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Sample records for basal hepatic glucose

  1. Involvement of the vagus nerves in the regulation of basal hepatic glucose production in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, Sylvain; Walmsley, Konstantin; Neal, Doss W; Williams, Phillip E; Cherrington, Alan D

    2002-11-01

    We determined if blocking transmission in the fibers of the vagus nerves would affect basal hepatic glucose metabolism in the 18-h-fasted conscious dog. A pancreatic clamp (somatostatin, basal portal insulin, and glucagon) was employed. A 40-min control period was followed by a 90-min test period. In one group, stainless steel cooling coils (Sham, n = 5) were perfused with a 37 degrees C solution, while in the other (Cool, n = 6), the coils were perfused with -20 degrees C solution. Vagal blockade was verified by heart rate change (80 +/- 9 to 84 +/- 14 beats/min in Sham; 98 +/- 12 to 193 +/- 22 beats/min in Cool). The arterial glucose level was kept euglycemic by glucose infusion. No change in tracer-determined glucose production occurred in Sham, whereas in Cool it dropped significantly (2.4 +/- 0.4 to 1.9 +/- 0.4 mg. kg(-1). min(-1)). Net hepatic glucose output did not change in Sham but decreased from 1.9 +/- 0.3 to 1.3 +/- 0.3 mg. kg(-1). min(-1) in the Cool group. Hepatic gluconeogenesis did not change in either group. These data suggest that vagal blockade acutely modulates hepatic glucose production by inhibiting glycogenolysis.

  2. Basal hepatic glucose production is regulated by the portal vein insulin concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, D K; Chu, C A; Venson, P; Donahue, E P; Neal, D W; Cherrington, A D

    1998-04-01

    The ability of portal vein insulin to control hepatic glucose production (HGP) is debated. The aim of the present study was to determine, therefore, if the liver can respond to a selective decrease in portal vein insulin. Isotopic ([3H]glucose) and arteriovenous difference methods were used to measure HGP in conscious overnight fasted dogs. A pancreatic clamp (somatostatin plus basal portal insulin and glucagon) was used to control the endocrine pancreas. A 40-min control period was followed by a 180-min test period. During the latter, the portal vein insulin level was selectively decreased while the arterial insulin level was not changed. This was accomplished by stopping the portal insulin infusion and giving insulin peripherally at half the basal portal rate (PID, n=5). In a control group (n=5), the portal insulin infusion was not changed and glucose was infused to match the hyperglycemia that occurred in the PID group. A selective decrease of 120 pmol/l in portal vein insulin was achieved (basal, 150+/-36 to last 30 min, 30+/-12 pmol/l) in the absence of a change in the arterial insulin level (basal, 30+/-3 to last 30 min, 36+/-4 pmol/l). Neither arterial nor portal insulin levels changed in the control group (30+/-6 and 126+/-30 pmol/l, respectively). In response to the selective decrease in portal vein insulin, net hepatic glucose output (NHGO) increased significantly, from 8+/-1 (basal) to 30+/-6 and 14+/-2 micromol x kg(-1) x min(-1) by 15 min and the last 30 min (P glycogenolysis. These studies indicate that after an overnight fast, basal HGP (glycogenolysis) is highly sensitive to the hepatic sinusoidal insulin level.

  3. A variant in the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus is associated with increased fasting plasma glucose, increased basal hepatic glucose production and increased insulin release after oral and intravenous glucose loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, C S; Grarup, N; Krarup, N T

    2009-01-01

    to hepatic glucose production during a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Furthermore, we examined rs560887 for association with impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), type 2 diabetes and components of the metabolic syndrome. METHODS: rs560887 was genotyped in the Inter99...... an increased acute insulin response (p = 4 x 10(-4)) during an IVGTT. Among elderly twins, G allele carriers had higher basal hepatic glucose production (p = 0.04). Finally, the G allele associated with the risk of having IFG (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.08-1.47, p = 0.002), but not with IGT (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.......82-1.08, p = 0.4) or type 2 diabetes (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.84-1.04, p = 0.2). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The common rs560887 G allele in the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus is associated with increased fasting glycaemia and increased risk of IFG, associations that may be partly related to an increased basal hepatic glucose...

  4. Autoregulation of hepatic glucose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M C; Connolly, C C; Cherrington, A D

    1998-03-01

    In vitro evidence indicates that the liver responds directly to changes in circulating glucose concentrations with reciprocal changes in glucose production and that this autoregulation plays a role in maintenance of normoglycemia. Under in vivo conditions it is difficult to separate the effects of glucose on neural regulation mediated by the central nervous system from its direct effect on the liver. Nevertheless, it is clear that nonhormonal mechanisms can cause significant changes in net hepatic glucose balance. In response to hyperglycemia, net hepatic glucose output can be decreased by as much as 60-90% by nonhormonal mechanisms. Under conditions in which hepatic glycogen stores are high (i.e. the overnight-fasted state), a decrease in the glycogenolytic rate and an increase in the rate of glucose cycling within the liver appear to be the explanation for the decrease in hepatic glucose output seen in response to hyperglycemia. During more prolonged fasting, when glycogen levels are reduced, a decrease in gluconeogenesis may occur as a part of the nonhormonal response to hyperglycemia. A substantial role for hepatic autoregulation in the response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia is most clearly evident in severe hypoglycemia (glycogenolysis and is capable of supplying enough glucose to meet at least half of the requirement of the brain. The nonhormonal response can include neural signaling, as well as autoregulation. However, even in the absence of the ability to secrete counterregulatory hormones (glucocorticoids, catecholamines, and glucagon), dogs with denervated livers (to interrupt neural pathways between the liver and brain) were able to respond to hypoglycemia with increases in net hepatic glucose output. Thus, even though the endocrine system provides the primary response to changes in glycemia, autoregulation plays an important adjunctive role.

  5. Brain Glucose Metabolism Controls Hepatic Glucose and Lipid Production

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Tony K.T.

    2007-01-01

    Brain glucose-sensing mechanisms are implicated in the regulation of feeding behavior and hypoglycemic-induced hormonal counter-regulation. This commentary discusses recent findings indicating that the brain senses glucose to regulate both hepatic glucose and lipid production.

  6. Alterations in basal glucose metabolism during late pregnancy in the conscious dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, C C; Holste, L C; Aglione, L N; Neal, D W; Lacy, D B; Smith, M S; Diamond, M P; Cherrington, A D; Chiasson, J L

    2000-11-01

    We assessed basal glucose metabolism in 16 female nonpregnant (NP) and 16 late-pregnant (P) conscious, 18-h-fasted dogs that had catheters inserted into the hepatic and portal veins and femoral artery approximately 17 days before the experiment. Pregnancy resulted in lower arterial plasma insulin (11 +/- 1 and 4 +/- 1 microU/ml in NP and P, respectively, P dog is not accompanied by changes in the absolute rates of gluconeogenesis or glycogenolysis. Rather, repartitioning of the glucose released from glycogen is responsible for the increase in hepatic glucose production.

  7. Brain insulin action augments hepatic glycogen synthesis without suppressing glucose production or gluconeogenesis in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Saraswathi, Viswanathan; Smith, Marta S.; Donahue, E. Patrick; Farmer, Ben; Farmer, Tiffany D.; Neal, Doss; Williams, Philip E.; Lautz, Margaret; Mari, Andrea; Cherrington, Alan D.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2011-01-01

    In rodents, acute brain insulin action reduces blood glucose levels by suppressing the expression of enzymes in the hepatic gluconeogenic pathway, thereby reducing gluconeogenesis and endogenous glucose production (EGP). Whether a similar mechanism is functional in large animals, including humans, is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that in canines, physiologic brain hyperinsulinemia brought about by infusion of insulin into the head arteries (during a pancreatic clamp to maintain basal hepatic...

  8. Exogenous amino acids suppress glucose oxidation and potentiate hepatic glucose production in late gestation fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura D; Kohn, Jaden R; Rozance, Paul J; Hay, William W; Wesolowski, Stephanie R

    2017-05-01

    Acute amino acid (AA) infusion increases AA oxidation rates in normal late gestation fetal sheep. Because the fetal oxygen consumption rate does not change with increased AA oxidation, we hypothesized that AA infusion would suppress glucose oxidation pathways and that the additional carbon supply from AA would activate hepatic glucose production. To test this, late gestation fetal sheep were infused intravenously for 3 h with saline or exogenous AA (AA). Glucose tracer metabolic studies were performed and skeletal muscle and liver tissues samples were collected. AA infusion increased fetal arterial plasma branched chain AA, cortisol, and glucagon concentrations. Fetal glucose utilization rates were similar between basal and AA periods, yet the fraction of glucose oxidized and the glucose oxidation rate were decreased by 40% in the AA period. AA infusion increased expression of PDK4 , an inhibitor of glucose oxidation, nearly twofold in muscle and liver. In liver, AA infusion tended to increase PCK1 gluconeogenic gene and PCK1 correlated with plasma cortisol concentrations. AA infusion also increased liver mRNA expression of the lactate transporter gene ( MCT1) , protein expression of GLUT2 and LDHA, and phosphorylation of AMPK, 4EBP1, and S6 proteins. In isolated fetal hepatocytes, AA supplementation increased glucose production and PCK1 , LDHA , and MCT1 gene expression. These results demonstrate that AA infusion into fetal sheep competitively suppresses glucose oxidation and potentiates hepatic glucose production. These metabolic patterns support flexibility in fetal metabolism in response to increased nutrient substrate supply while maintaining a relatively stable rate of oxidative metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Pulsatile hyperglucagonemia fails to increase hepatic glucose production in normal man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paolisso, G.; Scheen, A.J.; Luyckx, A.S.; Lefebvre, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    To study the metabolic effects of pulsatile glucagon administration, six male volunteers were submitted to a 260-min glucose-controlled glucose intravenous infusion using the Biostator. The endogenous secretion of the pancreatic hormones was inhibited by somatostatin, basal insulin secretion was replaced by a continuous insulin infusion, and glucagon was infused intravenously in two conditions at random: either continuously or intermittently. Blood glucose levels and glucose infusion rate were monitored continuously by the Biostator, and classical methodology using a D-[3- 3 H]glucose infusion allowed the authors to study glucose turnover. While basal plasma glucagon levels were similar in both conditions, they plateaued at 189 +/- 38 pg ml -1 during continuous infusion and varied between 95 and 501 pg x ml -1 during pulsatile infusion. When compared with continuous administration, pulsatile glucagon infusion 1) initially induced a similar increase in endogenous (hepatic) glucose production and blood glucose, 2) did not prevent the so-called evanescent effect of glucagon on blood glucose, and 3) after 3 h tended to reduce rather than increase hepatic glucose production. In conclusion, in vivo pulsatile hyperglucanemia in normal man fails to increase hepatic glucose production

  10. Brain insulin action augments hepatic glycogen synthesis without suppressing glucose production or gluconeogenesis in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Saraswathi, Viswanathan; Smith, Marta S.; Donahue, E. Patrick; Farmer, Ben; Farmer, Tiffany D.; Neal, Doss; Williams, Philip E.; Lautz, Margaret; Mari, Andrea; Cherrington, Alan D.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2011-01-01

    In rodents, acute brain insulin action reduces blood glucose levels by suppressing the expression of enzymes in the hepatic gluconeogenic pathway, thereby reducing gluconeogenesis and endogenous glucose production (EGP). Whether a similar mechanism is functional in large animals, including humans, is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that in canines, physiologic brain hyperinsulinemia brought about by infusion of insulin into the head arteries (during a pancreatic clamp to maintain basal hepatic insulin and glucagon levels) activated hypothalamic Akt, altered STAT3 signaling in the liver, and suppressed hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression without altering EGP or gluconeogenesis. Rather, brain hyperinsulinemia slowly caused a modest reduction in net hepatic glucose output (NHGO) that was attributable to increased net hepatic glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. This was associated with decreased levels of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) protein and mRNA and with decreased glycogen synthase phosphorylation, changes that were blocked by hypothalamic PI3K inhibition. Therefore, we conclude that the canine brain senses physiologic elevations in plasma insulin, and that this in turn regulates genetic events in the liver. In the context of basal insulin and glucagon levels at the liver, this input augments hepatic glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, reducing NHGO without altering EGP. PMID:21865644

  11. Brain insulin action augments hepatic glycogen synthesis without suppressing glucose production or gluconeogenesis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnanan, Christopher J; Saraswathi, Viswanathan; Smith, Marta S; Donahue, E Patrick; Farmer, Ben; Farmer, Tiffany D; Neal, Doss; Williams, Philip E; Lautz, Margaret; Mari, Andrea; Cherrington, Alan D; Edgerton, Dale S

    2011-09-01

    In rodents, acute brain insulin action reduces blood glucose levels by suppressing the expression of enzymes in the hepatic gluconeogenic pathway, thereby reducing gluconeogenesis and endogenous glucose production (EGP). Whether a similar mechanism is functional in large animals, including humans, is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that in canines, physiologic brain hyperinsulinemia brought about by infusion of insulin into the head arteries (during a pancreatic clamp to maintain basal hepatic insulin and glucagon levels) activated hypothalamic Akt, altered STAT3 signaling in the liver, and suppressed hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression without altering EGP or gluconeogenesis. Rather, brain hyperinsulinemia slowly caused a modest reduction in net hepatic glucose output (NHGO) that was attributable to increased net hepatic glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. This was associated with decreased levels of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) protein and mRNA and with decreased glycogen synthase phosphorylation, changes that were blocked by hypothalamic PI3K inhibition. Therefore, we conclude that the canine brain senses physiologic elevations in plasma insulin, and that this in turn regulates genetic events in the liver. In the context of basal insulin and glucagon levels at the liver, this input augments hepatic glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, reducing NHGO without altering EGP.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Insulin-Mediated Suppression of Hepatic Glucose Production In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Edgerton, Dale S.; Rivera, Noelia; Irimia-Dominguez, Jose; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss W.; Lautz, Margaret; Donahue, E. Patrick; Meyer, Catalina M.; Roach, Peter J.; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production (HGP) is associated with sensitive intracellular signaling and molecular inhibition of gluconeogenic (GNG) enzyme mRNA expression. We determined, for the first time, the time course and relevance (to metabolic flux) of these molecular events during physiological hyperinsulinemia in vivo in a large animal model. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS 24 h fasted dogs were infused with somatostatin, while insulin (basal or 8× basal) and ...

  13. Abnormal transient rise in hepatic glucose production after oral glucose in non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, A; Litchfield, A; Fabris, S; Proietto, J

    1995-05-01

    A transient rise in hepatic glucose production (HGP) after an oral glucosa load has been reported in some insulin-resistant states such as in obese fa/fa Zucker rats. The aim of this study was to determine whether this rise in HGP also occurs in subjects with established non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Glucose kinetics were measured basally and during a double-label oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 12 NIDDM subjects and 12 non-diabetic 'control' subjects. Twenty minutes after the glucose load, HGP had increased 73% above basal in the NIDDM subjects (7.29 +/- 0.52 to 12.58 +/- 1.86 mumol/kg/min, P < 0.02). A transient rise in glucagon (12 pg/ml above basal, P < 0.004) occurred at a similar time. In contrast, the control subjects showed no rise in HGP or plasma glucagon. HGP began to suppress 40-50 min after the OGTT in both the NIDDM and control subjects. A 27% increase in the rate of gut-derived glucose absorption was also observed in the NIDDM group, which could be the result of increased gut glucose absorption or decreased first pass extraction of glucose by the liver. Therefore, in agreement with data in animal models of NIDDM, a transient rise in HGP partly contributes to the hyperglycemia observed after an oral glucose load in NIDDM subjects.

  14. Underestimation of hepatic glucose production by radioactive and stable tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argoud, G.M.; Schade, D.S.; Eaton, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Although negative hepatic glucose production rates are physiologically impossible, they have been observed when hepatic glucose production is measured with the tracer-dilution technique during the hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic glucose clamp. Because hepatic glucose production is determined from the difference between tracer-derived glucose disposal and the known exogenous glucose infusion rate, the negative values for hepatic glucose production must result from an underestimation of glucose disposal by the tracer technique. In the current investigation, tracer-derived glucose disposal was measured in 25 subjects undergoing hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamps. Glucose disposal was measured with both radioactive and stable isotopes that utilize different methodologies, to determine whether discriminant metabolism of the isotopes versus methodological error leads to underestimation of tracer-derived glucose disposal. Both the radioactive and stable methodologies underestimated the exogenous glucose infusion rate during the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp by 27 and 17%, respectively. Mean hepatic glucose production was -2.1 +/- 0.2 and -1.3 +/- 0.2 mg X kg-1 X min-1 as determined by the radioactive and stable isotope methodologies, respectively. Methodological error was an unlikely cause of this underestimation because it occurred with two different methodologies. The most likely explanation for underestimated rates of glucose disposal determined by the two types of isotope methodologies is discrepant metabolism of glucose tracers in comparison with unlabeled glucose

  15. Impaired basal glucose effectiveness but unaltered fasting glucose release and gluconeogenesis during short-term hypercortisolemia in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael F; Caumo, Andrea; Chandramouli, Visvanathan

    2004-01-01

    with hydrocortisone or saline. Glucose effectiveness was assessed by a combined somatostatin and insulin infusion protocol to maintain insulin concentration at basal level in the presence of prandial glucose infusions. Despite elevated insulin concentrations (P ... basal insulin concentrations were higher during hydrocortisone than during saline infusion (P

  16. Control of hepatic glucose output by glucagon and insulin in the intact dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherrington, A D; Chiasson, J L; Liljenquist, J E; Lacy, W W; Park, C R

    1978-01-01

    The regulation of hepatic glucose production by glucagon and insulin has been studied in the intact dog. An attempt has been made to evaluate the role of basal physiological concentrations of the hormones in the regulation of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. Somatostatin was infused continuously into postabsorptive dogs to inhibit the secretion of both glucagon and insulin. Either or both hormones were then replaced intraportally by continuous infusion as desired. The main observations were as follows. (1) When both hormones were simultaneously replaced for periods up to 4.5h, plasma insulin and glucagon concentrations, total glucose output (glycogenolysis plus gluconeogenesis), glucose utilization and the plasma glucose concentration closely matched the same parameters in 0.9% NaCl-infused controls. (2) When glucagon alone was infused, thereby creating a selective insulin deficiency, glucose output (primarily glycogenolysis) rapidly increased by as much as threefold. Glycogenolytic glucose production then fell off progressively and returned to the control value within 4h. The gluconeogenic conversion of [14C]alanine and [14C]lactate into [14C]glucose was stimulated markedly and increased progressively throughout the test period. Glucagon therefore converted the liver from an organ largely dependent on glycogenolysis for glucose production to one heavily dependent on gluconeogenesis. The potent inhibitory effect of basal insulin on postabsorptive glucose output was also clearly apparent. (3) When insulin alone was infused, thereby creating a selective glucagon deficiency, glucose output (glycogenolysis) fell abruptly by about 30% and remained decreased. Gluconeogenesis also decreased (20%) after the selective removal of both insulin and glucagon, but it only remained suppressed for 1h. The low glucose output led to a modest fall in the blood glucose concentration. Thus glucagon plays an important role in maintaining basal glucose production. (4) When insulin was

  17. Hepatic carboxylesterase 1 is induced by glucose and regulates postprandial glucose levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiesi Xu

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome, characterized by obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension, increases the risks for cardiovascular disease, diabetes and stroke. Carboxylesterase 1 (CES1 is an enzyme that hydrolyzes triglycerides and cholesterol esters, and is important for lipid metabolism. Our previous data show that over-expression of mouse hepatic CES1 lowers plasma glucose levels and improves insulin sensitivity in diabetic ob/ob mice. In the present study, we determined the physiological role of hepatic CES1 in glucose homeostasis. Hepatic CES1 expression was reduced by fasting but increased in diabetic mice. Treatment of mice with glucose induced hepatic CES1 expression. Consistent with the in vivo study, glucose stimulated CES1 promoter activity and increased acetylation of histone 3 and histone 4 in the CES1 chromatin. Knockdown of ATP-citrate lyase (ACL, an enzyme that regulates histone acetylation, abolished glucose-mediated histone acetylation in the CES1 chromatin and glucose-induced hepatic CES1 expression. Finally, knockdown of hepatic CES1 significantly increased postprandial blood glucose levels. In conclusion, the present study uncovers a novel glucose-CES1-glucose pathway which may play an important role in regulating postprandial blood glucose levels.

  18. Increased basal glucose production in type 1 Gaucher's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corssmit, E. P.; Hollak, C. E.; Endert, E.; van Oers, M. H.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Romijn, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the metabolic effects of Gaucher's disease, glucose metabolism and parameters of fat metabolism were studied by indirect calorimetry and primed continuous infusion of [3-3H]glucose in seven clinically stable untreated patients with type 1 Gaucher's disease and in seven healthy matched

  19. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27144291

  20. The GLP-1 Analogue Exenatide Improves Hepatic and Muscle Insulin Sensitivity in Diabetic Rats: Tracer Studies in the Basal State and during Hyperinsulinemic-Euglycemic Clamp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 analogues (e.g., exenatide increase insulin secretion in diabetes but less is known about their effects on glucose production or insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. Methods. Four groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: nondiabetic (control, C; nondiabetic + exenatide (C + E; diabetic (D; diabetic + exenatide (D + E with diabetes induced by streptozotocin and high fat diet. Infusion of 3-3H-glucose and U-13C-glycerol was used to measure basal rates of appearance (Ra of glucose and glycerol and gluconeogenesis from glycerol (GNG. During hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, glucose uptake into gastrocnemius muscles was measured with 2-deoxy-D-14C-glucose. Results. In the diabetic rats, exenatide reduced the basal Ra of glucose (P<0.01 and glycerol (P<0.01 and GNG (P<0.001. During the clamp, Ra of glucose was also reduced, whereas the rate of disappearance of glucose increased and there was increased glucose uptake into muscle (P<0.01 during the clamp. In the nondiabetic rats, exenatide had no effect. Conclusion. In addition to its known effects on insulin secretion, administration of the GLP-1 analogue, exenatide, is associated with increased inhibition of gluconeogenesis and improved glucose uptake into muscle in diabetic rats, implying improved hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  1. Control of Hepatic Glucose Metabolism by Islet and Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Jennifer M.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of hepatic glucose uptake (HGU) and inability of insulin to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP), both contribute to hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Growing evidence suggests that insulin can inhibit HGP not only through a direct effect on the liver, but also via a mechanism involving the brain. Yet the notion that insulin action in the brain plays a physiological role in the control of HGP continues to be controversial. Although studies in dogs suggest that the direct hepatic effect of insulin is sufficient to explain day-to-day control of HGP, a surprising outcome has been revealed by recent studies in mice investigating whether the direct hepatic action of insulin is necessary for normal HGP: when hepatic insulin signaling pathway was genetically disrupted, HGP was maintained normally even in the absence of direct input from insulin. Here we present evidence that points to a potentially important role of the brain in the physiological control of both HGU and HGP in response to input from insulin as well as other hormones and nutrients. PMID:25200294

  2. Sugarcoated Isolation: Evidence that Social Avoidance is Linked to Higher Basal Glucose Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsachi eEin-Dor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The human brain adjusts its level of effort in coping with various life stressors as a partial function of perceived access to social resources. We examined whether people who avoid social ties maintain a higher fasting basal level of glucose in their bloodstream, reflecting a strategy to draw more on personal resources when threatened.Methods: For Study 1, we obtained fasting blood glucose and adult attachment orientations data from 60 undergraduate women at the University of Virginia. For Study 2, we collected measures of fasting blood glucose, self-reported trait anxiety, DHEA-cortisol, hypertension, and adult attachment orientations from 285 older adults of mixed gender, using a measure of attachment style different from study 1.Results: In study 1, fasting blood glucose levels corresponded with higher attachment avoidance scores after statistically adjusting for interpersonal anxiety. For study 2, fasting blood glucose continued to correspond with higher adult attachment avoidance even after statistically adjusting for interpersonal anxiety, trait anxiety, DHEA-cortisol and hypertension. Conclusions: Results suggest socially avoidant individuals upwardly adjust their basal glucose levels with the expectation of increased personal effort because of limited access to social resources.

  3. Interaction Between the Central and Peripheral Effects of Insulin in Controlling Hepatic Glucose Metabolism in the Conscious Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Kraft, Guillaume; Smith, Marta S.; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Williams, Phillip E.; Lautz, Margaret; Farmer, Tiffany; Donahue, E. Patrick; Cherrington, Alan D.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of hypothalamic insulin action to the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in the presence of a normal liver/brain insulin ratio (3:1) is unknown. Thus, we assessed the role of central insulin action in the response of the liver to normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia over 4 h. Using a pancreatic clamp, hepatic portal vein insulin delivery was increased three- or eightfold in the conscious dog. Insulin action was studied in the presence or absence of intracerebroventricularly mediated blockade of hypothalamic insulin action. Euglycemia was maintained, and glucagon was clamped at basal. Both the molecular and metabolic aspects of insulin action were assessed. Blockade of hypothalamic insulin signaling did not alter the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic gluconeogenic gene transcription but blunted the induction of glucokinase gene transcription and completely blocked the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β gene transcription. Thus, central and peripheral insulin action combined to control some, but not other, hepatic enzyme programs. Nevertheless, inhibition of hypothalamic insulin action did not alter the effects of the hormone on hepatic glucose flux (production or uptake). These data indicate that brain insulin action is not a determinant of the rapid (<4 h) inhibition of hepatic glucose metabolism caused by normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia in this large animal model. PMID:23011594

  4. Control of Hepatic Glucose Metabolism by the Oral Hypoglycemic Sulfonylureas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-11

    observed were specific for the hypo- glycemic sulfonylureas and could not be extended to Include other para-substltuted sulfonamides. The inhibition...tolbutamide in glucose-free medium (Kaldor and Pogasta, 1960). In vivo measurements in dogs (Shambye and Tarding, 1957) and man (Recant and Fischer, 1957) of...accepted as the most appropriate model for the study of hepatic carbohydrate metabolism. 2) The evaluation of ̂ vitro potencies of the sulfonylureas in

  5. SREBP-1c regulates glucose-stimulated hepatic clusterin expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gukhan; Kim, Geun Hyang; Oh, Gyun-Sik; Yoon, Jin; Kim, Hae Won; Kim, Min-Seon; Kim, Seung-Whan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This is the first report to show nutrient-regulated clusterin expression. → Clusterin expression in hepatocytes was increased by high glucose concentration. → SREBP-1c is directly involved in the transcriptional activation of clusterin by glucose. → This glucose-stimulated activation process is mediated through tandem E-box motifs. -- Abstract: Clusterin is a stress-response protein that is involved in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, tissue differentiation, inflammation, and lipid transport. Its expression is upregulated in a broad spectrum of diverse pathological states. Clusterin was recently reported to be associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and their sequelae. However, the regulation of clusterin expression by metabolic signals was not addressed. In this study we evaluated the effects of glucose on hepatic clusterin expression. Interestingly, high glucose concentrations significantly increased clusterin expression in primary hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines, but the conventional promoter region of the clusterin gene did not respond to glucose stimulation. In contrast, the first intronic region was transcriptionally activated by high glucose concentrations. We then defined a glucose response element (GlRE) of the clusterin gene, showing that it consists of two E-box motifs separated by five nucleotides and resembles carbohydrate response element (ChoRE). Unexpectedly, however, these E-box motifs were not activated by ChoRE binding protein (ChREBP), but were activated by sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). Furthermore, we found that glucose induced recruitment of SREBP-1c to the E-box of the clusterin gene intronic region. Taken together, these results suggest that clusterin expression is increased by glucose stimulation, and SREBP-1c plays a crucial role in the metabolic regulation of clusterin.

  6. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  7. Glucose absorption, hormonal release and hepatic metabolism after guar gum ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes Nunes, C.; Malmlof, K.

    1992-01-01

    Six non-anaesthetized Large White pigs (mean body weight 59 +/- 1.7 kg) were fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, the brachiocephalic artery and the right hepatic vein and with electromagnetic flow probes around the portal vein and the hepatic artery. The animals were provided a basal none-fibre diet (diet A) alone or together with 6% guar gum (diet B) or 15% purified cellulose (diet C). The diets were given for 1 week and according to a replicated 3 x 3 latin-square design. On the last day of each adaptation period test meals of 800 g were given prior to blood sampling. The sampling was continued for 8 h. Guar gum strongly reduced the glucose absorption as well as the insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) production. However, the reduction in peripheral blood insulin levels caused by guar gum was not associated with a change in hepatic insulin extraction. IGF-1 appeared to be strongly produced by the gut. The liver had a net uptake of the peptide. Ingestion of guar gum increased the hepatic extraction coefficient of gut produced IGF-1. Guar gum ingestion also appeared to decrease pancreatic glucagon secretion. Cellulose at the level consumed had very little effect on the parameters considered. It is suggested that the modulation of intestinal mechanisms by guar gum was sufficient to mediate the latter internal metabolic effects.

  8. Hepatic glucose sensing via the CREB coactivator CRTC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentin, Renaud; Hedrick, Susan; Xie, Jianxin; Yates, John; Montminy, Marc

    2008-03-07

    Chronic hyperglycemia contributes to the development of diabetes-associated complications. Increases in the concentration of circulating glucose activate the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) and promote the O-glycosylation of proteins by O-glycosyl transferase (OGT). We show that OGT triggered hepatic gluconeogenesis through the O-glycosylation of the transducer of regulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) 2 (TORC2 or CRTC2). CRTC2 was O-glycosylated at sites that normally sequester CRTC2 in the cytoplasm through a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism. Decreasing amounts of O-glycosylated CRTC2 by expression of the deglycosylating enzyme O-GlcNAcase blocked effects of glucose on gluconeogenesis, demonstrating the importance of the HBP in the development of glucose intolerance.

  9. Hepatic glucose output in humans measured with labeled glucose to reduce negative errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, J.C.; Brown, G.; Matthews, D.R.; Turner, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Steele and others have suggested that minimizing changes in glucose specific activity when estimating hepatic glucose output (HGO) during glucose infusions could reduce non-steady-state errors. This approach was assessed in nondiabetic and type II diabetic subjects during constant low dose [27 mumol.kg ideal body wt (IBW)-1.min-1] glucose infusion followed by a 12 mmol/l hyperglycemic clamp. Eight subjects had paired tests with and without labeled infusions. Labeled infusion was used to compare HGO in 11 nondiabetic and 15 diabetic subjects. Whereas unlabeled infusions produced negative values for endogenous glucose output, labeled infusions largely eliminated this error and reduced the dependence of the Steele model on the pool fraction in the paired tests. By use of labeled infusions, 11 nondiabetic subjects suppressed HGO from 10.2 +/- 0.6 (SE) fasting to 0.8 +/- 0.9 mumol.kg IBW-1.min-1 after 90 min of glucose infusion and to -1.9 +/- 0.5 mumol.kg IBW-1.min-1 after 90 min of a 12 mmol/l glucose clamp, but 15 diabetic subjects suppressed only partially from 13.0 +/- 0.9 fasting to 5.7 +/- 1.2 at the end of the glucose infusion and 5.6 +/- 1.0 mumol.kg IBW-1.min-1 in the clamp (P = 0.02, 0.002, and less than 0.001, respectively)

  10. Deletion of hepatic carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP impairs glucose homeostasis and hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Jois

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Overall, hepatic ChREBP is protective in regards to hepatic insulin sensitivity and whole body glucose homeostasis. Hepatic ChREBP action can influence other peripheral tissues and is likely essential in coordinating the body's response to different feeding states.

  11. Sortilin 1 knockout alters basal adipose glucose metabolism but not diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jibiao; Matye, David J; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Tiangang

    2017-04-01

    Sortilin 1 (Sort1) is a trafficking receptor that has been implicated in the regulation of plasma cholesterol in humans and mice. Here, we use metabolomics and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp approaches to obtain further understanding of the in vivo effects of Sort1 deletion on diet-induced obesity as well as on adipose lipid and glucose metabolism. Results show that Sort1 knockout (KO) does not affect Western diet-induced obesity nor adipose fatty acid and ceramide concentrations. Under the basal fasting state, chow-fed Sort1 KO mice have decreased adipose glycolytic metabolites, but Sort1 deletion does not affect insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake during the insulin clamp. These results suggest that Sort1 loss-of-function in vivo does not affect obesity development, but differentially modulates adipose glucose metabolism under fasting and insulin-stimulated states. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Activation of Basal Gluconeogenesis by Coactivator p300 Maintains Hepatic Glycogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jia; Meng, Shumei; Ma, Anlin; Radovick, Sally; Wondisford, Fredric E.

    2013-01-01

    Because hepatic glycogenolysis maintains euglycemia during early fasting, proper hepatic glycogen synthesis in the fed/postprandial states is critical. It has been known for decades that gluconeogenesis is essential for hepatic glycogen synthesis; however, the molecular mechanism remains unknown. In this report, we show that depletion of hepatic p300 reduces glycogen synthesis, decreases hepatic glycogen storage, and leads to relative hypoglycemia. We previously reported that insulin suppressed gluconeogenesis by phosphorylating cAMP response element binding protein-binding protein (CBP) at S436 and disassembling the cAMP response element-binding protein-CBP complex. However, p300, which is closely related to CBP, lacks the corresponding S436 phosphorylation site found on CBP. In a phosphorylation-competent p300G422S knock-in mouse model, we found that mutant mice exhibited reduced hepatic glycogen content and produced significantly less glycogen in a tracer incorporation assay in the postprandial state. Our study demonstrates the important and unique role of p300 in glycogen synthesis through maintaining basal gluconeogenesis. PMID:23770612

  13. Molecular characterization of insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnanan, Christopher J; Edgerton, Dale S; Rivera, Noelia; Irimia-Dominguez, Jose; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss W; Lautz, Margaret; Donahue, E Patrick; Meyer, Catalina M; Roach, Peter J; Cherrington, Alan D

    2010-06-01

    Insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production (HGP) is associated with sensitive intracellular signaling and molecular inhibition of gluconeogenic (GNG) enzyme mRNA expression. We determined, for the first time, the time course and relevance (to metabolic flux) of these molecular events during physiological hyperinsulinemia in vivo in a large animal model. 24 h fasted dogs were infused with somatostatin, while insulin (basal or 8 x basal) and glucagon (basal) were replaced intraportally. Euglycemia was maintained and glucose metabolism was assessed using tracer, (2)H(2)O, and arterio-venous difference techniques. Studies were terminated at different time points to evaluate insulin signaling and enzyme regulation in the liver. Hyperinsulinemia reduced HGP due to a rapid transition from net glycogen breakdown to synthesis, which was associated with an increase in glycogen synthase and a decrease in glycogen phosphorylase activity. Thirty minutes of hyperinsulinemia resulted in an increase in phospho-FOXO1, a decrease in GNG enzyme mRNA expression, an increase in F2,6P(2), a decrease in fat oxidation, and a transient decrease in net GNG flux. Net GNG flux was restored to basal by 4 h, despite a substantial reduction in PEPCK protein, as gluconeogenically-derived carbon was redirected from lactate efflux to glycogen deposition. In response to acute physiologic hyperinsulinemia, 1) HGP is suppressed primarily through modulation of glycogen metabolism; 2) a transient reduction in net GNG flux occurs and is explained by increased glycolysis resulting from increased F2,6P(2) and decreased fat oxidation; and 3) net GNG flux is not ultimately inhibited by the rise in insulin, despite eventual reduction in PEPCK protein, supporting the concept that PEPCK has poor control strength over the gluconeogenic pathway in vivo.

  14. Chronic levodopa treatment alters basal and dopamine agonist-stimulated cerebral glucose utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engber, T.M.; Susel, Z.; Kuo, S.; Chase, T.N. (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-12-01

    The effect of chronic levodopa administration on the functional activity of the basal ganglia and its output regions was evaluated by means of the 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) autoradiographic technique in rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway. The rates of local cerebral glucose utilization were studied under basal conditions as well as in response to challenge with a selective D1 or D2 dopamine-receptor agonist. Levodopa (100 mg/kg/d, i.p.) was administered for 19 d either continuously via infusion with an osmotic pump or intermittently by twice-daily injections. Following a 3-d washout, glucose utilization was found to be decreased by both levodopa regimens in the nucleus accumbens; intermittent levodopa also decreased glucose utilization in the entopeduncular nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, ventrolateral thalamus, ventromedial thalamus, ventroposterolateral thalamus, and lateral habenula. In control (lesioned and treated chronically with saline) rats, the D1 agonist SKF 38393 (5 mg/kg, i.v.) increased 2-DG uptake in the substantia nigra pars reticulata and entopeduncular nucleus ipsilateral to the lesion by 84% and 56%, respectively. Both continuous and intermittent levodopa blunted the SKF 38393-induced elevation in glucose metabolism in the substantia nigra pars reticulata, while intermittent levodopa also attenuated the increase in the entopeduncular nucleus. The D2 agonist quinpirole (0.4 mg/kg, i.v.) did not increase glucose utilization in any brain region in control animals; following intermittent levodopa treatment, however, quinpirole increased 2-DG uptake by 64% in the subthalamic nucleus and by 39% in the deep layers of the superior colliculus on the ipsilateral side.

  15. ARAP2 promotes GLUT1-mediated basal glucose uptake through regulation of sphingolipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Aditi; Håversen, Liliana; Mobini, Reza; Andersson, Linda; Ståhlman, Marcus; Lu, Emma; Rutberg, Mikael; Fogelstrand, Per; Ekroos, Kim; Mardinoglu, Adil; Levin, Malin; Perkins, Rosie; Borén, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Lipid droplet formation, which is driven by triglyceride synthesis, requires several droplet-associated proteins. We identified ARAP2 (an ADP-ribosylation factor 6 GTPase-activating protein) in the lipid droplet proteome of NIH-3T3 cells and showed that knockdown of ARAP2 resulted in decreased lipid droplet formation and triglyceride synthesis. We also showed that ARAP2 knockdown did not affect fatty acid uptake but reduced basal glucose uptake, total levels of the glucose transporter GLUT1, and GLUT1 levels in the plasma membrane and the lipid micro-domain fraction (a specialized plasma membrane domain enriched in sphingolipids). Microarray analysis showed that ARAP2 knockdown altered expression of genes involved in sphingolipid metabolism. Because sphingolipids are known to play a key role in cell signaling, we performed lipidomics to further investigate the relationship between ARAP2 and sphingolipids and potentially identify a link with glucose uptake. We found that ARAP2 knockdown increased glucosylceramide and lactosylceramide levels without affecting ceramide levels, and thus speculated that the rate-limiting enzyme in glycosphingolipid synthesis, namely glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), could be modified by ARAP2. In agreement with our hypothesis, we showed that the activity of GCS was increased by ARAP2 knockdown and reduced by ARAP2 overexpression. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of GCS resulted in increases in basal glucose uptake, total GLUT1 levels, triglyceride biosynthesis from glucose, and lipid droplet formation, indicating that the effects of GCS inhibition are the opposite to those resulting from ARAP2 knockdown. Taken together, our data suggest that ARAP2 promotes lipid droplet formation by modifying sphingolipid metabolism through GCS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Relative contribution of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis to basal, glucagon- and nerve stimulation-dependent glucose output in the perfused liver from fed and fasted rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, U.; JUNGERMANN, K.

    1990-01-01

    The relative contribution to basal, glucagon- and nerve stimulation-enhanced glucose output of glycogenolysis (glucose output in the presence of the gluconeogenic inhibitor mercaptopicolinate) and gluconeogenesis (difference in glucose output in the absence and presence of the inhibitor) was

  17. Correlation between endogenous noradrenaline and glucose released from the liver upon hepatic sympathetic nerve stimulation in anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garceau, D; Yamaguchi, N; Goyer, R; Guitard, F

    1984-09-01

    The metabolic role of neurally released noradrenaline (NA) was studied in the liver of anesthetized dogs. Sustained stimulation with various frequencies was directly applied on the anterior plexus of hepatic nerves. Stimulation-induced changes in plasma concentrations of endogenous catecholamines in hepatic venous blood were determined in correlation with concomitant changes in those of glucose (GL). Mean basal values for hepatic venous NA, adrenaline, dopamine, and GL were 0.062, 0.022, 0.032 ng/mL, and 97.9 mg%, respectively. Among these catecholamines, NA was the only one being released significantly during stimulation. While hepatic venous NA increased rapidly during stimulation, being maximum within 3 min, hepatic venous GL increased gradually, reaching a maximum value 5 min after the onset of stimulation. A highly significant correlation (r = 0.90, P less than 0.001) was found between changes in hepatic venous NA and GL concentrations observed during stimulation at various frequencies (2-16 Hz). However, hepatic vasoconstricting responses to stimulation were not correlated with increased hepatic venous GL. An alpha-blockade with phentolamine (2 mg/kg, iv) resulted in diminished release of GL by approximately 50% (P less than 0.05) and reduced hepatic arterial vasoconstriction by approximately 47% (P less than 0.01) upon stimulation (8 Hz, 5 min), even though NA release was markedly enhanced. We conclude that in the dog, NA is the sole catecholamine released within the liver in response to direct hepatic nerve stimulation, and NA thus released mediates the hepatic glycogenolysis via alpha-adrenoceptors.

  18. A randomized clinical trial comparing the effect of basal insulin and inhaled mealtime insulin on glucose variability and oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegelaar, S. E.; Kulik, W.; van Lenthe, H.; Mukherjee, R.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; DeVries, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the effect of three times daily mealtime inhaled insulin therapy compared with once daily basal insulin glargine therapy on 72-h glucose profiles, glucose variability and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetes patients. In an inpatient crossover study, 40 subjects with type 2 diabetes were

  19. Glucose abnormalities in Asian patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Q

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Qingyan Bo,1 Roberto Orsenigo,2 Junyi Wang,1 Louis Griffel,3 Clifford Brass3 1Beijing Novartis Pharma Co. Ltd., Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 3Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA Abstract: Many studies have demonstrated a potential association between type 2 diabetes (T2D and hepatitis C virus infection in Western countries, while similar evidence is limited in Asia. We compared the prevalence of glucose abnormalities (impaired fasting glucose [IFG] and T2D and their risk factors between Asian and non-Asian chronic hepatitis C (CHC patients, and evaluated whether glucose abnormalities impacted the viral responses to peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment (current standard of care in most Asian countries. This study retrospectively analyzed data of 1,887 CHC patients from three Phase II/III studies with alisporivir (DEB025 as treatment for CHC. The chi-square test was used to compare the prevalence of IFG/T2D between Asian and non-Asian CHC patients, and logistic regression was used to adjust for sex, age, and cirrhosis status. Risk factors for IFG/T2D were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. Our results indicated that the prevalence of IFG/T2D was high in both Asian and non-Asian CHC patients (23.0% vs 20.9%, and no significant difference was found between these two populations (adjusted odds ratio: 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.7; P=0.08. Age, sex, and cirrhosis status were risk factors for IFG/T2D in both populations, while body mass index was positively associated with IFG/T2D in non-Asian but not in Asian participants. No significant differences in sustained virological response rates were seen between patients with normal fasting glucose and patients with IFG/T2D for both populations. These results demonstrate that the prevalence of glucose abnormalities in Asian CHC patients was similar to that in non-Asians, and glucose abnormalities had

  20. Interaction of free fatty acids and epinephrine in regulating hepatic glucose production in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chang An; Galassetti, Pietro; Igawa, Kayano; Sindelar, Dana K; Neal, Doss W; Burish, Mark; Cherrington, Alan D

    2003-02-01

    To determine the effects of an increase in lipolysis on the glycogenolytic effect of epinephrine (EPI), the catecholamine was infused portally into 18-h-fasted conscious dogs maintained on a pancreatic clamp in the presence [portal (Po)-EPI+FFA, n = 6] and absence (Po-EPI+SAL, n = 6) of peripheral Intralipid infusion. Control groups with high glucose (70% increase) and free fatty acid (FFA; 200% increase; HG+FFA, n = 6) and high glucose alone (HG+SAL, n = 6) were also included. Hepatic sinusoidal EPI levels were elevated (Delta 568 +/- 77 and Delta 527 +/- 37 pg/ml, respectively) in Po-EPI+SAL and EPI+FFA but remained basal in HG+FFA and HG+SAL. Arterial plasma FFA increased from 613 +/- 73 to 1,633 +/- 101 and 746 +/- 112 to 1,898 +/- 237 micromol/l in Po-EPI+FFA and HG+FFA but did not change in EPI+SAL or HG+SAL. Net hepatic glycogenolysis increased from 1.5 +/- 0.3 to 3.1 +/- 0.4 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) (P glycogenolysis decreased from 1.7 +/- 0.2 to 0.9 +/- 0.2 and 1.6 +/- 0.2 to 0.7 +/- 0.2 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) by 30 min in HG+FFA and HG+SAL. Hepatic gluconeogenic flux to glucose 6-phosphate increased from 0.6 +/- 0.1 to 1.2 +/- 0.1 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) (P < 0.05; by 3 h) and 0.7 +/- 0.1 to 1.6 +/- 0.1 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) (P < 0.05; at 90 min) in HG+FFA and Po-EPI+FFA. The gluconeogenic parameters remained unchanged in the Po-EPI+SAL and HG+SAL groups. In conclusion, increased FFA markedly changed the mechanism by which EPI stimulated hepatic glucose production, suggesting that its overall lipolytic effect may be important in determining its effect on the liver.

