profile of IDegAsp is characterized by distinct prandial and basal effects from the IAsp and IDeg components, consistent with what has been reported previously in Caucasian patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist or bolus insulin with optimized basal insulin in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Michaela; Nauck, Michael A; Shaginian, Rimma; Malone, James K; Cleall, Simon; Reaney, Matthew; de Vries, Danielle; Hoogwerf, Byron J; MacConell, Leigh; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R

    2014-10-01

    Mealtime insulin is commonly added to manage hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes when basal insulin is insufficient. However, this complex regimen is associated with weight gain and hypoglycemia. This study compared the efficacy and safety of exenatide twice daily or mealtime insulin lispro in patients inadequately controlled by insulin glargine and metformin despite up-titration. In this 30-week, open-label, multicenter, randomized, noninferiority trial with 12 weeks prior insulin optimization, 627 patients with insufficient postoptimization glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were randomized to exenatide (10-20 µg/day) or thrice-daily mealtime lispro titrated to premeal glucose of 5.6-6.0 mmol/L, both added to insulin glargine (mean 61 units/day at randomization) and metformin (mean 2,000 mg/day). Randomization HbA1c and fasting glucose (FG) were 8.3% (67 mmol/mol) and 7.1 mmol/L for exenatide and 8.2% (66 mmol/mol) and 7.1 mmol/L for lispro. At 30 weeks postrandomization, mean HbA1c changes were noninferior for exenatide compared with lispro (-1.13 and -1.10%, respectively); treatment differences were -0.04 (95% CI -0.18, 0.11) in per-protocol (n = 510) and -0.03 (95% CI -0.16, 0.11) in intent-to-treat (n = 627) populations. FG was lower with exenatide than lispro (6.5 vs. 7.2 mmol/L; P = 0.002). Weight decreased with exenatide and increased with lispro (-2.5 vs. +2.1 kg; P < 0.001). More patients reported treatment satisfaction and better quality of life with exenatide than lispro, although a larger proportion of patients with exenatide experienced treatment-emergent adverse events. Exenatide resulted in fewer nonnocturnal hypoglycemic episodes but more gastrointestinal adverse events than lispro. Adding exenatide to titrated glargine with metformin resulted in similar glycemic control as adding lispro and was well tolerated. These findings support exenatide as a noninsulin addition for patients failing basal insulin. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association

  11. The basal insulin dose; a lesson from prolonged fasting in young individuals with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strich, David; Teomim, Renana; Gillis, David

    2015-12-01

    The insulin requirement for type 1 diabetes during prolonged fasting is unclear. In order to define this for clinical purposes, we investigated the total insulin dose associated with successful completion of a 25 h religious fast. Questionnaires were filled in during telephone interviews performed before and after 88 fasts in 57 young individuals with type 1 diabetes (age 20.4 ± 5.3, range: 12.3-31.2 yr). Duration of their diabetes was 8.7 ± 6.1 yr (range: 0.5-21.8) and latest HbA1c was 8.5 ± 1.9% (5.7-13.7). Twenty-eight patients fasted using multiple daily injections (MDI) and 30 were on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), including one who fasted in both categories. Subjects were instructed either to act as they had done for previous successful fasts or, for first-time fasts, to inject half their daily basal insulin injection or halve their basal CSII rate throughout the fast. The total daily insulin dose associated with successful completion of the fast was determined. Among those who completed the fast, average total insulin was 0.19 ± 0.16 U/kg, patients who discontinued their fast took on average 0.34 ± 0.15 U/kg. Seven MDI patients and 12 CSII patients terminated their fast early, mostly for mild hypoglycemia. No severe hypoglycemia or other serious adverse event occurred during any of the fasts. Fasting for 25 h is safe and can be undertaken in individuals with type 1 diabetes. The recommended total daily dose is 0.2 U/kg/day. This recommendation may possibly be used for other situations in which abstention from oral intake is required. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Use of the DISST model to estimate the HOMA and Matsuda indexes using only a basal insulin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Shaun M; Docherty, Paul D; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2014-07-01

    It is hypothesized that early detection of reduced insulin sensitivity (SI) could prompt intervention that may reduce the considerable financial strain type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) places on global health care. Reduction of the cost of already inexpensive SI metrics such as the Matsuda and HOMA indexes would enable more widespread, economically feasible use of these metrics for screening. The goal of this research was to determine a means of reducing the number of insulin samples and therefore the cost required to provide an accurate Matsuda Index value. The Dynamic Insulin Sensitivity and Secretion Test (DISST) model was used with the glucose and basal insulin measurements from an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) to predict patient insulin responses. The insulin response to the OGTT was determined via population based regression analysis that incorporated the 60-minute glucose and basal insulin values. The proposed method derived accurate and precise Matsuda Indices as compared to the fully sampled Matsuda (R = .95) using only the basal assay insulin-level data and 4 glucose measurements. Using a model employing the basal insulin also allows for determination of the 1-day HOMA value. The DISST model was successfully modified to allow for the accurate prediction an individual's insulin response to the OGTT. In turn, this enabled highly accurate and precise estimation of a Matsuda Index using only the glucose and basal insulin assays. As insulin assays account for the majority of the cost of the Matsuda Index, this model offers a significant reduction in assay cost. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  13. Premixed vs basal-bolus insulin regimen in Type 2 diabetes: comparison of clinical outcomes from randomized controlled trials and real-world data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwagu, U; Mamza, J; Gordon, J; Donnelly, R; Idris, I

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the concordance between data derived from randomized controlled trial (RCT) and real-world estimates of HbA 1c and weight change after 24 weeks of initiation of a basal-bolus compared with a premixed insulin regimen in people with Type 2 diabetes. Data eight RCTs were pooled after a systematic review of studies examining basal-bolus (n = 1893) or premixed (n = 1517) regimens. Real-world data were extracted from the UK primary care dataset for people on basal-bolus (n = 7483) or premixed insulin regimens (n=10 744). The mean differences between HbA 1c and weight from baseline were calculated using t-tests, while analysis of variance was used to compare the two treatment regimens. Linear regression analyses were used to determine the predictors of this change. Both insulin regimens were associated with HbA 1c reductions (real-world data -0.28%; RCT data, -1.4%) and weight gain (real-world data, +0.27 kg; RCT data, +2.96 kg) but there were no significant differences between basal-bolus and premixed insulin. Discordances in the pattern of treatment response were observed, however, between real-world and RCT data for both insulin regimens. For any given baseline HbA 1c concentration, the change in HbA 1c in the RCTs was greater than in real-world conditions and for those with baseline weight above ~60 kg, RCT data showed overall weight gain in contrast to slight weight loss in the real-world population. Lastly, for both randomized controlled trial and real-world populations, while greater baseline weight was associated with reduced response to treatment, the association was much steeper in the RCT than in the real-world population. In addition, greater baseline weight was associated with greater weight reductions in both premixed insulin and basal-bolus insulin regimens, although to a lesser extent with the latter. These results highlight specific discrepancies in the HbA 1c reduction and weight change in insulin regimen between real world versus RCT

  14. Lower dose basal insulin infusion has positive effect on glycaemic control for children with type I diabetes on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulten, Ron J; Piet, Jessica; Bruijning-Verhagen, Patricia; de Waal, Wouter J

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to explore a possible relationship between proportion of basal insulin dose (%BD/T) and glycaemic control in children with type I diabetes on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy. Methods: All patients under the age of 18 with type I diabetes

  15. Use of basal insulin and the associated clinical outcomes among elderly nursing home residents with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a retrospective chart review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Keith L; Wei, Wenhui; Meyers, Juliana L; Kilpatrick, Brett S; Pandya, Naushira

    2014-01-01

    The management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in long-term care (LTC) settings can be complex as a result of age-related complications. Despite guideline recommendations, sliding scale insulin remains commonplace in the LTC setting and data on basal insulin use are lacking. This retrospective study used medical chart data and the Minimum Data Set from elderly LTC facility patients who received basal insulin (insulin glargine, insulin detemir, or neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin) for the treatment of diabetes, to investigate the practice patterns and associated clinical outcomes. A total of 2,096 elderly, insulin-treated patients in LTC were identified, with 59.5% of them (N=1,247) receiving basal insulin. Of these, more than 50% of patients received sliding scale insulin in co-administration with basal insulin. Despite its ease of use, insulin pen use was very low, at 14.6%. Significant differences were observed between the basal insulin groups for glycated hemoglobin level and dosing frequency. Hypoglycemia was uncommon -17.2% of patients experienced at least one event, and there was no significant difference in the prevalence of hypoglycemia between the groups. These data suggest the underutilization of basal insulin in the LTC setting and worryingly high combinational use with sliding scale insulin. Differences in glycated hemoglobin and dosing frequencies between types of basal insulin warrant further comparative effectiveness studies.

  16. How pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles pave the way for optimal basal insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnolds, S; Kuglin, B; Kapitza, C; Heise, T

    2010-09-01

    This pedagogical review illustrates the differences between pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) measures, using insulin therapy as the primary example. The main conclusion is that PD parameters are of greater clinical significance for insulin therapy than PK parameters. The glucose-clamp technique, the optimal method for determining insulin PD, is explained so that the reader can understand the important studies in the literature. Key glucose-clamp studies that compare two basal insulin analogues - insulin glargine and insulin detemir - to Neutral Protamine Hagedorn insulin and to each other are then presented. The review further explains how PD parameters have been translated into useful clinical concepts and simple titration algorithms for everyday clinical practice. Finally, the necessity of overcoming patient and/or physician barriers to insulin therapy and providing continuing education and training is emphasised.

  17. Leptin-induced basal Akt phosphorylation and its implication in exercise-mediated improvement of insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xianjie; Niu, Sen

    2018-01-29

    Physical exercise is an efficient therapeutical tool in the management of insulin resistance (IR) and related metabolic diseases. Leptin, the well-known obesity hormone and the absence of which leads to IR, showed controversial effects on IR as research continues. Thus, in this study, a detailed investigation of the effect of leptin on exercise-mediated improvement of insulin sensitivity and its underlying mechanism was carried out. Using a rat model of chronic or acute swimming exercise training, we found that serum leptin increased 1 h after either acute exercise or the last session of chronic exercise, when impaired insulin action was observed in previous reports. However, chronic exercise reducd basal serum leptin levels and promoted insulin sensitivity compared with sedentary controls or rats subjected to one bout of aerobic exercise. Our animal results indicated the potential linkage between leptin and insulin sensitivity, which is further investigated in the skeletal muscle L6 cells. Leptin treatment in L6 cells promoted the basal levels of insulin signaling as well as glucose uptake, while blocking JAK2 signaling with either pharmacological intervention (JAK2 inhibitor AG490) or genetic manipulation (siRNA knockdown) decreased the basal levels of insulin signaling. Furthermore, leptin treatment inhibited insulin-stimulated insulin signaling and glucose uptake, while blocking JAK2 signaling restored leptin-attenuated insulin sensitivity. Taken together, our results demonstrated that reduced serum leptin, at least in part, contributes to exercise-mediated improvement of insulin sensitivity, indicating JAK2 as a potent therapeutical target of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Cani, Patrice D.; Amar, Jacques; Iglesias, Miguel Angel; Poggi, Marjorie; Knauf, Claude; Bastelica, Delphine; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Fava, Francesca; Tuohy, Kieran; Chabo, Chantal; Waget, Aurélie; Delmée, Evelyne; Cousin, Béatrice; Sulpice, Thierry; Chamontin, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes and obesity are two metabolic diseases characterized by insulin resistance and a low-grade inflammation. Seeking an inflammatory factor causative of the onset of insulin resistance, obesity, and diabetes, we have identified bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a triggering factor. We found that normal endotoxemia increased or decreased during the fed or fasted state, respectively, on a nutritional basis and that a 4-week high-fat diet chronically increased plasma LPS concentration t...

  19. Variability of Basal Rate Profiles in Insulin Pump Therapy and Association with Complications in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Laimer

    Full Text Available Traditionally, basal rate profiles in continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy are individually adapted to cover expected insulin requirements. However, whether this approach is indeed superior to a more constant BR profile has not been assessed so far. This study analysed the associations between variability of BR profiles and acute and chronic complications in adult type 1 diabetes mellitus.BR profiles of 3118 female and 2427 male patients from the "Diabetes-Patienten-Verlaufsdokumentation" registry from Germany and Austria were analysed. Acute and chronic complications were recorded 6 months prior and after the most recently documented basal rate. The "variability index" was calculated as variation of basal rate intervals in percent and describes the excursions of the basal rate intervals from the median basal rate.The variability Index correlated positively with severe hypoglycemia (r = .06; p<0.001, hypoglycemic coma (r = .05; p = 0.002, and microalbuminuria (r = 0.05; p = 0.006. In addition, a higher variability index was associated with higher frequency of diabetic ketoacidosis (r = .04; p = 0.029 in male adult patients. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, duration of disease and total basal insulin confirmed significant correlations of the variability index with severe hypoglycemia (β = 0.013; p<0.001 and diabetic ketoacidosis (β = 0.012; p = 0.017.Basal rate profiles with higher variability are associated with an increased frequency of acute complications in adults with type 1 diabetes.

  20. Safety and efficacy of insulin degludec/insulin aspart with bolus mealtime insulin aspart compared with standard basal?bolus treatment in people with Type 1 diabetes: 1?year results from a randomized clinical trial (BOOST ? T1)

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, I. B.; Franek, E.; Mersebach, H.; Bardtrum, L.; Hermansen, K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims To evaluate the long?term safety and efficacy of a simplified basal?bolus regimen of once?daily insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) with additional IAsp vs. a standard basal?bolus insulin regimen of insulin detemir (IDet) with IAsp in adults with Type 1 diabetes. Methods This was an open?label trial comprising a 26?week core phase followed by a 26?week extension phase. Participants were randomized to IDegAsp once daily at the main meal and IAsp at remaining meals (IDegAsp+...

  1. Use of basal insulin and the associated clinical outcomes among elderly nursing home residents with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a retrospective chart review study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis KL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Keith L Davis,1 Wenhui Wei,2 Juliana L Meyers,1 Brett S Kilpatrick,3 Naushira Pandya4 1RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 2Sanofi US, Inc, Bridgewater, NJ, USA; 3AnalytiCare, LLC, Glenview, IL, USA; 4Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA Background: The management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in long-term care (LTC settings can be complex as a result of age-related complications. Despite guideline recommendations, sliding scale insulin remains commonplace in the LTC setting and data on basal insulin use are lacking.Methods: This retrospective study used medical chart data and the Minimum Data Set from elderly LTC facility patients who received basal insulin (insulin glargine, insulin detemir, or neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin for the treatment of diabetes, to investigate the practice patterns and associated clinical outcomes.Results: A total of 2,096 elderly, insulin-treated patients in LTC were identified, with 59.5% of them (N=1,247 receiving basal insulin. Of these, more than 50% of patients received sliding scale insulin in co-administration with basal insulin. Despite its ease of use, insulin pen use was very low, at 14.6%. Significant differences were observed between the basal insulin groups for glycated hemoglobin level and dosing frequency. Hypoglycemia was uncommon -17.2% of patients experienced at least one event, and there was no significant difference in the prevalence of hypoglycemia between the groups.Conclusion: These data suggest the underutilization of basal insulin in the LTC setting and worryingly high combinational use with sliding scale insulin. Differences in glycated hemoglobin and dosing frequencies between types of basal insulin warrant further comparative effectiveness studies. Keywords: long-term care, nursing homes, type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, NPH insulin

  2. IDegLira Versus Alternative Intensification Strategies in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled on Basal Insulin Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freemantle, Nick; Mamdani, Muhammad; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2015-01-01

    glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and other outcomes. METHODS: A pooled analysis of five completed Novo Nordisk randomized clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on basal insulin was used to compare indirectly IDegLira (N = 199) with: addition of liraglutide to basal insulin (N...... = 225) [glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) add-on strategy]; basal-bolus (BB) insulin [insulin glargine (IGlar) + insulin aspart] (N = 56); or up-titration of IGlar (N = 329). A supplementary analysis was performed with the BB arm including patients who received IGlar or IDeg as basal...... of study, differences between IDegLira and BB or up-titrated IGlar, respectively, were as follows: reduction in HbA1c -0.30%, 95% confidence interval (-0.58; -0.01) and -0.65% (-0.83; -0.47); change in body weight -6.89 kg (-7.92; -5.86) and -4.04 kg (-4.69; -3.40) all in favor of IDegLira. Confirmed...

  3. Insulin Pump and Continuous Glucose Monitor Initiation in Hospitalized Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, David L; Spanakis, Elias K; Ryan, Kathleen A; Silver, Kristi D

    2018-01-01

    Insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) are commonly used by patients with diabetes mellitus in the outpatient setting. The efficacy and safety of initiating inpatient insulin pumps and CGM in the nonintensive care unit setting is unknown. In a prospective pilot study, inpatients with type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive standard subcutaneous basal-bolus insulin and blinded CGM (group 1, n = 5), insulin pump and blinded CGM (group 2, n = 6), or insulin pump and nonblinded CGM (group 3, n = 5). Feasibility, glycemic control, and patient satisfaction were evaluated among groups. Group 1 had lower mean capillary glucose levels, 144.5 ± 19.5 mg/dL, compared with groups 2 and 3, 191.5 ± 52.3 and 182.7 ± 59.9 mg/dL (P 1 vs. 2+3  = 0.05). CGM detected 19 hypoglycemic episodes (glucose insulin or percentage of time spent below target glucose range (180 mg/dL). On the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire-Change, group 3 reported increased hyperglycemia and decreased hypoglycemia frequency compared with the other two groups, although the differences did not reach statistical significance. Insulin pump and CGM initiation are feasible during hospitalization, although they are labor intensive. Although insulin pump initiation may not lead to improved glycemic control, there is a trend toward CGM detecting a greater number of hypoglycemic episodes. Larger studies are needed to determine whether use of this technology can lower inpatient morbidity and mortality.

  4. Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cani, Patrice D; Amar, Jacques; Iglesias, Miguel Angel; Poggi, Marjorie; Knauf, Claude; Bastelica, Delphine; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Fava, Francesca; Tuohy, Kieran M; Chabo, Chantal; Waget, Aurélie; Delmée, Evelyne; Cousin, Béatrice; Sulpice, Thierry; Chamontin, Bernard; Ferrières, Jean; Tanti, Jean-François; Gibson, Glenn R; Casteilla, Louis; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Alessi, Marie Christine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2007-07-01

    Diabetes and obesity are two metabolic diseases characterized by insulin resistance and a low-grade inflammation. Seeking an inflammatory factor causative of the onset of insulin resistance, obesity, and diabetes, we have identified bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a triggering factor. We found that normal endotoxemia increased or decreased during the fed or fasted state, respectively, on a nutritional basis and that a 4-week high-fat diet chronically increased plasma LPS concentration two to three times, a threshold that we have defined as metabolic endotoxemia. Importantly, a high-fat diet increased the proportion of an LPS-containing microbiota in the gut. When metabolic endotoxemia was induced for 4 weeks in mice through continuous subcutaneous infusion of LPS, fasted glycemia and insulinemia and whole-body, liver, and adipose tissue weight gain were increased to a similar extent as in high-fat-fed mice. In addition, adipose tissue F4/80-positive cells and markers of inflammation, and liver triglyceride content, were increased. Furthermore, liver, but not whole-body, insulin resistance was detected in LPS-infused mice. CD14 mutant mice resisted most of the LPS and high-fat diet-induced features of metabolic diseases. This new finding demonstrates that metabolic endotoxemia dysregulates the inflammatory tone and triggers body weight gain and diabetes. We conclude that the LPS/CD14 system sets the tone of insulin sensitivity and the onset of diabetes and obesity. Lowering plasma LPS concentration could be a potent strategy for the control of metabolic diseases.

  5. Insulin Initiation in Insulin-Naïve Korean Type 2 Diabetic Patients Inadequately Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Drugs in Real-World Practice: The Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, In Joo; Kim, Yong Ki; Yoon, Kun Ho; Son, Ho Young; Park, Sung Woo; Sung, Yeon Ah; Baek, Hong Sun

    2015-12-01

    The Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation (MOTIV) study was performed to provide real-world data concerning insulin initiation in Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with inadequate glycemic control with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). This multicenter, non-interventional, prospective, observational study enrolled T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] ≥7.0%) who had been on OHAs for ≥3 months and were already decided to introduce basal insulin by their physician prior to the start of the study. All treatment decisions were at the physician's discretion to reflect real-world practice. A total of 9,196 patients were enrolled, and 8,636 patients were included in the analysis (mean duration of diabetes, 8.9 years; mean HbA1c, 9.2%). Basal insulin plus one OHA was the most frequently (51.0%) used regimen. After 6 months of basal insulin treatment, HbA1c decreased to 7.4% and 44.5% of patients reached HbA1c <7%. Body weight increased from 65.2 kg to 65.5 kg, which was not significant. Meanwhile, there was significant increase in the mean daily insulin dose from 16.9 IU at baseline to 24.5 IU at month 6 (P<0.001). Overall, 17.6% of patients experienced at least one hypoglycemic event. In a real-world setting, the initiation of basal insulin is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option in Korean patients with T2DM who are failing to meet targets with OHA therapy.

  6. Insulin Initiation in Insulin-Naïve Korean Type 2 Diabetic Patients Inadequately Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Drugs in Real-World Practice: The Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation (MOTIV study was performed to provide real-world data concerning insulin initiation in Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs.MethodsThis multicenter, non-interventional, prospective, observational study enrolled T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] ≥7.0% who had been on OHAs for ≥3 months and were already decided to introduce basal insulin by their physician prior to the start of the study. All treatment decisions were at the physician's discretion to reflect real-world practice.ResultsA total of 9,196 patients were enrolled, and 8,636 patients were included in the analysis (mean duration of diabetes, 8.9 years; mean HbA1c, 9.2%. Basal insulin plus one OHA was the most frequently (51.0% used regimen. After 6 months of basal insulin treatment, HbA1c decreased to 7.4% and 44.5% of patients reached HbA1c <7%. Body weight increased from 65.2 kg to 65.5 kg, which was not significant. Meanwhile, there was significant increase in the mean daily insulin dose from 16.9 IU at baseline to 24.5 IU at month 6 (P<0.001. Overall, 17.6% of patients experienced at least one hypoglycemic event.ConclusionIn a real-world setting, the initiation of basal insulin is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option in Korean patients with T2DM who are failing to meet targets with OHA therapy.

  7. Improvement of both fasting and postprandial glycemic control by the two-step addition of miglitol and mitiglinide to basal insulin therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihana, Noriko; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kishimoto, Miyako; Kajio, Hiroshi; Noto, Hiroshi; Kakei, Masafumi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Combination therapy consisting of basal insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) is effective for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) that cannot be adequately controlled using OHAs alone. Though basal insulin with metformin or sulfonylurea is an effective therapy, it cannot reduce postprandial glycemia without the risk of hypoglycemia. We examined a two-step regimen consisting of the addition of postprandial hypoglycemic agents (an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor and a glinide) in patients whose T2DM was poorly controlled using basal insulin therapy. Inpatients between the ages of 30-79 years who had T2DM and an HbA1c level of more than 7.0% were recruited. The patients were treated with once-daily insulin glargine with or without metformin, depending on the patient's age and renal function. Insulin glargine was titrated to achieve a target fasting glucose level of 70-130 mg/dL as a first step (STEP0). If the 2-hour postprandial glucose (PBG) level was higher than the target of 180 mg/dL, miglitol treatment (150 mg/day) was initiated, with dose adjustments (75-225 mg) allowed depending on abdominal symptoms and the PBG (STEP1). If the PBG of the patients remained higher than the target after 3 days of treatment, mitiglinide (30 mg/day, titrated up to 60 mg) was added (STEP2). We then evaluated the proportion of patients who achieved the target PBG before and after the two-step regimen. Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) was performed throughout the two-step protocol in most of the patients. Of the 16 patients who were recruited (median age, 67.0 [58.0-71.0] years; body mass index, 25.0 [22.0-27.9] kg/m(2); HbA1c level at admission, 9.1% [8.35-10.4%]), 1 patient (6.25%) achieved the target PBG at STEP 0 and 14 patients (87.5%) had achieved the target PBG at the end of the treatment protocol (P = 0.002). CGM showed a significant decrease in the glucose level at each step of the protocol. The standard deviations in the CGM glucose levels for 24

  8. COMPARING CLINICAL OUTCOMES AND COSTS FOR DIFFERENT TREATMENT INTENSIFICATION APPROACHES IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES UNCONTROLLED ON BASAL INSULIN: ADDING GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE 1 RECEPTOR AGONISTS VERSUS ADDING RAPID-ACTING INSULIN OR INCREASING BASAL INSULIN DOSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Philip; Fan, Tao; Song, Xue; Nero, Damion; Davis, Brian; Chu, Bong-Chul

    2017-11-01

    Not all patients with type 2 diabetes achieve recommended glycated hemoglobin A 1c (A1C) levels after adequate titration of basal insulin (BI). Current intensification approaches include addition of rapid-acting insulin (RAI) or a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA), but it is not clear which strategy results in better long-term outcomes. This retrospective analysis of health insurance claims data in the U.S. MarketScan database compared glycemic control and healthcare resource utilization and costs 12 months after adding a GLP-1 RA to BI versus adding a RAI or increasing BI doses. Propensity score matching was used in the comparative effectiveness analysis. A total of 8,034 patients underwent treatment intensification within 6 months of showing poor glycemic control; 4,134 patients had their BI dose adjusted, and 2,076 and 331 received RAI and GLP-1 RA, respectively. A1C changes were similar for the GLP-1 RA and RAI cohorts but higher for the GLP-1 RA versus the dose-adjustment group. The hypoglycemia rate was lower after adding GLP-1 RA versus RAI or increasing BI dose. No overall changes in utilization of healthcare resources or diabetes-related costs were observed between intensification strategies, although prescription costs were higher for the GLP-1 RA cohort. BI in combination with GLP-1 RAs appears to be an effective intensification strategy, further reducing A1C levels and hypoglycemia frequency compared to increasing BI doses. GLP-1 RA addition also decreases hypoglycemia frequency versus BI dose increases and RAI addition, without raising overall healthcare costs. A1C = hemoglobin A 1c ; BI = basal insulin; CAD = coronary artery disease; ED = emergency department; FPG = fasting plasma glucose; GLP-1 RA = glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist; ICD-9-CM = International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification; NPH = neutral protamine Hagedorn; OAD = oral antidiabetes drug; PSM = propensity score matching; RAI

  9. Meta-analysis of insulin aspart versus regular human insulin used in a basal-bolus regimen for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Simon; Bode, Bruce; Kozlovski, Plamen; Svendsen, Anne Louise

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the current study was to compare the efficacy of two different insulin formulations, insulin aspart (IAsp) and regular human insulin (RHI), for prandial insulin coverage with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin as basal insulin using a meta-analysis approach. The primary endpoint was change in A1c over time. Secondary endpoints included incidence of hypoglycemia and postprandial glycemic control. Clinical trials (Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes) complying with Good Clinical Practice, and with individual patient data, were included in the meta-analysis. Trials were randomized, consisting of (at least) two treatment arms and had a minimum duration of 12 weeks. Estimates were calculated using fixed-effects and random-effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed for each analysis. The effect of baseline parameters on A1c was analyzed in extended simultaneous models. The mean difference in A1c was 0.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] [-0.15; -0.04], P IAsp. Higher accumulated dose of IAsp, higher age and increased rates of hypoglycemia were associated with improved A1c outcome. Fasting plasma glucose was not significantly different between regimens. Postprandial glucose was significantly lower after treatment with IAsp compared with RHI, but the analysis did present a significant level of heterogeneity (P IAsp. A basal-bolus regimen with IAsp as bolus insulin provided minimal, but statistically significant, improvement in overall glycemic control with a lower rate of nocturnal hypoglycemic episodes, compared with a corresponding regimen with bolus RHI. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes published by Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Barriers to initiating insulin therapy in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    oral medication by MOs in community health centres (CHCs). Barriers to ... diabetes mellitus in public-sector primary health care centres in Cape .... responsibility for initiation of insulin therapy to tertiary hospitals. 'There's not always somebody to ask [for advice] and there's no protocol, so the easiest thing is to just send [the.

  11. High fat diet promotes prostatic basal-to-luminal differentiation and accelerates initiation of prostate epithelial hyperplasia originated from basal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh-Joon; Zhang, Boyu; Zhang, Li; Xin, Li

    2016-05-01

    Recent lineage tracing studies showed that the prostate basal and luminal cells in adult mice are two independent lineages under the physiological condition, but basal cells are capable of generating luminal progenies during bacterial infection-induced prostatitis. Because acute bacterial infection in human prostate tissues is relatively rare, the disease relevance of the bacterial infection-induced basal-to-luminal differentiation is uncertain. Herein we employ a high fat diet-induced sterile prostate inflammation model to determine whether basal-to-luminal differentiation can be induced by inflammation irrespective of the underlying etiologies. A K14-CreER model and a fluorescent report line are utilized to specifically label basal cells with the green fluorescent protein. We show that high fat diet promotes immune cell infiltration into the prostate tissues and basal-to-luminal differentiation. Increased cell proliferation accompanies basal-to-luminal differentiation, suggesting a concurrent regulation of basal cell proliferation and differentiation. This study demonstrates that basal-to-luminal differentiation can be induced by different types of prostate inflammation evolved with distinct etiologies. Finally, high fat diet also accelerates initiation and progression of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia that are originated from basal cells with loss-of-function of the tumor suppressor Pten. Because prostate cancer originated from basal cells tends to be invasive, our study also provides an alternative explanation for the association between obesity and aggressive prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Insulin glargine versus other types of basal insulin?clinical and tumor characteristics in patients with breast carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Besic, Nikola; Satej, Nika

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that some insulin analogues could be associated with an increased risk of cancer. The aim of this retrospective study was to examine whether patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) using insulin glargine have a higher tumor stage of breast carcinoma in comparison to patients using other types of insulin. Methods We performed a chart review of 79 surgically treated breast carcinoma patients (mean age of 66.5?years; range 38-86?years) who we...

  13. Insulin glargine versus other types of basal insulin-clinical and tumor characteristics in patients with breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besic, Nikola; Satej, Nika

    2013-10-16

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that some insulin analogues could be associated with an increased risk of cancer. The aim of this retrospective study was to examine whether patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) using insulin glargine have a higher tumor stage of breast carcinoma in comparison to patients using other types of insulin. We performed a chart review of 79 surgically treated breast carcinoma patients (mean age of 66.5 years; range 38-86 years) who were on insulin. Insulin glargine was used in 13 patients, while the other 66 patients were on other types of insulin. Clinical and histopathology characteristics of patients on glargine versus other types of insulin were compared using a chi-square test and non-parametric statistical analysis. DM type 1 and DM type 2 was present in 14 and 65 patients, respectively. The mean tumor size was 2.98 cm. The TNM tumor stage at diagnosis was not higher among patients on glargine compared to patients on other types of insulin (T1/T2 85% vs. 68%, T3/T4 15% vs. 32%, p = 0.32; N1 54% vs. 58%, p = 0.80; M1 8% vs. 6%, respectively). No significant differences between both study groups (glargine vs. other types of insulin) were found in the ages of the patients, their BMI, tumor histology, grade, number of metastatic lymph nodes, hormone receptors or HER-2 status. We could not show that patients with DM using insulin glargine have a higher tumor stage of breast carcinoma in comparison to those using other types of insulin.

  14. Does Reducing Basal Insulin During Ramadan Fasting by Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Decrease the Risk of Symptomatic Hypoglycemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Asma; Al Qahtani, Nabras; Attia, Salima; Al Suwaidi, Hana; Nagelkerke, Nico

    2016-09-01

    Ramadan fasting by patients with type 1 diabetes might predispose them to hypoglycemia. There are no data on the optimal way of adjusting basal insulin during fasting. We aim at studying whether reducing basal insulin during Ramadan reduces the frequency of symptomatic hypoglycemia. We enrolled children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes who intended to fast during Ramadan. Logbooks were given to subjects to mark days fasted, symptomatic hypoglycemia, and dose of basal insulin on all days of Ramadan. Logbooks were examined. Glucometers and insulin pumps were downloaded. Seventy-five patients were enrolled. The age was 10.2-18.9 (14.5) years. Sixty-eight patients had results analyzed. Forty-one patients were on pumps, and 27 patients were on multiple daily injections (MDI). Mean HbA1c was 7.9 (1.2) and 8.4 (1.3) for the pump and the MDI, respectively (P = 0.007). Thirty-nine patients had hypoglycemia leading to breaking fast. The mean number of episodes of breaking fast was 3 (1-8). Thirty-five of the 68 patients had reduced basal insulin. The difference in the frequency of hypoglycemia in those who reduced/did not reduce insulin was not statistically significant (P > 0.10). Fifteen patients on MDI and 24 patients on pumps had at least one episode of breaking fast. Six and 18 of the patients on MDI and pumps, respectively, reduced basal insulin (P > 0.10). This is the first study examining the impact of reduction of basal insulin on hypoglycemia in adolescents. Reducing basal insulin during Ramadan fasting does not decrease the risk of symptomatic hypoglycemia. Use of the insulin pump does not appear to be different from MDI in the frequency of occurrence of hypoglycemia.

  15. Similar glucose control with basal-bolus regimen of insulin detemir plus insulin aspart and thrice-daily biphasic insulin aspart 30 in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes: Results of a 50-week randomized clinical trial of stepwise insulin intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, R; Ajili, F; Assaad-Khalil, S H; Shinde, A; Chen, J W; Van den Berg, E

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the non-inferiority of 50-week treatment with stepwise insulin intensification of basal-bolus insulin analogues [insulin detemir (IDet) and aspart (IAsp)] versus biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp30) in insulin-naive type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients not controlled by oral glucose-lowering drugs (OGLDs). In this open-label multicentre, multinational, randomized, parallel-arm treat-to-target trial, 403 insulin-naive patients with T2DM in four African countries were randomized to either an IDet+IAsp (n = 200) or BIAsp1-2-3 (n = 203) treatment group. Stepwise insulin intensification was performed at the end of 14, 26 and 38 weeks, depending on HbA1c values. The primary endpoint was change in HbA1c after 50 weeks of treatment. Safety variables were hypoglycaemia incidence, occurrence of adverse events and weight gain. Non-inferiority of the IDet+IAsp versus BIAsp1-2-3 treatment regimen was demonstrated by their similar HbA1c levels at the end of trial (IDet+IAsp: baseline 8.6%, 50 weeks 7.4%; BIAsp1-2-3: baseline 8.7%, 50 weeks 7.3%; full analysis set difference: 0.1% [95% CI: -0.1, 0.3]; per protocol: 0.2% [95% CI: -0.1, 0.4]). At week 50, 40.3 and 44.9% of patients achieved HbA1c IAsp and BIAsp1-2-3, respectively. The rate of overall hypoglycaemia during the trial was also similar in both groups (IDet+IAsp: 9.4 events/patient-year; BIAsp1-2-3: 9.8 events/patient-year). Insulin initiation and intensification using IDet+IAsp was not inferior to BIAsp1-2-3 in insulin-naive patients with T2DM not controlled by OGLDs. Both regimens led to similar reductions in HbA1c values after 50 weeks of treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Distinct Prandial and Basal Glucose-Lowering Effects of Insulin Degludec/Insulin Aspart (IDegAsp) at Steady State in Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Tim; Nosek, Leszek; Roepstorff, Carsten; Chenji, Suresh; Klein, Oliver; Haahr, Hanne

    2014-06-01

    Insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) is a soluble co-formulation of long-acting and short-acting insulin analogs. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacodynamic response of once-daily IDegAsp dosing in patients with type 1 diabetes. Pharmacokinetic response, as well as safety and tolerability, were assessed as secondary objectives. This was a single-center, open-label, single-arm study. Twenty-two subjects received once-daily insulin degludec (IDeg) (0.42 U/kg) for five consecutive days [with separate bolus insulin aspart (IAsp) as needed for safety and glycemic control], to achieve clinical steady state of the basal component. On Day 6, they received a single injection of IDegAsp (0.6 U/kg, comprising 0.42 U/kg IDeg and 0.18 U/kg IAsp). Pharmacodynamic response was assessed using a 30-h euglycemic glucose clamp, with blood glucose stabilized at a target of 5.5 mmol/L. The glucose infusion rate profile showed a rapid onset of action and a distinct peak due to IAsp, followed by a separate, flat and stable basal glucose-lowering effect due to the IDeg component. Modeling data suggested that the pharmacodynamic profile of IDegAsp was retained with twice-daily dosing (allowing for coverage of two main meals daily). IDegAsp was well tolerated and no safety issues were identified in this trial. In conclusion, the IAsp component of IDegAsp has a fast onset of appearance and a peak covering the prandial phase, while the IDeg component has a flat and an evenly distributed pharmacokinetic profile over 24 h. IDegAsp is the first co-formulation of a basal insulin analog with an ultra-long duration of action and a mealtime insulin analog in a single soluble injection. These properties translate into clinically relevant benefits, including improved glycemic control and reduction in hypoglycemia.

  17. Effects of biphasic, basal-bolus or basal insulin analogue treatments on carotid intima-media thickness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby-Christensen, Louise; Vaag, Allan; Tarnow, Lise

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of 3 insulin analogue regimens on change in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes. DESIGN AND SETTING: Investigator-initiated, randomised, placebo-controlled trial with a 2×3 factorial design, conducted at 8 hospitals in Denmark....... PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: Participants with type 2 diabetes (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c)≥7.5% (≥58 mmol/mol), body mass index >25 kg/m(2)) were, in addition to metformin versus placebo, randomised to 18 months open-label biphasic insulin aspart 1-3 times daily (n=137) versus insulin aspart 3 times daily...

  18. Selection for and initiation of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Proceedings from a workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanas, Ragnar

    2002-01-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) has been used in the paediatric age group for more than 20 years. The technique is not yet widely used in most countries but there has recently been increasing interest in pump therapy for young children and adolescents. In 1999, 7.5% of Swedish children and adolescents with diabetes used pumps, now the figure is approaching 12%. The indication for starting pump therapy has usually been a medical problem, but today quality of life issues are becoming increasingly important. One technique sometimes used is to start CSII by wearing the pump only at night. Daily insulin requirements are usually decreased compared with injection therapy. Studies have shown that it is possible to lower HbA1c when using an insulin pump and that the risk of severe hypoglycaemia can be lowered. The use of CSII has also been successful in preventing recurrent admission for diabetic ketoacidosis. While starting pump therapy does take an extra effort from both the diabetes team and the family, routine visits are generally no more time-consuming than for patients on multiple injection therapy. CSII can be initiated during admission to hospital but most pumps are started on an outpatient basis. Our department has the patients on the day care ward for 3-4 days of 'pump school'. Parents wear a saline pump for practice. The total daily insulin dose is usually lowered 15-20% compared with multiple injections; on average 40-50% (sometimes up to 60%) of the daily dose is given as basal rate. We start all pumps on rapid-acting analogues and use 40 IU/ml if the basal rate is <0.3 IU/h. In conclusion, the use of CSII in children and adolescents is well accepted and can be managed safely. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Perceptions of diabetes control among physicians and people with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled on basal insulin in Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brod, Meryl; Pfeiffer, Kathryn M; Barnett, Anthony H

    2016-01-01

    of physicians. The purpose of the study was to investigate perceptions of control and views on insulin intensification among physicians and PWUD. Research design and methods Web surveys of 1012 PWUD on basal insulin and 300 physicians were conducted in Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Results...

  20. Higher dose requirements with insulin detemir in type 2 diabetes--three cases and a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinnen, Sanne G. H. A.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2009-01-01

    We report on three type 2 diabetic patients whose daily basal insulin dose requirements were substantially reduced after switching from insulin detemir to insulin glargine. Meta-analysis of three randomised trials of basal insulin initiation confirmed this increased insulin detemir dose requirement

  1. Basal insulin peglispro increases lipid oxidation, metabolic flexibility, thermogenesis and ketone bodies compared to insulin glargine in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porksen, Niels K; Linnebjerg, Helle; Lam, Eric Chen Quin; Garhyan, Parag; Pachori, Alok; Pratley, Richard E; Smith, Steven R

    2018-01-08

    When treated with basal insulin peglispro (BIL), patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) exhibit weight loss and lower prandial insulin requirements versus insulin glargine (GL), while total insulin requirements remain similar. One possible explanation is enhanced lipid oxidation and improved ability to switch between glucose and lipid metabolism with BIL. This study compared the effects of BIL and GL on glucose and lipid metabolism in subjects with T1DM. Fifteen subjects with T1DM were enrolled into this open-label, randomised, crossover study, and received once-daily stable, individualised, subcutaneous doses of BIL and GL for 4 weeks each. Respiratory quotient (RQ) was measured using whole-room calorimetry, and energy expenditure (EE) and concentrations of ketone bodies (3-hydroxybutyrate) and acylcarnitines were assessed. Mean sleep RQ was lower during the BIL (0.822) than the GL (0.846) treatment period, indicating greater lipid metabolism during the post-absorptive period with BIL. Increases in carbohydrate oxidation following breakfast were greater during BIL than GL treatment (mean change in RQ following breakfast 0.111 for BIL, 0.063 for GL). Furthermore, BIL treatment increased total daily EE versus GL (2215.9 kcal/d for BIL, 2135.5 kcal/d for GL). Concentrations of ketone bodies and acylcarnitines appeared to be higher following BIL than GL treatment. BIL increased sleeping fat oxidation, EE, ketone bodies, acylcarnitines and post-prandial glucose metabolism when switching from conventional insulin, thus, restoring metabolic flexibility and increasing thermogenesis. These changes may explain the previously observed weight loss with BIL versus GL. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Safety and efficacy of insulin degludec/insulin aspart with bolus mealtime insulin aspart compared with standard basal-bolus treatment in people with Type 1 diabetes: 1-year results from a randomized clinical trial (BOOST®T1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, I B; Franek, E; Mersebach, H; Bardtrum, L; Hermansen, K

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of a simplified basal-bolus regimen of once-daily insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) with additional IAsp vs. a standard basal-bolus insulin regimen of insulin detemir (IDet) with IAsp in adults with Type 1 diabetes. This was an open-label trial comprising a 26-week core phase followed by a 26-week extension phase. Participants were randomized to IDegAsp once daily at the main meal and IAsp at remaining meals (IDegAsp+IAsp), or IDet (once or twice daily) and IAsp at all meals (IDet+IAsp). Insulins were titrated to target plasma glucose of IAsp). After 52 weeks, the overall confirmed hypoglycaemia rate was 31.8 episodes/patient-years of exposure (PYE) with IDegAsp+Asp and 36.7 episodes/PYE with IDet+IAsp, and the rate of nocturnal confirmed hypoglycaemia was significantly lower with IDegAsp+Asp than with IDet+IAsp (3.1 vs. 5.4 episodes/PYE, respectively; P IAsp) and 0.6% (IDet+IAsp), achieving 60 or 61 mmol/mol (7.6% or 7.7%, respectively), at Week 52. The mean total daily insulin dose was lower with IDegAsp+IAsp than with IDet+IAsp (ratio: 0.87; 95% CI 0.79-0.95; P = 0.0026). Once-daily treatment with IDegAsp and IAsp as bolus insulin for remaining meals was associated with significantly lower risk of nocturnal confirmed hypoglycaemia, improved glycaemic control and showed non-inferiority compared with IDet+IAsp, the standard of care in Type 1 diabetes. © 2016 The Authors Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  3. Regulated basal and bolus insulin release from glucose-responsive core-shell microspheres based on concanavalin A-sugar affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Meirong; He, Jing; Kang, Liangfa; Nie, Jun; Yin, Ruixue

    2018-03-07

    Individual insulin therapy considering the heterogeneity of insulin resistance between patients may bring more benefits than conventional therapy. Therefore, in glucose-responsive insulin delivery systems, more attention should be paid on further regulation of insulin release to meet individual requirements. Our study shows the feasibility of using a photo-crosslinkable shell layer to regulate basal and bolus insulin release from glucose-responsive Con A-polysaccharides network. Core-shell microspheres were fabricated through a two-step high-speed shear-emulsification method. The morphology was observed by SEM and TEM, and the core-shell structure was confirmed by the differences in chemical composition between core-shell and single-layer microspheres obtained from XPS and IR analysis. In vitro insulin release test revealed that the core-shell microspheres with or without light-irradiation could maintain corresponding bolus and basal insulin release in response to different glucose concentration but enable much lower burst release compared with single-layer microspheres without shell. Meanwhile, insulin release rate and amount could be further decreased upon light-irradiation owing to the photo-induced cycloaddition of cinnamate pendant groups of the shell material. The released insulin was proved to remain active according to fluorescence and circular dichroism analysis. The HDF cell viability assessment suggested that the core-shell microspheres possessed no in vitro cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. High intensity aerobic exercise training improves chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced insulin resistance without basal autophagy modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Marion; Assense, Allan; Rondon, Aurélie; Thomas, Amandine; Dubouchaud, Hervé; Freyssenet, Damien; Benoit, Henri; Castells, Josiane; Flore, Patrice

    2017-03-03

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases (insulin resistance: IR). Autophagy is involved in the pathophysiology of IR and high intensity training (HIT) has recently emerged as a potential therapy. We aimed to confirm IH-induced IR in a tissue-dependent way and to explore the preventive effect of HIT on IR-induced by IH. Thirty Swiss 129 male mice were randomly assigned to Normoxia (N), Intermittent Hypoxia (IH: 21-5% FiO 2 , 30 s cycle, 8 h/day) or IH associated with high intensity training (IH HIT). After 8 days of HIT (2*24 min, 50 to 90% of Maximal Aerobic Speed or MAS on a treadmill) mice underwent 14 days IH or N. We found that IH induced IR, characterized by a greater glycemia, an impaired insulin sensitivity and lower AKT phosphorylation in adipose tissue and liver. Nevertheless, MAS and AKT phosphorylation were greater in muscle after IH. IH associated with HIT induced better systemic insulin sensitivity and AKT phosphorylation in liver. Autophagy markers were not altered in both conditions. These findings suggest that HIT could represent a preventive strategy to limit IH-induced IR without change of basal autophagy.

  5. Simulation-Based Evaluation of Dose-Titration Algorithms for Rapid-Acting Insulin in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Inadequately Controlled on Basal Insulin and Oral Antihyperglycemic Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaosu; Chien, Jenny Y; Johnson, Jennal; Malone, James; Sinha, Vikram

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective, model-based simulation approach was to evaluate the impact of various rapid-acting mealtime insulin dose-titration algorithms on glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c]). Seven stepwise, glucose-driven insulin dose-titration algorithms were evaluated with a model-based simulation approach by using insulin lispro. Pre-meal blood glucose readings were used to adjust insulin lispro doses. Two control dosing algorithms were included for comparison: no insulin lispro (basal insulin+metformin only) or insulin lispro with fixed doses without titration. Of the seven dosing algorithms assessed, daily adjustment of insulin lispro dose, when glucose targets were met at pre-breakfast, pre-lunch, and pre-dinner, sequentially, demonstrated greater HbA1c reduction at 24 weeks, compared with the other dosing algorithms. Hypoglycemic rates were comparable among the dosing algorithms except for higher rates with the insulin lispro fixed-dose scenario (no titration), as expected. The inferior HbA1c response for the "basal plus metformin only" arm supports the additional glycemic benefit with prandial insulin lispro. Our model-based simulations support a simplified dosing algorithm that does not include carbohydrate counting, but that includes glucose targets for daily dose adjustment to maintain glycemic control with a low risk of hypoglycemia.

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease, Basal Insulin Glargine, and Health Outcomes in People with Dysglycemia: The ORIGIN Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papademetriou, Vasilios; Nylen, Eric S; Doumas, Michael; Probstfield, Jeff; Mann, Johannes F E; Gilbert, Richard E; Gerstein, Hertzel C

    2017-12-01

    Early stages of chronic kidney disease are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk in patients with established type 2 diabetes and macrovascular disease. The role of early stages of chronic kidney disease on macrovascular outcomes in prediabetes and early type 2 diabetes mellitus is not known. In the Outcome Reduction with an Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN) trial, the introduction of insulin had no effect on cardiovascular outcomes compared with standard therapy. In this post hoc analysis of ORIGIN, we compared cardiovascular outcomes in subjects without to those with mild (Stages 1-2) or moderate chronic kidney disease (Stage 3). Τwo co-primary composite cardiovascular outcomes were assessed. The first was the composite end point of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes; and the second was a composite of any of these events plus a revascularization procedure, or hospitalization for heart failure. Several secondary outcomes were prespecified, including microvascular outcomes, incident diabetes, hypoglycemia, weight, and cancers. Complete renal function data were available in 12,174 of 12,537 ORIGIN participants. A total of 8114 (67%) had no chronic kidney disease, while 4060 (33%) had chronic kidney disease stage 1-3. When compared with nonchronic kidney disease participants, the risk of developing the composite primary outcome (nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or cardiovascular death) in those with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease was 87% higher; hazard ratio (HR) 1.87; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.71-2.04 (P chronic kidney disease 1-3 was also associated with a greater than twofold higher risk for both all-cause mortality (HR 2.17; 95% CI, 1.98-2.38; P chronic kidney disease had significantly higher risk for nonfatal myocardial infarction (50%), nonfatal stroke (68%), any stroke (84%), the above composite primary end point plus revascularization or heart failure requiring

  7. Surfactant protein d deficiency in mice is associated with hyperphagia, altered fat deposition, insulin resistance, and increased basal endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob V Stidsen

    Full Text Available Pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D is a host defence lectin of the innate immune system that enhances clearance of pathogens and modulates inflammatory responses. Recently it has been found that systemic SP-D is associated with metabolic disturbances and that SP-D deficient mice are mildly obese. However, the mechanism behind SP-D's role in energy metabolism is not known.Here we report that SP-D deficient mice had significantly higher ad libitum energy intake compared to wild-type mice and unchanged energy expenditure. This resulted in accumulation but also redistribution of fat tissue. Blood pressure was unchanged. The change in energy intake was unrelated to the basal levels of hypothalamic Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC and Agouti-related peptide (AgRP gene expression. Neither short time systemic, nor intracereberoventricular SP-D treatment altered the hypothalamic signalling or body weight accumulation.In ad libitum fed animals, serum leptin, insulin, and glucose were significantly increased in mice deficient in SP-D, and indicative of insulin resistance. However, restricted diets eliminated all metabolic differences except the distribution of body fat. SP-D deficiency was further associated with elevated levels of systemic bacterial lipopolysaccharide.In conclusion, our findings suggest that lack of SP-D mediates modulation of food intake not directly involving hypothalamic regulatory pathways. The resulting accumulation of adipose tissue was associated with insulin resistance. The data suggest SP-D as a regulator of energy intake and body composition and an inhibitor of metabolic endotoxemia. SP-D may play a causal role at the crossroads of inflammation, obesity, and insulin resistance.