  1. Interaction of glucagon and epinephrine in the control of hepatic glucose production in the conscious dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavson, Stephanie M; Chu, Chang An; Nishizawa, Makoto; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Yang, Ying; Donahue, E Patrick; Flakoll, Paul; Cherrington, Alan D

    2003-04-01

    Epinephrine increases net hepatic glucose output (NHGO) mainly via increased gluconeogenesis, whereas glucagon increases NHGO mainly via increased glycogenolysis. The aim of the present study was to determine how the two hormones interact in controlling glucose production. In 18-h-fasted conscious dogs, a pancreatic clamp initially fixed insulin and glucagon at basal levels, following which one of four protocols was instituted. In G + E, glucagon (1.5 ng x kg(-1) x min(-1); portally) and epinephrine (50 ng x kg(-1) x min(-1); peripherally) were increased; in G, glucagon was increased alone; in E, epinephrine was increased alone; and in C, neither was increased. In G, E, and C, glucose was infused to match the hyperglycemia seen in G + E ( approximately 250 mg/dl). The areas under the curve for the increase in NHGO, after the change in C was subtracted, were as follows: G = 661 +/- 185, E = 424 +/- 158, G + E = 1178 +/- 57 mg/kg. Therefore, the overall effects of the two hormones on NHGO were additive. Additionally, glucagon exerted its full glycogenolytic effect, whereas epinephrine exerted its full gluconeogenic effect, such that both processes increased significantly during concurrent hormone administration.

  2. Effect of basal ganglia calcification on its glucose metabolism and dopaminergic function in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Sagar; Arora, Geetanjali; Bal, Chandra Shekhar; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Kailash, Suparna; Sagar, Rajesh; Goswami, Ravinder

    2015-10-01

    The functional significance of basal ganglia calcification (BGC) in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (IH) is not clear. To assess the effect of BGC on glucose metabolism and dopaminergic function in IH. (18) F-FDG and (99m) Tc-TRODAT-1 nuclear imaging were performed in 35 IH patients with (n = 26) and without (n = 9) BGC. Controls were subjects without hypoparathyroidism or BGC (nine for (18) F-FDG and 12 for (99m) Tc-TRODAT-1). Relationship of the glucose metabolism and dopaminergic function was assessed with the neuropsychological and biochemical abnormalities. (18) F-FDG uptake in IH patients with calcification at caudate and striatum was less than that of IH patients without calcification (1·06 ± 0·13 vs 1·24 ± 0·09, P = basal ganglia was comparable between IH with and without BGC and between IH without BGC and controls. Serum calcium-phosphorus ratio maintained by the patients correlated with (18) F-FDG uptake at striatum (r = 0·57, P = 0·001). For every 0·1 unit reduction in calcium-phosphorus ratio, (18) F-FDG uptake decreased by 2·5 ± 0·68% (P = 0·001). BGC was associated with modest reduction (15%) in (18) F-FDG uptake at basal ganglia in IH but did not affect dopaminergic function. (18) F-FDG uptake did not correlate with neuropsychological dysfunctions. Interestingly, chronic hypocalcaemia-hyperphosphataemia also contributed to reduction in (18) F-FDG uptake which was independent of BGC. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Dual role of the coactivator TORC2 in modulating hepatic glucose output and insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canettieri, Gianluca; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Berdeaux, Rebecca; Heredia, Jose; Hedrick, Susan; Zhang, Xinmin; Montminy, Marc

    2005-11-01

    Under fasting conditions, the cAMP-responsive CREB coactivator TORC2 promotes glucose homeostasis by stimulating the gluconeogenic program in liver. Following its nuclear translocation in response to elevations in circulating glucagon, TORC2 regulates hepatic gene expression via an association with CREB on relevant promoters. Here, we show that, in parallel with their effects on glucose output, CREB and TORC2 also enhance insulin signaling in liver by stimulating expression of the insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) gene. The induction of hepatic IRS2 during fasting appears critical for glucose homeostasis; knockdown of hepatic IRS2 expression leads to glucose intolerance, whereas hepatic IRS2 overexpression attenuates the gluconeogenic program and reduces fasting glucose levels. By stimulating the expression of IRS2 in conjunction with gluconeogenic genes, the CREB:TORC2 pathway thus triggers a feedback response that limits glucose output from the liver during fasting.

  4. The effect of an acute elevation of NEFA concentrations on glucagon-stimulated hepatic glucose output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett-Grueter, Carrie; Edgerton, Dale S; Donahue, E Patrick; Vaughan, Suzan; Chu, Chang An; Sindelar, Dana K; Cherrington, Alan D

    2006-09-01

    To determine the effect of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) on glucagon action, glucagon was infused intraportally (1.65 ng.min(-1).kg(-1)) for 3 h into 18-h-fasted, pancreatic-clamped conscious dogs in the presence [NEFA + glucagon (GGN)] or absence (GGN) of peripheral Intralipid plus heparin infusion. Additionally, hyperglycemic (HG), hyperglycemic-hyperlipidemic (NEFA + HG), and glycerol plus glucagon (GLYC + GGN) controls were studied. Arterial plasma glucagon concentrations rose equally in GGN, NEFA + GGN, and GLYC + GGN but remained basal in hyperglycemic controls. Peripheral infusions of Intralipid and heparin increased arterial plasma NEFA concentrations equally in NEFA + GGN and NEFA + HG and did not change in other protocols. After 15 min, glucagon infusion resulted in a rapid, brief increase in net hepatic glycogenolysis (NHGLY, mg.min(-1).kg(-1)) of approximately 6.0 in GGN and GLYC + GGN but only increased by 3.8 +/- 1.3 in NEFA + GGN. Thus increases in NHGLY, and consequently net hepatic glucose output (NHGO), were blunted by 40%, with no difference between the groups in the last 2.5 h of the study. NHGO and NHGLY did not significantly change in HG and NEFA + HG. Net hepatic gluconeogenic flux did not change in GGN, GLYC + GGN, or HG. However, Intralipid and heparin infusion resulted in similar increases in net hepatic gluconeogenic flux in NEFA + GGN and NEFA + HG. Thus elevated NEFA limit the initial increase in glucagon-stimulated HGO by blunting glycogenolysis, without having any effect on the gluconeogenic or glycogenolytic contributions or NHGO thereafter.

  5. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Deficits Reduce Glucose Metabolism and Function of Cholinergic and GABAergic Systems in the Cingulate Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da Un; Oh, Jin Hwan; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Jihyeon; Cho, Zang Hee; Chang, Jin Woo; Chang, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Reduced brain glucose metabolism and basal forebrain cholinergic neuron degeneration are common features of Alzheimer's disease and have been correlated with memory function. Although regions representing glucose hypometabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease are targets of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, the interaction between cholinergic denervation and glucose hypometabolism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate glucose metabolism changes caused by cholinergic deficits. We lesioned basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in rats using 192 immunoglobulin G-saporin. After 3 weeks, lesioned animals underwent water maze testing or were analyzed by ¹⁸F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. During water maze probe testing, performance of the lesioned group decreased with respect to time spent in the target quadrant and platform zone. Cingulate cortex glucose metabolism in the lesioned group decreased, compared with the normal group. Additionally, acetylcholinesterase activity and glutamate decarboxylase 65/67 expression declined in the cingulate cortex. Our results reveal that spatial memory impairment in animals with selective basal forebrain cholinergic neuron damage is associated with a functional decline in the GABAergic and cholinergic system associated with cingulate cortex glucose hypometabolism.

  6. Sulforaphane reduces hepatic glucose production and improves glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Annika S; Tubbs, Emily; Mecham, Brig; Chacko, Shaji; Nenonen, Hannah A; Tang, Yunzhao; Fahey, Jed W; Derry, Jonathan M J; Wollheim, Claes B; Wierup, Nils; Haymond, Morey W; Friend, Stephen H; Mulder, Hindrik; Rosengren, Anders H

    2017-06-14

    A potentially useful approach for drug discovery is to connect gene expression profiles of disease-affected tissues ("disease signatures") to drug signatures, but it remains to be shown whether it can be used to identify clinically relevant treatment options. We analyzed coexpression networks and genetic data to identify a disease signature for type 2 diabetes in liver tissue. By interrogating a library of 3800 drug signatures, we identified sulforaphane as a compound that may reverse the disease signature. Sulforaphane suppressed glucose production from hepatic cells by nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and decreased expression of key enzymes in gluconeogenesis. Moreover, sulforaphane reversed the disease signature in the livers from diabetic animals and attenuated exaggerated glucose production and glucose intolerance by a magnitude similar to that of metformin. Finally, sulforaphane, provided as concentrated broccoli sprout extract, reduced fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in obese patients with dysregulated type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. A novel glucagon receptor antagonist, NNC 25-0926, blunts hepatic glucose production in the conscious dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Noelia; Everett-Grueter, Carrie A; Edgerton, Dale S; Rodewald, Tiffany; Neal, Doss W; Nishimura, Erica; Larsen, Marianne O; Jacobsen, Lene O; Kristensen, Kim; Brand, Christian L; Cherrington, Alan D

    2007-05-01

    Elevated glucagon is associated with fasting hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. We assessed the effects of the glucagon receptor antagonist (2R)-N-[4-({4-(1-cyclohexen-1-yl)[(3,5-dichloroanilino)carbonyl]anilino}methyl)benzoyl]-2-hydroxy-b-alanine (NNC 25-0926) on hepatic glucose production (HPG) in vivo, using arteriovenous difference and tracer techniques in conscious dogs. The experiments consisted of equilibration (-140 to -40 min), control (40-0 min), and experimental [0-180 min, divided into P1 (0-60 min) and P2 (60-180 min)] periods. In P1, NNC 25-0926 was given intragastrically at 0 (veh), 10, 20, 40, or 100 mg/kg, and euglycemia was maintained. In P2, somatostatin, basal intraportal insulin, and 5-fold basal intraportal glucagon (2.5 ng/kg/min) were infused. Arterial plasma insulin levels remained basal throughout the study in all groups. Arterial plasma glucagon levels remained basal during the control period and P1 and then increased to approximately 70 pg/ml in P2 in all groups. Arterial plasma glucose levels were basal in the control period and P1 in all groups. In P2, the arterial glucose level increased to 245+/-22 and 172+/-15 mg/dl in the veh and 10 mg/kg groups, respectively, whereas in the 20, 40, and 100 mg/kg groups, there was no rise in glucose. Net hepatic glucose output was approximately 2 mg/kg/min in all groups during the control period. In P2, it increased by 9.4+/-2 mg/kg/min in the veh group. In the 10, 20, 40, and 100 mg/kg groups, the rise was only 4.1+/-0.9, 1.6+/-0.6, 2.4+/-0.7, and 1.5+/-0.3 mg/kg/min, respectively, due to inhibition of glycogenolysis. In conclusion, NNC 25-0926 effectively blocked the ability of glucagon to increase HGP in the dog.

  8. A comparison of the effects of selective increases in peripheral or portal insulin on hepatic glucose production in the conscious dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, D K; Balcom, J H; Chu, C A; Neal, D W; Cherrington, A D

    1996-11-01

    We investigated the mechanisms by which peripheral or portal insulin can independently alter liver glucose production. Isotopic ([3-3H]glucose) and arteriovenous difference methods were used in conscious overnight-fasted dogs. A pancreatic clamp (somatostatin plus basal insulin and basal glucagon infusions) was used to control the endocrine pancreas. After a 40-min basal period, a 180-min experimental period followed in which selective increases in peripheral (PERI group, n = 5) or portal-vein (PORT group, n = 5) insulin were induced. In control dogs (CONT group, n = 10), insulin was not increased. Glucagon levels were fixed in all studies, and basal euglycemia was maintained by peripheral glucose infusion in the two experimental groups. In the PERI group, arterial insulin rose from 36 +/- 12 to 120 +/- 12 pmol/l, while portal insulin was unaltered. In the PORT group, portal insulin rose from 108 +/- 42 to 192 +/- 42 pmol/l, while arterial insulin was unaltered. Neither arterial nor portal insulin changed from basal in the CONT group. With a selective rise in peripheral insulin, the net hepatic glucose output (NHGO; basal, 11.8 +/- 0.7 micromol x kg-1 x min-1) did not change initially (11.8 +/- 2.1 micromol x kg-1 x min-1, 30 min after the insulin increase), but eventually fell (P glycogenolysis, while an equal increment in arterial insulin produced an equally potent but slower effect that resulted from a small increase in hepatic sinusoidal insulin, from a suppression of gluconeogenic precursor uptake by the liver, and from a redirection of glycogenolytic carbon to lactate rather than glucose.

  9. Direct effects of catecholamines on hepatic glucose production in conscious dog are due to glycogenolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C A; Sindelar, D K; Neal, D W; Cherrington, A D

    1996-07-01

    The effects of catecholamines (CATS) infused into the hepatic portal vein were studied in ten 18-h-fasted conscious dogs. Glucose production (GP) and gluconeogenesis (GNG) were assessed using tracer ([3H]glucose, [14C]alanine) and arteriovenous difference techniques. Each experiment consisted of a 100-min equilibration, a 40-min basal, and two 90-min test periods. A pancreatic clamp (somatostatin + basal portal insulin and glucagon) was used to fix insulin and glucagon at basal levels. Propranolol (1 microgram.kg-1.min-1) and phentolamine (2 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) were infused intraportally during both test periods of the blockade group while a carrier solution was infused in the control group. Norepinephrine (NE; 100 ng.kg-1.min-1) and epinephrine (Epi; 40 ng.kg-1.min-1) were infused intraportally during the second test period of both protocols. Portal NE (70 +/- 46 to 8,404 +/- 674 and 162 +/- 57 to 6,530 +/- 624 pg/ml, respectively) and portal Epi (21 +/- 11 to 3,587 +/- 309 and 29 +/- 6 to 2,989 +/- 406 pg/ml, respectively) rose in the control and adrenergic blockade groups, respectively. The increases in arterial NE and Epi were modest in both groups. Intraportal infusion of CATS increased GP from 2.1 +/- 0.2 to 6.2 +/- 1.0 mg.kg-1.min-1 in the control group but did not change it (2.7 +/- 0.4 to 2.7 +/- 0.3 mg.kg-1.min-1) in the blockade group. Portal CATS had no effect on GNG in the presence or absence of adrenergic blockade (GNG rose from 0.7 +/- 0.2 to 0.9 +/- 0.2 and 0.8 +/- 0.2 to 1.0 +/- 0.2 mg.kg-1.min-1 in the control and blockade groups, respectively). In conclusion, portal infusion of catecholamines significantly augmented GP by selectively stimulating glycogenolysis. The increase in hepatic GP could be completely inhibited by intraportal adrenergic blockade.

  10. MicroRNA-451 Negatively Regulates Hepatic Glucose Production and Glucose Homeostasis by Targeting Glycerol Kinase-Mediated Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Shu; Yang, Mengmei; Zhao, Yanan; Chen, Xiaofang; Zhang, Feifei; Li, Na; Yao, Pengle; Zhu, Tengfei; Mei, Hong; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Yu; Chen, Shiting; Le, Yingying

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of regulatory molecules implicated in type 2 diabetes, which is characterized by insulin resistance and hepatic glucose overproduction. We show that miRNA-451 (miR-451) is elevated in the liver tissues of dietary and genetic mouse models of diabetes. Through an adenovirus-mediated gain- and loss-of-function study, we found that miR-451 negatively regulates hepatic gluconeogenesis and blood glucose levels in normal mice and identified glycerol kinase (Gyk) as a direct target of miR-451. We demonstrate that miR-451 and Gyk regulate hepatic glucose production, the glycerol gluconeogenesis axis, and the AKT-FOXO1-PEPCK/G6Pase pathway in an opposite manner; Gyk could reverse the effect of miR-451 on hepatic gluconeogenesis and AKT-FOXO1-PEPCK/G6Pase pathway. Moreover, overexpression of miR-451 or knockdown of Gyk in diabetic mice significantly inhibited hepatic gluconeogenesis, alleviated hyperglycemia, and improved glucose tolerance. Further studies showed that miR-451 is upregulated by glucose and insulin in hepatocytes; the elevation of hepatic miR-451 in diabetic mice may contribute to inhibiting Gyk expression. This study provides the first evidence that miR-451 and Gyk regulate the AKT-FOXO1-PEPCK/G6Pase pathway and play critical roles in hepatic gluconeogenesis and glucose homeostasis and identifies miR-451 and Gyk as potential therapeutic targets against hyperglycemia in diabetes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Hepatic NPC1L1 overexpression ameliorates glucose metabolism in diabetic mice via suppression of gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurano, Makoto; Hara, Masumi; Satoh, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Kazuhisa

    2015-05-01

    Inhibition of intestinal NPC1L1 by ezetimibe has been demonstrated to improve glucose metabolism in rodent models; however, the role of hepatic NPC1L1 in glucose metabolism has not been elucidated. In this study, we analyzed the effects of hepatic NPC1L1 on glucose metabolism. We overexpressed NPC1L1 in the livers of lean wild type mice, diet-induced obesity mice and db/db mice with adenoviral gene transfer. We found that in all three mouse models, hepatic NPC1L1 overexpression lowered fasting blood glucose levels as well as blood glucose levels on ad libitum; in db/db mice, hepatic NPC1L1 overexpression improved blood glucose levels to almost the same as those found in lean wild type mice. A pyruvate tolerance test revealed that gluconeogenesis was suppressed by hepatic NPC1L1 overexpression. Further analyses revealed that hepatic NPC1L1 overexpression decreased the expression of FoxO1, resulting in the reduced expression of G6Pase and PEPCK, key enzymes in gluconeogenesis. These results indicate that hepatic NPC1L1 might have distinct properties of suppressing gluconeogenesis via inhibition of FoxO1 pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct vs. indirect pathway of hepatic glycogen synthesis as a function of glucose infusion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagby, G.J.; Lang, C.H.; Johnson, J.L.; Blakesly, H.L.; Spitzer, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    This study was initiated to determine the influence of the rate of exogenous glucose administration on liver glycogen synthesis by the direct (glucose uptake and incorporation into glycogen) vs the indirect pathway (glucose degradation to 3-carbon intermediates, e.g., lactate, prior to incorporation into glycogen). Catheterized rats were fasted 2 days prior to receiving a 3 hr infusion of glucose at rates of 0 to 230 μmol/min/kg containing tracer [6- 3 H]- and [U- 14 C]-glucose. Plasma glucose (r = 0.80), insulin (r = 0.90) and lactate (r = 0.84) were correlated with glucose infusion rate. The rate of liver glycogen deposition (0.46 +/- 0.03 μmol/min/g) did not differ between a glucose infusion rate of 20 and 230 μmol/min/kg. At the lowest and highest glucose infusion rates hepatic glycogenesis accounted for 87 +/- 6 and 9 +/- 1% of the total glucose load, respectively. The percent contribution of the direct pathways to glycogen deposition ([ 3 H] specific activity in hepatic glycogen/[ 3 H] specific activity in plasma glucose) increased from 16 +/- 3 to 83 +/- 5% from lowest to highest glucose infusion rates (prevailing plasma glucose concentrations: 9 +/- 1 and 21 +/- 2 mM, respectively). The results indicate that the relative contribution of the direct and indirect pathways of glucogen synthesis are dependent upon the glucose load or plasma glucose concentration

  13. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation does not influence basal glucose metabolism or insulin sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Nicolette M.; Sondermeijer, Brigitte M.; Twickler, Th B. Marcel; de Bie, Rob M.; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Fliers, Eric; Schuurman, P. Richard; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that central dopamine signaling influences glucose metabolism. As a first step to show this association in an experimental setting in humans, we studied whether deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which modulates the basal ganglia circuitry,

  14. Moderate physical activity promotes basal hepatic autophagy in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Caldwell, Megan E; Lee, David E; Brown, Jacob L; Brown, Lemuel A; Perry, Richard A; Greene, Elizabeth S; Carvallo Chaigneau, Francisco R; Washington, Tyrone A; Greene, Nicholas P

    2017-02-01

    Obesity is a known risk factor for the development of hepatic disease; obesity-induced fatty liver can lead to inflammation, steatosis, and cirrhosis and is associated with degeneration of the mitochondria. Lifestyle interventions such as physical activity may ameliorate this condition. The purpose of this study was to investigate regulation of mitochondrial and autophagy quality control in liver following Western diet-induced obesity and voluntary physical activity. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were fed a Western diet (WD) or normal chow (NC, control) for 4 weeks; afterwards, groups were divided into voluntary wheel running (VWR) or sedentary (SED) conditions for an additional 4 weeks. WD-SED animals had a median histology score of 2, whereas WD-VWR was not different from NC groups (median score 1). There was no difference in mRNA of inflammatory markers Il6 and Tnfa in WD animals. WD animals had 50% lower mitochondrial content (COX IV and Cytochrome C proteins), 50% lower Pgc1a mRNA content, and reduced content of mitochondrial fusion and fission markers. Markers of autophagy were increased in VWR animals, regardless of obesity, as measured by 50% greater LC3-II/I ratio and 40% lower p62 protein content. BNIP3 protein content was 30% less in WD animals compared with NC animals, regardless of physical activity. Diet-induced obesity results in derangements in mitochondrial quality control that appear to occur prior to the onset of hepatic inflammation. Moderate physical activity appears to enhance basal autophagy in the liver; increased autophagy may provide protection from hepatic fat accumulation.

  15. Effect of sepsis on VLDL kinetics: responses in basal state and during glucose infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, R.R.; Shaw, J.H.; Durkot, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of gram-negative sepsis on the kinetics and oxidation of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) fatty acids was assessed in conscious dogs in the normal state and 24 h after infusion of live Escherichia coli. VLDL, labeled with [2- 3 H]glycerol and [1- 14 C]palmitic acid, was used to trace VLDL kinetics and oxidation, and [1- 13 C]palmitic acid bound to albumin was infused simultaneously to quantify kinetics and oxidation of free fatty acid (FFA) in plasma. Sepsis caused a fivefold increase in the rate of VLDL production (RaVLDL). In the control dogs, the direct oxidation of VLDL-fatty acids was not an important contributor to their overall energy metabolism, but in dogs with sepsis, 17% of the total rate of CO2 production could be accounted for by VLDL-fatty acid oxidation. When glucose was infused into dogs with insulin and glucagon levels clamped at basal levels (by means of infusion of somatostatin and replacement of the hormones), RaVLDL increased significantly in the control dogs, but it did not increase further in dogs with sepsis. The authors conclude that the increase in triglyceride concentration in fasting dogs with gram-negative sepsis is the result of an increase in VLDL production and that the fatty acids in VLDL can serve as an important source of energy in sepsis

  16. CREBH Maintains Circadian Glucose Homeostasis by Regulating Hepatic Glycogenolysis and Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunbae; Zheng, Ze; Walker, Paul D; Kapatos, Gregory; Zhang, Kezhong

    2017-07-15

    Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein, hepatocyte specific (CREBH), is a liver-enriched, endoplasmic reticulum-tethered transcription factor known to regulate the hepatic acute-phase response and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we demonstrate that CREBH functions as a circadian transcriptional regulator that plays major roles in maintaining glucose homeostasis. The proteolytic cleavage and posttranslational acetylation modification of CREBH are regulated by the circadian clock. Functionally, CREBH is required in order to maintain circadian homeostasis of hepatic glycogen storage and blood glucose levels. CREBH regulates the rhythmic expression of the genes encoding the rate-limiting enzymes for glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, including liver glycogen phosphorylase (PYGL), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PCK1), and the glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit (G6PC). CREBH interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) to synergize its transcriptional activities in hepatic gluconeogenesis. The acetylation of CREBH at lysine residue 294 controls CREBH-PPARα interaction and synergy in regulating hepatic glucose metabolism in mice. CREBH deficiency leads to reduced blood glucose levels but increases hepatic glycogen levels during the daytime or upon fasting. In summary, our studies revealed that CREBH functions as a key metabolic regulator that controls glucose homeostasis across the circadian cycle or under metabolic stress. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Effects of glucose infusion on hepatic and muscle glycogenolysis in exercising dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issekutz, B

    1981-05-01

    Hepatic glucose production (Ra) and the rate of utilization of nonglucose sources (essentially muscle glycogen) were measured in dogs running on a treadmill (15%, 133 m/min) with indwelling catheters in the jugular vein and carotid artery. A mixture of [3-3H]glucose and [U-14C]glucose was used as tracer according to the principles of the primed constant-rate infusion techniques. Glucose was infused intravenously at a rate (12 mg.kg-1.min-1) about 20% higher than the endogenous glucose Ra in exercising dogs. Glucose infusion started either at the beginning of the run or midexercise. Plasma insulin (IRI), glucagon (IRG), and cAMP levels were measured. Exogenous glucose prevented the usual decline of both plasma glucose and IRI without causing hyperglycemia. Exercise increased the molar ratio of IRG/IRI from 0.7 to 1.4, and glucose infusion lowered it to the resting value. The rise of plasma cAMP was slowed significantly. Both the hepatic glucose Ra and intramuscular glycogenolysis were strongly inhibited and the metabolic clearance rate of glucose was increased by 60-100%. The ratio of the specific activities of [14C]lactate to [14C]glucose indicated that 75-95% of the lactate turnover arose from plasma glucose. The corresponding value in the control group was 40-50%. It is concluded that in prolonged exercise the decline of both plasma glucose and insulin play a major role in preserving glucose homeostasis, by limiting the glucose uptake of the working muscle and by helping to achieve an approximately equal contribution of the liver and the muscle glycogen for the elevated glycolysis.

  18. The effect of aniracetam on cerebral glucose metabolism in rats after lesioning of the basal forebrain measured by PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Y; Kakiuchi, T; Okada, H; Nishiyama, S; Tsukada, H

    1999-03-15

    To evaluate the effect of aniracetam, a potent modulator of the glutamatergic and cholinergic systems, on the altered cerebral glucose metabolism after lesioning of the basal forebrain, we measured the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRGlc) with positron emission tomography and the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in the frontal cortex of the lesioned rats after treating them with aniracetam. Continuous administration of aniracetam for 7 days after the surgery prevented CMRGlc reduction in the frontal cortex ipsilateral to the lesion while the lesioned rats without aniracetam showed significant CMRGlc reduction in the frontal cortex. The level of CMRGlc in the lesion-side basal forebrain was lower in all rats regardless of the aniracetam treatment. Biochemical studies showed that aniracetam did not alter the reduction in the frontal ChAT activity. These results showed that aniracetam prevents glucose metabolic reduction in the cholinergically denervated frontal cortex with little effect on the cortical cholinergic system. The present study suggested that a neurotransmitter system other than the cholinergic system, e.g. the glutamatergic system, plays a central role in the cortical metabolic recovery after lesioning of the basal forebrain.

  19. Portal Vein Glucose Entry Triggers a Coordinated Cellular Response That Potentiates Hepatic Glucose Uptake and Storage in Normal but Not High-Fat/High-Fructose–Fed Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Coate, Katie C.; Kraft, Guillaume; Irimia, Jose M.; Smith, Marta S.; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss W.; Roach, Peter J.; Shiota, Masakazu; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2013-01-01

    The cellular events mediating the pleiotropic actions of portal vein glucose (PoG) delivery on hepatic glucose disposition have not been clearly defined. Likewise, the molecular defects associated with postprandial hyperglycemia and impaired hepatic glucose uptake (HGU) following consumption of a high-fat, high-fructose diet (HFFD) are unknown. Our goal was to identify hepatocellular changes elicited by hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and PoG signaling in normal chow-fed (CTR) and HFFD-fed d...

  20. Effects of guar gum and cellulose on glucose absorption, hormonal release and hepatic metabolism in the pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, C. S.; Malmlof, K.

    1992-01-01

    Six Large White pigs (mean body-weight 59 (SE 1.7) kg) were surgically fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, the brachiocephalic artery and the right hepatic vein, as well as with electromagnetic flow probes around the portal vein and the hepatic artery, and allowed to recover. The non-anaesthetized animals were given a basal non-fibre diet (diet A) alone or together with 60 g guar gum/kg (diet B) or 150 g purified cellulose/kg (diet C) by substitution for mica. The diets were given for weekly periods and according to a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design. On the last day of each such adaptation period, test meals of 800 g were given before blood sampling. Sampling was continued for 8 h. Guar gum strongly reduced glucose apparent absorption without changing the absorption and the hepatic uptake profiles. Production rates of insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were lowest after guar gum ingestion. However, the reductions in peripheral blood insulin levels caused by guar gum were not associated with a change in hepatic insulin extraction. IGF-1 appeared to be strongly secreted by the gut, whereas the liver had a net uptake of the peptide. Ingestion of guar gum increased the hepatic extraction coefficient of gut-produced IGF-1. Guar gum ingestion appeared also to decrease glucagon secretion. Cellulose at the level consumed had very few effects on the variables considered. It is suggested that the modulation of intestinal mechanisms by guar gum was sufficient to mediate the metabolic effects described.

  1. Natural products, an important resource for discovery of multitarget drugs and functional food for regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Sijian; Wang, Wei; Chen, Qian; Ma, Yanmin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Imbalanced hepatic glucose homeostasis is one of the critical pathologic events in the development of metabolic syndromes (MSs). Therefore, regulation of imbalanced hepatic glucose homeostasis is important in drug development for MS treatment. In this review, we discuss the major targets that regulate hepatic glucose homeostasis in human physiologic and pathophysiologic processes, involving hepatic glucose uptake, glycolysis and glycogen synthesis, and summarize their changes in MSs. Recent literature suggests the necessity of multitarget drugs in the management of MS disorder for regulation of imbalanced glucose homeostasis in both experimental models and MS patients. Here, we highlight the potential bioactive compounds from natural products with medicinal or health care values, and focus on polypharmacologic and multitarget natural products with effects on various signaling pathways in hepatic glucose metabolism. This review shows the advantage and feasibility of discovering multicompound-multitarget drugs from natural products, and providing a new perspective of ways on drug and functional food development for MSs.

  2. Effect of interferon treatment on glucose metabolism in children with chronic hepatitis B infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuloğlu, Zarife; Kansu, Aydan; Berberoğlu, Merih; Demirçeken, Fulya; Ocal, Gönül; Girgin, Nurten

    2004-03-01

    Interferon is known to have some effects on glucose metabolism, but this issue has not been investigated in children with chronic hepatitis B infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of interferon on glucose metabolism and to investigate whether autoimmunity has a role in the pathogenesis. Fourteen patients (9 male, 6.3+/-2.7 years) with children with chronic hepatitis B infection were prospectively evaluated. They received interferon 10 MU/m2 for six months. Vral glucose tolerance test, fasting insulin and C-peptide, postprandial insulin and C-peptide, anti-GAD antibody, HOMA-IR and glucose/insulin ratio were measured before and after treatment. Before interferon, oral glucose tolerance test showed glucose intolerance in two patients (14.5%) and hypoglycemia in one patient (7.1%). One patient had hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance (7.1%), and four patients had hypoinsulinemia and insulin hypersensitivity (28.5%). After interferon, oral glucose tolerance test was normal in 13 patients (92.8%). Abnormal oral glucose tolerance test persisted in the same patient, but no difference was found in insulin resistance. Hypoinsulinemia and insulin hypersensitivity were present in five patients (35.7%). DM related autoantibodies were negative in all patients before interferon; however, one patient, whose glucose metabolism was within normal limits, developed anti-GAD antibody after interferon. Children with children with chronic hepatitis B infection were shown to have hypoinsulinemia and insulin hypersensitivity. These children may have risk of progresssing to insuline dependent drabetes mellitus. We demonstrated that interferon did not seem to worsen glucose metabolism, but it had minimal positive impact on it. These results should be supported with other studies and interferon should be used carefully, especially in children with decreased beta cell reserve.

  3. Insulin sensitivity of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism in animal models of hepatic steatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefhorst, Aldo

    2006-01-01

    De lever is betrokken bij de regulatie van zowel het koolhydraat als het vet metabolisme. De lever slaat glucose op als glycogeen, scheidt glucose uit, kan glucose maken uit bijvoorbeeld melkzuur en aminozuren (‘gluconeogenese’), zet glucose om in vet (‘de novo lipogenese’), verbrandt vetzuren in de

  4. Dynamical modeling of liver Aquaporin-9 expression and glycerol permeability in hepatic glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gena, Patrizia; Buono, Nicoletta Del; D'Abbicco, Marcello; Mastrodonato, Maria; Berardi, Marco; Svelto, Maria; Lopez, Luciano; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Liver is crucial in the homeostasis of glycerol, an important metabolic intermediate. Plasma glycerol is imported by hepatocytes mainly through Aquaporin-9 (AQP9), an aquaglyceroporin channel negatively regulated by insulin in rodents. AQP9 is of critical importance in glycerol metabolism since hepatic glycerol utilization is rate-limited at the hepatocyte membrane permeation step. Glycerol kinase catalyzes the initial step for the conversion of the imported glycerol into glycerol-3-phosphate, a major substrate for de novo synthesis of glucose (gluconeogenesis) and/or triacyglycerols (lipogenesis). A model addressing the glucose-insulin system to describe the hepatic glycerol import and metabolism and the correlation with the glucose homeostasis is lacking so far. Here we consider a system of first-order ordinary differential equations delineating the relevance of hepatocyte AQP9 in liver glycerol permeability. Assuming the hepatic glycerol permeability as depending on the protein levels of AQP9, a mathematical function is designed describing the time course of the involvement of AQP9 in mouse hepatic glycerol metabolism in different nutritional states. The resulting theoretical relationship is derived fitting experimental data obtained with murine models at the fed, fasted or re-fed condition. While providing useful insights into the dynamics of liver AQP9 involvement in male rodent glycerol homeostasis our model may be adapted to the human liver serving as an important module of a whole body-model of the glucose metabolism both in health and metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Insulin sensitivity of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism in animal models of hepatic steatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Grefhorst, Aldo

    2006-01-01

    De lever is betrokken bij de regulatie van zowel het koolhydraat als het vet metabolisme. De lever slaat glucose op als glycogeen, scheidt glucose uit, kan glucose maken uit bijvoorbeeld melkzuur en aminozuren (‘gluconeogenese’), zet glucose om in vet (‘de novo lipogenese’), verbrandt vetzuren in de beta-oxidatie (levert energie voor de gluconeogenese) en scheidt triglycerides uit in de circulatie in ‘very low density lipoprotein’ (VLDL) deeltjes. Insuline remt de glucoseproductie door de lev...

  6. The role of hepatic mitochondria in the regulation of glucose metabolism in BHE rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The interacting effects of dietary fat source and thyroxine treatment on the hepatic mitochondrial function and glucose metabolism were studied. In the first study, three different sources of dietary fatty acids and thyroxine treatment were used to investigate the hepatic mitochondrial thermotropic behavior in two strains of rat. The NIDDM BHE and Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Feeding coconut oil increased serum T 4 levels and T 4 treatment increased serum T 3 levels in the BHE rats. In the mitochondria from BHE rats fed coconut oil and treated with T 4 , the transition temperature disappeared due to a decoupling of succinate supported respiration. This was not observed in the Sprague-Dawley rats. In the second study, two different sources of dietary fat and T 4 treatment were used to investigate hepatic mitochondrial function. Coconut oil feeding increased Ca ++ Mg ++ ATPase and Mg ++ ATPase. T 4 treatment had potentiated this effect. T 4 increased the malate-aspartate shuttle and α-glycerophosphate shuttle activities. In the third study, the glucose turnover rate from D-[ 14 C-U]/[6- 3 H]-glucose and gluconeogeneis from L-[ 14 C-U]-alanine was examined. Dietary fat or T 4 did not affect the glucose mass. T 4 increased the irreversible fractional glucose turnover rate

  7. MicroRNA-21 regulates hepatic glucose metabolism by targeting FOXO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ailing; Yan, Haibo; Liang, Jichao; Du, Chunyuan; Zhao, Xuemei; Sun, Lijuan; Chen, Yong

    2017-09-05

    Abnormal activation of hepatic gluconeogenesis is a major contributor to fasting hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes; however, the potential role of microRNAs in gluconeogenesis remains unclear. Here, we showed that hepatic expression levels of microRNA-21 (miR-21) were decreased in db/db and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic mice. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of miR-21 decreased the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and inhibited glucose production in primary mouse hepatocytes. Silencing of miR-21 reversed this effect. Overexpression of miR-21 in the livers of db/db and HFD-induced mice was able to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis, subsequently decreasing blood glucose levels and improving glucose and insulin intolerance. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-21 in primary mouse hepatocytes and mouse livers decreased the protein levels of FOXO1 and increased hepatic insulin sensitivity. By contrast, silencing of miR-21 increased the protein levels of FOXO1, subsequently leading to a decrease in insulin sensitivity and impaired glucose intolerance in C57BL/6 mice fed with high-fat diet for 4weeks. Finally, we confirmed that FOXO1 was a potential target of miR-21. These results suggest that miR-21 is a critical regulator in hepatic gluconeogenesis and may provide a novel therapeutic target for treating insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effect of Phloroglucinol, A Component of Ecklonia cava Extract, on Hepatic Glucose Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Young Yoon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phloroglucinol is a phenolic compound that is one of the major compounds in Ecklonia cava (brown alga. It has many pharmacological activities, but its anti-diabetic effect is not yet fully explored. In this study, we investigated the effect of phloroglucinol on the control of blood glucose levels and the regulation of hepatic glucose production. Phloroglucinol significantly improved glucose tolerance in male C57BL/6J mice fed a high fat diet (HFD and inhibited glucose production in mouse primary hepatocytes. The expression of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK and glucose-6-phosphatase mRNA and protein (G6Pase, enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis, were inhibited in liver tissue from phloroglucinol-treated mice and in phloroglucinol-treated HepG2 cells. In addition, phloroglucinol treatment increased phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPKα in HepG2 cells. Treatment with compound C, an AMPKα inhibitor, inhibited the increase of phosphorylated AMPKα and the decrease of PEPCK and G6Pase expression caused by phloroglucinol treatment. We conclude that phloroglucinol may inhibit hepatic gluconeogenesis via modulating the AMPKα signaling pathway, and thus lower blood glucose levels.

  9. Splanchnic blood flow and hepatic glucose production in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, R; Kjaer, M; Simonsen, L

    2001-01-01

    -blockade group vs. the control group, hormones, metabolites, VO(2), and RER followed the same pattern of changes in ACE-blockade and control groups during exercise. Splanchnic blood flow (at rest: 1.67 +/- 0.12, ACE blockade; 1.59 +/- 0.18 l/min, control) decreased during moderate exercise (0.78 +/- 0.07, ACE......, no differences in the pattern of change of splanchnic blood flow and splanchnic glucose production were observed during ACE blockade compared with controls. This study demonstrates that the normal increase in ANG II levels observed during prolonged exercise in humans does not play a major role in the regulation......The study examined the implication of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in regulation of splanchnic blood flow and glucose production in exercising humans. Subjects cycled for 40 min at 50% maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)) followed by 30 min at 70% VO(2 max) either with [angiotensin...

  10. Bisphenol A impairs hepatic glucose sensing in C57BL/6 male mice.

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    Leigh Perreault

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Glucose sensing (eg. glucokinase activity becomes impaired in the development of type 2 diabetes, the etiology of which is unclear. Estrogen can stimulate glucokinase activity, whereas the pervasive environmental pollutant bisphenol A (BPA can inhibit estrogen action, hence we aimed to determine the effect of BPA on glucokinase activity directly. METHODS: To evaluate a potential acute effect on hepatic glucokinase activity, BPA in water (n = 5 vs. water alone (n = 5 was administered at the EPA's purported "safe dose" (50 µg/kg by gavage to lean 6-month old male C57BL/6 mice. Two hours later, animals were euthanized and hepatic glucokinase activity measured over glucose levels from 1-20 mmol/l in liver homogenate. To determine the effect of chronic BPA exposure on hepatic glucokinase activity, lean 6-month old male C57BL/6 mice were provided with water (n = 15 or water with 1.75 mM BPA (∼50 µg/kg/day; n = 14 for 2 weeks. Following the 2-week exposure, animals were euthanized and glucokinase activity measured as above. RESULTS: Hepatic glucokinase activity was signficantly suppressed after 2 hours in animals given an oral BPA bolus compared to those who received only water (p = 0.002-0.029 at glucose 5-20 mmol/l; overall treatment effect p<0.001. Exposure to BPA over 2 weeks also suppressed hepatic glucokinase activity in exposed vs. unexposed mice (overall treatment effect, p = 0.003. In both experiments, the Hill coefficient was higher and Vmax lower in mice treated with BPA. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Both acute and chronic exposure to BPA significantly impair hepatic glucokinase activity and function. These findings identify a potential mechanism for how BPA may increase risk for diabetes.

  11. Two-way crossover comparison of insulin glargine and insulin detemir in basal-bolus therapy using continuous glucose monitoring

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    Abe S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Shinya Abe1,2, Gaku Inoue1,2, Satoru Yamada1,3, Junichiro Irie1,3, Hiroyuki Nojima2, Kaoru Tsuyusaki2, Kensuke Usui2, Koichiro Atsuda2, Toshikazu Yamanouchi41Diabetes Center, Kitasato Institute Hospital, 2Center for Clinical Pharmacy and Clinical Sciences, Kitasato University, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, 4Department of Internal Medicine, University of Teikyo School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanObjective: This study aimed to compare the glucose-lowering effect and glycemic variability of insulin glargine with those of insulin detemir.Material and methods: This was an open-label, single-center, randomized, two-way crossover study in patients with diabetes on basal-bolus insulin therapy, with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH insulin as basal insulin. Patients switched from NPH insulin to a course either of insulin glargine followed by insulin detemir, or insulin detemir followed by insulin glargine, continuing the same dose of the prior bolus of insulin. To evaluate the glucose-lowering effect, daily glycemic profiles were recorded for 72 hours by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM in an outpatient setting. The mean amplitude of glycemic excursions, standard deviation (SD, and the mean of daily difference (MODD were used to assess intraday and day-to-day glycemic variability.Results: Eleven patients were enrolled and nine completed the study. Mean blood glucose calculated from CGM values was significantly lower with insulin glargine compared with insulin detemir (9.6 ± 2.4 mmol/L versus 10.4 ± 2.8 mmol/L, P = 0.038. The SD was significantly lower with insulin glargine versus insulin detemir (2.5 ± 0.9 mmol/L vs 3.5 ± 1.6 mmol/L, P = 0.011. The MODD value was significantly lower with insulin glargine than with insulin detemir (2.2 ± 1.1 mmol/L vs 3.6 ± 1.7 mmol/L, P = 0.011. There was no significant difference between the two insulin analogs in terms of hypoglycemia.Conclusion: This study suggests that

  12. Natural products, an important resource for discovery of multitarget drugs and functional food for regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism

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    Li J

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jian Li,1,* Haiyang Yu,2,* Sijian Wang,1 Wei Wang,3 Qian Chen,1 Yanmin Ma,2 Yi Zhang,1 Tao Wang1 1Tianjin State Key Laboratory of Modern Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, 2Department of Phytochemistry, Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China; 3Internal Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Imbalanced hepatic glucose homeostasis is one of the critical pathologic events in the development of metabolic syndromes (MSs. Therefore, regulation of imbalanced hepatic glucose homeostasis is important in drug development for MS treatment. In this review, we discuss the major targets that regulate hepatic glucose homeostasis in human physiologic and pathophysiologic processes, involving hepatic glucose uptake, glycolysis and glycogen synthesis, and summarize their changes in MSs. Recent literature suggests the necessity of multitarget drugs in the management of MS disorder for regulation of imbalanced glucose homeostasis in both experimental models and MS patients. Here, we highlight the potential bioactive compounds from natural products with medicinal or health care values, and focus on polypharmacologic and multitarget natural products with effects on various signaling pathways in hepatic glucose metabolism. This review shows the advantage and feasibility of discovering multicompound–multitarget drugs from natural products, and providing a new perspective of ways on drug and functional food development for MSs. Keywords: hepatic glucose metabolism, natural products, multitarget, metabolic syndromes, drug and functional food development integrative medicine

  13. Altered glucose homeostasis and hepatic function in obese mice deficient for both kinin receptor genes.

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    Carlos C Barros

    Full Text Available The Kallikrein-Kinin System (KKS has been implicated in several aspects of metabolism, including the regulation of glucose homeostasis and adiposity. Kinins and des-Arg-kinins are the major effectors of this system and promote their effects by binding to two different receptors, the kinin B2 and B1 receptors, respectively. To understand the influence of the KKS on the pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM, we generated an animal model deficient for both kinin receptor genes and leptin (obB1B2KO. Six-month-old obB1B2KO mice showed increased blood glucose levels. Isolated islets of the transgenic animals were more responsive to glucose stimulation releasing greater amounts of insulin, mainly in 3-month-old mice, which was corroborated by elevated serum C-peptide concentrations. Furthermore, they presented hepatomegaly, pronounced steatosis, and increased levels of circulating transaminases. This mouse also demonstrated exacerbated gluconeogenesis during the pyruvate challenge test. The hepatic abnormalities were accompanied by changes in the gene expression of factors linked to glucose and lipid metabolisms in the liver. Thus, we conclude that kinin receptors are important for modulation of insulin secretion and for the preservation of normal glucose levels and hepatic functions in obese mice, suggesting a protective role of the KKS regarding complications associated with obesity and T2DM.

  14. Circulating Glucagon 1-61 Regulates Blood Glucose by Increasing Insulin Secretion and Hepatic Glucose Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J.; Kuhre, Rune E.; Hornburg, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    that PG 1-61 dose-dependently increases levels of cAMP, through the glucagon receptor, and increases insulin secretion and protein levels of enzymes regulating glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. In rats, PG 1-61 increases blood glucose and plasma insulin and decreases plasma levels of amino acids in...

  15. Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 2 Regulates Hepatic Gluconeogenesis and Diurnal Glucose Metabolism Through 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molusky, Matthew M.; Li, Siming; Ma, Di; Yu, Lei; Lin, Jiandie D.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is important for maintaining steady blood glucose levels during starvation and through light/dark cycles. The regulatory network that transduces hormonal and circadian signals serves to integrate these physiological cues and adjust glucose synthesis and secretion by the liver. In this study, we identified ubiquitin-specific protease 2 (USP2) as an inducible regulator of hepatic gluconeogenesis that responds to nutritional status and clock. Adenoviral-mediated expression of USP2 in the liver promotes hepatic glucose production and exacerbates glucose intolerance in diet-induced obese mice. In contrast, in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of this factor improves systemic glycemic control. USP2 is a target gene of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a coactivator that integrates clock and energy metabolism, and is required for maintaining diurnal glucose homeostasis during restricted feeding. At the mechanistic level, USP2 regulates hepatic glucose metabolism through its induction of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD1) and glucocorticoid signaling in the liver. Pharmacological inhibition and liver-specific RNAi knockdown of HSD1 significantly impair the stimulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis by USP2. Together, these studies delineate a novel pathway that links hormonal and circadian signals to gluconeogenesis and glucose homeostasis. PMID:22447855

  16. Pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of empagliflozin, a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, in patients with hepatic impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macha, S; Rose, P; Mattheus, M; Cinca, R; Pinnetti, S; Broedl, U C; Woerle, H J

    2014-02-01

    This open-label, parallel-group study investigated the effect of various degrees of hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin. Thirty-six subjects [8 each with mild, moderate or severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh classification), and 12 matched controls with normal hepatic function] received a single 50 mg dose of empagliflozin. Empagliflozin was rapidly absorbed. After reaching peak levels, plasma drug concentrations declined in a biphasic fashion. Compared with subjects with normal hepatic function, geometric mean ratios (90% confidence interval) of AUC(0-∞) and C(max) were 123.15% (98.89-153.36) and 103.81% (82.29-130.95), respectively, in patients with mild hepatic impairment, 146.97% (118.02-183.02) and 123.31% (97.74-155.55), respectively, in patients with moderate hepatic impairment, and 174.70% (140.29-217.55) and 148.41% (117.65-187.23), respectively, in patients with severe hepatic impairment. Adverse events, all mild or moderate in intensity, were reported in three subjects with moderate hepatic impairment, two subjects with severe hepatic impairment and six subjects with normal hepatic function. Empagliflozin was well tolerated in subjects with hepatic impairment. Increases in empagliflozin exposure were less than twofold in patients with hepatic impairment; therefore no dose adjustment of empagliflozin is required in patients with hepatic impairment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Insulin-like peptide 5 is a microbially regulated peptide that promotes hepatic glucose production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying Shiuan; De Vadder, Filipe; Tremaroli, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) is a recently identified gut hormone that is produced predominantly by L-cells in the colon, but its function is unclear. We have previously shown that colonic expression of the gene for the L-cell hormone GLP-1 is high in mice that lack a microbiota...... expression in the brain was higher in CONV-R versus GF mice. We also observed that colonic Insl5 expression was suppressed by increasing the energy supply in GF mice by colonization or high-fat feeding. We did not observe any differences in food intake, gut transit or oral glucose tolerance between Insl5......-/- and wild-type mice. However, we showed impaired intraperitoneal glucose tolerance in Insl5-/- mice. We also observed improved insulin tolerance and reduced hepatic glucose production in Insl5-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: We have shown that colonic Insl5 expression is regulated by the gut microbiota and energy...

  18. Berberine improves glucose metabolism in diabetic rats by inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

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    Xuan Xia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Berberine (BBR is a compound originally identified in a Chinese herbal medicine Huanglian (Coptis chinensis French. It improves glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetic patients. The mechanisms involve in activation of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK and improvement of insulin sensitivity. However, it is not clear if BBR reduces blood glucose through other mechanism. In this study, we addressed this issue by examining liver response to BBR in diabetic rats, in which hyperglycemia was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by high fat diet. We observed that BBR decreased fasting glucose significantly. Gluconeogenic genes, Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK and Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase, were decreased in liver by BBR. Hepatic steatosis was also reduced by BBR and expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS was inhibited in liver. Activities of transcription factors including Forkhead transcription factor O1 (FoxO1, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1 and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP were decreased. Insulin signaling pathway was not altered in the liver. In cultured hepatocytes, BBR inhibited oxygen consumption and reduced intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP level. The data suggest that BBR improves fasting blood glucose by direct inhibition of gluconeogenesis in liver. This activity is not dependent on insulin action. The gluconeogenic inhibition is likely a result of mitochondria inhibition by BBR. The observation supports that BBR improves glucose metabolism through an insulin-independent pathway.

  19. The impact of obesity, sex, and diet on hepatic glucose production in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kley, Saskia; Hoenig, Margarethe; Glushka, John; Jin, Eunsook S; Burgess, Shawn C; Waldron, Mark; Jordan, Erin T; Prestegard, James H; Ferguson, Duncan C; Wu, Shaoxiong; Olson, Darin E

    2009-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes in cats. The risk of developing diabetes is severalfold greater for male cats than for females, even after having been neutered early in life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of different metabolic pathways in the regulation of endogenous glucose production (EGP) during the fasted state considering these risk factors. A triple tracer protocol using (2)H(2)O, [U-(13)C(3)]propionate, and [3,4-(13)C(2)]glucose was applied in overnight-fasted cats (12 lean and 12 obese; equal sex distribution) fed three different diets. Compared with lean cats, obese cats had higher insulin (P cats (P glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis (GNG; P cats had approximately 1.5 times higher fluxes through phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (P cats. However, GNG was not higher because pyruvate cycling was increased 1.5-fold (P cats have lower hepatic EGP compared with lean cats and are still capable of maintaining fasting euglycemia, despite the well-documented existence of peripheral insulin resistance in obese cats. Our data further suggest that sex-related differences exist in the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in obese cats, suggesting that pyruvate cycling acts as a controlling mechanism to modulate EGP. Increased pyruvate cycling could therefore be an important factor in modulating the diabetes risk in female cats.

  20. PPP2R5C Couples Hepatic Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis.

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    Yong-Sheng Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, the liver plays a central role in maintaining carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis by acting both as a major source and a major sink of glucose and lipids. In particular, when dietary carbohydrates are in excess, the liver converts them to lipids via de novo lipogenesis. The molecular checkpoints regulating the balance between carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis, however, are not fully understood. Here we identify PPP2R5C, a regulatory subunit of PP2A, as a novel modulator of liver metabolism in postprandial physiology. Inactivation of PPP2R5C in isolated hepatocytes leads to increased glucose uptake and increased de novo lipogenesis. These phenotypes are reiterated in vivo, where hepatocyte specific PPP2R5C knockdown yields mice with improved systemic glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, but elevated circulating triglyceride levels. We show that modulation of PPP2R5C levels leads to alterations in AMPK and SREBP-1 activity. We find that hepatic levels of PPP2R5C are elevated in human diabetic patients, and correlate with obesity and insulin resistance in these subjects. In sum, our data suggest that hepatic PPP2R5C represents an important factor in the functional wiring of energy metabolism and the maintenance of a metabolically healthy state.

  1. Increased activity of the glucose cycle in the liver: early characteristic of type 2 diabetes.

    OpenAIRE

    Efendić, S; Wajngot, A; Vranić, M

    1985-01-01

    The aims were to assess in the mild, lean, type 2 diabetics the activity of the hepatic futile cycle (glucose cycling) in the basal state and during an infusion of glucose and the overall contribution of futile cycling and the relative contributions of the liver and the periphery to excessive hyperglycemia during a glucose challenge. To determine hepatic futile cycling, we studied seven healthy controls (C) and eight mild, lean, type 2 diabetics with decreased oral glucose tolerance test and ...

  2. Expression Changes in Lactate and Glucose Metabolism and Associated Transporters in Basal Ganglia following Hypoxic-Ischemic Reperfusion Injury in Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y; Wang, X-M

    2018-01-11

    The neonatal brain has active energy metabolism, and glucose oxidation is the major energy source of brain tissue. Lactate is produced by astrocytes and released to neurons. In the central nervous system, lactate is transported between neurons and astrocytes via the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of energy metabolism in neurons and astrocytes in the basal ganglia of a neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury piglet model. A total of 35 healthy piglets (3-5 days of age; 1.0-1.5 kg) were assigned to a control group ( n = 5) or a hypoxic-ischemic model group ( n = 30). The hypoxic-ischemic model group was further divided into 6 groups according to the 1 H-MR spectroscopy and PET/CT scan times after hypoxia-ischemia (0-2, 2-6, 6-12, 12-24, 24-48, and 48-72 hours; n = 5/group). 1 H-MR spectroscopy data were processed with LCModel software. Maximum standard uptake values refer to the maximum standard uptake values for glucose (or FDG). The maximum standard uptake values of the basal ganglia-to-occipital cortex ratio were analyzed. The expression levels of glucose transporters and monocarboxylate transporters were detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Lactate levels decreased after an initial increase, with the maximal level occurring around 2-6 hours following hypoxia-ischemia. After hypoxia-ischemia, the maximum standard uptake values of the basal ganglia and basal ganglia/occipital cortex initially increased then decreased, with the maximum occurring at approximately 6-12 hours. The lactate and glucose uptake (basal ganglia/occipital cortex maximum standard uptake values) levels were positively correlated. The expression levels of glucose transporter-1 and glucose transporter-3 were positively correlated with the basal ganglia/occipital cortex. The expression levels of monocarboxylic acid transporter-2 and monocarboxylic acid transporter-4 were positively correlated with lactate content. The

  3. Comparison of the direct and indirect effects of epinephrine on hepatic glucose production.

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, C A; Sindelar, D K; Neal, D W; Allen, E J; Donahue, E P; Cherrington, A D

    1997-01-01

    To determine the extent to which the effect of a physiologic increment in epinephrine (EPI) on glucose production (GP) arises indirectly from its action on peripheral tissues (muscle and adipose tissue), epinephrine was infused intraportally (EPI po) or peripherally (EPI pe) into 18-h-fasted conscious dogs maintained on a pancreatic clamp. Arterial EPI levels in EPI po and EPI pe groups rose from 97 +/- 29 to 107 +/- 37 and 42 +/- 12 to 1,064 +/- 144 pg/ml, respectively. Hepatic sinusoidal EP...

  4. Inhibitory effects of ursolic acid on hepatic polyol pathway and glucose production in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sun-Mi; Kim, Myung-Joo; Choi, Myung-Sook; Kwon, Eun-Young; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2010-04-01

    The effects of ursolic acid on the polyol pathway and glucose homeostasis-related metabolism were examined in the livers of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice fed a high-fat (37% calories from fat) diet for 4 weeks. Male mice were divided into nondiabetic, diabetic control, and diabetic-ursolic acid (0.05% wt/wt) groups. Diabetes was induced by the injection of STZ (200 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally). Although an ursolic acid supplement lowered the blood glucose level, it did not affect the plasma leptin and adiponectin levels. The present study shows that the blood glucose levels have a positive correlation with the hepatic sorbitol dehydrogenase activities (r = 0.39, P Ursolic acid significantly inhibited sorbitol dehydrogenase activity as well as aldose reductase activity in the liver. The supplementation of ursolic acid significantly increased glucokinase activity, while decreasing glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the livers of STZ-induced diabetic mice. Ursolic acid significantly elevated the hepatic glycogen content compared with the diabetic control group. Supplementation with ursolic acid significantly lowered the plasma total cholesterol, free fatty acid, and triglyceride concentrations compared with the diabetic control group, whereas it normalized hepatic triglyceride concentration. A negative correlation was found between the hepatic triglyceride concentration and blood glucose levels (r = -0.50, P acid synthase activity was significantly lower in the ursolic acid group than in the diabetic control group, whereas hepatic fatty acid beta-oxidation and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activities were significantly higher. These results indicate that ursolic acid may be beneficial in preventing diabetic complications by improving the polyol pathway as well as the lipid metabolism and that it can function as a potential modulator of hepatic glucose production, which is partly mediated by up-regulating glucose utilization and glycogen storage

  5. Singing can improve speech function in aphasics associated with intact right basal ganglia and preserve right temporal glucose metabolism: Implications for singing therapy indication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanuma, Kyoko; Meguro, Kenichi; Satoh, Masayuki; Tashiro, Manabu; Itoh, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Clinically, we know that some aphasic patients can sing well despite their speech disturbances. Herein, we report 10 patients with non-fluent aphasia, of which half of the patients improved their speech function after singing training. We studied ten patients with non-fluent aphasia complaining of difficulty finding words. All had lesions in the left basal ganglia or temporal lobe. They selected the melodies they knew well, but which they could not sing. We made a new lyric with a familiar melody using words they could not name. The singing training using these new lyrics was performed for 30 minutes once a week for 10 weeks. Before and after the training, their speech functions were assessed by language tests. At baseline, 6 of them received positron emission tomography to evaluate glucose metabolism. Five patients exhibited improvements after intervention; all but one exhibited intact right basal ganglia and left temporal lobes, but all exhibited left basal ganglia lesions. Among them, three subjects exhibited preserved glucose metabolism in the right temporal lobe. We considered that patients who exhibit intact right basal ganglia and left temporal lobes, together with preserved right hemispheric glucose metabolism, might be an indication of the effectiveness of singing therapy.

  6. Peripheral effects of insulin dominate suppression of fasting hepatic glucose production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ader, M.; Bergman, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    Insulin may suppress hepatic glucose production directly, or indirectly via suppression of release of gluconeogenic substrates from extrasplanchnic tissues. To compare these mechanisms, we performed insulin dose-response experiments in conscious dogs at euglycemia, during somatostatin infusion, and intraportal glucagon replacement. Insulin was sequentially infused either intraportally (0.05, 0.20, 0.40, 1.0, 1.4, and/or 3.0; protocol I) or systemically at half the intraportal rate (0.025, 0.10, 0.20, 0.50, 0.70, and/or 1.5 mU.min-1.kg-1; protocol II). Exogenous glucose infused during clamps was labeled with 3-[3H]glucose (2 microCi/g) to prevent a fall in plasma specific activity (P greater than 0.2) that may have contributed to previous underestimations of hepatic glucose output (HGO). Portal insulins were up to threefold higher during intraportal infusion, but peripheral insulin levels were not different between the intraportal and systemic protocols [7 +/- 5 vs. 9 +/- 1, 12 +/- 4 vs. 13 +/- 6, 16 +/- 3 vs. 27 +/- 5, 70 +/- 23 vs. 48 +/- 8, 83 +/- 3 vs. 86 +/- 21, and 128 vs. 120 +/- 14 microU/ml for paired insulin doses; P greater than 0.06 by analysis of variance (ANOVA)]. Despite higher portal insulin levels in protocol I, HGO suppression was equivalent in the two protocols when systemic insulin was matched, from 3.3 +/- 0.1 to near-total suppression at 0.3 mg.min-1.kg-1 at the highest insulin infusion rate (3.0 mU.min-1.kg-1; P less than 0.0001) with intraportal insulin, from 2.9 +/- 0.8 to -0.8 +/- 0.2 mg.min-1.kg-1 in protocol II (P less than 0.001). Suppression of HGO was similar at matched systemic insulin, regardless of portal insulin, suggesting the primacy of insulin's action on the periphery in its restraint of hepatic glucose production

  7. Hepatitis B virus basal core promoter/precore mutants and association with liver cirrhosis in children with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Y W; Di, F L; Liu, C; Zhang, X C; Bi, J F; Li, Y L; Wu, S Q; Dong, H; Liu, L M; He, J; Shi, Y M; Zhang, H F; Zhang, M

    2016-04-01

    We investigated 168 children and analysed the virological characterization and association with disease progression in children with hepatitis B virus (HBV) basal core promoter/precore (BCP/PC) mutants. Among 168 patients with HBV infection (aged 0.5-18 years old, mean 10.1), 86 of them had HBV-related liver cirrhosis (LC) and 82 had HBV-related chronic hepatitis B (CHB). A direct sequencing method was employed to determine the HBV genotypes and the mutations in BCP/PC regions. In all, 133 of them were infected with genotype C viruses (79.17%); only 35 patients (20.83%) were infected with genotype B viruses. Both LC patients and CHB patients had significantly higher ratios of genotype C when compared with the ratios of genotype B (83.7%-16.3% versus 74.4%-25.6%). For patients with CHB, the prevalence of BCP/PC wild-type viruses was 52.4%; but this was only 4.7% in patients with LC. The C1653T, T1753C, A1762T/G1764A and G1896A mutations had a significantly higher prevalence in patients with LC. Among all the patients with genotype B viruses, those with LC had lower HBV DNA levels and higher G1899A mutation frequency than patients with CHB. Among all the patients with genotype C viruses, the patients with LC had higher prevalence of C1653T, A1762T/G1764A and G1896A mutation frequency, higher hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) -negative rates, lower viral load, lower elevated alanine aminotransferase and lower anti-HBe positive rates than CHB patients. The HBV BCP/PC variants were more common in HBeAg-negative LC patients than in the CHB group (BCP, 53.4% versus 15.6%; PC, 18.6% versus 3.7%, respectively, p viruses, high viral load and C1653T, A1762T/G1764A, G1896A mutant viruses, were more susceptible to developing LC. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 inhibition on hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnick, J J; Ramnanan, C J; Saraswathi, V; Roop, J; Scott, M; Jacobson, P; Jung, P; Basu, R; Cherrington, A D; Edgerton, D S

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of prolonged 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 (11β-HSD1) inhibition on basal and hormone-stimulated glucose metabolism in fasted conscious dogs. For 7 days prior to study, either an 11β-HSD1 inhibitor (HSD1-I; n = 6) or placebo (PBO; n = 6) was administered. After the basal period, a 4-h metabolic challenge followed, where glucagon (3×-basal), epinephrine (5×-basal), and insulin (2×-basal) concentrations were increased. Hepatic glucose fluxes did not differ between groups during the basal period. In response to the metabolic challenge, hepatic glucose production was stimulated in PBO, resulting in hyperglycemia such that exogenous glucose was required in HSD-I (P < 0.05) to match the glycemia between groups. Net hepatic glucose output and endogenous glucose production were decreased by 11β-HSD1 inhibition (P < 0.05) due to a reduction in net hepatic glycogenolysis (P < 0.05), with no effect on gluconeogenic flux compared with PBO. In addition, glucose utilization (P < 0.05) and the suppression of lipolysis were increased (P < 0.05) in HSD-I compared with PBO. These data suggest that inhibition of 11β-HSD1 may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of diseases characterized by insulin resistance and excessive hepatic glucose production.

  9. Hepatic rather than cardiac steatosis relates to glucose intolerance in women with prior gestational diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Winhofer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased myocardial lipid accumulation has been described in patients with pre- and overt type 2 diabetes and could underlie the development of left-ventricular dysfunction in metabolic diseases (diabetic cardiomyopathy. Since women with prior gestational diabetes (pGDM display a generally young population at high risk of developing diabetes and associated cardiovascular complications, we aimed to assess whether myocardial lipid accumulation can be detected at early stages of glucose intolerance and relates to markers of hepatic steatosis (Fatty Liver Index, cardiac function, insulin sensitivity and secretion. METHODS: Myocardial lipid content (MYCL, left-ventricular function (1H-magnetic-resonance-spectroscopy and -imaging, insulin sensitivity/secretion (oral glucose tolerance test and the fatty liver index (FLI were assessed in 35 pGDM (45.6±7.0 years, 28.3±4.8 kg/m2 and 14 healthy control females (CON; 44.7±9.8 years, 26.1±2.5 kg/m2, matching for age and body-mass-index (each p>0.1. RESULTS: Of 35 pGDM, 9 displayed normal glucose tolerance (NGT, 6 impaired glucose regulation (IGR and 20 had been already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2DM. MYCL and cardiac function were comparable between pGDM and CON; in addition, no evidence of left-ventricular dysfunction was observed. MYCL was inversely correlated with the ejection fraction in T2DM (R = -0.45, p<0.05, while the FLI was tightly correlated with metabolic parameters (such as HbA1C, fasting plasma glucose and HDL-cholesterol and rose along GT-groups. CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence of cardiac steatosis in middle-aged women with prior gestational diabetes, suggesting that cardiac complications might develop later in the time-course of diabetes and may be accelerated by the co-existence of further risk factors, whereas hepatic steatosis remains a valid biomarker for metabolic diseases even in this rather young female cohort.

  10. Selective Inhibition of FOXO1 Activator/Repressor Balance Modulates Hepatic Glucose Handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlet, Fanny; Haeusler, Rebecca A; Lindén, Daniel; Ericson, Elke; Norris, Tyrrell; Johansson, Anders; Cook, Joshua R; Aizawa, Kumiko; Wang, Ling; Buettner, Christoph; Accili, Domenico

    2017-11-02

    Insulin resistance is a hallmark of diabetes and an unmet clinical need. Insulin inhibits hepatic glucose production and promotes lipogenesis by suppressing FOXO1-dependent activation of G6pase and inhibition of glucokinase, respectively. The tight coupling of these events poses a dual conundrum: mechanistically, as the FOXO1 corepressor of glucokinase is unknown, and clinically, as inhibition of glucose production is predicted to increase lipogenesis. Here, we report that SIN3A is the insulin-sensitive FOXO1 corepressor of glucokinase. Genetic ablation of SIN3A abolishes nutrient regulation of glucokinase without affecting other FOXO1 target genes and lowers glycemia without concurrent steatosis. To extend this work, we executed a small-molecule screen and discovered selective inhibitors of FOXO-dependent glucose production devoid of lipogenic activity in hepatocytes. In addition to identifying a novel mode of insulin action, these data raise the possibility of developing selective modulators of unliganded transcription factors to dial out adverse effects of insulin sensitizers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α deficiency leads to metabolic reprogramming in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jun-Ho; Kim, Goo-Young; Mansfield, Brian C; Chou, Janice Y

    2018-04-15

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC), a key enzyme in endogenous glucose production. This autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and long-term complications of hepatocellular adenoma/carcinoma (HCA/HCC). We have shown that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency-mediated steatosis leads to defective autophagy that is frequently associated with carcinogenesis. We now show that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency also leads to enhancement of hepatic glycolysis and hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) that can contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis. The enhanced hepatic glycolysis is reflected by increased lactate accumulation, increased expression of many glycolytic enzymes, and elevated expression of c-Myc that stimulates glycolysis. The increased HMS is reflected by increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and elevated production of NADPH and the reduced glutathione. We have previously shown that restoration of hepatic G6Pase-α expression in G6Pase-α-deficient liver corrects metabolic abnormalities, normalizes autophagy, and prevents HCA/HCC development in GSD-Ia. We now show that restoration of hepatic G6Pase-α expression normalizes both glycolysis and HMS in GSD-Ia. Moreover, the HCA/HCC lesions in L-G6pc-/- mice exhibit elevated levels of hexokinase 2 (HK2) and the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) which play an important role in aerobic glycolysis and cancer cell proliferation. Taken together, hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency causes metabolic reprogramming, leading to enhanced glycolysis and elevated HMS that along with impaired autophagy can contribute to HCA/HCC development in GSD-Ia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Glycogen storage disease type Ia mice with less than 2% of normal hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α activity restored are at risk of developing hepatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Goo-Young; Lee, Young Mok; Kwon, Joon Hyun; Cho, Jun-Ho; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Starost, Matthew F; Mansfield, Brian C; Chou, Janice Y

    2017-03-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and chronic risk of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) and carcinoma (HCC), is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC). We have previously shown that G6pc-/- mice receiving gene transfer mediated by rAAV-G6PC, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing G6Pase-α, and expressing 3-63% of normal hepatic G6Pase-α activity maintain glucose homeostasis and do not develop HCA/HCC. However, the threshold of hepatic G6Pase-α activity required to prevent tumor formation remained unknown. In this study, we constructed rAAV-co-G6PC, a rAAV vector expressing a codon-optimized (co) G6Pase-α and showed that rAAV-co-G6PC was more efficacious than rAAV-G6PC in directing hepatic G6Pase-α expression. Over an 88-week study, we showed that both rAAV-G6PC- and rAAV-co-G6PC-treated G6pc-/- mice expressing 3-33% of normal hepatic G6Pase-α activity (AAV mice) maintained glucose homeostasis, lacked HCA/HCC, and were protected against age-related obesity and insulin resistance. Of the eleven rAAV-G6PC/rAAV-co-G6PC-treated G6pc-/- mice harboring 0.9-2.4% of normal hepatic G6Pase-α activity (AAV-low mice), 3 expressing 0.9-1.3% of normal hepatic G6Pase-α activity developed HCA/HCC, while 8 did not (AAV-low-NT). Finally, we showed that the AAV-low-NT mice exhibited a phenotype indistinguishable from that of AAV mice expressing ≥3% of normal hepatic G6Pase-α activity. The results establish the threshold of hepatic G6Pase-α activity required to prevent HCA/HCC and show that GSD-Ia mice harboring <2% of normal hepatic G6Pase-α activity are at risk of tumor development. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. EFFECTS OF GLUCOSE-INFUSION ON HORMONE-SECRETION AND HEPATIC GLUCOSE-PRODUCTION DURING HEAVY EXERCISE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERSMA, MML; VISSING, J; STEFFENS, AB; GALBO, H

    1993-01-01

    Blood-borne metabolic feedback vs. neural feedforward regulation of glucose homeostasis during exercise was investigated by infusing glucose and [H-3]glucose for glucose appearance determination intravenously in rats running for 20 min at 28 m/min [almost-equal-to 85% of maximal 02 consumption

  14. The influence of social status on hepatic glucose metabolism in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Kathleen M; Kirkpatrick, Sheryn; Massarsky, Andrey; Pearce, Brenda; Saliba, Sarah; Stephany, Céleste-Élise; Moon, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    The effects of chronic social stress on hepatic glycogen metabolism were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss by comparing hepatocyte glucose production, liver glycogen phosphorylase (GP) activity, and liver β-adrenergic receptors in dominant, subordinate, control, fasted, and cortisol-treated fish. Hepatocyte glucose production in subordinate fish was approximately half that of dominant fish, reflecting hepatocyte glycogen stores in subordinate trout that were just 16% of those in dominant fish. Fasting and/or chronic elevation of cortisol likely contributed to these differences based on similarities among subordinate, fasted, and cortisol-treated fish. However, calculation of the "glycogen gap"--the difference between glycogen stores used and glucose produced--suggested an enhanced gluconeogenic potential in subordinate fish that was not present in fasted or cortisol-treated trout. Subordinate, fasted, and cortisol-treated trout also exhibited similar GP activities (both total activity and that of the active or a form), and these activities were in all cases significantly lower than those in control trout, perhaps reflecting an attempt to protect liver glycogen stores or a modified capacity to activate GP. Dominant trout exhibited the lowest GP activities (20%-24% of the values in control trout). Low GP activities, presumably in conjunction with incoming energy from feeding, allowed dominant fish to achieve the highest liver glycogen concentrations (double the value in control trout). Liver membrane β-adrenoceptor numbers (assessed as the number of (3)H-CGP binding sites) were significantly lower in subordinate than in dominant trout, although this difference did not translate into attenuated adrenergic responsiveness in hepatocyte glucose production in vitro. Transcriptional regulation, likely as a result of fasting, was indicated by significantly lower β(2)-adrenoceptor relative mRNA levels in subordinate and fasted trout. Collectively, the data

  15. Loss of Hepatic Mitochondrial Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Confers Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity and Glucose Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Selen Alpergin, Ebru S; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas; Scafidi, Susanna; Riddle, Ryan C; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2017-07-18

    The liver has a large capacity for mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation, which is critical for systemic metabolic adaptations such as gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid oxidation in response to a chronic high-fat diet (HFD), we generated mice with a liver-specific deficiency of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation (Cpt2 L-/- mice). Paradoxically, Cpt2 L-/- mice were resistant to HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance with an absence of liver damage, although they exhibited serum dyslipidemia, hepatic oxidative stress, and systemic carnitine deficiency. Feeding an HFD induced hepatokines in mice, with a loss of hepatic fatty acid oxidation that enhanced systemic energy expenditure and suppressed adiposity. Additionally, the suppression in hepatic gluconeogenesis was sufficient to improve HFD-induced glucose intolerance. These data show that inhibiting hepatic fatty acid oxidation results in a systemic hormetic response that protects mice from HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Loss of Hepatic Mitochondrial Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Confers Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity and Glucose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The liver has a large capacity for mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation, which is critical for systemic metabolic adaptations such as gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid oxidation in response to a chronic high-fat diet (HFD, we generated mice with a liver-specific deficiency of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation (Cpt2L−/− mice. Paradoxically, Cpt2L−/− mice were resistant to HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance with an absence of liver damage, although they exhibited serum dyslipidemia, hepatic oxidative stress, and systemic carnitine deficiency. Feeding an HFD induced hepatokines in mice, with a loss of hepatic fatty acid oxidation that enhanced systemic energy expenditure and suppressed adiposity. Additionally, the suppression in hepatic gluconeogenesis was sufficient to improve HFD-induced glucose intolerance. These data show that inhibiting hepatic fatty acid oxidation results in a systemic hormetic response that protects mice from HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance.

  17. Interregional correlations of glucose metabolism between the basal ganglia and different cortical areas: an ultra-high resolution PET/MRI fusion study using 18F-FDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Son, Y D; Kim, J M; Kim, H K; Kim, Y B; Lee, C; Oh, C H

    2017-11-13

    Basal ganglia have complex functional connections with the cerebral cortex and are involved in motor control, executive functions of the forebrain, such as the planning of movement, and cognitive behaviors based on their connections. The aim of this study was to provide detailed functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex by conducting an interregional correlation analysis of the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) data based on precise structural information. Fifteen participants were scanned with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high resolution research tomography (HRRT)-PET fusion system using 18F-FDG. For detailed interregional correlation analysis, 24 subregions of the basal ganglia including pre-commissural dorsal caudate, post-commissural caudate, pre-commissural dorsal putamen, post-commissural putamen, internal globus pallidus, and external globus pallidus and 80 cerebral regions were selected as regions of interest on the MRI image and their glucose metabolism were calculated from the PET images. Pearson's product-moment correlation analysis was conducted for the interregional correlation analysis of the basal ganglia. Functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex were not only consistent with the findings of previous studies, but also showed new functional correlation between the dorsal striatum (i.e., caudate nucleus and putamen) and insula. In this study, we established the detailed basal ganglia subregional functional correlation patterns using 18F-FDG PET/MRI fusion imaging. Our methods and results could potentially be an important resource for investigating basal ganglia dysfunction as well as for conducting functional studies in the context of movement and psychiatric disorders.

  18. Intracellular mechanism of action of sympathetic hepatic nerves on glucose and lactate balance in perfused rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballé, C.; Beuers, U.; ENGELHARDT, R.; JUNGERMANN, K.

    1987-01-01

    In rat liver perfused in situ stimulation of the nerve plexus around the hepatic artery and the portal vein caused an increase in glucose output and a shift from lactate uptake to output. The effects of nerve stimulation on some key enzymes, metabolites and effectors of carbohydrate metabolism were

  19. Pathways of hepatic glycogen formation in humans following ingestion of a glucose load in the fed state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Schumann, W.C.; Kumaran, K.; Wahren, J.; Landau, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The relative contributions of the direct and the indirect pathways to hepatic glycogen formation following a glucose load given to humans four hours after a substantial breakfast have been examined. Glucose loads labeled with [6-( 14 )C]glucose were given to six healthy volunteers along with diflunisal (1 g) or acetaminophen (1.5 g), drugs excreted in urine as glucuronides. Distribution of 14 C in the glucose unit of the glucuronide was taken as a measure of the extent to which glucose was deposited directly in liver glycogen (ie, glucose----glucose-6-phosphate----glycogen) rather than indirectly (ie, glucose----C3-compound----glucose-6-phosphate----glycogen). The maximum contribution to glycogen formation by the direct pathway was estimated to be 77% +/- 4%, which is somewhat higher than previous estimates in humans fasted overnight (65% +/- 1%, P less than 0.05). Thus, the indirect pathway of liver glycogen formation following a glucose load is operative in both the overnight fasted and the fed state, although its contribution may be somewhat less in the fed state

  20. Fermented Moringa oleifera Decreases Hepatic Adiposity and Ameliorates Glucose Intolerance in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Hyunchae; Kim, Bobae; Park, Hyunjoon; Lee, Kyuyeon; Kim, Hee-Hoon; Sim, Ho-Cheol; Do, Hyun-Jin; Hyun, Chang-Kee; Do, Myoung-Sool

    2017-05-01

    Metabolic diseases, such as glucose intolerance and nonalcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD), are primary risk factors for life-threatening conditions such as diabetes, heart attack, stroke, and hepatic cancer. Extracts from the tropical tree Moringa oleifera show antidiabetic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Fermentation can further improve the safety and nutritional value of certain foods. We investigated the efficacy of fermented M. oleifera extract (FM) against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced glucose intolerance and hepatic lipid accumulation and investigated the underlying mechanisms by analyzing expression of proteins and genes involved in glucose and lipid regulation. C57BL/6 mice were fed with normal chow diet (ND) or HFD supplemented with distilled water (DW, control), nonfermented M. oleifera extract (NFM), or FM for 10 weeks. Although body weights were similar among HFD-fed treatment groups, liver weight was decreased, and glucose tolerance test (GTT) results improved in the FM group compared with DW and NFM groups. Hepatic lipid accumulation was also lower in the FM group, and expressions of genes involved in liver lipid metabolism were upregulated. In addition, HFD-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity in quadriceps muscles were decreased by FM. Finally, proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression was decreased by FM in the liver, epididymal adipose tissue, and quadriceps of HFD-fed mice. FMs may decrease glucose intolerance and NAFLD under HFD-induced obesity by decreasing ER stress, oxidative stress, and inflammation.

  1. Involvement of KLF11 in hepatic glucose metabolism in mice via suppressing of PEPCK-C expression.

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    Huabing Zhang

    Full Text Available Abnormal hepatic gluconeogenesis is related to hyperglycemia in mammals with insulin resistance. Despite the strong evidences linking Krüppel-like factor 11 (KLF11 gene mutations to development of Type 2 diabetes, the precise physiological functions of KLF11 in vivo remain largely unknown.In current investigation, we showed that KLF11 is involved in modulating hepatic glucose metabolism in mice. Overexpression of KLF11 in primary mouse hepatocytes could inhibit the expression of gluconeogenic genes, including phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (cytosolic isoform, PEPCK-C and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α, subsequently decreasing the cellular glucose output. Diabetic mice with overexpression of KLF11 gene in livers significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance; in contrast, the knockdown of KLF11 expression in db/m and C57BL/6J mice livers impaired glucose tolerance.Our data strongly indicated the involvement of KLF11 in hepatic glucose homeostasis via modulating the expression of PEPCK-C.

  2. Comparison of the direct and indirect effects of epinephrine on hepatic glucose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C A; Sindelar, D K; Neal, D W; Allen, E J; Donahue, E P; Cherrington, A D

    1997-03-01

    To determine the extent to which the effect of a physiologic increment in epinephrine (EPI) on glucose production (GP) arises indirectly from its action on peripheral tissues (muscle and adipose tissue), epinephrine was infused intraportally (EPI po) or peripherally (EPI pe) into 18-h-fasted conscious dogs maintained on a pancreatic clamp. Arterial EPI levels in EPI po and EPI pe groups rose from 97 +/- 29 to 107 +/- 37 and 42 +/- 12 to 1,064 +/- 144 pg/ml, respectively. Hepatic sinusoidal EPI levels in EPI po and EPI pe were indistinguishable (561 +/- 84 and 568 +/- 75 pg/ml, respectively). During peripheral epinephrine infusion, GP increased from 2.2 +/- 0.1 to 5.1 +/- 0.2 mg/kg x min (10 min). In the presence of the same rise in sinusoidal EPI, but with no rise in arterial EPI (during portal EPI infusion), GP increased from 2.1 +/- 0.1 to 3.8 +/- 0.6 mg/kg x min. Peripheral EPI infusion increased the maximal gluconeogenic rate from 0.7 +/- 0.4 to 1.8 +/- 0.5 mg/ kg x min. Portal EPI infusion did not change the maximal gluconeogenic rate. The estimated initial increase in glycogenolysis was approximately 1.7 and 2.3 mg/kg x min in the EPI pe and EPI po groups, respectively. Gluconeogenesis was responsible for 60% of the overall increase in glucose production stimulated by the increase in plasma epinephrine (EPI pe). Elevation of sinusoidal EPI per se had no direct gluconeogenic effect on the liver, thus its effect on glucose production was solely attributable to an increase in glycogenolysis. Lastly, the gluconeogenic effects of EPI markedly decreased (60-80%) its overall glycogenolytic action on the liver.

  3. Regulated basal and bolus insulin release from glucose-responsive core-shell microspheres based on concanavalin A-sugar affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Meirong; He, Jing; Kang, Liangfa; Nie, Jun; Yin, Ruixue

    2018-03-07

    Individual insulin therapy considering the heterogeneity of insulin resistance between patients may bring more benefits than conventional therapy. Therefore, in glucose-responsive insulin delivery systems, more attention should be paid on further regulation of insulin release to meet individual requirements. Our study shows the feasibility of using a photo-crosslinkable shell layer to regulate basal and bolus insulin release from glucose-responsive Con A-polysaccharides network. Core-shell microspheres were fabricated through a two-step high-speed shear-emulsification method. The morphology was observed by SEM and TEM, and the core-shell structure was confirmed by the differences in chemical composition between core-shell and single-layer microspheres obtained from XPS and IR analysis. In vitro insulin release test revealed that the core-shell microspheres with or without light-irradiation could maintain corresponding bolus and basal insulin release in response to different glucose concentration but enable much lower burst release compared with single-layer microspheres without shell. Meanwhile, insulin release rate and amount could be further decreased upon light-irradiation owing to the photo-induced cycloaddition of cinnamate pendant groups of the shell material. The released insulin was proved to remain active according to fluorescence and circular dichroism analysis. The HDF cell viability assessment suggested that the core-shell microspheres possessed no in vitro cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Embryonic liver fordin is involved in glucose glycolysis of hepatic stellate cell by regulating PI3K/Akt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wei; Ye, Jin; Wang, Zhi-Jun

    2016-10-14

    To investigate the role of embryonic liver fordin (ELF) in liver fibrosis by regulating hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) glucose glycolysis. The expression of ELF and the glucose glycolysis-related proteins were evaluated in activated HSCs. siRNA was used to silence ELF expression in activated HSCs in vitro and the subsequent changes in PI3K/Akt signaling and glucose glycolysis-related proteins were observed. The expression of ELF increased remarkably in HSCs of the fibrosis mouse model and HSCs that were cultured for 3 wk in vitro . Glucose glycolysis-related proteins showed an obvious increase in the activated HSCs, such as phosphofructokinase, platelet and glucose transporter 1. ELF-siRNA, which perfectly silenced the expression of ELF in activated HSCs, led to the induction of glucose glycolysis-related proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Moreover, pAkt, which is an important downstream factor in PI3K/Akt signaling, showed a significant change in response to the ELF silencing. The expression of glucose glycolysis-related proteins and ECM components decreased remarkably when the PI3K/Akt signaling was blocked by Ly294002 in the activated HSCs. ELF is involved in HSC glucose glycolysis by regulating PI3K/Akt signaling.

  5. The Action of Antidiabetic Plants of the Canadian James Bay Cree Traditional Pharmacopeia on Key Enzymes of Hepatic Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Nachar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the capacity of putative antidiabetic plants used by the Eastern James Bay Cree (Canada to modulate key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and glycogen synthesis and key regulating kinases. Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase and glycogen synthase (GS activities were assessed in cultured hepatocytes treated with crude extracts of seventeen plant species. Phosphorylation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK, Akt, and Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 were probed by Western blot. Seven of the seventeen plant extracts significantly decreased G6Pase activity, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca, exerting an effect similar to insulin. This action involved both Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, several plant extracts activated GS, Larix laricina and A. balsamea, far exceeding the action of insulin. We also found a significant correlation between GS stimulation and GSK-3 phosphorylation induced by plant extract treatments. In summary, three Cree plants stand out for marked effects on hepatic glucose homeostasis. P. glauca affects glucose production whereas L. laricina rather acts on glucose storage. However, A. balsamea has the most promising profile, simultaneously and powerfully reducing G6Pase and stimulating GS. Our studies thus confirm that the reduction of hepatic glucose production likely contributes to the therapeutic potential of several antidiabetic Cree traditional medicines.