  8. Perceptions of diabetes control among people with type 2 diabetes treated with basal insulin in Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brod, Meryl; Pfeiffer, Kathryn M; Barnett, Anthony H

    2016-01-01

    recall bias in patient-reported data. CONCLUSIONS: The results illuminate how people with T2D treated with basal insulin perceive control and show important differences between the well controlled and uncontrolled. Findings may have implications for improving patient and physician education and diabetes......OBJECTIVE: To investigate perceptions of control among people with uncontrolled and well controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated with basal insulin, as well as differences in perceptions and diabetes management practices between the two groups. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Web surveys of 1012....../extremely important for deciding whether they are well controlled, including diet (80.7%), HbA1c value (78.9%), times per day insulin taken (78.8%), insulin units taken per day (77.6%), and energy levels (74.5%). Fifty-one percent of uncontrolled respondents considered the past week or more recently when thinking...

  9. **-Postprandial pancreatic [11C]methionine uptake after pancreaticoduodenectomy mirrors basal beta cell function and insulin release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, Emanuel; Kazianka, Lukas; Breuer, Robert; Miholic, Johannes; Hacker, Marcus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus; Stimpfl, Thomas; Reiter, Birgit; Karanikas, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    [S-methyl- 11 C]-L-methionine ([ 11 C]MET) uptake in the pancreas might be a central indicator of beta cell function. Since gastric emptying was recently shown to influence glycemic control in subjects after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, the surgical treatment of neoplasms of the pancreas head), we looked for imaginable relationships between gastric emptying, pre- and postprandial insulin concentrations, and [ 11 C]MET uptake. Nineteen tumor-free survivors after PD (age mean ± SD: 61 ± 8.7 yrs.; 10 male, 9 female) and 10 healthy controls (age: 27 ± 8.7 yrs.; 7 male, 3 female) were given a mixed test meal. One gram of paracetamol was ingested with the meal to evaluate the speed of gastric emptying. Insulin, glucose, and paracetamol plasma concentrations were measured before and over 180 minutes after ingestion. Beta cell function was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin plasma concentrations. Simultaneously, 800 MBq of [ 11 C]MET were administered and the activity (maximum tissue standardized uptake values [SUVmax]) over the pancreas was measured at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after injection. Total integrated SUVmax (area under the curve [AUC]) and incremental SUVmax were calculated. The uptake of [ 11 C]MET in the pancreas was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in controls compared to the PD group. Gastric emptying was significantly slower in controls compared to pancreatectomy subjects (p < 0.0001). Paracetamol AUC 30 correlated with the SUVmax increment between 15 and 30 minutes (R 2 = 0.27, p = 0.0263), suggesting a relationship between gastric emptying and the uptake of [ 11 C]MET. Total integrated SUVmax correlated with insulin AUC 60 (R 2 = 0.66,p < 0.0001) in patients after PD. Multivariate regression analysis revealed insulin AUC 60 and beta cell function, calculated from the fasting insulin to glucose ratio, as independent predictors of 11 C-methionine uptake, i.e. total integrated SUVmax, in patients after PD (R 2 = 0.78, p < 0.0001). Postprandial

  10. **-Postprandial pancreatic [{sup 11}C]methionine uptake after pancreaticoduodenectomy mirrors basal beta cell function and insulin release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Emanuel; Kazianka, Lukas; Breuer, Robert; Miholic, Johannes [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Hacker, Marcus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Stimpfl, Thomas; Reiter, Birgit [Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Forensic Toxicology, Vienna (Austria); Karanikas, Georgios [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Divisional Head PET-PET/CT (Nuclear Medicine), Vienna (Austria)

    2017-03-15

    [S-methyl-{sup 11}C]-L-methionine ([{sup 11}C]MET) uptake in the pancreas might be a central indicator of beta cell function. Since gastric emptying was recently shown to influence glycemic control in subjects after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, the surgical treatment of neoplasms of the pancreas head), we looked for imaginable relationships between gastric emptying, pre- and postprandial insulin concentrations, and [{sup 11}C]MET uptake. Nineteen tumor-free survivors after PD (age mean ± SD: 61 ± 8.7 yrs.; 10 male, 9 female) and 10 healthy controls (age: 27 ± 8.7 yrs.; 7 male, 3 female) were given a mixed test meal. One gram of paracetamol was ingested with the meal to evaluate the speed of gastric emptying. Insulin, glucose, and paracetamol plasma concentrations were measured before and over 180 minutes after ingestion. Beta cell function was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin plasma concentrations. Simultaneously, 800 MBq of [{sup 11}C]MET were administered and the activity (maximum tissue standardized uptake values [SUVmax]) over the pancreas was measured at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after injection. Total integrated SUVmax (area under the curve [AUC]) and incremental SUVmax were calculated. The uptake of [{sup 11}C]MET in the pancreas was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in controls compared to the PD group. Gastric emptying was significantly slower in controls compared to pancreatectomy subjects (p < 0.0001). Paracetamol AUC{sub 30} correlated with the SUVmax increment between 15 and 30 minutes (R{sup 2} = 0.27, p = 0.0263), suggesting a relationship between gastric emptying and the uptake of [{sup 11}C]MET. Total integrated SUVmax correlated with insulin AUC{sub 60} (R{sup 2} = 0.66,p < 0.0001) in patients after PD. Multivariate regression analysis revealed insulin AUC{sub 60} and beta cell function, calculated from the fasting insulin to glucose ratio, as independent predictors of {sup 11}C-methionine uptake, i.e. total integrated SUVmax, in

  11. Effects of Basal Insulin Analog and Metformin on Glycaemia Control and Weight as Risk Factors for Endothelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belma Aščić – Buturović

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Obese patients with type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance are at increased risk of development of cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial dysfunction may be a reason for development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Lifestyle modification, increased physical activity, weight reduction, energy restricted diet and good glycaemia control can be useful for the endothelial function improvement and may decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of basal insulin analog and metformin on glycaemia control and weight as risk factors of endothelial dysfunction. Total of 15 patients (9 male and 6 female with type 2 diabetes were studied. The patients were monitored over six months period. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, postprandial plasma glucose (PPG, and body mass index (BMI were observed. Mean age of the subjects was 53,4 ± 6,27 years. Mean diabetes duration was 3,71 ± 1,89 years. At the end of the study mean body mass index decreased from 27,5 ± 1,45 kg/m2 to 25,7 ±1,22 kg/m2. In this study we included diabetic patients with fasting glycaemia over 7 mmol/ dm3, postmeal glycaemia over 7,8 mmol/dm3 and glycated hemoglobin over 7%. Prior to the study, the patients were treated with premix insulin divided in two daily doses and metformin after the lunch, which did not result in sufficient regulation of glycaemia. We started treatment with one daily insulin basal analog and three daily doses of metformin and monitored the above mentioned parameters. We advised patients to change their lifestyle, to practice energy restricted diet and to increase their daily physical activity. Insulin doses were titrated separately for each patient (0,7-1 IU/kg. Weight reduction was recorded after the study. Mean fasting glycaemia decreased from 8,6±0,49 mmol/dm3 to 7,04±0,19 mmol/dm3 (p < 0,05. Mean postmeal glycaemia decreased from 9,74 ± 0,79 mmol/dm3 to 7,6 ± 0

  12. The Automatic Regulation of the Basal Dose on the Insulin Pump for the Treatment of Patients that have Diabetes Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sifet Mehanović

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus type 1 is a chronic metabolic disorder, and its main characteristic is Hyperglycemia. It usually occurs in the early years because of the absolute or relative absence of the active insulin that is caused by the autoimmune disease of the β cells of the pancreas. Despite the numerous researches and efforts of the scientists, the therapy for Diabetes type 1 is based on the substitution of insulin. Even though the principles of the therapy have not changed so much, still some important changes have occurred in the production and usage of insulin. Lately, the insulin pumps are more frequent in the therapy for Diabetes type 1. The functioning of the pump is based on the continuing delivery of insulin in a small dose (“the basal dose”, that keeps the level of glycemia in the blood constant. The increase of glycemia during the meal is reduced with the additional dose of insulin (“the bolus dose”. The use of the insulin pumps and the continuing glucose sensors has provided an easier and more efficient monitoring of the diabetes, a better metabolic control and a better life quality for the patient and his/her family.This work presents the way of automatic regulation of the basal dose of insulin through the synthesis of the functions of the insulin pump and the continuing glucose sensor. The aim is to give a contribution to the development of the controlling algorithm on the insulin pump for the automatic regulation of the glucose concentration in the blood. This could be a step further which is closer to the delivery of the dose of insulin that is really needed for the basic needs of the organism, and a significant contribution is given to the development of the artificial pancreas.

  13. Effect of switching basal insulin regimen to degludec on quality of life in Japanese patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Morihiro; Okada, Masae; Nishigami, Jun; Yamaaki, Naoto; Furukawa, Kenji; Ohyama, Kiminori; Shimada, Tsutomu; Sai, Yoshimichi

    2015-01-01

    Maintainance of a stable basal insulin level is important for glycemic control in treatment of diabetes mellitus. Recently introduced insulin degludec has the longest duration of action among basal insulin formulations. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in quality of life (QOL) associated with switching the basal insulin regimen to degludec in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This 24-week open-label intervention study included type 1 (n = 10) and type 2 (n = 20) diabetes mellitus patients, with adequately controlled hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), who had received insulin glargine or detemir for at least 6 months. The primary outcome was change of QOL from baseline, as assessed by the Diabetes Therapy-Related QOL (DTR-QOL) application, after switching from glargine or detemir to degludec. HbA1c and other parameters were also assessed as secondary outcomes. QOL and HbA1c in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus were unchanged during this study. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, HbA1c did not change, but total DTR-QOL score was significantly improved from baseline after switching to degludec. The DTR-QOL Factor 2, "Anxiety and dissatisfaction with treatment", was significantly improved in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and especially in the subgroup receiving basal supported oral therapy (BOT). Switching of the basal insulin regimen from glargine or detemir to degludec significantly improved the QOL of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were receiving BOT, by reducing mental stress or anxiety about their treatment.

  14. Advancing basal insulin replacement in type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with insulin glargine plus oral agents: a comparison of adding albiglutide, a weekly GLP-1 receptor agonist, versus thrice-daily prandial insulin lispro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstock, Julio; Fonseca, Vivian A; Gross, Jorge L; Ratner, Robert E; Ahrén, Bo; Chow, Francis C C; Yang, Fred; Miller, Diane; Johnson, Susan L; Stewart, Murray W; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2014-08-01

    GLP-1 receptor agonists may provide an alternative to prandial insulin for advancing basal insulin therapy. Harmony 6 was a randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial testing once-weekly albiglutide vs. thrice-daily prandial insulin lispro as an add-on to titrated once-daily insulin glargine. Patients taking basal insulin (with or without oral agents) with HbA1c 7-10.5% (53-91 mmol/mol) entered a glargine standardization period, followed by randomization to albiglutide, 30 mg weekly (n = 282), subsequently uptitrated to 50 mg, if necessary, or thrice-daily prandial lispro (n = 281) while continuing metformin and/or pioglitazone. Glargine was titrated to fasting plasma glucose of <5.6 mmol/L, and lispro was adjusted based on glucose monitoring. The primary end point was the difference in the HbA1c change from baseline at week 26. At week 26, HbA1c decreased from baseline by -0.82 ± SE 0.06% (9.0 mmol/mol) with albiglutide and -0.66 ± 0.06% (7.2 mmol/mol) with lispro; treatment difference, -0.16% (95% CI -0.32 to 0.00; 1.8 mmol/mol; P < 0.0001), meeting the noninferiority end point (margin, 0.4%). Weight decreased with albiglutide but increased with lispro (-0.73 ± 0.19 kg vs. +0.81 ± 0.19 kg). The mean glargine dose increased from 47 to 53 IU (albiglutide) and from 44 to 51 IU (lispro). Adverse events for albiglutide versus lispro included severe hypoglycemia (0 vs. 2 events), documented symptomatic hypoglycemia (15.8% vs. 29.9%), nausea (11.2% vs. 1.4%), vomiting (6.7% vs. 1.4%), and injection site reactions (9.5% vs. 5.3%). Weekly albiglutide is a simpler therapeutic option than thrice-daily lispro for advancing basal insulin glargine therapy, resulting in comparable HbA1c reduction with weight loss and lower hypoglycemia risk. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  15. Basal insulin analogues in diabetic pregnancy: a literature review and baseline results of a randomised, controlled trial in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Damm, Peter; Jovanovic, Lois

    2011-01-01

    As basal insulin analogues are being used off-label, there is a need to evaluate their safety (maternal hypoglycaemia and fetal and perinatal outcomes) and efficacy [haemoglobin A1c(HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose, and maternal weight gain]. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the ...

  16. Switching to multiple daily injection therapy with glulisine improves glycaemic control, vascular damage and treatment satisfaction in basal insulin glargine-injected diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Katsuyuki; Ashihara, Junya; Obara, Shinji; Wada, Norio; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Nishino, Yuri; Maeda, Sayaka; Ishibashi, Yuji; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2014-11-01

    Basal and bolus insulin therapy is required for strict blood control in diabetic patients, which could lead to prevention of vascular complications in diabetes. However, the optimal combination regimen is not well established. Fifty-nine diabetic patients (49 type 1 and 10 type 2; 52.9 ± 13.3 years old) whose blood glucose levels were uncontrolled (HbA1c  > 6.2%) by combination treatment of basal insulin glargine with multiple daily pre-meal injections of bolus short-acting insulin [aspart (n = 19), lispro (n = 37) and regular human insulin (n = 3)] for at least 8 weeks were enrolled in this study. We examined whether glycaemic control and vascular injury were improved by replacement of short-acting insulin with glulisine. Patient satisfaction was assessed with Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire. Although bolus and basal insulin doses were almost unchanged before and after replacement therapy, switching to glulisine insulin for 24 weeks significantly decreased level of HbA1c , advanced glycation end products (AGEs), soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and urinary albumin excretion. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, change in MCP-1 values from baseline (ΔMCP-1) was a sole determinant of log urinary albumin excretion. ΔAGEs and ΔsRAGE were independently correlated with each other. The relationship between ΔMCP-1 and ΔsRAGE was marginally significant (p = 0.05). Replacement of short-acting insulin by glulisine significantly increased Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire scores. Our present study suggests that combination therapy of glargine with multiple daily pre-meal injections of glulisine might show superior efficacy in controlling blood glucose, preventing vascular damage and improving treatment satisfaction in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Effects of basal insulin glargine and omega-3 fatty acid on cognitive decline and probable cognitive impairment in people with dysglycaemia: a substudy of the ORIGIN trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali; Bosch, Jackie; Diaz, Rafael; Dyal, Leanne; Hancu, Nicolae; Hildebrandt, Pers; Lanas, Fernando; Lewis, Basil S; Marre, Michel; Yale, Jean-Francois; Yusuf, Salim; Gerstein, Hertzel C

    2014-07-01

    Diabetes and non-diabetic dysglycaemia are risk factors for accelerated cognitive decline. In this planned substudy of the Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN) trial, we assessed whether normalising glucose with insulin glargine or administering omega-3 fatty acids in this population may slow this process or affect the development of cognitive impairment. The ORIGIN trial recruited participants older than 50 years with dysglycaemia who were taking either no or one oral glucose-lowering drug, who had additional risk factors for cardiovascular events, whose HbA1c was less than 9%, and who were not taking insulin. Participants were recruited from 573 sites in 40 countries. Participants were randomly assigned to either titrated basal insulin glargine targeting a fasting plasma glucose concentration of 5.3 mmol/L or lower or standard care and to either omega-3 fatty acid (1 g) or placebo by a factorial design. Outcome adjudicators and data analysts were masked to treatment allocation. Cognitive function was assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMS) and Digit Symbol Substitution (DSS). The effect of insulin glargine or omega-3 fatty * acid on cognitive function over time, the annualised change in test scores, and the development of probable cognitive impairment were measured. All analyses were restricted to those participants who had a cognitive measurement at both baseline and at least one follow-up visit. The ORIGIN trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00069784. Participants were randomly assigned between Sept 1, 2003, and Dec 15, 2005. MMSE and DSS were assessed in 11,685 and 3392 ORIGIN participants (mean age 63.4 years [SD 7.7]), who were followed up for a median of 6.2 years (IQR 5.8-6.7). There was no difference in the rate of change of cognitive test scores between the insulin glargine and standard care groups (for the MMSE 0.0046, 95% CI -0.0132 to 0.0224, p=0.39; and for the DSS -0.0362, -0.2180 to 0.1455, p=0

  18. Efficacy of Exenatide Plus Pioglitazone Vs Basal/Bolus Insulin in T2DM Patients With Very High HbA1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; Migahid, Osama; Megahed, Ayman; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Zirie, Mahmoud; Jayyousi, Amin

    2017-07-01

    To examine the efficacy and safety of combination therapy with exenatide plus pioglitazone vs basal/bolus insulin in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with very high hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (>10%) receiving sulfonylurea plus metformin and with a long duration of disease. Participants (n = 101) in the Qatar Study with very poor glycemic control (HbA1c >10%) and a long duration of diabetes (10.9 years) receiving maximum/near-maximum doses of sulfonylurea plus metformin were randomly assigned to receive pioglitazone plus weekly exenatide (combination therapy), or basal plus prandial insulin (insulin therapy), to maintain HbA1c insulin therapy groups, respectively. At 6 months, combination therapy caused a robust decrease in HbA1c to 6.7% ± 0.1% (∆ = -4.8%) compared with 7.4% ± 0.1% (∆ = -3.8%) in subjects receiving insulin therapy. Combination therapy was effective in lowering the HbA1c independent of sex, ethnicity, or body mass index. Subjects in the insulin therapy group experienced significantly greater weight gain and a 2.5-fold higher rate of hypoglycemia compared with patients receiving combination therapy. Exenatide/pioglitazone combination therapy is an effective and safe therapeutic option in patients with poorly controlled T2DM receiving metformin plus sulfonylurea with very high HbA1c (>10%). Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  19. A feasibility study of a 3-day basal-bolus insulin delivery device in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Julia K; Lilly, Leslie C; Aberer, Felix; Korsatko, Stefan; Strock, Ellie; Mazze, Roger S; Damsbo, Peter; Pieber, Thomas R

    2014-05-01

    This study tested the feasibility of transition from multiple daily injections (MDI) to a 3-day, basal-bolus insulin delivery device (PaQ) for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Twenty MDI-treated individuals with T2D with HbA(1c) ≤9% (75 mmol/mol) were enrolled in a single-center, single-arm pilot study, lasting three 2-week periods: baseline (MDI), transition to PaQ, and PaQ therapy. Feasibility of use, glycemic control, safety, and patient satisfaction were assessed. Nineteen participants transitioned to PaQ treatment and demonstrated competency in assembling, placing, and using the device. Self-monitored blood glucose and blinded continuous glucose-monitoring data showed glycemic control similar to MDI. Study participants reported high satisfaction and device acceptance. PaQ treatment is both feasible and acceptable in individuals with T2D. Transition from MDI is easy and safe. PaQ treatment might lead to better therapy adherence and improvements in glycemic control and clinical outcomes.

  20. Changes in basal rates and bolus calculator settings in insulin pumps during pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jonathan M; Secher, Anna L; Ringholm, Lene

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore insulin pump settings in a cohort of pregnant women with type 1 diabetes on insulin pump therapy with a bolus calculator. METHODS: Twenty-seven women with type 1 diabetes on insulin pump therapy were included in this study. At 8, 12, 21, 27 and 33 weeks, insulin pump setting...

  1. Efficacy of basal-bolus insulin regimens in the inpatient management of non-critically ill patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Merete B.; Gotfredsen, Anders; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    and safety of basal-bolus insulin therapy (BBI) by summarizing evidence from studies of BBI versus sliding scale insulin therapy (SSI) in the management of hospitalized non-critically ill type 2 diabetes patients. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library for studies comparing BBI therapy...... was associated with increased risk of mild hypoglycemia (BG ≤ 70 mg/dl, RR 5.75; 95% CI 2.79-11.83), (BG ≤ 60 mg/dl, RR 4.21; 95% CI 1.61-11.02) compared with SSI therapy. There was no difference in risk of severe hypoglycemia (BG ≤ 40 mg/dl) and no difference in mean length of stay. In conclusion, basal...

  2. Insulin Initiation in Type 2 Diabetes – Why, When and How?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popa Simona Georgiana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease and, despite recent progress in the treatment of diabetes, the glycemic control usually deteriorates gradually and insulin therapy is needed. When insulin therapy should be started and which are the appropriate insulin therapy strategies, still represent subjects of debates. Insulin represents a therapeutic option in type 2 diabetes due to the existence of early β-cell dysfunction and significant reduction of β-cell mass in natural history of type 2 diabetes. The current guidelines recommend insulin in double therapy in association with metformin or in combination with metformin and other noninsulin agent. Initiation of insulin therapy is recommended in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and symptomatic and/or presenting important hyperglycemia or elevated HbA1c. Initiation of insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes should take into consideration the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, the effects and the potential risks of insulin therapy, the guidelines recommendations and the barriers to insulin use. Literatures of only English language were analyzed from NCBI database. Guidelines were accessed electronically from organisations, i.e. American Diabetes Associations, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology, European Association for the Study of Diabetes, International Diabetes Federation.

  3. One-year sustained glycaemic control and less hypoglycaemia with new insulin glargine 300 U/ml compared with 100 U/ml in people with type 2 diabetes using basal plus meal-time insulin: the EDITION 1 12-month randomized trial, including 6-month extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, M C; Yki-Järvinen, H; Bolli, G B; Ziemen, M; Muehlen-Bartmer, I; Cissokho, S; Home, P D

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the maintenance of efficacy and safety of insulin glargine 300 U/ml (Gla-300) versus glargine 100 U/ml (Gla-100) in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using basal plus meal-time insulin for 12 months in the EDITION 1 trial. EDITION 1 was a multicentre, randomized, open-label, two-arm, phase IIIa study. Participants completing the initial 6-month treatment period continued to receive Gla-300 or Gla-100, as previously randomized, once daily for a further 6-month open-label extension phase. Changes in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting plasma glucose concentrations, insulin dose, hypoglycaemic events and body weight were assessed. Of 807 participants enrolled in the initial phase, 89% (359/404) assigned to Gla-300 and 88% (355/403) assigned to Gla-100 completed 12 months. Glycaemic control was sustained in both groups (mean HbA1c: Gla-300, 7.24%; Gla-100, 7.42%), with more sustained HbA1c reduction for Gla-300 at 12 months: least squares mean difference Gla-300 vs Gla-100: HbA1c -0.17 [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.30 to -0.05]%. The mean daily basal insulin dose at 12 months was 1.03 U/kg for Gla-300 and 0.90 U/kg for Gla-100. Lower percentages of participants had ≥1 confirmed [≤3.9 mmol/l (≤70 mg/dl)] or severe hypoglycaemic event with Gla-300 than Gla-100 at any time of day [24 h; 86 vs 92%; relative risk 0.94 (95% CI 0.89-0.99)] and during the night [54 vs 65%; relative risk 0.84 (95% CI 0.75-0.94)], while the annualized rates of such hypoglycaemic events were similar. No between-treatment differences in adverse events were apparent. During 12 months of treatment of T2DM requiring basal and meal-time insulin, glycaemic control was better sustained and fewer individuals reported hypoglycaemia with Gla-300 than with Gla-100. The mean basal insulin dose was higher with Gla-300 compared with Gla-100, but total numbers of hypoglycaemic events and overall tolerability did not differ between treatments. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes

  4. Impact of patient attitudes and beliefs to insulin therapy upon initiation, and their attitudinal changes after initiation: the DAWN Japan study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odawara, Masato; Ishii, Hitoshi; Tajima, Naoko; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective As a part of the Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) Japan study, a multi-center, questionnaire-based survey conducted between 2004 and 2005, this analysis aimed to (1) explore patients' attitudes and beliefs contributing to their decision to start insulin therapy, and (2) assess the changes in their attitudes and beliefs after actual initiation. Methods Insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes who were recommended to start insulin therapy (n = 149) were invited to answer a 21-item questionnaire consisting of five clusters assessing their attitudes and beliefs toward insulin therapy. The questionnaire was administered twice: first upon insulin recommendation, and then 1 month after insulin initiation for those who started and 4 months after for those who did not. Results Of 130 patients included in the analysis, 74 patients (56.9%) started insulin therapy. 'Negative image of injections' and 'Positive image toward insulin therapy' were significantly associated with patient decision to start insulin therapy (odds ratios [95% CI]: 0.49 [0.32-0.76] and 2.58 [1.51-4.42], respectively). After insulin initiation, 'Negative image of injections', 'Positive image toward insulin therapy', 'Feelings of guilt regarding diabetes self-management', and 'Negative image toward insulin therapy' decreased significantly (P change after insulin initiation. Conclusions This study demonstrated that patients who started insulin therapy were less likely to have negative images of injections and more likely to have positive images toward insulin therapy. Starting insulin therapy did not deteriorate the patient's overall impression of therapy. The key limitation is the relatively small sample size (n = 130). The results suggest that education about the benefits of insulin therapy may help patients who are not ready to initiate insulin overcome their barrier to early insulin initiation and practical support may help those who have already started therapy to

  5. Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with improved insulin sensitivity, reduced basal insulin secretion rate and lower fasting glucagon concentration in healthy women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, F; Disse, E; Laville, M

    2012-01-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes with a stronger effect in women. As the underlying mechanisms remain poorly characterised, we investigated its relationship with insulin resistance, insulin secretion, clearance of insulin and glucagon concentration....

  6. The GLP-1 Analogue Exenatide Improves Hepatic and Muscle Insulin Sensitivity in Diabetic Rats: Tracer Studies in the Basal State and during Hyperinsulinemic-Euglycemic Clamp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 analogues (e.g., exenatide increase insulin secretion in diabetes but less is known about their effects on glucose production or insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. Methods. Four groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: nondiabetic (control, C; nondiabetic + exenatide (C + E; diabetic (D; diabetic + exenatide (D + E with diabetes induced by streptozotocin and high fat diet. Infusion of 3-3H-glucose and U-13C-glycerol was used to measure basal rates of appearance (Ra of glucose and glycerol and gluconeogenesis from glycerol (GNG. During hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, glucose uptake into gastrocnemius muscles was measured with 2-deoxy-D-14C-glucose. Results. In the diabetic rats, exenatide reduced the basal Ra of glucose (P<0.01 and glycerol (P<0.01 and GNG (P<0.001. During the clamp, Ra of glucose was also reduced, whereas the rate of disappearance of glucose increased and there was increased glucose uptake into muscle (P<0.01 during the clamp. In the nondiabetic rats, exenatide had no effect. Conclusion. In addition to its known effects on insulin secretion, administration of the GLP-1 analogue, exenatide, is associated with increased inhibition of gluconeogenesis and improved glucose uptake into muscle in diabetic rats, implying improved hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  7. Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Insulin Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... medicines. You can do it. Back to Top Insulin Safety Tips Never drink insulin. Do not share ...

  8. Possible roles of insulin, IGF-1 and IGFBPs in initiation and progression of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Xin; Du, Li-Li; Wang, Yan; Liu, Dong-Bo; Han, Cun-Zhi; Jing, Jie-Xian; Zhao, Xian-Wen; Xu, Xiao-Qin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the roles of serum insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) in the initiation and progression of colorectal cancer. METHODS: We determined serum insulin, IGF-1 and IGFBPs levels in 615 colorectal cancer patients and 650 control healthy donors by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the meantime, their body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were measured. RESULTS: Serum levels of insulin and IGF-1 as well as IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratio in pre-operation patients were significantly elevated, but the level of IGFBP-3 was significantly decreased compared with normal controls and post-operation patients (P 0.05) in the levels of insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3 and IGF-1/IGFBP-3 between the patients with and without hepatic as well as distal abdominal metastases. WHR and BMI of colon cancer patients were positively and significantly correlated with the levels of insulin and IGF-1/IGFBP-3. In contrast, WHR and BMI were negatively correlated with IGFBP-3 level. CONCLUSION: The elevation of insulin, IGF-1 as well as IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratio and the reduction of IGFBP-3 may be related to the initiation of colorectal cancer, but they are not related to the progression and outcome of the disease. PMID:24587638

  9. Reflectance confocal microscopy-guided laser ablation of basal cell carcinomas: initial clinical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Heidy; Yélamos, Oriol; Cordova, Miguel; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2017-08-01

    Laser ablation offers a procedure for precise, fast, and minimally invasive removal of superficial and early nodular basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). However, the lack of histopathological confirmation has been a limitation toward widespread use in the clinic. A reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging-guided approach offers cellular-level histopathology-like feedback directly on the patient, which may then guide and help improve the efficacy of the ablation procedure. Following an ex vivo benchtop study (reported in our earlier papers), we performed an initial study on 44 BCCs on 21 patients in vivo, using a pulsed erbium:ytterbium aluminum garnet laser and a contrast agent (aluminum chloride). In 10 lesions on six patients, the RCM imaging-guided detection of either presence of residual tumor or complete clearance was immediately confirmed with histopathology. Additionally, 34 BCCs on 15 patients were treated with RCM imaging-guided laser ablation, with immediate confirmation for clearance of tumor (no histopathology), followed by longer-term monitoring, currently in progress, with follow-up imaging (again, no histopathology) at 3, 6, and 18 months. Thus far, the imaging resolution appears to be sufficient and consistent for monitoring efficacy of ablation in the wound, both immediately postablation and subsequently during recovery. The efficacy results appear to be promising, with observed clearance in 19 cases of 22 cases with follow-ups ranging from 6 to 21 months. An additional 12 cases with 1 to 3 months of follow-ups has shown clearance of tumor but a longer follow-up time is required to establish conclusive results. Further instrumentation development will be necessary to cover larger areas with a more automatically controlled instrument for more uniform, faster, and deeper imaging of margins.

  10. Adding fast‐acting insulin aspart to basal insulin significantly improved glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes: A randomized, 18‐week, open‐label, phase 3 trial (onset 3)

    OpenAIRE

    Rodbard, Helena W.; Tripathy, Devjit; Vidrio Velázquez, Maricela; Demissie, Marek; Tamer, Søren C.; Piletič, Milivoj

    2017-01-01

    Aim To confirm glycaemic control superiority of mealtime fast‐acting insulin aspart (faster aspart) in a basal–bolus (BB) regimen vs basal‐only insulin. Materials and methods In this open‐label, randomized, 18‐week trial (51 sites; 6 countries), adults (n = 236) with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D; mean glycosylated haemoglobin [HbA1c] ± SD: 7.9% ± 0.7% [63.1 ± 7.5 mmol/mol]) receiving basal insulin and oral antidiabetic drugs underwent 8‐week optimization of prior once‐daily ba...

  11. How pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) principles pave the way for optimal basal insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Arnolds, Sabine; Kuglin, Bernd; Kapitza, Christoph; Heise, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This pedagogical review illustrates the differences between pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) measures, using insulin therapy as the primary example. The main conclusion is that PD parameters are of greater clinical significance for insulin therapy than PK parameters. The glucose-clamp technique, the optimal method for determining insulin PD, is explained so that the reader can understand important studies in the literature. Key glucose-clamp studies that compa...

  12. The basal kinetic parameters of glycogen synthase in human myotube cultures are not affected by chronic high insulin exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Schrøder, H D; Handberg, A

    2001-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding the results from in vivo and in vitro studies on the impact of chronic high insulin and/or high glucose exposure on acute insulin stimulation of glycogen synthase (GS) kinetic parameters in human skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetic...... the sensitivity of GS to the allosteric activator glucose 6-phosphate (A(0.5)) and increased the sensitivity of GS to its substrate UDPG (K(m(0.1))) when myotubes were precultured at low insulin with/without high glucose conditions. However, this effect of acute insulin stimulation was abolished in myotubes...

  13. Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Sørlie, Therese

    2012-01-01

    become basal-like to initiate tumors or to invade? Could luminally differentiated cells within a basally initiated hierarchy also be tumorigenic? To answer these questions, we used rare and mutually exclusive lineage markers to isolate subsets of luminal-like and basal-like cells from human breast tumors...... by gene expression, mammosphere formation and lineage markers. Luminal-like cells without basal-like traits, surprisingly, were fully capable of initiating invasive tumors in NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice. In fact, these phenotypically pure luminal-like cells generated larger and more invasive tumors than....... We enriched for populations with or without prominent basal-like traits from individual tumors or single cell cloning from cell lines and recovered cells with a luminal-like phenotype. Tumor cells with basal-like traits mimicked phenotypic and functional behavior associated with stem cells assessed...

  14. Faster Aspart Versus Insulin Aspart as Part of a Basal-Bolus Regimen in Inadequately Controlled Type 2 Diabetes: The onset 2 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowering, Keith; Case, Christopher; Harvey, John; Reeves, Michael; Sampson, Michael; Strzinek, Robert; Bretler, Ditte-Marie; Bang, Rikke Beck; Bode, Bruce W

    2017-07-01

    This multicenter, double-blind, treat-to-target, phase 3 trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of fast-acting insulin aspart (faster aspart) versus insulin aspart (IAsp) in adults with type 2 diabetes receiving basal insulin and oral antidiabetic agents. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The primary end point was HbA 1c change from baseline after 26 weeks' treatment. After an 8-week run-in to optimize basal insulin, subjects were randomized (1:1) to mealtime faster aspart ( n = 345) or IAsp ( n = 344), titrated using a simple daily patient-driven algorithm, plus insulin glargine U100 and metformin. HbA 1c change was -1.38% (faster aspart) and -1.36% (IAsp); mean HbA 1c was 6.6% for both groups. Faster aspart demonstrated noninferiority versus IAsp in reducing HbA 1c (estimated treatment difference [ETD] [95% CI] -0.02% [-0.15; 0.10]). Both treatments improved postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) control; the PPG increment (liquid meal test) was statistically significant in favor of faster aspart after 1 h (ETD [95% CI] -0.59 mmol/L [-1.09; -0.09]; -10.63 mg/dL [-19.56; -1.69]; P = 0.0198), but not after 2-4 h. Change from baseline in fasting plasma glucose, body weight, and overall severe/blood glucose-confirmed hypoglycemia rates (rate ratio [RR] [95% CI] 1.09 [0.88; 1.36]) were similar between treatments. Postmeal hypoglycemia (0-2 h) rates were 2.27 (faster aspart) and 1.49 (IAsp) per patient-year of exposure (RR [95% CI] 1.60 [1.13; 2.27]). Faster aspart and IAsp were confirmed noninferior in a basal-bolus regimen regarding change from baseline in HbA 1c . Faster aspart improved 1-h PPG with no differences in 2-4-h PPG versus IAsp. Overall hypoglycemia rates were similar except for an increase in 0-2-h postmeal hypoglycemia with faster aspart. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  15. Switching from NPH insulin to once-daily insulin detemir in basal-bolus-treated patients with diabetes mellitus: data from the European cohort of the PREDICTIVE study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sreenan, S

    2008-12-01

    The PREDICTIVE study is a multinational observational study designed to follow up patients with diabetes who started insulin detemir (IDet) in routine care. Recruitment started in June 2004 and is ongoing in some countries.

  16. Insulin Requirements in Relation to Insulin Pump Indications in Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela GHIMPEŢEANU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current research was to assess changes in daily insulin requirements in type 1 diabetic patients transitioning from multiple daily injections (MDI of insulin to continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII using an external insulin pump, according to clinical indications for changing therapy. The charts of 70 patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D initiating insulin pump therapy were retrospectively reviewed before CSII and after optimization of glycaemic profile with CSII during hospital admission. Daily insulin doses, basal/bolus distributions, dose changes during treatment transition and glycaemic outcomes with MDI and optimized CSII according to insulin pump indications were evaluated. Daily insulin doses were not significantly different among indication groups, with both MDI and CSII; likewise, the overall daily distribution of basal/rapid insulin ratio was similar, around 40/60. With optimized CSII, significant differences were found only in basal/bolus distribution in patients initiating CSII for recurrent hypoglycemia, who had a significantly lower basal (6.4% lower and a complementary higher bolus requirement, compared to patients initiating CSII for HbA1c ≥ 8.5%. At transition, basal insulin needs declined similarly in the high HbA1c and impractical/inflexible MDI groups by approximately 20%, and up to 30% in the recurrent hypoglycaemia group; bolus doses decreased by 20% when the indication was high HbA1c and by approximately 15% for the other indications. Glycaemic control was significantly improved only in patients initiating CSII for high HbA1c (≥8.5%. Insulin pump indication should be considered when starting T1D patients on CSII. These findings may support clinicians in decision making regarding insulin dose changes when initiating insulin pump therapy.

  17. Treatment outcomes after initiation of exenatide twice daily or insulin in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenson, Claes-Göran; Matthaei, Stephan; Reaney, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    study. Clinical data were collected at initiation of first injectable therapy and after approximately 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: Of 2497 patients enrolled in CHOICE, 1096 in the exenatide BID and 1239 in the insulin cohorts had ≥1 post-baseline assessment and were included in this analysis. Overall...... (exenatide twice daily [BID] or insulin) in routine clinical practice, and these patients' clinical outcomes, in six European countries. This paper reports interim data from the first 12 months of the study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: CHOICE (NCT00635492) is a prospective, noninterventional, observational......, and no hypoglycemia was attained at 12 months by 24.3% and 10.3% of patients who had data at 12 months and who were receiving exenatide BID and insulin, respectively. CONCLUSION: About 30% of patients in CHOICE changed treatment in the first 12 months after initiation of first injectable therapy (exenatide BID...

  18. Treatment intensification with an insulin degludec (IDeg)/insulin aspart (IAsp) co-formulation twice daily compared with basal IDeg and prandial IAsp in type 2 diabetes: a randomized, controlled phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodbard, H W; Cariou, B; Pieber, T R; Endahl, L A; Zacho, J; Cooper, J G

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of two insulin intensification strategies for patients with type 2 diabetes previously treated with basal insulin--insulin degludec (IDeg) and insulin aspart (IAsp)--administered as a co-formulation (IDegAsp) or as a basal-bolus regimen (IDeg and IAsp in separate injections). This 26-week, open-label, treat-to-target, phase IIIb, non-inferiority trial randomized patients (1 : 1) to IDegAsp twice daily with main meals (n = 138; IDegAsp group) or IDeg once daily and IAsp 2-4 times daily (n = 136; IDeg+IAsp group). After 26 weeks, the mean glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 7.0% (53 mmol/mol) for the IDegAsp group and 6.8% (51 mmol/mol) for the IDeg+IAsp group (Δ%HbA1c from baseline -1.31 and -1.50%, respectively). The non-inferiority of IDegAsp versus IDeg+IAsp was not confirmed for mean change in HbA1c [estimated treatment difference (ETD) 0.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.04, 0.41; p = non-significant]. No significant differences were observed in the proportion of patients achieving HbA1c IAsp. Patient-reported outcome scores for social functioning were significantly higher for IDegAsp versus IDeg+IAsp (ETD 2.2; 95% CI 0.3, 4.1; p < 0.05). Both intensification strategies effectively improved glycaemic control. Although non-inferiority was not confirmed, there were no significant differences between the groups that could affect clinical utility. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Switch to Combined GLP1 Receptor Agonist Lixisenatide with Basal Insulin Glargine in Poorly Controlled T2DM Patients with Premixed Insulin Therapy: A Clinical Observation and Pilot Study in Nine Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harreiter, Jürgen; Kosi-Trebotic, Lana; Lukas, Albert; Wolf, Peter; Winhofer, Yvonne; Luger, Anton; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Krebs, Michael R

    2017-06-01

    To prove the feasibility and safety of a conversion to once-daily injected GLP1 agonist (lixisenatide) and long-acting basal insulin analogue (glargine) in patients with T2DM and poorly controlled glycemia previously treated with multiple injections of premixed insulins (iPremix) in an outpatient setting. Nine patients with T2DM currently receiving iPremix formulations and poor glycemic control were switched to once-daily injected lixisenatide (Lixi) and basal insulin analogue glargine (iGlar) for a 12-week period. Efficacy was defined as A1c reduction of at least 0.4% and weight loss of 0.5 kg or higher. Five of nine patients achieved A1c reductions of 0.4% (4 mmol/mol) or higher and six of nine patients a weight loss of 0.5 kg or higher. A mean A1C reduction of 0.5% ± 0.5% (6 mmol/mol) and mean weight loss of -1.4 ± 3.6 kg were observed in all patients. Total daily insulin dose after 12 weeks declined from 56 ± 26 IU with iPremix formulations to 47 ± 17 IU in patients taking combined iGlar and Lixi. Corrections with fast acting insulin glulisine (iGlu) were necessary in two patients on a regular basis and in four patients on an irregular basis (2.3 IU mean total daily dose). Two patients did not need additional iGlu. Postprandial glucose profiles were lower in the combined group compared with iPremix throughout the day, which resolved in the afternoon. No metabolic derangements occurred. Mild hypoglycemia and gastrointestinal symptoms were the most often reported adverse events affecting three patients. The conversion to once-daily injected GLP1 agonist Lixi and basal iGlar could safely be performed in an outpatient setting and was associated with better postprandial glycemic control throughout the day, except dinner, compared to iPremix. EU clinical trials register EudraCT number 2013-005334-37 and ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02168491. Sponsored by the Medical University of Vienna and in part supported by Sanofi-Aventis.

  20. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation does not influence basal glucose metabolism or insulin sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Nicolette M.; Sondermeijer, Brigitte M.; Twickler, Th B. Marcel; de Bie, Rob M.; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Fliers, Eric; Schuurman, P. Richard; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that central dopamine signaling influences glucose metabolism. As a first step to show this association in an experimental setting in humans, we studied whether deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which modulates the basal ganglia circuitry,

  1. Physical characteristics that predict final basal insulin dose in type 2 diabetes mellitus, with a special focus on BMI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A. C. R.; Bolli, G. B.; Dain, M.-P.; Wang, E.; Holleman, F.

    2014-01-01

    The possibility to predict final insulin dose based on patient's characteristics would allow for efficient titration for patients with higher dose needs. The primary aim of this post-hoc analysis of the L2T3 study was to determine predictors for final dose. Specifically, we focused on the

  2. Changes in basal rates and bolus calculator settings in insulin pumps during pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jonathan Michael; Secher, Anna L; Ringholm, Lene

    2014-01-01

    settings and HbA1c were recorded. Results were compared with 96 women with type 1 diabetes on multiple daily injection therapy. Results: Throughout pregnancy, the carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio decreased at all three main meals. The most pronounced decrease was observed at breakfast, where the carbohydrate...

  3. A qualitative study on healthcare professionals’ perceived barriers to insulin initiation in a multi-ethnic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yew

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nationwide surveys have shown that the prevalence of diabetes rates in Malaysia have almost doubled in the past ten years; yet diabetes control remains poor and insulin therapy is underutilized. This study aimed to explore healthcare professionals’ views on barriers to starting insulin therapy in people with type 2 diabetes. Methods Healthcare professionals consisting of general practitioners (n = 11, family medicine specialists (n = 10, medical officers (n = 8, government policy makers (n = 4, diabetes educators (n = 3 and endocrinologists (n = 2 were interviewed. A semi-structured topic guide was used to guide the interviews by trained facilitators. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Insulin initiation was found to be affected by patient, healthcare professional and system factors. Patients’ barriers include culture-specific barriers such as the religious purity of insulin, preferred use of complementary medication and perceived lethality of insulin therapy. Healthcare professionals’ barriers include negative attitudes towards insulin therapy and the ‘legacy effect’ of old insulin guidelines; whilst system barriers highlight the lack of resources, language and communication challenges. Conclusions Tackling the issue of insulin initiation should not only happen during clinical consultations. It requires health education to emphasise the progressive nature of diabetes and the eventuality of insulin therapy at early stage of the illness. Healthcare professionals should be trained how to initiate insulin and communicate effectively with patients from various cultural and religious backgrounds.

  4. Treatment intensification with an insulin degludec (IDeg)/insulin aspart (IAsp) co‐formulation twice daily compared with basal IDeg and prandial IAsp in type 2 diabetes: a randomized, controlled phase III trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariou, B.; Pieber, T. R.; Endahl, L. A.; Zacho, J.; Cooper, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the efficacy and safety of two insulin intensification strategies for patients with type 2 diabetes previously treated with basal insulin – insulin degludec (IDeg) and insulin aspart (IAsp) – administered as a co‐formulation (IDegAsp) or as a basal‐bolus regimen (IDeg and IAsp in separate injections). Methods This 26‐week, open‐label, treat‐to‐target, phase IIIb, non‐inferiority trial randomized patients (1 : 1) to IDegAsp twice daily with main meals (n = 138; IDegAsp group) or IDeg once daily and IAsp 2–4 times daily (n = 136; IDeg+IAsp group). Results After 26 weeks, the mean glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 7.0% (53 mmol/mol) for the IDegAsp group and 6.8% (51 mmol/mol) for the IDeg+IAsp group (Δ%HbA1c from baseline −1.31 and −1.50%, respectively). The non‐inferiority of IDegAsp versus IDeg+IAsp was not confirmed for mean change in HbA1c [estimated treatment difference (ETD) 0.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.04, 0.41; p = non‐significant]. No significant differences were observed in the proportion of patients achieving HbA1c IAsp. Patient‐reported outcome scores for social functioning were significantly higher for IDegAsp versus IDeg+IAsp (ETD 2.2; 95% CI 0.3, 4.1; p < 0.05). Conclusions Both intensification strategies effectively improved glycaemic control. Although non‐inferiority was not confirmed, there were no significant differences between the groups that could affect clinical utility. PMID:26592732

  5. Steady state is reached within 2-3 days of once-daily administration of degludec, a basal insulin with an ultralong duration of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Tim; Korsatko, Stefan; Nosek, Leszek; Coester, Hans Veit; Deller, Sigrid; Roepstorff, Carsten; Segel, Stine; Kapur, Rahul; Haahr, Hanne; Hompesch, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Various factors influence the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of insulin analogs. The aim of the present study was to determine time to steady state of insulin degludec (IDeg), a basal insulin analog with an ultralong duration of action, after once-daily subcutaneous administration in subjects of varying age, diabetes type, and ethnicity. Time to steady state was analyzed in 195 subjects across five Phase I randomized single-center double-blind studies: three in subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), including one in elderly subjects, and two in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), including one with African American and Hispanic/Latino subpopulations. Subjects received once-daily IDeg (100 U/mL, s.c.) at doses of 0.4-0.8 U/kg for 6-12 days. Time to clinical steady state was measured from first dose until the serum IDeg trough concentration exceeded 90% of the final plateau level. The IDeg concentrations were log-transformed and analyzed using a mixed-effects model with time from first dose and dose level (where applicable) as fixed effects, and subject as a random effect. Steady state serum IDeg concentrations were reached after 2-3 days in all subjects. In trials with multiple dose levels, time to steady state was independent of dose level in T1DM (P = 0.51) and T2DM (P = 0.75). Serum IDeg concentrations reached steady state within 2-3 days of once-daily subcutaneous administration in all subjects with T1DM or T2DM, including elderly and African American and Hispanic/Latino subjects. At steady state, serum IDeg concentrations were unchanged from day to day. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. An iterative inverse method to estimate basal topography and initialize ice flow models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. J. van Pelt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate an inverse approach to reconstruct distributed bedrock topography and simultaneously initialize an ice flow model. The inverse method involves an iterative procedure in which an ice dynamical model (PISM is run multiple times over a prescribed period, while being forced with space- and time-dependent climate input. After every iteration bed heights are adjusted using information of the remaining misfit between observed and modeled surface topography. The inverse method is first applied in synthetic experiments with a constant climate forcing to verify convergence and robustness of the approach in three dimensions. In a next step, the inverse approach is applied to Nordenskiöldbreen, Svalbard, forced with height- and time-dependent climate input since 1300 AD. An L-curve stopping criterion is used to prevent overfitting. Validation against radar data reveals a high correlation (up to R = 0.89 between modeled and observed thicknesses. Remaining uncertainties can mainly be ascribed to inaccurate model physics, in particular, uncertainty in the description of sliding. Results demonstrate the applicability of this inverse method to reconstruct the ice thickness distribution of glaciers and ice caps. In addition to reconstructing bedrock topography, the method provides a direct tool to initialize ice flow models for forecasting experiments.

  7. Differentiation driven changes in the dynamic organization of Basal transcription initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Giglia-Mari

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies based on cell-free systems and on in vitro-cultured living cells support the concept that many cellular processes, such as transcription initiation, are highly dynamic: individual proteins stochastically bind to their substrates and disassemble after reaction completion. This dynamic nature allows quick adaptation of transcription to changing conditions. However, it is unknown to what extent this dynamic transcription organization holds for postmitotic cells embedded in mammalian tissue. To allow analysis of transcription initiation dynamics directly into living mammalian tissues, we created a knock-in mouse model expressing fluorescently tagged TFIIH. Surprisingly and in contrast to what has been observed in cultured and proliferating cells, postmitotic murine cells embedded in their tissue exhibit a strong and long-lasting transcription-dependent immobilization of TFIIH. This immobilization is both differentiation driven and development dependent. Furthermore, although very statically bound, TFIIH can be remobilized to respond to new transcriptional needs. This divergent spatiotemporal transcriptional organization in different cells of the soma revisits the generally accepted highly dynamic concept of the kinetic framework of transcription and shows how basic processes, such as transcription, can be organized in a fundamentally different fashion in intact organisms as previously deduced from in vitro studies.

  8. Surfactant protein d deficiency in mice is associated with hyperphagia, altered fat deposition, insulin resistance, and increased Basal endotoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Jacob V; Khorooshi, Reza; Rahbek, Martin K U

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a host defence lectin of the innate immune system that enhances clearance of pathogens and modulates inflammatory responses. Recently it has been found that systemic SP-D is associated with metabolic disturbances and that SP-D deficient mice are mildly obese....... However, the mechanism behind SP-D's role in energy metabolism is not known.Here we report that SP-D deficient mice had significantly higher ad libitum energy intake compared to wild-type mice and unchanged energy expenditure. This resulted in accumulation but also redistribution of fat tissue. Blood...... pressure was unchanged. The change in energy intake was unrelated to the basal levels of hypothalamic Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) gene expression. Neither short time systemic, nor intracereberoventricular SP-D treatment altered the hypothalamic signalling or body weight...

  9. A 5' splice site enhances the recruitment of basal transcription initiation factors in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Kahns, Søren; Lykke-Andersen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Transcription and pre-mRNA splicing are interdependent events. Although mechanisms governing the effects of transcription on splicing are becoming increasingly clear, the means by which splicing affects transcription remain elusive. Using cell lines stably expressing HIV-1 or β-globin mRNAs, harb...... a promoter-proximal 5′ splice site via its U1 snRNA interaction can feed back to stimulate transcription initiation by enhancing preinitiation complex assembly.......Transcription and pre-mRNA splicing are interdependent events. Although mechanisms governing the effects of transcription on splicing are becoming increasingly clear, the means by which splicing affects transcription remain elusive. Using cell lines stably expressing HIV-1 or β-globin mRNAs......, harboring wild-type or various 5′ splice site mutations, we demonstrate a strong positive correlation between splicing efficiency and transcription activity. Interestingly, a 5′ splice site can stimulate transcription even in the absence of splicing. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show enhanced...