  6. Effects of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 inhibition on hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Winnick, J. J.; Ramnanan, C. J.; Saraswathi, V.; Roop, J.; Scott, M.; Jacobson, P.; Jung, P.; Basu, R.; Cherrington, A. D.; Edgerton, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of prolonged 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 (11β-HSD1) inhibition on basal and hormone-stimulated glucose metabolism in fasted conscious dogs. For 7 days prior to study, either an 11β-HSD1 inhibitor (HSD1-I; n = 6) or placebo (PBO; n = 6) was administered. After the basal period, a 4-h metabolic challenge followed, where glucagon (3×-basal), epinephrine (5×-basal), and insulin (2×-basal) concentrations were increased. Hepatic glucose fluxe...

  7. Central IKK2 inhibition ameliorates air pollution mediated hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism dysfunction in mice with type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing; Zhang, Guoqing; Chen, Rucheng; Li, Ran; Wang, Huanhuan; Jiang, Apei; Li, Zhenwei; Kong, Liya; Fonken, Laura K; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Sun, Qinghua; Liu, Cuiqing

    2018-04-09

    Previous studies supported a role of hypothalamic inflammation in fine ambient particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure-mediated diabetes development. We therefore investigated the effects of PM2.5 exposure on insulin resistance and the disorders of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism via hypothalamic inflammation. KKAy mice, a genetically susceptible model of Type II diabetes mellitus, were administered intra-cerebroventricularly with IKK2 inhibitor (IMD-0354) and were exposed to either concentrated PM2.5 or filtered air (FA) for four weeks simultaneously via a versatile aerosol concentration exposure system. At the end of the exposure, fasting blood glucose and serum insulin were evaluated before epididymal adipose tissue and liver were collected, flow cytometry, quantitative PCR and Western blot were performed at euthanasia. We observed that intra-cerebroventricular administration of IMD-0354 attenuated insulin resistance, inhibited macrophage polarization to M1 phenotype in epididymal adipose tissue in response to PM2.5 exposure. Although the treatment did not affect hepatic inflammation or endoplasmic reticulum stress, it inhibited the expression of the enzymes for gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis in the liver. Therefore, our current finding indicates an important role of hypothalamic inflammation in PM2.5 exposure-mediated hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism disorder.

  8. Effect of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 inhibition on hepatic glucose metabolism in the conscious dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rita; Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Farmer, Tiffany D.; Neal, Doss; Scott, Melanie; Jacobson, Peer; Rizza, Robert A.; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Inactive cortisone is converted to active cortisol within the liver by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 (11β-HSD1), and impaired regulation of this process may be related to increased hepatic glucose production (HGP) in individuals with type 2 diabetes. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute 11β-HSD1 inhibition on HGP and fat metabolism during insulin deficiency. Sixteen conscious, 42-h-fasted, lean, healthy dogs were studied. Somatostatin was infused to create insulin deficiency, and the animals were treated with a specific 11β-HSD1 inhibitor (compound 531) or placebo for 5 h. 11β-HSD1 inhibition completely suppressed hepatic cortisol production, and this attenuated the increase in HGP that occurred during insulin deficiency. PEPCK and glucose-6-phosphatase expression were decreased when 11β-HSD1 was inhibited, but gluconeogenic flux was unchanged, implying an effect on glycogenolysis. Since inhibition of hepatic cortisol production reduces HGP during insulin deficiency, 11β-HSD1 is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of excess glucose production that occurs in diabetes. PMID:20159854

  9. Effect of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 inhibition on hepatic glucose metabolism in the conscious dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, Dale S; Basu, Rita; Ramnanan, Christopher J; Farmer, Tiffany D; Neal, Doss; Scott, Melanie; Jacobson, Peer; Rizza, Robert A; Cherrington, Alan D

    2010-05-01

    Inactive cortisone is converted to active cortisol within the liver by 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 (11 beta-HSD1), and impaired regulation of this process may be related to increased hepatic glucose production (HGP) in individuals with type 2 diabetes. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute 11 beta-HSD1 inhibition on HGP and fat metabolism during insulin deficiency. Sixteen conscious, 42-h-fasted, lean, healthy dogs were studied. Somatostatin was infused to create insulin deficiency, and the animals were treated with a specific 11 beta-HSD1 inhibitor (compound 531) or placebo for 5 h. 11 beta-HSD1 inhibition completely suppressed hepatic cortisol production, and this attenuated the increase in HGP that occurred during insulin deficiency. PEPCK and glucose-6-phosphatase expression were decreased when 11 beta-HSD1 was inhibited, but gluconeogenic flux was unchanged, implying an effect on glycogenolysis. Since inhibition of hepatic cortisol production reduces HGP during insulin deficiency, 11 beta-HSD1 is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of excess glucose production that occurs in diabetes.

  10. Distinct Prandial and Basal Glucose-Lowering Effects of Insulin Degludec/Insulin Aspart (IDegAsp) at Steady State in Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Tim; Nosek, Leszek; Roepstorff, Carsten; Chenji, Suresh; Klein, Oliver; Haahr, Hanne

    2014-06-01

    Insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) is a soluble co-formulation of long-acting and short-acting insulin analogs. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacodynamic response of once-daily IDegAsp dosing in patients with type 1 diabetes. Pharmacokinetic response, as well as safety and tolerability, were assessed as secondary objectives. This was a single-center, open-label, single-arm study. Twenty-two subjects received once-daily insulin degludec (IDeg) (0.42 U/kg) for five consecutive days [with separate bolus insulin aspart (IAsp) as needed for safety and glycemic control], to achieve clinical steady state of the basal component. On Day 6, they received a single injection of IDegAsp (0.6 U/kg, comprising 0.42 U/kg IDeg and 0.18 U/kg IAsp). Pharmacodynamic response was assessed using a 30-h euglycemic glucose clamp, with blood glucose stabilized at a target of 5.5 mmol/L. The glucose infusion rate profile showed a rapid onset of action and a distinct peak due to IAsp, followed by a separate, flat and stable basal glucose-lowering effect due to the IDeg component. Modeling data suggested that the pharmacodynamic profile of IDegAsp was retained with twice-daily dosing (allowing for coverage of two main meals daily). IDegAsp was well tolerated and no safety issues were identified in this trial. In conclusion, the IAsp component of IDegAsp has a fast onset of appearance and a peak covering the prandial phase, while the IDeg component has a flat and an evenly distributed pharmacokinetic profile over 24 h. IDegAsp is the first co-formulation of a basal insulin analog with an ultra-long duration of action and a mealtime insulin analog in a single soluble injection. These properties translate into clinically relevant benefits, including improved glycemic control and reduction in hypoglycemia.

  11. Altered effective connectivity network of the basal ganglia in low-grade hepatic encephalopathy: a resting-state fMRI study with Granger causality analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfeng Qi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The basal ganglia often show abnormal metabolism and intracranial hemodynamics in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE. Little is known about how the basal ganglia affect other brain system and is affected by other brain regions in HE. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effective connectivity network associated with the basal ganglia is disturbed in HE patients by using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty five low-grade HE patients and thirty five age- and gender- matched healthy controls participated in the rs-fMRI scans. The effective connectivity networks associated with the globus pallidus, the primarily affected region within basal ganglia in HE, were characterized by using the Granger causality analysis and compared between HE patients and healthy controls. Pearson correlation analysis was performed between the abnormal effective connectivity and venous blood ammonia levels and neuropsychological performances of all HE patients. Compared with the healthy controls, patients with low-grade HE demonstrated mutually decreased influence between the globus pallidus and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, cuneus, bi-directionally increased influence between the globus pallidus and the precuneus, and either decreased or increased influence from and to the globus pallidus in many other frontal, temporal, parietal gyri, and cerebellum. Pearson correlation analyses revealed that the blood ammonia levels in HE patients negatively correlated with effective connectivity from the globus pallidus to ACC, and positively correlated with that from the globus pallidus to precuneus; and the number connectivity test scores in patients negatively correlated with the effective connectivity from the globus pallidus to ACC, and from superior frontal gyrus to globus pallidus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low-grade HE patients had disrupted effective

  12. Clinical features of male patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis or hepatitis B cirrhosis complicated by abnormal glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Qidan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical features of male patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC or hepatitis B cirrhosis (HBC complicated by abnormal glucose metabolism. MethodsA total of 287 patients with liver cirrhosis who were admitted to Guangzhou Panyu Central Hospital from January 2008 to September 2013 were selected. Among these patients, 74 had ALC and were all male, including 54 with abnormal glucose metabolism; the other 213 had HBC, including 97 with abnormal glucose metabolism (69 male patients and 28 female patients. A controlled study was performed for the clinical data of ALC and HBC patients with abnormal glucose metabolism, to investigate the association of patients′ clinical manifestations with the indices for laboratory examination, insulin resistance index, incidence rate of abnormal glucose metabolism, and Child-Pugh class. The t-test was applied for comparison of continuous data between groups, the chi-square test was applied for comparison of categorical data between groups, and the Spearman rank correlation was applied for correlation analysis. ResultsCompared with HBC patients, ALC patients had significantly higher incidence rates of abnormal glucose metabolism (730% vs 32.4%, hepatogenous diabetes (35.1% vs 14.6%, fasting hypoglycemia (27.0% vs 10.3%, and impaired glucose tolerance (31.1% vs 14.1% (χ2=4.371, 3.274, 4.784, and 1.633, all P<0.05. The Spearman correlation analysis showed that in ALC and HBC patients, the incidence rate of abnormal glucose metabolism was positively correlated with Child-Pugh class (rs=0.41, P<005. Compared with the HBC patients with abnormal glucose metabolism, the ALC patients with abnormal glucose metabolism had a significantly higher incidence rate of Child-Pugh class A (χ2=7.520, P=0.001, and a significantly lower incidence rate of Child-Pugh class C (χ2=6.542, P=0.003. There were significant differences in the incidence rates of dim complexion, telangiectasia of the

  13. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 is required for high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjære, Even; Andersen, Charlotte; Myrmel, Lene Secher

    2015-01-01

    -induced glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis using the Timp1 null mice. METHODS: Timp1 knockout (TKO) and wild type (TWT) mice were fed chow, high-fat diet (HFD) or intermediate fat and sucrose diet (IFSD). We determined body weight, body composition, lipid content of the liver, energy intake, energy...... and had lower energy efficiency than TWT mice when fed HFD, but not when fed chow or IFSD. Importantly, TKO mice were protected from development of HFD- as well as IFSD-induced glucose intolerance, hepatic steatosis, and altered expression of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism and inflammation....... CONCLUSION: Collectively, our results indicate that TIMP-1 contributes to the development of diet-induced hepatic steatosis and glucose intolerance and may be a potential therapeutic target....

  14. Intestinal gluconeogenesis is crucial to maintain a physiological fasting glycemia in the absence of hepatic glucose production in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penhoat, Armelle; Fayard, Laetitia; Stefanutti, Anne; Mithieux, Gilles; Rajas, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    Similar to the liver and kidneys, the intestine has been strongly suggested to be a gluconeogenic organ. However, the precise contribution of the intestine to endogenous glucose production (EGP) remains to be determined. To define the quantitative role of intestinal gluconeogenesis during long-term fasting, we compared changes in blood glucose during prolonged fasting in mice with a liver-deletion of the glucose-6 phosphatase catalytic (G6PC) subunit (LKO) and in mice with a combined deletion of G6PC in both the liver and the intestine (ILKO). The LKO and ILKO mice were studied after 6h and 40 h of fasting by measuring metabolic and hormonal plasmatic parameters, as well as the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes in the liver, kidneys and intestine. After a transient hypoglycemic episode (approximately 60 mg/dL) because of their incapacity to mobilize liver glycogen, the LKO mice progressively re-increased their plasma glucose to reach a glycemia comparable to that of wild-type mice (90 mg/dL) from 30 h of fasting. This increase was associated with a rapid induction of renal and intestinal gluconeogenic gene expression, driven by glucagon, glucocorticoids and acidosis. The ILKO mice exhibited a similar induction of renal gluconeogenesis. However, these mice failed to re-increase their glycemia and maintained a plasma glucose level of only 60 mg/dL throughout the 48 h-fasting period. These data indicate that intestinal glucose production is essential to maintain glucose homeostasis in the absence of hepatic glucose production during fasting. These data provide a definitive quantitative estimate of the capacity of intestinal gluconeogenesis to sustain EGP during long-term fasting. © 2013.

  15. Enhanced glucose cycling and suppressed de novo synthesis of glucose-6-phosphate result in a net unchanged hepatic glucose output in ob/ob mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, RHJ; Grefhorst, A; van Dijk, TH; van der Sluijs, FH; Hammer, A; Reijngoud, DJ; Kuipers, F

    2004-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis. Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice are hyperinsulinaemic and hyperglycaemic; however, the cause of hyperglycaemia remains largely unknown. Methods. Glucose metabolism in vivo in 9-h fasted ob/ob mice and lean littermates was studied by infusing [U-C-13]-glucose, [2-C-13]-glycerol,

  16. Minimal hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α activity required to sustain survival and prevent hepatocellular adenoma formation in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Mok; Kim, Goo-Young; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Mansfield, Brian C.; Chou, Janice Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and chronic risk of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA), is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC) activity. In a previous 70–90 week-study, we showed that a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene transfer that restores more than 3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity in G6pc−/− mice corrects hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency with no evidence of HCA. We now examine the minimal hepatic G6Pase-α activity required to confer therapeutic efficacy. We show that rAAV-treated G6pc−/− mice expressing 0.2% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity suffered from frequent hypoglycemic seizures at age 63–65 weeks but mice expressing 0.5–1.3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity (AAV-LL mice) sustain 4–6 h of fast and grow normally to age 75–90 weeks. Despite marked increases in hepatic glycogen accumulation, the AAV-LL mice display no evidence of hepatic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis, or HCA. Interprandial glucose homeostasis is maintained by the G6Pase-α/glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) complex, and G6PT-mediated microsomal G6P uptake is the rate-limiting step in endogenous glucose production. We show that hepatic G6PT activity is increased in AAV-LL mice. These findings are encouraging for clinical studies of G6Pase-α gene-based therapy for GSD-Ia. PMID:26937391

  17. Minimal hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α activity required to sustain survival and prevent hepatocellular adenoma formation in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Mok Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia, characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and chronic risk of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA, is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC activity. In a previous 70–90 week-study, we showed that a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV vector-mediated gene transfer that restores more than 3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity in G6pc−/− mice corrects hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency with no evidence of HCA. We now examine the minimal hepatic G6Pase-α activity required to confer therapeutic efficacy. We show that rAAV-treated G6pc−/− mice expressing 0.2% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity suffered from frequent hypoglycemic seizures at age 63–65 weeks but mice expressing 0.5–1.3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity (AAV-LL mice sustain 4–6 h of fast and grow normally to age 75–90 weeks. Despite marked increases in hepatic glycogen accumulation, the AAV-LL mice display no evidence of hepatic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis, or HCA. Interprandial glucose homeostasis is maintained by the G6Pase-α/glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT complex, and G6PT-mediated microsomal G6P uptake is the rate-limiting step in endogenous glucose production. We show that hepatic G6PT activity is increased in AAV-LL mice. These findings are encouraging for clinical studies of G6Pase-α gene-based therapy for GSD-Ia.

  18. Kinetic Modeling of Human Hepatic Glucose Metabolism in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Predicts Higher Risk of Hypoglycemic Events in Rigorous Insulin Therapy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Matthias; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2012-01-01

    A major problem in the insulin therapy of patients with diabetes type 2 (T2DM) is the increased occurrence of hypoglycemic events which, if left untreated, may cause confusion or fainting and in severe cases seizures, coma, and even death. To elucidate the potential contribution of the liver to hypoglycemia in T2DM we applied a detailed kinetic model of human hepatic glucose metabolism to simulate changes in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen metabolism induced by deviations of the hormones insulin, glucagon, and epinephrine from their normal plasma profiles. Our simulations reveal in line with experimental and clinical data from a multitude of studies in T2DM, (i) significant changes in the relative contribution of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen metabolism to hepatic glucose production and hepatic glucose utilization; (ii) decreased postprandial glycogen storage as well as increased glycogen depletion in overnight fasting and short term fasting; and (iii) a shift of the set point defining the switch between hepatic glucose production and hepatic glucose utilization to elevated plasma glucose levels, respectively, in T2DM relative to normal, healthy subjects. Intriguingly, our model simulations predict a restricted gluconeogenic response of the liver under impaired hormonal signals observed in T2DM, resulting in an increased risk of hypoglycemia. The inability of hepatic glucose metabolism to effectively counterbalance a decline of the blood glucose level becomes even more pronounced in case of tightly controlled insulin treatment. Given this Janus face mode of action of insulin, our model simulations underline the great potential that normalization of the plasma glucagon profile may have for the treatment of T2DM. PMID:22977253

  19. Kinetic modeling of human hepatic glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus predicts higher risk of hypoglycemic events in rigorous insulin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Matthias; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2012-10-26

    A major problem in the insulin therapy of patients with diabetes type 2 (T2DM) is the increased occurrence of hypoglycemic events which, if left untreated, may cause confusion or fainting and in severe cases seizures, coma, and even death. To elucidate the potential contribution of the liver to hypoglycemia in T2DM we applied a detailed kinetic model of human hepatic glucose metabolism to simulate changes in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen metabolism induced by deviations of the hormones insulin, glucagon, and epinephrine from their normal plasma profiles. Our simulations reveal in line with experimental and clinical data from a multitude of studies in T2DM, (i) significant changes in the relative contribution of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen metabolism to hepatic glucose production and hepatic glucose utilization; (ii) decreased postprandial glycogen storage as well as increased glycogen depletion in overnight fasting and short term fasting; and (iii) a shift of the set point defining the switch between hepatic glucose production and hepatic glucose utilization to elevated plasma glucose levels, respectively, in T2DM relative to normal, healthy subjects. Intriguingly, our model simulations predict a restricted gluconeogenic response of the liver under impaired hormonal signals observed in T2DM, resulting in an increased risk of hypoglycemia. The inability of hepatic glucose metabolism to effectively counterbalance a decline of the blood glucose level becomes even more pronounced in case of tightly controlled insulin treatment. Given this Janus face mode of action of insulin, our model simulations underline the great potential that normalization of the plasma glucagon profile may have for the treatment of T2DM.

  20. Correction of Diabetic Hyperglycemia and Amelioration of Metabolic Anomalies by Minicircle DNA Mediated Glucose-Dependent Hepatic Insulin Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tausif Alam

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is caused by immune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Commonly used insulin injection therapy does not provide a dynamic blood glucose control to prevent long-term systemic T1DM-associated damages. Donor shortage and the limited long-term success of islet transplants have stimulated the development of novel therapies for T1DM. Gene therapy-based glucose-regulated hepatic insulin production is a promising strategy to treat T1DM. We have developed gene constructs which cause glucose-concentration-dependent human insulin production in liver cells. A novel set of human insulin expression constructs containing a combination of elements to improve gene transcription, mRNA processing, and translation efficiency were generated as minicircle DNA preparations that lack bacterial and viral DNA. Hepatocytes transduced with the new constructs, ex vivo, produced large amounts of glucose-inducible human insulin. In vivo, insulin minicircle DNA (TA1m treated streptozotocin (STZ-diabetic rats demonstrated euglycemia when fasted or fed, ad libitum. Weight loss due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia was reversed in insulin gene treated diabetic rats to normal rate of weight gain, lasting ∼1 month. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGT demonstrated in vivo glucose-responsive changes in insulin levels to correct hyperglycemia within 45 minutes. A single TA1m treatment raised serum albumin levels in diabetic rats to normal and significantly reduced hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia. Elevated serum levels of aspartate transaminase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase were restored to normal or greatly reduced in treated rats, indicating normalization of liver function. Non-viral insulin minicircle DNA-based TA1m mediated glucose-dependent insulin production in liver may represent a safe and promising approach to treat T1DM.

  1. Hepatic autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staehr, Peter; Hother-Nielsen, Ole; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2007-01-01

    The effect of increased glycogenolysis, simulated by galactose's conversion to glucose, on the contribution of gluconeogenesis (GNG) to hepatic glucose production (GP) was determined. The conversion of galactose to glucose is by the same pathway as glycogen's conversion to glucose, i.e., glucose 1...

  2. Insulin degludec/insulin aspart in Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Distinct prandial and basal glucose-lowering effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Hanne; Sasaki, Tomio; Bardtrum, Lars; Ikushima, Ippei

    2016-07-01

    Insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) is a soluble co-formulation of long-acting insulin degludec (IDeg) and rapid-acting insulin aspart (IAsp). The present study investigated the pharmacodynamic properties of IDegAsp in Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. In this randomized, double-blind, two-period, cross-over trial, 21 Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus received single doses of 0.5 U/kg IDegAsp and biphasic insulin aspart 30 in a randomized sequence (13-21 days washout between treatments). The pharmacodynamic response was evaluated in a 26-h euglycemic glucose clamp (target 5.5 mmol/L). Single-dose IDegAsp glucose infusion rate (GIR) profiles were extrapolated to steady state using modeling. The IDegAsp single-dose GIR profile showed a clear distinction between the effects of the bolus (IAsp) and basal (IDeg) components in IDegAsp. When simulated to steady state, the GIR profile of IDegAsp was shifted upwards compared with the single-dose profile, and showed a rapid onset of action and a distinct peak from the IAsp component followed by a separate and sustained basal action from the long-acting IDeg component. For biphasic insulin aspart 30, the initial shape of the GIR profile was similar to IDegAsp, but GIR continuously decreased from maximum and reached zero 18-20 h post-dosing. The characteristics of the GIR profile for IDegAsp were retained when simulated to steady state in a twice-daily dosing regimen. In Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, the pharmacodynamic profile of IDegAsp is characterized by distinct prandial and basal effects from the IAsp and IDeg components, consistent with what has been reported previously in Caucasian patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Evidence That in Uncontrolled Diabetes, Hyperglucagonemia Is Required for Ketosis but Not for Increased Hepatic Glucose Production or Hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Thomas H; Dorfman, Mauricio D; Matsen, Miles E; Fischer, Jonathan D; Cubelo, Alexis; Kumar, Monica R; Taborsky, Gerald J; Morton, Gregory J

    2015-07-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate excess glucagon secretion in the elevated rates of hepatic glucose production (HGP), hyperglycemia, and ketosis characteristic of uncontrolled insulin-deficient diabetes (uDM), but whether hyperglucagonemia is required for hyperglycemia in this setting is unknown. To address this question, adult male Wistar rats received either streptozotocin (STZ) to induce uDM (STZ-DM) or vehicle and remained nondiabetic. Four days later, animals received daily subcutaneous injections of either the synthetic GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in a dose-escalating regimen to reverse hyperglucagonemia or its vehicle for 10 days. As expected, plasma glucagon levels were elevated in STZ-DM rats, and although liraglutide treatment lowered glucagon levels to those of nondiabetic controls, it failed to attenuate diabetic hyperglycemia, elevated rates of glucose appearance (Ra), or increased hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression. In contrast, it markedly reduced levels of both plasma ketone bodies and hepatic expression of the rate-limiting enzyme involved in ketone body production. To independently confirm this finding, in a separate study, treatment of STZ-DM rats with a glucagon-neutralizing antibody was sufficient to potently lower plasma ketone bodies but failed to normalize elevated levels of either blood glucose or Ra. These data suggest that in rats with uDM, hyperglucagonemia is required for ketosis but not for increased HGP or hyperglycemia. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Improves Hepatic Glucose Metabolism Involving Down-Regulation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B in Obese Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Mu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was initiated to investigate the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB surgery on hepatic glucose metabolism and hepatic expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B in obese rats. Methods: Body weight, glucose, intraperitoneal glucose, insulin, and pyruvate tolerance tests were performed pre- and postoperatively, and plasma lipid, insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 were measured. The mRNA levels of G6Pase, Pepck, Gsk-3β and Gys-2, and the expression levels of PTP1B mRNA, protein, and other components of the insulin signaling pathway were measured by using RT-PCR and western blotting. The intracellular localization of PTP1B and hepatic glycogen deposition was also observed. Results: RYGB surgery-treated rats showed persistent weight loss, significantly improved glucose tolerance, pyruvate tolerance, and dyslipidemia, as well as increased insulin sensitivity, hepatic glycogen deposition and increased plasma GLP-1 in obese rats. RT-PCR analyses showed Pepck, G6Pase, and Gsk-3β mRNA to be significantly decreased, and Gys-2 mRNA to be significantly increased in liver tissue in the RYGB group (p Conclusion: RYGB can improve hepatic glucose metabolism and down-regulate PTP1B in obese rats. An increased circulating GLP-1 concentration may be correlated with the effects following RYGB in obese rats.

  5. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Improves Hepatic Glucose Metabolism Involving Down-Regulation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B in Obese Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Song; Liu, Jiayu; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Shuping; Xiao, Xiaoqiu; Wang, Zhihong; Zhang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was initiated to investigate the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery on hepatic glucose metabolism and hepatic expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) in obese rats. Methods Body weight, glucose, intraperitoneal glucose, insulin, and pyruvate tolerance tests were performed pre- and postoperatively, and plasma lipid, insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) were measured. The mRNA levels of G6Pase, Pepck, Gsk-3β and Gys-2, and the expression levels of PTP1B mRNA, protein, and other components of the insulin signaling pathway were measured by using RT-PCR and western blotting. The intracellular localization of PTP1B and hepatic glycogen deposition was also observed. Results RYGB surgery-treated rats showed persistent weight loss, significantly improved glucose tolerance, pyruvate tolerance, and dyslipidemia, as well as increased insulin sensitivity, hepatic glycogen deposition and increased plasma GLP-1 in obese rats. RT-PCR analyses showed Pepck, G6Pase, and Gsk-3β mRNA to be significantly decreased, and Gys-2 mRNA to be significantly increased in liver tissue in the RYGB group (p RYGB group (p RYGB can improve hepatic glucose metabolism and down-regulate PTP1B in obese rats. An increased circulating GLP-1 concentration may be correlated with the effects following RYGB in obese rats. PMID:28564652

  6. Rare Sugar Syrup Containing d-Allulose but Not High-Fructose Corn Syrup Maintains Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Sensitivity Partly via Hepatic Glucokinase Translocation in Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Tomoya; Yamada, Takako; Hayashi, Noriko; Iida, Tetsuo; Nagata, Yasuo; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Toyoda, Yukiyasu

    2017-04-05

    Ingestion of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is associated with the risk of both diabetes and obesity. Rare sugar syrup (RSS) has been developed by alkaline isomerization of HFCS and has anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. However, the influence of RSS on glucose metabolism has not been explored. We investigated whether long-term administration of RSS maintains glucose tolerance and whether the underlying mechanism involves hepatic glucokinase translocation. Wistar rats were administered water, RSS, or HFCS in drinking water for 10 weeks and then evaluated for glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance, liver glycogen content, and subcellular distribution of liver glucokinase. RSS significantly suppressed body weight gain and abdominal fat mass (p < 0.05). The glucose tolerance test revealed significantly higher blood glucose levels in the HFCS group compared to the water group, whereas the RSS group had significantly lower blood glucose levels from 90 to 180 min (p < 0.05). At 30, 60, and 90 min, the levels of insulin in the RSS group were significantly lower than those in the water group (p < 0.05). The amount of hepatic glycogen was more than 3 times higher in the RSS group than that in the other groups. After glucose loading, the nuclear export of glucokinase was significantly increased in the RSS group compared to the water group. These results imply that RSS maintains glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, at least partly, by enhancing nuclear export of hepatic glucokinase.

  7. Effect of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 inhibition on hepatic glucose metabolism in the conscious dog

    OpenAIRE

    Edgerton, Dale S.; Basu, Rita; Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Farmer, Tiffany D.; Neal, Doss; Scott, Melanie; Jacobson, Peer; Rizza, Robert A.; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Inactive cortisone is converted to active cortisol within the liver by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 (11β-HSD1), and impaired regulation of this process may be related to increased hepatic glucose production (HGP) in individuals with type 2 diabetes. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute 11β-HSD1 inhibition on HGP and fat metabolism during insulin deficiency. Sixteen conscious, 42-h-fasted, lean, healthy dogs were studied. Somatostatin was infused to create...

  8. Continued glucose output after re-feeding contributes to glucose intolerance in hyperthyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Holness, M J; Sugden, M C

    1987-01-01

    The effects of hyperthyroidism to elicit glucose intolerance after glucose administration were decreased under conditions where hepatic glucose output was suppressed. It is concluded that continued hepatic glucose output contributes to abnormal glucose tolerance in hyperthyroidism.

  9. Experimental study on renal and hepatic glucose metabolism in total gastrectomized dogs with special reference to glycolysis and glyconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, S

    1976-09-01

    In spite of the extensive studies on glucose metabolism in surgical field, the postoperative renal and hepatic glucose metabolism and their interrelation have not been reported. The present study was undertaken to interrelate the metabolic states in the kidney and the liver in total gastrectomized dogs. In the kidney, the glycolysis was inhibited in the early postoperative stage whereas the gluconeogenesis was activated. In the late postoperative stage the glycolysis remained slightly inhibited, while the gluconeogenesis remained activated. In the liver, in the early postoperative stage the glycolysis was inhibited, whereas the gluconeogenesis was activated. The glycolysis in the late postoperative stage returned to the preoperative stage, while the gluconeogenesis remained inhibited. The gluconeogenesis in both kidney and liver was disturbed in the early postoperative stage while they were restored, but were reversed, in the late postoperative stage.

  10. Free fatty acid-induced PP2A hyperactivity selectively impairs hepatic insulin action on glucose metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Galbo

    Full Text Available In type 2 Diabetes (T2D free fatty acids (FFAs in plasma are increased and hepatic insulin resistance is "selective", in the sense that the insulin-mediated decrease of glucose production is blunted while insulin's effect on stimulating lipogenesis is maintained. We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathogenic paradox. Primary rat hepatocytes were exposed to palmitate for twenty hours. To establish the physiological relevance of the in vitro findings, we also studied insulin-resistant Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF rats. While insulin-receptor phosphorylation was unaffected, activation of Akt and inactivation of the downstream targets Glycogen synthase kinase 3α (Gsk3α and Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1 was inhibited in palmitate-exposed cells. Accordingly, dose-response curves for insulin-mediated suppression of the FoxO1-induced gluconeogenic genes and for de novo glucose production were right shifted, and insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation and glycogen synthesis were impaired. In contrast, similar to findings in human T2D, the ability of insulin to induce triglyceride (TG accumulation and transcription of the enzymes that catalyze de novo lipogenesis and TG assembly was unaffected. Insulin-induction of these genes could, however, be blocked by inhibition of the atypical PKCs (aPKCs. The activity of the Akt-inactivating Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A was increased in the insulin-resistant cells. Furthermore, inhibition of PP2A by specific inhibitors increased insulin-stimulated activation of Akt and phosphorylation of FoxO1 and Gsk3α. Finally, PP2A mRNA levels were increased in liver, muscle and adipose tissue, while PP2A activity was increased in liver and muscle tissue in insulin-resistant ZDF rats. In conclusion, our findings indicate that FFAs may cause a selective impairment of insulin action upon hepatic glucose metabolism by increasing PP2A activity.

  11. Brain MR imaging in patients with hepatic cirrhosis: relationship between high intensity signal in basal ganglia on T1-weighted images and elemental concentrations in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, H.; Sato, M.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kimura, M.; Sonomura, T.; Terada, M.; Kishi, K.

    1997-01-01

    In patients with hepatic cirrhosis, the globus pallidus and putamen show high intensity on T1-weighted MRI. While the causes of this high signal have been thought to include paramagnetic substances, especially manganese, no evidence for this has been presented. Autopsy in four cases of hepatic cirrhosis permitted measurement of metal concentrations in brain and histopathological examination. In three cases the globus pallidus showed high intensity on T1-weighted images. Mean manganese concentrations in globus pallidus, putamen and frontal white matter were 3.03 ± 0.38, 2.12 ± 0.37, and 1.38 ± 0.24 (μg/g wet weight), respectively, being approximately four- to almost ten-fold the normal values. Copper concentrations in globus pallidus and putamen were also high, 50 % more than normal. Calcium, iron, zinc and magnesium concentrations were all normal. The fourth case showed no abnormal intensity in the basal ganglia and brain metal concentrations were all normal. Histopathologically, cases with showing high signal remarkable atrophy, necrosis, and deciduation of nerve cells and proliferation of glial cells and microglia in globus pallidus. These findings were similar to those in chronic manganese poisoning. On T1-weighted images, copper deposition shows no abnormal intensity. It is therefore inferred that deposition of highly concentrations of manganese may caused high signal on T1-weighted images and nerve cell death in the globus pallidus. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. Viruses cause most cases of hepatitis. The type ... can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, ...

  13. Hepatic Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 1 Is Required for Efficient Regulation of Gluconeogenesis and Whole-Body Glucose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lawrence R; Sultana, Mst Rasheda; Rauckhorst, Adam J; Oonthonpan, Lalita; Tompkins, Sean C; Sharma, Arpit; Fu, Xiaorong; Miao, Ren; Pewa, Alvin D; Brown, Kathryn S; Lane, Erin E; Dohlman, Ashley; Zepeda-Orozco, Diana; Xie, Jianxin; Rutter, Jared; Norris, Andrew W; Cox, James E; Burgess, Shawn C; Potthoff, Matthew J; Taylor, Eric B

    2015-10-06

    Gluconeogenesis is critical for maintenance of euglycemia during fasting. Elevated gluconeogenesis during type 2 diabetes (T2D) contributes to chronic hyperglycemia. Pyruvate is a major gluconeogenic substrate and requires import into the mitochondrial matrix for channeling into gluconeogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) comprising the Mpc1 and Mpc2 proteins is required for efficient regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Liver-specific deletion of Mpc1 abolished hepatic MPC activity and markedly decreased pyruvate-driven gluconeogenesis and TCA cycle flux. Loss of MPC activity induced adaptive utilization of glutamine and increased urea cycle activity. Diet-induced obesity increased hepatic MPC expression and activity. Constitutive Mpc1 deletion attenuated the development of hyperglycemia induced by a high-fat diet. Acute, virally mediated Mpc1 deletion after diet-induced obesity decreased hyperglycemia and improved glucose tolerance. We conclude that the MPC is required for efficient regulation of gluconeogenesis and that the MPC contributes to the elevated gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia in T2D. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antidiabetic activity of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides F31 down-regulated hepatic glucose regulatory enzymes in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chun; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Xie, Yizhen; Cai, Wen; Tan, Jianbin

    2017-01-20

    Ganoderma lucidum (Lin Zhi) has been used to treat diabetes in Chinese folk for centuries. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLPs) had hypoglycemic effects in diabetic mice. Our aim was to identify the main bioactives in GLPs and corresponding mechanism of action. Four polysaccharide-enriched fraction were isolated from GLPs and the antidiabetic activities were evaluated by type 2 diabetic mice. Fasting serum glucose (FSG), fasting serum insulin (FSI) and epididymal fat/BW ratio were measured at the end of the experiment. In liver, the mRNA levels of hepatic glucose regulatory enzymes were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and the protein levels of phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK)/AMPK were determined by western blotting test. In epididymal fat tissue, the mRNA and protein levels GLUT4, resistin, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) were determined by qPCR and immuno-histochemistry. The structure of polysaccharide F31 was obtained from GPC, FTIR NMR and GC-MS spectroscopy, RESULTS: F31 significantly decreased FSG (P<0.05), FSI and epididymal fat/BW ratio (P<0.01). In liver, F31 decreased the mRNA levels of hepatic glucose regulatory enzymes, and up-regulated the ratio of phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK)/AMPK. In epididymal fat tissue, F31 increased the mRNA levels of GLUT4 but decreased fatty acid synthase (FAS), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) and resistin. Immuno-histochemistry results revealed F31 increased the protein levels of GLUT4 and decreased resistin. Data suggested that the main bioactives in GLPs was F31, which was determined to be a β-heteropolysaccharide with the weight-average molecular weight of 15.9kDa. The possible action mechanism of F31 may be associated with down-regulation of the hepatic glucose regulated enzyme mRNA levels via AMPK activation, improvement of insulin resistance and decrease of epididymal fat/BW ratio. These

  15. Effects of dry period length on milk production, body condition, metabolites, and hepatic glucose metabolism in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C; Losand, B; Tuchscherer, A; Rehbock, F; Blum, E; Yang, W; Bruckmaier, R M; Sanftleben, P; Hammon, H M

    2015-03-01

    Dry period (DP) length affects energy metabolism around calving in dairy cows as well as milk production in the subsequent lactation. The aim of the study was to investigate milk production, body condition, metabolic adaptation, and hepatic gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes in Holstein cows (>10,000 kg milk/305 d) with 28- (n=18), 56- (n=18), and 90-d DP (n=22) length (treatment groups) in a commercial farm. Cows were fed total mixed rations ad libitum adjusted for far-off (not for 28-d DP) and close-up DP and lactation. Milk yield was recorded daily and body condition score (BCS), back fat thickness (BFT), and body weight (BW) were determined at dry off, 1 wk before expected and after calving, and on wk 2, 4, and 8 postpartum (pp). Blood samples were taken on d -56, -28, -7, 1, 7, 14, 28, and 56 relative to calving to measure plasma concentrations of metabolites and hormones. Liver biopsies (n=11 per treatment) were taken on d -10 and 10 relative to calving to determine glycogen and total liver fat concentration (LFC) and to quantify mRNA levels of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and glucose-6-phosphatase. Time course of milk yield during first 8 wk in lactation differed among treatment. Milk protein content was higher in 28-d than in 90-d DP cows. Milk fat to protein ratio was highest and milk urea was lowest in 90-d DP cows. Differences in BW, BFT, and BCS were predominantly seen before calving with greatest BW, BFT, and BCS in 90-d DP cows. Plasma concentrations of NEFA and BHBA were elevated during the transition period in all cows, and the greatest increase pp was seen in 90-d DP cows. Plasma glucose concentration decreased around calving and was greater in 28-d than in 90-d DP cows. Dry period length also affected plasma concentrations of urea, cholesterol, aspartate transaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenase. Plasma insulin concentration decreased around calving in all cows, but insulin concentration pp was

  16. The relative importance of kinetic mechanisms and variable enzyme abundances for the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism--insights from mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulik, Sascha; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Berndt, Nikolaus

    2016-03-02

    Adaptation of the cellular metabolism to varying external conditions is brought about by regulated changes in the activity of enzymes and transporters. Hormone-dependent reversible enzyme phosphorylation and concentration changes of reactants and allosteric effectors are the major types of rapid kinetic enzyme regulation, whereas on longer time scales changes in protein abundance may also become operative. Here, we used a comprehensive mathematical model of the hepatic glucose metabolism of rat hepatocytes to decipher the relative importance of different regulatory modes and their mutual interdependencies in the hepatic control of plasma glucose homeostasis. Model simulations reveal significant differences in the capability of liver metabolism to counteract variations of plasma glucose in different physiological settings (starvation, ad libitum nutrient supply, diabetes). Changes in enzyme abundances adjust the metabolic output to the anticipated physiological demand but may turn into a regulatory disadvantage if sudden unexpected changes of the external conditions occur. Allosteric and hormonal control of enzyme activities allow the liver to assume a broad range of metabolic states and may even fully reverse flux changes resulting from changes of enzyme abundances alone. Metabolic control analysis reveals that control of the hepatic glucose metabolism is mainly exerted by enzymes alone, which are differently controlled by alterations in enzyme abundance, reversible phosphorylation, and allosteric effects. In hepatic glucose metabolism, regulation of enzyme activities by changes of reactants, allosteric effects, and reversible phosphorylation is equally important as changes in protein abundance of key regulatory enzymes.

  17. Deletion of hepatic FoxO1/3/4 genes in mice significantly impacts on glucose metabolism through downregulation of gluconeogenesis and upregulation of glycolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiwen Xiong

    Full Text Available Forkhead transcription factors FoxO1/3/4 have pleiotrophic functions including anti-oxidative stress and metabolism. With regard to glucose metabolism, most studies have been focused on FoxO1. To further investigate their hepatic functions, we generated liver-specific FoxO1/3/4 knockout mice (LTKO and examined their collective impacts on glucose homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. As compared to wild-type mice, LTKO mice had lower blood glucose levels under both fasting and non-fasting conditions and they manifested better glucose and pyruvate tolerance on regular chow diet. After challenged by a high-fat diet, wild-type mice developed type 2 diabetes, but LTKO mice remained euglycemic and insulin-sensitive. To understand the underlying mechanisms, we examined the roles of SIRT6 (Sirtuin 6 and Gck (glucokinase in the FoxO-mediated glucose metabolism. Interestingly, ectopic expression of SIRT6 in the liver only reduced gluconeogenesis in wild-type but not LTKO mice whereas knockdown of Gck caused glucose intolerance in both wild-type and LTKO mice. The data suggest that both decreased gluconeogenesis and increased glycolysis may contribute to the overall glucose phenotype in the LTKO mice. Collectively, FoxO1/3/4 transcription factors play important roles in hepatic glucose homeostasis.

  18. Hepatic branch vagus nerve plays a critical role in the recovery of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and mediates a neuroprotective effect by hypothalamic orexin-A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Harada

    Full Text Available Orexin-A (a neuropeptide in the hypothalamus plays an important role in many physiological functions, including the regulation of glucose metabolism. We have previously found that the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance is one of the triggers of ischemic neuronal damage, which is suppressed by hypothalamic orexin-A. Other reports have shown that the communication system between brain and peripheral tissues through the autonomic nervous system (sympathetic, parasympathetic and vagus nerve is important for maintaining glucose and energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of the hepatic vagus nerve on hypothalamic orexin-A-mediated suppression of post-ischemic glucose intolerance development and ischemic neuronal damage. Male ddY mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO for 2 h. Intrahypothalamic orexin-A (5 pmol/mouse administration significantly suppressed the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and neuronal damage on day 1 and 3, respectively after MCAO. MCAO-induced decrease of hepatic insulin receptors and increase of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes on day 1 after was reversed to control levels by orexin-A. This effect was reversed by intramedullary administration of the orexin-1 receptor antagonist, SB334867, or hepatic vagotomy. In the medulla oblongata, orexin-A induced the co-localization of cholin acetyltransferase (cholinergic neuronal marker used for the vagus nerve with orexin-1 receptor and c-Fos (activated neural cells marker. These results suggest that the hepatic branch vagus nerve projecting from the medulla oblongata plays an important role in the recovery of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and mediates a neuroprotective effect by hypothalamic orexin-A.

  19. Forkhead Box O6 (FoxO6) Depletion Attenuates Hepatic Gluconeogenesis and Protects against Fat-induced Glucose Disorder in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabuig-Navarro, Virtu; Yamauchi, Jun; Lee, Sojin; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Yun-Zi; Sadlek, Kelsey; Coudriet, Gina M; Piganelli, Jon D; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Miller, Rita; Lowe, Mark; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Dong, H Henry

    2015-06-19

    Excessive endogenous glucose production contributes to fasting hyperglycemia in diabetes. FoxO6 is a distinct member of the FoxO subfamily. To elucidate the role of FoxO6 in hepatic gluconeogenesis and assess its contribution to the pathogenesis of fasting hyperglycemia in diabetes, we generated FoxO6 knock-out (FoxO6-KO) mice followed by determining the effect of FoxO6 loss-of-function on hepatic gluconeogenesis under physiological and pathological conditions. FoxO6 depletion attenuated hepatic gluconeogenesis and lowered fasting glycemia in FoxO6-KO mice. FoxO6-deficient primary hepatocytes were associated with reduced capacities to produce glucose in response to glucagon. When fed a high fat diet, FoxO6-KO mice exhibited significantly enhanced glucose tolerance and reduced blood glucose levels accompanied by improved insulin sensitivity. These effects correlated with attenuated hepatic gluconeogenesis in FoxO6-KO mice. In contrast, wild-type littermates developed fat-induced glucose intolerance with a concomitant induction of fasting hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. Furthermore, FoxO6-KO mice displayed significantly diminished macrophage infiltration into liver and adipose tissues, correlating with the reduction of macrophage expression of C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2), a factor that is critical for regulating macrophage recruitment in peripheral tissues. Our data indicate that FoxO6 depletion protected against diet-induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance by attenuating hepatic gluconeogenesis and curbing macrophage infiltration in liver and adipose tissues in mice. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Forkhead Box O6 (FoxO6) Depletion Attenuates Hepatic Gluconeogenesis and Protects against Fat-induced Glucose Disorder in Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabuig-Navarro, Virtu; Yamauchi, Jun; Lee, Sojin; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Yun-Zi; Sadlek, Kelsey; Coudriet, Gina M.; Piganelli, Jon D.; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Miller, Rita; Lowe, Mark; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Dong, H. Henry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive endogenous glucose production contributes to fasting hyperglycemia in diabetes. FoxO6 is a distinct member of the FoxO subfamily. To elucidate the role of FoxO6 in hepatic gluconeogenesis and assess its contribution to the pathogenesis of fasting hyperglycemia in diabetes, we generated FoxO6 knock-out (FoxO6-KO) mice followed by determining the effect of FoxO6 loss-of-function on hepatic gluconeogenesis under physiological and pathological conditions. FoxO6 depletion attenuated hepatic gluconeogenesis and lowered fasting glycemia in FoxO6-KO mice. FoxO6-deficient primary hepatocytes were associated with reduced capacities to produce glucose in response to glucagon. When fed a high fat diet, FoxO6-KO mice exhibited significantly enhanced glucose tolerance and reduced blood glucose levels accompanied by improved insulin sensitivity. These effects correlated with attenuated hepatic gluconeogenesis in FoxO6-KO mice. In contrast, wild-type littermates developed fat-induced glucose intolerance with a concomitant induction of fasting hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. Furthermore, FoxO6-KO mice displayed significantly diminished macrophage infiltration into liver and adipose tissues, correlating with the reduction of macrophage expression of C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2), a factor that is critical for regulating macrophage recruitment in peripheral tissues. Our data indicate that FoxO6 depletion protected against diet-induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance by attenuating hepatic gluconeogenesis and curbing macrophage infiltration in liver and adipose tissues in mice. PMID:25944898

  1. Changes in hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism-related parameters in domestic pigeon (Columba livia) during incubation and chick rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, X P; Xie, P; Bu, Z; Zou, X T

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism-related parameters of adult male and female White King pigeons (Columba livia) during incubation and chick rearing. At day 4 (I4), 10 (I10) and 17 (I17) of incubation and day 1 (R1), 7 (R7), 15 (R15) and 25 (R25) of chick rearing, livers were sampled from six pigeons for each sex. Glycogen and fat contents, activities of glycolytic enzymes (hexokinase, HK; 6-phosphofructokinase, 6-PFK), and genes expressions of key enzymes involved in glycolysis (pyruvate kinase, PK; glucokinase, GK), gluconeogenesis (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase cytosolic, PCK1; fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, FBP1; glucose-6-phosphatase, G6Pase), fatty acid synthesis (fatty acid synthase, FAS; acetyl-CoA carboxylase, ACC) and fatty acid β-oxidation (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, CPT1; acyl-CoA 1, ACO) were measured. In male and female pigeon livers, glycogen content and HK activity dramatically increased after I17 and after R1, respectively; expressions of FBP1 and G6Pase genes were maximized at R15; activity of 6-PFK and expressions of PK and CPT1 genes were highest at R7; fat content and expressions of FAS and ACC genes steeply increased from I10 to R1. In females, hepatic expressions of GK and PCK1 genes were greatest at R7 and I17, respectively; however, in males, both of them were maximized at R15. Hepatic expression of ACO gene was significantly enhanced at R1 compared to I17 and R7 in males, whereas it was notably up-regulated at I17 and R7 in females. Furthermore, expressions of PCK1, GK, FAS and ACC genes were in significant relation to fat content in the livers of female pigeons, while fat content in male pigeons was highly correlated with expression of PCK1, ACC, CPT1 and ACO genes. In conclusion, regulations of glucose and lipid metabolic processes were enhanced in parent pigeon livers from terminal phases of incubation to mid phase of chick rearing with sexual effects. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes can alleviate some of the symptoms. Long-term effects can last as long as six months to one year. Hepatitis A is rarely fatal (100 deaths per year in the United States), but 20% of hepatitis A cases require hospitalization. Swallowing fecal matter, even in microscopic quantities. Infection ...

  3. Effects of β-hydroxy β-methyl butyrate supplementation to sows in late gestation on absorption and hepatic metabolism of glucose and amino acids during transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flummer, Christine; Lyby, H; Storli, K S

    2012-01-01

    A multicatheter sow model was established to study the effects of dietary β-hydroxy β-methyl butyrate (HMB) supplementation on net portal flux (NPF) and net hepatic flux (NHF) of HMB, glucose, and the AA Ala, Gly, Ile, Leu, Phe, Tyr, and Val. Eight second parity sows were fitted with permanent...

  4. Tetrahydrobiopterin Has a Glucose-Lowering Effect by Suppressing Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in an Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase–Dependent Manner in Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fujita, Yoshihito; Obara, Akio; Ohashi, Akiko; Fukushima, Toru; Sato, Yuichi; Ogura, Masahito; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Hosokawa, Masaya; Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction induces insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor of eNOS that regulates eNOS activity. In the diabetic state, BH4 is oxidized to 7,8-dihydrobiopterin, which leads to eNOS dysfunction owing to eNOS uncoupling. The current study investigates the effects of BH4 on glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in diabetic mice. Single administration of BH4 lowered fasting blood glucose levels in wild-type mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and alleviated eNOS dysfunction by increasing eNOS dimerization in the liver of these mice. Liver has a critical role in glucose-lowering effects of BH4 through suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. BH4 activated AMP kinase (AMPK), and the suppressing effect of BH4 on gluconeogenesis was AMPK-dependent. In addition, the glucose-lowering effect and activation of AMPK by BH4 did not appear in mice with STZ-induced diabetes lacking eNOS. Consecutive administration of BH4 in ob/ob mice ameliorated glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Taken together, BH4 suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis in an eNOS-dependent manner, and BH4 has a glucose-lowering effect as well as an insulin-sensitizing effect in diabetic mice. BH4 has potential in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:23649519

  5. Dairy fat intake is associated with glucose tolerance, hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity, and liver fat but not β-cell function in humans123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcovina, Santica; Nelson, James E; Yeh, Matthew M; Kowdley, Kris V; Callahan, Holly S; Song, Xiaoling; Di, Chongzhi; Utzschneider, Kristina M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plasma phospholipid concentrations of trans-palmitoleic acid (trans-16:1n−7), a biomarker of dairy fat intake, are inversely associated with incident type 2 diabetes in 2 US cohorts. Objective: The objective was to investigate whether the intake of trans-16:1n−7 in particular, or dairy fat in general, is associated with glucose tolerance and key factors determining glucose tolerance. Design: A cross-sectional investigation was undertaken in 17 men and women with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and 15 body mass index (BMI)- and age-matched controls. The concentrations of trans-16:1n−7 and 2 other biomarkers of dairy fat intake, 15:0 and 17:0, were measured in plasma phospholipids and free fatty acids (FFAs). Liver fat was estimated by computed tomography–derived liver-spleen ratio. Intravenous-glucose-tolerance tests and oral-glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed to assess β-cell function and hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity. Results: In multivariate analyses adjusted for age, sex, and BMI, phospholipid 17:0, phospholipid trans-16:1n−7, FFA 15:0, and FFA 17:0 were inversely associated with fasting plasma glucose, the area under the curve for glucose during an OGTT, and liver fat. Phospholipid trans-16:1n−7 was also positively associated with hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity. None of the biomarkers were associated with β-cell function. The associations between dairy fat intake and glucose tolerance were attenuated by adjusting for insulin sensitivity or liver fat, but strengthened by adjusting for β-cell function. Conclusion: Although we cannot rule out reverse causation, these data support the hypothesis that dairy fat improves glucose tolerance, possibly through a mechanism involving improved hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity and reduced liver fat. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01289639. PMID:24740208

  6. Dairy fat intake is associated with glucose tolerance, hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity, and liver fat but not β-cell function in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Mario; Marcovina, Santica; Nelson, James E; Yeh, Matthew M; Kowdley, Kris V; Callahan, Holly S; Song, Xiaoling; Di, Chongzhi; Utzschneider, Kristina M

    2014-06-01

    Plasma phospholipid concentrations of trans-palmitoleic acid (trans-16:1n-7), a biomarker of dairy fat intake, are inversely associated with incident type 2 diabetes in 2 US cohorts. The objective was to investigate whether the intake of trans-16:1n-7 in particular, or dairy fat in general, is associated with glucose tolerance and key factors determining glucose tolerance. A cross-sectional investigation was undertaken in 17 men and women with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and 15 body mass index (BMI)- and age-matched controls. The concentrations of trans-16:1n-7 and 2 other biomarkers of dairy fat intake, 15:0 and 17:0, were measured in plasma phospholipids and free fatty acids (FFAs). Liver fat was estimated by computed tomography-derived liver-spleen ratio. Intravenous-glucose-tolerance tests and oral-glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed to assess β-cell function and hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity. In multivariate analyses adjusted for age, sex, and BMI, phospholipid 17:0, phospholipid trans-16:1n-7, FFA 15:0, and FFA 17:0 were inversely associated with fasting plasma glucose, the area under the curve for glucose during an OGTT, and liver fat. Phospholipid trans-16:1n-7 was also positively associated with hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity. None of the biomarkers were associated with β-cell function. The associations between dairy fat intake and glucose tolerance were attenuated by adjusting for insulin sensitivity or liver fat, but strengthened by adjusting for β-cell function. Although we cannot rule out reverse causation, these data support the hypothesis that dairy fat improves glucose tolerance, possibly through a mechanism involving improved hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity and reduced liver fat. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. The impact of obesity, sex, and diet on hepatic glucose production in cats

    OpenAIRE

    Kley, Saskia; Hoenig, Margarethe; Glushka, John; Jin, Eunsook S.; Burgess, Shawn C.; Waldron, Mark; Jordan, Erin T.; Prestegard, James H.; Ferguson, Duncan C.; Wu, Shaoxiong; Olson, Darin E.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes in cats. The risk of developing diabetes is severalfold greater for male cats than for females, even after having been neutered early in life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of different metabolic pathways in the regulation of endogenous glucose production (EGP) during the fasted state considering these risk factors. A triple tracer protocol using 2H2O, [U-13C3]propionate, and [3,4-13C2]glucose was applied in overnight-fasted...

  8. Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... low because of routine testing of donated blood. Sexual transmission and transmission among family members through close contact ... associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses ... B Blood, needles, sexual 10% of older children develop chronic infection. 90% ...

  9. Co-ordination of hepatic and adipose tissue lipid metabolism after oral glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Simonsen, L; Wiggins, D

    1999-01-01

    The integration of lipid metabolism in the splanchnic bed and in subcutaneous adipose tissue before and after ingestion of a 75 g glucose load was studied by Fick's principle in seven healthy subjects. Six additional subjects were studied during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Release of non...

  10. Lack of skeletal muscle IL-6 influences hepatic glucose metabolism in mice during prolonged exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertholdt, Lærke; Gudiksen, Anders; Schwartz, Camilla Lindgren

    2017-01-01

    The liver is essential in maintaining and regulating glucose homeostasis during prolonged exercise. IL-6 has been shown to be secreted from skeletal muscle during exercise and has been suggested to signal to the liver. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of skeletal muscl...

  11. Glucoregulatory hormones in hepatic cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, J S; Pruthi, H S; Naqvi, S; Karnani, I; Shetty, K J

    1992-07-01

    In the present study hormonal responses to 75 gm oral glucose were studied in 34 biopsy proven cases of hepatic cirrhosis and 15 normal subjects. Though fasting blood glucose was similar in both controls and cirrhotics the latter showed higher glucose values throughout the study. The peak of glucose level in cirrhotics was delayed to 60 minutes. Two of 34 (5.8%) cirrhotics showed marginal fasting hyperglycaemia and 44% had (impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in blood glucose levels in patients with and without varices. The fasting serum insulin was significantly raised in cirrhotics (24.9 +/- 2.2 vs 8.4 +/- 1.2 mu/ml, p > 0.05). Hyperinsulinaemia was significantly marked in cirrhotics with abnormal Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as compared to those who had normal OGTT. The mean fasting serum insulin concentration in patients with and without varices was similar showing thereby that portasystemic shunt in cirrhotics is not the cause for peripheral hyper-insulinaemia. Basal cortisol was similar in cirrhotics and controls though expected fall in cirrhotics like control was absent. Twelve percent cirrhotics had basal human growth hormone (hGH) more than 10 ng/ml. Forty four percent showed paradoxical rise of hGH. hGH has significantly high (p < 0.01) in cirrhotics with abnormal OGTT as compared to those with normal OGTT.

  12. Momordica charantia ameliorates insulin resistance and dyslipidemia with altered hepatic glucose production and fatty acid synthesis and AMPK phosphorylation in high-fat-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chun-Ching; Shlau, Min-Tzong; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Wu, Jin-Bin

    2014-03-01

    Momordica charantia Linn. (Cucurbitaceae) fruit is commonly known as bitter melon. C57BL/6J mice were firstly divided randomly into two groups: the control (CON) group was fed with a low-fat diet, whereas the experimental group was fed a 45% high-fat (HF) diet for 8 weeks. Afterwards, the CON group was treated with vehicle, whereas the HF group was subdivided into five groups and still on HF diet and was given orally M. charantia extract (MCE) or rosiglitazone (Rosi) or not for 4 weeks. M. charantia decreased the weights of visceral fat and caused glucose lowering. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major cellular regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism. MCE significantly increases the hepatic protein contents of AMPK phosphorylation by 126.2-297.3% and reduces expression of phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose production. Most importantly, MCE decreased expression of hepatic 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydroxygenase (11beta-HSD1) gene, which contributed in attenuating diabetic state. Furthermore, MCE lowered serum triglycerides (TGs) by inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthesis by dampening sterol response element binding protein 1c and fatty acid synthase mRNA leading to reduction in TGs synthesis. This study demonstrates M. charantia ameliorates diabetic and hyperlipidemic state in HF-fed mice occurred by regulation of hepatic PEPCK, 11beta-HSD1 and AMPK phosphorylation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Farnesoid X receptor: a master regulator of hepatic triglyceride and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Lu, Yan; Li, Xiao-ying

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by the aberrant accumulation of triglycerides in hepatocytes in the absence of significant alcohol consumption, viral infection or other specific causes of liver disease. NAFLD has become a burgeoning health problem both worldwide and in China, but its pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily, has been demonstrated to be the primary sensor for endogenous bile acids, and play a crucial role in hepatic triglyceride homeostasis. Deciphering the synergistic contributions of FXR to triglyceride metabolism is critical for discovering therapeutic agents in the treatment of NAFLD and hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:25500875

  14. Inter regional correlations of glucose metabolism between the basal ganglia and different cortical areas: an ultra-high resolution PET/MRI fusion study using 18F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.; Son, Y.D.; Kim, H.K.; Oh, C.H.; Kim, J.M.; Kim, Y.B.; Lee, C.

    2018-01-01

    Basal ganglia have complex functional connections with the cerebral cortex and are involved in motor control, executive functions of the forebrain, such as the planning of movement, and cognitive behaviors based on their connections. The aim of this study was to provide detailed functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex by conducting an inter regional correlation analysis of the 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) data based on precise structural information. Fifteen participants were scanned with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high resolution research tomography (HRRT)-PET fusion system using 18 F-FDG. For detailed inter regional correlation analysis, 24 subregions of the basal ganglia including pre-commissural dorsal caudate, post-commissural caudate, pre-commissural dorsal putamen, post-commissural putamen, internal globus pallidus, and external globus pallidus and 80 cerebral regions were selected as regions of interest on the MRI image and their glucose metabolism were calculated from the PET images. Pearson's product-moment correlation analysis was conducted for the inter regional correlation analysis of the basal ganglia. Functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex were not only consistent with the findings of previous studies, but also showed new functional correlation between the dorsal striatum (i.e., caudate nucleus and putamen) and insula. In this study, we established the detailed basal ganglia subregional functional correlation patterns using 18 F-FDG PET/MRI fusion imaging. Our methods and results could potentially be an important resource for investigating basal ganglia dysfunction as well as for conducting functional studies in the context of movement and psychiatric disorders. (author)

  15. Inter regional correlations of glucose metabolism between the basal ganglia and different cortical areas: an ultra-high resolution PET/MRI fusion study using {sup 18}F-FDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H. [Research Institute for Advanced Industrial Technology, Korea University, Sejong (Korea, Republic of); Son, Y.D.; Kim, H.K.; Oh, C.H., E-mail: ohch@korea.ac.kr [College of Health Science, Gachon University, Incheon, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.M. [College of Science and Technology, Korea University, Sejong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.B. [Gachon University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C. [Bioimaging Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-02-01

    Basal ganglia have complex functional connections with the cerebral cortex and are involved in motor control, executive functions of the forebrain, such as the planning of movement, and cognitive behaviors based on their connections. The aim of this study was to provide detailed functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex by conducting an inter regional correlation analysis of the {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) data based on precise structural information. Fifteen participants were scanned with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high resolution research tomography (HRRT)-PET fusion system using {sup 18}F-FDG. For detailed inter regional correlation analysis, 24 subregions of the basal ganglia including pre-commissural dorsal caudate, post-commissural caudate, pre-commissural dorsal putamen, post-commissural putamen, internal globus pallidus, and external globus pallidus and 80 cerebral regions were selected as regions of interest on the MRI image and their glucose metabolism were calculated from the PET images. Pearson's product-moment correlation analysis was conducted for the inter regional correlation analysis of the basal ganglia. Functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex were not only consistent with the findings of previous studies, but also showed new functional correlation between the dorsal striatum (i.e., caudate nucleus and putamen) and insula. In this study, we established the detailed basal ganglia subregional functional correlation patterns using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI fusion imaging. Our methods and results could potentially be an important resource for investigating basal ganglia dysfunction as well as for conducting functional studies in the context of movement and psychiatric disorders. (author)

  16. Immunoneutralization of endogenous glucagon reduces hepatic glucose output and improves long-term glycemic control in diabetic ob/ob mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Heidi; Brand, Christian L; Neschen, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    for treatment of type 2 diabetes. In the current study, effects of eliminating glucagon signaling with a glucagon monoclonal antibody (mAb) were investigated in the diabetic ob/ob mouse. Acute effects of inhibiting glucagon action were studied by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and by measurement of HGO....... In addition, the effects of subchronic (5 and 14 days) glucagon mAb treatment on plasma glucose, insulin, triglycerides, and HbA1c (A1C) levels were investigated. Glucagon mAb treatment reduced the area under the curve for glucose after an OGTT, reduced HGO, and increased the rate of hepatic glycogen...... synthesis. Glucagon mAb treatment for 5 days lowered plasma glucose and triglyceride levels, whereas 14 days of glucagon mAb treatment reduced A1C. In conclusion, acute and subchronic neutralization of endogenous glucagon improves glycemic control, thus supporting the contention that glucagon antagonism may...

  17. Ocimum basilicum extract exhibits antidiabetic effects via inhibition of hepatic glucose mobilization and carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeani, Chinelo; Ezenyi, Ifeoma; Okoye, Theophine; Okoli, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Ocimum basilicum L (Lamiaceae) is used as a traditional remedy for different ailments, including diabetes mellitus. This study investigated the antidiabetic effects of an extract of aerial parts of O. basilicum . Antihyperglycemic effect of the extract was determined by its effects on α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro , while antidiabetic properties were studied in alloxan induced diabetic rats treated for 28 days with extract and compared to those treated with oral metformin (150 mg/kg). The study and analysis was conducted between 2014 and 2015. The treatment with 100 and 200 mg/kg extract significantly ( P < 0.05) reduced fasting blood glucose concentration and slightly increased mean body weight in treated groups. Oral glucose tolerance was also significantly ( P < 0.05, 0.001) improved in 100 and 400 mg/kg extract-treated groups. The extract caused a dose-dependent increase in liver glycogen content, while it decreased alanine transferase (18.9-30.56%) and aspartate transferase (6.48-34.3%) levels in a non-dose-dependent manner. A dose of 100 mg/kg also reduced serum cholesterol and triglycerides by 19.3 and 39.54%, compared to a 2.6% reduction of cholesterol seen in the metformin-treated group. The extract was observed to produce significant ( P < 0.001) concentration-dependent inhibition of α-glucosidase (35.71-100%) and also α-amylase (23.55-81.52%), with estimated inhibitory concentration values of 1.62 and 3.86 mg/mL, respectively. The antidiabetic properties of the extract may be due to its ability to suppress endogenous glucose release, inhibit glycogenolysis and/or stimulate glycogenesis.

  18. Comparative Evaluation of Whole Body and Hepatic Insulin Resistance Using Indices from Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Morbidly Obese Subjects with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Qureshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is a marker of Insulin Resistance (IR. Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp is the gold standard for measuring whole body IR (hepatic + peripheral IR. However, it is an invasive and expensive procedure. Homeostasis Model Assessment Index for Insulin Sensitivity (HOMA-IS, Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI for hepatic IR and Insulin Sensitivity Index (ISI0,120, and Whole Body Insulin Sensitivity Index (WBISI for whole body IR are the indices calculated after Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT. We used these indices as noninvasive methods of IR (inverse of insulin sensitivity estimation and compared hepatic/peripheral components of whole body IR in NAFLD. Methods. 113 morbidly obese, nondiabetic subjects who underwent gastric bypass surgery and intraoperative liver biopsy were included in the study. OGTT was performed preoperatively and the indices were calculated. Subjects were divided into closely matched groups as normal, fatty liver (FL and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH based on histology. Results. Whole body IR was significantly higher in both FL and NASH groups (NAFLD as compared to Normal, while hepatic IR was higher only in NASH from Normal. Conclusions. FL is a manifestation of peripheral IR but not hepatic IR.

  19. Enhanced hepatic insulin signaling in the livers of high altitude native rats under basal conditions and in the livers of low altitude native rats under insulin stimulation: a mechanistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dera, Hussain; Eleawa, Samy M; Al-Hashem, Fahaid H; Mahzari, Moeber M; Hoja, Ibrahim; Al Khateeb, Mahmoud

    2017-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of the liver in lowering fasting blood glucose levels (FBG) in rats native to high (HA) and low altitude (LA) areas. As compared with LA natives, besides the improved insulin and glucose tolerance, HA native rats had lower FBG, at least mediated by inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis and activation of glycogen synthesis. An effect that is mediated by the enhancement of hepatic insulin signaling mediated by the decreased phosphorylation of TSC induced inhibition of mTOR function. Such effect was independent of activation of AMPK nor stabilization of HIF1α, but most probably due to oxidative stress induced REDD1 expression. However, under insulin stimulation, and in spite of the less activated mTOR function in HA native rats, LA native rats had higher glycogen content and reduced levels of gluconeogenic enzymes with a more enhanced insulin signaling, mainly due to higher levels of p-IRS1 (tyr612).

  20. [Relationship between hepatitis B virus polymerase gene mutation patterns of rtM204I/V and pre-core/basal core promoter mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Wang, Jie-Fei; Wang, Zhan-Hui; Sun, Jian; Zhou, Bin; Hou, Jinlin

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between mutations of rtM204V/I (methionine to valine or isoleucine at position rt204 of reverse transcriptase domain) in the hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase gene and the G1896A and G1899A single mutations in the pre-eore (PC) region and the A1762T and G1764A double-mutations in the basal core promoter (BCP) region. A total of 2,849 hepatitis B complete genome sequences were retrieved from the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ. The amino acid sequence of the of reverse transcriptase domain and genome sequences of the PC region and the BCP region were aligned using MEGA4 software. Data were calculated using Microsoft Excel and evaluated using SPSS 13.0 statistical software. Among the 2, 849 HBV complete genome sequences, 217 (8%) strains were identified with Y(I/V) DD and 120 of those had the YIDD mutation and 97 had the YVDD mutation. Of the 1543 strains (54.2%) with PC-BCP mutations, seven mutation patterns of G 1896A-G 1899A-G 1896A-G 1899A-A 1762T/G 1764A, A 1762T/G 1764AG 1896A, A 1762T/G 1764A-G 1899A, and A 1762T/G 1764A-G 1896A-G 1899A were identified. of YMDD and PC-BCP had a higher incidence than the single YMDD mutation (76% vs 24.0%, x2=45.283, P=0.000). The double-mutations of YIDD and PC-BCP had a higher incidence than the double-mutation of YVDD and PC-BCP (85% vs 64.9%, x2=11.836, P=0.000). The double-mutation for lamivudine resistance of YMDD and PC-BCP had a higher incidence than the double pre-existent YMDD and PC-BCP mutations (89.3% vs 58.9%, x2=27.084, P=0.000). The three mutation patterns of G1896A-G1899A (P=0.000, OR=7.573), A1762T/G1764A-G1899A (P=0.000, OR=6.539) and A1762T/G1764A-G1896A-G1899A (P=0.000, OR=6.596) were associated with a greater risk of developing the YIDD mutation, according to binary logistic analysis. There is a relationship between the HBV YI/VDD mutation and PC-BCP mutations. Different PC-BCP mutation patterns have different effects on the YI/VDD mutation.

  1. Hepatic gene expression involved in glucose and lipid metabolism in transition cows: effects of fat mobilization during early lactation in relation to milk performance and metabolic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C; Hametner, C; Tuchscherer, A; Losand, B; Kanitz, E; Otten, W; Sauerwein, H; Bruckmaier, R M; Becker, F; Kanitz, W; Hammon, H M

    2013-09-01

    Insufficient feed intake during early lactation results in elevated body fat mobilization to meet energy demands for milk production. Hepatic energy metabolism is involved by increasing endogenous glucose production and hepatic glucose output for milk synthesis and by adaptation of postcalving fuel oxidation. Given that cows differ in their degree of fat mobilization around parturition, indicated by variable total liver fat concentration (LFC), the study investigated the influence of peripartum fat mobilization on hepatic gene expression involved in gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis, and cholesterol synthesis, as well as transcriptional factors referring to energy metabolism. German Holstein cows were grouped according to mean total LFC on d 1, 14, and 28 after parturition as low [300 mg of total fat/g of DM; n=7), indicating fat mobilization during early lactation. Cows were fed total mixed rations ad libitum and held under equal conditions. Liver biopsies were taken at d 56 and 15 before and d 1, 14, 28, and 49 after parturition to measure mRNA abundances of pyruvate carboxylase (PC); phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase; glucose-6-phosphatase; propionyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase α; carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1A (CPT1A); acyl-CoA synthetase, long chain 1 (ASCL1); acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain; 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 1 and 2; sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1; and peroxisome proliferator-activated factor α. Total LFC postpartum differed greatly among cows, and the mRNA abundance of most enzymes and transcription factors changed with time during the experimental period. Abundance of PC mRNA increased at parturition to a greater extent in high- and medium-LFC groups than in the low-LFC group. Significant LFC × time interactions for ACSL1 and CPT1A during the experimental period indicated variable gene expression depending on LFC after parturition. Correlations between hepatic gene expression and

  2. Pathogenesis of glucose intolerance in uremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFronzo, R A

    1978-12-01

    The pathogenesis of glucose intolerance in uremia was examined with the glucose clamp technique. Hyperglycemic clamp (n = 8): The plasma glucose concentration is acutely raised and maintained at 125 mg/dl above basal levels. Under these steady state conditions the glucose infusion rate, M, equals the amount of glucose metabolized: Predialysis M averaged 4.23 +/- 0.36 mg/kg/min and increased to 7.71 +/- 0.43 postdialysis (p less than 0.001). The plasma insulin response predialysis was 90 +/- 20 microU/ml and decreased to 80 +/- 23 microU/ml following dialysis. Consequently the M/l ratio, a measure of tissue sensitivity to insulin, increased by 80% +/- 25% (p less than 0.001) but still remained less than controls (p less than 0.01). Euglycemic insulin clamp (n = 10): The plasma insulin concentration is acutely raised by 100 microU/ml and the plasma glucose concentration is held constant at the basal level. Predialysis both M (3.37 +/- 0.36 mg/kg/min) and M/l (3.56 +/- 0.33 mg/kg/min per microU/ml X 100) were significantly less than controls (p less than 0.01). Postdialysis both M and M/l increased significantly (p less than 0.01) to a mean that was not significantly different from controls. Basal hepatic glucose production (n = 6), 2.15 +/- 0.09 mg/kg/min, was similar to controls and fell (87% +/- 4%) normally during the insulin clamp. In five uremic subjects in wom insulin binding to monocytes was measured, there was no correlation with tissue sensitivity to insulin (M/l). Significant abnormalities in both growth hormone and glucagon physiology were present in uremic individuals, but no correlation with either the presence or degree of glucose intolerance was demonstrable. In conclusion, glucose intolerance is universally present in uremic subjects and results primarily from peripheral tissue insensitivity to insulin. Insulin secretion is usually enhanced in an attempt to compensate for this insulin resistance but in occasional subjects uremia also inhibits beta

  3. Both GLP-1 and GIP are insulinotropic at basal and postprandial glucose levels and contribute nearly equally to the incretin effect of a meal in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Krarup, Thure; Madsbad, Sten

    2003-01-01

    -1(7-36)amide (0.33 pmol/kg/min) or saline were infused for three periods of 30 min at each glucose level, with 1 h "washout" between the infusions. On a separate day, a standard meal test (566 kcal) was performed. During the meal test, peak insulin concentrations were observed after 30 min....... Total and intact incretin hormone concentrations during the clamp studies were higher compared to the meal test, but within physiological limits. Glucose infusion alone significantly inhibited glucagon secretion, which was further inhibited by GLP-1 but not by GIP infusion. We conclude that during...

  4. Diminished hepatic insulin removal in obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, I.; Salvador, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Arraiza, M.C.; Goena, M.; Barberia, J.J.; Moncada, E.

    1986-01-01

    Peripheral insulin and C-peptide levels during oral glucose load were measured in 20 obese and 23 normal weight nondiabetic subjects. The fasting C-peptide to insulin molar ratios (Cp/I), as well as the relation between incremental areas of the two polypeptides (ACp-AI)/ACp, were used as relative measures of the hepatic insulin extraction (HIE). The insulin and C-peptide basal levels as well as incremental areas under plasma curves were higher in the obese subjects (P<0.001). HIE was lower in obeses than in controls assessed in the fasting state (P<0.05), as well as after glucose load (P<0.001). Nevertheless, obeses and controls with similar insulin fasting levels showed identical hepatic insulin extraction in fasting or after glucose load. HIE was independent of obesity degree, but was related to insulin basal levels (r=-0.60, P<0.01). This study suggests the hypothesis that the decreased hepatic insulin extraction in obeses is a result of the chronically increased insulin delivery to the liver and is not a consequence of obesity, although a contributory role cannot be ruled out

  5. Free fatty acid-induced hepatic insulin resistance is attenuated following lifestyle intervention in obese individuals with impaired glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haus, Jacob M; Solomon, Thomas; Marchetti, Christine M

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effects of an exercise/diet lifestyle intervention on free fatty acid (FFA)-induced hepatic insulin resistance in obese humans.......The objective of the study was to examine the effects of an exercise/diet lifestyle intervention on free fatty acid (FFA)-induced hepatic insulin resistance in obese humans....

  6. Both GLP-1 and GIP are insulinotropic at basal and postprandial glucose levels and contribute nearly equally to the incretin effect of a meal in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Krarup, Thure; Madsbad, Sten

    2003-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are both incretin hormones regulating postprandial insulin secretion. Their relative importance in this respect under normal physiological conditions is unclear, however, and the aim of the present investigatio...

  7. Reduced glucose metabolism in the frontal cortex and basal ganglia of multiple sclerosis patients with fatigue : A F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelcke, U; Kappos, L; LechnerScott, J; Brunnschweiler, H; Ammann, W; Plohmann, A; Dellas, S; Maguire, RP; Missimer, J; Radu, EW; Steck, A; Leenders, KL

    To investigate the pathophysiology of fatigue in MS, we assessed cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRGlu) in 47 MS patients using PET and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose. Applying the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), we first compared MS patients with severe fatigue (MS-FAT, n = 19, FSS > 4.9) and MS patients

  8. Assessment of triacylglycerole level of hepatic cells and total bilirubin and glucose of serum in hybrid dairy cows slaughtered in Ahwaz abattoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P Rezaei Saber

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatty liver is a major metabolic disorder that affects approximately half of multiparous dairy cows mildly or severely in early lactation. The purpose of this study was to compare the hepatic triacylglycerols (TAG with total bilirubin and glucose of serum. For this purpose, 203 blood and liver samples were collected from the indigenous hybrid cows immediately after slaughtered. The sampled cows were divided into four groups according to their pregnancy status: 1-8 months pregnant, 8-9 months pregnant, less than a month after parturition and more than a month after parturition. The percentage of TAG in liver samples and the amounts of total bilirubin and glucose in blood were measured. All liver samples collected in this study showed percentage of fatty infiltration. The accumulation of fat in the liver of cows that had recently given birth was significantly (p

  9. Coffee and tea consumption in relation to inflammation and basal glucose metabolism in a multi-ethnic Asian population: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai E Shyong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Higher coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in cohort studies, but the physiological pathways through which coffee affects glucose metabolism are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between habitual coffee and tea consumption and glucose metabolism in a multi-ethnic Asian population and possible mediation by inflammation. Methods We cross-sectionally examined the association between coffee, green tea, black tea and Oolong tea consumption and glycemic (fasting plasma glucose, HOMA-IR, HOMA-beta, plasma HbA1c and inflammatory (plasma adiponectin and C-reactive protein markers in a multi-ethnic Asian population (N = 4139. Results After adjusting for multiple confounders, we observed inverse associations between coffee and HOMA-IR (percent difference: - 8.8% for ≥ 3 cups/day versus rarely or never; Ptrend = 0.007, but no significant associations between coffee and inflammatory markers. Tea consumption was not associated with glycemic markers, but green tea was inversely associated with plasma C-reactive protein concentrations (percent difference: - 12.2% for ≥ 1 cup/day versus Ptrend = 0.042. Conclusions These data provide additional evidence for a beneficial effect of habitual caffeinated coffee consumption on insulin sensitivity, and suggest that this effect is unlikely to be mediated by anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  10. Stable-label intravenous glucose tolerance test minimal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avogaro, A.; Bristow, J.D.; Bier, D.M.; Cobelli, C.; Toffolo, G.

    1989-01-01

    The minimal model approach to estimating insulin sensitivity (Sl) and glucose effectiveness in promoting its own disposition at basal insulin (SG) is a powerful tool that has been underutilized given its potential applications. In part, this has been due to its inability to separate insulin and glucose effects on peripheral uptake from their effects on hepatic glucose inflow. Prior enhancements, with radiotracer labeling of the dosage, permit this separation but are unsuitable for use in pregnancy and childhood. In this study, we labeled the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) dosage with [6,6- 2 H 2 ]glucose, [2- 2 H]glucose, or both stable isotopically labeled glucose tracers and modeled glucose kinetics in six postabsorptive, nonobese adults. As previously found with the radiotracer model, the tracer-estimated S*l derived from the stable-label IVGTT was greater than Sl in each case except one, and the tracer-estimated SG* was less than SG in each instance. More importantly, however, the stable-label IVGTT estimated each parameter with an average precision of +/- 5% (range 3-9%) compared to average precisions of +/- 74% (range 7-309%) for SG and +/- 22% (range 3-72%) for Sl. In addition, because of the different metabolic fates of the two deuterated tracers, there were minor differences in basal insulin-derived measures of glucose effectiveness, but these differences were negligible for parameters describing insulin-stimulated processes. In conclusion, the stable-label IVGTT is a simple, highly precise means of assessing insulin sensitivity and glucose effectiveness at basal insulin that can be used to measure these parameters in individuals of all ages, including children and pregnant women

  11. Non-invasive estimation of hepatic glucose uptake from [{sup 18}F]FDG PET images using tissue-derived input functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudomi, N.; Jaervisalo, M.J.; Borra, R.; Viljanen, A.; Viljanen, T.; Knuuti, J. [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); Kiss, J.; Savunen, T. [University of Turku, Department of Surgery, Turku (Finland); Iida, H. [National Cardiovascular Center-Research Institute, Department of Investigative Radiology, Advanced Medical Engineering Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Nuutila, P. [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Department of Medicine, Turku (Finland); Iozzo, P. [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); National Research Council, Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The liver is perfused through the portal vein and hepatic artery. Quantification of hepatic glucose uptake (HGU) using PET requires the use of an input function for both the hepatic artery and portal vein. The former can be generally obtained invasively, but blood withdrawal from the portal vein is not practical in humans. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new technique to obtain quantitative HGU by estimating the input function from PET images. Normal pigs (n = 12) were studied with [{sup 18}F]FDG PET, in which arterial and portal blood time-activity curves (TAC) were determined invasively to serve as reference measurements. The present technique consisted of two characteristics, i.e. using a model input function and simultaneously fitting multiple liver tissue TACs from images by minimizing the residual sum of square between the tissue TACs and fitted curves. The input function was obtained from the parameters determined from the fitting. The HGU values were computed by the estimated and measured input functions and compared between the methods. The estimated input functions were well reproduced. The HGU values, ranging from 0.005 to 0.02 ml/min per ml, were not significantly different between the two methods (r = 0.95, p < 0.001). A Bland-Altman plot demonstrated a small overestimation by the image-derived method with a bias of 0.00052 ml/min per g for HGU. The results presented demonstrate that the input function can be estimated directly from the PET image, supporting the fully non-invasive assessment of liver glucose metabolism in human studies. (orig.)

  12. Keratin 8/18 regulation of glucose metabolism in normal versus cancerous hepatic cells through differential modulation of hexokinase status and insulin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Jasmin; Loranger, Anne; Gilbert, Stéphane [Centre de recherche en cancérologie de l' Université Laval and Centre de recherche du CHUQ (L' Hôtel-Dieu de Québec), 9 McMahon, Québec, Qc, Canada G1R 2J6 (Canada); Faure, Robert [Département de Pédiatrie, Université Laval and Centre de recherche du CHUQ (Centre Mère-Enfant), Québec, Qc, Canada G1V 4G2 (Canada); Marceau, Normand, E-mail: normand.marceau@crhdq.ulaval.ca [Centre de recherche en cancérologie de l' Université Laval and Centre de recherche du CHUQ (L' Hôtel-Dieu de Québec), 9 McMahon, Québec, Qc, Canada G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2013-02-15

    As differentiated cells, hepatocytes primarily metabolize glucose for ATP production through oxidative phosphorylation of glycolytic pyruvate, whereas proliferative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells undergo a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis despite oxygen availability. Keratins, the intermediate filament (IF) proteins of epithelial cells, are expressed as pairs in a lineage/differentiation manner. Hepatocyte and HCC (hepatoma) cell IFs are made solely of keratins 8/18 (K8/K18), thus providing models of choice to address K8/K18 IF functions in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. Here, we demonstrate distinctive increases in glucose uptake, glucose-6-phosphate formation, lactate release, and glycogen formation in K8/K18 IF-lacking hepatocytes and/or hepatoma cells versus their respective IF-containing counterparts. We also show that the K8/K18-dependent glucose uptake/G6P formation is linked to alterations in hexokinase I/II/IV content and localization at mitochondria, with little effect on GLUT1 status. In addition, we find that the insulin-stimulated glycogen formation in normal hepatocytes involves the main PI-3 kinase-dependent signaling pathway and that the K8/K18 IF loss makes them more efficient glycogen producers. In comparison, the higher insulin-dependent glycogen formation in K8/K18 IF-lacking hepatoma cells is associated with a signaling occurring through a mTOR-dependent pathway, along with an augmentation in cell proliferative activity. Together, the results uncover a key K8/K18 regulation of glucose metabolism in normal and cancerous hepatic cells through differential modulations of mitochondrial HK status and insulin-mediated signaling.

  13. The T allele of rs7903146 TCF7L2 is associated with impaired insulinotropic action of incretin hormones, reduced 24 h profiles of plasma insulin and glucagon, and increased hepatic glucose production in young healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilgaard, K; Jensen, C B; Schou, J H

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We studied the physiological, metabolic and hormonal mechanisms underlying the elevated risk of type 2 diabetes in carriers of TCF7L2 gene. METHODS: We undertook genotyping of 81 healthy young Danish men for rs7903146 of TCF7L2 and carried out various beta cell tests including: 24...... altered alpha cell function. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Elevated hepatic glucose production and reduced insulinotropic effect of incretin hormones contribute to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in carriers of the rs7903146 risk T allele of TCF7L2....... h glucose, insulin and glucagon profiles; OGTT; mixed meal test; IVGTT; hyperglycaemic clamp with co-infusion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 or glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP); and a euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp combined with glucose tracer infusion to study hepatic...

  14. The Methionine Transamination Pathway Controls Hepatic Glucose Metabolism through Regulation of the GCN5 Acetyltransferase and the PGC-1α Transcriptional Coactivator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Clint D J; Sharabi, Kfir; Dominy, John E; Lee, Yoonjin; Isasa, Marta; Orozco, Jose M; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Griffin, Patrick R; Gygi, Steven P; Puigserver, Pere

    2016-05-13

    Methionine is an essential sulfur amino acid that is engaged in key cellular functions such as protein synthesis and is a precursor for critical metabolites involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis. In mammals, in response to nutrient conditions, the liver plays a significant role in regulating methionine concentrations by altering its flux through the transmethylation, transsulfuration, and transamination metabolic pathways. A comprehensive understanding of how hepatic methionine metabolism intersects with other regulatory nutrient signaling and transcriptional events is, however, lacking. Here, we show that methionine and derived-sulfur metabolites in the transamination pathway activate the GCN5 acetyltransferase promoting acetylation of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α to control hepatic gluconeogenesis. Methionine was the only essential amino acid that rapidly induced PGC-1α acetylation through activating the GCN5 acetyltransferase. Experiments employing metabolic pathway intermediates revealed that methionine transamination, and not the transmethylation or transsulfuration pathways, contributed to methionine-induced PGC-1α acetylation. Moreover, aminooxyacetic acid, a transaminase inhibitor, was able to potently suppress PGC-1α acetylation stimulated by methionine, which was accompanied by predicted alterations in PGC-1α-mediated gluconeogenic gene expression and glucose production in primary murine hepatocytes. Methionine administration in mice likewise induced hepatic PGC-1α acetylation, suppressed the gluconeogenic gene program, and lowered glycemia, indicating that a similar phenomenon occurs in vivo These results highlight a communication between methionine metabolism and PGC-1α-mediated hepatic gluconeogenesis, suggesting that influencing methionine metabolic flux has the potential to be therapeutically exploited for diabetes treatment. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Estimation of insulin secretion, glucose uptake by tissues, and liver handling of glucose using a mathematical model of glucose-insulin homeostasis in lean and obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Michael; Abadi, Sakineh Esmaeili Mohsen; Balouchzadeh, Ramin; Lee, H Felix; Ko, Hoo Sang; Johns, Michael; Malik, Nehal; Lee, Joshua J; Kwon, Guim

    2017-06-01

    Destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells is the key determinant of diabetes mellitus regardless of their types. Due to their anatomical location within the islets of Langerhans scattered throughout the pancreas, it is difficult to monitor β-cell function and mass clinically. To this end, we propose to use a mathematical model of glucose-insulin homeostasis to estimate insulin secretion, glucose uptake by tissues, and hepatic handling of glucose. We applied the mathematical model by Lombarte et al. (2013) to compare various rate constants representing glucose-insulin homeostasis between lean (11% fat)- and high fat diet (HFD; 45% fat)-fed mice. Mice fed HFD (n = 12) for 3 months showed significantly higher body weights (49.97 ± 0.52 g vs. 29.86 ± 0.46 g), fasting blood glucose levels (213.08 ± 10.35 mg/dl vs. 121.91 ± 2.26 mg/dl), and glucose intolerance compared to mice fed lean diet (n = 12). Mice were injected with 1 g/kg glucose intraperitoneally and blood glucose levels were measured at various intervals for 120 min. We performed simulation using Arena™ software based on the mathematical model and estimated the rate constants (9 parameters) for various terms in the differential equations using OptQuest™. The simulated data fit accurately to the observed data for both lean and obese mice, validating the use of the mathematical model in mice at different stages of diabetes progression. Among 9 parameters, 5 parameters including basal insulin, k 2 (rate constant for insulin-dependent glucose uptake to tissues), k 3 (rate constant for insulin-independent glucose uptake to tissues), k 4 (rate constant for liver glucose transfer), and I pi (rate constant for insulin concentration where liver switches from glucose release to uptake) were significantly different between lean- and HFD-fed mice. Basal blood insulin levels, k 3 , and I pi were significantly elevated but k 2 and k 4 were reduced in mice fed a HFD compared to those fed a lean diet. Non

  16. The PPARα/γ Agonist, Tesaglitazar, Improves Insulin Mediated Switching of Tissue Glucose and Free Fatty Acid Utilization In Vivo in the Obese Zucker Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Wallenius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic flexibility was assessed in male Zucker rats: lean controls, obese controls, and obese rats treated with the dual peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR agonist, tesaglitazar, 3 μmol/kg/day for 3 weeks. Whole body glucose disposal rate ( and hepatic glucose output (HGO were assessed under basal fasting and hyperinsulinemic isoglycemic clamp conditions using [3,3H]glucose. Indices of tissue specific glucose utilization ( were measured at basal, physiological, and supraphysiological levels of insulinemia using 2-deoxy-D-[2,6-3H]glucose. Finally, whole body and tissue specific FFA and glucose utilization and metabolic fate were evaluated under basal and hyperinsulinemic conditions using a combination of [U-13C]glucose, 2-deoxy-D-[U-14C]glucose, [U-14C]palmitate, and [9,10-3H]-(R-bromopalmitate. Tesaglitazar improved whole body insulin action by greater suppression of HGO and stimulation of compared to obese controls. This involved increased insulin stimulation of in fat and skeletal muscle as well as increased glycogen synthesis. Tesaglitazar dramatically improved insulin mediated suppression of plasma FFA level, whole body turnover (, and muscle, liver, and fat utilization. At basal insulin levels, tesaglitazar failed to lower HGO or compared to obese controls. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that tesaglitazar has a remarkable ability to improve insulin mediated control of glucose and FFA fluxes in obese Zucker rats.