  10. Intensification of IDegAsp Twice Daily (Adding Insulin Aspart vs. Switching To Basal-Bolus): Exploratory Randomized Trial in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebakar, Wan Mohamaed Wan; Chaykin, Louis; Hersløv, Malene Lundgren; Rasmussen, Søren

    2017-02-01

    In a preceding trial comparing two different titration schemes, insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) showed good efficacy for achieving HbA 1c IAsp) or by switching to a basal-bolus regimen of insulin degludec (IDeg) plus IAsp taken three times a day (TID). A 26-week, randomized, open-label, phase 3b, treat-to-target trial in which 40 patients with T2D who had not reached target HbA 1c ≤7.0% following previous 26-week treatment intensification with IDegAsp BID ±3 oral antidiabetic agents (OADs) were randomized (1:1) to receive IDegAsp BID + IAsp OD (n = 20) or IDeg OD + IAsp TID (n = 20). Mean baseline HbA 1c was 7.9% in the IDegAsp BID + IAsp OD group and 7.7% in the IDeg OD + IAsp TID group. After 26 weeks, the estimated mean change in HbA 1c from baseline was 0.05% points in the IDegAsp BID + IAsp OD group and -0.49% points for IDeg OD + IAsp TID: estimated treatment difference (ETD) [95% confidence interval] 0.54% [0.09; 0.99], p = 0.021. Few achieved HbA 1c IAsp OD (four patients) and IDeg OD + IAsp TID groups (five patients). Fasting plasma glucose, hypoglycemia, and adverse events were similar between groups. When used as intensification regimens in patients who failed to achieve target HbA 1c during 26-week IDegAsp BID treatment, HbA 1c improvements were numerically greater with IDeg OD + IAsp TID compared with IDegAsp BID + IAsp OD. No new safety issues were identified. However, the small, selective sample means clinical generalizations should be made with caution. Novo Nordisk. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT01814137.

  11. [Adjustment of unstable diabetics with a simple insulin infusion program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, B; Blatter, G; Froesch, E R

    1978-11-18

    In view of the importance of knowing exactly how much insulin is required by diabetics who are difficult to control with subcutaneous insulin, an insulin infusion program has been tried in such patients. The apparatus, which was produced by Siemens as a prototype, works according to the following simple and flexible principle: During the day a basal rate of insulin is continuously infused. During the three main meals an additional rectangular insulin infusion is initiated by turning a knob. After an hour the apparatus switches automatically back to the basal ratio. We have used this machine in 13 patients who are fully mobile. 11 of them showed an almost ideal blood sugar profile after 4 days. After switching back to subcutaneous insulin 8 of these 11 patients did better than before but not as well as on the insulin infusion program.

  12. Insulin therapy for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus: strategies for initiation and long-term patient adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barag, Steven H

    2011-07-01

    Effective glycemic control is essential to minimize the long-term complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it is well documented that many patients spend prolonged periods outside of the optimal glycemic range. The use of insulin is important to effectively control the disease process in patients with T2DM. Even so, resistance to insulin use among patients and healthcare providers often limits initiation and intensification of insulin therapy. With the increasing prevalence of T2DM across all socioeconomic strata, an expanded viewpoint of early and sustained insulin use is crucial to enhance glycemic control in patients. To manage the effects of T2DM on cardiovascular disease in the aging population, physicians can promote insulin therapy as an affordable and effective treatment option. The author reviews beliefs and myths about the use of insulin in the management of T2DM and discusses strategies to overcome barriers to initiation of insulin therapy in the primary care setting.

  13. Determinants and consequences of insulin initiation for type 2 diabetes in France: analysis of the National Health and Wellness Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reach G

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gérard Reach,1 Véronique Le Pautremat,2 Shaloo Gupta31Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolic Diseases, Avicenne Hospital APHP, and EA 3412, CRNH-IdF, Paris 13 University, Sorbonnne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France; 2Kantar Health, Paris, France; 3Kantar Health, Princeton, NJ, USABackground: The aim of the study was to identify the intrinsic patient characteristics and extrinsic environmental factors predicting prescription and use and, more specifically, early initiation (up to 5 years of disease duration of insulin for type 2 diabetes in France. A secondary objective was to evaluate the impact of insulin therapy on mental and physical quality of life and patient adherence.Methods: The data used in this study were derived from the 2008, 2010, and 2011 France National Health and Wellness Survey. This survey is an annual, cross-sectional, self-administered, Internet-based questionnaire among a nationwide representative sample of adults (aged 18 years or older. Of the total of 45,958 persons recruited in France, 1,933 respondents (deduped were identified as diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. All unique respondents from the three waves, currently using insulin or oral bitherapy or tritherapy at the time of assessment, were included in this analysis.Results: Early (versus late initiation of insulin therapy was 9.9 times more likely to be prescribed by an endocrinologist or diabetologist than by a primary care physician (P < 0.0001. Younger age at diagnosis and current smoking habits were significant predictors of early (versus late insulin initiation (odds ratio [OR] 1.031, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.005–1.059, P = 0.0196, and OR 2.537, 95% CI 1.165–5.524, P = 0.0191, respectively. Patients with a yearly income ≥€50,000 were less likely to be put on insulin early (P = 0.0399. A link between insulin prescription and complications was shown only in univariate analysis. Mental quality of life was lower in patients on early (versus

  14. Insulin degludec/insulin aspart administered once daily at any meal, with insulin aspart at other meals versus a standard basal-bolus regimen in patients with type 1 diabetes: a 26-week, phase 3, randomized, open-label, treat-to-target trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Irl B; Bode, Bruce; Courreges, Jean-Pierre; Dykiel, Patrik; Franek, Edward; Hermansen, Kjeld; King, Allen; Mersebach, Henriette; Davies, Melanie

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate efficacy and tolerability of a co-formulation of insulin degludec and insulin aspart (IDegAsp) with insulin aspart (IAsp) at other meals compared with basal-bolus therapy using insulin detemir (IDet) and IAsp. Adults (n = 548) with type 1 diabetes (A1C 7.0-10.0%; BMI ≤35.0 kg/m(2)) were randomized 2:1 in a 26-week, multinational, parallel-group, treat-to-target trial to IDegAsp or IDet. IDegAsp was given with a meal, and IDet was given in the evening, with a second (breakfast) dose added if needed. Non-inferiority for IDegAsp versus IDet was confirmed; A1C improved by 0.75% with IDegAsp and 0.70% with IDet to 7.6% in both groups (estimated treatment difference IDegAsp - IDet: -0.05% [95% CI -0.18 to 0.08]). There was no statistically significant difference between IDegAsp and IDet in the rates of severe hypoglycemia (0.33 and 0.42 episodes/patient-year, respectively) or overall confirmed (plasma glucose <3.1 mmol/L) hypoglycemia (39.17 and 44.34 episodes/patient-year, respectively). Nocturnal confirmed hypoglycemia rate was 37% lower with IDegAsp than IDet (3.71 vs. 5.72 episodes/patient-year, P < 0.05). Weight gain was 2.3 and 1.3 kg with IDegAsp and IDet, respectively (P < 0.05). Total insulin dose was 13% lower in the IDegAsp group (P < 0.0001). No treatment differences were detected in Health-Related Quality of Life, laboratory measurements, physical examination, vital signs, electrocardiograms, fundoscopy, or adverse events. IDegAsp in basal-bolus therapy with IAsp at additional mealtimes improves overall glycemic control and was non-inferior to IDet, with a reduced risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia and fewer injections in comparison with IDet + IAsp basal-bolus therapy.

  15. The autonomous cell fate specification of basal cell lineage: the initial round of cell fate specification occurs at the two-celled proembryo stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Liang-Huan; Zhou, Xuemei; Li, Xinbo; Li, Shi-Sheng; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Yuan; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2017-09-01

    In angiosperms, the first zygotic division usually gives rise to two daughter cells with distinct morphologies and developmental fates, which is critical for embryo pattern formation; however, it is still unclear when and how these distinct cell fates are specified, and whether the cell specification is related to cytoplasmic localization or polarity. Here, we demonstrated that when isolated from both maternal tissues and the apical cell, a single basal cell could only develop into a typical suspensor, but never into an embryo in vitro. Morphological, cytological and gene expression analyses confirmed that the resulting suspensor in vitro is highly similar to its undisturbed in vivo counterpart. We also demonstrated that the isolated apical cell could develop into a small globular embryo, both in vivo and in vitro, after artificial dysfunction of the basal cell; however, these growing apical cell lineages could never generate a new suspensor. These findings suggest that the initial round of cell fate specification occurs at the two-celled proembryo stage, and that the basal cell lineage is autonomously specified towards the suspensor, implying a polar distribution of cytoplasmic contents in the zygote. The cell fate transition of the basal cell lineage to the embryo in vivo is actually a conditional cell specification process, depending on the developmental signals from both the apical cell lineage and maternal tissues connected to the basal cell lineage. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Lipoproteína (a está associada com níveis basais de insulina em pacientes com Diabetes Mellitus tipo 2 Lipoproteína (a está asociada a niveles basales de insulina en pacientes con Diabetes Mellitus tipo 2 Lipoprotein (a is associated with basal insulin levels in patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shahid Habib

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Ainda não foi claramente estabelecido se a resistência/deficiência insulínica leva diretamente à aterogênese ou através de sua associação com outros fatores de risco como os níveis de lipoproteína (a[Lp(a]. OBJETIVO: O objetivo do estudo foi estabelecer a relação entre os níveis basais de insulina, lípides e lipoproteína (a em pacientes com diabetes mellitus (DM tipo 2. MÉTODOS: Amostras de sangue foram colhidas em jejum e os níveis de insulina, lipoproteína (a, colesterol total (CT, triglicérides (TG, lipoproteína de baixa densidade (LDL-C, lipoproteína de alta densidade (LDL-C, glicose e hemoglobina glicada (HbA1c foram medidos em 60 pacientes com DM tipo 2 e 28 indivíduos saudáveis. Nós dividimos os pacientes em dois grupos baseados nos níveis basais de insulina: > 10 µIU/ml e 10 µIU/ml comparados com aqueles que apresentavam insulina basal FUNDAMENTO: Todavía no se aclaró totalmente si la resistencia/deficiencia insulínica lleva directamente a la aterogénesis o a través de su asociación con otros factores de riesgo como los niveles de lipoproteína (a [Lp(a]. OBJETIVO: : El objetivo del estudio fue establecer la relación entre los niveles basales de insulina, lípidos y lipoproteína (a en pacientes con diabetes mellitus (DM tipo 2. MÉTODOS: Se extrajeron muestras de sangre en ayuno y se determinaron los niveles de insulina, lipoproteína (a, colesterol total (CT, triglicéridos (TG, lipoproteína de baja densidad (LDL-C, lipoproteína de alta densidad (LDL-C, glucosa y hemoglobina glicosilada (HbA1c en 60 pacientes con DM tipo 2 y 28 individuos sanos. Dividimos a los pacientes en dos grupos basados en los niveles basales de insulina: > 10 µIU/ml y 10 µIU/ml comparados con aquellos que presentaban insulina basal BACKGROUND: It has not been clearly established whether insulin resistance/deficiency leads directly to atherogenesis or through its association with other risk factors such as

  17. Failure to initiate early insulin therapy - A risk factor for diabetic retinopathy in insulin users with Type 2 diabetes mellitus: Sankara Nethralaya-Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SN-DREAMS, Report number 35).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditi; Delhiwala, Kushal S; Raman, Rajiv P G; Sharma, Tarun; Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Kulothungan, Vaitheeswaran

    2016-06-01

    Insulin users have been reported to have a higher incidence of diabetic retinopathy (DR). The aim was to elucidate the factors associated with DR among insulin users, especially association between duration, prior to initiating insulin for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and developing DR. Retrospective cross-sectional observational study included 1414 subjects having Type 2 DM. Insulin users were defined as subjects using insulin for glycemic control, and insulin nonusers as those either not using any antidiabetic treatment or using diet control or oral medications. The duration before initiating insulin after diagnosis was calculated by subtracting the duration of insulin usage from the duration of DM. DR was clinically graded using Klein's classification. SPSS (version 9.0) was used for statistical analysis. Insulin users had more incidence of DR (52.9% vs. 16.3%, P diabetes (>5 years) and sub-optimal glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin <7.0%). Among insulin users, abdominal obesity was found to be a significant predictor of DR; DR is associated with longer duration prior to initiating insulin therapy in Type 2 DM subjects with suboptimal glycemic control.

  18. Once-daily basal insulin glargine versus thrice-daily prandial insulin lispro in people with type 2 diabetes on oral hypoglycaemic agents (APOLLO): an open randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretzel, R.G.; Nuber, U.; Landgraf, W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As type 2 diabetes mellitus progresses, oral hypoglycaemic agents often fail to maintain blood glucose control and insulin is needed. We investigated whether the addition of once-daily insulin glargine is non-inferior to three-times daily prandial insulin lispro in overall glycaemic c......, and greater patient satisfaction than was insulin lispro. FUNDING: Sanofi-Aventis Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3/29...

  19. Influence of the dynamics of body weight on the risk factors of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes during the first year of insulin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Dzhavakhishvili

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate whether insulin treatment-induced weight gain had an adverse impact on cardiovascular risk factors in insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients during the first year after initiating insulin therapy when insulin analogues or human insulins are used. A total of 157 patients with newly insulinized type 2 diabetes were included in the study. The patients were divided in two groups. First group consisted of subjects (mean age 57 [45; 73], duration of diabetes of 10 years [4; 16] who had received long-acting basal (glargine, detemir, premixed (biphasic insulin aspart 30, Humalog Mix 25 or short-acting (aspart, lispro insulin analogues. Patients from second group (mean age 59 [46; 75], duration of diabetes of 10 years [5; 15] were treated with intermediate-acting basal (Protophane, Humulin NPH insulin, premixed (biphasic human insulin 30, Humulin M3 and regular (Actrapid, Humulin R human insulins. Our study has shown that insulin-induced weight gain may not adversely affect cardiovascular risk factors, particularly, lipid profile, in insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients during the first year after initiating insulin therapy. Use of insulin analogues for treatment of type 2 diabetes patients results in better glycaemic control, significant declines in blood lipid concentrations, less increase in waist circumference compared with human insulins during the first year after initiating insulin therapy.

  20. How can insulin initiation delivery in a dual-sector health system be optimised? A qualitative study on healthcare professionals’ views

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Ping Yein; Lee Yew Kong; Ng Chirk Jenn

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in developing countries. However, glycaemia control remains suboptimal and insulin use is low. One important barrier is the lack of an efficient and effective insulin initiation delivery approach. This study aimed to document the strategies used and proposed by healthcare professionals to improve insulin initiation in the Malaysian dual-sector (public–private) health system. Methods In depth interviews and...

  1. Influence of initial insulin dosage on blood glucose dynamics of children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Gong, Chunxiu; Cao, Bingyan; Meng, Xi; Wei, Liya; Wu, Di; Liang, Xuejun; Li, Wenjing; Liu, Min; Gu, Yi; Su, Chang

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effect of initial insulin dosage on blood glucose (BG) dynamics, β-cell protection, and oxidative stress in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Sixty newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus patients were randomly assigned to continuous subcutaneous insulin infusions of 0.6 ± 0.2 IU/kg/d (group 1), 1.0 ± 0.2 IU/kg/d (group 2), or 1.4 ± 0.2 IU/kg/d (group 3) for 3 wk. BG was monitored continuously for the first 10 d and the last 2 d of wk 2 and 3. A total of 24-hour urinary 8-iso-PGF2α was assayed on days 8, 9, and 10. The occurrence and duration of the honeymoon period were recorded. Fasting C-peptide and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were assayed after 1, 6, and 12 months of insulin treatment. BG decreased to the target range by the end of wk 3 (group 1), wk 2 (group 2), or wk 1 (group 3). The actual insulin dosage over the 3 wk, frequency of hypoglycemia on wk 1 and 2, and median BG at the end of wk 1 differed significantly, but not 8-iso-PGF2α and the honeymoon period in the three groups. No severe hypoglycemia event was observed in any patient, but there was significant difference in the first occurrence of hypoglycemia. Differences in initial insulin dosage produced different BG dynamics in wk 1, equivalent BG dynamics on wk 2 and 3, but had no influence on short- and long-term BG control and honeymoon phase. The wide range of initial insulin dosage could be chosen if guided by BG monitoring. © 2016 The Authors. Pediatric Diabetes published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Basal insulin analogues in diabetic pregnancy: a literature review and baseline results of a randomised, controlled trial in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Damm, Peter; Jovanovic, Lois

    2011-01-01

    hagedorn insulin, both with insulin aspart, in women with type 1 diabetes planning a pregnancy (n = 306) or are already pregnant (n = 164). Inclusion criteria include type 1 diabetes > 12 months' duration; screening HbA1c ≤ 9.0% (women recruited prepregnancy), or pregnant with gestational age 8-12 weeks...

  3. Human insulin-like growth factor II leader 2 mediates internal initiation of translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne; Christiansen, Jan; Hansen, T.O.

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a fetal growth factor, which belongs to the family of insulin-like peptides. During fetal life, the IGF-II gene generates three mRNAs with different 5' untranslated regions (UTRs), but identical coding regions and 3' UTRs. We have shown previously that IG...

  4. Once-daily basal insulin glargine versus thrice-daily prandial insulin lispro in people with type 2 diabetes on oral hypoglycaemic agents (APOLLO): an open randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretzel, R.G.; Nuber, U.; Landgraf, W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As type 2 diabetes mellitus progresses, oral hypoglycaemic agents often fail to maintain blood glucose control and insulin is needed. We investigated whether the addition of once-daily insulin glargine is non-inferior to three-times daily prandial insulin lispro in overall glycaemic...... control in adults with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus taking oral hypoglycaemic agents. METHODS: In the 44-week, parallel, open study that was undertaken in 69 study sites across Europe and Australia, 418 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus that was inadequately controlled by oral....... Randomisation was done with a central randomisation service. Analysis was per protocol. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00311818. FINDINGS: 205 patients were randomly assigned to insulin glargine and 210 to insulin lispro. Mean haemoglobin A(1c) decrease in the insulin glargine group...

  5. Comparison Between Individually and Group-Based Insulin Pump Initiation by Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderstråle, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Depending on available resources, competencies, and pedagogic preference, initiation of insulin pump therapy can be performed on either an individual or a group basis. Here we compared the two models with respect to resources used. Time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) was used to compare initiating insulin pump treatment in groups (GT) to individual treatment (IT). Activities and cost drivers were identified, timed, or estimated at location. Medical quality and patient satisfaction were assumed to be noninferior and were not measured. GT was about 30% less time-consuming and 17% less cost driving per patient and activity compared to IT. As a batch driver (16 patients in one group) GT produced an upward jigsaw-shaped accumulative cost curve compared to the incremental increase incurred by IT. Taking the alternate cost for those not attending into account, and realizing the cost of opportunity gained, suggested that GT was cost neutral already when 5 of 16 patients attended, and that a second group could be initiated at no additional cost as the attendance rate reached 15:1. We found TDABC to be effective in comparing treatment alternatives, improving cost control and decision making. Everything else being equal, if the setup is available, our data suggest that initiating insulin pump treatment in groups is far more cost effective than on an individual basis and that TDABC may be used to find the balance point.

  6. Can community retail pharmacist and diabetes expert support facilitate insulin initiation by family physicians? Results of the AIM@GP randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stewart B; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Yale, Jean-François; Berard, Lori; Stewart, John; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Tompkins, Jordan W

    2013-02-21

    Limited evidence exists on the effectiveness of external diabetes support provided by diabetes specialists and community retail pharmacists to facilitate insulin-prescribing in family practice. A stratified, parallel group, randomized control study was conducted in 15 sites across Canada. Family physicians received insulin initiation/titration education, a physician-specific 'report card' on the characteristics of their type 2 diabetes (T2DM) population, and a registry of insulin-eligible patients at a workshop. Intervention physicians in addition received: (1) diabetes specialist/educator consultation support (active diabetes specialist/educator consultation support for 2 months [the educator initiated contact every 2 weeks] and passive consultation support for 10 months [family physician initiated as needed]); and (2) community retail pharmacist support (option to refer patients to the pharmacist(s) for a 1-hour insulin-initiation session). The primary outcome was the insulin prescribing rate (IPR) per physician defined as the number of insulin starts of insulin-eligible patients during the 12-month strategy. Consenting, eligible physicians (n = 151) participated with 15 specialist sites and 107 community pharmacists providing the intervention. Most physicians were male (74%), and had an average of 81 patients with T2DM. Few (9%) routinely initiated patients on insulin. Physicians were randomly allocated to usual care (n = 78) or the intervention (n = 73). Intervention physicians had a mean (SE) IPR of 2.28 (0.27) compared to 2.29 (0.25) for control physicians, with an estimated adjusted RR (95% CI) of 0.99 (0.80 to 1.24), p = 0.96. An insulin support program utilizing diabetes experts and community retail pharmacists to enhance insulin prescribing in family practice was not successful. Too few physicians are appropriately intensifying diabetes management through insulin initiation, and aggressive therapeutic treatment is lacking.

  7. Can community retail pharmacist and diabetes expert support facilitate insulin initiation by family physicians? Results of the AIM@GP randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Stewart B

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limited evidence exists on the effectiveness of external diabetes support provided by diabetes specialists and community retail pharmacists to facilitate insulin-prescribing in family practice. Methods A stratified, parallel group, randomized control study was conducted in 15 sites across Canada. Family physicians received insulin initiation/titration education, a physician-specific ‘report card’ on the characteristics of their type 2 diabetes (T2DM population, and a registry of insulin-eligible patients at a workshop. Intervention physicians in addition received: (1 diabetes specialist/educator consultation support (active diabetes specialist/educator consultation support for 2 months [the educator initiated contact every 2 weeks] and passive consultation support for 10 months [family physician initiated as needed]; and (2 community retail pharmacist support (option to refer patients to the pharmacist(s for a 1-hour insulin-initiation session. The primary outcome was the insulin prescribing rate (IPR per physician defined as the number of insulin starts of insulin-eligible patients during the 12-month strategy. Results Consenting, eligible physicians (n = 151 participated with 15 specialist sites and 107 community pharmacists providing the intervention. Most physicians were male (74%, and had an average of 81 patients with T2DM. Few (9% routinely initiated patients on insulin. Physicians were randomly allocated to usual care (n = 78 or the intervention (n = 73. Intervention physicians had a mean (SE IPR of 2.28 (0.27 compared to 2.29 (0.25 for control physicians, with an estimated adjusted RR (95% CI of 0.99 (0.80 to 1.24, p = 0.96. Conclusions An insulin support program utilizing diabetes experts and community retail pharmacists to enhance insulin prescribing in family practice was not successful. Too few physicians are appropriately intensifying diabetes management through insulin initiation, and

  8. Lack of relationship between 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase setpoint and insulin sensitivity in the basal state and after 24h of insulin infusion in healthy subjects and type 2 diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, MN; Riemens, SC; Sluiter, WJ; Pratt, JJ; Wolthers, BG; Dullaart, RPF

    OBJECTIVES To test whether insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with an altered overall setpoint of the 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta HSD) mediated cortisol to cortisone interconversion towards cortisol, and to evaluate whether changes in insulin sensitivity

  9. Real-world medication persistence and outcomes associated with basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist free-dose combination therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin J

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jay Lin,1 Melissa Lingohr-Smith,1 Tao Fan2 1Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Novosys Health, Green Brook, NJ, USA; 2North America Medical Affairs, Sanofi US, Inc., Bridgewater, NJ, USA Background: Free-dose combination treatment with basal insulin and short-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs reduces hyperglycemia via complementary targeting of fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels, however, in the real world, due to injection burden and clinical inertia, the full efficacy may not be able to translate into clinical and economic benefits. Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate treatment persistence and associated outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D treated with a GLP-1 RA in free-dose combination with basal insulin. Methods: Claims data were extracted on US adults with T2D with ≥1 prescription claim for both a GLP-1 RA and a basal insulin from July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2013, and continuous health plan coverage for 6 months prior to (baseline and 12 months after the index date (follow-up period. Outcomes analyzed for patients stratified by treatment persistence included glycemic control, hypoglycemia, and health care costs and resource utilization. Multivariate analyses were used to examine factors associated with persistence or hypoglycemia. Results: The analysis included 7,320 patients, of whom 16.9% were persistent with free-dose combination treatment. The median time to treatment discontinuation was 133 days. Compared with ­nonpersistent patients, persistent patients had greater glycated hemoglobin A1c (A1C reductions (–0.80% vs –0.42%; P=0.032, were more likely to achieve A1C <7.0% (39% vs 22%; P<0.001, and were less likely to experience hypoglycemia (9.5% vs 6.8%; P=0.002. Persistent patients also had significantly fewer hospitalizations and shorter hospital stays. While prescription costs were significantly higher (all-cause: $14,691 vs $10,791; P<0.001; diabetes-related: $8

  10. Greater early postprandial suppression of endogenous glucose production and higher initial glucose disappearance is achieved with fast-acting insulin aspart compared to insulin aspart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ananda; Pieber, Thomas R; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Sach-Friedl, Stefanie; Erichsen, Lars; Basu, Rita; Haahr, Hanne

    2018-03-01

    Fast-acting insulin aspart (faster aspart) is insulin aspart (IAsp) in a new formulation with accelerated initial absorption after subcutaneous administration, leading to improved postprandial glucose control versus IAsp. We investigated the mechanisms behind the reduced postprandial glucose with faster aspart versus IAsp. In a randomised, double-blind, crossover trial, 41 subjects with type 1 diabetes received identical subcutaneous single faster aspart and IAsp doses (individualised for each subject) together with a standardised mixed meal (including 75 g carbohydrate labelled with [1- 13 C] glucose). Postprandial glucose turnover was determined by the triple-tracer meal method using continuous, variable [6- 3 H] glucose and [6,6- 2 H 2 ] glucose infusion. Insulin exposure within the first hour was 32% greater for faster aspart versus IAsp (treatment ratio faster aspart/IAsp [95% confidence interval] 1.32 [1.18;1.48], pIAsp [95% confidence interval] -0.59 mmol/L [-1.19;0.01], p=0.055). The trend towards reduced ΔPG 1h with faster aspart was due to 12% greater suppression of endogenous glucose production (treatment ratio 1.12 [1.01;1.25], p=0.040) and 23% higher glucose disappearance (1.23 [1.05;1.45], p=0.012) with faster aspart versus IAsp during the first hour. Suppression of free fatty acid levels during the first hour was 36% greater for faster aspart versus IAsp (1.36 [1.01;1.88], 0.042). The trend towards improved postprandial glucose control with faster aspart versus IAsp in this study was due to both greater early suppression of endogenous glucose production and stimulation of glucose disappearance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Insulin degludec is a new ultra-long-acting insulin analogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Achieving optimal glycemic control is an important aspect of preventing and slowing the progression of diabetes-associated complications, and reducing the cost of their treatment. Long-acting insulin analogues, glargine and detemir, provide better metabolic control with reduced risk of hypoglycaemia as compared to NPH insulin. However, fear of hypoglycaemia and weight gain, as well as the complexity of regimen, are still the most important barriers to well-timed initiation and intensification of insulin therapy. Insulin degludec (Tresiba® is a new ultra-long-acting insulin analogue. After subcutaneous injection degludec forms repository of soluble multi-hexamers, which are gradually absorbed to the bloodstream, providing a flat, stable antihyperglycemic effect lasting more than 42 h, and low intra-individual variability as opposed to currently used basal insulin analogues, insulin glargine and insulin detemir. In the seven randomized, open label, controlled phase 3 trials lasting 26 or 52 weeks, using treat-to-target (no more non-inferiority design, insulin degludec provided glycemic control similar to that of insulin glargine with lower risk of nocturnal hypoglycaemia and good safety profile in patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes. Furthermore, trials examining a flexible dosing regimen of insulin degludec in patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes have shown that it is possible to vary the injection time without compromising glycemic control or safety of the therapy.

  12. Inactivation of a Gα(s)-PKA tumour suppressor pathway in skin stem cells initiates basal-cell carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Torres, Daniela; Marone, Romina; Feng, Xiaodong; Martin, Daniel; Simaan, May; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; Taylor, Susan S; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2015-06-01

    Genomic alterations in GNAS, the gene coding for the Gαs heterotrimeric G protein, are associated with a large number of human diseases. Here, we explored the role of Gαs on stem cell fate decisions by using the mouse epidermis as a model system. Conditional epidermal deletion of Gnas or repression of PKA signalling caused a remarkable expansion of the stem cell compartment, resulting in rapid basal-cell carcinoma formation. In contrast, inducible expression of active Gαs in the epidermis caused hair follicle stem cell exhaustion and hair loss. Mechanistically, we found that Gαs-PKA disruption promotes the cell autonomous Sonic Hedgehog pathway stimulation and Hippo signalling inhibition, resulting in the non-canonical activation of GLI and YAP1. Our study highlights an important tumour suppressive function of Gαs-PKA, limiting the proliferation of epithelial stem cells and maintaining proper hair follicle homeostasis. These findings could have broad implications in multiple pathophysiological conditions, including cancer.

  13. Inactivation of a Gαs-PKA tumor suppressor pathway in skin stem cells initiates basal-cell carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Torres, Daniela; Marone, Romina; Feng, Xiaodong; Martin, Daniel; Simaan, May; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S.; Taylor, Susan S.; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Genomic alterations in GNAS, the gene coding for the Gαs heterotrimeric G-protein, are associated with a large number human of diseases. Here, we explored the role of Gαs on stem cell fate decisions by using the mouse epidermis as a model system. Conditional epidermal deletion of Gnas or repression of PKA signaling caused a remarkable expansion of the stem cell compartment, resulting in rapid basal cell carcinoma formation. In contrast, inducible expression of active Gαs in the epidermis caused hair follicle stem cell exhaustion and hair loss. Mechanistically, we found that Gαs-PKA disruption promotes the cell autonomous Sonic Hedgehog pathway stimulation and Hippo signaling inhibition, resulting in the non-canonical activation of GLI and YAP1. Our study highlights an important tumor suppressive function of Gαs-PKA, limiting the proliferation of epithelial stem cells and maintaining proper hair follicle homeostasis. These findings can have broad implications in multiple pathophysiological conditions, including cancer. PMID:25961504

  14. Enhanced hepatic insulin signaling in the livers of high altitude native rats under basal conditions and in the livers of low altitude native rats under insulin stimulation: a mechanistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dera, Hussain; Eleawa, Samy M; Al-Hashem, Fahaid H; Mahzari, Moeber M; Hoja, Ibrahim; Al Khateeb, Mahmoud

    2017-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of the liver in lowering fasting blood glucose levels (FBG) in rats native to high (HA) and low altitude (LA) areas. As compared with LA natives, besides the improved insulin and glucose tolerance, HA native rats had lower FBG, at least mediated by inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis and activation of glycogen synthesis. An effect that is mediated by the enhancement of hepatic insulin signaling mediated by the decreased phosphorylation of TSC induced inhibition of mTOR function. Such effect was independent of activation of AMPK nor stabilization of HIF1α, but most probably due to oxidative stress induced REDD1 expression. However, under insulin stimulation, and in spite of the less activated mTOR function in HA native rats, LA native rats had higher glycogen content and reduced levels of gluconeogenic enzymes with a more enhanced insulin signaling, mainly due to higher levels of p-IRS1 (tyr612).

  15. Insulin inhalation: NN 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Aradigm Corporation has developed an inhaled form of insulin using its proprietary AERx drug delivery system. The system uses liquid insulin that is converted into an aerosol containing very small particles (1-3 micro in diameter), and an electronic device suitable for either the rapid transfer of molecules of insulin into the bloodstream or localised delivery within the lung. The AERx insulin Diabetes Management System (iDMS), AERx iDMS, instructs the user on breathing technique to achieve the best results. Aradigm Corporation and Novo Nordisk have signed an agreement to jointly develop a pulmonary delivery system for insulin [AERx iDMS, NN 1998]. Under the terms of the agreement, Novo Nordisk has exclusive rights for worldwide marketing of any products resulting from the development programme. Aradigm Corporation will initially manufacture the product covered by the agreement, and in return will receive a share of the overall gross profits from Novo Nordisk's sales. Novo Nordisk will cover all development costs incurred by Aradigm Corporation while both parties will co-fund final development of the AERx device. Both companies will explore the possibilities of the AERx platform to deliver other compounds for the regulation of blood glucose levels. Additionally, the agreement gives Novo Nordisk an option to develop the technology for delivery of agents outside the diabetes area. In April 2001, Aradigm Corporation received a milestone payment from Novo Nordisk related to the completion of certain clinical and product development stages of the AERx drug delivery system. Profil, a CRO in Germany, is cooperating with Aradigm and Novo Nordisk in the development of inhaled insulin. Aradigm and Novo Nordisk initiated a pivotal phase III study with inhaled insulin formulation in September 2002. This 24-month, 300-patient trial is evaluating inhaled insulin in comparison with insulin aspart. Both medications will be given three times daily before meals in addition to basal

  16. Barriers to initiating insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The majority of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Cape Town who attend primary care community health centres (CHCs) have unsatisfactory glycaemic control. Insulin is rarely prescribed despite its being indicated for type 2 diabetic patients with inadequate metabolic control on maximum oral ...

  17. Disordered eating behaviors in youth with type 1 diabetes: prospective pilot assessment following initiation of insulin pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Jessica T; Alleyn, Cielo A; Phillips, Roxanne; Muir, Andrew; Young-Hyman, Deborah; Laffel, Lori M B

    2013-05-01

    There is risk for disordered eating behaviors in type 1 diabetes, especially related to insulin manipulation. Implementation of insulin pump therapy may encourage either normalization of eating behaviors or a greater focus on food intake due to renewed emphasis on carbohydrate counting. There is need for prospective studies to assess disordered eating behaviors upon implementation of pump therapy using diabetes-specific measurement tools. In a multicenter pilot study, 43 youth with type 1 diabetes, 10-17 years old, were assessed prior to pump initiation and after 1 and 6 months of pump therapy. Youth completed the Diabetes-specific Eating Problems Survey-Revised (DEPS-R), a validated measure of risk for both diabetes-specific and general disordered eating behaviors. Youth (45% female), 13.3 years old with diabetes for 2.1 years, had a mean hemoglobin A1c of 8.3±1.3% (68±14.5 mmol/mol) at baseline. DEPS-R scores decreased over time (P=0.01). Overall rate of high risk for eating disorders was low. Overweight/obese youth endorsed more disordered eating behaviors than normal-weight participants. DEPS-R scores were correlated with z-score for body mass index at all three time points and with hemoglobin A1c after 1 and 6 months. Hemoglobin A1c did not change significantly over the 6 months and was higher in overweight/obese compared with normal-weight participants. Initiation of insulin pump therapy was associated with diminished endorsement of disordered eating behaviors in youth with type 1 diabetes. Longer follow-up studies are needed to assess the impact of insulin pump therapy on glycemic control, weight status, and disordered eating behaviors in this vulnerable population.

  18. Transcriptome analysis of basal and luminal tumor-initiating cells in ErbB2-driven breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Borcherding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality for females worldwide [1]. Improving early screening strategies and understanding the events that lead to tumor initiation have led to demonstrable improvements in clinical outcome. Our previous work revealed a variance in the tumorigenic capacity between different mammary epithelial cell populations in an MMTV-ErbB2 mouse model. In order to greater understand how different mammary epithelial cells influence the tumorigenic capacity in ErbB2-induced breast cancer, we transplanted different cell populations from pre-neoplastic MMTV-ErbB2 female mice into recipient mice for tumorigenic study. We found that different mammary epithelial cells bear different tumorigenic potentials even when induced by the same ErbB2 proto-oncogene. To understand the difference in tumors formed from different epithelial cells, we performed gene expression profiling using these tumors (GSE64487. Several genes were further validated using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Here we provide further details on the experimental methods and microarray analysis. This data provides a resource to further understanding how different mammary cell populations can initiate ErbB2-driven tumors and the role of these cell populations as putative tumor-initiating cells (TICs.

  19. Effect of dietary restriction on metabolic, anatomic and molecular traits in mice depends on the initial level of basal metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzek, Pawel; Ksiazek, Aneta; Dobrzyn, Agnieszka; Konarzewski, Marek

    2012-09-15

    Dietary restriction (DR)-related delay of ageing is hypothesized to be mediated by the reduction of the metabolic rate (MR). However, studies on the effect of DR on MR have produced equivocal results. We demonstrated that this lack of congruency can be due to a variation in the initial level of MR within a given pool of experimental subjects. We subjected laboratory mice from two line types divergently selected for basal MR (BMR) to 30% DR lasting 6 months to test whether the effect of DR depends on the initial variation in BMR and peak MR. BMR and peak MR were independently affected by DR. The effect of DR was stronger in line types with higher initial levels of MR. Line-type-specific changes in the proportions of body components explained contrasting effects of DR on the mass-corrected BMR, which decreased in the high-BMR line type and did not change in the low-BMR line type. We conclude that the initial variation in MR can significantly affect response to DR. However, we found no association between the level of MR and mechanisms underlying the susceptibility to or protection against oxidative stress.

  20. Initial screening of children treated with second-generation antipsychotics points to an association between physical activity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Anita T; Devlin, Angela M; Panagiotopoulos, Constadina

    2014-11-01

    Second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) medications, used to treat youth for a wide-range of mental health conditions, are associated with excessive weight gain and other comorbidities, placing these individuals at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Little is known about the effect of physical activity (PA) on cardiovascular risk in these children. Anthropometrics, fasting blood sample and self-report PA were obtained in 386 children diagnosed with mental health conditions (6-18 y). PA was classified as below (insulin, and HOMA-IR were significantly different by PA status. After adjusting for SGA-treatment duration, sex, age, and ethnicity, higher PA was associated with lower insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in SGA-treated (mean, 95% CI; below vs. meets: 2.10 [1.84, 2.37] vs. 1.59 [1.37, 1.81], p = .046) but not in SGA-naïve (1.70 [1.47, 1.94] vs. 1.55 [1.35, 1.75], p = .707) children. Upon initial screening, SGA-treated children that reported meeting the minimal recommendations for daily PA displayed lower measures of adiposity and improved insulin resistance.

  1. An exploration of barriers to insulin initiation for physicians in Japan: findings from the Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes And Needs (DAWN JAPAN study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Ishii

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Insulin is recommended as an appropriate treatment in type 2 diabetes patients with suboptimal glycemic control; however, its initiation is often delayed. We therefore conducted the DAWN (Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs JAPAN study in an attempt to identify specific patient- and physician-related factors which contribute to delay of insulin initiation among Japanese patients with diabetes. In this report, we explored barriers for physicians which prevent timely insulin initiation. METHODS: The DAWN JAPAN study is a multicenter, questionnaire-based survey, conducted between 2004 and 2005. Participating physicians were categorized as follows based on their expertise: Japan Diabetes Society (JDS certified specialists (n = 77, JDS-affiliated physicians (n = 30, and non-JDS-affiliated physicians (n = 27. To assess physician barriers to insulin initiation, we have used a newly developed 27- item questionnaire. RESULTS: The mean age of patients (n = 11,656 treated by participating physicians was 64.1 years. The mean duration of diabetes was 121.6 months, and their mean HbA1c was 7.5%. Insulin was used in 27.4% of total patients. With regard to physician barriers to insulin initiation, the biggest differences in concerns expressed by JDS-certified specialists and non-JDS-affiliated physicians were observed in the following items with statistical significance: "I do not have staff (nurse, pharmacists who can assist with explanations" (1.3% vs 55.5%, respectively, "I have concerns about the use of insulin therapy in elderly patients" (38.1% vs 81.5%, and "It is difficult to provide guidance and education on insulin injection to patients" (16.9% vs 55.5%. The mean HbA1c at which physicians responded they would recommend insulin to their patients was 8.7%; however, they would reduce this level to 8.2% if they themselves required insulin. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated that physicians have concerns about insulin use, and suggested that

  2. A variant in the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus is associated with increased fasting plasma glucose, increased basal hepatic glucose production and increased insulin release after oral and intravenous glucose loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, C S; Grarup, N; Krarup, N T

    2009-01-01

    to hepatic glucose production during a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Furthermore, we examined rs560887 for association with impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), type 2 diabetes and components of the metabolic syndrome. METHODS: rs560887 was genotyped in the Inter99...... an increased acute insulin response (p = 4 x 10(-4)) during an IVGTT. Among elderly twins, G allele carriers had higher basal hepatic glucose production (p = 0.04). Finally, the G allele associated with the risk of having IFG (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.08-1.47, p = 0.002), but not with IGT (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.......82-1.08, p = 0.4) or type 2 diabetes (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.84-1.04, p = 0.2). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The common rs560887 G allele in the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus is associated with increased fasting glycaemia and increased risk of IFG, associations that may be partly related to an increased basal hepatic glucose...

  3. Optimum bolus wizard settings in insulin pumps in children with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A J B; Ostenfeld, A; Pipper, C B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate current insulin pump settings in an optimally regulated paediatric population using bolus wizard. METHODS: We used a retrospective study design to analyse data from 124 children on insulin pump therapy who had optimum HbA1c levels [.... Furthermore, duration of insulin pump treatment was significantly associated with insulin sensitivity factor and percentage bolus/basal was significantly associated with insulin to carbohydrate factor. Gender, diabetes duration and BMI were not associated with any of the calculation factors. CONCLUSION......: Optimum insulin pump settings at pump initiation depend on both insulin requirements and use of the pump. Settings need to be individualized because the standardized calculation factors are not constant for children. There is a need to develop specific age- and insulin dose-dependent calculation factors....

  4. Clinical Efficacy of Two Different Methods to Initiate Sensor-Augmented Insulin Pumps: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Moreno-Fernandez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze clinical effect of a novel approach to initiate sensor-augmented insulin pumps in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM patients through early real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM initiation. Methods. A 26-week pilot study with T1DM subjects randomized (1 : 1 to start RT-CGM three weeks before continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CGM pre-CSII or adding RT-CGM three weeks after continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CGM post-CSII. Results. Twenty-two patients were enrolled with a mean age of 36.6 yr. (range 19–59 yr. and T1DM duration of 16.8±10.6 yr. Higher adherence in CGM pre-CSII patients was confirmed at study end (84.6±11.1% versus 64.0±25.4%; P=0.01. The two intervention groups had similar HbA1c reduction at study end of −0.6% (P=0.9. Hypoglycemic event frequency reduction was observed from baseline to study end only in CGM pre-CSII group (mean difference in change, −6.3%; 95% confidence interval, −12.0 to −0.5; P=0.04. Moreover, no severe hypoglycemia was detected among CGM pre-CSII subjects during the study follow-up (0.0±0.0 events versus 0.63±1.0 events; P=0.03. CGM pre-CSII patients showed better satisfaction than CGM post-CSII patients at the end of the study (27.3±9.3 versus 32.9±7.2; P=0.04. Conclusions. CGM pre-CSII is a novel approach to improve glycemic control and satisfaction in type 1 diabetes sensor-augmented pump treated patients.

  5. Heterogeneity of change in state affect following insulin therapy initiation in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruszczyńska Ewa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore heterogeneity of change in state affect following the introduction of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes. State affect was assessed twice among 305 patients: just before the introduction of insulin therapy and at 1-month follow-up. Latent class growth modeling showed that negative affect (NA increased in 78% of the sample, whereas positive affect (PA improved in only 17% of the participants. On the basis of cross-tabulation of these changes a 4-class model of emotional response to the new treatment was obtained. The largest subgroup of participants (57% manifested “threat response”, i.e. moderate-stable PA with increase in NA. Participants in the “challenge response” subgroup (11.8% showed increases in both NA and PA. The third class (10.2% characterized by “no response”, had low-stable NA and moderate-stable PA. The smallest “stress response” subgroup (9.8% showed increase in NA and high-stable PA. Gender, age and education level were significant covariates of group membership. Thus, the findings revealed heterogeneous emotional response to the new treatment, which may be of clinical relevance for improving diabetic patients’ adjustment through a more individual, person-centered approach.

  6. A comparison of the effects of selective increases in peripheral or portal insulin on hepatic glucose production in the conscious dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, D K; Balcom, J H; Chu, C A; Neal, D W; Cherrington, A D

    1996-11-01

    We investigated the mechanisms by which peripheral or portal insulin can independently alter liver glucose production. Isotopic ([3-3H]glucose) and arteriovenous difference methods were used in conscious overnight-fasted dogs. A pancreatic clamp (somatostatin plus basal insulin and basal glucagon infusions) was used to control the endocrine pancreas. After a 40-min basal period, a 180-min experimental period followed in which selective increases in peripheral (PERI group, n = 5) or portal-vein (PORT group, n = 5) insulin were induced. In control dogs (CONT group, n = 10), insulin was not increased. Glucagon levels were fixed in all studies, and basal euglycemia was maintained by peripheral glucose infusion in the two experimental groups. In the PERI group, arterial insulin rose from 36 +/- 12 to 120 +/- 12 pmol/l, while portal insulin was unaltered. In the PORT group, portal insulin rose from 108 +/- 42 to 192 +/- 42 pmol/l, while arterial insulin was unaltered. Neither arterial nor portal insulin changed from basal in the CONT group. With a selective rise in peripheral insulin, the net hepatic glucose output (NHGO; basal, 11.8 +/- 0.7 micromol x kg-1 x min-1) did not change initially (11.8 +/- 2.1 micromol x kg-1 x min-1, 30 min after the insulin increase), but eventually fell (P glycogenolysis, while an equal increment in arterial insulin produced an equally potent but slower effect that resulted from a small increase in hepatic sinusoidal insulin, from a suppression of gluconeogenic precursor uptake by the liver, and from a redirection of glycogenolytic carbon to lactate rather than glucose.

  7. Drug-use patterns of initially prescribed insulin detemir and insulin glargine in the Netherlands; A comparative analysis using pharmacy data from IADB.nl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.T.; Vegter, S.; Boersma, C.; De Grooth, R.; Postma, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Newer long-acting insulin analogs have shown to result in several treatment improvements if compared with NPH insulins. Promising results from clinical trials require confirmation from observational settings reflecting potential “real-life” benefits. Therefore, the current study aimed to

  8. Insulin Like Growth Factor 2 Expression in the Rat Brain Both in Basal Condition and following Learning Predominantly Derives from the Maternal Allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Ye

    Full Text Available Insulin like growth factor 2 (Igf2 is known as a maternally imprinted gene involved in growth and development. Recently, Igf2 was found to also be regulated and required in the adult rat hippocampus for long-term memory formation, raising the question of its allelic regulation in adult brain regions following experience and in cognitive processes. We show that, in adult rats, Igf2 is abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in cognitive functions, like hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, compared to the peripheral tissues. In contrast to its maternal imprinting in peripheral tissues, Igf2 is mainly expressed from the maternal allele in these brain regions. The training-dependent increase in Igf2 expression derives proportionally from both parental alleles, and, hence, is mostly maternal. Thus, Igf2 parental expression in the adult rat brain does not follow the imprinting rules found in peripheral tissues, suggesting differential expression regulation and functions of imprinted genes in the brain.

  9. Weight gain in insulin-treated patients by body mass index category at treatment initiation: new evidence from real-world data in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S K; Shaw, J E; Montvida, O; Klein, K

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate, in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) treated with insulin, the extent of weight gain over 2 years of insulin treatment, and the dynamics of weight gain in relation to glycaemic achievements over time according to adiposity levels at insulin initiation. Patients with T2DM (n = 155 917), who commenced insulin therapy and continued it for at least 6 months, were selected from a large database of electronic medical records in the USA. Longitudinal changes in body weight and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) according to body mass index (BMI) category were estimated. Patients had a mean age of 59 years, a mean HbA1c level of 9.5%, and a mean BMI of 35 kg/m 2 at insulin initiation. The HbA1c levels at insulin initiation were significantly lower (9.2-9.4%) in the obese patients than in patients with normal body weight (10.0%); however, the proportions of patients with HbA1c >7.5% or >8.0% were similar across the BMI categories. The adjusted weight gain fell progressively with increasing baseline BMI category over 6, 12 and 24 months (p weight gain as pretreatment BMI rose, ranging from a 1.24 kg gain in those with a BMI 40 kg/m 2 . During 24 months of insulin treatment, obese patients gained significantly less body weight than normal-weight and overweight patients, while achieving clinically similar glycaemic benefits. These data provide reassurance with regard to the use of insulin in obese patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Initiation of insulin glargine in patients with Type 2 diabetes in suboptimal glycaemic control positively impacts health-related quality of life. A prospective cohort study in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajos, T. R. S.; Pouwer, F.; de Grooth, R.; Holleman, F.; Twisk, J. W. R.; Diamant, M.; Snoek, F. J.

    2011-01-01

    Diabet. Med. 28, 1096-1102 (2011) ABSTRACT: Aims  To study prospectively the impact of initiating insulin glargine in suboptimally controlled insulin-naïve patients with Type 2 diabetes on health-related quality of life in relation to glycaemic control. Methods  Insulin-naïve Dutch patients with

  11. A Variable State Dimension Approach to Meal Detection and Meal Size Estimation: In Silico Evaluation Through Basal-Bolus Insulin Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jinyu; Wang, Qian

    2017-06-01

    This paper aims to develop an algorithm that can detect unannounced meals and estimate meal sizes to achieve a robust glucose control. A variable state dimension (VSD) algorithm is developed to detect unannounced meals and estimate meal sizes, where a Kalman filter operates on a quiescent state model when no meal is detected, and switches to a maneuvering state model to estimate meal information once the meal-induced glucose variability is statistically significant. Through evaluation using 30 subjects of the UVa/Padova simulator, a basal-bolus (BB) control using the VSD-estimated meal size for each meal can achieve mean blood glucose (BG) of 142 mg/dl with an average 17.7% of time in hypoglycemia. In terms of 20 Monte-Carlo simulations for each subject over a two-day scenario, where each meal/snack has a probability of 0.5 not to be announced, the BB control using VSD for unannounced meals can achieve an average mean BG of 143 mg/dl with 8% of time in hypoglycemia, in contrast to mean BG of 180 mg/dl with 8% of time in hypoglycemia obtained by BB with missing boluses. Additionally, VSD is able to detect a meal within 45 (±14) min since its start with a 76% success rate and 16% false alarm rate. The addition of VSD to the BB control improves glucose control when meal announcements are missed. The VSD can be used as a complementary tool to detect meal and estimate meal size in absence of a meal announcement.