  17. Obesity-driven prepartal hepatic lipid accumulation in dairy cows is associated with increased CD36 and SREBP-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodanović, Radiša; Korićanac, Goran; Vujanac, Ivan; Djordjević, Ana; Pantelić, Marija; Romić, Snježana; Stanimirović, Zoran; Kirovski, Danijela

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that obesity in dairy cows enhanced expression of proteins involved in hepatic fatty acid uptake and metabolism. Sixteen Holstein-Friesian close-up cows were divided into 2 equal groups based on their body condition score (BCS) as optimal (3.25≤BCS≤3.5) and high (4.0≤BCS≤4.25). Intravenous glucose tolerance test (GTT) and liver biopsies were carried out at day 10 before calving. Blood samples were collected before (basal) and after glucose infusion, and glucose, insulin and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels were determined at each sample point. In addition, β-hydroxybutyrate and triglycerides levels were measured in the basal samples. The liver biopsies were analyzed for total lipid content and protein expression of insulin receptor beta (IRβ), fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1). Basal glucose and insulin were higher in high-BCS cows, which coincided with higher circulating triglycerides and hepatic lipid content. Clearance rate and AUC for NEFA during GTT were higher in optimal-BCS cows. The development of insulin resistance and fatty liver in obese cows was paralleled by increased hepatic expression of the IRβ, CD36 and SREBP-1. These results suggest that increased expression of hepatic CD36 and SREBP-1 is relevant in the obesity-driven lipid accumulation in the liver of dairy cows during late gestation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Basal {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography as a prognostic biomarker in patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Vicente, Ana Maria; Soriano Castrejon, Angel [University General Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Ciudad Real (Spain); Lopez-Fidalgo, Jesus Fernando; Amo-Salas, Mariano [University of Castilla-La Mancha, Department of Mathematics, Ciudad Real (Spain); Mar Munoz Sanchez, Maria del [Virgen de la Luz Hospital, Oncology Department, Cuenca (Spain); Alvarez Cabellos, Ruth [Virgen de la Salud Hospital, Oncology Department, Toledo (Spain); Espinosa Aunion, Ruth [La Mancha Centro Hospital, Oncology Department, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    To explore the relationship between basal {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT information in breast tumours and survival in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). This prospective, multicentre study included 198 women diagnosed with LABC. All patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT prior to treatment. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in tumor (T), lymph nodes (N) and the N/T ratio was obtained in all cases. Stage according to PET/CT imaging (metabolic stage) and conventional imaging techniques (clinical stage) was established. During follow-up, patient status was established (disease free status or not). The relationship between all the variables and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. A ROC analysis was performed to obtain a cut-off value of SUVmax that was useful in the prediction of outcome. The mean SUVmax ± SD values in the primary tumour, lymph nodes and the SUVmax N/T index were 7.40 ± 5.57, 4.17 ± 4.74 and 0.73 ± 1.20, respectively. Higher semiquantitative metabolic values were found in more advanced metabolic and clinical stages. During follow-up, 78.4 % of patients were free of disease. Significant relationships were observed between SUVT and SUVN and patient status. With respect to OS and DFS, significant differences were detected for the metabolic stage. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that using the cut-off values, a primary-tumour SUVmax ≥ 6.05 or a nodal SUVmax ≥2.25 were significantly correlated with DFS and OS. PET imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG offers prognostic information for LABC that can be obtained preoperatively and noninvasively. (orig.)

  19. Basal 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography as a prognostic biomarker in patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Vicente, Ana Maria; Soriano Castrejon, Angel; Lopez-Fidalgo, Jesus Fernando; Amo-Salas, Mariano; Mar Munoz Sanchez, Maria del; Alvarez Cabellos, Ruth; Espinosa Aunion, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    To explore the relationship between basal 18 F-FDG PET/CT information in breast tumours and survival in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). This prospective, multicentre study included 198 women diagnosed with LABC. All patients underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT prior to treatment. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in tumor (T), lymph nodes (N) and the N/T ratio was obtained in all cases. Stage according to PET/CT imaging (metabolic stage) and conventional imaging techniques (clinical stage) was established. During follow-up, patient status was established (disease free status or not). The relationship between all the variables and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. A ROC analysis was performed to obtain a cut-off value of SUVmax that was useful in the prediction of outcome. The mean SUVmax ± SD values in the primary tumour, lymph nodes and the SUVmax N/T index were 7.40 ± 5.57, 4.17 ± 4.74 and 0.73 ± 1.20, respectively. Higher semiquantitative metabolic values were found in more advanced metabolic and clinical stages. During follow-up, 78.4 % of patients were free of disease. Significant relationships were observed between SUVT and SUVN and patient status. With respect to OS and DFS, significant differences were detected for the metabolic stage. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that using the cut-off values, a primary-tumour SUVmax ≥ 6.05 or a nodal SUVmax ≥2.25 were significantly correlated with DFS and OS. PET imaging with 18 F-FDG offers prognostic information for LABC that can be obtained preoperatively and noninvasively. (orig.)

  20. Basal ¹⁸F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography as a prognostic biomarker in patients with locally advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Vicente, Ana María; Soriano Castrejón, Ángel; López-Fidalgo, Jesús Fernando; Amo-Salas, Mariano; Muñoz Sanchez, María Del Mar; Álvarez Cabellos, Ruth; Espinosa Aunión, Ruth

    2015-11-01

    To explore the relationship between basal (18) F-FDG PET/CT information in breast tumours and survival in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). This prospective, multicentre study included 198 women diagnosed with LABC. All patients underwent (18) F-FDG PET/CT prior to treatment. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in tumor (T), lymph nodes (N) and the N/T ratio was obtained in all cases. Stage according to PET/CT imaging (metabolic stage) and conventional imaging techniques (clinical stage) was established. During follow-up, patient status was established (disease free status or not). The relationship between all the variables and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. A ROC analysis was performed to obtain a cut-off value of SUVmax that was useful in the prediction of outcome. The mean SUVmax ± SD values in the primary tumour, lymph nodes and the SUVmax N/T index were 7.40 ± 5.57, 4.17 ± 4.74 and 0.73 ± 1.20, respectively. Higher semiquantitative metabolic values were found in more advanced metabolic and clinical stages. During follow-up, 78.4 % of patients were free of disease. Significant relationships were observed between SUVT and SUVN and patient status. With respect to OS and DFS, significant differences were detected for the metabolic stage. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that using the cut-off values, a primary-tumour SUVmax ≥ 6.05 or a nodal SUVmax ≥2.25 were significantly correlated with DFS and OS. PET imaging with (18) F-FDG offers prognostic information for LABC that can be obtained preoperatively and noninvasively.

  1. A ketogenic diet impairs energy and glucose homeostasis by the attenuation of hypothalamic leptin signaling and hepatic insulin signaling in a rat model of non-obese type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Kim, Da Sol; Kang, Sunna; Daily, James W

    2011-02-01

    Ketogenic diets (KTD) are reported to have beneficial effects on the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis, but remain controversial. We investigated the effects of KTD and ketones on insulin resistance and secretion in non-obese type 2 diabetic rats and their mechanism. KTD (82% energy as fat), intraperitoneal injection of β-hydroxybutyrate (IHB; 150 mg/kg bw/12 h) with a control diet (COD; 20% energy as fat) or saline injection with COD was given to 90% pancreatectomized (Px) diabetic rats for five weeks. KTD increased epididymal fat pads and serum leptin levels without increasing energy intake, but IHB decreased them. KTD, but not IHB, attenuated hypothalamic signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in KTD. Serum glucagon levels were markedly higher in the KTD group than in other groups. During an oral glucose tolerance test, serum glucose levels slowly increased until 80 min in the KTD group and then decreased very slowly. Insulin secretion capacity during a hyperglycemic clamp was significantly lower in the IHB group than in other groups. However, a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp revealed that KTD decreased glucose infusion rates and increased hepatic glucose output in hyperinsulinemic states while IHB had opposite effects to KTD. The increased hepatic glucose output in KTD was associated with increased hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression through attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS2 and phosphorylation of Akt(Ser473). Hepatic AMPK(Thr172) phosphorylation was reduced in KTD. In conclusion, KTD impairs energy and glucose homeostasis by exacerbating insulin resistance and attenuating hypothalamic leptin signaling in non-obese type 2 diabetic rats. These changes are not associated with increased serum ketone levels.

  2. Acute inhibition of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase does not affect gluconeogenesis but directs gluconeogenic flux toward glycogen in fasted rats - A pharmacological study with the chlorogenic acid derivative S4048

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, TH; van der Sluijs, FH; Wiegman, CH; Baller, JFW; Gustafson, LA; Burger, HJ; Herling, AW; Kuipers, F; Meijer, AJ; Reijngoud, DJ

    2001-01-01

    Effects of acute inhibition of glucose-6-phosphatase activity by the chlorogenic acid derivative S4048 on hepatic carbohydrate fluxes were examined in isolated rat hepatocytes and in vivo in rats. Fluxes were calculated using tracer dilution techniques and mass isotopomer distribution analysis in

  3. Acute inhibition of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase does not affect gluconeogenesis but directs gluconeogenic flux toward glycogen in fasted rats. A pharmacological study with the chlorogenic acid derivative S4048

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, T. H.; van der Sluijs, F. H.; Wiegman, C. H.; Baller, J. F.; Gustafson, L. A.; Burger, H. J.; Herling, A. W.; Kuipers, F.; Meijer, A. J.; Reijngoud, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    Effects of acute inhibition of glucose-6-phosphatase activity by the chlorogenic acid derivative S4048 on hepatic carbohydrate fluxes were examined in isolated rat hepatocytes and in vivo in rats. Fluxes were calculated using tracer dilution techniques and mass isotopomer distribution analysis in

  4. Psidium guajava Linn. leaf extract affects hepatic glucose transporter-2 to attenuate early onset of insulin resistance consequent to high fructose intake: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, R.; Dutta, Shagun; Velpandian, T.; Mathur, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Insulin resistance (IR) is amalgam of pathologies like altered glucos metabolism, dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and associated with type-II diabetes and cardiometabolic diseases. One of the reasons leading to its increased and early incidence is understood to be a high intake of processed fructose containing foods and beverages by individuals, especially, during critical developmental years. Objective: To investigate the preventive potential of aqueous extract of Psidium guajava leaves (PG) against metabolic pathologies, vis-à-vis, IR, dyslipidemia, hyperleptinemia and hypertension, due to excess fructose intake initiated during developmental years. Materials and Methods: Post-weaning (4 weeks old) male rats were provided fructose (15%) as drinking solution, ad libitum, for 8 weeks and assessed for food and water/fructose intake, body weight, fasting blood sugar, mean arterial pressure, lipid biochemistry, endocrinal (insulin, leptin), histopathological (fatty liver) and immunohistochemical (hepatic glucose transporter [GLUT2]) parameters. Parallel treatment groups were administered PG in doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg/d, po × 8 weeks and assessed for same parameters. Using extensive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry protocols, PG was analyzed for the presence of phytoconstituents like Myrecetin, Luteolin, Kaempferol and Guavanoic acid and validated to contain Quercetin up to 9.9%w/w. Results: High fructose intake raised circulating levels of insulin and leptin and hepatic GLUT2 expression to promote IR, dyslipidemia, and hypertension that were favorably re-set with PG. Although PG is known for its beneficial role in diabetes mellitus, for the first time we report its potential in the management of lifelong pathologies arising from high fructose intake initiated during developmental years. PMID:25829790

  5. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Basal cell carcinoma Overview Basal cell carcinoma: This skin cancer ... that has received years of sun exposure. Basal cell carcinoma: Overview Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the ...

  6. A 12 week aerobic exercise program improves fitness, hepatic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in obese Hispanic adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rise in obesity related morbidity in children and adolescents requires urgent prevention and treatment strategies. Strictly controlled exercise programs might be useful tools to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose kinetics. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a 12-wk aerobic exerci...

  7. Effects of prenatal caffeine exposure on glucose homeostasis of adult offspring rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Hao; Wang, Gui-hua; Pei, Lin-guo; Zhang, Li; Shi, Chai; Guo, Yu; Wu, Dong-fang; Wang, Hui

    2017-12-01

    Epidemiological evidences show that prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) could induce intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). The IUGR offspring also present glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus after maturity. We have previously demonstrated that PCE induced IUGR and increased susceptibility to adult metabolic syndrome in rats. This study aimed to further investigate the effects of PCE on glucose homeostasis in adult offspring rats. Pregnant rats were administered caffeine (120 mg/kg/day, intragastrically) from gestational days 11 to 20. PCE offspring presented partial catch-up growth pattern after birth, characterizing by the increased body weight gain rates. Meanwhile, PCE had no significant influences on the basal blood glucose and insulin phenotypes of adult offspring but increased the glucose tolerance, glucose-stimulated insulin section and β cell sensitivity to glucose in female progeny. The insulin sensitivity of both male and female PCE offspring were enhanced accompanied with reduced β cell fraction and mass. Western blotting results revealed that significant augmentation in protein expression of hepatic insulin signaling elements of PCE females, including insulin receptor (INSR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and the phosphorylation of serine-threonine protein kinase (Akt), was also potentiated. In conclusion, we demonstrated that PCE reduced the pancreatic β mass but increased the glucose tolerance in adult offspring rats, especially for females. The adaptive compensatory enhancement of β cell responsiveness to glucose and elevated insulin sensitivity mainly mediated by upregulated hepatic insulin signaling might coordinately contribute to the increased glucose tolerance.

  8. Embryonic protein undernutrition by albumen removal programs the hepatic amino acid and glucose metabolism during the perinatal period in an avian model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els Willems

    Full Text Available Different animal models have been used to study the effects of prenatal protein undernutrition and the mechanisms by which these occur. In mammals, the maternal diet is manipulated, exerting both direct nutritional and indirect hormonal effects. Chicken embryos develop independent from the hen in the egg. Therefore, in the chicken, the direct effects of protein deficiency by albumen removal early during incubation can be examined. Prenatal protein undernutrition was established in layer-type eggs by the partial replacement of albumen by saline at embryonic day 1 (albumen-deprived group, compared to a mock-treated sham and a non-treated control group. At hatch, survival of the albumen-deprived group was lower compared to the control and sham group due to increased early mortality by the manipulation. No treatment differences in yolk-free body weight or yolk weight could be detected. The water content of the yolk was reduced, whereas the water content of the carcass was increased in the albumen-deprived group, compared to the control group, indicating less uptake of nutrients from the yolk. At embryonic day 16, 20 and at hatch, plasma triiodothyronine (T3, corticosterone, lactate or glucose concentrations and hepatic glycogen content were not affected by treatment. At embryonic day 20, the plasma thyroxine (T4 concentrations of the albumen-deprived embryos was reduced compared to the control group, indicating a decreased metabolic rate. Screening for differential protein expression in the liver at hatch using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis revealed not only changed abundance of proteins important for amino acid metabolism, but also of enzymes related to energy and glucose metabolism. Interestingly, GLUT1, a glucose transporter, and PCK2 and FBP1, two out of three regulatory enzymes of the gluconeogenesis were dysregulated. No parallel differences in gene expressions causing the differences in protein abundance could be detected

  9. Hepatic mRNA expression for genes related to somatotropic axis, glucose and lipid metabolisms, and inflammatory response of periparturient dairy cows treated with recombinant bovine somatotropin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P R B; Weber, W J; Crooker, B A; Collier, R J; Thatcher, W W; Chebel, R C

    2017-05-01

    Objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) treatment of periparturient dairy cows on hepatic mRNA expression for genes related to the somatotropic axis, insulin, glucose, and lipid metabolism, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Holstein cows were enrolled in the experiment at 253 ± 3 d of gestation and assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: untreated control (n = 53), 87.5 mg of rbST (n = 56; rbST87.5), and 125 mg of rbST (n = 57; rbST125). Cows in the rbST87.5 and rbST125 treatments received weekly injections of rbST from -21 to 28 d relative to calving. A subsample of cows (control = 20, rbST87.5 = 20, rbST125 = 20) was randomly selected for collection of liver samples according to expected calving date, BCS, and previous lactation 305-d mature equivalent milk yield. Only cows that had liver sampled at -21 ± 3, -7 ± 3, and 7 ± 3 d relative to calving were used in the current experiment. Blood, sampled weekly from -28 to 21 d relative to calving, was used to determine the concentrations of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor 1, insulin, cortisol, fatty acids, β-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, haptoglobin, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Liver samples were used to determine hepatic mRNA expression of 50 genes. Treatment with rbST increased growth hormone concentrations during the postpartum period (control = 9.0 ± 0.7, rbST87.5 = 15.3 ± 1.0, rbST125 = 18.5 ± 1.3 ng/mL) and increased insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations during the prepartum period (control = 107.4 ± 7.2, rbST87.5 = 126.9 ± 6.6, rbST125 = 139.4 ± 6.9 ng/mL). Control cows had greater postpartum concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate (control = 776.4 ± 64.0, rbST87.5 = 628.4 ± 59.7, rbST125 = 595.4 ± 60.9 µmol/L) than rbST cows. The rbST87.5 and rbST125 treatments upregulated the hepatic mRNA expression for somatotropic axis genes (GHR, GHR1A, IGF1, IGFBP3, and SOCS2) on d -7 relative to calving and upregulated the mRNA expression

  10. Basal insulin and cardiovascular and other outcomes in dysglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstein, Hertzel C; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R

    2012-01-01

    The provision of sufficient basal insulin to normalize fasting plasma glucose levels may reduce cardiovascular events, but such a possibility has not been formally tested.......The provision of sufficient basal insulin to normalize fasting plasma glucose levels may reduce cardiovascular events, but such a possibility has not been formally tested....

  11. Regional differences in adipocyte lactate production from glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newby, F.D.; Sykes, M.N.; DiGirolamo, M.

    1988-01-01

    Having shown that lactate is an important product of glucose metabolism by rat epididymal adipocytes, the authors investigated possible regional differences in adipocyte lactate production and the role of the animals' nutritional state and stage of development. [U- 14 C]glucose metabolism, lactate production, and response to insulin were measured in fat cells isolated from four adipose regions from young lean and older fatter rats, killed either in the fed state or after fasting for 48 h. In the absence of insulin, mesenteric fat cells from either age group metabolized significantly more glucose per cell and converted more glucose to lactate than cells from other depots, regardless of nutritional state. Adipocytes from fasted lean rats showed a significant increase in the relative glucose conversion to lactate in all depots when compared with cells from fed lean rats. Fasting of older fatter rats, however, had limited effects on the relative adipocyte glucose conversion to lactate since lactate production was already high. Mesenteric fat cells had the lowest relative response to insulin, possibly due to the high basal rate of glucose metabolism. These findings indicate that differences exist among adipose regions in the rates of glucose metabolism, lactate production and response to insulin. The anatomical location of the mesenteric adipose depot, coupled with a high metabolic rate and blood perfusion, suggests that mesenteric adipocytes may provide a unique and more direct contribution of metabolic substrates for hepatic metabolism than adipocytes from other depots

  12. Hypothalamic leucine metabolism regulates liver glucose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ya; Lam, Tony K T; He, Wu; Pocai, Alessandro; Bryan, Joseph; Aguilar-Bryan, Lydia; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids profoundly affect insulin action and glucose metabolism in mammals. Here, we investigated the role of the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), a key center involved in nutrient-dependent metabolic regulation. Specifically, we tested the novel hypothesis that the metabolism of leucine within the MBH couples the central sensing of leucine with the control of glucose production by the liver. We performed either central (MBH) or systemic infusions of leucine in Sprague-Dawley male rats during basal pancreatic insulin clamps in combination with various pharmacological and molecular interventions designed to modulate leucine metabolism in the MBH. We also examined the role of hypothalamic ATP-sensitive K(+) channels (K(ATP) channels) in the effects of leucine. Enhancing the metabolism of leucine acutely in the MBH lowered blood glucose through a biochemical network that was insensitive to rapamycin but strictly dependent on the hypothalamic metabolism of leucine to α-ketoisocaproic acid and, further, insensitive to acetyl- and malonyl-CoA. Functional K(ATP) channels were also required. Importantly, molecular attenuation of this central sensing mechanism in rats conferred susceptibility to developing hyperglycemia. We postulate that the metabolic sensing of leucine in the MBH is a previously unrecognized mechanism for the regulation of hepatic glucose production required to maintain glucose homeostasis.

  13. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannucci E

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Edoardo Mannucci,1 Stefano Giannini,2 Ilaria Dicembrini1 1Diabetes Agency, Careggi Teaching Hospital, Florence, 2Section of Endocrinology, Department of Biomedical Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Florence and Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy Abstract: Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with

  14. Synergetic Effects of Prenatal and Postnatal High Sucrose Intake on Glucose Tolerance and Hepatic Insulin Resistance in Rat Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengjie; Zhu, Di; Zhang, Yueming; Li, Lingjun; Chen, Xionghui; Zhang, Wenna; Shi, Ruixiu; Tao, Jianying; Han, Bing; Xu, Zhice

    2018-03-01

    High sucrose intake during pregnancy is linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus and altered insulin resistance. This study attempts to ascertain whether prenatal high sucrose intake (20% sucrose) alleviates the detrimental effects of high postnatal sugar consumption in the offspring, and the molecular mechanisms are investigated using a rat model. High prenatal sucrose exposure increases the body weight of the offspring at 1-3 weeks of age. Exposure to both prenatal and postnatal high sucrose increases glucose tolerance in the 4-month-old adult offspring compared with offspring receiving other treatments. Postnatal high sucrose exposure suppresses food intake but increases the total daily caloric and fluid intake. Both fasting blood glucose and plasma triglyceride levels are increased, but the fasting insulin level is unaffected. Prenatal high sucrose intake enlarges pancreatic islet area; however, prenatal-plus-postnatal high sucrose exposure induces smaller pancreatic islets. IRS-1(S612) protein phosphorylation is significantly increased, and the GSK-3β (S9) phosphorylation level is reduced. Both prenatal and prenatal-plus-postnatal high sucrose exposure substantially affect biological functions related to insulin homeostasis. IRS-1(S612) protein phosphorylation appears to be a part of the molecular mechanism underlying these effects. These results add to the understanding of how high sucrose intake contributes to insulin resistance and diabetes pathogenesis and how postnatal nutrition and lifestyle may mitigate detrimental prenatal exposures. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. MATLAB-implemented estimation procedure for model-based assessment of hepatic insulin degradation from standard intravenous glucose tolerance test data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nardo, Francesco; Mengoni, Michele; Morettini, Micaela

    2013-05-01

    Present study provides a novel MATLAB-based parameter estimation procedure for individual assessment of hepatic insulin degradation (HID) process from standard frequently-sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT) data. Direct access to the source code, offered by MATLAB, enabled us to design an optimization procedure based on the alternating use of Gauss-Newton's and Levenberg-Marquardt's algorithms, which assures the full convergence of the process and the containment of computational time. Reliability was tested by direct comparison with the application, in eighteen non-diabetic subjects, of well-known kinetic analysis software package SAAM II, and by application on different data. Agreement between MATLAB and SAAM II was warranted by intraclass correlation coefficients ≥0.73; no significant differences between corresponding mean parameter estimates and prediction of HID rate; and consistent residual analysis. Moreover, MATLAB optimization procedure resulted in a significant 51% reduction of CV% for the worst-estimated parameter by SAAM II and in maintaining all model-parameter CV% MATLAB-based procedure was suggested as a suitable tool for the individual assessment of HID process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Giannini, Stefano; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane) and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec) differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with regard to cardiovascular safety will provide definitive evidence.

  17. Associations between Forkhead Box O1 (FoxO1 Expression and Indicators of Hepatic Glucose Production in Transition Dairy Cows Supplemented with Dietary Nicotinic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asako Kinoshita

    Full Text Available Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1 is a transcription factor which promotes hepatic glucose production (HGP by up-regulating the transcription of gluconeogenic enzymes in monogastric species. The activity of FoxO1 is inhibited by insulin-induced phosphorylation. The aims of the present study were to find associations between FoxO1 expression and variables associated with HGP as affected by feeding regimen in dairy cows during the transition period. Twenty one healthy German Holstein cows were allocated to four groups (LC-CON, HC-CON, LC-NA with 5 cows/group and HC-NA with 6 cows/group, respectively. Cows received 0 (LC-CON and HC-CON or 24 (LC-NA and HC-NA g/d nicotinic acid with high (HC or low (LC concentrate proportion from -42 days (-41.8 + 4.8; mean + standard deviation relative to expected calving date (d-42 to d24. Liver biopsy was taken at d-42, 1, 21, and 100. The total protein expression of FoxO1 (tFoxO1 and the extent of phosphorylation of FoxO1 at serine 256 (pFoxO1 were analysed semiquantitatively by Western Blotting. The expression of hepatic mRNA of FoxO1 and seven genes associated with HGP was measured by real-time RT-PCR. Mixed model and Pearson's correlation were used for statistical evaluation with the level of significance at P<0.05. No dietary effect was observed either on feed intake, energy balance, or on the concentration of blood metabolites. Neither time nor diet affected the expression of FoxO1 total protein and mRNA. A NA × concentrate interaction was found in pFoxO1. However, no corresponding dietary effect was found in the mRNA expression of investigated genes. Different patterns of correlations between FoxO1-related variables and investigated indicators for HGP were found at d21 and 100. The results indicated that the regulation of HGP did not take place on the levels of mRNA and protein expression and the phosphorylation of FoxO1 in dairy cows in early lactation.

  18. ASSOCIATION OF CARDIORESPIRATORY FITNESS WITH ELEVATED HEPATIC ENZYME AND LIVER FAT IN JAPANESE PATIENTS WITH IMPAIRED GLUCOSE TOLERANCE AND TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Nagano

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available No study has so far determined whether a favorable level of cardiorespiratory fitness (CF contributes to a reduced risk of elevated hepatic enzymes and a high degree of liver fat in patients having various metabolic risks. This study investigated the association between the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max and the prevalence of elevated liver enzymes and high liver fat, while considering such factors as abdominal obesity, hyperinsulinemia and the other metabolic risks. The study enrolled newly diagnosed Japanese patients (n = 84; 52 males and 32 females; aged 25-69 years with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and type 2 diabetes mellitus (Type2DM who did not receive any intervention or pharmacological therapy. The subjects were divided into 3 groups according to the distribution of the VO2max for each sex. The odds ratios (ORs for the prevalence of elevated aspartate and alanine aminotransferase (AST and ALT and high degree of liver fat adjusted for age, sex, disease type, daily ethanol intake, and current smoking were significantly lower in the moderate- and high CF groups in comparison to the low CF group. In addition, a significant OR for AST was maintained in the moderate and high CF group after adjusting for abdominal obesity and/or hyperinsulinemia. The significant ORs for the prevalence of elevated ALT and a high degree of liver fat were attenuated after adjusting for abdominal obesity and/or hyperinsulinemia. No significant OR for the prevalence of elevated gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT was recognized in all logistic models. These results indicated that CF was negatively and independently associated with the prevalence of elevated AST even in Japanese diabetic patients having various metabolic risks. It was concluded that the AST level might be useful as a simple marker reflecting physical inactivity in such subjects

  19. Dose-related effects of epinephrine on glucose production in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, R W; Steiner, K E; Connolly, C C; Fuchs, H; Alberti, K G; Williams, P E; Cherrington, A D

    1991-03-01

    The effects of increases in plasma epinephrine from 78 +/- 32 to 447 +/- 75, 1,812 +/- 97, or 2,495 +/- 427 pg/ml on glucose production, including gluconeogenesis, were determined in the conscious, overnight-fasted dog, using a combination of tracer [( 3-3H]glucose and [U-14C]alanine) and arteriovenous difference techniques. Insulin and glucagon were fixed at basal levels using a pancreatic clamp. Plasma glucose levels rose during the 180-min epinephrine infusion by 47 +/- 7, 42 +/- 22, and 74 +/- 25 mg/dl, respectively, in association with increases in hepatic glucose output of 1.04 +/- 0.22, 1.87 +/- 0.23, and 3.70 +/- 0.83 mg.kg-1.min-1 (at 15 min). Blood lactate levels rose by 1.52 +/- 0.24, 4.29 +/- 0.49, and 4.60 +/- 0.45 mmol/l, respectively, by 180 min, despite increases in hepatic uptake of lactate of 3.47 +/- 5.73, 12.83 +/- 3.46, and 37.00 +/- 4.20 mumol.kg-1.min-1. The intrahepatic gluconeogenic efficiency with which the liver converted the incoming alanine to glucose had risen by 84 +/- 40, 77 +/- 24, and 136 +/- 34% at 180 min, respectively. The latter effect plus the effect on net hepatic lactate uptake point to an intrahepatic action of high levels of the hormone in vivo. In conclusion, epinephrine produces dose-dependent increments in overall glucose production, which involve a progressive stimulation of both glycogenolysis (as assessed by glucose production at 15 min) and gluconeogenesis (assessed in the last 30 min of the study). The latter involves a peripheral action of the catecholamine to increase gluconeogenic substrate supply to the liver and may also involve a hepatic effect when high epinephrine levels are present.

  20. Application of the Oral Minimal Model to Korean Subjects with Normal Glucose Tolerance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hyuk Lim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe oral minimal model is a simple, useful tool for the assessment of β-cell function and insulin sensitivity across the spectrum of glucose tolerance, including normal glucose tolerance (NGT, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in humans.MethodsPlasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide levels were measured during a 180-minute, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test in 24 Korean subjects with NGT (n=10 and T2DM (n=14. The parameters in the computational model were estimated, and the indexes for insulin sensitivity and β-cell function were compared between the NGT and T2DM groups.ResultsThe insulin sensitivity index was lower in the T2DM group than the NGT group. The basal index of β-cell responsivity, basal hepatic insulin extraction ratio, and post-glucose challenge hepatic insulin extraction ratio were not different between the NGT and T2DM groups. The dynamic, static, and total β-cell responsivity indexes were significantly lower in the T2DM group than the NGT group. The dynamic, static, and total disposition indexes were also significantly lower in the T2DM group than the NGT group.ConclusionThe oral minimal model can be reproducibly applied to evaluate β-cell function and insulin sensitivity in Koreans.

  1. Basal cell nevus syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nevus syndrome Basal cell nevus syndrome - face References Evans DG, Farndon PA. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. ... A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among ...

  2. Glucose autoregulation is the dominant component of the hormone-independent counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia in the conscious dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Justin M; Rivera, Noelia; Kraft, Guillaume; Winnick, Jason J; Farmer, Ben; Allen, Eric J; Donahue, E Patrick; Smith, Marta S; Edgerton, Dale S; Williams, Phillip E; Cherrington, Alan D

    2017-09-01

    The contribution of hormone-independent counterregulatory signals in defense of insulin-induced hypoglycemia was determined in adrenalectomized, overnight-fasted conscious dogs receiving hepatic portal vein insulin infusions at a rate 20-fold basal. Either euglycemia was maintained ( group 1 ) or hypoglycemia (≈45 mg/dl) was allowed to occur. There were three hypoglycemic groups: one in which hepatic autoregulation against hypoglycemia occurred in the absence of sympathetic nervous system input ( group 2 ), one in which autoregulation occurred in the presence of norepinephrine (NE) signaling to fat and muscle ( group 3 ), and one in which autoregulation occurred in the presence of NE signaling to fat, muscle, and liver ( group 4 ). Average net hepatic glucose balance (NHGB) during the last hour for groups 1-4 was -0.7 ± 0.1, 0.3 ± 0.1 ( P gluconeogenesis. Lowering glucose per se decreased nonhepatic glucose uptake by 8.9 mg·kg -1 ·min -1 , and the addition of increased neural efferent signaling to muscle and fat blocked glucose uptake further by 3.2 mg·kg -1 ·min -1 The addition of increased neural efferent input to liver did not affect NHGB or nonhepatic glucose uptake significantly. In conclusion, even in the absence of increases in counterregulatory hormones, the body can defend itself against hypoglycemia using glucose autoregulation and increased neural efferent signaling, both of which stimulate hepatic glucose production and limit glucose utilization. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Hepatic and Whole-Body Insulin Metabolism during Proestrus and Estrus in Mongrel Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Erin Nz; Winnick, Jason J; Edgerton, Dale S; Scott, Melanie F; Smith, Marta S; Farmer, Ben; Williams, Phillip E; Cherrington, Alan D; Moore, Mary Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance occurs during various stages of the estrus cycle in dogs. To quantify the effects of proestrus-estrus (PE) and determine whether PE affects liver insulin sensitivity, 11 female mongrel dogs were implanted with sampling and intraportal infusion catheters. Five of the dogs (PE group) entered proestrus after surgery; those remaining in anestrus were controls. The dogs were fasted overnight, [3-(3)H]glucose and somatostatin were infused through peripheral veins, and glucagon was infused intraportally. Insulin was infused intraportally, with the rate adjusted to maintain arterial plasma glucose at basal levels (PE, 294±25 μU/kg/min; control, 223±21 μU/kg/min). Subsequently the insulin infusion rate was increased by 0.2 mU/kg/min for 120 min (P1) and then to 1.5 mU/kg/min for the last 120 min (P2); glucose was infused peripherally as needed to maintain euglycemia. Insulin concentrations did not differ between groups at any time; they increased 3 μU/mL over baseline during P1 and to 3 times baseline during P2. The glucose infusion rate in PE dogs during P2 was 63% of that in control dogs. Net hepatic glucose output and the endogenous glucose production rate declined 40% to 50% from baseline in both groups during P1; during P2, both groups exhibited a low rate of net hepatic glucose uptake with full suppression of endogenous glucose production. The glucose disappearance rate during P1 and P2 was 35% greater in control than PE dogs. Therefore, PE in canines is associated with loss of nonhepatic (primarily muscle) but not hepatic insulin sensitivity.

  4. Glucose and fructose 6-phosphate cycle in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlander, S.; Roovete, A.; Vranic, M.; Efendic, S.

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the rate of glucose cycling by comparing turnovers of [2- 3 H]- and [6- 3 H]glucose under basal conditions and during a glucose infusion. Moreover, the activity of the fructose 6-phosphate cycle was assessed by comparing [3- 3 H]- and [6- 3 H]glucose. The study included eight lean subjects with normal glucose tolerance. They participated in two randomly performed investigations. In one experiment [2- 3 H]- and [6- 3 H]glucose were given simultaneously, while in the other only [3- 3 H]glucose was given. The basal rate of glucose cycling was 0.32 +/- 0.08 mg X kg-1 X min-1 or 17% of basal glucose production (P less than 0.005). During glucose infusion the activity of endogenous glucose cycling did not change but since glucose production was suppressed it amounted to 130% of glucose production. The basal fructose 6-phosphate cycle could be detected only in three subjects and was suppressed during glucose infusion. In conclusion, the glucose cycle is active in healthy humans both in basal conditions and during moderate hyperglycemia. In some subjects, the fructose 6-phosphate cycle also appears to be active. Thus it is preferable to use [6- 3 H]glucose rather than [3- 3 H]glucose when measuring glucose production and particularly when assessing glucose cycle

  5. Portal venous 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside infusion overcomes hyperinsulinemic suppression of endogenous glucose output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Raul C; Pencek, R Richard; Lacy, D Brooks; James, Freyja D; Donahue, E Patrick; Wasserman, David H

    2005-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in regulating metabolism, serving as a metabolic master switch. The aim of this study was to assess whether increased concentrations of the AMP analog, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribosyl-5-monophosphate, in the liver would create a metabolic response consistent with an increase in whole-body metabolic need. Dogs had sampling (artery, portal vein, hepatic vein) and infusion (vena cava, portal vein) catheters and flow probes (hepatic artery, portal vein) implanted >16 days before a study. Protocols consisted of equilibration (-130 to -30 min), basal (-30 to 0 min), and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic or -hypoglycemic clamp periods (0-150 min). At t = 0 min, somatostatin was infused and glucagon was replaced in the portal vein at basal rates. An intraportal hyperinsulinemic (2 mU . kg(-1) . min(-1)) infusion was also initiated at this time. Glucose was clamped at hypoglycemic or euglycemic levels in the presence (H-AIC, n = 6; E-AIC, n = 6) or absence (H-SAL, n = 6; E-SAL, n = 6) of a portal venous 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-ribofuranoside (AICAR) infusion (1 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1)) initiated at t = 60 min. In the presence of intraportal saline, glucose was infused into the vena cava to match glucose levels seen with intraportal AICAR. Glucagon remained fixed at basal levels, whereas insulin rose similarly in all groups. Glucose fell to 50 +/- 2 mg/dl by t = 60 min in hypoglycemic groups and remained at 105 +/- 3 mg/dl in euglycemic groups. Endogenous glucose production (R(a)) was similarly suppressed among groups in the presence of euglycemia or hypoglycemia before t = 60 min and remained suppressed in the H-SAL and E-SAL groups. However, intraportal AICAR infusion stimulated R(a) to increase by 2.5 +/- 1.0 and 3.4 +/- 0.4 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) in the E-AIC and H-AIC groups, respectively. Arteriovenous measurement of net hepatic glucose output showed similar results. AICAR stimulated hepatic glycogen to

  6. The future of basal insulin supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Airin C R; DeVries, J Hans

    2011-06-01

    This review presents an overview of the candidates for an improved basal insulin in the pharmaceutical pipeline. The first new basal insulin to enter the market is most likely insulin degludec (IDeg), currently reporting in phase 3 of development, from Novo Nordisk (Bagsvaerd, Denmark). IDeg has a longer duration of action than currently available analogs. Phase 2 studies show comparable efficacy and safety outcomes compared with insulin glargine once daily with less hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes. The final results of phase 3 studies seem to confirm this, also in type 2 diabetes. Biodel (Danbury, CT) has two long-acting basal insulin formulations in the pipeline, both in the preclinical phase of development: BIOD-Adjustable Basal, a modified formulation of insulin glargine, is available in long-, medium-, and short-acting forms and could be mixed, and BIOD-Smart Basal releases insulin proportional to the subcutaneous glucose concentration. Eli Lilly (Indianapolis, IN) is also developing a basal insulin. Phase 2 trials have been completed, but no results are published yet. Clinical trials with the new patch pump from CeQur (Montreux, Switzerland) have recently started in Europe. This patch pump delivers both basal and bolus doses subcutaneously and is intended for people with type 2 diabetes who need multiple daily injection insulin therapy.

  7. Effect of Livingstone potato (Plectranthus esculentus N.E.Br) on hepatic glucose-6-phosphophate dehydrogenase activity of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbonnaya, Eleazu Chinedum

    2014-07-28

    To determine the effect of Livingstone potato (Plectranthus esculentus N.E.Br) on hepatic G6PD in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. The G6PD activities in the liver homogenates of the rats and chemical analysis of the test feeds were determined using standard techniques. The diabetic control rats had significant elevation (P < 0.05) of their hepatic G6PD activities compared with the non-diabetic rats. Intake of the test feed by the diabetic rats of group 3, resulted in significant (P<0.05) amelioration of their hepatic G6PD activities in comparison with the diabetic control rats. Chemical analysis of the test feed revealed that it contained considerable amounts of tannins, saponins, alkaloids, antioxidants and their cyanide contents were below the toxic level for humans. The study shows ameliorative potentials of Livingstone potato on the hepatic G6PD activity of diabetic rats which is attributed to its antioxidant/polyphenolic constituents.

  8. Impact of variable insulinemia and glycemia on in vivo glycolysis and glucose storage in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, M J; Rantzau, C; Ward, G M; Alford, F P

    1994-01-01

    To determine the impact of variable plasma insulin concentrations and glycemia on the partitioning of whole body glucose metabolism between glycolysis and glucose storage, we estimated endogenous hepatic glucose production and rates of in vivo glycolytic flux (GF) and glucose storage (GS) in six normal dogs from the generation of plasma tritiated water (3H2O) and [3-3H]glucose specific activity during 150 min of somatostatin euglycemic (E) and hyperglycemic (H) clamps at hypoinsulinemic, basal, intermediate, and high insulin levels. During both E and H clamps, overall rates of GF and GS increased with the rising insulin levels, but the relative contributions to in vivo glucose disposal of GF decreased, whereas GS rose progressively with increasing insulin levels. The relative contribution of GS during H to overall glucose disposal was greater at the lower insulin level. In addition, in absolute terms, GF and GS were significantly higher (P < 0.05) during H than during E at all insulin levels. Moreover, the incremental rise in GF induced by H was equal for the low to intermediate insulin levels tested, independent of the prevailing free fatty acid (FFA) levels. However, when whole body glucose disposal rates were matched, GF and GS rates were independent of the coexisting glycemia, insulin, and/or FFA levels. We conclude that 1) insulin has a major impact on the intracellular fate of infused glucose, with a lesser but significant effect of hyperglycemia per se on these processes; 2) the magnitude of the hyperglycemia-induced increase in GF is independent of the prevailing insulin level from low to intermediate levels; and 3) in vivo GF and GS are dependent on the net rate of glucose uptake into cells but independent of absolute FFA levels or whether glucose uptake is stimulated by raised insulin or glucose levels.