  12. Diurnal rhythm and effects of feeding, exercise and recombinant equine growth hormone on serum insulin concentrations in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, G K; Sillence, M N

    2013-11-01

    As growth hormone increases lean body mass, it could be a therapy for obese horses. However, growth hormone use induces hyperinsulinaemia in some species, so further investigation is warranted. To investigate the effects of feeding, exercise and growth hormone therapy on basal insulin concentrations in healthy horses. In vivo experimental study. Blood samples were obtained every 30 min from 12 geldings over 24 h, to establish basal serum insulin concentrations, before they underwent a 3-week exercise programme. Horses were allocated into 2 groups and exercised for another 4 weeks. Group A received daily i.m. injections of recombinant equine growth hormone; 5 mg/day for 5 days, then 12.5 mg/day for 16 days. Blood samples were taken daily before feeding. Insulin vs. time area under curve of Groups A and B were compared using a Student's unpaired t test. Horses demonstrated insulin peaks within 2 h of feeding of 577 ± 108.3 pmol/l at 09.30 h and 342.4 ± 75.7 pmol/l at 17.30 h, despite receiving the same meal. The nadir was between midnight and 07.30 h. Exercise had no effect on basal insulin concentrations prior to equine growth hormone administrations. The equine growth hormone injections increased serum insulin concentrations (P = 0.01) within Group A, from 44.4 ± 15.3 pmol/l initially to 320.9 ± 238.2 pmol/l by Day 12. Exogenous growth hormone caused variable hyperinsulinaemia, which was alleviated once equine growth hormone administration ceased. Single serum samples taken prior to the morning meal provide basal insulin concentrations. Exercise did not change basal insulin concentrations. However, equine growth hormone injections increased basal insulin concentrations, which were not ameliorated by exercise. This therapy is not recommended to address obesity in insulin-resistant equids. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  13. An evaluation of insulin therapy initiation among patients with type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clinically effective interventions that could reduce diabetic patients' risk of long-term complications are needed to contain the rising cost of diabetes care associated with the increasing prevalence of this condition. Good glycaemic control needs to be rapidly attained and maintained by the appropriate initiation ...

  14. Clinical use of the co-formulation of insulin degludec and insulin aspart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, A; Awata, T; Bain, S C

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To provide a review of the available data and practical use of insulin degludec with insulin aspart (IDegAsp). Premixed insulins provide basal and prandial glucose control; however, they have an intermediate-acting prandial insulin component and do not provide as effective basal coverage...... as true long-acting insulins, owing to the physicochemical incompatibility of their individual components, coupled with the inflexibility of adjustment. The molecular structure of the co-formulation of IDegAsp, a novel insulin preparation, allows these two molecules to coexist without affecting...... (HbA1c ) to current modern insulins, but with lower risk of nocturnal hypoglycaemia. In prior insulin users, glycaemic control was achieved with lower or equal insulin doses vs. other basal+meal-time or premix insulin regimens. In insulin-naïve patients with T2DM, IDegAsp can be started once or twice...

  15. How can insulin initiation delivery in a dual-sector health system be optimised? A qualitative study on healthcare professionals’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ping Yein

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in developing countries. However, glycaemia control remains suboptimal and insulin use is low. One important barrier is the lack of an efficient and effective insulin initiation delivery approach. This study aimed to document the strategies used and proposed by healthcare professionals to improve insulin initiation in the Malaysian dual-sector (public–private health system. Methods In depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in Klang Valley and Seremban, Malaysia in 2010–11. Healthcare professionals consisting of general practitioners (n = 11, medical officers (n = 8, diabetes educators (n = 3, government policy makers (n = 4, family medicine specialists (n = 10 and endocrinologists (n = 2 were interviewed. We used a topic guide to facilitate the interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic approach. Results Three main themes emerged from the interviews. Firstly, there was a lack of collaboration between the private and public sectors in diabetes care. The general practitioners in the private sector proposed an integrated system for them to refer patients to the public health services for insulin initiation programmes. There could be shared care between the two sectors and this would reduce the disproportionately heavy workload at the public sector. Secondly, besides the support from the government health authority, the healthcare professionals wanted greater involvement of non-government organisations, media and pharmaceutical industry in facilitating insulin initiation in both the public and private sectors. The support included: training of healthcare professionals; developing and disseminating patient education materials; service provision by diabetes education teams; organising programmes for patients’ peer group sessions; increasing awareness and demystifying

  16. How can insulin initiation delivery in a dual-sector health system be optimised? A qualitative study on healthcare professionals' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ping Yein; Lee, Yew Kong; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2012-04-30

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in developing countries. However, glycaemia control remains suboptimal and insulin use is low. One important barrier is the lack of an efficient and effective insulin initiation delivery approach. This study aimed to document the strategies used and proposed by healthcare professionals to improve insulin initiation in the Malaysian dual-sector (public-private) health system. In depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in Klang Valley and Seremban, Malaysia in 2010-11. Healthcare professionals consisting of general practitioners (n = 11), medical officers (n = 8), diabetes educators (n = 3), government policy makers (n = 4), family medicine specialists (n = 10) and endocrinologists (n = 2) were interviewed. We used a topic guide to facilitate the interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic approach. Three main themes emerged from the interviews. Firstly, there was a lack of collaboration between the private and public sectors in diabetes care. The general practitioners in the private sector proposed an integrated system for them to refer patients to the public health services for insulin initiation programmes. There could be shared care between the two sectors and this would reduce the disproportionately heavy workload at the public sector. Secondly, besides the support from the government health authority, the healthcare professionals wanted greater involvement of non-government organisations, media and pharmaceutical industry in facilitating insulin initiation in both the public and private sectors. The support included: training of healthcare professionals; developing and disseminating patient education materials; service provision by diabetes education teams; organising programmes for patients' peer group sessions; increasing awareness and demystifying insulin via public campaigns; and subsidising glucose

  17. Effect of glucagon on glucose production during insulin deficiency in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherrington, A D; Lacy, W W; Chiasson, J L

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the present experiments was to determine the effects of basal glucagon on glucose production after induction of prolonged insulin lack in normal conscious dogs fasted overnight. A selective deficiency of insulin or a combined deficiency of both pancreatic hormones was created by infusing somatostatin alone or in combination with an intraportal replacement infusion of glucagon. Glucose production (GP) was measured by a primed constant infusion of [3H-3]glucose, and gluconeogenesis (GNG) was assessed by determining the conversion rate of circulating [14C]alanine and [14C]lactate into [14C]glucose. When insulin deficiency was induced in the presence of basal glucagon the latter hormone caused GP to double and then to decline so that after 4 h it had returned to the conrol rate. The conversion of alanine and lactate into glucose, on the other hand, increased throughout the period of insulin lack. Withdrawal of glucagon after GP had normalized resulted in a 40% fall in GP, a 37% decrease in GNG, and a marked decrease in the plasma glucose concentration. Induction of insulin deficiency in the absence of basal glucagon resulted in an initial (30%) drop in GP followed by a restoration of normal GP after 2--3 h and moderately enhanced glucose formation from alanine and lactate. It can be concluded that (a) the effect of relative hyperglucagonemia on GP is short-lived; (b) the waning of the effect of glucagon is attributable solely to a diminution of glycogenolysis because GNG remains stimulated; (c) basal glucagon markedly enhances the GNG stimulation apparent after induction of insulin deficiency; and (d) basal glucagon worsens the hyperglycemia pursuant on the induction of insulin deficiency both by triggering an initial overproduction of glucose and by maintaining the basal production rate thereafter. PMID:690190

  18. Comparison of insulin degludec with insulin glargine in insulin-naive subjects with Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodbard, H W; Cariou, B; Zinman, B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare long-term safety and efficacy of the basal insulin analogue degludec with glargine in insulin-naive subjects with Type 2 diabetes.......The aim of this study was to compare long-term safety and efficacy of the basal insulin analogue degludec with glargine in insulin-naive subjects with Type 2 diabetes....

  19. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Basal cell carcinoma Overview Basal cell carcinoma: This skin cancer ... that has received years of sun exposure. Basal cell carcinoma: Overview Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the ...

  20. Glycaemic control and hypoglycaemia with insulin glargine 300 U/mL compared with glargine 100 U/mL in Japanese adults with type 2 diabetes using basal insulin plus oral anti-hyperglycaemic drugs (EDITION JP 2 randomised 12-month trial including 6-month extension).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Y; Koyama, M; Cheng, X; Sumi, M; Riddle, M C; Bolli, G B; Hirose, T

    2017-10-01

    To compare insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300) with glargine 100 U/mL (Gla-100) in Japanese adults with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes on basal insulin and oral anti-hyperglycaemic drugs over 12 months. EDITION JP 2 was a randomised, open-label, phase 3 study. Following a 6-month treatment period, participants continued receiving previously assigned once daily Gla-300 or Gla-100, plus oral anti-hyperglycaemic drugs, in a 6-month extension period. Glycaemic control, hypoglycaemia and adverse events were assessed. The 12-month completion rate was 88% for Gla-300 and 96% for Gla-100, with comparable reasons for discontinuation. Mean HbA 1c decrease from baseline to month 12 was 0.3% in both groups. Annualised rates of confirmed (≤3.9mmol/L [≤70mg/dL]) or severe hypoglycaemia were lower with Gla-300 than Gla-100 (nocturnal [00:00-05:59h]: rate ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval: 0.18 to 0.92; anytime [24h]: rate ratio 0.64; 95% confidence interval: 0.44 to 0.94). Cumulative number of hypoglycaemic events was lower with Gla-300 than Gla-100. Adverse event profiles were comparable between treatments. Over 12 months, Gla-300-treated participants achieved sustained glycaemic control and experienced less hypoglycaemia, particularly at night, versus Gla-100, supporting 6-month results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors associated with relational coordination between health professionals involved in insulin initiation in the general practice setting for people with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski-Nankervis, Jo-Anne; Furler, John; Young, Doris; Patterson, Elizabeth; Blackberry, Irene

    2015-09-01

    To examine associations between characteristics of general practice settings and primary healthcare providers (general practitioners and practice nurses) and the degree of relational coordination for the task of insulin initiation for type 2 diabetes between primary healthcare providers and diabetes specialists. Relational coordination is a component of effective chronic disease management and can be used to measure collaboration and communication between health professionals. High levels of relational coordination may be important to support insulin initiation in general practice. Cross-sectional study. Surveys were completed by general practitioners and practice nurses participating in the Stepping Up trial. Data on demographics, practice characteristics and relational coordination were collected between October 2012-June 2014. Univariate and multivariate analyses examined factors associated with relational coordination. General practitioners (n = 174) and 115 practice nurses from 78 general practices were included in the analysis. General practice characteristics associated with relational coordination were geographical location and number of administrative staff. Female general practitioners and older practice nurses reported lower relational coordination. Practice nurses with diabetes educator qualifications and experience in insulin initiation reported higher relational coordination. An expanded role and experience of practice nurses in diabetes care increased relational coordination and has the potential to deliver more effective chronic disease management in general practice. Practice and health professional characteristics should be taken into account when designing models of care to increase insulin initiation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Impaired basal glucose effectiveness but unaltered fasting glucose release and gluconeogenesis during short-term hypercortisolemia in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael F; Caumo, Andrea; Chandramouli, Visvanathan

    2004-01-01

    with hydrocortisone or saline. Glucose effectiveness was assessed by a combined somatostatin and insulin infusion protocol to maintain insulin concentration at basal level in the presence of prandial glucose infusions. Despite elevated insulin concentrations (P ... basal insulin concentrations were higher during hydrocortisone than during saline infusion (P

  3. Relational coordination amongst health professionals involved in insulin initiation for people with type 2 diabetes in general practice: an exploratory survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski-Nankervis, Jo-Anne; Blackberry, Irene; Young, Doris; O'Neal, David; Patterson, Elizabeth; Furler, John

    2014-11-01

    The majority of people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) receive their care in general practice and will eventually require initiation of insulin as part of their management. However, this is often delayed and frequently involves referral to specialists. If insulin initiation is to become more frequent and routine within general practice, coordination of care with specialist services may be required. Relational coordination (RC) provides a framework to explore this. The aim of this study was to explore RC between specialist physicians, specialist diabetes nurses (DNEs), generalist physicians in primary care (GPs) and generalist nurses (practice nurses (PNs)) and to explore the association between RC and the initiation of insulin in general practice, and the belief that it is appropriate for this task to be carried out in general practice. A survey was distributed to a convenience sample of specialist physicians, DNEs, GPs and practice nurses. We collected data on demographics, models of care and RC in relation to insulin initiation. We expected that RC would be higher between specialists than between specialists and generalists. We expected higher RC between specialists and generalists to be associated with insulin initiation in general practice and with the belief that it is appropriate for insulin initiation to be carried out in general practice. We used descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests to explore these hypotheses. 179 health professionals returned completed surveys. Specialists reported higher RC with each other and lower RC with PNs. All groups except PNs reported their highest RC with DNEs, suggesting the potential for DNEs to serve as boundary spanners. Lower RC with specialists was reported by those working within a general practice model of care. Health professionals who felt that a general practice model was appropriate reported lower communication with specialist physicians and higher shared knowledge with GPs. Given the need for coordination

  4. Initial basal cell carcinomas diagnosed in the National Campaign for Skin Cancer Prevention are smaller than those identified by the conventional medical referral system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakiyama, Thweicyka Pinheiro; França, Maria Laura Marconi; Carvalho, Larissa Pierri; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Miot, Hélio Amante; Schmitt, Juliano Vilaverde

    2017-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the malignant tumor most often diagnosed in the National Campaign for Skin Cancer Prevention (NCSCP). Little is known about the profile of these lesions compared to the profile of lesions diagnosed by conventional routes of public dermatological care. To identify if basal cell carcinomas identified in prevention campaigns and referred to surgery are smaller than those routinely removed in a same medical institution. Cross-sectional study including tumors routed from 2011-2014 campaigns and 84 anatomopathological reports of outpatients. The campaigns identified 223 individuals with suspicious lesions among 2,531 examinations (9%), with 116 basal cell carcinomas removed. Anatomopathological examinations revealed that the primary lesions identified in the national campaigns were smaller than those referred to surgery by the conventional routes of public health care (28 [13-50] x 38 [20-113] mm2, p basal cell carcinoma lesions. Retrospective study and inaccuracies in the measurements of the lesions. The NCSCP promotes an earlier treatment of basal cell carcinomas compared to patients referred to surgery by the conventional routes of public health care, which can result in lower morbidity rates and better prognosis.

  5. The A1 chieve study - an observational non-interventional study of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus initiating or switched to insulin analogue therapy: subgroup analysis of the Gulf population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naggar, N; Almansari, A; Khudada, K; Salman, S; Mariswamy, N; Abdelfattah, W; Hashim, F

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of insulin analogues (insulin aspart, insulin detemir and biphasic insulin aspart 30, alone or in combination) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in routine clinical practice in the Gulf as a subgroup of the A(1) chieve multi-national study. A total of 10,704 T2DM Gulf patients with uncontrolled T2DM on oral antidiabetics ± insulins other than insulin aspart, insulin detemir or biphasic insulin aspart 30, who initiated or switched to study insulins were included and followed up for 24 weeks in the context of the A(1) chieve study. Baseline HbA(1c) (± SD) was poor: 9.7 ± 1.7%. At Week 24, an improvement in HbA(1c) of -2.3 ± 1.6% was observed in the entire cohort, and -2.4 ± 1.5% and -2.1 ± 1.7% for insulin-naïve patients and prior insulin users respectively. Overall, rates of hypoglycaemia increased in those new to insulin therapy, whereas a reduction was observed in those switching from other insulins. A marginal reduction in body weight (-0.8 ± 4.4 kg) was noted in the entire cohort, whereas the overall lipid profile and systolic blood pressure (-6.2 ± 15.3 mmHg) improved. Initiating or switching to insulin analogues was well tolerated and resulted in significant improvements in glycaemic control in T2DM patients in the Gulf. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Flexibility in insulin prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication explores the concept of flexibility, a propos insulin preparations and insulin regimes used in the management of type 2 diabetes. The flexibility of an insulin regime or preparation is defined as their ability to be injected at variable times, with variable injection-meal time gaps, in a dose frequency and quantum determined by shared decision making, with a minimal requirement of glucose monitoring and health professional consultation, with no compromise on safety, efficiency and tolerability. The relative flexibility of various basal, prandial and dual action insulins, as well as intensive regimes, is compared. The biopsychosocial model of health is used to assess the utility of different insulins while encouraging a philosophy of flexible insulin usage.

  7. Safety and Efficacy in Early Insulin Initiation as Comprehensive Therapy for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Primary Health Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Pranoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to analyze the safety and efficacy of early insulin initiation therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in primary health care provided by general practitioners (GPs in Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia. Methods: pre-post study of ninety nine diabetic patients without previous insulin treatment with HbA1c levels >8% were involved in this study. The study was conducted in 10 primary health care centers in Surabaya between October 2011 to June 2012. Each patient received insulin therapy for 12 weeks. Laboratory examination was performed for each patient including fasting plasma glucose (FPG, 2 hours post-prandial plasma glucose (2hPPG and HbA1c examination before and after the study. Self monitoring blood glucose (SMBG examination was conducted in order to adjust the insulin dose and prevent the incidence of hypoglycemia. Data was statistically analyzed using paired-T test. Results: FPG level was decreased from baseline data (209 mg/dL to 152.07 mg/dL at the end of the study (Δ56.93 mg/dl; p=0.0001. The average of 2hPPG level was also decreased from 313.00 mg/dl to 220.72 mg/dL (Δ 92.28 mg/dL; p=0.0001. HbA1c was reduced from 11.60% at baseline to 8.95% at the end of study (Δ 2.65%; p=0.0001. Hypoglycemia was found in 6 patients (6.06% in this study, but all events were mild and did not need to be admitted to hospital. Conclusion: the safety of insulin therapy iniatiation might be provided by GPs at primary health centers with significant efficacy and minimal side effects. Key words: insulin, general practioner, primary health center.

  8. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  9. New basal temperature and basal melt rate maps of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Yasmina M.; Martin, Carlos; Vaughan, David G.

    2017-04-01

    Ice sheet basal conditions are key to initialize ice flow models and be able to estimate the future of the cryosphere. The thermal conditions are of importance because of the widespread presence of water beneath the Antarctic continent that affects both the ice-dynamics and the mass budget. The melting or freezing at the base of the ice sheet is consequence of several contributions to the heat balance. This includes the geothermal heat flux, the heat conducted or advected through the ice sheet, the latent heat and the friction heat at the interface. Here we present a new basal temperature and a total basal melting rate distributions of Antarctica. For this we use the most recent heat flux map (Martos et al., 2016) and an advanced ice flow model to incorporate the effect of advection and estimate frictional heat. We assume steady state conditions to estimate the basal properties. We found higher basal melting rates in West Antarctica than in East Antarctica as well as in the coastal regions of the continent and ice shelves. The spatial variation of our new basal temperature and basal melting rate distributions are greater than previously proposed which will help to unveil the Antarctic subglacial hydrology.

  10. Insulin receptor binding and protein kinase activity in muscles of trained rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohm, G.L.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, and muscle is quantitatively the most important tissue of insulin action. Since the first step in insulin action is the binding to a membrane receptor, the authors postulated that exercise training would change insulin receptors in muscle and in this study they have investigated this hypothesis. Female rats initially weighing ∼ 100 g were trained by treadmill running for 2 h/day, 6 days/wk for 4 wk at 25 m/min (0 grade). Insulin receptors from vastus intermedius muscles were solubilized by homogenizing in a buffer containing 1% Triton X-100 and then partially purified by passing the soluble extract over a wheat germ agglutinin column. The 4 wk training regimen resulted in a 65% increase in citrate synthase activity in red vastus lateralis muscle, indicating an adaptation to exercise [ 125 I]. Insulin binding by the partially purified receptor preparations was approximately doubled in muscle of trained rats at all insulin concentrations, suggesting an increase in the number of receptors. Training did not alter insulin receptor structure as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Basal insulin receptor protein kinase activity was higher in trained than untrained animals and this was likely due to the greater number of receptors. However, insulin stimulation of the protein kinase activity was depressed by training. These results demonstrate that endurance training does alter receptor number and function in muscle and these changes may be important in increasing insulin sensitivity after exercise training

  11. Insulin degludec aspart: One-year real world experience

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Kalra; Manash P Baruah

    2016-01-01

    Background: This retrospective analysis describes the use of insulin degludec aspart (IDegAsp) in India. Material and Methods: All subjects who had received IDegAsp for 52 weeks at two endocrine centers were included in this study. Results: Forty-eight subjects (40 men), with mean age of 54.33 ? 9.63 years and mean duration of diabetes of 6.33 ? 2.96 years, started IDegAsp as insulin of initiation (16), as an intensification regime (4), as de-escalation from basal-bolus therapy (16), or as sw...

  12. Effects of Insulin Detemir and NPH Insulin on Body Weight and Appetite-Regulating Brain Regions in Human Type 1 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Golen, L.W.; Veltman, D.J.; IJzerman, R.G.; Deijen, J.B.; Heijboer, A.C.; Barkhof, F.; Drent, M.L.; Diamant, M.

    2014-01-01

    Studies in rodents have demonstrated that insulin in the central nervous system induces satiety. In humans, these effects are less well established. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that causes less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, including the current standard

  13. Effects of insulin detemir and NPH insulin on body weight and appetite-regulating brain regions in human type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Golen, Larissa W.; Veltman, Dick J.; IJzerman, Richard G.; Deijen, Jan Berend; Heijboer, Annemieke C.; Barkhof, Frederik; Drent, Madeleine L.; Diamant, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Studies in rodents have demonstrated that insulin in the central nervous system induces satiety. In humans, these effects are less well established. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that causes less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, including the current standard

  14. Changes in glycemic control and quality of life in pediatric type 1 diabetics with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion of insulin aspart following multiple daily injection therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tomoyuki; Urakami, Tatsuhiko; Sugihara, Shigetaka; Kim, Hey Sook; Mochizuki, Mie; Amamiya, Shin

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) of the rapid-acting insulin analogue, insulin aspart, was evaluated in 26 patients with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes aged between 6 and 18 yr who had been on basal-bolus therapy (multiple daily injection (MDI) of regular human insulin or rapid-acting insulin and intermediate/long-acting insulin). The glycemic control in the patients was evaluated based on changes in the clinical parameters and the patient quality of life (QOL) was evaluated by using the insulin therapy-related QOL questionnaire. Twenty two patients continued CSII during the 6-mo study period. The mean HbA1c was 7.8 ± 1.8% at baseline and it decreased to 7.4 ± 0.8% at 6 mo after the start of the CSII. Overall, no decrease of the QOL post-CSII initiation was noted. The possible superiority of CSII as compared to MDI was suggested for patients who "eat out" or "have to look for an appropriate place for insulin injection." Aside from an inadequate indwelling needle placement detected after the initiation of CSII in several patients, no adverse event associated with NovoRapid(®) was seen. In conclusion, CSII of rapid-acting insulin appears to be a useful therapy for patients with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes.

  15. The effects of structured self-monitoring of blood glucose on therapeutic effectiveness and adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus initiating insulin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Aleksandrovna Suvorova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the efficiency of standard and structured approaches to self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM initiating insulin treatment.Materials and Methods. This open prospective randomized clinical trial included 51 T2DM patients who initiated insulin therapy in either outpatient or inpatient setting. Subjects were randomized in standard and structured SMBG groups, the structured group used an advanced Accu-Chek 360 View protocol. Evaluation included clinical examination and laboratory testing of HbA1c levels at the beginning of the treatment and after 3 months of the follow-up period.Results. 70% of the structured self-monitoring group and 32% of the control group achieved therapeutic goals (p=0.008. Higher adherence was associated with better glycemic control in both groups – and vice versa. However, among patients with low adherence, 73% of advanced SMBG group managed to achieve therapeutic goals vs. 19% in the control group (p=0.005. In addition, patients in the structured monitoring group gained less weight as compared to the control (1.0±2.88 kg vs. 3.2±2.56 kg; p=0.005.Conclusion. Structured SMBG commenced at the initiation of insulin therapy improves glycemic control in a greater fraction of patients, especially in those with low adherence to treatment. Structured SMBG also partially alleviates weight gain as side effect of insulin treatment.

  16. Insulin Secretagogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Spikes Is mealtime insulin right for you? Insulin Secretagogues September 2017 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors ... Additional Resources Affordable Insulin Project FDA What are insulin secretagogues? Insulin secretagogues are one type of medicine ...

  17. Efficacy and safety of premixed insulin analogs in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Wayne H-H; Ji, Linong; Lee, Woo Je; Jabbar, Abdul; Han, Jeong Hee; Lew, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    The primary aim of this systematic review was to provide an overview of the efficacy and safety of premixed insulin analogs in Asians, specifically East Asians, with type 2 diabetes. The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched from 1 January 1995 to 26 November 2015. Randomized controlled trials involving East Asians with type 2 diabetes treated with any premixed insulin analog were included. Major comparator treatments were basal insulin and basal-bolus insulin. Comparisons were also made between East Asian and Caucasian patients. The primary efficacy outcome was glycated hemoglobin change from baseline to end-point. The primary safety outcome was the incidence of hypoglycemia. A total of 21 studies were included; most (n = 14) were carried out in China or Japan. The duration of treatment ranged from 12 to 48 weeks. The glycated hemoglobin mean/least squares mean change from baseline to end-point after treatment with premixed insulin analogs ranged from -0.12 to -4.2% (improvement was generally more pronounced with insulin initiation vs intensification). The incidence of hypoglycemia ranged from 8.3 to 72.0% in most studies, with the variability reflecting the definition of hypoglycemia used. Efficacy and safety outcomes for premixed insulin analogs were generally similar to those for basal or basal-bolus insulin. Limited evidence suggests that dosing, efficacy and safety profiles might differ slightly between East Asian and Caucasians receiving premixed insulin analogs. These results support the current use of premixed insulin analogs for managing East Asian patients with type 2 diabetes. © 2016 Eli Lilly and Company (Taiwan), Inc. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Biphasic Insulin Analogues in Type 2 Diabetes: Expert Panel Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Akalın

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has reached pandemic levels all over the world, and the problem is still growing. Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease, in which insulin resistance and decrease in beta cell function accompany obesity. Early disorder, which ensues in clinical progression of the disease, is the defect of early phase insulin secretion. Patients have already lost approximately half of their beta cell reserve at the time of diagnosis. Aims of type 2 diabetes treatment are to eliminate hyperglycemia caused by insufficient insulin secretion and/or insulin resistance, to slow down beta cell destruction/depletion, to improve concomitant metabolic problems and to prevent complications. In treatment algorithms, insulin is evaluated as a replacement therapy at the following stage after life style changes (medical nutrition therapy, exercise and oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs options. Since beta cell depletion is present at initial stages of the disease, it transforms insulin therapy into an earlier approach in treatment stages. Premixed insulin forms are one of the proposed treatment options in patients with hyperglycemia that is not controlled by OADs. These types of insulins are developed to meet both basal and postprandial insulin requirements of patients. Currently, premixed human insulin forms are replaced by analogue insulin forms, which can mimic the physiological secretion in more acceptable manner. Biphasic analogue insulin is one of the readily available pre-mixed analogue insulin forms, an example of this, Biphasic Insulin aspart 30 which is the one of the premixed analoge insulin forms, contains 30% insulin aspart and 70% protaminated insulin aspart. Consensus recommending the individualized approach in insulin therapy implies that physicians should have more detailed information about the use of different insulin forms. Although a global consensus report about initiation, titration and intensification and the use

  19. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  20. Computational modeling of stuttering caused by impairments in a basal ganglia thalamo-cortical circuit involved in syllable selection and initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civier, Oren; Bullock, Daniel; Max, Ludo; Guenther, Frank H.

    2013-01-01

    A typical white-matter integrity and elevated dopamine levels have been reported for individuals who stutter. We investigated how such abnormalities may lead to speech dysfluencies due to their effects on a syllable-sequencing circuit that consists of basal ganglia (BG), thalamus, and left ventral premotor cortex (vPMC). “Neurally impaired” versions of the neurocomputational speech production model GODIVA were utilized to test two hypotheses: (1) that white-matter abnormalities disturb the circuit via corticostriatal projections carrying copies of executed motor commands, and (2) that dopaminergic abnormalities disturb the circuit via the striatum. Simulation results support both hypotheses: in both scenarios, the neural abnormalities delay readout of the next syllable’s motor program, leading to dysfluency. The results also account for brain imaging findings during dysfluent speech. It is concluded that each of the two abnormality types can cause stuttering moments, probably by affecting the same BG-thalamus-vPMC circuit. PMID:23872286

  1. Optimizing Glycemic Control Through Titration of Insulin Glargine 100 U/mL: A Review of Current and Future Approaches with a Focus on Asian Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deerochanawong, Chaicharn; Bajpai, Shailendra; Dwipayana, I Made Pande; Hussein, Zanariah; Mabunay, Maria Aileen; Rosales, Reynaldo; Tsai, Shih-Tzer; Tsang, Man Wo

    2017-12-01

    Various data have demonstrated inadequate glycemic control amongst Asians with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), possibly on account of suboptimal titration of basal insulin-an issue which needs to be further examined. Here we review the available global and Asia-specific data on titration of basal insulin, with a focus on the use of insulin glargine 100 U/mL (Gla-100). We also discuss clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of titrating Gla-100, different approaches to titration, including some of the latest technological advancements, and guidance on the titration of basal insulin from international and local Asian guidelines. The authors also provide their recommendations for the initiation and titration of basal insulin for Asian populations. Discussion of the data included in this review and in relation to the authors' clinical experience with treating T2DM in Asian patients is also included. Briefly, clinical studies demonstrate the achievement of adequate glycemic control in adults with T2DM through titration of Gla-100. However, studies investigating approaches to titration, specifically in Asian populations, are lacking and need to be conducted. Given that the management of insulin therapy is a multidisciplinary team effort involving endocrinologists, primary care physicians, nurse educators, and patients, greater resources and education targeted at these groups are needed regarding the optimal titration of basal insulin. Technological advancements in the form of mobile or web-based applications for automated dose adjustment can aid different stakeholders in optimizing the dose of basal insulin, enabling a larger number of patients in Asia to reach their target glycemic goals with improved outcomes.

  2. Treatment outcomes after initiation of exenatide twice daily or insulin in clinical practice: 12-month results from CHOICE in six European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostenson CG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Claes-Göran Östenson,1 Stephan Matthaei,2 Matthew Reaney,3 Thure Krarup,4 Bruno Guerci,5 Jacek Kiljanski,6 Carole Salaun-Martin,7 Hélène Sapin,7 David Bruhn,8 Chantal Mathieu,9 Michael Theodorakis10 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Diabetes-Center Quakenbrück, Quakenbrück, Germany; 3Eli Lilly, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 4Department of Endocrinology I, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; 5Diabetology, Metabolic Diseases and Nutrition, Brabois Hospital, CHU Nancy, and INSERM CIC, ILCV, Vandoeuvre Lès Nancy, France; 6Eli Lilly, Warsaw, Poland; 7Eli Lilly, Neuilly Cedex, France; 8Eli Lilly, San Diego, California, USA; 9Department of Endocrinology, UZ Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium; 10Department of Clinical Therapeutics, University of Athens School of Medicine, Athens, Greece* *Michael Theodorakis was affiliated with the institution shown at the time of the study, but has since left this institution Objective: The CHanges to treatment and Outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes initiating InjeCtablE therapy (CHOICE study assessed time to, and reasons for, significant treatment change after patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM initiated their first injectable glucose-lowering therapy (exenatide twice daily [BID] or insulin in routine clinical practice, and these patients’ clinical outcomes, in six European countries. This paper reports interim data from the first 12 months of the study. Research design and methods: CHOICE (NCT00635492 is a prospective, noninterventional, observational study. Clinical data were collected at initiation of first injectable therapy and after approximately 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: Of 2497 patients enrolled in CHOICE, 1096 in the exenatide BID and 1239 in the insulin cohorts had ≥1 post-baseline assessment and were included in this analysis. Overall, 32.2% of the exenatide BID cohort and 29.1% of the insulin cohort (Kaplan–Meier estimates had

  3. Insulin Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Insulin Pumps Insulin pumps are small computerized devices that deliver insulin in ... tissue and is taped in place. The insulin pump is not an artificial pancreas (because you still ...

  4. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  5. Basal cell nevus syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nevus syndrome Basal cell nevus syndrome - face References Evans DG, Farndon PA. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. ... A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among ...

  6. Oral insulin-mimetic compounds that act independently of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vicente, Silvia; Yraola, Francesc; Marti, Luc; González-Muñoz, Elena; García-Barrado, María José; Cantó, Carles; Abella, Anna; Bour, Sandy; Artuch, Rafael; Sierra, Cristina; Brandi, Nuria; Carpéné, Christian; Moratinos, Julio; Camps, Marta; Palacín, Manuel; Testar, Xavier; Gumà, Anna; Albericio, Fernando; Royo, Miriam; Mian, Alec; Zorzano, Antonio

    2007-02-01

    The hallmarks of insulin action are the stimulation and suppression of anabolic and catabolic responses, respectively. These responses are orchestrated by the insulin pathway and are initiated by the binding of insulin to the insulin receptor, which leads to activation of the receptor's intrinsic tyrosine kinase. Severe defects in the insulin pathway, such as in types A and B and advanced type 1 and 2 diabetes lead to severe insulin resistance, resulting in a partial or complete absence of response to exogenous insulin and other known classes of antidiabetes therapies. We have characterized a novel class of arylalkylamine vanadium salts that exert potent insulin-mimetic effects downstream of the insulin receptor in adipocytes. These compounds trigger insulin signaling, which is characterized by rapid activation of insulin receptor substrate-1, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3 independent of insulin receptor phosphorylation. Administration of these compounds to animal models of diabetes lowered glycemia and normalized the plasma lipid profile. Arylalkylamine vanadium compounds also showed antidiabetic effects in severely diabetic rats with undetectable circulating insulin. These results demonstrate the feasibility of insulin-like regulation in the complete absence of insulin and downstream of the insulin receptor. This represents a novel therapeutic approach for diabetic patients with severe insulin resistance.

  7. Baseline results indicate poor glycemic control and delay in initiation and optimization of insulin therapy: results from the improving management practices and clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C R Anand Moses

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Improving management practices and clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes (IMPACT, was a prospective, open-label, 26- week, comparative, multi-center study to compare efficacy and safety of the Indian insulin guideline (IIG group versus routine clinical practice (RCP group in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: A total of 20,653 patients from 885 centers across India were enrolled and treated with premixed insulin therapy as per IIG or routine care. Results: Most of the participating centers (81.7% reported following a diabetes guideline in their practice routinely but only 20.4% targeted HbA1c 75% achieved an HbA1c <7%. Most of the physicians (39.8% also agreed that only 10-25% of the patients agree to start insulin therapy at the first counseling. Mean duration of diabetes before initiating insulin in patients using oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs was 7 years, indicating a delay in initiating insulin therapy. The difference in mean daily dose of insulin at initiation vs. at 26 weeks was only 0.8 U (25.8 ± 11.3 at initiation compared to 26.6 ± 9.5, respectively, p = ns suggesting lack of treatment optimization. Weekly titration till achieving HbA1c <7% was done in 51.1% of the patients and only 8.9% performed self-titration. Conclusion: Baseline glycemic control in these patients was poor and reflects a delay in initiating insulin therapy. Data also reflect a lack of optimization of insulin doses.

  8. A prospective randomised cross-over study of the effect of insulin analogues and human insulin on the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and recurrent hypoglycaemia (the HypoAna trial: study rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Peter

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe hypoglycaemia still represents a significant problem in insulin-treated diabetes. Most patients do not experience severe hypoglycaemia often. However, 20% of patients with type 1 diabetes experience recurrent severe hypoglycaemia corresponding to at least two episodes per year. The effect of insulin analogues on glycaemic control has been documented in large trials, while their effect on the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia is less clear, especially in patients with recurrent severe hypoglycaemia. The HypoAna Trial is designed to investigate whether short-acting and long-acting insulin analogues in comparison with human insulin are superior in reducing the occurrence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes in patients with recurrent hypoglycaemia. This paper reports the study design of the HypoAna Trial. Methods/design The study is a Danish two-year investigator-initiated, prospective, randomised, open, blinded endpoint (PROBE, multicentre, cross-over trial investigating the effect of insulin analogues versus human insulin on the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in subjects with type 1 diabetes. Patients are randomised to treatment with basal-bolus therapy with insulin detemir / insulin aspart or human NPH insulin / human regular insulin in random order. The major inclusion criterion is history of two or more episodes of severe hypoglycaemia in the preceding year. Discussion In contrast to almost all other studies in this field the HypoAna Trial includes only patients with major problems with hypoglycaemia. The HypoAna Trial will elucidate whether basal-bolus regimen with short-acting and long-acting insulin analogues in comparison with human insulin are superior in reducing occurrence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes in hypoglycaemia prone patients with type 1 diabetes. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00346996.

  9. Health promotion initiatives at school related to overweight, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia in adolescents: a cross-sectional study in Recife, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assunção Bezerra, Myrtis Katille; Freese de Carvalho, Eduardo; Souza Oliveira, Juliana; Pessoa Cesse, Eduarda Ângela; Cabral de Lira, Pedro Israel; Galvão Tenório Cavalcante, Jonathan; Sá Leal, Vanessa

    2018-02-07

    The emergence of diseases such as dyslipidemia, systemic arterial hypertension, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents has brought about a change in the epidemiologic profile of the pediatric population. As action to promote health in the school environment is a useful tool for changing the pattern of health/disease in the young population, the present study aimed to identify schools that promote healthy eating and physical activity and to study the relationship between these practices and the prevalence of overweight, hypertension, insulin resistance and hypercholesterolemia in adolescents. A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted with 2400 adolescents aged from 12 to 17 years old and participating in the "Study of Cardiovascular Risk in Adolescents" (ERICA - Estudo de Riscos Cardiovasculares em Adolescente). The association between dependent (overweight, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia) and independent variables (implementation of health promoting initiative in schools) was investigated using the chi-square test and prevalence ratio (PR) with a confidence index (CI) of 95%. The unsatisfactory implementation of a "health promoting environment" (PR = 1.02; CI 95%: 1.0; 1.04) and "partnerships with the health sector" (PR = 1.03; CI 95%: 1.01; 1.05) were linked to a high prevalence of overweight in adolescents. Hypercholesterolemia was found to be higher in the schools with unsatisfactory implementation of "healthy eating and health on the scholar curriculum" (PR = 1.71; CI 95%: 1.22; 2.44) and those lacking a "healthy-eating promoting environment" (PR = 1.29; CI 95%: 1.10; 1.54). Schools with unsatisfactory implementation of a "health-eating promoting environment" (PR = 1.36; CI 95%: 1.04; 1.79) and those lacking "partnership with the health sector" (PR = 2.12; CI 95%: 1.38; 3.24) had more adolescents with insulin resistance. There was no association between hypertension and any

  10. Changes in Insulin Resistance After Initiation of Raltegravir or Protease Inhibitors With Tenofovir-Emtricitabine: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5260s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirajlal-Fargo, Sahera; Moser, Carlee; Brown, Todd T.; Kelesidis, Theodoros; Dube, Michael P.; Stein, James H.; Currier, Judith; McComsey, Grace A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) can alter glucose metabolism, but little data exist on the association of raltegravir (RAL) with insulin resistance. Methods. A5260s was a substudy of A5257, a prospective open-label randomized trial in which human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected treatment-naive participants were randomized to tenofovir-emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) plus atazanavir-ritonavir (ATV/r), darunavir-ritonavir (DRV/r), or RAL over 96 weeks. Baseline and changes in insulin resistance as estimated by the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were assessed. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to assess shifts in the distribution of fold increase from baseline between treatment arms, and Spearman correlation was used to assess associations between HOMA-IR and measures of inflammation and body composition. Results. Three hundred twenty-eight participants were randomized; 90% were male, baseline median age was 36, HIV ribonucleic acid copies were 4.55 log10 copies/mL, and CD4 cell count was 349/mm3. Overall, HOMA-IR increased significantly after 4 weeks (1.9-fold change; 95% confidence interval, 1.73–2.05) then plateaued over the remainder of the study. Changes in HOMA-IR were not different between the arms (P ≥ .23). Changes in HOMA-IR were associated with changes in body mass index at weeks 48 and 96 (r = 0.12–0.22; P ≤ .04). There was a trend with increases in HOMA-IR and increases in visceral abdominal fat at week 96 (r = 0.12; P = .06). At 48 and 96 weeks, HOMA-IR correlated with interleukin-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and soluble CD163 (r = 0.16–0.27; P ≤ .003). Conclusions. Insulin resistance increased rapidly and then plateaued in treatment-naive participants initiating ART with TDF/FTC, and no differences were found with RAL when compared with ATV/r or DRV/r. PMID:27704026

  11. Associations of serum insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 levels with biomarker-calibrated protein, dairy product and milk intake in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Jeannette M; Gunter, Marc J; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Prentice, Ross L; Neuhouser, Marian L; Tinker, Lesley F; Vitolins, Mara Z; Strickler, Howard D

    2014-03-14

    It is well established that protein-energy malnutrition decreases serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I levels, and supplementation of 30 g of whey protein daily has been shown to increase serum IGF-I levels by 8 % after 2 years in a clinical trial. Cohort studies provide the opportunity to assess associations between dietary protein intake and IGF axis protein levels under more typical eating conditions. In the present study, we assessed the associations of circulating IGF axis protein levels (ELISA, Diagnostic Systems Laboratories) with total biomarker-calibrated protein intake, as well as with dairy product and milk intake, among postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative (n 747). Analyses were carried out using multivariate linear regression models that adjusted for age, BMI, race/ethnicity, education, biomarker-calibrated energy intake, alcohol intake, smoking, physical activity and hormone therapy use. There was a positive association between milk intake and free IGF-I levels. A three-serving increase in milk intake per d (approximately 30 g of protein) was associated with an estimated average 18·6 % higher increase in free IGF-I levels (95 % CI 0·9, 39·3 %). However, total IGF-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) levels were not associated with milk consumption and nor were there associations between biomarker-calibrated protein intake, biomarker-calibrated energy intake, and free IGF-I, total IGF-I or IGFBP-3 levels. The findings of the present study carried out in postmenopausal women are consistent with clinical trial data suggesting a specific relationship between milk consumption and serum IGF-I levels, although in the present study this association was only statistically significant for free, but not total, IGF-I or IGFBP-3 levels.

  12. Treatment of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Insulin Detemir, a Long-Acting Insulin Analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R. Young

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin detemir is a long-acting basal insulin approved for use in patients with type 1 (T1DM or type 2 diabetes (T2DM. Insulin detemir has demonstrated equivalent glycemic control and hypoglycemic risk when compared to insulin glargine, and insulin detemir has generally but not consistently demonstrated less weight gain than insulin glargine in T2DM. The benefits of basal insulin analogs relative to NPH insulin are well recognized, including less FBG variability, lower risk of hypoglycemia, and less weight gain specifically with insulin detemir. However, NPH insulin continues to be widely prescribed, which may be due in part to economic considerations. While NPH insulin generally costs less per prescription, insulin detemir has been shown to be cost effective compared to NPH insulin as well as insulin glargine. Therefore, insulin detemir is an effective option from both clinical and economic perspectives for patients with T1DM or T2DM who require basal insulin to achieve glycemic control.

  13. Depressive symptoms prior to and following insulin initiation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Prevalence, risk factors and effect on physician resource utilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzida, Grzegorz; Karnieli, Eddy; Svendsen, Anne Louise; Sølje, Kristine Steensen; Hermanns, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    To study the frequency and intensity of depressive symptoms and associations with physician resource utilisation following insulin initiation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. SOLVE was a 24-week observational study. In this sub-analysis of data from Poland, depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9. PHQ-9 was completed by 942 of 1169 patients (80.6%) at baseline, and 751 (64.2%) at both baseline and final (24-week) visit. PHQ-9 scores indicated depressive symptoms in 45.6% (n=430) at baseline, and 27.2% (n=223) at final visit. Mean PHQ-9 change was -2.38 [95% CI -2.73, -2.02], pdiabetes and associated with increased healthcare utilisation, reinforcing the need for holistic interdisciplinary management approaches. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lessons learned from a pilot RCT of simultaneous versus delayed initiation of continuous glucose monitoring in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes starting insulin pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Patricia; Lawson, Margaret L; Huot, Celine; Richardson, Christine; Nakhla, Meranda; Romain, Judette

    2014-05-01

    Uncertainty remains about effectiveness of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in pediatric type 1 diabetes (T1D). Success with CGM is related to CGM adherence, which may relate to readiness to make the behavior changes required for effective use. We hypothesize that readiness for change will be greater at initiation of insulin pump therapy than in established pump users, and that this will predict CGM adherence. Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) in children with established T1D comparing simultaneous pump and CGM initiation to standard pump therapy with delayed CGM initiation. We randomized participants to simultaneous pump and CGM initiation or to standard pump therapy with the option of adding CGM 4 months later. CGM adherence was tracked via web-based download and readiness for change assessed with the SOCRATES questionnaire. Of 41 eligible children, 20 agreed to participate; 15 subjects completed the study (7 males; baseline age 11.8 ± 4.0 years; T1D duration 2.7 ± 2.7 years; mean A1C 8.2 ± 0.8%). Six of 8 simultaneous group subjects used CGM > 60% of the time for 4 months compared to 1 of 7 delayed group subjects (P = .02). Using SOCRATES, we could assign 87-100% of subjects to a single motivation stage at baseline and 4 months. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of randomizing pump naïve children and adolescents with established T1D to simultaneous pump and CGM initiation versus standard pump therapy with delayed CGM initiation. Lessons from this pilot study were used to inform development of a full-scale multicenter RCT. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  15. Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Insulin Therapy Insulin Therapy Share Print When you digest food, your ... you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  16. Insulin degludec in type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial of a new-generation ultra-long-acting insulin compared with insulin glargine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birkeland, Kåre I.; Home, Philip D.; Wendisch, Ulrich; Ratner, Robert E.; Johansen, Thue; Endahl, Lars A.; Lyby, Karsten; Jendle, Johan H.; Roberts, Anthony P.; DeVries, J. Hans; Meneghini, Luigi F.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin degludec (IDeg) is a basal insulin that forms soluble multihexamers after subcutaneous injection, resulting in an ultra-long action profile. We assessed the efficacy and safety of IDeg formulations administered once daily in combination with mealtime insulin aspart in people with type 1

  17. Fast-Acting Insulin Aspart Improves Glycemic Control in Basal-Bolus Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes: Results of a 26-Week Multicenter, Active-Controlled, Treat-to-Target, Randomized, Parallel-Group Trial (onset 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Jones, David; Bode, Bruce W; De Block, Christophe; Franek, Edward; Heller, Simon R; Mathieu, Chantal; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena; Rose, Ludger; Woo, Vincent C; Østerskov, Anne Birk; Graungaard, Tina; Bergenstal, Richard M

    2017-07-01

    This multicenter, treat-to-target, phase 3 trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of fast-acting insulin aspart (faster aspart) versus conventional insulin aspart (IAsp) in adults with type 1 diabetes. The primary end point was change from baseline in HbA 1c after 26 weeks. After an 8-week run-in, subjects were randomized (1:1:1) to double-blind mealtime faster aspart ( n = 381), IAsp ( n = 380), or open-label postmeal faster aspart ( n = 382)-each with insulin detemir. HbA 1c was reduced in both treatment groups, and noninferiority to IAsp was confirmed for both mealtime and postmeal faster aspart (estimated treatment difference [ETD] faster aspart-IAsp, mealtime, -0.15% [95% CI -0.23; -0.07], and postmeal, 0.04% [-0.04; 0.12]); mealtime faster aspart statistically significantly reduced HbA 1c versus IAsp ( P = 0.0003). Postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) increments were statistically significantly lower with mealtime faster aspart at 1 h (ETD -1.18 mmol/L [95% CI -1.65; -0.71], -21.21 mg/dL [-29.65; -12.77]; P IAsp for the 2-h PPG increment was confirmed. The overall rate of severe or blood glucose-confirmed (plasma glucose IAsp was confirmed, with superior PPG control for mealtime faster aspart versus IAsp. Subjects randomized to postmeal faster aspart for all meals maintained HbA 1c noninferior to that obtained with mealtime IAsp. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  18. Fetal and perinatal outcomes in type 1 diabetes pregnancy: a randomized study comparing insulin aspart with human insulin in 322 subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hod, Moshe; Damm, Peter; Kaaja, Risto

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was a comparison of insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin (HI) in basal-bolus therapy with neutral protamine Hagedorn for fetal and perinatal outcomes of type 1 diabetes in pregnancy....

  19. [Effect of arotinolol on insulin secretion and insulin clearance rate in patients with Graves' disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohguni, S; Notsu, K; Tanaka, J; Sato, T; Kato, Y

    1993-08-20

    Glucose-induced insulin secretion, 24-h urinary C-peptide (CPR) and euglycemic clamp were examined in five patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease before and 2 weeks after treatment with arotinolol (20 mg/day, p.o.). Plasma glucose and insulin responses to oral administration of 75 g glucose were not changed by arotinolol treatment. 24-h urinary CPR and basal posthepatic insulin delivery rate (BPIDR) as an indicator of insulin secretion were significantly suppressed by arotinolol. Glucose infusion rate (GIR) as an indicator of insulin sensitivity and glucose clearance rate (GCR) were not influenced by arotinolol therapy. Insulin clearance rate (ICR) was significantly suppressed by arotinolol. These findings suggest that arotinolol inhibits insulin secretion by decreasing ICR but does not attenuate insulin release induced by glucose in hyperthyroid patients, and that insulin sensitivity and GCR are not affected by arotinolol.

  20. The Barbados Insulin Matters (BIM study: Barriers to insulin therapy among a population-based sample of people with type 2 diabetes in the Caribbean island of Barbados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles G. Taylor, Jr.

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Multiple factors related to patient beliefs and attitudes need to be considered and addressed when initiating insulin in order to minimise psychological insulin resistance and delay. Patients using insulin had less negative perceptions than those not on insulin.

  1. Roles and relationships between health professionals involved in insulin initiation for people with type 2 diabetes in the general practice setting: a qualitative study drawing on relational coordination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski-Nankervis, Jo-Anne; Furler, John; Blackberry, Irene; Young, Doris; O'Neal, David; Patterson, Elizabeth

    2014-01-31

    The majority of care for people with type 2 diabetes occurs in general practice, however when insulin initiation is required it often does not occur in this setting or in a timely manner and this may have implications for the development of complications. Increased insulin initiation in general practice is an important goal given the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes and a relative shortage of specialists. Coordination between primary and secondary care, and between medical and nursing personnel, may be important in achieving this. Relational coordination theory identifies key concepts that underpin effective interprofessional work: communication which is problem solving, timely, accurate and frequent and relationships between professional roles which are characterized by shared goals, shared knowledge and mutual respect. This study explores roles and relationships between health professionals involved in insulin initiation in order to gain an understanding of factors which may impact on this task being carried out in the general practice setting. 21 general practitioners, practice nurses, diabetes nurse educators and physicians were purposively sampled to participate in a semi-structured interview. Transcripts of the interviews were analysed using framework analysis. There were four closely interlinked themes identified which impacted on how health professionals worked together to initiate people with type 2 diabetes on insulin: 1. Ambiguous roles; 2. Uncertain competency and capacity; 3. Varying relationships and communication; and 4. Developing trust and respect. This study has shown that insulin initiation is generally recognised as acceptable in general practice. The role of the DNE and practice nurse in this space and improved communication and relationships between health professionals across organisations and levels of care are factors which need to be addressed to support this clinical work. Relational coordination provides a useful framework for

  2. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Casablanca cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Farouqi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Casablanca, Morocco. Results: A total of 495 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 231, insulin detemir (n = 151, insulin aspart (n = 19, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 53 and other insulin combinations (n = 41. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 10.2% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 9.4% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −2.3%, insulin users: −1.8%. Major hypoglycaemia was observed in the insulin naïve group after 24 weeks. SADRs were reported in 1.2% of insulin naïve and 2.1% of insulin user groups. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  3. Prescribing insulin in type 1 diabetes mellitus: an update for general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of insulin therapy in diabetics is to mimic this secretion pattern to provide enough insulin throughout a 24-hour period to meet the basal requirements and to deliver higher boluses of insulin to meet the glycaemic effect of meals. To achieve good diabetes control, an individually tailored insulin treatment regimen is ...

  4. Initiation of insulin pump therapy in children at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes resulted in improved long-term glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Eunice G; King, Bruce R; Miller, Malcolm N; Dunn, Sandra V; Price, Darrell A; Foskett, Deborah C

    2017-02-01

    Insulin pump therapy (IPT) is increasingly used in children and young people with type 1 diabetes. There are limited studies evaluating the optimal time to start IPT. The aim of this study was to determine if early initiation of IPT in children with type 1 diabetes leads to improved glycaemic control and quality of life (QOL) compared with the later introduction of IPT. There were 38 subjects in the early pump group (EPG) (age 12.6 + 4.9 yr, 23 male) and 37 in the later pump group (LPG) (age 13.1 + 4.1 yr, 19 male). Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), rate of severe hypoglycemia, and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) were collected retrospectively over a 48-month period. Eligible subjects and/or their parents completed both a Paediatric and Paediatric Diabetes-specific Quality of Life Inventory. HbA1c measurements were lower in the EPG (6.8%; 51 mmol/mol) compared to the LPG (7.9%; 63 mmol/mol), across the 48 months of the study (p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the rate (per patient years) of severe hypoglycaemia (0.02; 0.07) p = 0.075 between the two groups. There were no episodes of DKA in either group. There was no significant difference in QOL between the groups with both having high satisfaction rates. Initiation of IPT at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children resulted in consistently lower HbA1c with no apparent change in hypoglycemia, DKA, or QOL. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Fasting in Ramadan with an insulin pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavadev, Jothydev

    2015-05-01

    A good majority of subjects with diabetes on insulin therapies observe fasting during Ramadan. The challenge for the physician and the patient is to manage diabetes without an interruption to fasting by avoiding hypoglycaemia and simultaneously ensuring that blood glucose remain at acceptable safe levels. Insulin Pumps differ from syringes and insulin pens in that it offers a variable basal rate, different type of boluses and associated calculators. The technological advances that pumps offer, help educated subjects pre-programme a reduced basal rate throughout the day. Pumps ensure avoidance of hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia and preserve quality of life and enhance confidence in patients during fasting. Due to multiple benefits, insulin pumps are considered the best delivery systems for insulin during the holy month of Ramadan, despite the prerequisites for its optimal output and cost concerns.

  6. Consensus on Insulin Dose Modification During Fasting in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, A G; Lodha, Sailesh; Sharma, S K

    2017-03-01

    Fasting for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) carries a risk of an assortment of complications. The decision of T2DM patient to fast should be made after sufficient discussion with physician regarding the risks involved. The current consensus is developed to help physicians manage T2DM patients during fasting. To provide simple and easily implementable guidelines on insulin dose modification during fasting in T2DM patients. The expert group committee discussed and proposed six recommendations for the use of insulin regimens during fasting. The recommendations were proposed on diet, exercise and categorization of risks during fast, breaking fast, dose modification of basal insulins, premix insulins and prandial insulins. All these recommendations were based on established guidelines and published scientific literature. These evidences were then factored into the national context based on the expert committee representative's patient-physician experience in their clinical practice and common therapeutic practices followed in India to successfully achieve optimal glucose control. The final consensus-based recommendations were proposed and collectively recorded for each insulin regimen. Recommendations based on insulin dose modification during fasting in T2DM patients has been developed. Patients with diabetes, who fast are recommended to keep themselves hydrated, consume low glycaemic and high fibre food but, avoid sugary and caffeinated drinks along with fried foods. The main goal of insulin therapy during fasting is to provide adequate insulin to prevent post meal hyperglycaemia and prevent hypoglycaemia during fast. We hope that the consensus based recommendations mentioned in this paper will be a useful reference tool for health care practitioners to initiate and intensify insulin therapy in T2DM patients in order to successfully complete fasting without much complication.

  7. The Need for Faster Insulin: Problem Solved?

    OpenAIRE

    Muchmore, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Considerable progress in treatment of diabetes has been made in the nearly 100 years following the discovery of insulin, and advances in insulin therapy have improved convenience, quality of life, overall glycemic control (A1C), and risk of hypoglycemia. An unmet need remains for a mealtime insulin that can faithfully reproduce the metabolic profile that ensues following meal ingestion in healthy persons. A number of “ultra-fast” insulin programs have been initiated, and Afrezza® (insulin hum...

  8. Jejunal proteins secreted by db/db mice or insulin-resistant humans impair the insulin signaling and determine insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenella Salinari

    Full Text Available Two recent studies demonstrated that bariatric surgery induced remission of type 2 diabetes very soon after surgery and far too early to be attributed to weight loss. In this study, we sought to explore the mechanism/s of this phenomenon by testing the effects of proteins from the duodenum-jejunum conditioned-medium (CM of db/db or Swiss mice on glucose uptake in vivo in Swiss mice and in vitro in both Swiss mice soleus and L6 cells. We studied the effect of sera and CM proteins from insulin resistant (IR and insulin-sensitive subjects on insulin signaling in human myoblasts.db/db proteins induced massive IR either in vivo or in vitro, while Swiss proteins did not. In L6 cells, only db/db proteins produced a noticeable increase in basal (473Ser-Akt phosphorylation, lack of GSK3β inhibition and a reduced basal (389Thr-p70-S6K1 phosphorylation. Human IR serum markedly increased basal (473Ser-Akt phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. Human CM IR proteins increased by about twofold both basal and insulin-stimulated (473Ser-Akt. Basal (9Ser-GSK3β phosphorylation was increased by IR subjects serum with a smaller potentiating effect of insulin.These findings show that jejunal proteins either from db/db mice or from insulin resistant subjects impair muscle insulin signaling, thus inducing insulin resistance.

  9. Insulin resistance in drug naive patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Smiljana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Due to the fact that there is a relatively small number of data related to systemic insulin abnormalities in the multiple sclerosis (MS, the main objective of our study was to determine whether a dysbalance of glucose and insulin metabolism exist in patients with natural course of MS. Our hypothesis was that the metabolic disorder that characterizes state of the insulin resistance (IR and reduced insulin sensitivity (IS in untreated patients with MS could play a role in disease progression and degree of functional disability. Methods. The study included 31 patients with relapsing-remitting (RR MS and 14 healthy controls from the same geographic area matched by age, ethnicity and number of smokers. The glucose tolerance, IS, and IR were examined using an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and using basal plasma glucose and insulin levels. The functional disability and disease progression were evaluated by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS and Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS. Results. The MS patients tolerated glucose equally well as the healthy controls. Basal concentrations of insulin were significantly higher in the MS group (p < 0.05, as well as insulin plasma level 30 min after oral glucose load (p < 0.01. The patients with MS had significantly higher values of homeostasis model assessment indexes of IR (HOMA-IR (p = 0.027; p = 0.028. The percentage of IS (HOMA2 %S and whole body IS index (ISI Matsuda showed significantly lower values in the MS patients than in the controls (p = 0.005; p = 0.001. The insulinogenic index in the first 30 min of OGTT was significantly higher in MS patients (p = 0.005. The measures of functional disability and MS progression did not correlate significantly with the investigated parameters of IR and IS indexes. Conclusion. This study demonstrates for the first time the existence of hyperinsulinemia, reduced insulin sensitivity and normal glucose tolerance that indicate the initial

  10. Reduced Circulating Insulin Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Old Mice and Extends Lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Templeman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The causal relationships between insulin levels, insulin resistance, and longevity are not fully elucidated. Genetic downregulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1 signaling components can extend invertebrate and mammalian lifespan, but insulin resistance, a natural form of decreased insulin signaling, is associated with greater risk of age-related disease in mammals. We compared Ins2+/− mice to Ins2+/+ littermate controls, on a genetically stable Ins1 null background. Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of livers from 25-week-old mice suggested potential for healthier aging and altered insulin sensitivity in Ins2+/− mice. Halving Ins2 lowered circulating insulin by 25%–34% in aged female mice, without altering Igf1 or circulating Igf1. Remarkably, decreased insulin led to lower fasting glucose and improved insulin sensitivity in aged mice. Moreover, lowered insulin caused significant lifespan extension, observed across two diverse diets. Our study indicates that elevated insulin contributes to age-dependent insulin resistance and that limiting basal insulin levels can extend lifespan.

  11. Reduced Circulating Insulin Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Old Mice and Extends Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeman, Nicole M; Flibotte, Stephane; Chik, Jenny H L; Sinha, Sunita; Lim, Gareth E; Foster, Leonard J; Nislow, Corey; Johnson, James D

    2017-07-11

    The causal relationships between insulin levels, insulin resistance, and longevity are not fully elucidated. Genetic downregulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) signaling components can extend invertebrate and mammalian lifespan, but insulin resistance, a natural form of decreased insulin signaling, is associated with greater risk of age-related disease in mammals. We compared Ins2 +/- mice to Ins2 +/+ littermate controls, on a genetically stable Ins1 null background. Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of livers from 25-week-old mice suggested potential for healthier aging and altered insulin sensitivity in Ins2 +/- mice. Halving Ins2 lowered circulating insulin by 25%-34% in aged female mice, without altering Igf1 or circulating Igf1. Remarkably, decreased insulin led to lower fasting glucose and improved insulin sensitivity in aged mice. Moreover, lowered insulin caused significant lifespan extension, observed across two diverse diets. Our study indicates that elevated insulin contributes to age-dependent insulin resistance and that limiting basal insulin levels can extend lifespan. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Insulin secretion in lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients is associated with high levels of nonglucose secretagogues and insulin resistance of beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Storgaard, Heidi

    2004-01-01

    We examined whether plasma concentrations of nonglucose insulin secretagogues are associated with prehepatic insulin secretion rates (ISR) in nondiabetic, insulin-resistant, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected, lipodystrophic patients (LIPO). Additionally, the negative feedback of insulin...... on ISR was evaluated. ISR were estimated by deconvolution of plasma C-peptide concentrations during fasting (basal) and during the last 30 min of a 120-min euglycemic insulin clamp (40 mU.m(-2).min(-1)). Eighteen normoglycemic LIPO were compared with 25 normoglycemic HIV-infected patients without...... lipodystrophy (controls). Thirty minutes before start of the clamp, a bolus of glucose was injected intravenously to stimulate endogenous insulin secretion. Insulin sensitivity index (SiRd) was estimated from glucose tracer analysis. LIPO displayed increased basal ISR (69%), clamp ISR (114%), basal insulin (130...

  13. [Basal cell carcinoma of unusual site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlika, Rym Benmously; Kerkeni, Nadia; Jebali, Amel; Zghal, Mohamed; Debbiche, Achraf; Ayed, Mohamed Ben; Mokhtar, Insaf; Fenniche, Samy

    2011-02-01

    Labial mucosa is an atypical site of basal cell carcinoma. The involvement of the vermilion lip, devoid of hair follicles and sweat glands, contrasts with the concept of its origin from pilar structures. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma developed on the vermilion upper lip. A 49-year-old woman, presented with an asymptomatic, 1-cm-diameter, erythematous, telangiectatic and crusted nodule on the upper lip evolving for 9 months and having once interested the vermilion border. There were no cervical lymph nodes. Diagnosis of infiltrative basal cell carcinoma was made by histological study, which showed a tumoral proliferation of epithelial basal cells infiltrating the dermis with perineural and muscular infiltration. Our report illustrates a rare but not exceptional site of basal cell carcinoma. The nodule, initially confined to the vermilion border, has then developed onto the mucosal and the cutaneous areas. Histopathological study revealed, as previously reported, infiltarative features. Basal cell carcinoma of the lip should be rapidly managed since its invasion to deeper structures occurs early. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Insulin Lispro Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes, insulin lispro is always used with another type of insulin, unless it is used in an external insulin ... diabetes, insulin lispro may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin lispro ...

  15. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Kuwait cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Daban

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Kuwait. Results: A total of 1185 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 472, insulin detemir (n = 472, insulin aspart (n = 4, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 188 and other insulin combinations (n = 48. At baseline, glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 9.8% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 9.4% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −2.4%, insulin users: −1.7%. No major hypoglycaemic episodes were observed at 24 weeks. SADR was reported in 0.1% of insulin users. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  16. Diminished hepatic insulin removal in obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, I.; Salvador, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Arraiza, M.C.; Goena, M.; Barberia, J.J.; Moncada, E.

    1986-01-01

    Peripheral insulin and C-peptide levels during oral glucose load were measured in 20 obese and 23 normal weight nondiabetic subjects. The fasting C-peptide to insulin molar ratios (Cp/I), as well as the relation between incremental areas of the two polypeptides (ACp-AI)/ACp, were used as relative measures of the hepatic insulin extraction (HIE). The insulin and C-peptide basal levels as well as incremental areas under plasma curves were higher in the obese subjects (P<0.001). HIE was lower in obeses than in controls assessed in the fasting state (P<0.05), as well as after glucose load (P<0.001). Nevertheless, obeses and controls with similar insulin fasting levels showed identical hepatic insulin extraction in fasting or after glucose load. HIE was independent of obesity degree, but was related to insulin basal levels (r=-0.60, P<0.01). This study suggests the hypothesis that the decreased hepatic insulin extraction in obeses is a result of the chronically increased insulin delivery to the liver and is not a consequence of obesity, although a contributory role cannot be ruled out

  17. Basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baruah, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Seven cases of basal cell carcinoma are reported in this paper. The incidence of this disease is two percent of all malignancies seen at the Miraj Medical Centre, Miraj, Maharashtra. There were five male and two female patients in this series. The youngest patient was 40 years old and the oldest 70 years. The average age of the patients was 57.3 years. All the cases in the series had lesions confined to the head and neck region. Radiation therapy was given to all the seven cases which was the primary form of treatment in five cases. In two cases surgical excision had been done and the growth in both the cases had recurred. Radiation therapy is considered more ideal and suitable in the treatment of basal cell carcinomas. (auth.)

  18. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Chennai cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Chennai, India. Results: A total of 1334 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 983, insulin detemir (n = 205, insulin aspart (n = 42, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 41 and other insulin combinations (n = 63. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 9.4% and insulin users (mean HbA 1 c: 9.3% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −2.1%, insulin users: −1.9%. SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  19. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Haryana cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Haryana, India. Results: A total of 345 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 236, insulin detemir (n = 66, insulin aspart (n = 28, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 1 and other insulin combinations (n = 14. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 10.7% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 10.5% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −3.9%, insulin users: −3.3%. SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  20. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Oman cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Al Abousi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Oman. Results: A total of 349 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 121, insulin detemir (n = 171, insulin aspart (n = 2, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 38 and other insulin combinations (n = 17. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 9.2% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 8.8% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −2.1%, insulin users: −1.6%. SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events did not occur in the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia and no weight gain.

  1. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Maharashtra cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Phadke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Maharashtra, India. Results: A total of 3069 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 2115, insulin detemir (n = 461, insulin aspart (n = 333, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 92 and other insulin combinations (n = 61. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 8.8 and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 9.1% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −1.4%, insulin users: −1.4%. SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  2. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Marrakech cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Ansari Nawal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Marrakech, Morocco. Results: A total of 196 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 71, insulin detemir (n = 83, insulin aspart (n = 5, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 14 and other insulin combinations (n = 23. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 9.3% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 9.3% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the study groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −2.3%, insulin users: −1.9%. SADR′s including major hypoglycaemic events did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  3. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Mumbai cohort of the A1chieve study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwalkar, P G; Gupta, Vishal; Kovil, Rajiv

    2013-11-01

    The A1chieve, a multicentric (28 countries), 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726) in routine clinical care across four continents. Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Mumbai, India. A total of 2112 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 1561), insulin detemir (n = 313), insulin aspart (n = 144), basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 53) and other insulin combinations (n = 41). At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA1c: 8.7%) and insulin user (mean HbA1c: 9.2%) groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA1c (insulin naïve: -1.4%, insulin users: -1.8%). SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  4. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Kolkata cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Majumder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Kolkata, India. Results: A total of 576 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 417, insulin detemir (n = 70, insulin aspart (n = 55, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 19 and other insulin combinations (n = 15. At baseline, glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 8.3% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 8.6% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −1.3%, insulin users: −1.4%. SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  5. Dissociation between fat-induced in vivo insulin resistance and proximal insulin signaling in skeletal muscle in men at risk for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Heidi; Jensen, Christine B; Björnholm, Marie

    2004-01-01

    groups. Insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation was higher after long-term as compared with short-term fat infusion in control subjects. Short- or long-term infusion did not affect the absolute values of basal or insulin-stimulated insulin receptor substrate-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, tyrosine......-associated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activity, insulin receptor substrate-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity, or Akt serine phosphorylation in IGT relatives or matched controls. In fact, a paradoxical increase in both basal and insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase activity was noted in the total study population after...

  6. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, J.R.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 4 0 C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 37 0 C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation

  7. Unintended Insulin Pump Delivery in Hyperbaric Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Federico; Pintaudi, Basilio; Bonomo, Matteo; Garuti, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    Unintended pump insulin delivery was reported to occur as a consequence of decreased atmospheric pressure, probably mediated by air bubble formation and the expansion of existing bubbles. This observation has been used to explain some hypoglycemic episodes occurring in patients on insulin pump treatment in between 1 and 1 h 45 min after the flight takeoff. New models of insulin pumps have been introduced in the market, most of them are waterproof certified. It is not clear if in these new pumps the influence of atmospheric pressure changes on the insulin delivery is still present. Moreover, there are no evidences related to the insulin pump operations in hyperbaric conditions, like as during diving activities. Our aim is therefore to verify the eventual variation of insulin pump delivery determined by atmospheric pressure changes in hyperbaric conditions. Three new models of insulin pumps were tested in hyperbaric conditions at a flow rate of 2 U/h. Atmospheric pressure variation affected pump insulin release. An increase in the atmospheric pressure from 1 to 1.3 atmosphere (ATA) induced a decrease of pump basal insulin release (about -0.2 U/10 min); conversely, when the atmospheric pressure returned from 1.3 to 1 ATA, an unintended insulin delivery was observed (about +0.3 U/10 min). This phenomenon appeared to be independent of the insulin pump rate and dependent on the presence of air bubbles within the insulin tube setting and cartridge. Unintended insulin delivery driven by atmospheric pressure changes in hyperbaric conditions occurred in the new insulin pumps available. Patients should pay attention to possible variation of insulin rate during the flight or during diving activities.

  8. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seum Chung

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer, predominantly affecting the head and neck, and can be diagnosed clinically in most cases. Metastasis of BCC is rare, but localised tissue invasion and destruction can lead to morbidity.Risk factors for BCC include tendency to freckle, degree of sun exposure, excessive sun-bed use, and smoking.Incidence of BCC increases markedly after the age of 40 years, but incidence in younger people is rising, possibly as a result of inc...

  9. Perianal Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isil Bulur

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common non-melanoma skin cancer. Exposure to ultraviolet light is an important risk factor for BCC development and the disorder therefore develops commonly on body areas that are more exposed to sunlight, such as the face and neck. It is uncommon in the closed area of the body and quite rare in the perianal and genital regions. Herein, we report a 34-year-old patient with perianal BCC who had no additional risk factors.

  10. Basal cell carcinoma: pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Chatterjee, Kingshuk; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer in humans, which typically appears over the sun-exposed skin as a slow-growing, locally invasive lesion that rarely metastasizes. Although the exact etiology of BCC is unknown, there exists a well-established relationship between BCC and the pilo-sebaceous unit, and it is currently thought to originate from pluri-potential cells in the basal layer of the epidermis or the follicle. The patched/hedgehog intracellular signaling pathway plays a central role in both sporadic BCCs and nevoid BCC syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). This pathway is vital for the regulation of cell growth, and differentiation and loss of inhibition of this pathway is associated with development of BCC. The sonic hedgehog protein is the most relevant to BCC; nevertheless, the Patched (PTCH) protein is the ligand-binding component of the hedgehog receptor complex in the cell membrane. The other protein member of the receptor complex, smoothened (SMO), is responsible for transducing hedgehog signaling to downstream genes, leading to abnormal cell proliferation. The importance of this pathway is highlighted by the successful use in advanced forms of BCC of vismodegib, a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug, that selectively inhibits SMO. The UV-specific nucleotide changes in the tumor suppressor genes, TP53 and PTCH, have also been implicated in the development of BCC.

  11. Impact of telephonic interviews on persistence and daily adherence to insulin treatment in insulin-naïve type 2 diabetes patients: dropout study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz DG

    2016-05-01

    =733 and single (n=723 telephonic interview groups were included. Data on insulin treatment and self-reported blood glucose values were obtained via telephone interview. Logistic regression analysis was performed for factors predicting increased likelihood of persistence and skipping an injection.Results: Overall, 76.8% patients (83.2% in sequential vs 70.3% in single interview group, (P<0.001 remained on insulin treatment at the third month. Significantly higher rate for skipping doses was noted in basal bolus than in other regimens (27.0% vs 15.0% for premixed and 15.8% basal insulin, respectively, P<0.0001. Logistic regression analysis revealed sequential telephonic interview (odds ratio [OR], 1.531; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.093–2.143; P=0.013, higher hemoglobin A1c levels (OR, 1.090; 95% CI, 0.999–1.189; P=0.049, and less negative appraisal of insulin therapy as significant predictors of higher persistence. Basal bolus regimen (OR, 1.583; 95% CI, 1.011–2.479; P=0.045 and higher hemoglobin A1c levels (OR, 1.114; 95% CI, 1.028–1.207; P=0.008 were the significant predictors of increased likelihood of skipping an injection.Conclusion: Our findings revealed positive influence of sequential telephonic interview, although including no intervention in treatment, on achieving better treatment persistence in type 2 diabetes patients initiating insulin. Keywords: type 2 diabetes, insulin analogs, HbA1c, self-monitoring of blood glucose

  12. Effects of exogenous human insulin dose adjustment on body mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results. The majority of the patients (84.8%) received the twice-daily biphasic human insulin regimen and the remainder received the basal neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) plus prandial regular human insulin regimen. The multivariable multilevel mixed-effects linear regression model indicated that time-varying BMI was ...

  13. Studies of insulin resistance in congenital generalized lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvik, O; Vestergaard, H; Trygstad, O

    1996-01-01

    not occur. In both patients there was severely increased hepatic glucose output in the basal state, suggesting a failure of insulin to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis. During insulin infusion a substantially elevated rate of lipid oxidation remained in the patients, in contrast to the almost completely...

  14. Microvascular Recruitment in Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    the resonating sound from the microbubbles in the systemic circulation were recorded for determination of microvascular recruitment in designated muscle segments. Results showed that microvascular recruitment increased with insulin stimulation by ~30% in rats and ~40% in humans (study I). Furthermore......, it was observed that muscle contractions increased muscle perfusion rapidly by 3-4 fold and by 1-2 fold compared to basal and insulin, respectively, in both rat and human skeletal muscle (study I). The real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound method was applied to investigate the vaso-active effect of the incretin...... hormone glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the microcirculation. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogs are drugs used for treatments of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes but the vascular effects of GLP-1 in vivo are elusive. Here it was shown that GLP-1 rapidly increased the microvascular recruitment...

  15. Microvascular Recruitment in Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    hormone glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the microcirculation. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogs are drugs used for treatments of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes but the vascular effects of GLP-1 in vivo are elusive. Here it was shown that GLP-1 rapidly increased the microvascular recruitment...... the resonating sound from the microbubbles in the systemic circulation were recorded for determination of microvascular recruitment in designated muscle segments. Results showed that microvascular recruitment increased with insulin stimulation by ~30% in rats and ~40% in humans (study I). Furthermore......, it was observed that muscle contractions increased muscle perfusion rapidly by 3-4 fold and by 1-2 fold compared to basal and insulin, respectively, in both rat and human skeletal muscle (study I). The real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound method was applied to investigate the vaso-active effect of the incretin...

  16. Management of the hospitalized diabetes patient with an insulin pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    More than 375,000 Americans manage their diabetes with an insulin pump, and this number continues to increase. Many of these patients will want to remain on their insulin pump while hospitalized, so the nurse needs to know about how to care for the hospitalized patient wearing an insulin pump. This article discusses the benefits of intensive insulin therapy, how the insulin pump works, initial insulin-pump dosing, candidate selection, advantages and disadvantages of using an insulin pump, troubleshooting the pump, nursing care of the hospitalized patient wearing an insulin pump, and development of hospital protocols for the care of such patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive tissues, increased hepatic glucose production, increased lipolysis in adipose tissue, and altered insulin secretion. Studies of individuals with insulin resistance, both with established T2D and high-risk individuals, have consistently demonstrated a diverse array of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D.

  18. Insulin-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanoparticles: efficient, sustained and safe insulin delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Thiago M; Teixeira, Zaine; Barbosa-Sampaio, Helena C; Rezende, Luiz F; Boschero, Antonio C; Durán, Nelson; Höehr, Nelci F

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an efficient, biodegradable, biocompatible and safe controlled release system using insulin-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanoparticles. The insulin-loaded PCL nanoparticles were prepared by double emulsion method (water-in-oil-in-water) using Pluronic F68 as emulsifier. Using the double emulsion method a high insulin encapsulation efficiency (90.6 +/-1.6%) with a zeta potential of -29 +/-2.7 mV and average particle size of 796 +/-10.5 nm was obtained. Insulin-loaded PCL nanoparticles showed no toxicity to MIN6 cells. Insulin nanoparticles administered subcutaneously and intraperitoneally in rats reduced glycaemia of basal levels after 15 minutes, and presented a sustainable hypoglycemic effect on insulin-dependent type 1 diabetic rats, showing to be more efficient than unencapsulated insulin. Furthermore, these nanoparticles were not hepatotoxic, as evaluated by the effect over liver cell-death and oxidative stress scavenger system in rats. These results suggest that insulin-loaded PCL nanoparticles prepared by water-in-oil-in-water emulsion method are biocompatible, efficient and safe insulin-delivering system with controlled insulin release, which indicates that it may be a powerful tool for insulin-dependent patients care.

  19. Insulin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome Staph Infections and MRSA Stroke Testicular Cancer Thalassemia Thyroid Cancer Thyroid ... Get Tested? To help evaluate insulin production by the beta cells in the pancreas; to help diagnose the ...

  20. Insulin Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Association Events Messaging Tools Recruiting Advocates Local Market Planning Training Webinars News & Events Advocacy News Call ... be imported for personal use. Inside the pancreas, beta cells make the hormone insulin. With each meal, ...

  1. Fasting and postprandial levels of ghrelin, leptin and insulin in lean, obese and anorexic subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Hanna; Gibas-Dorna, Magdalena; Kupsz, Justyna; Piątek, Małgorzata; Piątek, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Ghrelin, leptin and insulin are involved in neurohormonal regulation of energetic homeostasis. Aim We investigated the correlation between nutritional status and plasma levels of leptin, ghrelin and insulin in lean, obese and anorexic subjects. Material and methods Nineteen obese and 18 anorexic adults were enrolled in the study. Seventeen adults with normal body mass index (BMI) served as controls. Blood samples were taken twice: before breakfast and 2 h after breakfast. Fasting and postprandial ghrelin, leptin and insulin were examined. The following correlations were estimated: between BMI and basal level of tested hormones, between insulin and ghrelin, and between insulin and leptin. The threshold level of significance was p ≤ 0.05 for all calculations. Results Basal insulin level was lowest in anorexic patients and greatest in obese subjects. Fasting plasma ghrelin was lower in obesity and higher in anorexia as compared with the controls. Comparing with controls, fasting leptin levels were higher in obese and lower in anorexic subjects. There was positive correlation between BMI and basal leptin level in obesity. A significant postprandial increase was noted for insulin in all studied groups. Increased leptin and decreased ghrelin levels were detected 2 h after a meal in the control group. In obese patients, postprandial leptin was lower than before food intake, and fasting leptin showed positive correlation with basal insulin level. Conclusions Basal plasma ghrelin, leptin and insulin levels differ according to nutritional status. Impaired ghrelin and leptin secretion and insulin sensitivity may be involved in the pathogenesis of eating disorders. PMID:24868288

  2. Effects of insulin detemir and NPH insulin on body weight and appetite-regulating brain regions in human type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Golen, Larissa W; Veltman, Dick J; IJzerman, Richard G; Deijen, Jan Berend; Heijboer, Annemieke C; Barkhof, Frederik; Drent, Madeleine L; Diamant, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Studies in rodents have demonstrated that insulin in the central nervous system induces satiety. In humans, these effects are less well established. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that causes less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, including the current standard intermediate-long acting Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin. Due to its structural modifications, which render the molecule more lipophilic, it was proposed that insulin detemir enters the brain more readily than other insulins. The aim of this study was to investigate whether insulin detemir treatment differentially modifies brain activation in response to food stimuli as compared to NPH insulin. In addition, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) insulin levels were measured after both treatments. Brain responses to viewing food and non-food pictures were measured using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in 32 type 1 diabetic patients, after each of two 12-week treatment periods with insulin detemir and NPH insulin, respectively, both combined with prandial insulin aspart. CSF insulin levels were determined in a subgroup. Insulin detemir decreased body weight by 0.8 kg and NPH insulin increased weight by 0.5 kg (p = 0.02 for difference), while both treatments resulted in similar glycemic control. After treatment with insulin detemir, as compared to NPH insulin, brain activation was significantly lower in bilateral insula in response to visual food stimuli, compared to NPH (p = 0.02 for right and p = 0.05 for left insula). Also, CSF insulin levels were higher compared to those with NPH insulin treatment (p = 0.003). Our findings support the hypothesis that in type 1 diabetic patients, the weight sparing effect of insulin detemir may be mediated by its enhanced action on the central nervous system, resulting in blunted activation in bilateral insula, an appetite-regulating brain region, in response to food stimuli. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00626080.

  3. Effects of insulin detemir and NPH insulin on body weight and appetite-regulating brain regions in human type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa W van Golen

    Full Text Available Studies in rodents have demonstrated that insulin in the central nervous system induces satiety. In humans, these effects are less well established. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that causes less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, including the current standard intermediate-long acting Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH insulin. Due to its structural modifications, which render the molecule more lipophilic, it was proposed that insulin detemir enters the brain more readily than other insulins. The aim of this study was to investigate whether insulin detemir treatment differentially modifies brain activation in response to food stimuli as compared to NPH insulin. In addition, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF insulin levels were measured after both treatments. Brain responses to viewing food and non-food pictures were measured using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in 32 type 1 diabetic patients, after each of two 12-week treatment periods with insulin detemir and NPH insulin, respectively, both combined with prandial insulin aspart. CSF insulin levels were determined in a subgroup. Insulin detemir decreased body weight by 0.8 kg and NPH insulin increased weight by 0.5 kg (p = 0.02 for difference, while both treatments resulted in similar glycemic control. After treatment with insulin detemir, as compared to NPH insulin, brain activation was significantly lower in bilateral insula in response to visual food stimuli, compared to NPH (p = 0.02 for right and p = 0.05 for left insula. Also, CSF insulin levels were higher compared to those with NPH insulin treatment (p = 0.003. Our findings support the hypothesis that in type 1 diabetic patients, the weight sparing effect of insulin detemir may be mediated by its enhanced action on the central nervous system, resulting in blunted activation in bilateral insula, an appetite-regulating brain region, in response to food stimuli.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00626080.

  4. Impact of streptozotocin on altering normal glucose homeostasis during insulin testing in diabetic rats compared to normoglycemic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinna, Nidal A; Badwan, Adnan A

    2015-01-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ) is currently the most used diabetogenic agent in testing insulin and new antidiabetic drugs in animals. Due to the toxic and disruptive nature of STZ on organs, apart from pancreas, involved in preserving the body’s normal glucose homeostasis, this study aims to reassess the action of STZ in inducing different glucose response states in diabetic rats while testing insulin. Diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats induced with STZ were classified according to their initial blood glucose levels into stages. The effect of randomizing rats in such a manner was investigated for the severity of interrupting normal liver, pancreas, and kidney functions. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of subcutaneously injected insulin in diabetic and nondiabetic rats were compared. Interruption of glucose homeostasis by STZ was challenged by single and repeated administrations of injected insulin and oral glucose to diabetic rats. In diabetic rats with high glucose (451–750 mg/dL), noticeable changes were seen in the liver and kidney functions compared to rats with lower basal glucose levels. Increased serum levels of recombinant human insulin were clearly indicated by a significant increase in the calculated maximum serum concentration and area under the concentration–time curve. Reversion of serum glucose levels to normal levels pre- and postinsulin and oral glucose administrations to STZ diabetic rats were found to be variable. In conclusion, diabetic animals were more responsive to insulin than nondiabetic animals. STZ was capable of inducing different levels of normal glucose homeostasis disruption in rats. Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of insulin were altered when different initial blood glucose levels of STZ diabetic rats were selected for testing. Such findings emphasize the importance of selecting predefined and unified glucose levels when using STZ as a diabetogenic agent in experimental protocols evaluating new antidiabetic agents

  5. An investigation of the action of Neutral Protamine Hagedorn human analogue insulin in dogs with naturally occurring diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, C A; Boston, R C; Refsal, K R; Hess, R S

    2009-01-01

    Neutral Protamine Hagedorn human analogue insulin (Humulin N) is commonly used for treatment of canine diabetes mellitus (DM). However, blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations in Humulin N-treated dogs with naturally occurring DM have not been reported. To investigate blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations in the clinical setting of client-owned Humulin N-treated dogs with naturally occurring, well-regulated DM. Ten client-owned dogs with naturally occurring, well-regulated DM. In this clinical study, blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations were measured when dogs received food and insulin (T(0)), at approximately every half hour for the next 2 hours, and then approximately every 2 hours for an additional 8 hours. Insulin duration of action was defined as the number of hours from T(0) to the lowest blood glucose concentration and until blood glucose concentration returned to an interpolated value of 70% of basal blood glucose concentration (Glucose(b)). Mean percent of insulin-induced blood glucose suppression was 49.9 +/- 17.1% (median, 46%; range, 29-78%). Insulin duration of action ranged from 4 to 10 hours. Blood glucose concentration increased initially and returned to Glucose(b) within 0.6-2.2 hours after T(0) in 5 dogs. This initial blood glucose surge then was followed by blood glucose suppression in all 5 dogs. These results suggest that Humulin N administered SC twice daily is an effective mode of treatment for dogs with naturally occurring DM. Postprandial hyperglycemia is present in some well-regulated diabetic dogs treated with Humulin N.

  6. Insulin resistance in porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcinaro, F; Basta, G; Lisi, P; Cruciani, C; Pietropaolo, M; Santeusanio, F; Falorni, A; Calafiore, R

    1989-06-01

    It has been reported that patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) develop carbohydrate (CHO) intolerance and manifest diabetes melitus (DM) more frequently than the normal population. In order to verify whether this is due to insulin resistance we studied 5 patients with PCT and 5 normal subjects matched for age, sex and weight. In all the patients an evaluation consisted of the glycemic curve and insulin response to an iv glucose tolerance test (IVGTT: 0.33 g/kg) as well as of an evaluation of the circulating monocyte insulin receptors. Blood samples were drawn in the basal state to measure plasma levels of NEFA, glycerol, and intermediate metabolites. The patients with PCT showed normal glucose tolerance which was obtained, however, at the expense of the elevated insulin levels: therefore a condition of insulin resistance was demonstrated in these subjects. An involvement of the lipid metabolism, observed by the raised levels of plasma NEFA and glycerol, was also evident. The insulin binding to circulating monocytes was reduced but not enough to justify the degree of insulin resistance observed. Therefore, it could be hypothesized, in agreement with similar studies, that a postreceptor defect is responsible for the insulin-resistance observed in patients with PCT and that the reduction of insulin receptors is determined by the down regulation in response to elevated insulinemic levels. An alteration of the porphyrin metabolism might be responsible for this disorder.

  7. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  8. Tolerability, safety and adherence to treatment with insulin detemir injection in the treatment of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athena Philis-Tsimikas

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Athena Philis-TsimikasScripps Whittier Diabetes Institute, La Jolla, CA, USAAbstract: The progressive nature of type 2 diabetes poses challenges in the clinic: treatment must be continually reviewed and adjusted in response to the patient’s changing pathophysiology. Ultimately, insulin replacement therapy will be necessary as the physiological insulin response is compromised. The modern basal insulin analog insulin detemir has been the subject of several clinical trials and observational studies in type 2 diabetes. Compared with NPH insulin, insulin detemir offers an improved balance between achieving current glycemic targets with acceptable tolerability. Insulin detemir also has a unique weight-sparing effect which is associated with body mass index, and this may be a particular advantage to obese patients with type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes data from key clinical studies of insulin detemir, and also provides insights from observational studies.Keywords: type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin detemir, modern analog, basal insulin

  9. of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Sobjanek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Polymorphic variants of MCP-1 and RANTES genes and their protein serum levels have been implicated in the increased risk and severity of several malignancies. However, the subject has not been explored in basal cell carcinoma (BCC patients so far. Aim : To investigate the association between monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 (–2518 A/G and RANTES (–403 G/A polymorphism and risk and clinical course of BCC. Material and methods : The study group consisted of 150 unrelated patients with BCC and 140 healthy, unrelated, age- and sex-matched volunteers. The polymorphisms were analysed using the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction method (ARMS-PCR and single specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR. Serum cytokine levels were measured with ELISA. Results : The presence of the MCP-1 –2518 GG genotype was statistically more frequent in BCC patients and it increased the risk of BCC (OR = 2.63, p = 0.003. Genotype –330 GG was statistically more common in patients with less advanced tumours (OR = 2.8, p = 0.017. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 serum level was statistically higher with GG genotype. In the BCC group MCP-1 serum levels were decreased. Neither polymorphic variants of RANTES nor the chemokine serum concentration differed significantly between the study groups. Conclusions : These findings suggest that –2518 A/G MCP-1 polymorphism may be involved in BCC pathogenesis.

  10. Red Dot Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Red dot basal cell carcinoma, a distinctive morphologic variant of basal cell carcinoma that presents as a small red macule (dot) or papule, is described on a woman’s thigh. A high index of suspicion is necessary to consider the diagnosis since the tumor mimics a telangiectasia or an angioma. PMID:28670359

  11. Het instellen op insuline van patiënten met diabetes mellitus type 2: In een transmurale organisatievorm minstens even effectief als poliklinisch; een retrospectief onderzoek met 4 jaar follow-up [Initiating insulin therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2: In a transmural form of care at least as effective as an outpatients form; a retrospective study with a 4-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosendal, H.; Vondeling, H.; Witte, L.P. de; Hutubessy, R.C.W.; Beekum, W.T. van; Heine, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. Assessing whether the initiation of insulin therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 can be delivered as effectively in a structured transmural care model as in the more usual outpatients structure. Design. Retrospective comparative cohort study. Method. In 1997 data were

  12. Comparison of Insulin Lispro Protamine Suspension with NPH Insulin in Pregnant Women with Type 2 and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Colatrella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin therapy is still the gold standard in diabetic pregnancy. Insulin lispro protamine suspension is an available basal insulin analogue. Aim. To study pregnancy outcomes of women with type 2 and gestational diabetes mellitus when insulin lispro protamine suspension or human NPH insulin was added to medical nutrition therapy and/or short-acting insulin. Methods. In this retrospective study, for maternal outcome we recorded time and mode of delivery, hypertension, glycaemic control (fasting blood glucose and HbA1c, hypoglycemias, weight increase, and insulin need. For neonatal outcome birth weight and weight class, congenital malformations was recorded and main neonatal complications. Two-tail Student's t-test and chi-square test were performed when applicable; significant P<0.05. Results. Eighty-nine pregnant women (25 with type 2 diabetes and 64 with gestational diabetes mellitus; 53 under insulin lispro protamine suspension and 36 under human NPH insulin were recruited. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were quite similar between the two therapeutic approaches; however, insulin need was higher in NPH. At the end of pregnancy, eight women with gestational diabetes continued to use only basal insulin analogue. Conclusions. Pregnancy outcome in type 2 and gestational diabetes mellitus with insulin lispro protamine suspension was similar to that with NPH insulin, except for a lower insulin requirement.

  13. Insulin aggregation tracked by its intrinsic TRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Li Hung C.; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav; Ryadnov, Maxim G.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2017-12-01

    Time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) have been used to detect conformational changes of intrinsic tyrosines within bovine insulin at a physiological pH. The approach offers the ability to detect the initial stages of insulin aggregation at the molecular level. The data analysis has revealed the existence of at least three fluorescent species undergoing dielectric relaxation and significant spectral changes due to insulin aggregation. The results indicate the suitability of the intrinsic TRES approach for insulin studies and for monitoring its stability during storage and aggregation in insulin delivery devices.

  14. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Rajasthan cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Rajasthan, India. Results: A total of 477 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 340, insulin detemir (n = 90, insulin aspart (n = 37, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 7 and other insulin combinations (n = 2. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 8.3% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 8.4% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −0.9%, insulin users: −1.2%. Major hypoglycaemic events decreased from 0.5 events/patient-year to 0.0 events/patient-year in insulin naïve group while no change from baseline (1.3 events/patients-year was observed for insulin users. SADRs were not reported in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  15. Diabetes and Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the abdomen just behind the stomach, produces insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes glucose from the ... occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body doesn’t use insulin ...

  16. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the normal range. What happens with insulin resistance? In insulin resistance, muscle, fat, and liver cells do not ... they do not usually test specifically for insulin resistance. Insulin resistance can be assessed by measuring the level ...

  17. Sliding scale insulin: will the false idol finally fall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, N W; Chipps, D R

    2010-09-01

    Despite a lack of evidence that sliding scale insulin has any clinical benefit, and some evidence that it may even be detrimental, sliding scale insulin is still commonly prescribed in hospitals today. Adopting a proactive rather than a reactive approach to managing diabetes by the use of 'supplemental insulin', given in conjunction with either considered adjustments to the patient's regular anti-diabetic therapy or the provision of basal insulin, is a more effective and safer means of improving glycaemic control in hospital. There are now randomized trial data to support this approach. These data, together with the recognition that there is no evidence base for the use of sliding scale insulin, coupled with changes to insulin prescribing charts in Australia, should lead to the demise of sliding scale insulin use in hospital.

  18. Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...... interventions. We further show that improving the inflammatory toning, using fish oil as fat source, protects mice against diet induced obesity and -inflammation while preserving insulin sensitivity, even in the absence of free fatty acid receptor 4. Conversely, HFD-induced intestinal dysbiosis is associated...

  19. Review of biphasic insulin aspart in the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Raja-Khan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nazia Raja-Khan, Sarah S Warehime, Robert A GabbayDivision of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Penn State Institute for Diabetes and Obesity, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USABackground: Insulin is an effective treatment for achieving glycemic control and preventing complications in patients with diabetes. In order to make insulin therapy more acceptable to patients, newer formulations of insulin have been developed, such as biphasic insulins. Biphasic insulins conveniently provide both prandial and basal insulin in a single injection. One of the most well-studied biphasic insulins is biphasic insulin aspart 70/30.Objective: Our goal was to review the current literature on the safety and efficacy of biphasic insulin aspart in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.Methods: A MEDLINE search was conducted using the terms “biphasic insulin aspart” to identify clinical studies and reviews.Results: Biphasic insulin aspart more effectively reduces post-prandial glucose compared to other biphasic insulins and basal insulins. Compared to biphasic insulin aspart, fasting glucose levels are lower with NPH, similar with glargine, and similar or lower with biphasic human insulin. Treat-to-target trials have shown that a goal HbA1c below 6.5 or 7% can be achieved with biphasic insulin aspart. The risk of hypoglycemia is similar to or less than that seen with other biphasic insulins or NPH insulin.Conclusion: Biphasic insulin aspart 70/30 is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with diabetes.Keywords: biphasic insulin aspart, insulin, diabetes

  20. Anaesthesia generates neuronal insulin resistance by inducing hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutherland Calum

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaesthesia is commonly employed prior to surgical investigations and to permit icv injections in rodents. Indeed it is standard practise in many studies examining the subsequent actions of hormones and growth factors on the brain. Recent evidence that the basal activity of specific intracellular signalling proteins can be affected by anaesthesia prompted us to examine the effect of anaesthesia not only on the basal activity but also the insulin sensitivity of the major insulin signalling pathways. Results We find that urethane- and ketamine-induced anaesthesia results in rapid activation of the phosphatidylinositol (PI 3-kinase-protein kinase B (PKB signalling pathway in the brain, increases tau phosphorylation while at the same time reducing basal activity of the Ras-ERK pathway. Subsequent injection of insulin does not alter the activity of either the PI 3-kinase or ERK signalling pathways, indicating a degree of neuronal molecular insulin resistance. However, if body temperature is maintained during anaesthesia then there is no alteration in the basal activity of these signalling molecules. Subsequent response of both pathways to insulin injection is restored. Conclusion The data is consistent with a hypothermia related alteration in neuronal signalling following anaesthesia, and emphasises the importance of maintaining the body temperature of rodents when monitoring insulin (or growth factor/neurotrophic agent action in the brain of anesthetised rodents.

  1. Novel Simple Insulin Delivery Device Reduces Barriers to Insulin Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes: Results From a Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hermanns, Norbert; Lilly, Leslie C.; Mader, Julia K.; Aberer, Felix; Ribitsch, Anja; Kojzar, Harald; Warner, Jay; Pieber, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The PaQ® insulin delivery system is a simple-to-use patch-on device that provides preset basal rates and bolus insulin on demand. In addition to feasibility of use, safety, and efficacy (reported elsewhere), this study analyzed the impact of PaQ on patient-reported outcomes, including barriers to insulin treatment, diabetes-related distress, and attitudes toward insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes on a stable multiple daily injection (MDI) regimen. Methods: This singl...

  2. Effects of aging on basal fat oxidation in obese humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Marchetti, Christine M; Krishnan, Raj K

    2008-01-01

    = .16); however, waist circumference was not different between groups (104.3 +/- 10.3 vs 102.1 +/- 12.6 cm, P = .65). Basal fat oxidation was 22% lower (1.42 +/- 0.14 vs 1.17 +/- 0.22 mg/kg fat-free mass per minute, P = .03) in older subjects. The VO(2)max was also decreased in older individuals (44.......6 +/- 7.1 vs 38.3 +/- 6.0 mL/kg fat-free mass per minute, P = .03); but insulin sensitivity, lipemia, and leptinemia were not different between groups (P > .05). Fat oxidation was most related to age (r = -0.61, P = .003) and VO(2)max (r = 0.52, P = .01). These data suggest that aging per se......Basal fat oxidation decreases with age. In obesity, it is not known whether this age-related process occurs independently of changes in body composition and insulin sensitivity. Therefore, body composition, resting energy expenditure, basal substrate oxidation, and maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2...

  3. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in healthy and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul S

    2016-01-01

    transporter protein 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane which leads to facilitated diffusion of glucose into the cell. Understanding the precise signaling events guiding insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is pivotal, because impairment in these signaling events leads to development of insulin resistance and type...... 2 diabetes. This review summarizes current understanding of insulin signaling pathways mediating glucose uptake in healthy and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle.......Skeletal muscle is the largest tissues in the human body and is considered the primary target for insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. In skeletal muscle, binding of the insulin to insulin receptor (IR) initiates a signaling cascade that results in the translocation of the insulin-sensitive glucose...

  4. Insulin and Its Cardiovascular Effects: What Is the Current Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongerkery, Sahana Pai; Schroeder, Pamela R; Shomali, Mansur E

    2017-10-23

    In this article, we examine the nature of the complex relationship between insulin and cardiovascular disease. With metabolic abnormalities comes increased risk for cardiovascular complications. We discuss the key factors implicated in development and progression of cardiovascular disease, its relationship to insulin therapy, and what can be learned from large, recent cardiovascular outcome studies. Preclinical studies suggest that insulin has positive effects of facilitating glucose entry into cells and maintaining euglycemia and negative effects of favoring obesity and atherogenesis under certain conditions. Confounding this relationship is that cardiovascular morbidity is linked closely to duration and control of diabetes, and insulin is often used in patients with diabetes of longer duration. However, more recent clinical studies examining the cardiovascular safety of insulin therapy have been reassuring. Diabetes and cardiovascular outcomes are closely linked. Many studies have implicated insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia as a major factor for poor cardiovascular outcomes. Additional studies link the anabolic effects of therapeutic insulin to weight gain, along with hypoglycemia, which may further aggravate cardiovascular risk in this population. Though good glycemic control has been shown to improve microvascular risks in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, what are the known cardiovascular effects of insulin therapy? The ORIGIN trial suggests at least a neutral effect of the basal insulin glargine on cardiovascular outcomes. Recent studies have demonstrated that ultra-long-acting insulin analogs like insulin degludec are non-inferior to insulin glargine with regard to cardiovascular outcomes.

  5. Insulin sensitivity in post-obese women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toubro, S; Western, P; Bülow, J

    1994-01-01

    1. Both increased and decreased sensitivity to insulin has been proposed to precede the development of obesity. Therefore, insulin sensitivity was measured during a 2 h hyperinsulinaemia (100 m-units min-1 m-2) euglycaemic (4.5 mmol/l) glucose clamp combined with indirect calorimetry in nine weight......-1 kg-1, not significant). Basal plasma concentrations of free fatty acids were similar, but at the end of the clamp free fatty acids were lower in the post-obese women than in the control women (139 +/- 19 and 276 +/- 48 mumol/l, P = 0.02). 3. We conclude that the insulin sensitivity of glucose...... metabolism is unaltered in the post-obese state. The study, however, points to an increased antilipolytic insulin action in post-obese subjects, which may favour fat storage and lower lipid oxidation rate postprandially.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  6. Future of Automated Insulin Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Jessica R; DeVries, J Hans; Kovatchev, Boris

    2017-06-01

    Advances in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) have brought on a paradigm shift in the management of type 1 diabetes. These advances have enabled the automation of insulin delivery, where an algorithm determines the insulin delivery rate in response to the CGM values. There are multiple automated insulin delivery (AID) systems in development. A system that automates basal insulin delivery has already received Food and Drug Administration approval, and more systems are likely to follow. As the field of AID matures, future systems may incorporate additional hormones and/or multiple inputs, such as activity level. All AID systems are impacted by CGM accuracy and future CGM devices must be shown to be sufficiently accurate to be safely incorporated into AID. In this article, we summarize recent achievements in AID development, with a special emphasis on CGM sensor performance, and discuss the future of AID systems from the point of view of their input-output characteristics, form factor, and adaptability.