  9. Consumption of Quercetin and Quercetin-Containing Apple and Cherry Extracts Affects Blood Glucose Concentration, Hepatic Metabolism, and Gene Expression Patterns in Obese C57BL/6J High Fat-Fed Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Sarah M; Zhao, Bingxin; Luo, Ting; Kaiser, Clive; Cavender, George; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill; Sullivan, Debra K; Shay, Neil F

    2016-05-01

    Intake of polyphenols and polyphenol-rich fruit extracts has been shown to reduce markers of inflammation, diabetes, and hepatic complications that result from the consumption of a high-fat (HF) diet. The objective of this study was to determine whether mice fed polyphenol-rich apple peel extract (AE), cherry extract (CE), and quercetin, a phytochemical abundant in fruits including apples and cherries, would modulate the harmful effects of adiposity on blood glucose regulation, endocrine concentrations, and hepatic metabolism in HF-fed C57BL/6J male mice. Groups of 8-wk-old mice (n = 8 each) were fed 5 diets for 10 wk, including low-fat (LF; 10% of total energy) and HF (60% of total energy) control diets and 3 HF diets containing polyphenol-rich AE, CE, and quercetin (0.2% wt:wt). Also, an in vitro study used HepG2 cells exposed to quercetin (0-100 μmol/L) to determine whether intracellular lipid accumulation could be modulated by this phytochemical. Mice fed the HF control diet consumed 36% more energy, gained 14 g more body weight, and had ∼50% elevated blood glucose concentrations (all P fruit phytochemicals may reduce hepatic lipid accumulation. A quantitative analysis of lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in lipid content in cells treated with 0-100 μmol quercetin/L (P < 0.05). In mice, consumption of AE, CE, or quercetin appears to modulate some of the harmful effects associated with the consumption of an obesogenic HF diet. Furthermore, in a cell culture model, quercetin was shown to reduce intracellular lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent fashion. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  11. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froissart, Roseline; Piraud, Monique; Boudjemline, Alix Mollet; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Petit, François; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Eberschweiler, Pascale Trioche; Gajdos, Vincent; Labrune, Philippe

    2011-05-20

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  12. Branched chain enriched amino acid versus glucose treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. A double-blind study of 65 patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilstrup, Hendrik; Gluud, C; Hardt, F

    1990-01-01

    . In the glucose group ten died, three developed renal and two respiratory failure, and one remained encephalopathic. The coma score worsened in three of the patients who died in the amino acid group, but in all patients who died in the glucose group. The negative nitrogen balance on entry reversed in the amino...

  13. Lixisenatide as add-on therapy to basal insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown DX

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dominique Xavier Brown, Emma Louise Butler, Marc Evans Diabetes Department, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff, UK Abstract: Many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus do not achieve target glycosylated hemoglobin A1c levels despite optimally titrated basal insulin and satisfactory fasting plasma glucose levels. Current evidence suggests that HbA1c levels are dictated by both basal glucose and postprandial glucose levels. This has led to a consensus that postprandial glucose excursions contribute to poor glycemic control in these patients. Lixisenatide is a once-daily, prandial glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 receptor agonist with a four-fold affinity for the GLP-1 receptor compared with native GLP-1. Importantly, lixisenatide causes a significant delay in gastric emptying time, an important determinant of the once-daily dosing regimen. An exendin-4 mimetic with six lysine residues removed at the C-terminal, lixisenatide has pronounced postprandial glucose-lowering effects, making it a novel incretin agent for use in combination with optimally titrated basal insulin. Lixisenatide exerts profound effects on postprandial glucose through established mechanisms of glucose-dependent insulin secretion and glucagon suppression in combination with delayed gastric emptying. This review discusses the likely place that lixisenatide will occupy in clinical practice, given its profound effects on postprandial glucose and potential to reduce glycemic variability. Keywords: lixisenatide, add-on therapy, insulin, GLP-1 receptor agonist, postprandial glucose, pharmacodynamics

  14. A review of metabolism of labeled glucoses for use in measuring glucose recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, R.W.; Young, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    The fate of tritium from each carbon of D-glucose and the metabolism of L-glucose and 2-deoxy-D-glucose are known. Differences in metabolism of labeled glucoses can be used to quantify physical and chemical recycling of glucose. Only physical recycling is measured by [1- 3 H]-L-glucose, whereas [U- 14 C]-D-glucose measures total recycling. The difference between [1- 3 H]-L-glucose and [U- 14 C]-D-glucose, therefore, is chemical recycling. Recycling from extracellular binding sites and hepatic glucose 6-phosphate can be measured by difference between [1,2- 3 H]-2-deoxy-D-glucose and [1- 3 H]-L-glucose, and the difference in irreversible loss of the two will measure extrahepatic uptake of D-glucose. Recycling via Cori-alanine cycle plus CO 2 is the difference in irreversible loss measured by using [6- 3 H]-glucose and [U- 14 C]-D-glucose. Recycling via the hexose monophosphate pathway can be determined by difference in irreversible loss between [1- 3 H]-D-glucose and [6- 3 H]-D-glucose. Recycling via CO 2 and glycerol must be measured directly with [U- 14 C]glucose, bicarbonate, and glycerol. Recycling via hepatic glycogen can be estimated by subtracting all other measured chemical recycling from total chemical recycling. This review describes means to quantify glucose recycling in vivo, enabling studies of mechanisms for conservation and utilization of glucose. 54 references

  15. Alteration of de novo glucose production contributes to fasting hypoglycaemia in Fyn deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjuan Yang

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that glucose disposal is increased in the Fyn knockout (FynKO mice due to increased insulin sensitivity. FynKO mice also display fasting hypoglycaemia despite decreased insulin levels, which suggested that hepatic glucose production was unable to compensate for the increased basal glucose utilization. The present study investigates the basis for the reduction in plasma glucose levels and the reduced ability for the liver to produce glucose in response to gluconeogenic substrates. FynKO mice had a 5-fold reduction in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK gene and protein expression and a marked reduction in pyruvate, pyruvate/lactate-stimulated glucose output. Remarkably, de novo glucose production was also blunted using gluconeogenic substrates that bypass the PEPCK step. Impaired conversion of glycerol to glucose was observed in both glycerol tolerance test and determination of the conversion of (13C-glycerol to glucose in the fasted state. α-glycerol phosphate levels were reduced but glycerol kinase protein expression levels were not changed. Fructose-driven glucose production was also diminished without alteration of fructokinase expression levels. The normal levels of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate observed in the FynKO liver extracts suggested normal triose kinase function. Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (aldolase mRNA or protein levels were normal in the Fyn-deficient livers, however, there was a large reduction in liver fructose-6-phosphate (30-fold and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (7-fold levels as well as a reduction in glucose-6-phosphate (2-fold levels. These data suggest a mechanistic defect in the allosteric regulation of aldolase activity.

  16. [Evaluation of hepatic gluconeogenesis by intravenous L-alanine tolerance test after major hepatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, N

    1989-11-01

    The response of glucose, insulin and glucagon to L-alanine tolerance test (0.5 g/kg, intravenously, A.T.T.) was examined in dogs following hepatectomy. Before A.T.T., dogs were starved for 24 hours after antecedent carbohydrate-free diets. Under this condition, hepatic glycogen and blood glucose were 0.5 +/- 0.2 mg/g liver and 85 +/- 11.9 mg/dl, respectively. The marked response of blood glucose to alanine tolerance test was observed and the maximal increment above the basal level was 47 +/- 5.2 mg/dl at 30 minutes after A.T.T. One week after 44% and 70% hepatectomy, the increments of glucose at 30 minutes after A.T.T. were 58% and 24% respectively, as compared with those before hepatectomy. These results suggest that the glucose response to alanine tolerance is useful for an index of functional reserve of glucose production in the remnant liver after hepatectomy. The increments of blood glucose at 30 minutes after A.T.T. 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after 70% hepatectomy were 24.0, 21.8, 52.7 and 80% of that before hepatectomy respectively. The insulin response to alanine tolerance gave two peaks at 2.5 min and 30 min and the latter peak was dependent on the blood glucose response before and after hepatectomy. One or two weeks after 70% hepatectomy, the exaggerated glucagon response to alanine tolerance was observed. These results suggest that A.T.T. is not only an excellent index of functional reserve of hepatic gluconeogenesis, but also is an appropriate method for investigation of the relation between endogenous glucose production and endocrine pancreas.

  17. Insulin receptor isoform A ameliorates long-term glucose intolerance in diabetic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Castroverde, Sabela; Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Fernández, Silvia; García-Gómez, Gema; Di Scala, Marianna; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Fernández-Millán, Elisa; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; García-Bravo, María; Chambon, Pierre; Álvarez, Carmen; Perdomo, Liliana; Beneit, Nuria; Benito, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease and its pathogenesis involves abnormalities in both peripheral insulin action and insulin secretion. Previous in vitro data showed that insulin receptor isoform A, but not B, favours basal glucose uptake through its specific association with endogenous GLUT1/2 in murine hepatocytes and beta cells. With this background, we hypothesized that hepatic expression of insulin receptor isoform A in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes could potentially increase the glucose uptake of these cells, decreasing the hyperglycaemia and therefore ameliorating the diabetic phenotype. To assure this hypothesis, we have developed recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors expressing insulin receptor isoform A (IRA) or isoform B (IRB) under the control of a hepatocyte­-specific promoter. Our results demonstrate that in the long term, hepatic expression of IRA in diabetic mice is more efficient than IRB in ameliorating glucose intolerance. Consequently, it impairs the induction of compensatory mechanisms through beta cell hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy that finally lead to beta cell failure, reverting the diabetic phenotype in about 8 weeks. Our data suggest that long-term hepatic expression of IRA could be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27562101

  18. RNAi screening in primary human hepatocytes of genes implicated in genome-wide association studies for roles in type 2 diabetes identifies roles for CAMK1D and CDKAL1, among others, in hepatic glucose regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Haney

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies have described a large number of new candidate genes that contribute to of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D. In some cases, small clusters of genes are implicated, rather than a single gene, and in all cases, the genetic contribution is not defined through the effects on a specific organ, such as the pancreas or liver. There is a significant need to develop and use human cell-based models to examine the effects these genes may have on glucose regulation. We describe the development of a primary human hepatocyte model that adjusts glucose disposition according to hormonal signals. This model was used to determine whether candidate genes identified in GWA studies regulate hepatic glucose disposition through siRNAs corresponding to the list of identified genes. We find that several genes affect the storage of glucose as glycogen (glycolytic response and/or affect the utilization of pyruvate, the critical step in gluconeogenesis. Of the genes that affect both of these processes, CAMK1D, TSPAN8 and KIF11 affect the localization of a mediator of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis regulation, CRTC2, to the nucleus in response to glucagon. In addition, the gene CDKAL1 was observed to affect glycogen storage, and molecular experiments using mutant forms of CDK5, a putative target of CDKAL1, in HepG2 cells show that this is mediated by coordinate regulation of CDK5 and PKA on MEK, which ultimately regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a critical step in the insulin signaling pathway.

  19. Phytopharmacological evaluation of Byesukar for hypoglycaemic activity and its effect on lipid profile and hepatic enzymes of glucose metabolism in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruvayoorappan, C; Sudha, G

    2008-01-01

    Many anti-diabetic herbal preparations have been recommended in alternative systems of medicine for the treatment of diabetes. No systematic study has been done on the anti-diabetic efficacy of Byesukar, a polyherbal formulation to treat diabetes. The anti-diabetic efficacy of byesukar ethanol extract was evaluated in an animal model of diabetes induced by alloxan. Male Wistar rats were divided in to four groups. Group 1 was normal control group; group 2 and 3 received alloxan. After inducing experimental diabetes group 2 served as diabetic control; group 3 received byesukar (500 mg/kg body weight) orally for 30 consecutive days. Group 4 were normal rats which received byesukar extract alone. The effect of byesukar on glucose level in diabetic rats was studied and the level of glucose metabolizing enzymes (Hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose 1, 6-bisphosphatase) in the liver and kidney were estimated. The effect of byesukar on the serum and tissue lipid profile (Cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids and free fatty acids) were also estimated in diabetic rats. Our results indicate that treatment with byesukar resulted in significant reduction of blood glucose, tissue glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose 1, 6- bisphosphatase activity. The decreased tissue hexokinase activity in diabetes state was found to be significantly increased by byesukar treatment. Also the byesukar treated diabetic rats showed a significant decrease in the tissue lipid profile compared to the diabetic rats. In conclusion the decreased blood glucose accompanied with decreased lipid profile and changes in the activities of the glucose metabolizing enzymes shows the antidiabetic effect of byesukar.

  20. Sexual dimorphism in hepatic, adipose tissue and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity in obese humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper W. ter Horst

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucose and lipid metabolism differ between men and women, and women tend to have better whole-body or muscle insulin sensitivity. This may be explained, in part, by differences in sex hormones and adipose tissue distribution. Few studies have investigated gender differences in hepatic, adipose tissue and whole-body insulin sensitivity between severely obese men and women. In this study, we aimed to determine the differences in glucose metabolism between severely obese men and women using tissue-specific measurements of insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity was compared between age and body mass index (BMI-matched obese men and women by a two-step euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp with infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose. Basal endogenous glucose production and insulin sensitivity of the liver, adipose tissue and peripheral tissues were assessed. Liver fat content was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a subset of included subjects. We included 46 obese men and women (age, 48±2 vs 46±2 years, p=0.591; BMI, 41±1 vs 41±1 kg/m2, p=0.832. There was no difference in basal endogenous glucose production (14.4±1.0 vs 15.3±0.5 µmol•kg fat-free mass-1•min-1, p=0.410, adipose tissue insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated suppression of free fatty acids, 71.6±3.6 vs 76.1±2.6%, p=0.314 or peripheral insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated rate of disappearance of glucose, 26.2±2.1 vs 22.7±1.7 µmol•kg-1•min-1, p=0.211. Obese men were characterized by lower hepatic insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production, 61.7±4.1 vs 72.8±2.5% in men vs women, resp., p=0.028. Finally, these observations could not be explained by differences in liver fat content (men vs women, 16.5±3.1 vs 16.0±2.5%, p=0.913, n=27.We conclude that obese men have lower hepatic, but comparable adipose tissue and peripheral tissue, insulin sensitivity compared to similarly obese women. Hepatic insulin resistance may

  1. Effect of abomasal glucose infusion on splanchnic and whole-body glucose metabolism in periparturient dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mogens; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2009-01-01

    Six periparturient Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas and permanent indwelling catheters in the hepatic portal vein, hepatic vein, mesenteric vein, and an artery were used to study the effects of abomasal glucose infusion on splanchnic and whole-body glucose metabolism.......Six periparturient Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas and permanent indwelling catheters in the hepatic portal vein, hepatic vein, mesenteric vein, and an artery were used to study the effects of abomasal glucose infusion on splanchnic and whole-body glucose metabolism....

  2. Dissociation between exercise-induced reduction in liver fat and changes in hepatic and peripheral glucose homoeostasis in obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Shojaee-Moradie, Fariba; Sprung, Victoria S; Jones, Helen; Pugh, Christopher J A; Richardson, Paul; Kemp, Graham J; Barrett, Mark; Jackson, Nicola C; Thomas, E Louise; Bell, Jimmy D; Umpleby, A Margot

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with multi-organ (hepatic, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue) insulin resistance (IR). Exercise is an effective treatment for lowering liver fat but its effect on IR in NAFLD is unknown. We aimed to determine whether supervised exercise in NAFLD would reduce liver fat and improve hepatic and peripheral (skeletal muscle and adipose tissue) insulin sensitivity. Sixty nine NAFLD patients were randomized to 16 weeks exercise supervision (n=38) or counselling (n=31) without dietary modification. All participants underwent MRI/spectroscopy to assess changes in body fat and in liver and skeletal muscle triglyceride, before and following exercise/counselling. To quantify changes in hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity, a pre-determined subset (n=12 per group) underwent a two-stage hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp pre- and post-intervention. Results are shown as mean [95% confidence interval (CI)]. Fifty participants (30 exercise, 20 counselling), 51 years (IQR 40, 56), body mass index (BMI) 31 kg/m(2) (IQR 29, 35) with baseline liver fat/water % of 18.8% (IQR 10.7, 34.6) completed the study (12/12 exercise and 7/12 counselling completed the clamp studies). Supervised exercise mediated a greater reduction in liver fat/water percentage than counselling [Δ mean change 4.7% (0.01, 9.4); Pliver fat, improving peripheral IR in NAFLD, the reduction in liver fat was insufficient to improve hepatic IR. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  3. Effects of insulin deficiency or excess on hepatic gluconeogenic flux during glycogenolytic inhibition in the conscious dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, Dale S; Cardin, Sylvain; Pan, Catherine; Neal, Doss; Farmer, Ben; Converse, Margaret; Cherrington, Alan D

    2002-11-01

    The direct acute effects of insulin on the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenic flux to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) in vivo may be masked by the hormone's effects on net hepatic glycogenolytic flux and the resulting changes in glycolysis. To investigate this possibility, we used a glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor (BAY R3401) to inhibit glycogen breakdown in the overnight-fasted dog, and the effects of complete insulin deficiency or a fourfold rise in the plasma insulin level were assessed during a 5-h experimental period. Hormone levels were controlled using somatostatin with portal insulin and glucagon infusion. After the control period, plasma insulin infusion 1) was discontinued, creating insulin deficiency; 2) increased fourfold; or 3) was continued at the basal rate. During insulin deficiency, glucose production and the plasma level and net hepatic uptake of nonesterified free fatty acids increased, whereas during hyperinsulinemia they decreased. Net hepatic lactate uptake increased sixfold during insulin deficiency and 2.5-fold during hyperinsulinemia. Net hepatic gluconeogenic flux increased more than fourfold during insulin deficiency but was not reduced by hyperinsulinemia. We conclude that in the absence of appreciable glycogen breakdown, an acute gluconeogenic effect of hypoinsulinemia becomes manifest, whereas inhibition of the process by a physiologic rise in insulin was not evident.

  4. The relationship between glucose production and plasma glucose concentration in children with falciparum malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, E.; Romijn, J. A.; Waruiru, C.; Ackermans, M. T.; Weverling, G. J.; Sauerwein, R. W.; Endert, E.; Peshu, N.; Marsh, K.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    1996-01-01

    The pathophysiology of hypoglycaemia in children with acute falciparum malaria, a frequent and serious complication, is unknown due to absence of data on glucose kinetics. We investigated the correlation between basal glucose production and plasma glucose concentration in 20 children (8 girls) with

  5. Regulation of glucose dynamics by noninvasive peripheral electrical stimulation in normal and insulin-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalogna, Merav; Fishman, Sigal; Halpern, Zamir; Ben-Shlomo, Shani; Nevo, Uri; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2016-06-01

    The epidemic nature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), along with the downsides of current treatments, has raised the need for therapeutic alternatives. We studied normo-glycemic and high-fat diet (HFD), induced insulin-resistant Wistar Han rats for 2 to 3weeks. Rats received peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) treatment (2Hz/16Hz bursts, 10mA) in their hind limbs for 3min, 3 times per week. Glucose tolerance was evaluated by using a glucose tolerance test at the beginning and again at the end of the study. The effect of an acute PES treatment on metabolic rates of glucose appearance and turnover was measured by using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (HEGC) test. Repeated PES treatment significantly inhibited the progression of glucose intolerance in normal and insulin-resistant rats and prevented HFD-induced gains in body weight and fat mass. Acute treatment induced a prolonged effect on glucose turnover, as evaluated by the HEGC test. Increased hepatic glucose output was observed during the basal state (Pinsulin (41.1%, Pinsulin sensitivity in rats. Repeated PES treatment may have a beneficial effect on HFD-induced adiposity and control of body weight. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulation of glucose turnover during exercise in pancreatectomized, totally insulin-deficient dogs. Effects of beta-adrenergic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, O; Miles, P; Wasserman, D; Lickley, L; Vranic, M

    1988-01-01

    To examine whether glucose metabolic clearance increases and whether catecholamines influence glucose turnover during exercise in total insulin deficiency, 24-h fasted and insulin-deprived pancreatectomized dogs were studied before and during exercise (60 min; 100 m/min; 10% slope) with (n = 8) and without (n = 8) propranolol infusion (PI, 5 micrograms/kg-min). Exercise with or without PI was accompanied by four and fivefold increments in norepinephrine and epinephrine respectively, while glucagon (extrapancreatic) fell slightly. Basal plasma glucose and FFA concentrations and rates of tracer-determined (3[3H]glucose) hepatic glucose production (Ra) and total glucose clearance (including urinary glucose loss) were 459 +/- 24 mg/dl, 1.7 +/- 0.5 mmol/liter, 7.8 +/- 0.9 mg/kg-min and 1.6 +/- 0.1 ml/kg-min, respectively. When corrected for urinary glucose excretion, basal glucose metabolic clearance rate (MCR) was 0.7 +/- 0.1 mg/kg-min and rose twofold (P less than 0.0001) during exercise. Despite lower lactate (3.3 +/- 0.6 vs. 6.6 +/- 1.3 mmol/liter; P less than 0.005) and FFA levels (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.2 +/- 0.2 mmol/liter; P less than 0.0001) with PI, PI failed to influence MCR during exercise. Ra rose by 3.7 +/- 1.7 mg/kg-min during exercise (P less than 0.02) while with PI the increase was only 1.9 +/- 0.7 mg/kg-min (P less than 0.002). Glucose levels remained unchanged during exercise alone but fell slightly with PI (P less than 0.0001). Therefore, in total insulin deficiency, MCR increases marginally with exercise (13% of normal); the beta adrenergic effects of catecholamines that stimulate both FFA mobilization and muscle glycogenolysis do not regulate muscle glucose uptake. The exercise-induced rise in hepatic glucose production does not require an increase in glucagon levels, but is mediated partially by catecholamines. Present and previous data in normal and alloxan-diabetic dogs, suggest that (a) in total insulin deficiency, control of hepatic glucose

  7. Regulation of glucose turnover during exercise in pancreatectomized, totally insulin-deficient dogs. Effects of beta-adrenergic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, O; Miles, P; Wasserman, D; Lickley, L; Vranic, M

    1988-06-01

    To examine whether glucose metabolic clearance increases and whether catecholamines influence glucose turnover during exercise in total insulin deficiency, 24-h fasted and insulin-deprived pancreatectomized dogs were studied before and during exercise (60 min; 100 m/min; 10% slope) with (n = 8) and without (n = 8) propranolol infusion (PI, 5 micrograms/kg-min). Exercise with or without PI was accompanied by four and fivefold increments in norepinephrine and epinephrine respectively, while glucagon (extrapancreatic) fell slightly. Basal plasma glucose and FFA concentrations and rates of tracer-determined (3[3H]glucose) hepatic glucose production (Ra) and total glucose clearance (including urinary glucose loss) were 459 +/- 24 mg/dl, 1.7 +/- 0.5 mmol/liter, 7.8 +/- 0.9 mg/kg-min and 1.6 +/- 0.1 ml/kg-min, respectively. When corrected for urinary glucose excretion, basal glucose metabolic clearance rate (MCR) was 0.7 +/- 0.1 mg/kg-min and rose twofold (P less than 0.0001) during exercise. Despite lower lactate (3.3 +/- 0.6 vs. 6.6 +/- 1.3 mmol/liter; P less than 0.005) and FFA levels (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.2 +/- 0.2 mmol/liter; P less than 0.0001) with PI, PI failed to influence MCR during exercise. Ra rose by 3.7 +/- 1.7 mg/kg-min during exercise (P less than 0.02) while with PI the increase was only 1.9 +/- 0.7 mg/kg-min (P less than 0.002). Glucose levels remained unchanged during exercise alone but fell slightly with PI (P less than 0.0001). Therefore, in total insulin deficiency, MCR increases marginally with exercise (13% of normal); the beta adrenergic effects of catecholamines that stimulate both FFA mobilization and muscle glycogenolysis do not regulate muscle glucose uptake. The exercise-induced rise in hepatic glucose production does not require an increase in glucagon levels, but is mediated partially by catecholamines. Present and previous data in normal and alloxan-diabetic dogs, suggest that (a) in total insulin deficiency, control of hepatic glucose

  8. Estimation of liver glucose metabolism after refeeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognstad, R.

    1987-01-01

    Refeeding or infusing glucose to rats fasted for 24 hr or more causes rapid liver glycogen synthesis, the carbon source now considered to be largely from gluconeogenesis. While substrate cycling between plasma glucose and liver glucose-6P is known to occur, this cycling has apparently been ignored when calculations are made of % contribution of direct and indirect pathways to liver glycogen synthesis, or when hepatic glucose output is calculated from glucose turnover minus the glucose infusion rate. They show that, isotopically, an estimate of the fluxes of liver glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase is required to quantitate sources of carbon for liver glycogen synthesis, and to measure hepatic glucose output (or uptake). They propose a method to estimate these fluxes, involving a short infusion of a 14 C labelled gluconeogenic precursor plus (6T)glucose, with determination of isotopic yields in liver glycogen and total glucose. Given also the rate of liver glycogen synthesis, this procedure permits the estimation of net gluconeogenesis and hepatic glucose output or uptake. Also, in vitro evidence against the notion of a drastic zonation of liver carbohydrate metabolism is presented, e.g. raising the glucose concentration from 10 to 25 mM increases the 14 C yield from H 14 CO 3 - in lactate, with the increased pyruvate kinase flux and decreased gluconeogenesis occurring in the same cell type, not opposing pathways in different hepatocyte types (as has been postulated by some to occur in vivo after refeeding

  9. Saponins, especially platycodin D, from Platycodon grandiflorum modulate hepatic lipogenesis in high-fat diet-fed rats and high glucose-exposed HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yong Pil [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, International University of Korea, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Khanal, Tilak; Song, Gye Young [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Myoung Soo [College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun-Sun [Molecular Cancer Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young Chul; Lee, Young Chun [Division of Food Science, International University of Korea, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hye Gwang, E-mail: hgjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a central role in controlling hepatic lipid metabolism through modulating the downstream acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) pathway. Saponins, particularly platycodin D, from the roots of Platycodon grandiflorum (Changkil saponins, CKS) have a variety of pharmacological properties, including antioxidant and hepatoprotective properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of CKS on hepatic lipogenesis and on the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis, and the mechanisms involved. CKS attenuated fat accumulation and the induction of the lipogenic genes encoding SREBP-1c and fatty acid synthase in the livers of HFD-fed rats and in steatotic HepG2 cells. Blood biochemical analyses and histopathological examinations showed that CKS prevented liver injury. CKS and platycodin D each increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in HFD-fed rats and HepG2 cells. The use of specific inhibitors showed that platycodin D activated AMPK via SIRT1/CaMKKβ in HepG2 cells. This study demonstrates that CKS or platycodin D alone can regulate hepatic lipogenesis via an AMPK-dependent signalling pathway. - Highlights: ► CKS attenuated fat accumulation in HFD-fed rats and in steatotic HepG2 cells. ► CKS and its major component, platycodin D, inhibited the levels of SREBP-1 and FAS. ► CKS and platycodin D increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. ► Platycodin D activated AMPK via SIRT1/CaMKKβ in HepG2 cells.

  10. The Relationships between Metabolic Disorders (Hypertension, Dyslipidemia, and Impaired Glucose Tolerance) and Computed Tomography-Based Indices of Hepatic Steatosis or Visceral Fat Accumulation in Middle-Aged Japanese Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibayashi, Kazutoshi; Gunji, Toshiaki; Yokokawa, Hirohide; Naito, Toshio; Sasabe, Noriko; Okumura, Mitsue; Iijima, Kimiko; Shibuya, Katsuhiko; Hisaoka, Teruhiko; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Most studies on the relationships between metabolic disorders (hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance) and hepatic steatosis (HS) or visceral fat accumulation (VFA) have been cross-sectional, and thus, these relationships remain unclear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to clarify the relationships between components of metabolic disorders and HS/VFA. The participants were 615 middle-aged men who were free from serious liver disorders, diabetes, and HS/VFA and underwent multiple general health check-ups at our institution between 2009 and 2013. The data from the initial and final check-ups were used. HS and VFA were assessed by computed tomography. HS was defined as a liver to spleen attenuation ratio of ≤1.0. VFA was defined as a visceral fat cross-sectional area of ≥100 cm2 at the level of the navel. Metabolic disorders were defined using Japan's metabolic syndrome diagnostic criteria. The participants were divided into four groups based on the presence (+) or absence (-) of HS/VFA. The onset rates of each metabolic disorder were compared among the four groups. Among the participants, 521, 55, 24, and 15 were classified as HS(-)/VFA(-), HS(-)/VFA(+), HS(+)/VFA(-), and HS(+)/VFA(+), respectively, at the end of the study. Impaired glucose tolerance was more common among the participants that exhibited HS or VFA (p = 0.05). On the other hand, dyslipidemia was more common among the participants that displayed VFA (p = 0.01). It is likely that VFA is associated with impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia, while HS might be associated with impaired glucose tolerance. Unfortunately, our study failed to detect associations between HS/VFA and metabolic disorders due to the low number of subjects that exhibited fat accumulation. Although our observational study had major limitations, we consider that it obtained some interesting results. HS and VFA might affect different metabolic disorders. Further large-scale longitudinal studies are

  11. The Relationships between Metabolic Disorders (Hypertension, Dyslipidemia, and Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Computed Tomography-Based Indices of Hepatic Steatosis or Visceral Fat Accumulation in Middle-Aged Japanese Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Fujibayashi

    Full Text Available Most studies on the relationships between metabolic disorders (hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance and hepatic steatosis (HS or visceral fat accumulation (VFA have been cross-sectional, and thus, these relationships remain unclear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to clarify the relationships between components of metabolic disorders and HS/VFA.The participants were 615 middle-aged men who were free from serious liver disorders, diabetes, and HS/VFA and underwent multiple general health check-ups at our institution between 2009 and 2013. The data from the initial and final check-ups were used. HS and VFA were assessed by computed tomography. HS was defined as a liver to spleen attenuation ratio of ≤1.0. VFA was defined as a visceral fat cross-sectional area of ≥100 cm2 at the level of the navel. Metabolic disorders were defined using Japan's metabolic syndrome diagnostic criteria. The participants were divided into four groups based on the presence (+ or absence (- of HS/VFA. The onset rates of each metabolic disorder were compared among the four groups.Among the participants, 521, 55, 24, and 15 were classified as HS(-/VFA(-, HS(-/VFA(+, HS(+/VFA(-, and HS(+/VFA(+, respectively, at the end of the study. Impaired glucose tolerance was more common among the participants that exhibited HS or VFA (p = 0.05. On the other hand, dyslipidemia was more common among the participants that displayed VFA (p = 0.01.It is likely that VFA is associated with impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia, while HS might be associated with impaired glucose tolerance. Unfortunately, our study failed to detect associations between HS/VFA and metabolic disorders due to the low number of subjects that exhibited fat accumulation. Although our observational study had major limitations, we consider that it obtained some interesting results. HS and VFA might affect different metabolic disorders. Further large-scale longitudinal studies

  12. Dexamethasone increases glucose cycling, but not glucose production, in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wajngot, A.; Khan, A.; Giacca, A.; Vranic, M.; Efendic, S.

    1990-01-01

    We established that measurement of glucose fluxes through glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase; hepatic total glucose output, HTGO), glucose cycling (GC), and glucose production (HGP), reveals early diabetogenic changes in liver metabolism. To elucidate the mechanism of the diabetogenic effect of glucocorticoids, we treated eight healthy subjects with oral dexamethasone (DEX; 15 mg over 48 h) and measured HTGO with [2-3H]glucose and HGP with [6-3H]glucose postabsorptively and during a 2-h glucose infusion (11.1 mumol.kg-1.min-1). [2-3H]- minus [6-3H]glucose equals GC. DEX significantly increased plasma glucose, insulin, C peptide, and HTGO, while HGP was unchanged. In controls and DEX, glucose infusion suppressed HTGO (82 vs. 78%) and HGP (87 vs. 91%). DEX increased GC postabsorptively (three-fold) P less than 0.005 and during glucose infusion (P less than 0.05) but decreased metabolic clearance and glucose uptake (Rd), which eventually normalized, however. Because DEX increased HTGO (G-6-Pase) and not HGP (glycogenolysis + gluconeogenesis), we assume that DEX increases HTGO and GC in humans by activating G-6-Pase directly, rather than by expanding the glucose 6-phosphate pool. Hyperglycemia caused by peripheral effects of DEX can also contribute to an increase in GC by activating glucokinase. Therefore, measurement of glucose fluxes through G-6-Pase and GC revealed significant early effects of DEX on hepatic glucose metabolism, which are not yet reflected in HGP

  13. Orthotopic liver transplantation in glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency--Von Gierke disease--with multiple hepatic adenomas and concomitant focal nodular hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreiro, Gerson; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A; Coelho, Henri ue Sérgio M; Basto, Samanta; Pannain, Vera Lucia; Caroli-Bottino, Adriana; Ribeiro Filho, Joaquim

    2007-04-01

    Von Gierke disease is occasionally complicated by hepatic adenomas (HAs) causing great concern owing to the current difficulties in monitoring them regarding malignant transformation. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is proposed as a therapeutic tool when multiple HAs and poor metabolic control are present, owing to the lack of a clear-cut criterion to detect early malignant transformation, whether or not associated with growth retardation. Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) has never been described together with multiple adenomas in von Gierke disease. We report a 26-year-old woman with von Gierke disease complicated by multiple HAs concomitant with FNH who underwent OLT and is now free from disease symptoms with good long-term outcome. In conclusion, although FNH could have been managed clinically, when multiple adenomas are present, OLT should be planned for some patients, mainly for those with poor metabolic control.

  14. Association between risk factors, basal viral load, virus genotype and the degree of liver fibrosis with the response to the therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Vuk R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Hepatitis C is an important sociomedical problem worldwide due to frequent progression to chronic disease, occurrence of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Standard pegylated interferon alfa 2a plus ribavirin therapy results in resolution of infection only in 50% of patients. The aim of this study was to determine the association of various factors with response to the therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Age and sex of patients, inoculation risk factors, histopathological changes in the liver, viral load and HCV genotype were analyzed. Methods. The study included a group of 121 patients with chronic HCV infection. The treatment was carried out 24 weeks for virus genotype 2 and 3, and 48 weeks for genotype 1 and 4. The degree of histopathological changes in the liver was determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining, whereas polimerase chain reaction was used for HCV genotyping. Results. In the group of non-responding patients genotype 1 was represented with 100%, while in the other groups, although predominantly present, its percentage was lower. Unresponsiveness to therapy and relapse of disease were associated with higher viral load and advanced fibrosis. Intravenous use of psychoactive substances, as a risk factor, was present in a high percentage in the group of patients with sustained response, while blood transfusion and dialysis were leading risk factors in the group of relapse responders and non-responders. Conclusion. The results of our study showed that the treatment outcome of chronic HCV infection was associated with baseline HCV ribonucleic acid, HCV genotype, route of infection and the degree of histopathological changes in the liver. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41010

  15. Permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared to reduce blood glucose level and hepatic function in mus musculus with diabetic mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhariningsih; Basuki Notobroto, Hari; Winarni, Dwi; Achmad Hussein, Saikhu; Anggono Prijo, Tri

    2017-05-01

    Blood contains several electrolytes with positive (cation) and negative (anion) ion load. Both electrolytes deliver impulse synergistically adjusting body needs. Those electrolytes give specific effect to external disturbance such as electric, magnetic, even infrared field. A study has been conducted to reduce blood glucose level and liver function, in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients, using Biophysics concept which uses combination therapy of permanent magnetic field, electric field, and infrared. This study used 48 healthy mice (mus musculus), male, age 3-4 weeks, with approximately 25-30 g in weight. Mice was fed with lard as high fat diet orally, before Streptozotocin (STZ) induction become diabetic mice. Therapy was conducted by putting mice in a chamber that emits the combination of permanent magnetic field, electric field, and infrared, every day for 1 hour for 28 days. There were 4 combinations of therapy/treatment, namely: (1) permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared; (2) permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, without infrared; (3) permanent magnetic field, alternating electric field, and infrared; and (4) permanent magnetic field, alternating electric field, without infrared. The results of therapy show that every combination is able to reduce blood glucose level, AST, and ALT. However, the best result is by using combination of permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared.

  16. Permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared to reduce blood glucose level and hepatic function in mus musculus with diabetic mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhariningsih; Prijo, Tri Anggono; Notobroto, Hari Basuki; Winarni, Dwi; Hussein, Saikhu Achmad

    2017-01-01

    Blood contains several electrolytes with positive (cation) and negative (anion) ion load. Both electrolytes deliver impulse synergistically adjusting body needs. Those electrolytes give specific effect to external disturbance such as electric, magnetic, even infrared field. A study has been conducted to reduce blood glucose level and liver function, in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients, using Biophysics concept which uses combination therapy of permanent magnetic field, electric field, and infrared. This study used 48 healthy mice ( mus musculus ), male, age 3-4 weeks, with approximately 25-30 g in weight. Mice was fed with lard as high fat diet orally, before Streptozotocin (STZ) induction become diabetic mice. Therapy was conducted by putting mice in a chamber that emits the combination of permanent magnetic field, electric field, and infrared, every day for 1 hour for 28 days. There were 4 combinations of therapy/treatment, namely: (1) permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared; (2) permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, without infrared; (3) permanent magnetic field, alternating electric field, and infrared; and (4) permanent magnetic field, alternating electric field, without infrared. The results of therapy show that every combination is able to reduce blood glucose level, AST, and ALT. However, the best result is by using combination of permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared. (paper)

  17. Alcoholic Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... avoid all alcohol. Protect yourself from hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is an infectious liver disease caused by a virus. Untreated, it can lead to cirrhosis. If you have hepatitis C and drink alcohol, you're far more likely ...

  18. Basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baruah, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Seven cases of basal cell carcinoma are reported in this paper. The incidence of this disease is two percent of all malignancies seen at the Miraj Medical Centre, Miraj, Maharashtra. There were five male and two female patients in this series. The youngest patient was 40 years old and the oldest 70 years. The average age of the patients was 57.3 years. All the cases in the series had lesions confined to the head and neck region. Radiation therapy was given to all the seven cases which was the primary form of treatment in five cases. In two cases surgical excision had been done and the growth in both the cases had recurred. Radiation therapy is considered more ideal and suitable in the treatment of basal cell carcinomas. (auth.)

  19. Hepatitis Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Sina Ogholikhan; Kathleen B. Schwarz

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B ...

  20. CD40 deficiency in mice exacerbates obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang-An; Kogan, Sophia; Amano, Shinya U; Wang, Mengxi; Dagdeviren, Sezin; Friedline, Randall H; Aouadi, Myriam; Kim, Jason K; Czech, Michael P

    2013-05-01

    The pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes in rodents and humans is characterized by low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue and liver. The CD40 receptor and its ligand CD40L initiate immune cell signaling promoting inflammation, but conflicting data on CD40L-null mice confound its role in obesity-associated insulin resistance. Here, we demonstrate that CD40 receptor-deficient mice on a high-fat diet display the expected decrease in hepatic cytokine levels but paradoxically exhibit liver steatosis, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance compared with their age-matched wild-type controls. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies also demonstrated insulin resistance in glucose utilization by the CD40-null mice compared with wild-type mice. In contrast to liver, adipose tissue in CD40-deficient animals harbors elevated cytokine levels and infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages and CD8(+) effector T cells. In addition, ex vivo explants of epididymal adipose tissue from CD40(-/-) mice display elevated basal and isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis, suggesting a potential increase of lipid efflux from visceral fat to the liver. These findings reveal that 1) CD40-null mice represent an unusual model of hepatic steatosis with reduced hepatic inflammation, and 2) CD40 unexpectedly functions in adipose tissue to attenuate its inflammation in obesity, thereby protecting against hepatic steatosis.

  1. Dopamine agents for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anders Ellekær; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present with extrapyramidal symptoms and changes in basal ganglia. These changes are similar to those seen in patients with Parkinson's disease. Dopamine agents (such as bromocriptine and levodopa, used for patients with Parkinson's disease) have...

  2. Future of newer basal insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Madhu, S. V.; Velmurugan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Basal insulin have been developed over the years. In recent times newer analogues have been added to the armanentarium for diabetes therapy. This review specifically reviews the current status of different basal insulins

  3. Glucose Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  4. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seum Chung

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer, predominantly affecting the head and neck, and can be diagnosed clinically in most cases. Metastasis of BCC is rare, but localised tissue invasion and destruction can lead to morbidity.Risk factors for BCC include tendency to freckle, degree of sun exposure, excessive sun-bed use, and smoking.Incidence of BCC increases markedly after the age of 40 years, but incidence in younger people is rising, possibly as a result of inc...

  5. Perianal Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isil Bulur

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common non-melanoma skin cancer. Exposure to ultraviolet light is an important risk factor for BCC development and the disorder therefore develops commonly on body areas that are more exposed to sunlight, such as the face and neck. It is uncommon in the closed area of the body and quite rare in the perianal and genital regions. Herein, we report a 34-year-old patient with perianal BCC who had no additional risk factors.

  6. Glucose kinetics in the collagen-induced arthritis model: an all-in-one model to assess both efficacy and metabolic side effects of glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Erik J M; Laskewitz, Anke J; van Dijk, Theo H; Bleeker, Aycha; Grefhorst, Aldo; Schouten, Annelies E; Bastiaanssen, Ellen A J; Ballak, Dov B; Koenders, Marije I; van Doorn, Cindy; van der Vleuten, Monique A J; van Lierop, Marie-Jose C; Groen, Albert K; Dokter, Wim H A

    2014-01-01

    Prednisolone and other glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent anti-inflammatory drugs, but chronic use is hampered by metabolic side effects. Therefore, there is an urgent medical need for improved GCs that are as effective as classical GCs but have a better safety profile. A well-established model to assess anti-inflammatory efficacy is the chronic collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model in mice, a model with features resembling rheumatoid arthritis. Models to quantify undesired effects of glucocorticoids on glucose kinetics are less well-established. Recently, we have described a model to quantify basal blood glucose kinetics using stably-labeled glucose. In the present study, we have integrated this blood glucose kinetic model in the CIA model to enable quantification of both efficacy and adverse effects in one animal model. Arthritis scores were decreased after treatment with prednisolone, confirming the anti-inflammatory properties of GCs. Both inflammation and prednisolone induced insulin resistance as insulin secretion was strongly increased whereas blood glucose concentrations and hepatic glucose production were only slightly decreased. This insulin resistance did not directly resulted in hyperglycemia, indicating a highly adaptive compensatory mechanism in these mice. In conclusion, this 'all-in-one' model allows for studying effects of (novel) GC compounds on the development of arthritis and glucose kinetics in a single animal. This integrative model provides a valuable tool for investigating (drug-induced) metabolic dysregulation in an inflammatory setting.

  7. Basal cell carcinoma: pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Chatterjee, Kingshuk; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer in humans, which typically appears over the sun-exposed skin as a slow-growing, locally invasive lesion that rarely metastasizes. Although the exact etiology of BCC is unknown, there exists a well-established relationship between BCC and the pilo-sebaceous unit, and it is currently thought to originate from pluri-potential cells in the basal layer of the epidermis or the follicle. The patched/hedgehog intracellular signaling pathway plays a central role in both sporadic BCCs and nevoid BCC syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). This pathway is vital for the regulation of cell growth, and differentiation and loss of inhibition of this pathway is associated with development of BCC. The sonic hedgehog protein is the most relevant to BCC; nevertheless, the Patched (PTCH) protein is the ligand-binding component of the hedgehog receptor complex in the cell membrane. The other protein member of the receptor complex, smoothened (SMO), is responsible for transducing hedgehog signaling to downstream genes, leading to abnormal cell proliferation. The importance of this pathway is highlighted by the successful use in advanced forms of BCC of vismodegib, a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug, that selectively inhibits SMO. The UV-specific nucleotide changes in the tumor suppressor genes, TP53 and PTCH, have also been implicated in the development of BCC.