  7. Expectations about insulin therapy, perceived insulin-delivery system social acceptability, and insulin treatment satisfaction contribute to decreases in insulin therapy self-efficacy in patients with type 2 diabetes after 36 weeks insulin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Risa P; Curtis, Bradley; Ilag, Liza; Nelson, David R; Wong, Mayme; Funnell, Martha

    2013-09-01

    Self-efficacy plays a critical role in diabetes self-care. Herein we explore factors contributing to decreased insulin therapy self-efficacy in insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) initiating and managing insulin therapy over 36 weeks. The study was conducted within an international, randomized clinical trial comparing two insulin therapies administered by insulin pen in patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with oral antihyperglycemic medications. Patients completed the Self-Efficacy about Insulin Therapy Questionnaire (SEITQ) at baseline and endpoint. Patients also completed patient-reported measures assessing expectations about insulin therapy at baseline and perceptions about insulin therapy and insulin-delivery system (IDS) satisfaction at endpoint. Baseline and endpoint SEITQ scores were compared. Using prespecified criteria, patients were classified as having "decreased" or "no change/improved" insulin self-efficacy. Demographic, clinical, and patient-reported variables were entered into a logistic regression model with decreased insulin self-efficacy (yes or no) as the dependent variable. Baseline and endpoint SEITQ data were available for 450 insulin-naïve T2DM patients (mean age 59 years; 53% female; 57% Caucasian; mean baseline HbA1c 9.4%; 80.0 mmol/mol). Insulin therapy self-efficacy improved from baseline to endpoint (74.0 vs 77.5; Psocial acceptability (P=0.004), and more positive expectations of insulin therapy (P<0.0001) were associated with decreased insulin self-efficacy. A candid discussion between clinicians and their insulin-naïve T2DM patients about the benefits and challenges of insulin therapy may prevent unrealistic expectations that could potentially undermine insulin self-efficacy. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine.

  8. Early differential defects of insulin secretion and action in 19-year-old caucasian men who had low birth weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi; Dela, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    were significantly lower in the LBW group. Insulin-stimulated glycolytic flux was significantly reduced, and suppression of endogenous glucose production was enhanced in the LBW group. Nevertheless, basal and insulin-stimulated rates of whole-body peripheral glucose disposal, glucose oxidation, lipid...... oxidation, exogenous glucose storage, and nonoxidative glucose metabolism were similar in the two groups. Insulin secretion was reduced by 30% in the LBW group, when expressed relative to insulin sensitivity (disposition index = insulin secretion x insulin action). We propose that reduced insulin-stimulated...

  9. Insulin induces calcium signals in the nucleus of rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Michele A; Gomes, Dawidson A; Andrade, Viviane A; Leite, M Fatima; Nathanson, Michael H

    2008-11-01

    Insulin is an hepatic mitogen that promotes liver regeneration. Actions of insulin are mediated by the insulin receptor, which is a receptor tyrosine kinase. It is currently thought that signaling via the insulin receptor occurs at the plasma membrane, where it binds to insulin. Here we report that insulin induces calcium oscillations in isolated rat hepatocytes, and that these calcium signals depend upon activation of phospholipase C and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, but not upon extracellular calcium. Furthermore, insulin-induced calcium signals occur in the nucleus, and are temporally associated with selective depletion of nuclear phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate and translocation of the insulin receptor to the nucleus. These findings suggest that the insulin receptor translocates to the nucleus to initiate nuclear, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated calcium signals in rat hepatocytes. This novel signaling mechanism may be responsible for insulin's effects on liver growth and regeneration.

  10. Converting U-500 regular insulin to insulin detemir and insulin lispro in a patient undergoing dietary changes in preparation for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim V; Weidner, Jarod A; Shaw, Kathy F; Valdez, Connie A

    2016-03-01

    The safe and effective conversion of human regular U-500 insulin (U-500R) to basal and bolus U-100 (insulin detemir and insulin lispro, respectively) in a patient undergoing a significant dietary change in preparation for bariatric surgery is described. Conversion from U-100 to U-500R insulin has been described in the literature. There is, however, a paucity of information describing the reverse conversion (i.e., from U-500R to U-100 insulin). Whether converting to or from U-500R, patient safety is a primary concern. A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with a 10-year history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and gastroparesis who was scheduled to undergo bariatric surgery was converted from U-500R to insulin detemir and insulin lispro preoperatively while undergoing significant diet changes. The patient's blood glucose values, diet, and activity levels were closely monitored daily by the interprofessional team over a 10-day preoperative period during which her regular diet was changed to a very low-calorie, high-protein diet; insulin doses were adjusted accordingly. Throughout this process, the patient did not experience any major hypoglycemic episodes. Close collaboration among interprofessional team members and a strong partnership with the patient were considered key factors in the successful conversion of insulin therapy. Subcutaneous insulin therapy in a woman preparing for bariatric surgery was safely converted from U-500R to basal therapy with U-100 insulin detemir and with as-needed boluses of U-100 insulin lispro. This occurred as the patient switched from a regular diet to a low-calorie, high-protein diet. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the North India cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surender Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from North India. Results: A total of 4912 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 3619, insulin detemir (n = 880, insulin aspart (n = 331, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 37 and other insulin combinations (n = 44. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 9.8% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 9.8% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the study groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −2.7%, insulin users: −2.6%. SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  12. No evidence for genetically determined alteration in insulin secretion or sensitivity predisposing to type 1 diabetes: a study of identical twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawa, Mohammed I; Bonfanti, Riccardo; Valeri, Christina; Delli Castelli, Michela; Beyan, Huriya; Leslie, R David G

    2005-06-01

    To determine whether inherited changes in insulin secretion or sensitivity could predispose to type 1 diabetes, we studied identical twins of type 1 diabetic patients. We studied prospectively a consecutive series of 27 identical twins of patients with type 1 diabetes who were initially nondiabetic, as well as 14 control subjects, over a period of 18 years. Of these 27 twins, 15 remain nondiabetic (now estimated at low disease risk) and 12 developed diabetes (pre-diabetic twins). Subjects were tested when not diabetic on at least two occasions with an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT), and we estimated insulin secretion as first-phase insulin response (FPIR), glucose clearance (K(g)), and insulin sensitivity both by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and relative to insulin response by the basal HOMA-IR-to-FPIR ratio. Twins now at low risk and control subjects had similar fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, FPIR, K(g), HOMA-IR, and HOMA-IR-to-FPIR ratio. In contrast, pre-diabetic twins compared with control twins had higher fasting insulin levels (10.3 +/- 6.0 vs. 4.6 +/- 4.0 mIU/ml), lower FPIR (245 +/- 129 vs. 796 +/- 622 mIU . ml(-1) . 10 min(-1)), lower K(g) (1.5 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.6 +/- 0.8% per min), and higher HOMA-IR-to-FPIR ratio (0.007 +/- 0.005 vs. 0.001 +/- 0.0009) (all P alteration in either insulin secretion or sensitivity predisposing to type 1 diabetes.

  13. Aminophylline stimulates insulin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arias, A. M.; Bisschop, P. H.; Ackermans, M. T.; Nijpels, G.; Endert, E.; Romijn, J. A.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    2001-01-01

    In healthy subjects, paracrine factors partly regulate insulin secretion and basal endogenous glucose production. Administration of pentoxifylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, inhibits transiently endogenous glucose production in healthy humans without any changes in glucoregulatory hormone

  14. Glucose effectiveness and insulin sensitivity measurements derived from the non-insulin-assisted minimal model and the clamp techniques are concordant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jan Erik; Alford, Frank; Ward, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the concordance between glucose effectiveness (SG) and insulin sensitivity (SI), derived from the unmodified dynamic non-insulin-assisted intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) implemented by SG(MM) and SI(MM); simulation analysis and modelling/conversational interaction (SAAM....../CONSAM) versus the eu/hyperglycaemic basal insulinaemic and the euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp (SG(CLAMP) and SI(CLAMP))....

  15. Basal cell carcinoma metastatic to cervical lymph nodes and lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, J Scott; Flam, Marshall S; Tashjian, David N; Tschang, Tai-Po

    2006-10-31

    Metastatic basal cell carcinoma (MBCC) of the skin is rare in occurrence and may initially elude proper diagnosis and management. We describe a case of MBCC to cervical lymph nodes, originally evaluated and treated surgically as metastatic thyroid carcinoma. After definitive diagnosis of MBCC was made, chemotherapy and concomitant radiation treatment were initiated; however, despite these measures, the patient then developed MBCC to the lung. Risk factors and current therapeutic modalities for MBCC are also discussed. In addition to the more commonly metastasizing carcinomas, metastases from a cutaneous basal cell carcinoma primary tumor should be considered when evaluating cervical lymph node metastases of an uncertain head and neck primary.

  16. HOW TO START AND OPTIMISE INSULIN THERAPY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Initial insulin therapy needs to be individualised to optimise target goals while avoiding hypoglycaemia. Patients need to measure their blood glucose at least twice a day (3 times if taking multiple injections) and have self-monitoring data available so dosage changes can be made. Insulin should not be delayed if the patient.

  17. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Karthiga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Binkley and Johnson first reported this syndrome in 1951. But it was in 1960, Gorlin-Goltz established the association of basal cell epithelioma, jaw cyst and bifid ribs, a combination which is now frequently known as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as well as Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS. NBCCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance and variable expressivity. NBCCS is characterized by variety of cutaneous, dental, osseous, opthalmic, neurologic and sexual abnormalities. One such case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is reported here with good illustrations.

  18. [Satisfaction of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after starting treatment with insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancera-Romero, J; Carramiñana-Barrera, F; Muñoz-González, L; Guillén-Álvarez, P; Murillo-García, D; Sánchez-Pérez, M R

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate if overcoming the barrier of starting treatment with insulin can lead to better clinical control and a higher level of patient satisfaction with their treatment. This is an observational, multicentre study of patients diagnosed with DM2 who attended primary care centres with poor glycaemic control (A1c≥8%) under treatment with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs), and who were given motivational treatment to overcome their fear of injections, and started treatment with insulin. The level of satisfaction with the treatment was evaluated using the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ). The questionnaire was used before initiating the treatment with insulin and in the follow-up visit (3-4 months from the beginning of treatment with basal insulin). A total of 573 patients with a mean age of 64±10 years were recruited. The overall mean score from the DTSQs satisfaction questionnaire was 18.3±6.3, and the change of treatment led to an improvement in patient satisfaction compared to the previous treatment (DTSQc mean score 8.8±5.9). A1c dropped from an initial value of 8.7% (SD 0.8) to 7.5% (SD 0.7) (PDM2 poorly controlled with OADs, overcoming a fear of injections and starting treatment with insulin was associated with an overall improvement in satisfaction with the new treatment, and decreased the perception of hyperglycaemic episodes. Glycaemic control and the metabolic profile of the patients also improved to a statistically significant degree with the change of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Characterization of Insulin-Mediated Suppression of Hepatic Glucose Production In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Edgerton, Dale S.; Rivera, Noelia; Irimia-Dominguez, Jose; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss W.; Lautz, Margaret; Donahue, E. Patrick; Meyer, Catalina M.; Roach, Peter J.; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production (HGP) is associated with sensitive intracellular signaling and molecular inhibition of gluconeogenic (GNG) enzyme mRNA expression. We determined, for the first time, the time course and relevance (to metabolic flux) of these molecular events during physiological hyperinsulinemia in vivo in a large animal model. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS 24 h fasted dogs were infused with somatostatin, while insulin (basal or 8× basal) and ...

  20. APPL1 potentiates insulin sensitivity by facilitating the binding of IRS1/2 to the insulin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jiyoon; Galan, Amanda K; Xin, Xiaoban; Dong, Feng; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A; Zhou, Lijun; Wang, Changhua; Li, Cuiling; Holmes, Bekke M; Sloane, Lauren B; Austad, Steven N; Guo, Shaodong; Musi, Nicolas; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Deng, Chuxia; White, Morris F; Liu, Feng; Dong, Lily Q

    2014-05-22

    Binding of insulin receptor substrate proteins 1 and 2 (IRS1/2) to the insulin receptor (IR) is essential for the regulation of insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis. However, the mechanism of IRS1/2 recruitment to the IR remains elusive. Here, we identify adaptor protein APPL1 as a critical molecule that promotes IRS1/2-IR interaction. APPL1 forms a complex with IRS1/2 under basal conditions, and this complex is then recruited to the IR in response to insulin or adiponectin stimulation. The interaction between APPL1 and IR depends on insulin- or adiponectin-stimulated APPL1 phosphorylation, which is greatly reduced in insulin target tissues in obese mice. appl1 deletion in mice consistently leads to systemic insulin resistance and a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated IRS1/2, but not IR, tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating that APPL1 sensitizes insulin signaling by acting at a site downstream of the IR. Our study uncovers a mechanism regulating insulin signaling and crosstalk between the insulin and adiponectin pathways. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. APPL1 Potentiates Insulin Sensitivity by Facilitating the Binding of IRS1/2 to the Insulin Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoon Ryu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Binding of insulin receptor substrate proteins 1 and 2 (IRS1/2 to the insulin receptor (IR is essential for the regulation of insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis. However, the mechanism of IRS1/2 recruitment to the IR remains elusive. Here, we identify adaptor protein APPL1 as a critical molecule that promotes IRS1/2-IR interaction. APPL1 forms a complex with IRS1/2 under basal conditions, and this complex is then recruited to the IR in response to insulin or adiponectin stimulation. The interaction between APPL1 and IR depends on insulin- or adiponectin-stimulated APPL1 phosphorylation, which is greatly reduced in insulin target tissues in obese mice. appl1 deletion in mice consistently leads to systemic insulin resistance and a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated IRS1/2, but not IR, tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating that APPL1 sensitizes insulin signaling by acting at a site downstream of the IR. Our study uncovers a mechanism regulating insulin signaling and crosstalk between the insulin and adiponectin pathways.

  2. A Review of Insulin Degludec/Insulin Aspart: Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Properties and Their Implications in Clinical Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Hanne; Fita, Edmond G; Heise, Tim

    2017-04-01

    Insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp; 70 % IDeg and 30 % IAsp) is a soluble combination of two individual insulin analogues in one product, designed to provide mealtime glycaemic control due to the IAsp component and basal glucose-lowering effect from the IDeg component. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of IDegAsp have been investigated in a series of clinical pharmacology studies with generally comparable designs, methodologies and patient inclusion/exclusion criteria. The glucose-lowering effect profile of IDegAsp during once-daily dosing at steady state shows distinct and clearly separated action from the prandial and basal components of IDegAsp. The IAsp component provides rapid onset and peak glucose-lowering effect followed by a flat glucose-lowering effect lasting beyond 30 h due to IDeg. During twice-daily dosing, the distinct peak effect and the flat basal effect are retained following each dose. The pharmacological properties of IDegAsp are maintained in the elderly, children, adolescents, Japanese patients and those with hepatic or renal impairment. The potential clinical benefits associated with the pharmacological properties of IDegAsp have been verified in phase III clinical trials comparing IDegAsp with three other currently available treatment options: premixed insulin, basal-bolus regimens and basal-only therapy. IDegAsp shows favourable clinical benefits compared with biphasic insulin aspart 30 and is a viable alternative to basal-bolus and basal-only therapy. This review presents the results from clinical pharmacology studies conducted with IDegAsp to date, and extrapolates these results to clinical use of IDegAsp in the context of findings from the IDegAsp clinical therapeutic studies.

  3. Caspase induction and BCL2 inhibition in human adipose tissue: a potential relationship with insulin signaling alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinahones, Francisco José; Coín Aragüez, Leticia; Murri, Mora; Oliva Olivera, Wilfredo; Mayas Torres, María Dolores; Barbarroja, Nuria; Gomez Huelgas, Ricardo; Malagón, Maria M; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2013-03-01

    Cell death determines the onset of obesity and associated insulin resistance. Here, we analyze the relationship among obesity, adipose tissue apoptosis, and insulin signaling. The expression levels of initiator (CASP8/9) and effector (CASP3/7) caspases as well as antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma (BCL)2 and inflammatory markers were assessed in visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue from patients with different degrees of obesity and without insulin resistance or diabetes. Adipose tissue explants from lean subjects were cultured with TNF-α or IL-6, and the expression of apoptotic and insulin signaling components was analyzed and compared with basal expression levels in morbidly obese subjects. SAT and VAT exhibited increased CASP3/7 and CASP8/9 expression levels and decreased BCL2 expression with BMI increase. These changes were accompanied by increased inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels and macrophage infiltration markers. In obese subjects, CASP3/7 activation and BCL2 downregulation correlated with the IRS-1/2-expression levels. Expression levels of caspases, BCL2, p21, p53, IRS-1/2, GLUT4, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, and leukocyte antigen-related phosphatase in TNF-α- or IL-6-treated explants from lean subjects were comparable with those found in adipose tissue samples from morbidly obese subjects. These insulin component expression levels were reverted with CASP3/7 inhibition in these TNF-α- or IL-6-treated explants. Body fat mass increase is associated with CASP3/7 and BCL2 expression in adipose tissue. Moreover, this proapoptotic state correlated with insulin signaling, suggesting its potential contribution to the development of insulin resistance.

  4. Insulin Human Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin inhalation is used in combination with a long-acting insulin to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar ...

  5. Original paper: Efficacy and safety analysis of insulin degludec/insulin aspart compared with biphasic insulin aspart 30: A phase 3, multicentre, international, open-label, randomised, treat-to-target trial in patients with type 2 diabetes fasting during Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Mohamed; Echtay, Akram Salim; Malek, Rachid; Omar, Mahomed; Shaikh, Shehla Sajid; Ekelund, Magnus; Kaplan, Kadriye; Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi

    2018-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) and biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) before, during and after Ramadan in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who fasted during Ramadan. In this multinational, randomised, treat-to-target trial, patients with T2DM who intended to fast and were on basal, pre- or self-mixed insulin ± oral antidiabetic drugs for ≥90 days were randomised (1:1) to IDegAsp twice daily (BID) or BIAsp 30 BID. Treatment period included pre-Ramadan treatment initiation (with insulin titration for 8-20 weeks), Ramadan (4 weeks) and post-Ramadan (4 weeks). Insulin doses were reduced by 30-50% for the pre-dawn meal (suhur) on the first day of Ramadan, and readjusted to the pre-Ramadan levels at the end of Ramadan. Hypoglycaemia was analysed as overall (severe or plasma glucose Ramadan, despite achieving significantly lower pre-iftar (meal at sunset) self-measured plasma glucose (estimated treatment difference: -0.54 mmol/L [-1.02; -0.07] 95% CI , p = .0247; post hoc) with similar overall glycaemic efficacy, IDegAsp showed significantly lower overall and nocturnal hypoglycaemia rates versus BIAsp 30. IDegAsp is a suitable therapeutic agent for patients who need insulin for sustained glucose control before, during and after Ramadan fasting, with a significantly lower risk of hypoglycaemia, versus BIAsp 30, an existing premixed insulin analogue. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Insulin accelerates global and mitochondrial protein synthesis rates in neonatal muscle during sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    In neonatal pigs, sepsis decreases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle by decreasing translation initiation. However, insulin stimulates muscle protein synthesis despite persistent repression of translation initiation signaling. To determine whether the insulin-induced increase in global rates of m...

  7. Rat amylin-(8-37) enhances insulin action and alters lipid metabolism in normal and insulin-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettiarachchi, M; Chalkley, S; Furler, S M; Choong, Y S; Heller, M; Cooper, G J; Kraegen, E W

    1997-11-01

    To clarify roles of amylin, we investigated metabolic responses to rat amylin-(8-37), a specific amylin antagonist, in normal and insulin-resistant, human growth hormone (hGH)-infused rats. Fasting conscious rats were infused with saline or hGH, each with and without amylin-(8-37) (0.125 mumol/h), over 5.75 h. At 3.75 h, a hyperinsulinemic (100 mU/l) clamp with bolus 2-deoxy-D-[3H]glucose and [14C]glucose was started. hGH infusion led to prompt (2- to 3-fold) basal hyperamylinemia (P hGH-infused rats. Amylin-(8-37) corrected hGH-induced liver insulin resistance, increased basal plasma triglycerides and lowered plasma nonesterified fatty acids in both groups, and reduced muscle triglyceride and total long-chain acyl-CoA content in saline-treated rats (P hGH infusion; 2) amylin-(8-37) increases whole body and muscle insulin sensitivity and consistently reduces basal insulin levels in normal and hGH-induced insulin resistant rats; and 3) amylin-(8-37) elicits a significant alteration of in vivo lipid metabolism. These findings support a role of amylin in modulating insulin action and suggest that this could be mediated by effects on lipid metabolism.

  8. Insulin responses to administrations of amino acids and fatty acids in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kyoji; Takashima, Satoshi; Takagi, Mitsuru; Nishii, Naohito; Ohba, Yasunori; Kitagawa, Hitoshi

    2011-10-01

    In order to compare the stimulation ability of insulin secretion, we determined changes in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations after intravenous administration of various amino acids and essential fatty acids in clinically healthy adult cats. Plasma glucose concentrations were within the normal ranges after injection of amino acids and fatty acids. Plasma insulin concentrations increased rapidly 2 to 4 min after injection of arginine, then decreased to the basal levels at 20 min in all five cats. Insulin peak responses were significantly greater in arginine injections than in normal saline (Pglucose (Pglucose toxication and required time for testing, the intravenous arginine tolerance test may be useful for estimation of insulin responses in cats.

  9. Insulin glargine: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic basis of clinical effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Valeryevich Klimontov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glargine became the first long-acting insulin analogue. Glargine was designed to meet basal insulin requirements throughout the day with a single injection. Pharmacokinetics of insulin glargine is characterized by biotransformation into metabolites M1 and M2 that transforms the B chain of glargine so it is similar to the B chain of human insulin. Plasma concentrations of active M1 and M2 metabolites have no pronounced peaks during the day, resulting in lower glucose variability and hypoglycaemia risk when compared with NPH insulin. The metabolic activities of M1 and M2 metabolites are similar to the effect of glargine, whereas the mitogenic effects of these metabolites do not exceed the effect of human insulin. Insulin glargine shows a higher affinity for the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 receptor when compared with human insulin. Glargine has no proliferative effect in vivo owing to its rapid conversion into metabolites. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability of glargine is comparable to other insulins. These characteristics are important for the clinical efficacy and safety of glargine.

  10. Severe insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus in patients with congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Klein, H H; Hansen, T

    1995-01-01

    severe insulin resistance of both liver and peripheral tissues. The impaired insulin-stimulated glucose disposal to peripheral tissues was primarily due to reduced nonoxidative glucose metabolism. These changes were paralleled by reduced basal values of muscle GS total activity, allosterical activation...

  11. Circadian control of insulin secretion is independent of the temporal distribution of feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Strubbe, JH

    1998-01-01

    To investigate whether there is a circadian regulation of insulin secretion, rats were adapted to a feeding regimen of six meals equally distributed over 24 h. Under these conditions basal glucose and insulin levels increased during the light phase and decreased during the dark phase. Maximal blood

  12. SIRT4 Is a Lysine Deacylase that Controls Leucine Metabolism and Insulin Secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Kristin A; Huynh, Frank K; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey

    2017-01-01

    in leucine oxidation, and we show a primary role for SIRT4 in controlling this pathway in mice. Furthermore, we find that dysregulated leucine metabolism in SIRT4KO mice leads to elevated basal and stimulated insulin secretion, which progressively develops into glucose intolerance and insulin resistance...

  13. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, Karim; Karlsson, Håkan K R; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied...... by altered signal transduction, skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from pancreas-kidney transplant recipients (n = 4), nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients (receiving the same immunosuppressive drugs; n = 5), and healthy subjects (n = 6) before and during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Basal...... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  14. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas tranplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, K; Karlsson, HRK; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied...... by altered signal transduction, skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from pancreas-kidney transplant recipients (n = 4), nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients (receiving the same immunosuppressive drugs; n = 5), and healthy subjects (n = 6) before and during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Basal...... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  15. A 16-Week Open-Label, Multicenter Pilot Study Assessing Insulin Pump Therapy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Suboptimally Controlled with Multiple Daily Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Juan P; Bode, Bruce W; Bailey, Timothy S; Kipnes, Mark S; Brunelle, Rocco; Edelman, Steven V

    2011-01-01

    Background We assessed the efficacy, safety, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of insulin pump therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who were suboptimally controlled with a multiple daily injection (MDI) regimen. Methods In this subanalysis of a 16-week multicenter study, 21 insulin-pump-naïve patients [age 57 ± 13 years, hemoglobin A1c (A1C) 8.4 ± 1.0%, body weight 98 ± 20 kg, total daily insulin dose 99 ± 65 U, mean ± standard deviation] treated at baseline with MDI therapy with or without oral antidiabetic agents discontinued all diabetes medications except metformin and initiated insulin pump therapy. Insulin was titrated to achieve the best possible glycemic control with the simplest possible dosing regimen. Outcome measures included A1C, fasting and postprandial glucose, body weight, incidence of hypoglycemia, and PROs. Results Glycemic control improved significantly after 16 weeks: A1C 7.3 ± 1.0% (−1.1 ± 1.2%, p insulin doses were 66 ± 36, 56 ± 40, and 122 ± 72 U (1.2 U/kg), respectively, and 90% of patients were treated with two or fewer daily basal rates. Body weight increased by 2.8 ± 2.6 kg (p Insulin pump therapy using a relatively simple dosing regimen safely improved glucose control and PROs in patients with T2DM who were unable to achieve glycemic targets with MDI therapy. Controlled trials are needed to further assess the clinical benefits and cost-effectiveness of insulin pumps in this patient population. PMID:21880230

  16. Seasonal variation of grassland basal cover | JW | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The construction of a portable bridge for establishing 1100 relocatable points is described. Basal cover, measured by wheel-point and bridge-point methods, showed a statistically significant seasonal increase through summer and a decrease again after the rainfall began decreasing with the onset of winter. An initial small ...

  17. Insulin degludec aspart: One-year real world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective analysis describes the use of insulin degludec aspart (IDegAsp) in India. All subjects who had received IDegAsp for 52 weeks at two endocrine centers were included in this study. Forty-eight subjects (40 men), with mean age of 54.33 ± 9.63 years and mean duration of diabetes of 6.33 ± 2.96 years, started IDegAsp as insulin of initiation (16), as an intensification regime (4), as de-escalation from basal-bolus therapy (16), or as switch from premixed insulin (12). The dose of IDegAsp fell from 43.17 ± 21.18 U/day or 0.56 ± 0.23 U/kg to 37.75 ± 17.13U/day (0.51 ± 0.12 U/kg) at 24 weeks and 41.41 ± 15.33 U/day (0.56 ± 0.17 U/kg) at 52 weeks. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), which was 9.52 ± 1.27% at the start of therapy, fell to 7.51 ± 0.46% at 26 weeks and to 7.48 ± 0.40% at 52 weeks. Fasting plasma glucose fell from 154.08 ± 33.30 mg% to 108.58 ± 22.26 mg% at 26 weeks and 102.17 ± 12.79 mg% at 52 weeks. Of the 48 subjects, 39 (81.25%) achieved a target of HbA1c <7.0% at both 26 and 52 weeks. No episode of hypoglycemia was reported in the 4 weeks preceding the analysis. This communication highlights the efficacy, safety, and tolerability, while providing insight into the usage patterns of IDegAsp.

  18. Insulin degludec aspart: One-year real world experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This retrospective analysis describes the use of insulin degludec aspart (IDegAsp in India. Material and Methods: All subjects who had received IDegAsp for 52 weeks at two endocrine centers were included in this study. Results: Forty-eight subjects (40 men, with mean age of 54.33 ± 9.63 years and mean duration of diabetes of 6.33 ± 2.96 years, started IDegAsp as insulin of initiation (16, as an intensification regime (4, as de-escalation from basal-bolus therapy (16, or as switch from premixed insulin (12. The dose of IDegAsp fell from 43.17 ± 21.18 U/day or 0.56 ± 0.23 U/kg to 37.75 ± 17.13U/day (0.51 ± 0.12 U/kg at 24 weeks and 41.41 ± 15.33 U/day (0.56 ± 0.17 U/kg at 52 weeks. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, which was 9.52 ± 1.27% at the start of therapy, fell to 7.51 ± 0.46% at 26 weeks and to 7.48 ± 0.40% at 52 weeks. Fasting plasma glucose fell from 154.08 ± 33.30 mg% to 108.58 ± 22.26 mg% at 26 weeks and 102.17 ± 12.79 mg% at 52 weeks. Of the 48 subjects, 39 (81.25% achieved a target of HbA1c <7.0% at both 26 and 52 weeks. No episode of hypoglycemia was reported in the 4 weeks preceding the analysis. Conclusion: This communication highlights the efficacy, safety, and tolerability, while providing insight into the usage patterns of IDegAsp.

  19. Cognitively impaired elderly exhibit insulin resistance and no memory improvement with infused insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jill K; Vidoni, Eric D; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Montgomery, Robert N; Johnson, David K; Thyfault, John P; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2016-03-01

    Insulin resistance is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), although its role in AD etiology is unclear. We assessed insulin resistance using fasting and insulin-stimulated measures in 51 elderly subjects with no dementia (ND; n = 37) and with cognitive impairment (CI; n = 14). CI subjects exhibited either mild CI or AD. Fasting insulin resistance was measured using the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was assessed using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp to calculate glucose disposal rate into lean mass, the primary site of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Because insulin crosses the blood-brain barrier, we also assessed whether insulin infusion would improve verbal episodic memory compared to baseline. Different but equivalent versions of cognitive tests were administered in counterbalanced order in the basal and insulin-stimulated state. Groups did not differ in age or body mass index. Cognitively impaired subjects exhibited greater insulin resistance as measured at fasting (HOMA-IR; ND: 1.09 [1.1] vs. CI: 2.01 [2.3], p = 0.028) and during the hyperinsulinemic clamp (glucose disposal rate into lean mass; ND: 9.9 (4.5) vs. AD 7.2 (3.2), p = 0.040). Cognitively impaired subjects also exhibited higher fasting insulin compared to ND subjects, (CI: 8.7 [7.8] vs. ND: 4.2 [3.8] μU/mL; p = 0.023) and higher fasting amylin (CI: 24.1 [39.1] vs. 8.37 [14.2]; p = 0.050) with no difference in fasting glucose. Insulin infusion elicited a detrimental effect on one test of verbal episodic memory (Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test) in both groups (p insulin resistance was observed in cognitively impaired subjects compared to ND controls, insulin infusion did not improve memory. Furthermore, a significant correlation between HOMA-IR and glucose disposal rate was present only in ND (p = 0.0002) but not in cognitively impaired (p = 0.884) subjects, indicating potentially important

  20. Basal cell carcinoma does metastasize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgediz, Doruk; Smith, E B; Zheng, Jie; Otero, Jose; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Corvera, Carlos U

    2008-08-15

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) rarely metastasizes. However, this unfortunate outcome can occur, usually in neglected tumors. We report a 52-year-old man with a BCC on the left chest that enlarged and then ulcerated over a 6-year period. Metastasis of the tumor to lymph nodes in the left axilla resulted, but the patient remains free of disease 24 months after wide excision, lymph node dissection, and local radiation therapy to the axilla.

  1. Oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebio, Alexandre; Brown, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The exact mechanisms underlying the dysfunction of the basal ganglia (BG) that leads to movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and dystonia still remain unclear. The classic model, based on two distinct pathways and described nearly 20 years ago by Albin and Delong, fails to explain why lesion or stimulation of the globus pallidus interna improves dyskinesias and why lesion or stimulation of the thalamus does not cause prominent bradykinesia. These paradoxes, initially highlighted out by Marsden and Obeso, led to the proposition that the pattern of neuronal discharge determines pathological function. Accordingly, over the past decade, attention has switched from considerations of discharge rate to the characterisation of synchronised activity within BG networks. Here we would like to briefly review current knowledge about synchronised oscillatory activity in the BG and focus on its relationship to abnormal motor function. In particular, we hypothesise that the frequency of synchronisation helps determine the nature of any motor deficit, perhaps as a consequence of the different tuning properties of basal ganglia-cortical sub-circuits.

  2. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, Karim; Karlsson, Håkan K R; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied....... In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients may arise from a negative feedback regulation of the canonical insulin-signaling cascade from excessive serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, possibly as a consequence of immunosuppressive therapy and hyperinsulinemia....... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  3. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas tranplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, K; Karlsson, HRK; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied....... In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients may arise from a negative feedback regulation of the canonical insulin-signaling cascade from excessive serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, possibly as a consequence of immunosuppressive therapy and hyperinsulinemia....... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  4. Role of glucagon in countering hypoglycemia induced by insulin infusion in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, R L; Connolly, C C; Neal, D W; Palladino, L J; Parlow, A F; Cherrington, A D

    1991-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the role of glucagon in countering the prolonged hypoglycemia resulting from insulin infusion and to determine whether its effect is manifest through glycogenolysis and/or gluconeogenesis. Two groups of 18-h fasted somatostatin-treated dogs were given intraportal insulin at 5 mU.kg-1.min-1. In one group (SimGGN; n = 6), glucagon was infused intraportally so as to mimic the normal response to hypoglycemia. In a second group (BasGGN; n = 6), glucagon was infused at a basal rate. Glucose turnover and gluconeogenesis were assessed by combining tracer and hepatic balance techniques. Exogenous glucose was infused as needed to maintain equivalent hypoglycemia at approximately 45 mg/dl in the two groups. Although glucagon concentrations were significantly different, the levels of other counterregulatory hormones were equivalent in both experimental protocols. Endogenous glucose production (EGP) in SimGGN doubled from 2.4 +/- 0.2 to 5.4 +/- 0.8 mg.kg-1.min-1 by 1 h before dropping to 4.5 +/- 0.2 mg.kg-1.min-1 in the 3rd h of insulin infusion. EGP in BasGGN was initially 2.5 +/- 0.1 mg.kg-1.min-1, unchanged by 1 h, and increased to 3.9 +/- 0.2 mg.kg-1.min-1 by the 3rd h of insulin infusion. In the 1st h of insulin infusion, the rise in gluconeogenesis in both groups was equal and represented only a small part of total EGP. By the 3rd h, gluconeogenesis was the major contributor to total EGP, and gluconeogenic efficiency increased significantly more in SimGGN than BasGGN (261 vs. 140%, P less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Nasal insulin changes peripheral insulin sensitivity simultaneously with altered activity in homeostatic and reward-related human brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, M; Kullmann, S; Ketterer, C; Guthoff, M; Linder, K; Wagner, R; Stingl, K T; Veit, R; Staiger, H; Häring, H-U; Preissl, H; Fritsche, A

    2012-06-01

    Impaired insulin sensitivity is a major factor leading to type 2 diabetes. Animal studies suggest that the brain is involved in the regulation of insulin sensitivity. We investigated whether insulin action in the human brain regulates peripheral insulin sensitivity and examined which brain areas are involved. Insulin and placebo were given intranasally. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide were measured in 103 participants at 0, 30 and 60 min. A subgroup (n = 12) was also studied with functional MRI, and blood sampling at 0, 30 and 120 min. For each time-point, the HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated as an inverse estimate of peripheral insulin sensitivity. Plasma insulin increased and subsequently decreased. This excursion was accompanied by slightly decreased plasma glucose, resulting in an initially increased HOMA-IR. At 1 h after insulin spray, the HOMA-IR subsequently decreased and remained lower up to 120 min. An increase in hypothalamic activity was observed, which correlated with the increased HOMA-IR at 30 min post-spray. Activity in the putamen, right insula and orbitofrontal cortex correlated with the decreased HOMA-IR at 120 min post-spray. Central insulin action in specific brain areas, including the hypothalamus, may time-dependently regulate peripheral insulin sensitivity. This introduces a potential novel mechanism for the regulation of peripheral insulin sensitivity and underlines the importance of cerebral insulin action for the whole organism.

  6. [Adverse reactions to insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liñana, J J; Montoro, F J; Hernández, M D; Basomba, A

    1997-07-01

    The prevalence of allergic reactions to insuline has decreased during the last few years. Probably this is due to the use of the newly-developed recombinant human insuline. At present, adverse reactions to insuline occur in 5-10% of patients on therapy with insuline. Adverse reactions may be local (more frequent) or systemic (rare). Insuline resistance consists in a different type of immunological reaction. Diagnosis of allergy to insuline is based on clinical history and cutaneous and serological tests. Treatment depends upon the severity of the reaction. When insuline is indispensable despite a previous allergic reaction, a desensitization protocol may be implemented.

  7. Retrospective analysis of insulin responses to standard dosed oral glucose tests (OGTs) via naso-gastric tubing towards definition of an objective cut-off value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnken, Tobias; Delarocque, Julien; Schumacher, Svenja; Huber, Korinna; Feige, Karsten

    2018-01-19

    Insulin dysregulation (ID) with basal or postprandial hyperinsulinemia is one of the key findings in horses and ponies suffering from the equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Assessment of ID can easily be performed in clinical settings by the use of oral glucose challenge tests. Oral glucose test (OGT) performed with 1 g/kg bodyweight (BW) glucose administered via naso-gastric tube allows the exact administration of a defined glucose dosage in a short time. However, reliable cut-off values have not been available so far. Therefore, the aim of the study was to describe variations in insulin response to OGT via naso-gastric tubing and to provide a clinical useful cut-off value for ID when using the insulin quantification performed with an equine-optimized insulin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data visualization revealed no clear separation in the serum insulin concentration of insulin sensitive and insulin dysregulated horses during OGT. Therefore, a model based clustering method was used to circumvent the use of an arbitrary limit for categorization. This method considered all data-points for the classification, taking into account the individual insulin trajectory during the OGT. With this method two clusters were differentiated, one with low and one with high insulin responses during OGT. The cluster of individuals with low insulin response was consistently detected, independently of the initialization parameters of the algorithm. In this cluster the 97.5% quantile of insulin is 110 µLU/mL at 120 min. We suggest using this insulin concentration of 110 µLU/mL as a cut-off value for samples obtained at 120 min in OGT. OGT performed with 1 g/kg BW glucose and administration via naso-gastric tubing can easily be performed under clinical settings. Application of the cut-off value of 110 µLU/mL at 120 min allows assessment of ID in horses.

  8. Basal cell carcinoma of penis: case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, M Z; Polacarz, S V; Partington, P E

    1988-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the penis is rare. A patient who presented with a penile and scrotal ulcer due to basal cell carcinoma is reported. Wide local excision and split skin grafting were performed to excise the lesion completely.

  9. Insulin causes insulin-receptor internalization in human erythrocyte ghosts.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelleher, R S; Murray, E F; Peterson, S W

    1987-01-01

    The effect of incubation with insulin on insulin-receptor internalization by erythrocyte ghosts was investigated. The number of surface insulin receptors decreased by 30-40% after incubation of ghosts with insulin. Total insulin-receptor binding to solubilized ghosts was the same in insulin-incubated and control ghosts, whereas insulin binding to an internal vesicular fraction was substantially increased in insulin-incubated ghosts. Our findings suggest that erythrocyte-ghost insulin receptor...

  10. Basal cell carcinoma of the prostate: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Gillian; Cheng, Jed-Sian; Shapiro, Oleg; Nsouli, Imad

    2012-06-01

    A 69-year-old man presented with gross hematuria and irritative urinary symptoms. He underwent transurethral resection of his prostate. The prostate chips revealed 70% poorly differentiated carcinoma with neuroendocrine features, initially read as small cell carcinoma, later as basal cell carcinoma. PSA at this time was 0.3. He received 4 cycles of etoposide and cisplatin. After which, rebiopsy of the prostate showed tumor consistent with poorly differentiated basal cell carcinoma. Given progression on chemotherapy, decision was made to proceed with radical prostatectomy. Metastatic workup was negative. Gross extraprostatic invasion was noted but lymph nodes were free of metastatic disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pseudo ?insulin allergy?

    OpenAIRE

    Chettiar, Pradeep Raman; Sanalkumar, Nishanth; John, Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Allergy to human insulin is relatively rare in clinical practice. This report describes a patient referred for suspected ?insulin allergy? due to lesions appearing at all sites of insulin injection. Careful evaluation confirmed contamination of the insulin syringes due to faulty techniques used by the patient. The report discusses the various types of insulin allergies and the need for proper diabetic education to avoid such infections.

  12. Insulin and the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosu Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain represents an important site for the action of insulin. Besides the traditionally known importance in glucoregulation, insulin has significant neurotrophic properties and influences the brain activity: insulin influences eating behavior, regulates the storage of energy and several aspects concerning memory and knowledge. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism could be associated with brain aging, vascular and metabolic pathologies. Elucidating the pathways and metabolism of brain insulin could have a major impact on future targeted therapies.

  13. Basal Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to Parotid Gland

    OpenAIRE

    Kurian, Rinsey Rose; Di Palma, Silvana; Barrett, A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis from basal cell carcinoma of the skin is very rare with cases being documented in the lymph nodes, lung, bone and parotid gland. The main histopathological differential diagnosis is the locally arising basal cell adenocarcinoma from which it is difficult to distinguish by morphology and routine immunohistochemistry. Approximately 85 % of all reported metastatic basal cell carcinomas arise in the head and neck region. Here we present a case of basal cell carcinoma of the skin of the...

  14. An information and communication technology-based centralized clinical trial to determine the efficacy and safety of insulin dose adjustment education based on a smartphone personal health record application: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gyuri; Bae, Ji Cheol; Yi, Byoung Kee; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Chang, Dong Kyung; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Jin, Sang-Man

    2017-07-18

    A Personal Health Record (PHR) is an online application that allows patients to access, manage, and share their health data. PHRs not only enhance shared decision making with healthcare providers, but also enable remote monitoring and at-home-collection of detailed data. The benefits of PHRs can be maximized in insulin dose adjustment for patients starting or intensifying insulin regimens, as frequent self-monitoring of glucose, self-adjustment of insulin dose, and precise at-home data collection during the visit-to-visit period are important for glycemic control. The aim of this study is to examine the efficacy and safety of insulin dose adjustment based on a smartphone PHR application in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and to confirm the validity and stability of an information and communication technology (ICT)-based centralized clinical trial monitoring system. This is a 24-week, open-label, randomized, multi-center trial. There are three follow-up measures: baseline, post-intervention at week 12, and at week 24. Subjects diagnosed with type 1 DM, type 2 DM, and/or post-transplant DM who initiate basal insulin or intensify their insulin regimen to a basal-bolus regimen are included. After education on insulin dose titration and prevention for hypoglycemia and a 1-week acclimation period, subjects are randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either an ICT-based intervention group or a conventional intervention group. Subjects in the conventional intervention group will save and send their health information to the server via a PHR application, whereas those in ICT-based intervention group will receive additional algorithm-based feedback messages. The health information includes level of blood glucose, insulin dose, details on hypoglycemia, food diary, and step count. The primary outcome will be the proportion of patients who reach an optimal insulin dose within 12 weeks of study enrollment, without severe hypoglycemia or unscheduled clinic visits. This clinical trial

  15. A new angle for glp-1 receptor agonist: the medical economics argument. Editorial on: Huetson P, Palmer JL, Levorsen A, et al. Cost-effectiveness of the once-daily glp-1 receptor agonist lixisenatide compared to bolus insulin both in combination with basal insulin for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes in Norway. J Med Econ 2015: 1-13 [Epub ahead of print].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Willy Marcos; Florez, Hermes Jose

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA) are relatively new medications for diabetes that offer a weight-loss profile that can be considered desirable for patients with both type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. GLP-1 RA are effective in combination with insulin, and even slightly superior or at least equal to short-acting insulin in T2D; however, since they work in the incretin system, they may not be effective in long-standing disease. Additionally, only recently have publications reported their cardiovascular safety, and there is limited evidence for long-term effectiveness. The work presented by Huetson et al. offers a much needed perspective through a medical economic model for the long term cost-effectiveness of GLP-1 RA. The authors found benefits in quality-adjusted life years and reduced lifetime healthcare costs. While there are a few limitations, this study contributes to the understanding of these agents and their impact on the epidemics of obesity in T2D, where weight management is no longer an option, but an essential component of the diabetes plan of care.

  16. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  17. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Abu Dhabi cohort of the A1chieve study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhabian, Oula; Yehyia, Mowafaq

    2013-11-01

    The A1chieve, a multicentric (28 countries), 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726) in routine clinical care across four continents. Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Abu Dhabi. A total of 383 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 134), insulin detemir (n = 152), insulin aspart (n = 13), basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 42) and other insulin combinations (n = 41). At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA1c: 9.4%) and insulin user (mean HbA1c: 9.1%) groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both groups showed improvement in HbA1c (insulin naïve: -2.1%, insulin users: -1.8%). SADRs did not occur in any of the study patients. Major hypoglycaemic events remained same as that of baseline (0.1 events/patient-year) for insulin naïve group whereas major hypoglycaemia reduced from 0.1 events/patient-year to 0.0 events/patient-year in insulin users. Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  18. Expression of the major insulin regulatable glucose transporter (GLUT4) in skeletal muscle of noninsulin-dependent diabetic patients and healthy subjects before and after insulin infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P H; Lund, S; Vestergaard, H

    1993-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study we have examined the regulatory effect of insulin in vivo on the major insulin regulatable glucose transporter (GLUT4) in vastus lateralis muscle from 12 noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients and 8 healthy control subjects. Insulin-stimulated glucose...... uptake rate in peripheral tissue was decreased by 41% (P 2 groups in muscle biopsies obtained...... in the basal state. In healthy subjects, 4 h of insulin infusion (2 mU/kg/min) induced a 31% reduction (P

  19. Alteration in insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanti, J F; Gual, P; Grémeaux, T

    2004-01-01

    Insulin resistance, when combined with impaired insulin secretion, contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is characterised by a decrease in insulin effect on glucose transport in muscle and adipose tIssue. Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS......-1) and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) are critical events in the insulin signalling cascade leading to insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Modification of IRS-1 by serine phosphorylation could be one of the mechanisms leading to a decrease in IRS-1 tyrosine...... to phosphorylate these serine residues have been identified. These exciting results suggest that serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 is a possible hallmark of insulin resistance in biologically insulin responsive cells or tIssues. Identifying the pathways by which "diabetogenic" factors activate IRS-1 kinases...

  20. Alteration in insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanti, J F; Gual, P; Grémeaux, T

    2004-01-01

    Insulin resistance, when combined with impaired insulin secretion, contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is characterised by a decrease in insulin effect on glucose transport in muscle and adipose tIssue. Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS...... to phosphorylate these serine residues have been identified. These exciting results suggest that serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 is a possible hallmark of insulin resistance in biologically insulin responsive cells or tIssues. Identifying the pathways by which "diabetogenic" factors activate IRS-1 kinases......-1) and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) are critical events in the insulin signalling cascade leading to insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Modification of IRS-1 by serine phosphorylation could be one of the mechanisms leading to a decrease in IRS-1 tyrosine...

  1. [Comparative analysis of insulin glargine vs. insulin detemir: A cost-minimization study applicable to Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragozo, Argemiro; Puerta, María Fernanda; Misas, Juan Diego

    2015-01-01

    More than 90% of subjects diagnosed with diabetes mellitus present with type 2, which is recognized for peripheral insulin resistance. To determine the costs of achieving glycemic target with the use of basal insulin analogs, insulin glargine (IG) once a day vs. insulin detemir (ID) once or twice a day, with a cost minimization model built from a third-party payer perspective in Colombia. A systematic review of comparative clinical trials between IG and ID in patients with insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes was performed to determine data of use, effectiveness and frequency of and adverse events. The goal of glycemic control (effectiveness measure) was defined as HbA1c=7%. The costs of insulin were extracted from the Integrated System of Medication Prices 2012 (Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social de Colombia) and the IMS Consulting Group mobile average cost for the past year as of December, 2012. Sensitivity analyses were performed via Montecarlo simulations for dose and medication costs (insulin). Five publications met inclusion criteria. The range of the difference between insulin doses was 3.2 IU to 33 IU. The percentage of patients requiring two ID doses was 12.6-100%. There were no significant differences in hypoglycemic events. For both retail and institutional channels, there was a higher differential cost between IG vs. ID favoring IG in 4 and 5 studies, respectively. For the retail channel only one study showed the opposite results. As only medication costs are considered, differences in insulin units between IG and ID result in a differential cost in favor of IG that makes it a cost/effective alternative.

  2. Starting Insulin in Type 2 Diabetes: Real-World Outcomes After the First 12?Months of Insulin Therapy in a New Zealand Cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Sehgal, Shekhar; Khanolkar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Aims Currently, there is no consensus on which form of insulin to use when initiating insulin in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our aim was to compare glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) reduction, weight change and severe hypoglycemia rates during the first year after initiation of intermediate-acting insulin isophane, insulin glargine and pre-mixed insulin in patients with T2D. Methods Electronic clinical records of patients with T2D, starting insulin at a tertiary referral center in Auckland, New Zealand,...

  3. Benchmarking Insulin Treatment Persistence Among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Across Different U.S. Payer Segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenhui; Jiang, Jenny; Lou, Youbei; Ganguli, Sohini; Matusik, Mark S

    2017-03-01

    Treatment persistence with basal insulins is crucial to achieving sustained glycemic control, which is associated with a reduced risk of microvascular disease and other complications of type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, studies suggest that persistence with basal insulin treatment is often poor. To measure and benchmark real-world basal insulin treatment persistence among patients with T2D across different payer segments in the United States. This was a retrospective observational study of data from a national pharmacy database (Walgreen Co., Deerfield, IL). The analysis included patients with T2D aged ≥ 18 years who filled ≥ 1 prescription for basal insulins between January 2013 and June 2013 (the index prescription) and who had also filled prescriptions for ≥ 1 oral antidiabetes drug in the database. Patients with claims for premixed insulin were excluded. Treatment persistence was defined as remaining on the study medication(s) during the 1-year follow-up period. Patients were stratified according to treatment history (existing basal insulin users vs. new insulin users), payer segments (commercially insured, Medicare, Medicaid, or cash-pay), type of basal insulin (insulin glargine, insulin detemir, or neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin [NPH]), and device for insulin administration (pen or vial/syringe). A total of 274,102 patients were included in this analysis, 82% of whom were existing insulin users. In terms of payer segments, 45.3% of patients were commercially insured, 47.8% had Medicare, 5.9% had Medicaid, and 1.1% were cash-pay. At the 1-year follow-up, basal insulin treatment persistence rate was 66.8% overall, 61.7% for new users, and 67.9% for existing users. In general, for both existing and new basal insulin users, higher persistence rate and duration were associated with Medicare versus cash-pay patients, use of insulin pens versus vial/syringe, and use of insulin glargine versus NPH. This large-scale study provides a benchmark of basal insulin

  4. A Micro-PIV Study of the Pulsed Micro-Flows Driven by an Insulin Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Demuren, Ayodeji; Gyuricsko, Eric; Hu, Hui

    2009-11-01

    In recent years, there is a surge in the popularity of using insulin pump or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy, as opposed to multiple daily injections by insulin syringe or an insulin pen. Some case studies have suggested that insulin delivery failure may be caused by precipitation of insulin within the infusion set. Speculation also exists that the flow of insulin through an insulin infusion set may be reduced or inhibited by air bubbles entrained into the micro-sized tubing system since there are chances that air be introduced into the insulin reservoir during the filling process. In the present study, a microscopic Particle Image Velocimtry (micro-PIV) system was used to characterize the transient behavior of the pulsed micro-flows inside the micro-sized tubing system of an insulin infusion set with insulin pump operating in basal mode (i.e., pulsed insulin pumping). The effects of the air bubbles entrained into the micro-sized tubing system on the insulin delivery process were assessed based on the micro-PIV measurements.

  5. Heterogeneity of human plasma insulin: techniques for separating immunoreactive components and their determination by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Iracelia Torres de Toledo e

    1977-01-01

    When human plasma is filtered on Sephadex G-SO fine, insulin immunoreactivity is recovered in two peaks: 'big insulin', the higher molecular weight component and 'little insulin', the lower molecular component, having elution volumes that correspond to those of porcine proinsulin 125 I and porcine insulin 125 I respectively. The presence of another form of immunoreactive insulin 'big big insulin' was detected from an insuloma suspect and its elution pattern corresponding to serum albumin. The eluates correspondent to 'big' and 'little' insulin as well as 'big big' component were assayed by radioimmunoassay using crystalline human insulin as a standard, porcine insulin 125 tracer and anti insulin serum. The antibody, raised in guinea-pigs, was sensitive and potent being adequate for the assay. The reactivity of insulin and proinsulin was tested against the antibody. The relative proportions of several components of total immunoreactive insulin in plasma were studied in basal conditions in five normal subjects and in the patient JSC with pancreatic insulin-secreting tumor as well as after glucose stimuli in all tolbutamide in JSC. (author)

  6. Impact of streptozotocin on altering normal glucose homeostasis during insulin testing in diabetic rats compared to normoglycemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinna NA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nidal A Qinna,1 Adnan A Badwan2 1Department of Pharmacology and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of Petra, 2Research and Innovation Centre, The Jordanian Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Co. Plc. (JPM, Amman, Jordan Abstract: Streptozotocin (STZ is currently the most used diabetogenic agent in testing insulin and new antidiabetic drugs in animals. Due to the toxic and disruptive nature of STZ on organs, apart from pancreas, involved in preserving the body’s normal glucose homeostasis, this study aims to reassess the action of STZ in inducing different glucose response states in diabetic rats while testing insulin. Diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats induced with STZ were classified according to their initial blood glucose levels into stages. The effect of randomizing rats in such a manner was investigated for the severity of interrupting normal liver, pancreas, and kidney functions. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of subcutaneously injected insulin in diabetic and nondiabetic rats were compared. Interruption of glucose homeostasis by STZ was challenged by single and repeated administrations of injected insulin and oral glucose to diabetic rats. In diabetic rats with high glucose (451–750 mg/dL, noticeable changes were seen in the liver and kidney functions compared to rats with lower basal glucose levels. Increased serum levels of recombinant human insulin were clearly indicated by a significant increase in the calculated maximum serum concentration and area under the concentration–time curve. Reversion of serum glucose levels to normal levels pre- and postinsulin and oral glucose administrations to STZ diabetic rats were found to be variable. In conclusion, diabetic animals were more responsive to insulin than nondiabetic animals. STZ was capable of inducing different levels of normal glucose homeostasis disruption in rats. Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of insulin were

  7. Current insulin analogues in the treatment of diabetes: emphasis on type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Katherine; Giugliano, Dario

    2012-02-01

    Although traditionally used as a final treatment option, early use of insulin is a therapeutic option after metformin failure in type 2 diabetes. Injection of native insulin lacks the rapid onset of action after food ingestion and the chronic maintenance of a steady-state low-level basal insulin in fasting periods. These limitations have fuelled the development of insulin analogues, which mainly fall into two different categories: short-acting and long-acting analogues. We review the recent literature investigating the efficacy and safety of insulin analogues in human diabetes, with emphasis on type 2 diabetes, as about 30% of these patients are being treated with insulin. We also examine novel developments in this area, including the new long-acting basal analogues whose longer duration of action might reduce dosing frequency to three times a week. Insulin analogues show some advantage compared with native insulin. However, improvements in reducing their pharmacological variability would be expected to lower the risk of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, as well as to simplify and perhaps also encourage optimal insulin titration in real-life clinical practice. Extending the duration of insulin effect would also allow for greater flexibility and potentially reduce the frequency of blood glucose monitoring.

  8. Dissociation of the effects of epinephrine and insulin on glucose and protein metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellino, P.; Luzi, L.; Del Prato, S.; DeFronzo, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The separate and combined effects of insulin and epinephrine on leucine metabolism were examined in healthy young volunteers. Subjects participated in four experimental protocols: (1) euglycemic insulin clamp (+80 microU/ml), (2) epinephrine infusion (50 ng.kg-1.min-1) plus somatostatin with basal replacement of insulin and glucagon, (3) combined epinephrine (50 ng.kg-1.min-1) plus insulin (+80 microU/ml) infusion, and (4) epinephrine and somatostatin as in study 2 plus basal amino acid replacement. Studies were performed with a prime-continuous infusion of [1-14C]leucine and indirect calorimetry. Our results indicate that (1) hyperinsulinemia causes a generalized decrease in plasma amino acid concentrations, including leucine; (2) the reduction in plasma leucine concentration is primarily due to an inhibition of endogenous leucine flux; nonoxidative leucine disposal decreases after insulin infusion; (3) epinephrine, without change in plasma insulin concentration, reduces plasma amino acid levels; (4) combined epinephrine-insulin infusion causes a greater decrease in plasma amino levels than observed with either hormone alone; this is because of a greater inhibition of endogenous leucine flux; and (5) when basal amino acid concentrations are maintained constant with a balanced amino acid infusion, epinephrine inhibits the endogenous leucine flux. In conclusion, the present results do not provide support for the concept that epinephrine is a catabolic hormone with respect to amino acid-protein metabolism. In contrast, epinephrine markedly inhibits insulin-mediated glucose metabolism

  9. Insulin pump (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal ... with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pump's small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin ...

  10. Focus on Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venura Samarasinghe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs, which include basal and squamous cell cancers are the most common human cancers. BCCs have a relatively low metastatic rate and slow growth and are frequently underreported. Whilst there is a definite role of sunexposure in the pathogenesis of BCC, several additional complex genotypic, phenotypic and environmental factors are contributory. The high prevalence and the frequent occurrence of multiple primary BCC in affected individuals make them an important public health problem. This has led to a substantial increase in search for newer noninvasive treatments for BCC. Surgical excision with predetermined margins remains the mainstay treatment for most BCC. Of the newer non-invasive treatments only photodynamic therapy and topical imiquimod have become established in the treatment of certain BCC subtypes, while the search for other more effective and tissue salvaging therapies continues. This paper focuses on the pathogenesis and management of BCC.

  11. Insulin resistance in brain and possible therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinkalp, Sevki; Simsir, Ilgin Y; Ertek, Sibel

    2014-01-01

    Although the brain has long been considered an insulin-independent organ, recent research has shown that insulin has significant effects on the brain, where it plays a role in maintaining glucose and energy homeostasis. To avoid peripheral insulin resistance, the brain may act via hypoinsulinemic responses, maintaining glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity within its own confines; however, brain insulin resistance may develop due to environmental factors. Insulin has two important functions in the brain: controlling food intake and regulating cognitive functions, particularly memory. Notably, defects in insulin signaling in the brain may contribute to neurodegenerative disorders. Insulin resistance may damage the cognitive system and lead to dementia states. Furthermore, inflammatory processes in the hypothalamus, where insulin receptors are expressed at high density, impair local signaling systems and cause glucose and energy metabolism disorders. Excessive caloric intake and high-fat diets initiate insulin and leptin resistance by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in the hypothalamus. This may lead to obesity and diabetes mellitus (DM). Exercise can enhance brain and hypothalamic insulin sensitivity, but it is the option least preferred and/or continuously practiced by the general population. Pharmacological treatments that increase brain and hypothalamic insulin sensitivity may provide new insights into the prevention of dementia disorders, obesity, and type 2 DM in the future.

  12. The cost-effectiveness of exenatide twice daily (BID) vs insulin lispro three times daily (TID) as add-on therapy to titrated insulin glargine in patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, J.; McEwan, P.; Sabale, U.; Kartman, B.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of exenatide twice daily (BID) vs bolus insulin lispro three times daily (TID) as add-on therapy when glycemic control is sub-optimal with titrated basal insulin glargine and metformin. Methods: The analysis was based on the recent 4B Study, which

  13. Cerebral Blood Flow and Glucose Metabolism in Appetite-Related Brain Regions in Type 1 Diabetic Patients After Treatment With Insulin Detemir and NPH Insulin A randomized controlled crossover trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Golen, L.W.; IJzerman, R.G.; Huisman, M.C.; Hensbergen, J.F.; Hoogma, R.P.; Drent, M.L.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Diamant, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective-To test the hypothesis that insulin detemir, which is associated with less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, exerts its weight-modulating effects by acting on brain regions involved in appetite regulation, as represented by altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cerebral

  14. Glycosphingolipids and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, Mirjam; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for insulin resistance, a state characterized by impaired responsiveness of liver, muscle and adipose tissue to insulin. One class of lipids involved in the development of insulin resistance are the (glyco)sphingolipids. Ceramide, the most simple

  15. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Taniwaki, Koukyo; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi

    1990-01-01

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs

  16. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Peris, Ketty

    2015-11-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy is an effective and safe noninvasive treatment for low-risk basal cell carcinoma, with the advantage of an excellent cosmetic outcome. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy in basal cell carcinoma is supported by substantial research and clinical trials. In this article, we review the procedure, indications and clinical evidences for the use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

  17. Comparing effects of insulin analogues and human insulin on nocturnal glycaemia in hypoglycaemia-prone people with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P. L.; Tarnow, L.; Bay, C.

    2017-01-01

    .1 ± 1.1%), mean ± sd duration of diabetes 30 ± 14 years], who participated in a 2-year randomized, crossover trial of basal-bolus therapy with insulin detemir/insulin aspart or human NPH insulin/human regular insulin (the HypoAna trial) were studied for 2 nights during each treatment. Venous blood was drawn...... hourly during sleep. Primary endpoints were nocturnal glucose profiles and occurrence of hypoglycaemia (blood glucose ≤ 3.9 mmol/l). Results: During insulin analogue treatment, the mean nocturnal plasma glucose level was significantly higher than during treatment with human insulin (10.6 vs 8.1 mmol....... Conclusions: Treatment with insulin analogue reduces the occurrence of nocturnal hypoglycaemia assessed by nocturnal glucose profiles in people with Type 1 diabetes prone to severe hypoglycaemia. Nocturnal glucose profiles provide a more comprehensive assessment of clinical benefit of insulin regimens...

  18. Impaired insulin-stimulated nonoxidative glucose metabolism in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients. Dose-response effects of insulin on glucose turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, E; Vestergaard, H; Tibell, A

    1996-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature in recipients of a pancreas transplant, but the relative contribution of the liver and peripheral tissues to this abnormality within a spanning range of insulin concentrations is unknown. To assess the impact of insulin action on glucose metabolism....... The overall effects of insulin on whole-body glucose metabolism, determined as the glucose infusion rates versus the corresponding steady-state serum insulin concentrations, demonstrated a rightward shift in the dose-response curves of the transplanted groups compared with those of normal subjects. The dose......, this finding could only explain in part the degree of impairment in nonoxidative glucose metabolism. No differences were found in total hexokinase activity in muscle between normal subjects and the transplant groups at basal insulinemia or after insulin stimulation. During hyperinsulinemia, glucagon...

  19. Impaired insulin-stimulated nonoxidative glucose metabolism in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients. Dose-response effects of insulin on glucose turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, E; Vestergaard, H; Tibell, A

    1996-01-01

    , this finding could only explain in part the degree of impairment in nonoxidative glucose metabolism. No differences were found in total hexokinase activity in muscle between normal subjects and the transplant groups at basal insulinemia or after insulin stimulation. During hyperinsulinemia, glucagon......Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature in recipients of a pancreas transplant, but the relative contribution of the liver and peripheral tissues to this abnormality within a spanning range of insulin concentrations is unknown. To assess the impact of insulin action on glucose metabolism....... The overall effects of insulin on whole-body glucose metabolism, determined as the glucose infusion rates versus the corresponding steady-state serum insulin concentrations, demonstrated a rightward shift in the dose-response curves of the transplanted groups compared with those of normal subjects. The dose...

  20. Characterization of the growth of murine fibroblasts that express human insulin receptors. I. The effect of insulin in the absence of other growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randazzo, P.A.; Morey, V.A.; Polishook, A.K.; Jarett, L. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The effect of insulin on the growth of murine fibroblasts transfected with an expression vector containing human insulin receptor cDNA (NIH 3T3/HIR) and the parental cells (NIH/3T3) was characterized. Insulin in the absence of other mitogens increased the rate of incorporation of thymidine into NIH 3T3/HIR cells with a half-maximal response occurring at an insulin concentration of 35 ng/ml and a maximal response that was equivalent to that elicited by 10% fetal calf serum. The thymidine incorporation rate was increased by 12 h, was maximal at approximately 16 h, and returned to basal rates at 24 h after the addition of insulin. Insulin induced a maximum of 65% of cells to incorporate thymidine. The increased DNA synthesis was accompanied by net growth. Addition of insulin to the NIH 3T3/HIR cells resulted in increased DNA content with a half-maximal response occurring at approximately 30 ng/ml insulin and a maximal response equivalent to that elicited by serum. An increase in cell number detected after the addition of insulin to the NIH 3T3/HIR suggests that the cells had progressed through mitosis. Insulin did not increase the rate of thymidine incorporation, DNA content, or number of the parental NIH 3T3 cells. These data show that insulin, in the absence of a second mitogen, is able to induce NIH 3T3/HIR fibroblasts to traverse the cell cycle.

  1. Environmental factors and dam characteristics associated with insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in newborn Holstein calves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, M.M.; Van Eetvelde, M.; Bogaert, H.; Hostens, M.; Vandaele, L.; Shamsuddin, M.; Opsomer, G.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The objective of the present retrospective cohort study was to evaluate potential associations between environmental factors and dam characteristics, including level of milk production during gestation, and insulin traits in newborn Holstein calves. Birth weight and gestational age of the calves at delivery were determined. On the next day, heart girth, wither height and diagonal length of both the calves and their dams were measured. Parity, body condition score and age at calving were recorded for all dams. For the cows, days open before last gestation, lactation length (LL), lenght of dry period (DP) and calving interval were also calculated. The magnitude and shape of the lactation curve both quantified using the MilkBot model based on monthly milk weights, were used to calculate the amount of milk produced during gestation. Using the same procedure, cumulative milk production from conception to drying off (MGEST) was calculated. A blood sample was collected from all calves (n=481; 169 born to heifers and 312 born to cows) at least 5 h after a milk meal on day 3 of life to measure basal glucose and insulin levels. In addition, an intravenous glucose-stimulated insulin secretion test was performed in a subset of the calves (n=316). After descriptive analysis, generalized linear mixed models were used to identify factors that were significantly associated with the major insulin traits (Insb, basal insulin level; QUICKI, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index; AIR, acute insulin response; DI, disposition index) of the newborn calves. The overall average birth weight of the calves was 42.7 ± 5.92 kg. The insulin traits were significantly associated with MGEST (P=0.076) and longer DP (P=0.034). The QUICKI was estimated to be lower in calves born to the cows having passed a higher MGEST (P=0.030) and longer DP (P=0.058). Moreover, the AIR (P=0.009) and DI (P=0.049) were estimated to be lower in male compared with female calves. Furthermore, the AIR

  2. Insulin pump therapy in transient neonatal diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong Heum Park

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM is a rare disease requiring insulin treatment. Its treatment is primarily focused on maintaining adequate glycemic control and avoiding hypoglycemia. Although insulin pump therapy is frequently administered to adults and children, there is no consensus on the use of insulin pumps in NDM. A 10 day-old female infant was referred to us with intrauterine growth retardation and poor weight gain. Hyperglycemia was noted, and continuous intravenous insulin infusion was initiated. However, the patient's serum glucose levels fluctuated widely, and maintaining the intravenous route became difficult within the following weeks. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion with an insulin pump was introduced on the twenty-fifth day of life, and good glycemic control was achieved without any notable adverse effects including hypoglycemia. We suggest that the insulin pump is a safe and effective mode for treating NDM and its early adoption may shorten the length of hospital stays in patients with NDM.

  3. Insulin and the Lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Suchita; Prakash, Y S; Linneberg, Allan

    2013-01-01

    , molecular understanding is necessary. Insulin resistance is a strong, independent risk factor for asthma development, but it is unknown whether a direct effect of insulin on the lung is involved. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the effect of insulin on cellular components of the lung...... and highlights the molecular consequences of insulin-related metabolic signaling cascades that could adversely affect lung structure and function. Examples include airway smooth muscle proliferation and contractility and regulatory signaling networks that are associated with asthma. These aspects of insulin...

  4. Basal metabolic rate in women with PCOS compared to eumenorrheic controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Sara J; Wang, Erica T; Bhasin, Gaisu; Alexander, Carolyn; Bresee, Catherine; Pall, Marita; Azziz, Ricardo; Mathur, Ruchi; Pisarska, Margareta D

    2015-09-01

    PCOS is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Efforts have focused on whether an abnormal energy homeostasis contributes to the development of obesity in these patients. There are conflicting results in the literature regarding whether women with PCOS have an altered basal metabolic rate (BMR), thereby leading to difficulties in weight loss. The objective of this study is to compare basal metabolic rate (BMR) in women with PCOS and controls. Cross-sectional study. One hundred and twenty-eight PCOS patients diagnosed by original NIH consensus criteria and 72 eumenorrheic, non-hirsute controls were recruited from an academic medical centre. Assessment of BMR using the InBody portable bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) device and insulin resistance by HOMA-IR indices. PCOS women were younger than controls. As expected, PCOS subjects had higher body mass index (BMI), serum androgens and estimated insulin resistance. After adjusting for age and BMI, there was no significant difference in BMR between PCOS subjects (adjusted mean 5807 kJ/day, 95% CI 5715-5899) and controls (adjusted mean 5916 kJ/day, 95% CI 5786-6046) (P = 0·193). BMR was also comparable in a secondary analysis comparing PCOS women with and without insulin resistance. After adjusting for age and BMI, there was no difference in BMR between PCOS women and controls. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Studies of insulin resistance in congenital generalized lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvik, O; Vestergaard, H; Trygstad, O

    1996-01-01

    suppressed lipid oxidation in the controls. It is concluded that patients with congenital generalized lipodystrophy may present severe insulin resistance with regard to hepatic glucose production as well as muscle glycogen synthesis and lipid oxidation. The results suggest a postreceptor defect in the action......, immunoreactive protein and mRNA levels. The patients had fasting hyperinsulinaemia, and the rate of total glucose disposal was severely impaired, primarily due to a decreased non-oxidative glucose metabolism. In the patient studied with muscle biopsy, the expected activation of glycogen synthase by insulin did...... not occur. In both patients there was severely increased hepatic glucose output in the basal state, suggesting a failure of insulin to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis. During insulin infusion a substantially elevated rate of lipid oxidation remained in the patients, in contrast to the almost completely...

  6. Sortilin 1 knockout alters basal adipose glucose metabolism but not diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jibiao; Matye, David J; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Tiangang

    2017-04-01

    Sortilin 1 (Sort1) is a trafficking receptor that has been implicated in the regulation of plasma cholesterol in humans and mice. Here, we use metabolomics and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp approaches to obtain further understanding of the in vivo effects of Sort1 deletion on diet-induced obesity as well as on adipose lipid and glucose metabolism. Results show that Sort1 knockout (KO) does not affect Western diet-induced obesity nor adipose fatty acid and ceramide concentrations. Under the basal fasting state, chow-fed Sort1 KO mice have decreased adipose glycolytic metabolites, but Sort1 deletion does not affect insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake during the insulin clamp. These results suggest that Sort1 loss-of-function in vivo does not affect obesity development, but differentially modulates adipose glucose metabolism under fasting and insulin-stimulated states. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. [New insulin types in type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Jordi

    2015-07-20

    Since its discovery almost a century ago, insulin remains the mainstay of treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Although progress in the synthesis of new formulations has been remarkable, the physiological profile of insulin is still different from that observed with preparations available nowadays. In the last decade, the introduction into clinical practice of insulin analogues has allowed significantly improvement in glycemic control and has facilitated the spread of basal/bolus patterns, the most physiological ones until now. Despite the benefits of basal analogues, glycemia often varies considerably when used as a single daily injection and this is why new molecules have been further investigated. Improvement has been achieved especially in terms of duration and rate of hypoglycemia, the main limiting factor of intensive therapy. This article reviews the available data concerning the new basal insulin analogues, degludec, pegylated lispro and glargine U300, and new formulations currently under development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. The Results of Open-Label, Multicenter, Non-Randomized Study on the Efficacy and Safety of Insulins: Insuman Basal®, Insuman Comb 25®, Insuman Rapid® in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Who Underwent Basic Training in Diabetes Schools (SPIRIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Larin

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions. Treatment with Insuman® insulins of patients with DM-2, who were not compensated while taking OADs, was associated with improved glycemic control without an increase in the incidence of severe hypoglycemia. There was no statistically significant increase in the effectiveness of therapy in patients, who have successfully completed a training program at diabetes school, compared with evaluation of overall efficiency. The state of young studied population of patients with inadequate control at baseline, and those who had developed cardiovascular complications associated with DM, improved in most cases in terms of glycemic control, and, at that, episodes of severe hypoglycemia were not detected. This may be due to the positive influence of training in diabetes school.

  9. Critical appraisal of the safety and efficacy of insulin detemir in glycemic control and cardiovascular risk management in diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Le Floch

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Pierre Le FlochDepartment of Diabetology, Medical Clinic, Villecresnes, FranceAbstract: Insulin detemir is an analog of human insulin designed to provide a long duration of basal insulin action. This is achieved by protracted absorption from the injection depot, which results in part from increased self-association of insulin detemir molecules and in part from reversible albumin binding. Subsequent albumin binding in the circulation is thought to buffer changes in the effects at target tissues that could otherwise arise from variability in absorption rate. In consequence, insulin detemir has shown a less variable pharmacodynamic profile than alternative basal insulins; this manifests as more consistent temporal glucose reduction profiles in repeat-clamp studies. In clinical trials, insulin detemir has been characterized by consistent risk reductions in hypoglycemia, as well as reduced weight gain in comparison with other basal insulins. Given some recent associations that have been made in prospective and epidemiologic studies between glucose variability and/or hypoglycemia and increased cardiovascular risk, and the long-known association between excess weight and cardiovascular risk, it is possible that the clinical profile of insulin detemir may carry prognostic value with regard to cardiovascular safety, although this is yet to be substantiated. There have also been some concerns raised recently over the use of insulin analogs and cancer risk, but available clinical data and the receptor interaction profile of insulin detemir suggest no excess in risk in comparison with human insulin therapy. Optimal approaches for the clinical use of insulin detemir have been emerging through an increasing clinical study base, and the analog is becoming established as a potentially valuable therapy option.Keywords: insulin detemir, type 2 diabetes, glucose variability, hypoglycemia, weight gain

  10. Metformin and insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    1984-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded

  11. Studies of gene expression and activity of hexokinase, phosphofructokinase and glycogen synthase in human skeletal muscle in states of altered insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H

    1999-01-01

    of the review is to discuss our present knowledge of the activities and gene expression of hexokinase II (HKII), phosphofructokinase (PFK) and glycogen synthase (GS) in human skeletal muscle in states of altered insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism. My own experimental studies have comprised patients...... been reported to increase the basal concentration of muscle GS mRNA in NIDDM patients to a level similar to that seen in control subjects although insulin-stimulated glucose disposal rates remain reduced in NIDDM patients. In the insulin resistant states examined so far, basal and insulin...

  12. An update on the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: focus on insulin detemir, a long-acting human insulin analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Raslova

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Katarina RaslovaMetabolic Center Ltd and Slovak Medical University, Bratislava, Slovak RepublicAbstract: Basal insulin analogs are used to minimize unpredictable processes of NPH insulin. Modification of the human insulin molecule results in a slower distribution to peripheral target tissues, a longer duration of action with stable concentrations and thus a lower rate of hypoglycemia. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that provides effective therapeutic options for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. For glycemic control, no significant differences were found in HbA1c levels compared with NPH and insulin glargine. It is comparable with insulin glargine in significantly reducing rates of all types of hypoglycemia. Clinical studies have demonstrated that detemir is responsible for significantly lower within-subject variability and no or less weight gain than NPH insulin and glargine. Recent pharmacodynamic studies have shown that detemir can be used once daily in many patients with diabetes. Together with patient-friendly injection devices and dose adjustments, it provides a treatment option with the potential to lower the key barriers of adherence to insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes. Recent guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes suggest starting intensive therapy of hyperglycemia at an early stage of diabetes and recommend therapeutic options that provide the possibility of reaching HbA1c goals individually, with a low risk of hypoglycemia or other adverse effects of treatment. The properties of insulin detemir match these requirements.Keywords: insulin analog, insulin detemir, diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia, within-subject variability

  13. Insulin-derived amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashdeep Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is the term for diseases caused by the extracellular deposition of insoluble polymeric protein fibrils in tissues and organs. Insulin-derived amyloidosis is a rare, yet significant complication of insulin therapy. Insulin-derived amyloidosis at injection site can cause poor glycemic control and increased insulin dose requirements because of the impairment in insulin absorption, which reverse on change of injection site and/or excision of the mass. This entity should be considered and assessed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry, in patients with firm/hard local site reactions, which do not regress after cessation of insulin injection at the affected site. Search strategy: PubMed was searched with terms "insulin amyloidosis". Full text of articles available in English was reviewed. Relevant cross references were also reviewed. Last search was made on October 15, 2014.

  14. Insulin Aspart (rDNA Origin) Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes, insulin aspart is usually used with another type of insulin, unless it is used in an external insulin ... insulin aspart also may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin aspart ...

  15. Comparison of a carbohydrate-free diet vs. fasting on plasma glucose, insulin and glucagon in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Frank Q; Almokayyad, Rami M; Gannon, Mary C

    2015-02-01

    Hyperglycemia improves when patients with type 2 diabetes are placed on a weight-loss diet. Improvement typically occurs soon after diet implementation. This rapid response could result from low fuel supply (calories), lower carbohydrate content of the weight-loss diet, and/or weight loss per se. To differentiate these effects, glucose, insulin, C-peptide and glucagon were determined during the last 24 h of a 3-day period without food (severe calorie restriction) and a calorie-sufficient, carbohydrate-free diet. Seven subjects with untreated type 2 diabetes were studied. A randomized-crossover design with a 4-week washout period between arms was used. Results from both the calorie-sufficient, carbohydrate-free diet and the 3-day fast were compared with the initial standard diet consisting of 55% carbohydrate, 15% protein and 30% fat. The overnight fasting glucose concentration decreased from 196 (standard diet) to 160 (carbohydrate-free diet) to 127 mg/dl (fasting). The 24 h glucose and insulin area responses decreased by 35% and 48% on day 3 of the carbohydrate-free diet, and by 49% and 69% after fasting. Overnight basal insulin and glucagon remained unchanged. Short-term fasting dramatically lowered overnight fasting and 24 h integrated glucose concentrations. Carbohydrate restriction per se could account for 71% of the reduction. Insulin could not entirely explain the glucose responses. In the absence of carbohydrate, the net insulin response was 28% of the standard diet. Glucagon did not contribute to the metabolic adaptations observed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. [Glycemic index and insulin response to the ingestion of precooked corn flour in the form of "arepa" in healthy individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprún-Fereira, M; Ryder, E; Morales, L M; Gómez, M E; Raleigh, X

    1994-09-01

    With the purpose of exploring the glucose and insulin responses to a breakfast composed of a complex carbohydrate (CC) in the form of a "arepa" prepared with precooked corn flour, with or without the addition of protein and fat (CC + P + F), we studied 6 healthy volunteers, ages ranging from 26-50 years and body mass index of 24.5 +/- 1.32. Three tests were performed on each individual: 1) 75 g OGTT, 2) Ingestion of 75 g of CC ("arepa") and 3) Ingestion of 75 g of CC + 6.7 g protein (low fat cheese) and 4 g fat (margarine). Glycemic values (glucose - oxidase method) and insulinemia (radioimmunoassay) were determined at basal, 30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 min. Glucose (GA) and insulin (IA) areas, glycemic index (GI) and insulin/glucose ratio (I/G) were calculated. We found that the "arepa" has a high GI (71.5%) that it is increased, although not significatively to 140% with the addition of protein and fat. Total GA as well as IA obtained for CC and for CC + P + F were similar to OGTT, however the profiles of the glucose and insulin responses during CC and CC + P + F were less abrupt but more prolonged, resulting in a greater I/G ratio for OGTT in comparison with CC or CC + P + F during the initial steps. We conclude that GI of this corn bread ("arepa") is high in comparison to other complex carbohydrates and it is not altered by the addition of protein and fat. This is possibly due to glucose and insulin responses similar to that produced by OGTT.

  17. Design of ultra-stable insulin analogues for the developing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Weiss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The engineering of insulin analogues illustrates the application of structure-based protein design to clinical medicine. Such design has traditionally been based on structures of wild-type insulin hexamers in an effort to optimize the pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic properties of the hormone. Rapid-acting insulin analogues (in chronological order of their clinical introduction, Humalog ® [Eli Lilly & Co.], Novolog ® [Novo-Nordisk], and Apidra ® [Sanofi-Aventis] exploit the targeted destabilization of subunit interfaces to facilitate capillary absorption. Conversely, long-acting insulin analogues exploit the stability of the insulin hexamer and its higher-order self-assembly within the subcutaneous depot to enhance basal glycemic control. Current products either operate through isoelectric precipitation (insulin glargine, the active component of Lantus ® ; Sanofi-Aventis or employ an albumin-binding acyl tether (insulin detemir, the active component of Levemir ® ; Novo-Nordisk. Such molecular engineering has often encountered a trade-off between PK goals and product stability. Given the global dimensions of the diabetes pandemic and complexity of an associated cold chain of insulin distribution, we envisage that concurrent engineering of ultra-stable protein analogue formulations would benefit the developing world, especially for patients exposed to high temperatures with inconsistent access to refrigeration. We review the principal mechanisms of insulin degradation above room temperature and novel molecular approaches toward the design of ultra-stable rapid-acting and basal formulations.

  18. [Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance: An Update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Rodelo, Citlaly; Roura-Guiberna, Adriana; Olivares-Reyes, Jesús Alberto

    The biological actions of insulin are initiated by activating its membrane receptor, which triggers multiple signaling pathways to mediate their biological actions. Due to the importance of metabolic regulation and promoting functions of cell growth and proliferation, insulin actions are highly regulated to promote proper metabolic functioning and energy balance. If these mechanisms are altered, this can lead to a condition known as insulin resistance, which is the consequence of a deficient insulin signaling caused by mutations or post-translational modifications of the receptor or effector molecules located downstream. Insulin resistance is one of the main characteristics of pathological manifestations associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, one of the leading causes of death in Mexico and worldwide. In recent years, it has been found that conditions such as inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction promote insulin resistance. The aim of this review is to elucidate the molecular aspects of insulin resistance and the mechanisms involved in regulating its effects, with particular emphasis on the role of inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  19. Fusarium basal rot in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de C.L.M.; Broek, van den R.C.F.M.; Brink, van den L.

    2006-01-01

    Fusarium basal rot of onion, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cepae, is a steadily increasing problem in The Netherlands. Financial losses for Dutch farmers confronted with Fusarium basal rot is substantial, due to yield reduction and high storage costs. This paper describes the development and

  20. Short-term fasting promotes insulin expression in rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakic, Tamara B; Jevdjovic, Tanja V; Peric, Mina I; Bjelobaba, Ivana M; Markelic, Milica B; Milutinovic, Bojana S; Lakic, Iva V; Jasnic, Nebojsa I; Djordjevic, Jelena D; Vujovic, Predrag Z

    2017-07-01

    In the hypothalamus, insulin takes on many roles involved in energy homoeostasis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine hypothalamic insulin expression during the initial phase of the metabolic response to fasting. Hypothalamic insulin content was assessed by both radioimmunoassay and Western blot. The relative expression of insulin mRNA was examined by qPCR. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the distribution of insulin immunopositivity in the hypothalamus. After 6-h fasting, both glucose and insulin levels were decreased in serum but not in the cerebrospinal fluid. Our study showed for the first time that, while the concentration of circulating glucose and insulin decreased, both insulin mRNA expression and insulin content in the hypothalamic parenchyma were increased after short-term fasting. Increased insulin immunopositivity was detected specifically in the neurons of the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus and in the ependymal cells of fasting animals. These novel findings point to the complexity of mechanisms regulating insulin expression in the CNS in general and in the hypothalamus in particular. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  2. Predictors of insulin uptake among adults with type 2 diabetes in the Stepping Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth; Furler, John; Blackberry, Irene; O'Neal, David N; Speight, Jane

    2017-11-01

    We aimed to investigate predictors of insulin uptake, and change in insulin appraisals, among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who participated in the Stepping Up trial. The Stepping Up model of care, supporting timely insulin initiation in primary care, was evaluated in a two-armed cluster-randomised controlled trial. Participants were 266 adults (mean±SD age 62±10years; 39% women) with T2DM (median (IQR) duration 8.5 (5, 13)years) from 74 primary care practices (Stepping Up intervention: 57%, control 43%). At 12months, 47% (n=126) had commenced insulin. Controlling for randomisation, logistic regression was used to explore baseline predictors of insulin uptake, including: demographic and clinical characteristics, emotional wellbeing (depressive symptoms and diabetes-related distress), insulin treatment appraisals, and, 'willingness' to initiate insulin. Two-way analysis of variance examined effects of, and interaction between, randomisation and insulin uptake on 12-month change in insulin appraisals. Participants using insulin at 12months were more likely (all pinsulin-treated T2DM to report: lower socioeconomic status, higher baseline HbA1c (median difference: 0.3%; 3mmol/mol), greater willingness to commence insulin (very willing: 27% vs 12%), and less negative and more positive insulin appraisals. All contributed significantly to the final model (χ 2 (8)=92.1, pinsulin appraisals. Regardless of trial allocation, those initiating insulin reported significantly greater reductions in negative insulin appraisals. Controlling for randomisation, 12-month insulin use was predicted by higher baseline HbA1c and 'willingness' to use insulin if recommended. Negative insulin appraisals reduced following insulin initiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. CD40 deficiency in mice exacerbates obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang-An; Kogan, Sophia; Amano, Shinya U; Wang, Mengxi; Dagdeviren, Sezin; Friedline, Randall H; Aouadi, Myriam; Kim, Jason K; Czech, Michael P

    2013-05-01

    The pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes in rodents and humans is characterized by low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue and liver. The CD40 receptor and its ligand CD40L initiate immune cell signaling promoting inflammation, but conflicting data on CD40L-null mice confound its role in obesity-associated insulin resistance. Here, we demonstrate that CD40 receptor-deficient mice on a high-fat diet display the expected decrease in hepatic cytokine levels but paradoxically exhibit liver steatosis, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance compared with their age-matched wild-type controls. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies also demonstrated insulin resistance in glucose utilization by the CD40-null mice compared with wild-type mice. In contrast to liver, adipose tissue in CD40-deficient animals harbors elevated cytokine levels and infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages and CD8(+) effector T cells. In addition, ex vivo explants of epididymal adipose tissue from CD40(-/-) mice display elevated basal and isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis, suggesting a potential increase of lipid efflux from visceral fat to the liver. These findings reveal that 1) CD40-null mice represent an unusual model of hepatic steatosis with reduced hepatic inflammation, and 2) CD40 unexpectedly functions in adipose tissue to attenuate its inflammation in obesity, thereby protecting against hepatic steatosis.

  4. Allergy reactions to insulin: effects of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and insulin analogues.

    OpenAIRE

    Radermecker, Régis; Scheen, André

    2007-01-01

    The purification of animal insulin preparations and the use of human recombinant insulin have markedly reduced the incidence but not completely suppressed the occurrence of insulin allergy manifestations. Advances in technologies concerning the mode of delivery of insulin, i.e. continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), and the use of insulin analogues, resulting from the alteration in the amino acid sequence of the native insulin molecule, may influence the immunogenicity and antigenic...

  5. Effects of heparin on insulin binding and biological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriauciunas, K.M.; Grigorescu, F.; Kahn, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of heparin, a polyanionic glycosaminoglycan known to alter the function of many proteins, on insulin binding and bioactivity was studied. Cultured human lymphocytes (IM-9) were incubated with varying concentrations of heparin, then extensively washed, and 125 I-labeled insulin binding was measured. Heparin at concentrations used clinically for anticoagulation (1-50 U/ml) inhibited binding in a dose-dependent manner; 50% inhibition of binding occurred with 5-10 U/ml. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding was due to a decrease in both the affinity and the apparent number of available insulin receptors. The effect occurred within 10 min at 22 degrees C and persisted even after the cells were extensively washed. Inhibition of insulin binding also occurred when cells were preincubated with heparinized plasma or heparinized serum but not when cells were incubated with normal serum or plasma from blood anticoagulated with EDTA. By contrast, other polyanions and polycations, e.g., poly-L-glutamic acid, poly-L-lysine, succinylated poly-L-lysine, and histone, did not inhibit binding. Heparin also inhibited insulin binding in Epstein-Barr (EB) virus-transformed lymphocytes but had no effect on insulin binding to isolated adipocytes, human erythrocytes, or intact hepatoma cells. When isolated adipocytes were incubated with heparin, there was a dose-dependent inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation and, to a lesser extent, of basal glucose oxidation. Although heparin has no effect on insulin binding to intact hepatoma cells, heparin inhibited both insulin binding and insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation in receptors solubilized from these cells

  6. Sygepleje tilbage til det basale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Erik Elgaard; Bahnsen, Iben Bøgh; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the rationale for the initiation of a development and research project in North Denmark Region in collaboration with international researchers led by Professor Alison Kitson, University of Adelaide, Australia. The international project has assumed a lead position with the o......This article describes the rationale for the initiation of a development and research project in North Denmark Region in collaboration with international researchers led by Professor Alison Kitson, University of Adelaide, Australia. The international project has assumed a lead position...... is provided in the article. Keywords: Conceptual framework, nursing practice, Fundamentals of Care, FoC...

  7. Classifying insulin regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neu, A; Lange, K; Barrett, T

    2015-01-01

    Modern insulin regimens for the treatment of type 1 diabetes are highly individualized. The concept of an individually tailored medicine accounts for a broad variety of different insulin regimens applied. Despite clear recommendations for insulin management in children and adolescents with type 1...... diabetes there is little distinctiveness about concepts and the nomenclature is confusing. Even among experts similar terms are used for different strategies. The aim of our review--based on the experiences of the Hvidoere Study Group (HSG)--is to propose comprehensive definitions for current insulin...... variety of insulin regimens applied in each center, respectively. Furthermore, the understanding of insulin regimens has been persistently different between the centers since more than 20 yr. Not even the terms 'conventional' and 'intensified therapy' were used consistently among all members. Besides...

  8. [Hypertension and insulin resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiculescu, A; Kutkuhn, B; Rösen, P; Grabensee, B

    1997-10-17

    Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and obesity are defined as classical insulin resistant states. Essential hypertension is now also considered to be an insulin resistant state, even in absence of NIDDM or obesity, as shown in epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies. Neither the underlying mechanism nor a direct causality between the two phenomena has been detected as yet, but different hypotheses have been postulated where, on the one hand, insulin resistance and hypertension are considered to be causally related and, on the other hand, they are considered to be parallel phenomena due to genetic and acquired factors. The clarification of the connection between hypertension and insulin resistance seems to be of great clinical importance, since they are both independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease and mortality from cardiovascular complications. This paper gives an overview of the results of recent research on the possible underlying pathogenetic mechanisms linking hypertension and insulin resistance.

  9. Insulin sensitivity and albuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilz, Stefan; Rutters, Femke; Nijpels, Giel

    2014-01-01

    was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, expressed as the M/I value. Oral glucose tolerance test-based insulin sensitivity (OGIS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were determined at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS......OBJECTIVE: Accumulating evidence suggests an association between insulin sensitivity and albuminuria, which, even in the normal range, is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We evaluated whether insulin sensitivity is associated with albuminuria in healthy subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN...... AND METHODS: We investigated 1,415 healthy, nondiabetic participants (mean age 43.9 ± 8.3 years; 54.3% women) from the RISC (Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease) study, of whom 852 participated in a follow-up examination after 3 years. At baseline, insulin sensitivity...

  10. Molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review discusses recent advances in understanding of the structure and function of the insulin receptor and insulin action, and how these relate to the clinical aspects of insulin resistance associated with non-insulin-dependent diabetes and other disorders. Improved understanding of the molecular basis of insulin ...

  11. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Synergizes with Insulin in Human Adipose Stem Cell-Derived (hASC) Adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Darwin V.; Li, Dongmei; Yan, Qingyun; Zhu, Yimin; Goodwin, Bryan; Calle, Roberto; Brenner, Martin B.; Talukdar, Saswata

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has evolved as a major metabolic regulator, the pharmacological administration of which causes weight loss, insulin sensitivity and glucose control in rodents and humans. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which FGF21 exerts its metabolic effects, we developed a human in vitro model of adipocytes to examine crosstalk between FGF21 and insulin signaling. Human adipose stem cell-derived (hASC) adipocytes were acutely treated with FGF21 alone, insulin alone, or in combination. Insulin signaling under these conditions was assessed by measuring tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor (InsR), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), and serine 473 phosphorylation of Akt, followed by a functional assay using 14C-2-deoxyglucose [14C]-2DG to measure glucose uptake in these cells. FGF21 alone caused a modest increase of glucose uptake, but treatment with FGF21 in combination with insulin had a synergistic effect on glucose uptake in these cells. The presence of FGF21 also effectively lowered the insulin concentration required to achieve the same level of glucose uptake compared to the absence of FGF21 by 10-fold. This acute effect of FGF21 on insulin signaling was not due to IR, IGF-1R, or IRS-1 activation. Moreover, we observed a substantial increase in basal S473-Akt phosphorylation by FGF21 alone, in contrast to the minimal shift in basal glucose uptake. Taken together, our data demonstrate that acute co-treatment of hASC-adipocytes with FGF21 and insulin can result in a synergistic improvement in glucose uptake. These effects were shown to occur at or downstream of Akt, or separate from the canonical insulin signaling pathway. PMID:25365322

  12. Fibroblast growth factor 21 improves insulin sensitivity and synergizes with insulin in human adipose stem cell-derived (hASC adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwin V Lee

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 has evolved as a major metabolic regulator, the pharmacological administration of which causes weight loss, insulin sensitivity and glucose control in rodents and humans. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which FGF21 exerts its metabolic effects, we developed a human in vitro model of adipocytes to examine crosstalk between FGF21 and insulin signaling. Human adipose stem cell-derived (hASC adipocytes were acutely treated with FGF21 alone, insulin alone, or in combination. Insulin signaling under these conditions was assessed by measuring tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor (InsR, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1, and serine 473 phosphorylation of Akt, followed by a functional assay using 14C-2-deoxyglucose [14C]-2DG to measure glucose uptake in these cells. FGF21 alone caused a modest increase of glucose uptake, but treatment with FGF21 in combination with insulin had a synergistic effect on glucose uptake in these cells. The presence of FGF21 also effectively lowered the insulin concentration required to achieve the same level of glucose uptake compared to the absence of FGF21 by 10-fold. This acute effect of FGF21 on insulin signaling was not due to IR, IGF-1R, or IRS-1 activation. Moreover, we observed a substantial increase in basal S473-Akt phosphorylation by FGF21 alone, in contrast to the minimal shift in basal glucose uptake. Taken together, our data demonstrate that acute co-treatment of hASC-adipocytes with FGF21 and insulin can result in a synergistic improvement in glucose uptake. These effects were shown to occur at or downstream of Akt, or separate from the canonical insulin signaling pathway.

  13. Insulin pump treatment in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, S; Meraner, D; Koehle, J

    2012-08-01

    Within children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes insulin pump treatment is of increasing interest. Frequency of insulin pump therapy shows a rapid and steep increase in toddlers and young children. Insulin pumps allow a close to physiologic insulin delivery due to basal rates programmed over 24 hours with circadian rhythms taken into account. Furthermore, another advantage of technical devices as insulin pumps is the application of extremely small amounts of insulin, as needed in very young children, with the possibility of titration of infusion rates down to 0.01E/h. Dawn Phenomenon and hypoglycemic events are main indications for insulin pump treatment in children and adolescents. A significant reduction of severe hypoglycemia, especially nocturnal hypoglycemia was shown, whereas a reduction of HbA1c and an improvement of metabolic control has been reported in short term and in some but not all long term studies. Ketoacidosis rate did not increase in insulin pump therapy. Complications due to continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, like local infections and dermatological changes are frequent but were not associated with glycemic control and did not lead to discontinuation of insulin pump treatment. Pump discontinuation rate in general is low, varying from 1% in very young children up to 6% in pubertal adolescent girls. Insulin pump treatment was shown to be safe and efficient and the simplicity of handling the devices as well as an improvement of quality of life may explain the rapid increase of pump treatment in young children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

  14. Insulin, cognition, and dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholerton, Brenna; Baker, Laura D.; Craft, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive disorders of aging represent a serious threat to the social and economic welfare of current society. It is now widely recognized that pathology related to such conditions, particularly Alzheimer’s disease, likely begins years or decades prior to the onset of clinical dementia symptoms. This revelation has led researchers to consider candidate mechanisms precipitating the cascade of neuropathological events that eventually lead to clinical Alzheimer’s disease. Insulin, a hormone with potent effects in the brain, has recently received a great deal of attention for its potential beneficial and protective role in cognitive function. Insulin resistance, which refers to the reduced sensitivity of target tissues to the favorable effects of insulin, is related to multiple chronic conditions known to impact cognition and increase dementia risk. With insulin resistance-associated conditions reaching epidemic proportions, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders will continue to rise exponentially. Fortunately, these chronic insulin-related conditions are amenable to pharmacological intervention. As a result, novel therapeutic strategies that focus on increasing insulin sensitivity in the brain may be an important target for protecting or treating cognitive decline. The following review will highlight our current understanding of the role of insulin in brain, potential mechanisms underlying the link between insulin resistance and dementia, and current experimental therapeutic strategies aimed at improving cognitive function via modifying the brain’s insulin sensitivity. PMID:24070815

  15. Insulin and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan, Fatemeh; Toth, Cory

    2013-03-01

    Mainly known for its role in peripheral glucose homeostasis, insulin has also significant impact within the brain, functioning as a key neuromodulator in behavioral, cellular, biochemical and molecular studies. The brain is now regarded as an insulin-sensitive organ with widespread, yet selective, expression of the insulin receptor in the olfactory bulb, hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebellum, amygdala and cerebral cortex. Insulin receptor signaling in the brain is important for neuronal development, glucoregulation, feeding behavior, body weight, and cognitive processes such as with attention, executive functioning, learning and memory. Emerging evidence has demonstrated insulin receptor signaling to be impaired in several neurological disorders. Moreover, insulin receptor signaling is recognized as important for dendritic outgrowth, neuronal survival, circuit development, synaptic plasticity and postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor trafficking. We review the multiple roles of insulin in the brain, as well as its endogenous trafficking to the brain or its exogenous intervention. Although insulin can be directly targeted to the brain via intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intraparenchymal delivery, these invasive techniques are with significant risk, necessitating repeated surgical intervention and providing potential for systemic hypoglycemia. Another method, intranasal delivery, is a non-invasive, safe, and alternative approach which rapidly targets delivery of molecules to the brain while minimizing systemic exposure. Over the last decades, the delivery of intranasal insulin in animal models and human patients has evolved and expanded, permitting new hope for associated neurodegenerative and neurovascular disorders.

  16. Effect of training on insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake and lipolysis in human adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, B; Larsen, J J; Mikines, K J

    2000-01-01

    Training increases insulin sensitivity of both whole body and muscle in humans. To investigate whether training also increases insulin sensitivity of adipose tissue, we performed a three-step hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp in eight endurance-trained (T) and eight sedentary (S) young men...... (glucose only). Adipose tissue blood flow was measured by (133)Xe washout. In the basal state, adipose tissue blood flow tended to be higher in T compared with S subjects, and in both groups blood flow was constant during the clamp. The change from basal in arterial-interstitial glucose concentration......-time: T, 44 +/- 9 min (n = 7); S, 102 +/- 23 min (n = 5); P training enhances insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake in subcutaneous adipose tissue and in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, interstitial glycerol data suggest that training also increases insulin sensitivity of lipolysis...

  17. Effect of insulin degludec versus insulin glargine on glycemic control and daily fasting blood glucose variability in insulin-naïve Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes: I'D GOT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Chiba, Yasuko; Sato, Minoru; Fujita, Nobuya; Takada, Yoshihisa; Murano, Shunichi; Kuroda, Hisamoto

    2017-08-01

    Insulin degludec (IDeg) is an ultra-long-acting insulin that has a smooth time/action profile over more than 42h. The present study compared the effects of IDeg and insulin glargine (IGlar) on HbA1c reduction and on within-subject day-to-day variability of fasting blood glucose (FBG) in insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes. Eligible patients were randomly allocated at a 3:1 ratio to receive once-daily IDeg (n=31) or IGlar (n=12). Both basal insulins were administered before breakfast and titrated to achieve a target FBG type 2 diabetes. The day-to-day variation of FBG was smaller in patients receiving IDeg. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  19. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  20. Basal encephalocele and morning glory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioli, J; Lesser, R L

    1983-01-01

    Basal encephaloceles are often associated with other midline anomalies such as hypertelorism, broad nasal root, cleft lip, and cleft palate. Optic disc anomalies such as pallor, dysplasia, optic pit, coLoboma, and megalopapilla have been reported to occur in patients with basal encephalocele We report a case of a child with a sphenoethmoidal encephalocele and morning glory syndrome of the optic nerve. The presence of such optic nerve anomalies with facial midline anomalies should alert the clinician to the possible presence of a basal encephalocele. Images PMID:6849854

  1. Transition from intravenous insulin to subcutaneous long-acting insulin in critical care patients on enteral or parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Analía; Zapata, Lluis; Vera, Paula; Betbese, Antoni J; Pérez, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    The optimal initial dose of subcutaneous (SC) insulin after intravenous (IV) infusion is controversial, especially in patients receiving continuous enteral nutrition (EN) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN). The aim of this study was to evaluate the strategy used at our hospital intensive care unit (ICU) in patients switched from IV insulin to SC insulin glargine while receiving EN or TPN. A retrospective analysis was made of 27 patients on EN and 14 on TPN switched from IV infusion insulin to SC insulin. The initial dose of SC insulin was estimated as 50% of the daily IV insulin requirements, extrapolated from the previous 12h. A corrective dose of short-acting insulin (lispro) was used when necessary. Mean blood glucose (BG) level during SC insulin treatment was 136±35mg/dL in the EN group and 157±37mg/dL in the TPN group (p=0.01). In the TPN group, mean BG was >180mg/dL during the first three days after switching, and a 41% increase in the glargine dose was required to achieve the target BG. In the EN group, mean BG remained <180mg/dL throughout the days of transition and the dose of glargine remained unchanged. In the transition from IV to SC insulin therapy, initial insulin glargine dose estimated as 50% of daily IV insulin requirements is adequate for patients on EN, but inadequate in those given TPN. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Loss of 50% of excess weight using a very low energy diet improves insulin-stimulated glucose disposal and skeletal muscle insulin signalling in obese insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jazet, I. M.; Schaart, G.; Gastaldelli, A.; Ferrannini, E.; Hesselink, M. K.; Schrauwen, P.; Romijn, J. A.; Maassen, J. A.; Pijl, H.; Ouwens, D. M.; Meinders, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Both energy restriction (ER) per se and weight loss improve glucose metabolism in obese insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients. Short-term ER decreases basal endogenous glucose production (EGP) but not glucose disposal. In contrast the blood glucose-lowering mechanism of long-term ER with

  3. LPA receptor activity is basal specific and coincident with early pregnancy and involution during mammary gland postnatal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Deanna; Bagchi, Susmita; Broin, Pilib Ó; Hollern, Daniel; Racedo, Silvia E.; Morrow, Bernice; Sellers, Rani S.; Greally, John M.; Golden, Aaron; Andrechek, Eran; Wood, Teresa; Montagna, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy, luminal and basal epithelial cells of the adult mammary gland proliferate and differentiate resulting in remodeling of the adult gland. While pathways that control this process have been characterized in the gland as a whole, the contribution of specific cell subtypes, in particular the basal compartment, remains largely unknown. Basal cells provide structural and contractile support, however they also orchestrate the communication between the stroma and the luminal compartment at all developmental stages. Using RNA-seq, we show that basal cells are extraordinarily transcriptionally dynamic throughout pregnancy when compared to luminal cells. We identified gene expression changes that define specific basal functions acquired during development that led to the identification of novel markers. Enrichment analysis of gene sets from 24 mouse models for breast cancer pinpoint to a potential new function for insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1r) in the basal epithelium during lactogenesis. We establish that β-catenin signaling is activated in basal cells during early pregnancy, and demonstrate that this activity is mediated by lysophosphatidic acid receptor 3 (Lpar3). These findings identify novel pathways active during functional maturation of the adult mammary gland. PMID:27808166

  4. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    independent phosphorylation of PKCε causes this reduction in insulin receptor gene expression. One of the pathways through which fatty acid can induce insulin resistance in insulin target cells is suggested by these studies. We provide an overview of ...

  5. Basal and postprandial change in serum fibroblast growth factor-21 concentration in type 1 diabetic mellitus and in healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibar, Karin; Blaslov, Kristina; Bulum, Tomislav; Ćuća, Jadranka Knežević; Smirčić-Duvnjak, Lea

    2015-04-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) appears to have an important role in glucose and lipid metabolism. FGF-21 secretion is mainly determined by nutritional status. The aim of this study was to measure basal and postprandial FGF-21 and postprandial change of FGF-21 concentration in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients and in healthy controls, and to investigate the differences between the groups. The cross-sectional study included 30 C-peptide negative T1DM patients, median age 37 years (20-59), disease duration 22 years (3-45), and nine healthy controls, median age 30 years (27-47). Basal and postprandial FGF-21 concentrations were measured by ELISA. The associations of FGF-21 with glucose, lipids, and insulin were analyzed. Individuals with T1DM showed significantly lower basal FGF-21 concentration (P=0.046) when compared with healthy controls (median value 28.2 vs 104 pg/mL) and had significantly different postprandial change (∆ 30'-0') of FGF-21 (P=0.006) in comparison with healthy controls (median value -1.1 vs -20.5 pg/mL). The glucose and lipid status did not correlate with FGF-21. In healthy controls, postprandial insulin level correlated with basal FGF-21 (ρ=0.7, P=0.036). Multiple regression analysis showed that they are independently associated after adjustment for confounding factors (β=1.824, P=0.04). We describe the pathological pattern of basal and postprandial change of FGF-21 secretion not associated with glucose, lipid levels, or insulin therapy in patients with T1DM. Since FGF-21 has numerous protective metabolic effects in the experimental model, the lower basal FGF-21 concentration in T1DM patients opens the question about the potential role of recombinant FGF-21 therapy.

  6. Brain insulin action augments hepatic glycogen synthesis without suppressing glucose production or gluconeogenesis in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Saraswathi, Viswanathan; Smith, Marta S.; Donahue, E. Patrick; Farmer, Ben; Farmer, Tiffany D.; Neal, Doss; Williams, Philip E.; Lautz, Margaret; Mari, Andrea; Cherrington, Alan D.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2011-01-01

    In rodents, acute brain insulin action reduces blood glucose levels by suppressing the expression of enzymes in the hepatic gluconeogenic pathway, thereby reducing gluconeogenesis and endogenous glucose production (EGP). Whether a similar mechanism is functional in large animals, including humans, is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that in canines, physiologic brain hyperinsulinemia brought about by infusion of insulin into the head arteries (during a pancreatic clamp to maintain basal hepatic...

  7. Short-term intensive insulin therapy could be the preferred option for new onset Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with HbA1c > 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jianping

    2017-10-01

    patients, initiating insulin is difficult, although it has been almost 10 years since the ACE/AACE Diabetes Road Map suggested insulin therapy for treatment-naïve patients with high HbA1c. Lack of patient education resources in primary care and of provider knowledge as to approaches to insulin treatment (insulin initiation dosage, multiple daily injection or basal insulin supplement, insulin treatment duration) are major obstacles to selecting appropriately intensive but also timely therapy for newly diagnosed T2DM patients in clinical practice so as to minimize avoidable glycemic exposure. Treatment with STII early in the course of T2DM is of considerable interest. There is a wide range of evidence currently available supporting the use of STII therapy in newly diagnosed T2DM. For example, STII can quickly normalize glycemic control, improve β-cell function, restore first-phase insulin secretion, and even reduce glucagonemia in newly diagnosed T2DM, suggesting that it may provide unique capacity for modification of the natural process of diabetes. The largest and most robust clinical trial of STII therapy enrolled 382 newly diagnosed people with T2DM at nine centers in China and randomized them to either insulin (short-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion [CSII] or multiple daily injections [MDI]) or oral anti-hyperglycemic therapy. First-phase insulin secretion was increased in all three groups after 2 weeks of normoglycemia. Remission rates at 1 year were higher in the two insulin-treated groups (51.1% in the CSII group, 44.9% in the MDI group) than in the oral therapy group (26.7%). Furthermore, the increase in first-phase insulin response was maintained at 1 year in the two insulin-treated groups, but declined in the group allocated to oral medication (Fig. ). A beneficial effect of insulin therapy over oral anti-diabetic agents was also observed by Chen et al. [Figure: see text] A meta-analysis, including seven studies and 839 participants, further

  8. Insulin alone can lead to a withdrawal of meiotic arrest in the carp

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meiotic arrest of oocyte in an Indian carp, Labeo rohita Ham. has been found for the first time to be withdrawn by insulin only. Addition of insulin to oocytes in vitro caused germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), one of the first visual markers to determine initiation of the final maturational process. Under the influence of insulin ...

  9. The prescription of insulin pen devices versus syringes for older people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaghouli, Amna A; Shah, Baiju R

    2009-07-01

    Insulin pen devices are easier to use and lead to better treatment adherence than syringes. This study sought to determine factors associated with the decision to prescribe insulin pen devices rather than syringes for older patients initiating insulin therapy. A population-based study examined all Ontario, Canada residents > or = 66 years old who received a first prescription for insulin between 1998 and 2006 (n = 47,810). Associations between demographic/clinical factors and the use of pen devices for insulin delivery were determined. Seventy-two percent of patients began insulin therapy using pen devices for insulin delivery, increasing from 46% in 1998 to 86% in 2006. Insulin initiation by a specialist was positively associated with the use of pen devices (odds ratio [OR] 2.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.08-2.40), whereas long-term care residence (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.49-0.54) and initiation during hospitalization (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.71-0.78) were negatively associated. Insulin pen devices were used by most patients starting insulin, but a substantial proportion of patients continued to be prescribed syringes for insulin delivery. The use of pen devices was positively associated with specialist care and negatively associated with insulin initiation during hospitalization. Increasing physicians' awareness of the benefits of pen devices to facilitate patient self-management could further increase their use and improve diabetes care.

  10. Insulin alone can lead to a withdrawal of meiotic arrest in the carp ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Meiotic arrest of oocyte in an Indian carp, Labeo rohita Ham. has been found for the first time to be withdrawn by insulin only. Addition of insulin to oocytes in vitro caused germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), one of the first visual markers to determine initiation of the final maturational process. Under the influence of insulin ...

  11. Sonic hedgehog signaling in basal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela; Couvé-Privat, Sophie

    2005-07-28

    The development of basal cell carcinoma, the commonest human cancer in fair skinned populations, is clearly associated with constitutive activation of sonic hedgehog signaling. Insight into the genesis of BCC came from the identification of germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene, PATCHED, a key regulatory component of hedgehog signaling in the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Analysis of sporadic basal cell carcinomas and those from repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients has revealed mutational inactivation of PATCHED and gain of function mutations of the proto-oncogenes, SMOOTHENED and SONIC HEDGEHOG associated with solar UV exposure. The molecular mechanisms involved in alterations of the hedgehog signaling pathway that lead to the formation of basal cell carcinomas are being unraveled and has already allowed the investigation of future therapeutic strategies for treating these skin cancers.

  12. Trichoepithelioma And Multiple Basal Cell Epithelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey S.K

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of multiple trichoepithelioma and basal cell epithelioma is reported. Although malignant degeneration of trichoepithelioma is debated, clinical and histopathological studies, in our case, hint at that. The case is reported for its rarity.

  13. Molecular basis of basal cell carcinoma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Erik; Lopes, Otávio Sérgio

    2017-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer, presenting low mortality but high morbidity, and it has as risk factor exposure to sunlight, especially UVB spectrum. The most important constitutional risk factors for basal cell carcinoma development are clear phototypes (I and II, Fitzpatrick classification), family history of basal cell carcinoma (30-60%), freckles in childhood, eyes and light hair. The environmental risk factor better established is exposure to ultraviolet radiation. However, different solar exposure scenarios probably are independent risk factors for certain clinical and histological types, topographies and prognosis of this tumor, and focus of controversy among researchers. Studies confirm that changes in cellular genes Hedgehog signaling pathway are associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma. The cellular Hedgehog signaling pathway is activated in organogenesis, but is altered in various types of tumors. PMID:28954101

  14. Molecular basis of basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Erik; Lopes, Otávio Sérgio

    2017-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer, presenting low mortality but high morbidity, and it has as risk factor exposure to sunlight, especially UVB spectrum. The most important constitutional risk factors for basal cell carcinoma development are clear phototypes (I and II, Fitzpatrick classification), family history of basal cell carcinoma (30-60%), freckles in childhood, eyes and light hair. The environmental risk factor better established is exposure to ultraviolet radiation. However, different solar exposure scenarios probably are independent risk factors for certain clinical and histological types, topographies and prognosis of this tumor, and focus of controversy among researchers. Studies confirm that changes in cellular genes Hedgehog signaling pathway are associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma. The cellular Hedgehog signaling pathway is activated in organogenesis, but is altered in various types of tumors.

  15. Cafeteria diet-induced insulin resistance is not associated with decreased insulin signaling or AMPK activity and is alleviated by physical training in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina; De Bock, Katrien; Richter, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Excess energy intake via a palatable low-fat diet (cafeteria diet) is known to induce obesity and glucose intolerance in rats. However, the molecular mechanisms behind this adaptation are not known, and it is also not known whether exercise training can reverse it. Male Wistar rats were assigned...... was counteracted by training. In the perfused hindlimb, insulin-stimulated glucose transport in red gastrocnemius muscle was completely abolished in CAF and rescued by exercise training. Apart from a tendency toward an approximately 20% reduction in both basal and insulin-stimulated Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation (P......) among the groups. In conclusion, surplus energy intake of a palatable but low-fat cafeteria diet resulted in obesity and insulin resistance that was rescued by exercise training. Interestingly, insulin resistance was not accompanied by major defects in the insulin-signaling cascade or in altered AMPK...

  16. Relative maxima of diameter and basal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas B. Lynch; Difei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    It has often been observed that maximum dbh growth occurs at an earlier age than maximum individual tree basal area growth. This can be deduced from the geometry of the tree stem, by observing that a dbh increment at a given radius will be associated with a larger basal area increment than an equal dbh increment occurring at a shorter radius from the stem center. Thus...

  17. Bed Conditions Inferred from Basal Earthquakes Beneath the Whillans Ice Plain, West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcheck, C. G.; Boucher, C.; Schwartz, S. Y.; Tulaczyk, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    Seismicity near the bed of fast-moving ice streams informs our understanding of basal controls on fast ice flow and the nature of small scale sources of basal resistance to sliding (sticky spots). Small basal earthquakes (BEQs) occurring at or near the base of ice streams express the current dominant basal stress state and allow observation of bed heterogeneities on spatial scales of 10s to 100s m that are difficult to observe otherwise. Temporal changes in the source mechanisms of these BEQs indicate changing basal conditions, and comparison of basal seismicity with GPS-determined ice velocity allows insight into the interplay between seismically active small basal sticky spots and fast ice motion. We present unique highly local observations of BEQs occurring beneath the Whillans Ice Plain, in West Antarctica, from a network of 13 surface and borehole seismometers overlying the WIP stick-slip cycle high tide initiation area. We record seismicity only 100s-1000s of m from basal seismic sources. We compare the occurrence of these BEQs with co-located GPS observations of ice surface velocity. We detect BEQs by cross correlation, using a catalog of hand-picked events with seismic wave arrivals at multiple sites. We then locate each BEQ and determine source parameters by fitting the S wave spectra: moment magnitude, stress drop, and rupture area. The basal earthquakes occur in families of remarkably repeatable events. The time interval between subsequent events within a BEQ family typically depends on ice velocity, but there is a complex interplay between ice velocity and source parameters. We also search for temporal changes in BEQ source parameters and seek to relate these changes to ice velocity measurements, thereby inferring changing bed conditions. Our preferred interpretation is that BEQs are rupture at or near the surface of an over-consolidated till package, suggesting that changes in basal seismicity may directly indicate changing subglacial till conditions.

  18. A randomized controlled trial examining combinations of repaglinide, metformin and NPH insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, M. J.; Thaware, P. K.; Tringham, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To compare combination use of repaglinide, metformin and bedtime Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin with conventional approaches of insulin initiation in patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods: Eighty-two patients with T2DM with suboptimal glycaemic control on oral glucose......-lowering agents were randomized to one of three treatment regimens for 4 months. Group 1 received metformin and twice daily biphasic 30/70 human insulin mixture (n = 27), group 2 metformin and bedtime NPH insulin (n = 26) and group 3 metformin, bedtime NPH insulin and mealtime repaglinide (n = 25). Results...... (group 3 vs. groups 1 and 2: P NPH insulin improved glycaemic control with a similar safety profile to conventional insulin initiation in T2DM and produced final glycaemic control similar to metformin and a twice daily biphasic insulin...

  19. Weight-sparing effect of insulin detemir: a consequence of central nervous system-mediated reduced energy intake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Jones, D; Danne, T; Hermansen, K; Niswender, K; Robertson, K; Thalange, N; Vasselli, J R; Yildiz, B; Häring, H U

    2015-10-01

    Insulin therapy is often associated with adverse weight gain. This is attributable, at least in part, to changes in energy balance and insulin's anabolic effects. Adverse weight gain increases the risk of poor macrovascular outcomes in people with diabetes and should therefore be mitigated if possible. Clinical studies have shown that insulin detemir, a basal insulin analogue, exerts a unique weight-sparing effect compared with other basal insulins. To understand this property, several hypotheses have been proposed. These explore the interplay of efferent and afferent signals between the muscles, brain, liver, renal and adipose tissues in response to insulin detemir and comparator basal insulins. The following models have been proposed: insulin detemir may reduce food intake through direct or indirect effects on the central nervous system (CNS); it may have favourable actions on hepatic glucose metabolism through a selective effect on the liver, or it may influence fluid homeostasis through renal effects. Studies have consistently shown that insulin detemir reduces energy intake, and moreover, it is clear that this shift in energy balance is not a consequence of reduced hypoglycaemia. CNS effects may be mediated by direct action, by indirect stimulation by peripheral mediators and/or via a more physiological counter-regulatory response to insulin through restoration of the hepatic-peripheral insulin gradient. Although the precise mechanism remains unclear, it is likely that the weight-sparing effect of insulin detemir can be explained by a combination of mechanisms. The evidence for each hypothesis is considered in this review. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Insulin in ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Jawad, Fatema

    2015-05-01

    Many people with diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, require insulin for maintainance of glycaemic control and health. Most of these people can observe the Ramadan fast, provided appropriate dosage adjustments are made, and basic rules of safety followed. This article describes modifications and precautions that are needed while prescribing insulin during Ramadan.

  1. Diabetes, insulin and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    -called counter-regulatory hormones tend to increase plasma glucose by increasing hepatic glucose production and adipose tissue lipolysis. If the pre-exercise plasma insulin level is high, hypoglycaemia may develop during exercise whereas hyperglycaemia and ketosis may develop if pre-exercise plasma insulin...

  2. Development of a bioassay system for investigating insulin resistance factors of pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausman, D.B.; Singh, R.; Martin, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    To determine if late-term pregnant serum and/or placenta could induce insulin resistance in normal adipose cells, the authors have developed an insulin sensitive bioassay system. Cells isolated from epididymal fat pads of 250-275 g Sprague Dawley rats are preincubated for 3 hours at 37 0 in media 199 and serum or placental extract. The cells are washed free of serum and tested for metabolic activity in a 2 hour incubation which measures the conversion of U- 14 C-glucose to 14 CO 2 and to 14 C-triglyceride fatty acids under basal and insulin stimulated conditions. Maximal insulin responsiveness (350-450% basal for CO 2 and 1400-1700% basal for fatty acids) is achieved using Worthington Type II collagenase and a 45-60 minute digestion period for cell isolations and Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing 0.5 mM glucose, 2% Armour bovine serum albumin (CRG-7), 1000 μU/ml insulin and 110,000 to 120,000 cells in the 2 hour incubations. Using this bioasssay system the authors have found that insulin responsiveness, in terms of glucose conversion to fatty acids, is unchanged when cells are preincubated with 5% control pig serum but reduced following preincubation with late pregnant (110 day) pig serum. In future experiments the authors hope to further characterize the factor(s) in pregnant serum responsible for inducing this metabolic effect

  3. Basal cell carcinoma metastatic to parotid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Rinsey Rose; Di Palma, Silvana; Barrett, A W

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis from basal cell carcinoma of the skin is very rare with cases being documented in the lymph nodes, lung, bone and parotid gland. The main histopathological differential diagnosis is the locally arising basal cell adenocarcinoma from which it is difficult to distinguish by morphology and routine immunohistochemistry. Approximately 85 % of all reported metastatic basal cell carcinomas arise in the head and neck region. Here we present a case of basal cell carcinoma of the skin of the left lateral canthus of the eye which metastasized to the intraparotid lymph nodes with infiltration of the adjacent parotid parenchyma. More awareness and vigilance is required on the part of the reporting pathologist to consider metastasis in the presence of a parotid tumour. Features favouring metastasis include history of primary cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, histological similarity to the primary lesion and absence of any demonstrable direct extension from the skin lesion. We also review the literature on metastatic basal cell carcinoma and discuss the need for adequate follow up in high risk patients.

  4. Surfactin variants for intra-intestinal delivery of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Xing, Xiaoying; Ding, Jia; Zhao, Xiuyun; Qi, Gaofu

    2017-06-01

    Surfactin is a Bacillus-produced natural lipopeptide, which can overcome the epithelial cell barriers for orally delivering insulin, but its ability to promote uptake of insulin by the intestine need to be further improved for a higher oral bioavailability. Here, we designed and synthesized several surfactin variants to improve its ability for oral delivery of insulin. Firstly, we replaced Glu with Gln in surfactin for decreasing its negative charges, but found this replacement weakened its ability to orally delivery insulin. We further chemically synthesized surfactin variant by replacing its fatty acid chain (C15) with a shortened one (C14), and found this replacement did not influence its ability to orally deliver insulin. Lastly, we replaced its amino acids (Leu) with more hydrophobic ones (Ile), and found the replacement could significantly improve its ability to deliver insulin, with a maximal blood glucose decrease to 27.33% of the initial level and an insulin bioavailability of 18.25%. We also replaced its amino acids of Leu with Val, and Val with Ile, and found this replacement could also significantly improve its ability to deliver insulin with a maximal blood glucose decrease to 18.36% of the initial level and a high insulin bioavailability of 26.32% in diabetic mice. Further analysis by CD, we found the surfactin variants with more hydrophobic amino acid residuals significantly induced insulin from rigid (α-helix) to flexible structure (β-sheet and random coil), that is favorable for insulin to permeate across the intestine epithelial membrane. Collectively, surfactin variants with more hydrophobicity are very potential for delivery of insulin in the everyday control of blood glucose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Insulin resistance in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stąpor, Natalia; Beń-Skowronek, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the state of reduced tissue sensitivity to insulin. The frequency of this occurrence is increasing dramatically in developed countries. Both, environmental and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Sedentary lifestyle and the excessive calorie intake cause the substantial increase of the fat issue, leading to overweight and obesity. Insulin resistance occurs physiologically during puberty, but it is also a pathological condition predisposing children to develop abnormal glucose tolerance, diabetes, hypertension and polycystic ovary syndrome among girls. More frequent occurrence of metabolic syndrome can be observed among children born small for gestational age (SGA). The article presents the current views on risk factors, etiology, diagnosis and consequences insulin resistance and disorders of glucose tolerance. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  6. Do Perceptions of Insulin Pump Usability Impact Attitudes Toward Insulin Pump Therapy? A Pilot Study of Individuals With Type 1 and Insulin-Treated Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgen, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Background: We assessed the impact of perceived insulin pump usability on attitudes toward insulin pump therapy in diabetic individuals currently treated with multiple daily insulin injections (MDI). Method: This comparative, single-arm study recruited 28 adults with type 1 (n = 16) and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes (n = 12) to evaluate 2 current insulin pumps: Medtronic Revel 723 (Pump 1), Asante Snap Insulin Pump (Pump 2). Participants were randomized 1:1 to 1 of 2 assessment sequences: Pump 1 followed by Pump 2; and Pump 2 followed by Pump 1. Structured observational protocols were utilized to assess participants’ ability and time required to learn/perform common tasks associated with pump setup/use. Participants used a modified version of the System Usability Scale (SUS) and investigator-developed questionnaires to rate pump usability and task difficulty; pre-post questionnaires assessed changes in attitudes toward insulin pump therapy. Results: All participants completed the study. SUS scores showed Pump 2 to be more usable than Pump 1 on all usability attributes. Participants rated Pump 2 more positively than Pump 1, overall mean SUS scores of 5.7 versus 4.1 respectively, F(1, 52) = 32.7, P Pump 2 last, 5.3 versus 4.4 for Pump 1 last, F(1, 52) = 10.8, P Pump 2 was preferred for all tasks: manual bolus (86%), bolus calculation (71%), managing basal rates (93%), interpreting alarms (96%), transferring settings (100%), changing insulin and infusion sets (93%), all P pump usability can directly impact acceptance and use of features that may benefit those who wear them. Simpler pump devices that decrease perceptions of complexity may encourage broader use of this technology. PMID:25269659

  7. Do perceptions of insulin pump usability impact attitudes toward insulin pump therapy? A pilot study of individuals with type 1 and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, James J; Gilgen, Emily

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the impact of perceived insulin pump usability on attitudes toward insulin pump therapy in diabetic individuals currently treated with multiple daily insulin injections (MDI). This comparative, single-arm study recruited 28 adults with type 1 (n = 16) and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes (n = 12) to evaluate 2 current insulin pumps: Medtronic Revel 723 (Pump 1), Asante Snap Insulin Pump (Pump 2). Participants were randomized 1:1 to 1 of 2 assessment sequences: Pump 1 followed by Pump 2; and Pump 2 followed by Pump 1. Structured observational protocols were utilized to assess participants' ability and time required to learn/perform common tasks associated with pump setup/use. Participants used a modified version of the System Usability Scale (SUS) and investigator-developed questionnaires to rate pump usability and task difficulty; pre-post questionnaires assessed changes in attitudes toward insulin pump therapy. All participants completed the study. SUS scores showed Pump 2 to be more usable than Pump 1 on all usability attributes. Participants rated Pump 2 more positively than Pump 1, overall mean SUS scores of 5.7 versus 4.1 respectively, F(1, 52) = 32.7, P Pump 2 last, 5.3 versus 4.4 for Pump 1 last, F(1, 52) = 10.8, P Pump 2 was preferred for all tasks: manual bolus (86%), bolus calculation (71%), managing basal rates (93%), interpreting alarms (96%), transferring settings (100%), changing insulin and infusion sets (93%), all P pump usability can directly impact acceptance and use of features that may benefit those who wear them. Simpler pump devices that decrease perceptions of complexity may encourage broader use of this technology. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  8. Interactions of short-acting, intermediate-acting and pre-mixed human insulins with free radicals--Comparative EPR examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczyk, Paweł; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Ramos, Paweł; Mencner, Łukasz; Olczyk, Krystyna; Pilawa, Barbara

    2015-07-25

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to examine insulins interactions with free radicals. Human recombinant DNA insulins of three groups were studied: short-acting insulin (Insuman Rapid); intermediate-acting insulins (Humulin N, Insuman Basal), and pre-mixed insulins (Humulin M3, Gensulin M50, Gensulin M40, Gensulin M30). The aim of an X-band (9.3GHz) study was comparative analysis of antioxidative properties of the three groups of human insulins. DPPH was used as a stable free radical model. Amplitudes of EPR lines of DPPH as the paramagnetic free radical reference, and DPPH interacting with the individual tested insulins were compared. For all the examined insulins kinetics of their interactions with free radicals up to 60 min were obtained. The strongest interactions with free radicals were observed for the short-acting insulin - Insuman Rapid. The lowest interactions with free radicals were characteristic for intermediate-acting insulin - Insuman Basal. The pre-mixed insulins i.e. Humulin M3 and Gensulin M50 revealed the fastest interactions with free radicals. The short acting, intermediate acting and premixed insulins have been found to be effective agents in reducing free radical formation in vitro and should be further considered as potential useful tools in attenuation of oxidative stress in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 21 CFR 522.1160 - Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... clinical signs in dogs with diabetes mellitus. (iii) Limitations. Federal law restricts this drug to use by... with diabetes mellitus. (iii) Limitations. Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of... initiated if the duration of insulin action is determined to be inadequate. If twice-daily treatment is...

  10. Successful treatment of type B insulin resistance with rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikas, Emmanouil-Dimitrios; Isaac, Iona; Semple, Robert K; Malek, Rana; Führer, Dagmar; Moeller, Lars C

    2015-05-01

    Type B insulin resistance is a very rare disease caused by autoantibodies against the insulin receptor. The mortality of type B insulin resistance is high (>50%), and management of this disease is not yet standardized. We report the successful treatment of a patient with type B insulin resistance with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone. A 45-year-old woman presented with unintended weight loss of 20 kg, unusually widespread acanthosis nigricans, and glucose levels > 500 mg/dL, which could not be controlled with up to 600 IU/d of insulin. Because of the severity of the insulin resistance combined with features of insulin deficiency, type B insulin resistance was suspected. Detection of high levels of insulin receptor autoantibodies confirmed the diagnosis. Neither immunosuppressive therapy with Ig iv nor plasmapheresis had an effect on glucose levels or insulin dose. Because the patient's condition was deteriorating, we started rituximab (750 mg/m(2) in two doses 2 wk apart) together with cyclophosphamide (100 mg/d orally) and dexamethasone 40 mg/d for 4 days. Two months after initiation of rituximab therapy, fasting glucose levels ranged from 80 to 110 mg/dL and could be controlled with very low insulin doses. Glycated hemoglobin decreased from 11.8 to 6.5%. Two months later, insulin therapy was stopped, and the patient showed normal blood glucose readings. In this patient with type B insulin resistance, Ig treatment and plasmapheresis failed to improve the condition. Finally, treatment with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, and steroids was successful in inducing a complete remission.

  11. Improved glycaemic control by switching from insulin NPH to insulin glargine: a retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetlow Anthony P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin glargine (glargine and insulin NPH (NPH are two basal insulin treatments. This study investigated the effect on glycaemic control of switching from a NPH-based regimen to a glargine-based regimen in 701 patients with type 1 (n= 304 or type 2 (n= 397 diabetes, using unselected primary care data. Methods Data for this retrospective observational study were extracted from a UK primary care database (The Health Improvement Network. Patients were required to have at least 12 months of data before and after switching from NPH to glargine. The principal analysis was the change in HbA1c after 12 months treatment with glargine; secondary analyses included change in weight and total daily insulin dose. Inconsistent reporting of hypoglycemic episodes precludes reliable reporting of this outcome. Multivariate analyses were used to adjust for baseline characteristics and confounding variables. Results After adjustment, both diabetic cohorts showed statistically significant reductions in mean HbA1c 12 months after the switch, by 0.38% (p 1c was positively correlated with baseline HbA1c; patients with baseline HbA1c ≥ 8% had reductions of 0.57% (p 0.05. Conclusion In routine clinical practice, switching from NPH to glargine provides the opportunity for improving glycaemic control in diabetes patients inadequately controlled by NPH.

  12. Régimen con insulina lispro mix 25 versus insulina glargina para la diabetes tipo 2 Starting an insulin regimen with insulin lispro mix 25 versus glargine insulin for type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fernández Landó

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available La información sobre el inicio de regímenes de insulina en poblaciones específicas con diabetes tipo 2 (DT2 es limitada. Se comparó eficacia y seguridad de dos regímenes de inicio: insulina lispro mix 25 (LM25 e insulina glargina basal (GL. Se evaluaron 193 pacientes no tratados previamente con insulina, en la fase de iniciación de 24 semanas del ensayo DURABLE; edades: 30-79 años, DT2 controlada inadecuadamente (HbA1c > 7.0% con = 2 medicaciones orales antidiabéticas (MOAs, aleatorizados para LM25 (25% de insulina lispro, 75% de insulina lispro protamina en suspensión dos veces/día, o GL (insulina glargina basal una vez/ día, a las MOAs previas. La eficacia primaria se midió por HbA1c a las 24 semanas. Se midió eficacia secundaria por: proporción de pacientes que alcanzaron HbA1c= 6.5% y= 7.0%, cambio en peso corporal, valores de automonitoreo glucémico e índices de hipoglucemia. LM25 demostró mayor reducción de la HbA1c (- 2.4% ± 0.16 vs. -2.0% ± 0.16, P = 0.002, mayor proporción de pacientes alcanzaron HbA1c= 7.0% (P = 0.012 y niveles de glucemia menores después del desayuno (P = 0.028 y de la cena (P = 0.011, y a las 3 a.m. (P = 0.005 comparada con GL. La glucemia en ayunas (GA y la proporción de pacientes que alcanzaron una HbA1c= 6.5% fueron similares. En ambos grupos hubo aumento del peso corporal, mayor en la valoración final con LM25 (6.35 kg vs. 4.23 kg, P Information on starting insulin regimens in specific populations with type 2 diabetes (T2D is limited. This analysis compared efficacy and safety of two starter insulin regimens: insulin lispro mix 25 (LM25 and basal insulin glargine (GL in patients from Argentina. This post-hoc analysis evaluated 193 insulin-naïve patients who participated in the DURABLE trial 24-week initiation phase. Patients 30-79 years with T2D inadequately controlled (HbA1c > 7.0% with = 2 oral antihyperglycemic medications (OAMs, were randomized to add LM25 (25% insulin lispro, 75

  13. A thiazolidinedione improves in vivo insulin action on skeletal muscle glycogen synthase in insulin-resistant monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmeyer, H K; Bodkin, N L; Haney, J; Yoshioka, S; Horikoshi, H; Hansen, B C

    2000-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZD) have been shown to have anti-diabetic effects including the ability to decrease fasting hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, increase insulin-mediated glucose disposal rate (M) and decrease hepatic glucose production, but the mechanisms of action are not well established. To determine whether a TZD (R-102380, Sankyo Company Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) could improve insulin action on skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (GS), the rate-limiting enzyme in glycogen synthesis, 4 insulin-resistant obese monkeys were given 1 mg/kg/day R-102380 p.o. for a 6-week period. Skeletal muscle GS activity and glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) content were compared between pre-dosing and dosing periods before and during the maximal insulin-stimulation of a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Compared to pre-dosing, insulin-stimulated GS activity and G6P content were increased by this TZD: GS independent activity (p = 0.02), GS total activity (p = 0.005), GS fractional activity (p = 0.06) and G6P content (p = 0.02). The change in GS activity induced by in vivo insulin (insulin-stimulated minus basal) was also increased by this TZD: GS independent activity (p = 0.03) and GS fractional activity (p = 0.04). We conclude that the TZD R-102380 improves insulin action at the skeletal muscle in part by increasing the activity of glycogen synthase. This improvement in insulin sensitivity may be a key factor in the anti-diabetic effect of the thiazolidinedione class of agents.

  14. Using ultra-rapid insulin analogs in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.V. Bolshova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of the study was a retrospective comparative analysis of using insulin analogues of the prolonged and ultra-short action and human genetically engineered insulins of middle and short action in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM. Materials and methods. The influence of ultra-rapid insulin analog in comparison with human rapid-action insulin on the course of type 1 DM in 100 children and adolescents was studied. It was applied as basal-bolus regimen of insulin therapy. Analysis of parameters which reflect criteria of insulin therapy effectiveness, positive effect of ultra-rapid insulin analog on the course of DM has been performed. Results. Application of ultra-rapid insulin analog before each meal improved parameters of pre- and postprandial glycemia, decreased the range of fluctuations of blood sugar during the day, reduced and maintained HbA1c level without augmentation of frequency and intensity of hypoglycaemia, and also decreased the level of noctural hypoglycaemia. Conclusions. The ultra-rapid insulin analog is the drug of choice for the effective use in insulin pumps.

  15. The insulin-mediated modulation of visually evoked magnetic fields is reduced in obese subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Guthoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin is an anorexigenic hormone that contributes to the termination of food intake in the postprandial state. An alteration in insulin action in the brain, named "cerebral insulin resistance", is responsible for overeating and the development of obesity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To analyze the direct effect of insulin on food-related neuronal activity we tested 10 lean and 10 obese subjects. We conducted a magnetencephalography study during a visual working memory task in both the basal state and after applying insulin or placebo spray intranasally to bypass the blood brain barrier. Food and non-food pictures were presented and subjects had to determine whether or not two consecutive pictures belonged to the same category. Intranasal insulin displayed no effect on blood glucose, insulin or C-peptide concentrations in the periphery; however, it led to an increase in the components of evoked fields related to identification and categorization of pictures (at around 170 ms post stimuli in the visual ventral stream in lean subjects when food pictures were presented. In contrast, insulin did not modulate food-related brain activity in obese subjects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated that intranasal insulin increases the cerebral processing of food pictures in lean whereas this was absent in obese subjects. This study further substantiates the presence of a "cerebral insulin resistance" in obese subjects and might be relevant in the pathogenesis of obesity.

  16. Clinical insights into the safety and utility of the insulin tolerance test (ITT) in the assessment of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Finucane, Francis M

    2008-10-01

    The insulin tolerance test (ITT) is the gold standard for assessing GH and cortisol production in pituitary disease. However, areas of uncertainty remain regarding its safety in older people, the optimal duration of the test and its performance in insulin resistant states. Whether basal cortisol concentration can reliably predict an adequate adrenal response to hypoglycaemia remains to be determined.

  17. Hyperlipidaemia is associated with increased insulin-mediated glucose metabolism, reduced fatty acid metabolism and normal blood pressure in transgenic mice overexpressing human apolipoprotein C1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, S.J.; Jong, M.C.; Que, I.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Pijl, H.; Radder, J.K.; Frölich, M.; Havekes, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis. Insulin resistance for glucose metabolism is associated with hyperlipidaemia and high blood pressure. In this study we investigated the effect of primary hyperlipidaemia on basal and insulin-mediated glucose and on non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) metabolism and mean arterial

  18. Effects of insulin therapy on myocardial lipid content and cardiac geometry in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drazenka Jankovic

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recent evidence suggests a link between myocardial steatosis and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Insulin, as a lipogenic and growth-promoting hormone, might stimulate intramyocardial lipid (MYCL deposition and hypertrophy. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the short-term effects of insulin therapy (IT on myocardial lipid content and morphology in patients with T2DM. METHODS: Eighteen patients with T2DM were recruited (age 56 ± 2 years; HbA1c: 10.5 ± 0.4%. In 10 patients with insufficient glucose control under oral medication IT was initiated due to secondary failure of oral glucose lowering therapy (IT-group, while 8 individuals did not require additional insulin substitution (OT-group. In order to assess MYCL and intrahepatic lipid (IHLC content as well as cardiac geometry and function magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and imaging (MRI examinations were performed at baseline (IT and OT and 10 days after initiation of IT. Follow up measurements took place 181 ± 49 days after IT. RESULTS: Interestingly, basal MYCLs were 50% lower in IT- compared to OT-group (0.41 ± 0.12 vs. 0.80 ± 0.11% of water signal; p = 0.034. After 10 days of IT, an acute 80%-rise in MYCL (p = 0.008 was observed, while IHLC did not change. Likewise, myocardial mass (+13%; p = 0.004, wall thickness in end-diastole (+13%; p = 0.030 and concentricity, an index of cardiac remodeling, increased (+28%; p = 0.026. In the long-term MYCL returned to baseline, while IHCL significantly decreased (-31%; p = 0.000. No acute changes in systolic left ventricular function were observed. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The initiation of IT in patients with T2DM was followed by an acute rise in MYCL concentration and myocardial mass.

  19. An Audit of Insulin Usage and Insulin Injection Practices in a Large Indian Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Manash P; Kalra, Sanjay; Bose, Saptarshi; Deka, Jumi

    2017-01-01

    Insulin remains the cornerstone of therapy in a substantial number of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Inadequate knowledge regarding insulin usage is likely to influence its acceptance and adherence, and outcome of therapy, underscoring great need to investigate knowledge, attitude, and practice of insulin usage in patients with T2DM. A cross-sectional registry-based retrospective study analyzed data collected from 748 respondents (male: 466, female: 282), mostly from high or middle economic status, who were enrolled as outpatient in a referral clinic during last 10 years (2006-2016), to assess the general characteristics of patients with type 2 diabetes and their baseline knowledge, attitude, and practice of insulin usage and injection practices. Mean ± standard deviation (SD) of duration of diabetes was 12.24 ± 7.60 years and mean ± SD duration of insulin therapy was 3.42 ± 4.18 years, which was initiated after a mean ± SD diabetes duration of 8.80 ± 6.42 years. Mean insulin dose per kilogram of body weight/day was 0.51 ± 0.27 units. Total daily dose of insulin was 33.36 ± 18.44 units and number of injections/day (mean ± SD) was 2.06 ± 0.73. Among the respondents, 58.96% were on human insulin and 35.70% were on analog insulin. Pen devices were used by 66.08% of the population whereas 31.76% used insulin syringes. The prevalence of lipohypertrophy (LH) was 12.57%, which was significantly ( P technique with regard to injection angle (10.45% vs. 23.02%), site of injection (7.00% vs. 30.51%), rotation of site of injection (0.88% vs. 17.66%), and reuse of needle (5.77% vs. 15.19%). LH was also significantly ( P insulin (8.24%). The current study highlights the unique patterns of insulin usage and associated high prevalence of LH among insulin users in India.

  20. An audit of insulin usage and insulin injection practices in a large Indian cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manash P Baruah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Insulin remains the cornerstone of therapy in a substantial number of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Inadequate knowledge regarding insulin usage is likely to influence its acceptance and adherence, and outcome of therapy, underscoring great need to investigate knowledge, attitude, and practice of insulin usage in patients with T2DM. Methodology: A cross-sectional registry-based retrospective study analyzed data collected from 748 respondents (male: 466, female: 282, mostly from high or middle economic status, who were enrolled as outpatient in a referral clinic during last 10 years (2006–2016, to assess the general characteristics of patients with type 2 diabetes and their baseline knowledge, attitude, and practice of insulin usage and injection practices. Results: Mean ± standard deviation (SD of duration of diabetes was 12.24 ± 7.60 years and mean ± SD duration of insulin therapy was 3.42 ± 4.18 years, which was initiated after a mean ± SD diabetes duration of 8.80 ± 6.42 years. Mean insulin dose per kilogram of body weight/day was 0.51 ± 0.27 units. Total daily dose of insulin was 33.36 ± 18.44 units and number of injections/day (mean ± SD was 2.06 ± 0.73. Among the respondents, 58.96% were on human insulin and 35.70% were on analog insulin. Pen devices were used by 66.08% of the population whereas 31.76% used insulin syringes. The prevalence of lipohypertrophy (LH was 12.57%, which was significantly (P < 0.001 associated with wrong technique with regard to injection angle (10.45% vs. 23.02%, site of injection (7.00% vs. 30.51%, rotation of site of injection (0.88% vs. 17.66%, and reuse of needle (5.77% vs. 15.19%. LH was also significantly (P < 0.05 associated with the use of human (14.74% compared to analog insulin (8.24%. Conclusion: The current study highlights the unique patterns of insulin usage and associated high prevalence of LH among insulin users in India.

  1. Differential effects of insulin injections and insulin infusions on levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies have shown that while injections of insulin cause an increase in fat mass, infusions of insulin increase fat mass. The aim of this paper was to test the hypothesis that if an increase in glycogen is an indicator of an impending increase in adipose mass, then insulin infusions should not increase glycogen, while insulin ...

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of Basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firnhaber, Jonathon M

    2012-07-15

    Family physicians are regularly faced with identifying, treating, and counseling patients with skin cancers. Nonmelanoma skin cancer, which encompasses basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma, is the most common cancer in the United States. Ultraviolet B exposure is a significant factor in the development of basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. The use of tanning beds is associated with a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of basal cell carcinoma and a 2.5-fold increase in the risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Routine screening for skin cancer is controversial. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force cites insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine whole-body skin examination to screen for skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma most commonly appears as a pearly white, dome-shaped papule with prominent telangiectatic surface vessels. Squamous cell carcinoma most commonly appears as a firm, smooth, or hyperkeratotic papule or plaque, often with central ulceration. Initial tissue sampling for diagnosis involves a shave technique if the lesion is raised, or a 2- to 4-mm punch biopsy of the most abnormal-appearing area of skin. Mohs micrographic surgery has the lowest recurrence rate among treatments, but is best considered for large, high-risk tumors. Smaller, lower-risk tumors may be treated with surgical excision, electrodesiccation and curettage, or cryotherapy. Topical imiquimod and fluorouracil are also potential, but less supported, treatments. Although there are no clear guidelines for follow-up after an index nonmelanoma skin cancer, monitoring for recurrence is prudent because the risk of subsequent skin cancer is 35 percent at three years and 50 percent at five years.

  3. Incorporating modelled subglacial hydrology into inversions for basal drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Conrad P.; Arnold, Neil

    2017-12-01

    A key challenge in modelling coupled ice-flow-subglacial hydrology is initializing the state and parameters of the system. We address this problem by presenting a workflow for initializing these values at the start of a summer melt season. The workflow depends on running a subglacial hydrology model for the winter season, when the system is not forced by meltwater inputs, and ice velocities can be assumed constant. Key parameters of the winter run of the subglacial hydrology model are determined from an initial inversion for basal drag using a linear sliding law. The state of the subglacial hydrology model at the end of winter is incorporated into an inversion of basal drag using a non-linear sliding law which is a function of water pressure. We demonstrate this procedure in the Russell Glacier area and compare the output of the linear sliding law with two non-linear sliding laws. Additionally, we compare the modelled winter hydrological state to radar observations and find that it is in line with summer rather than winter observations.

  4. Incorporating modelled subglacial hydrology into inversions for basal drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Koziol

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A key challenge in modelling coupled ice-flow–subglacial hydrology is initializing the state and parameters of the system. We address this problem by presenting a workflow for initializing these values at the start of a summer melt season. The workflow depends on running a subglacial hydrology model for the winter season, when the system is not forced by meltwater inputs, and ice velocities can be assumed constant. Key parameters of the winter run of the subglacial hydrology model are determined from an initial inversion for basal drag using a linear sliding law. The state of the subglacial hydrology model at the end of winter is incorporated into an inversion of basal drag using a non-linear sliding law which is a function of water pressure. We demonstrate this procedure in the Russell Glacier area and compare the output of the linear sliding law with two non-linear sliding laws. Additionally, we compare the modelled winter hydrological state to radar observations and find that it is in line with summer rather than winter observations.

  5. Nonirritative lesions of VMH: effects on plasma insulin, obesity, and hyperreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B M; Frohman, L A

    1985-06-01

    Obesity resulting from lesions of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) has often been attributed to ablation-induced disinhibition of insulin release. However, lesion studies have generally employed electrolyzing anodal current with stainless steel electrodes, which results not only in tissue ablation but deposits of metallic ions that can chronically irritate surrounding tissue. The present study compared the effects of irritative and nonirritative VMH lesions on plasma insulin levels and obesity in female rats. Blood samples were obtained after a 4-h fast and 17 min after the initiation of a meal (6 ml of sweetened milk in 7 min) during a period when VMH rats were food restricted to the level of sham-operated animals and again when all animals were fed ad libitum. Irritative lesions (anodal electrolytic with stainless steel electrodes) caused heavy metallic ion deposition at the lesion site, marked obesity, and hyperinsulinemia both during food restriction and ad libitum feeding. Nonirritative lesions (cathodal electrolytic with platinum electrodes) resulted in no metallic ion deposition in seven of nine animals. These seven rats, which displayed 65% of the weight gain of animals with irritative lesions (significantly greater than sham rats), had significantly elevated insulin levels only under the postabsorptive condition during ad libitum feeding. In addition, only the animals with irritative lesions displayed emotional hyperreactivity to capture and handling. It is concluded that obesity produced by anodal electrolytic lesions with stainless steel electrodes is a result of both a destructive component resulting in hyperphagia with secondary hyperinsulinemia and an irritative component (accounting for up to 40% of the weight gain in female rats) resulting in basal hyperinsulinemia independent of hyperphagia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Insulin secretion and cellular glucose metabolism after prolonged low-grade intralipid infusion in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi; Holst, Jens J

    2003-01-01

    (HI), 40 mU/m(2) x min], 3-(3)H-glucose, indirect calorimetry, and iv glucose tolerance test. Free fatty acid concentrations were similar during basal steady state but 3.7- to 13-fold higher during clamps. P-glucagon increased and the insulin/glucagon ratio decreased at both LI and HI during...... not in the nonoxidative) glucose metabolism in young healthy men. Moreover, insulin hypersecretion perfectly countered the free-fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. Future studies are needed to determine the role of a prolonged moderate lipid load in subjects at increased risk of developing diabetes....

  7. Interaction Between the Central and Peripheral Effects of Insulin in Controlling Hepatic Glucose Metabolism in the Conscious Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Kraft, Guillaume; Smith, Marta S.; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Williams, Phillip E.; Lautz, Margaret; Farmer, Tiffany; Donahue, E. Patrick; Cherrington, Alan D.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of hypothalamic insulin action to the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in the presence of a normal liver/brain insulin ratio (3:1) is unknown. Thus, we assessed the role of central insulin action in the response of the liver to normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia over 4 h. Using a pancreatic clamp, hepatic portal vein insulin delivery was increased three- or eightfold in the conscious dog. Insulin action was studied in the presence or absence of intracerebroventricularly mediated blockade of hypothalamic insulin action. Euglycemia was maintained, and glucagon was clamped at basal. Both the molecular and metabolic aspects of insulin action were assessed. Blockade of hypothalamic insulin signaling did not alter the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic gluconeogenic gene transcription but blunted the induction of glucokinase gene transcription and completely blocked the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β gene transcription. Thus, central and peripheral insulin action combined to control some, but not other, hepatic enzyme programs. Nevertheless, inhibition of hypothalamic insulin action did not alter the effects of the hormone on hepatic glucose flux (production or uptake). These data indicate that brain insulin action is not a determinant of the rapid (<4 h) inhibition of hepatic glucose metabolism caused by normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia in this large animal model. PMID:23011594

  8. Studies on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in non-insulin-dependent diabetes in young Indians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidoo, C.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. In the discrete genetic syndrome of NIDDY (non-insulin-dependent diabetes in the young), the situation is less clear and these aspects is the subject of this thesis. This study included Indian pasients with three generation transmission of NIDDM via one parent. The insulin and C-peptide responses to oral and intravenous glucose in patients with NIDDY were studied. The insulin and glucose responses to non-glucose secretogogues glucagon, tolbutamide and arginine, in NIDDY were also investigated. The following aspects with regard to insulin resistance in NIDDY were examined: glucose and free fatty acid response to intravenous insulin administration, insulin binding to circulating erythrocytes and monocytes, 125 I-insulin binding to the solubilized erythrocyte membrane receptor and 125 I-insulin binding to fibroblasts in culture

  9. Drosophila insulin degrading enzyme and rat skeletal muscle insulin protease cleave insulin at similar sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, W.C.; Garcia, J.V.; Liepnieks, J.J.; Hamel, F.G.; Hermodson, M.A.; Frank, B.H.; Rosner, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Insulin degradation is an integral part of the cellular action of insulin. Recent evidence suggests that the enzyme insulin protease is involved in the degradation of insulin in mammalian tissues. Drosophila, which has insulin-like hormones and insulin receptor homologues, also expresses an insulin degrading enzyme with properties that are very similar to those of mammalian insulin protease. In the present study, the insulin cleavage products generated by the Drosophila insulin degrading enzyme were identified and compared with the products generated by the mammalian insulin protease. Both purified enzymes were incubated with porcine insulin specifically labeled with 125 I on either the A19 or B26 position, and the degradation products were analyzed by HPLC before and after sulfitolysis. Isolation and sequencing of the cleavage products indicated that both enzymes cleave the A chain of intact insulin at identical sites between residues A13 and A14 and A14 and A15. These results demonstrate that all the insulin cleavage sites generated by the Drosopohila insulin degrading enzyme are shared in common with the mammalian insulin protease. These data support the hypothesis that there is evolutionary conservation of the insulin degrading enzyme and further suggest that this enzyme plays an important role in cellular function

  10. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; Grobbelaar, Marie; Steyn, Freda; Mapukata, Ayanda; Plessis, Jaco du [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Hospital, P.O. BOX 19063, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2006-11-15

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was