  8. Abomasal amino acid infusion in postpartum dairy cows: Effect on whole-body, splanchnic, and mammary glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, C; Larsen, M; Ouellet, D R; Maxin, G; Pellerin, D; Lapierre, H

    2015-11-01

    Nine Holstein cows fitted with rumen cannulas and indwelling catheters in splanchnic blood vessels were used to study the effects of supplementing AA on milk lactose secretion, whole-body rate of appearance (WB-Ra) of glucose, and tissue metabolism of glucose, lactate, glycerol, and β-OH-butyrate (BHBA) in postpartum dairy cows according to a generalized randomized incomplete block design with repeated measures in time. At calving, cows were blocked according to parity (second and third or greater) and were allocated to 2 treatments: abomasal infusion of water (n=4) or abomasal infusion of free AA with casein profile (AA-CN; n=5) in addition to the same basal diet. The AA-CN infusion started with half the maximal dose at 1 d in milk (DIM) and then steadily decreased from 791 to 226 g/d from DIM 2 to 29 to cover the estimated essential AA deficit. On DIM 5, 15, and 29, D[6,6-(2)H2]-glucose (23.7 mmol/h) was infused into a jugular vein for 5h, and 6 blood samples were taken from arterial, portal, hepatic, and mammary sources at 45-min intervals, starting 1h after the initiation of the D[6,6-(2)H2]glucose infusion. Trans-organ fluxes were calculated as veno-arterial differences times plasma flow (splanchnic: downstream dilution of deacetylated para-aminohippurate; mammary: Fick principle using Phe+Tyr). Energy-corrected milk and lactose yields increased on average with AA-CN by 6.4 kg/d and 353 g/d, respectively, with no DIM × treatment interaction. Despite increased AA supply and increased demand for lactose secretion with AA-CN, net hepatic release of glucose remained unchanged, but WB-Ra of glucose tended to increase with AA-CN. Portal true flux of glucose increased with AA-CN and represented, on average, 17% of WB-Ra. Splanchnic true flux of glucose was unaltered by treatments and was numerically equivalent to WB-Ra, averaging 729 and 741 mmol/h, respectively. Mammary glucose utilization increased with AA-CN infusion, averaging 78% of WB-Ra, and increased

  9. Glucagon is a primary controller of hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis during muscular work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, D H; Spalding, J A; Lacy, D B; Colburn, C A; Goldstein, R E; Cherrington, A D

    1989-07-01

    The effects of the exercise-induced rise in glucagon were studied during 2.5 h of treadmill exercise in 18-h fasted dogs. Five dogs were studied during paired experiments in which pancreatic hormones were clamped at basal levels during a control period (using somatostatin and intraportal hormone replacement), then altered during exercise to stimulate the normal exercise-induced fall in insulin, while glucagon was 1) increased to mimic its normal exercise-induced rise (SG) and 2) maintained at a basal level (BG). Six additional dogs were studied as described with saline infusion alone (C). Gluconeogenesis (GNG) and glucose production (Ra) were measured using tracers [( 3-3H]glucose and [U-14C]alanine) and arteriovenous differences. Glucose fell slightly during exercise in C and was infused in SG and BG so as to mimic the response in C. Glucagon rose from 60 +/- 3 and 74 +/- 5 pg/ml to 118 +/- 14 and 122 +/- 17 pg/ml with exercise in C and SG and was unchanged from basal in BG (67 +/- 6 pg/ml). In C, SG, and BG, insulin fell during exercise by 5 +/- 1, 6 +/- 1, and 6 +/- 1 microU/ml. Ra rose from 3.3 +/- 0.2 and 3.0 +/- 0.2 mg.kg-1.min-1 to 8.6 +/- 0.8 and 9.5 +/- 1.5 mg.kg-1.min-1 with exercise in C and SG, but from only 3.0 +/- 0.2 to 5.5 +/- 0.8 mg.kg-1.min-1 in BG. GNG increased by 248 +/- 38 and 183 +/- 75% with exercise in C and SG but by only 56 +/- 21% in BG. Intrahepatic gluconeogenic efficiency was also enhanced by the rise in glucagon increasing by 338 +/- 55 and 198 +/- 52% in C and SG but by only 54 +/- 46% in BG. The rise in hepatic fractional alanine extraction was 0.38 +/- 0.04 and 0.33 +/- 0.04 during exercise in C and SG and only 0.08 +/- 0.06 in BG. Ra was increased beyond that which could be explained by effects on GNG alone, hence hepatic glycogenolysis must have also been enhanced by the rise in glucagon. In conclusion, in the dog, the exercise-induced rise in glucagon 1) controls approximately 65% of the increase in Ra, 2) increases hepatic

  10. Glucokinase, the pancreatic glucose sensor, is not the gut glucose sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, R; Tura, A; Clark, P M

    2008-01-01

    measured at five time-points during a 75 g OGTT in 49 participants having GCK mutations with those of 28 familial controls. Mathematical modelling of glucose, insulin and C-peptide was used to estimate basal insulin secretion rate (BSR), total insulin secretion (TIS), beta cell glucose sensitivity....../INTERPRETATION: Glucokinase, the major pancreatic glucose sensor, is not the main gut glucose sensor. By modelling OGTT data in GCK mutation carriers we were able to distinguish a specific beta cell glucose-sensing defect. Our data suggest a reduction in potentiation of insulin secretion by glucose that is independent......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotrophic peptide (GIP) are released from intestinal endocrine cells in response to luminal glucose. Glucokinase is present in these cells and has been proposed as a glucose sensor. The physiological...

  11. The effect of altitude hypoxia on glucose homeostasis in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J J; Hansen, J M; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    1997-01-01

    1. Exposure to altitude hypoxia elicits changes in glucose homeostasis with increases in glucose and insulin concentrations within the first few days at altitude. Both increased and unchanged hepatic glucose production (HGP) have previously been reported in response to acute altitude hypoxia...

  12. The effect of altitude hypoxia on glucose homeostasis in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J J; Hansen, J M; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    1997-01-01

    1. Exposure to altitude hypoxia elicits changes in glucose homeostasis with increases in glucose and insulin concentrations within the first few days at altitude. Both increased and unchanged hepatic glucose production (HGP) have previously been reported in response to acute altitude hypoxia. Ins...

  13. Glucose homeostasis in children with falciparum malaria: precursor supply limits gluconeogenesis and glucose production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, E.; Hellerstein, M. K.; Romijn, J. A.; Neese, R. A.; Peshu, N.; Endert, E.; Marsh, K.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate glucose kinetics in children with falciparum malaria, basal glucose production and gluconeogenesis and an estimate of the flux of the gluconeogenic precursors were measured in Kenyan children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria before (n = 11) and during infusion of alanine (1.5

  14. 3,5 Diiodo-L-Thyronine (T2 Does Not Prevent Hepatic Steatosis or Insulin Resistance in Fat-Fed Sprague Dawley Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F Vatner

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone mimetics are alluring potential therapies for diseases like dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, and insulin resistance. Though diiodothyronines are thought inactive, pharmacologic treatment with 3,5- Diiodo-L-Thyronine (T2 reportedly reduces hepatic lipid content and improves glucose tolerance in fat-fed male rats. To test this, male Sprague Dawley rats fed a safflower-oil based high-fat diet were treated with T2 (0.25 mg/kg-d or vehicle. Neither 10 nor 30 days of T2 treatment had an effect on weight, adiposity, plasma fatty acids, or hepatic steatosis. Insulin action was quantified in vivo by a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. T2 did not alter fasting plasma glucose or insulin concentration. Basal endogenous glucose production (EGP rate was unchanged. During the clamp, there was no difference in insulin stimulated whole body glucose disposal. Insulin suppressed EGP by 60% ± 10 in T2-treated rats as compared with 47% ± 4 suppression in the vehicle group (p = 0.32. This was associated with an improvement in hepatic insulin signaling; insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation was ~2.5 fold greater in the T2-treated group as compared with the vehicle-treated group (p = 0.003. There was no change in expression of genes thought to mediate the effect of T2 on hepatic metabolism, including genes that regulate hepatic lipid oxidation (ppara, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a, genes that regulate hepatic fatty acid synthesis (srebp1c, acetyl coa carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and genes involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis (L-pyruvate kinase, glucose 6 phosphatase. Therefore, in contrast with previous reports, in Sprague Dawley rats fed an unsaturated fat diet, T2 administration failed to improve NAFLD or whole body insulin sensitivity. Though there was a modest improvement in hepatic insulin signaling, this was not associated with significant differences in hepatic insulin action. Further study will be

  15. Maintenance of Glucose Homeostasis through Acetylation of the Metabolic Transcriptional Coactivator PGC-1alpha

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Puigserver, Pere

    2007-01-01

    ... hepatic glucose production. This investigation has a define scope to specifically test how these proteins control the acetylation status of PGC-1alpha and what is the functional effect in blood glucose levels...

  16. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis commonly have other autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in ... 2 can also have any of the above autoimmune disorders. What are the symptoms of autoimmune hepatitis? The ...

  17. Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  18. of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Sobjanek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Polymorphic variants of MCP-1 and RANTES genes and their protein serum levels have been implicated in the increased risk and severity of several malignancies. However, the subject has not been explored in basal cell carcinoma (BCC patients so far. Aim : To investigate the association between monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 (–2518 A/G and RANTES (–403 G/A polymorphism and risk and clinical course of BCC. Material and methods : The study group consisted of 150 unrelated patients with BCC and 140 healthy, unrelated, age- and sex-matched volunteers. The polymorphisms were analysed using the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction method (ARMS-PCR and single specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR. Serum cytokine levels were measured with ELISA. Results : The presence of the MCP-1 –2518 GG genotype was statistically more frequent in BCC patients and it increased the risk of BCC (OR = 2.63, p = 0.003. Genotype –330 GG was statistically more common in patients with less advanced tumours (OR = 2.8, p = 0.017. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 serum level was statistically higher with GG genotype. In the BCC group MCP-1 serum levels were decreased. Neither polymorphic variants of RANTES nor the chemokine serum concentration differed significantly between the study groups. Conclusions : These findings suggest that –2518 A/G MCP-1 polymorphism may be involved in BCC pathogenesis.

  19. Impact of low dose prenatal ethanol exposure on glucose homeostasis in Sprague-Dawley rats aged up to eight months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probyn, Megan E; Parsonson, Kylie R; Gårdebjer, Emelie M; Ward, Leigh C; Wlodek, Mary E; Anderson, Stephen T; Moritz, Karen M

    2013-01-01

    Excessive exposure to alcohol prenatally has a myriad of detrimental effects on the health and well-being of the offspring. It is unknown whether chronic low-moderate exposure of alcohol prenatally has similar and lasting effects on the adult offspring's health. Using our recently developed Sprague-Dawley rat model of 6% chronic prenatal ethanol exposure, this study aimed to determine if this modest level of exposure adversely affects glucose homeostasis in male and female offspring aged up to eight months. Plasma glucose concentrations were measured in late fetal and postnatal life. The pancreas of 30 day old offspring was analysed for β-cell mass. Glucose handling and insulin action was measured at four months using an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and insulin challenge, respectively. Body composition and metabolic gene expression were measured at eight months. Despite normoglycaemia in ethanol consuming dams, ethanol-exposed fetuses were hypoglycaemic at embryonic day 20. Ethanol-exposed offspring were normoglycaemic and normoinsulinaemic under basal fasting conditions and had normal pancreatic β-cell mass at postnatal day 30. However, during a glucose tolerance test, male ethanol-exposed offspring were hyperinsulinaemic with increased first phase insulin secretion. Female ethanol-exposed offspring displayed enhanced glucose clearance during an insulin challenge. Body composition and hepatic, muscle and adipose tissue metabolic gene expression levels at eight months were not altered by prenatal ethanol exposure. Low-moderate chronic prenatal ethanol exposure has subtle, sex specific effects on glucose homeostasis in the young adult rat. As aging is associated with glucose dysregulation, further studies will clarify the long lasting effects of prenatal ethanol exposure.

  20. Impact of low dose prenatal ethanol exposure on glucose homeostasis in Sprague-Dawley rats aged up to eight months.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E Probyn

    Full Text Available Excessive exposure to alcohol prenatally has a myriad of detrimental effects on the health and well-being of the offspring. It is unknown whether chronic low-moderate exposure of alcohol prenatally has similar and lasting effects on the adult offspring's health. Using our recently developed Sprague-Dawley rat model of 6% chronic prenatal ethanol exposure, this study aimed to determine if this modest level of exposure adversely affects glucose homeostasis in male and female offspring aged up to eight months. Plasma glucose concentrations were measured in late fetal and postnatal life. The pancreas of 30 day old offspring was analysed for β-cell mass. Glucose handling and insulin action was measured at four months using an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and insulin challenge, respectively. Body composition and metabolic gene expression were measured at eight months. Despite normoglycaemia in ethanol consuming dams, ethanol-exposed fetuses were hypoglycaemic at embryonic day 20. Ethanol-exposed offspring were normoglycaemic and normoinsulinaemic under basal fasting conditions and had normal pancreatic β-cell mass at postnatal day 30. However, during a glucose tolerance test, male ethanol-exposed offspring were hyperinsulinaemic with increased first phase insulin secretion. Female ethanol-exposed offspring displayed enhanced glucose clearance during an insulin challenge. Body composition and hepatic, muscle and adipose tissue metabolic gene expression levels at eight months were not altered by prenatal ethanol exposure. Low-moderate chronic prenatal ethanol exposure has subtle, sex specific effects on glucose homeostasis in the young adult rat. As aging is associated with glucose dysregulation, further studies will clarify the long lasting effects of prenatal ethanol exposure.

  1. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to prevent HBV infection. Read more about hepatitis B . What Is Hepatitis C? Like hepatitis B, the hepatitis C virus (HCV) ... It Possible to Donate Blood After Having Hepatitis B? Hepatitis C Hand Washing Immunizations Blood Transfusions Blood Test: Liver ...

  2. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    HEPATITIS C & INCARCERATION What is hepatitis? “Hepatitis” means inflammation or swelling of the liver. The liver is an ... of viral hepatitis: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. They are all different from each other and ...

  3. Red Dot Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Red dot basal cell carcinoma, a distinctive morphologic variant of basal cell carcinoma that presents as a small red macule (dot) or papule, is described on a woman’s thigh. A high index of suspicion is necessary to consider the diagnosis since the tumor mimics a telangiectasia or an angioma. PMID:28670359

  4. Roles of the Gut in Glucose Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Gribble, Fiona; Horowitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract plays a major role in the regulation of postprandial glucose profiles. Gastric emptying is a highly regulated process, which normally ensures a limited and fairly constant delivery of nutrients and glucose to the proximal gut. The subsequent digestion and absorption...... of nutrients are associated with the release of a set of hormones that feeds back to regulate subsequent gastric emptying and regulates the release of insulin, resulting in downregulation of hepatic glucose production and deposition of glucose in insulin-sensitive tissues. These remarkable mechanisms normally...

  5. Hepatitis Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... others, the virus can cause long-term, chronic liver disease . Hepatitis C is most often spread by contact with infected ... contact with an infected person. Many people with hepatitis C develop chronic liver disease and cirrhosis . A hepatitis panel includes tests for ...

  6. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  7. Hepatitis C virus infection and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenborn, Karin; Tryc, Anita B; Heeren, Meike; Worthmann, Hans; Pflugrad, Henning; Berding, Georg; Bokemeyer, Martin; Tillmann, Hans L; Goldbecker, Annemarie

    2009-03-01

    There is growing evidence that hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection may affect the brain. About half of the HCV-infected patients complain of chronic fatigue irrespective of their stage of liver disease or virus replication rate. Even after successful antiviral therapy fatigue persists in about one third of the patients. Many patients, in addition, report of deficits in attention, concentration and memory, some also of depression. Psychometric testing revealed deficits in attention and verbal learning ability as characteristic for HCV-afflicted patients with normal liver function. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies showed alterations of the cerebral choline, N-acetyl-aspartate, and creatine content in the basal ganglia, white matter and frontal cortex, respectively. Recently, pathologic cerebral serotonin and dopamine transporter binding and regional alterations of the cerebral glucose utilisation compatible with alterations of the dopaminergic attentional system were observed. Several studies detected HCV in brain samples or cerebro-spinal fluid. Interestingly, viral sequences in the brain often differed from those in the liver, but were closely related to those found in lymphoid tissue. Therefore, the Trojan horse hypothesis emerged: HCV-infected mononuclear blood cells enter the brain, enabling the virus to reside within the brain (probably in microglia) and to infect brain cells, especially astrocytes.

  8. New basal temperature and basal melt rate maps of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Yasmina M.; Martin, Carlos; Vaughan, David G.

    2017-04-01

    Ice sheet basal conditions are key to initialize ice flow models and be able to estimate the future of the cryosphere. The thermal conditions are of importance because of the widespread presence of water beneath the Antarctic continent that affects both the ice-dynamics and the mass budget. The melting or freezing at the base of the ice sheet is consequence of several contributions to the heat balance. This includes the geothermal heat flux, the heat conducted or advected through the ice sheet, the latent heat and the friction heat at the interface. Here we present a new basal temperature and a total basal melting rate distributions of Antarctica. For this we use the most recent heat flux map (Martos et al., 2016) and an advanced ice flow model to incorporate the effect of advection and estimate frictional heat. We assume steady state conditions to estimate the basal properties. We found higher basal melting rates in West Antarctica than in East Antarctica as well as in the coastal regions of the continent and ice shelves. The spatial variation of our new basal temperature and basal melting rate distributions are greater than previously proposed which will help to unveil the Antarctic subglacial hydrology.

  9. Glucose allostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stumvoll, Michael; Tataranni, P Antonio; Stefan, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    In many organisms, normoglycemia is achieved by a tight coupling of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion in the pancreatic beta-cell (acute insulin response [AIR]) and the metabolic action of insulin to stimulate glucose disposal (insulin action [M]). It is widely accepted that in healthy...... individuals with normal glucose tolerance, normoglycemia can always be maintained by compensatorily increasing AIR in response to decreasing M (and vice versa). This has been mathematically described by the hyperbolic relationship between AIR and M and referred to as glucose homeostasis, with glucose...... concentration assumed to remain constant along the hyperbola. Conceivably, glucose is one of the signals stimulating AIR in response to decreasing M. Hypothetically, as with any normally functioning feed-forward system, AIR should not fully compensate for worsening M, since this would remove the stimulus...

  10. How to measure hepatic insulin resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukem, S-P; Gautier, J-F

    2008-12-01

    The liver plays a pivotal role in energy metabolism. Under the control of hormones, especially insulin, the liver stores or releases glucose as needed by the body's systems. It is also responsible for an important part of non-esterified fatty-acid and aminoacid metabolism. Assessing hepatic insulin resistance is almost always synonymous with measuring hepatic glucose production (HGP) and calculating indices of hepatic insulin resistance. The most frequently used method to this end is the isotope dilution technique using a tracer. Among tracers, stable isotope-labelled glucose molecules are particularly advantageous over radioactive isotope-labelled glucose and are, therefore, the tracers of choice. The tracer is infused either on its own after an overnight fast to evaluate fasting HGP, or with some among the usual insulin-sensitivity tests to assess HGP suppression by insulin and/or glucose. In a fasting state, HGP is easily calculated whereas, during insulin or glucose infusion, some formula are needed to correct for the non-steady-state condition. The hepatic insulin-resistance index is the product of HGP and the corresponding plasma insulin concentration. Although subject to error, the isotope dilution method nevertheless remains an irreplaceable tool for assessing hepatic insulin resistance in clinical research. From a practical point of view, some easily obtainable indices and clinical or biochemical parameters can serve as surrogates or markers of hepatic insulin resistance in clinical practice. Finally, drugs such as metformin or glitazones can improve hepatic insulin resistance, hence their use in hepatic insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  11. Hypoksisk hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amadid, Hanan; Schiødt, Frank Vinholt

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic hepatitis (HH), also known as ischaemic hepatitis or shock liver, is an acute liver injury caused by hepatic hypoxia. Cardiac failure, respiratory failure and septic shock are the main underlying conditions. In each of these conditions, several haemodynamic mechanisms lead to hepatic...... hypoxia. A shock state is observed in only 50% of cases. Thus, shock liver and ischaemic hepatitis are misnomers. HH can be a diagnostic pitfall but the diagnosis can be established when three criteria are met. Prognosis is poor and prompt identification and treatment of the underlying conditions...

  12. Substitution of starch for palm oil during gestation: impact on offspring survival and hepatic gene expression in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, K L; Fainberg, H P; Lomax, M A; Bikker, P; Symonds, M E; Mostyn, A

    2015-09-01

    Piglet neonatal mortality rates are high (~20%), so nutritional strategies to reduce this are highly desirable. Maternal fat substitution (FS) may promote the preweaning survival of piglets by improving their energy status. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of FS throughout pregnancy on offspring viability, together with the gene expression of stress-related markers in the liver. Sixteen pregnant sows were randomly allocated to one of two isocaloric diets, control (C) or FS in the form of palm oil, fed from 0 to 110 days gestation. Glucose tolerance was examined on Day 108. Median and low birthweight offspring were allocated to tissue sampling at either 7 days or 6 months postnatal age. In response to a glucose tolerance test, FS sows exhibited a raised glucose area under the curve with no change in basal glucose. Average piglet mortality (up to Day 28) was increased fourfold in the FS group, with surviving median-sized piglets exhibiting significantly lower fatty acid binding protein 1 (FABP1) expression at 7 days. There were no effects on the abundance of any other stress- or metabolic-related genes examined. Thus, this study demonstrates that maternal FS throughout gestation causes maternal glucose intolerance that may be linked to the observed increase in piglet mortality. However, the surviving offspring do not exhibit any detectable differences in postnatal growth or hepatic gene profile in later life.

  13. Glucose production during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, R; Kjaer, M; Simonsen, L

    1999-01-01

    The present study compared the arteriohepatic venous (a-hv) balance technique and the tracer-dilution method for estimation of hepatic glucose production during both moderate and heavy exercise in humans. Eight healthy young men (aged 25 yr; range, 23-30 yr) performed semisupine cycling for 40 min...... or by the tracer-dilution method, both at rest and during moderate and intense exercise (P > 0. 05). It is concluded that, during exercise in humans, determination of hepatic glucose production can be performed equally well with the two techniques....

  14. Vismodegib (ERIVEDGE°) In basal cell carcinoma: too many unknowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas are the most common skin cancers. They are usually localised and carry a good prognosis. There is no standard treatment for the rare patients with metastatic basal cell carcinoma or very extensive basal cell carcinoma for whom surgery or radiotherapy is inappropriate. Vismodegib, a cytotoxic drug, is claimed to prevent tumour growth by inhibiting a pathway involved in tissue repair and embryogenesis. It has been authorised in the European Union for patients with metastatic or locally advanced and extensive basal cell carcinoma. Clinical evaluation of vismodegib is based on a non-comparative clinical trial involving 104 patients, providing only weak evidence. Twenty-one months after the start of the trial, 7 patients with metastases (21%) and 6 patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma (10%) had died. Given the lack of a placebo group, there is no way of knowing whether vismodegib had any effect, positive or negative, on survival. There were no complete responses among patients with metastases, but about one-third of them had partial responses. Among the 63 patients with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma, there were 14 complete responses and 16 partial responses. The recurrence rate in patients with complete responses was not reported. Similar results were reported in two other uncontrolled trials available in mid-2014. Vismodegib has frequent and sometimes serious adverse effects, including muscle spasms, fatigue and severe hyponatraemia. Cases of severe weight loss, alopecia, ocular disorders, other cancers (including squamous cell carcinoma) and anaemia have also been reported. More data are needed on possible hepatic and cardiovascular adverse effects. A potent teratogenic effect was seen in experimental animals. As vismodegib enters semen, contraception is mandatory for both men (condoms) and women. In practice, vismodegib has frequent and varied adverse effects, some of which are serious, while its benefits are poorly documented

  15. Evaluation of glucose dose on intravenous glucose tolerance test traits in Holstein-Friesian heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Grajales, L Antonio; Pieper, Laura; Mengel, Sebastian; Staufenbiel, Rudolf

    2018-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in dairy and beef cattle has received considerable attention because balanced blood glucose is essential for numerous processes, such as milk production and general health. The glucose tolerance test measures the ability of an organism to regulate blood glucose levels. Glucose half-life time (GHLT) has high heritability and could serve as a potential parameter to breed for metabolic resistance. However, studies focusing on identification of an adequate glucose dose have not yet been conducted in cattle. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of 5 different glucose doses (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, and 3 g/kg of body weight 0.75 ) on intravenous glucose tolerance test (ivGTT) traits and insulin responses in nongestating heifers. A total of 150 tests were performed in 30 Holstein-Friesian heifers aged 13 to 15 mo. Blood samples were obtained every 7 min after glucose injection until min 63. Glucose traits and insulin parameters included blood serum glucose and insulin concentration at min 0 (basal concentration), min 7 to 21 (peak glucose and insulin concentration), and min 63 (last sampling) relative to glucose administration, glucose and insulin area under the curve (GAUC and IAUC), and GHLT estimated between min 14 and 42. Serum glucose and insulin concentrations were measured according to the hexokinase colorimetric method and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Generalized linear mixed model was used to test for significant differences in ivGTT traits, insulin responses, and glucose elimination rates (k) over time at different glucose doses. Maximum glucose and insulin concentrations at min 63 increased with higher glucose doses. Significantly lower GHLT were obtained at increasing glucose doses, whereas GAUC and IAUC were significantly higher at increasing doses. The k values were affected by glucose dose and by time interval. Glucose dose greatly affected most ivGTT traits, insulin responses, and glucose elimination rates. Therefore

  16. Similar glucose control with basal-bolus regimen of insulin detemir plus insulin aspart and thrice-daily biphasic insulin aspart 30 in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes: Results of a 50-week randomized clinical trial of stepwise insulin intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, R; Ajili, F; Assaad-Khalil, S H; Shinde, A; Chen, J W; Van den Berg, E

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the non-inferiority of 50-week treatment with stepwise insulin intensification of basal-bolus insulin analogues [insulin detemir (IDet) and aspart (IAsp)] versus biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp30) in insulin-naive type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients not controlled by oral glucose-lowering drugs (OGLDs). In this open-label multicentre, multinational, randomized, parallel-arm treat-to-target trial, 403 insulin-naive patients with T2DM in four African countries were randomized to either an IDet+IAsp (n = 200) or BIAsp1-2-3 (n = 203) treatment group. Stepwise insulin intensification was performed at the end of 14, 26 and 38 weeks, depending on HbA1c values. The primary endpoint was change in HbA1c after 50 weeks of treatment. Safety variables were hypoglycaemia incidence, occurrence of adverse events and weight gain. Non-inferiority of the IDet+IAsp versus BIAsp1-2-3 treatment regimen was demonstrated by their similar HbA1c levels at the end of trial (IDet+IAsp: baseline 8.6%, 50 weeks 7.4%; BIAsp1-2-3: baseline 8.7%, 50 weeks 7.3%; full analysis set difference: 0.1% [95% CI: -0.1, 0.3]; per protocol: 0.2% [95% CI: -0.1, 0.4]). At week 50, 40.3 and 44.9% of patients achieved HbA1c IAsp and BIAsp1-2-3, respectively. The rate of overall hypoglycaemia during the trial was also similar in both groups (IDet+IAsp: 9.4 events/patient-year; BIAsp1-2-3: 9.8 events/patient-year). Insulin initiation and intensification using IDet+IAsp was not inferior to BIAsp1-2-3 in insulin-naive patients with T2DM not controlled by OGLDs. Both regimens led to similar reductions in HbA1c values after 50 weeks of treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Hepatitis Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  18. Effects of taurine on plasma glucose concentration and active glucose transport in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Yo; Kawamata, Koichi

    2017-11-01

    Taurine lowers blood glucose levels and improves hyperglycemia. However, its effects on glucose transport in the small intestine have not been investigated. Here, we elucidated the effect of taurine on glucose absorption in the small intestine. In the oral glucose tolerance test, addition of 10 mmol/L taurine suppressed the increase in hepatic portal glucose concentrations. To investigate whether the suppressive effect of taurine occurs via down-regulation of active glucose transport in the small intestine, we performed an assay using the everted sac of the rat jejunum. Addition of taurine to the mucosal side of the jejunum suppressed active glucose transport via sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1). After elimination of chloride ions from the mucosal solution, taurine did not show suppressive effects on active glucose transport. These results suggest that taurine suppressed the increase in hepatic portal glucose concentrations via suppression of SGLT1 activity in the rat jejunum, depending on chloride ions. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  19. Alteration of hypothalamic glucose and lactate sensing in 48h hyperglycemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Camille; Carneiro, Lionel; Collins, Stephan C; Chrétien, Chloé; Grall, Sylvie; Pénicaud, Luc; Leloup, Corinne

    2013-02-08

    Hypothalamic detection of nutrients is involved in the control of energy metabolism and is altered in metabolic disorders. Although hypothalamic detection of blood lactate lowers hepatic glucose production and food intake, it is unknown whether it also modulates insulin secretion. To address this, a lactate injection via the right carotid artery (cephalad) was performed in Wistar rats. This triggered a transient increase in insulin secretion. Rats made hyperglycemic for 48h exhibited prolonged insulin secretion in response to a glucose injection via the carotid artery, but lactate injection induced two types of responses: half of the HG rats showed no difference compared to controls and the other half had markedly decreased insulin secretion. Astroglial monocarboxylates transporters MCT1 and MCT4 isoforms transfer lactate from blood to astrocytes and release lactate to the extracellular space, whilst the neuronal MCT2 isoform permits neuronal lactate uptake. We found that astroglial MCT1 and MCT4, and neuronal MCT2 protein levels in the medio-basal hypothalamus (MBH) were not modified by 48h-hyperglycemia. Together, these results indicate that hypothalamic sensing of circulating lactate triggers insulin secretion. Both glucose and lactate sensing are altered in a model of hyperglycemia, without alteration of MBH MCTs protein levels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Glucose production during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, R; Kjaer, M; Simonsen, L

    1999-01-01

    The present study compared the arteriohepatic venous (a-hv) balance technique and the tracer-dilution method for estimation of hepatic glucose production during both moderate and heavy exercise in humans. Eight healthy young men (aged 25 yr; range, 23-30 yr) performed semisupine cycling for 40 min...... at 50.4 +/- 1.5(SE)% maximal O(2) consumption, followed by 30 min at 69.0 +/- 2.2% maximal O(2) consumption. The splanchnic blood flow was estimated by continuous infusion of indocyanine green, and net splanchnic glucose output was calculated as the product of splanchnic blood flow and a-hv blood...... glucose concentration differences. Glucose appearance rate was determined by a primed, continuous infusion of [3-(3)H]glucose and was calculated by using formulas for a modified single compartment in non-steady state. Glucose production was similar whether determined by the a-hv balance technique...

  1. 13C MRS Studies of the Control of Hepatic Glycogen Metabolism at High Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corin O. Miller

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycogen is the primary intracellular storage form of carbohydrates. In contrast to most tissues where stored glycogen can only supply the local tissue with energy, hepatic glycogen is mobilized and released into the blood to maintain appropriate circulating glucose levels, and is delivered to other tissues as glucose in response to energetic demands. Insulin and glucagon, two current targets of high interest in the pharmaceutical industry, are well-known glucose-regulating hormones whose primary effect in liver is to modulate glycogen synthesis and breakdown. The purpose of these studies was to develop methods to measure glycogen metabolism in real time non-invasively both in isolated mouse livers, and in non-human primates (NHPs using 13C MRS.Methods: Livers were harvested from C57/Bl6 mice and perfused with [1-13C] Glucose. To demonstrate the ability to measure acute changes in glycogen metabolism ex-vivo, fructose, glucagon, and insulin were administered to the liver ex-vivo. The C1 resonance of glycogen was measured in real time with 13C MRS using an 11.7T (500 MHz NMR spectrometer. To demonstrate the translatability of this approach, NHPs (male rhesus monkeys were studied in a 7 T Philips MRI using a partial volume 1H/13C imaging coil. NPHs were subjected to a variable IV infusion of [1-13C] glucose (to maintain blood glucose at 3-4x basal, along with a constant 1 mg/kg/min infusion of fructose. The C1 resonance of glycogen was again measured in real time with 13C MRS. To demonstrate the ability to measure changes in glycogen metabolism in vivo, animals received a glucagon infusion (1 μg/kg bolus followed by 40 ng/kg/min constant infusion half way through the study on the second study session.Results: In both perfused mouse livers and in NHPs, hepatic 13C-glycogen synthesis (i.e., monotonic increases in the 13C-glycogen NMR signal was readily detected. In both paradigms, addition of glucagon resulted in cessation of glycogen

  2. 13C Mrs Studies of the Control of Hepatic Glycogen Metabolism at High Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Corin O.; Cao, Jin; Zhu, He; Chen, Li M.; Wilson, George; Kennan, Richard; Gore, John C.

    2017-06-01

    Introduction: Glycogen is the primary intracellular storage form of carbohydrates. In contrast to most tissues where stored glycogen can only supply the local tissue with energy, hepatic glycogen is mobilized and released into the blood to maintain appropriate circulating glucose levels, and is delivered to other tissues as glucose in response to energetic demands. Insulin and glucagon, two current targets of high interest in the pharmaceutical industry, are well known glucose-regulating hormones whose primary effect in liver is to modulate glycogen synthesis and breakdown. The purpose of these studies was to develop methods to measure glycogen metabolism in real time non-invasively both in isolated mouse livers, and in non-human primates (NHPs) using 13C MRS. Methods: Livers were harvested from C57/Bl6 mice and perfused with [1-13C] Glucose. To demonstrate the ability to measure acute changes in glycogen metabolism ex-vivo, fructose, glucagon, and insulin were administered to the liver ex-vivo. The C1 resonance of glycogen was measured in real time with 13C MRS using an 11.7T (500 MHz) NMR spectrometer. To demonstrate the translatability of this approach, NHPs (male rhesus monkeys) were studied in a 7 T Philips MRI using a partial volume 1H/13C imaging coil. NPHs were subjected to a variable IV infusion of [1-13C] glucose (to maintain blood glucose at 3-4x basal), along with a constant 1 mg/kg/min infusion of fructose. The C1 resonance of glycogen was again measured in real time with 13C MRS. To demonstrate the ability to measure changes in glycogen metabolism in vivo, animals received a glucagon infusion (1 μg/kg bolus followed by 40 ng/kg/min constant infusion) half way through the study on the second study session. Results: In both perfused mouse livers and in NHPs, hepatic 13C-glycogen synthesis (i.e. monotonic increases in the 13C-glycogen NMR signal) was readily detected. In both paradigms, addition of glucagon resulted in cessation of glycogen synthesis

  3. Estimation of endogenous glucose production during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamps. Comparison of unlabeled and labeled exogenous glucose infusates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finegood, D.T.; Bergman, R.N.; Vranic, M.

    1987-01-01

    Tracer methodology has been applied extensively to the estimation of endogenous glucose production (Ra) during euglycemic glucose clamps. The accuracy of this approach has been questioned due to the observation of significantly negative estimates for Ra when insulin levels are high. We performed hyperinsulinemic (300 microU/ml)-euglycemic glucose clamps for 180 min in normal dogs and compared the standard approach, an unlabeled exogenous glucose infusate (cold GINF protocol, n = 12), to a new approach in which a tracer (D-[3- 3 H]glucose) was added to the exogenous glucose used for clamping (hot GINF protocol, n = 10). Plasma glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations, and glucose infusion rates were similar for the two protocols. Plasma glucose specific activity was 20 +/- 1% of basal (at 120-180 min) in the cold GINF studies, and 44 +/- 3 to 187 +/- 5% of basal in the hot GINF studies. With the one-compartment, fixed pool volume model of Steele, Ra for the cold GINF studies was -2.4 +/- 0.7 mg X min-1 X kg-1 at 25 min and remained significantly negative until 110 min (P less than .05). For the hot GINF studies, Ra was never significantly less than zero (P greater than .05) and was greater than in the cold GINF studies at 20-90 min (P less than .05). There was substantially less between-(78%) and within- (40%) experiment variation for the hot GINF studies compared with the cold GINF studies. An alternate approach (regression method) to the application of the one-compartment model, which allows for a variable and estimable effective distribution volume, yielded Ra estimates that were suppressed 60-100% from basal

  4. Rose hip exerts antidiabetic effects via a mechanism involving downregulation of the hepatic lipogenic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Henriksson, Emma; Ström, Kristoffer; Alenfall, Jan; Göransson, Olga; Holm, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the metabolic effects of a dietary supplement of powdered rose hip to C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Two different study protocols were used; rose hip was fed together with HFD to lean mice for 20 wk (prevention study) and to obese mice for 10 wk (intervention study). Parameters related to obesity and glucose tolerance were monitored, and livers were examined for lipids and expression of genes and proteins related to lipid metabolism and gluconeogenesis. A supplement of rose hip was capable of both preventing and reversing the increase in body weight and body fat mass imposed by a HFD in the C57BL/6J mouse. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests together with lower basal levels of insulin and glucose showed improved glucose tolerance in mice fed a supplement of rose hip compared with control mice. Hepatic lipid accumulation was reduced in mice fed rose hip compared with control, and the expression of lipogenic proteins was downregulated, whereas AMP-activated protein kinase and other proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation were unaltered. Rose hip intake lowered total plasma cholesterol as well as the low-density lipoprotein-to-high-density lipoprotein ratio via a mechanism not involving altered gene expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 or 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase. Taken together, these data show that a dietary supplement of rose hip prevents the development of a diabetic state in the C57BL/6J mouse and that downregulation of the hepatic lipogenic program appears to be at least one mechanism underlying the antidiabetic effect of rose hip.

  5. Daidzin decreases blood glucose and lipid in streptozotocin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum or hepatic levels of lipid, proinflammatory factors, malondialdehyde (MDA) .... Animals were housed under a constant 12-h light and dark cycle and in an environment of 21 - 23 °C. To test the effect of DZ in normal mice, the animals were randomly divided into ..... hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism in diabetic db/db.

  6. Effects of free fatty acids on hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chang An; Sherck, Stephanie M; Igawa, Kayano; Sindelar, Dana K; Neal, Doss W; Emshwiller, Maya; Cherrington, Alan D

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of high levels of free fatty acids (FFA) and/or hyperglycemia on hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. Intralipid was infused peripherally in 18-h-fasted conscious dogs maintained on a pancreatic clamp in the presence (FFA + HG) or absence (FFA + EuG) of hyperglycemia. In the control studies, Intralipid was not infused, and euglycemia (EuG) or hyperglycemia (HG) was maintained. Insulin and glucagon were clamped at basal levels in all four groups. The arterial blood glucose level increased by 50% in the HG and FFA + HG groups. It did not change in the EuG and FFA + EuG groups. Arterial plasma FFA increased by approximately 140% in the FFA + EuG and FFA + HG groups but did not change significantly either in the EuG or HG groups. Arterial glycerol levels increased by approximately 150% in both groups. Overall (3-h) net hepatic glycogenolysis was 196 +/- 26 mg/kg in the EuG group. It decreased by 96 +/- 20, 82 +/- 16, and 177 +/- 22 mg/kg in the HG, FFA + EuG, and FFA + HG groups, respectively. Overall (3-h) hepatic gluconeogenic flux was 128 +/- 22 mg/kg in the EuG group, but it was suppressed by 30 +/- 9 mg/kg in response to hyperglycemia. It was increased by 59 +/- 12 and 56 +/- 10 mg/kg in the FFA + EuG and FFA + HG groups, respectively. In conclusion, an increase in plasma FFA and glycerol significantly inhibited hepatic glycogenolysis and markedly stimulated hepatic gluconeogenesis.

  7. Mobilization of glucose from the liver during exercise and replenishment afterward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencek, R Richard; Fueger, Patrick T; Camacho, Raul C; Wasserman, David H

    2005-06-01

    The liver is anatomically well situated to regulate blood glucose. It is positioned downstream from the pancreas, which releases the key regulatory hormones glucagon and insulin. It is also just downstream from the gut, permitting efficient extraction of ingested glucose and preventing large excursions in systemic glucose after a glucose-rich meal. The position of the liver is not as well situated from the standpoint of experimentation and clinical assessment, as its primary blood supply is impossible to access in conscious human subjects. Over the last 20 years, to study hepatic glucose metabolism during and after exercise, we have utilized a conscious dog model which permits sampling of the blood that perfuses (portal vein, artery) and drains (hepatic vein) the liver. Our work has demonstrated the key role of exercise-induced changes in glucagon and insulin in stimulating hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis during exercise. Recently we showed that portal venous infusion of the pharmacological agent 5'-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside leads to a marked increase in hepatic glucose production. Based on this, we propose that the concentration of AMP may be a component of a physiological pathway for stimulating hepatic glucose production during exercise. Insulin-stimulated hepatic glucose uptake is increased following exercise by an undefined mechanism that is independent of liver glycogen content. The fate of glucose taken up by the liver is critically dependent on hepatic glycogen stores, however, as glycogen deposition is greatly facilitated by prior glycogen depletion.

  8. Effects of gastric bypass surgery on glucose absorption and metabolism during a mixed meal in glucose-tolerant individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Siv H; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten; Jørgensen, Nils B; Clausen, Trine R; Wulff, Birgitte S; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Worm, Dorte; Hansen, Dorte L; Holst, Jens J; van Hall, Gerrit; Madsbad, Sten

    2013-10-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) improves glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes, but also changes the glucose profile in response to a meal in glucose-tolerant individuals. We hypothesised that the driving force for the changed postprandial glucose profiles after RYGB is rapid entry of glucose into the systemic circulation due to modified gastrointestinal anatomy, causing hypersecretion of insulin and other hormones influencing glucose disappearance and endogenous glucose production. We determined glucose absorption and metabolism and the rate of lipolysis before and 3 months after RYGB in obese glucose-tolerant individuals using the double-tracer technique during a mixed meal. After RYGB, the postprandial plasma glucose profile changed, with a higher peak glucose concentration followed by a faster return to lower than basal levels. These changes were brought about by changes in glucose kinetics: (1) a more rapid appearance of ingested glucose in the systemic circulation, and a concomitant increase in insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion; (2) postprandial glucose disappearance was maintained at a high rate for a longer time after RYGB. Endogenous glucose production was similar before and after surgery. Postoperative glucagon secretion increased and showed a biphasic response after RYGB. Adipose tissue basal rate of lipolysis was higher after RYGB. A rapid rate of absorption of ingested glucose into the systemic circulation, followed by increased insulin secretion and glucose disappearance appears to drive the changes in the glucose profile observed after RYGB, while endogenous glucose production remains unchanged. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01559792. The study was part of the UNIK program: Food, Fitness & Pharma for Health and Disease (see www.foodfitnesspharma.ku.dk ). Funding was received from the Novo Nordisk foundation and the Strategic Research Counsel for the Capital Area and Danish Research Agency. The primary investigator received a

  9. Effects of gastric bypass surgery on glucose absorption and metabolism during a mixed meal in glucose-tolerant individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Siv H; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    after RYGB is rapid entry of glucose into the systemic circulation due to modified gastrointestinal anatomy, causing hypersecretion of insulin and other hormones influencing glucose disappearance and endogenous glucose production. METHODS: We determined glucose absorption and metabolism and the rate...... RYGB. Endogenous glucose production was similar before and after surgery. Postoperative glucagon secretion increased and showed a biphasic response after RYGB. Adipose tissue basal rate of lipolysis was higher after RYGB. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: A rapid rate of absorption of ingested glucose...... into the systemic circulation, followed by increased insulin secretion and glucose disappearance appears to drive the changes in the glucose profile observed after RYGB, while endogenous glucose production remains unchanged. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01559792. FUNDING: The study was part of the UNIK...

  10. Underestimation of glucose turnover corrected with high-performance liquid chromatography purification of [6-3H]glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenk, W.F.; Butler, P.C.; Haymond, M.W.; Rizza, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    We have recently reported that during infusion of commercially available [6-3H]glucose, a radioactive nonglucose contaminant may accumulate in plasma causing errors in the measurement of glucose turnover. To determine whether purification of this tracer by HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) before infusion would eliminate the contaminant in plasma and remove the underestimation of glucose turnover reported during hyperinsulinemia, four normal subjects each underwent two 5-h euglycemic clamps during infusion of insulin (1 mU.kg-1.min-1). Glucose turnover was measured with either commercially available [6-3H]glucose or with HPLC-purified [6-3H]glucose. HPLC analysis of samples from the clamps done with commercially available [6-3H]glucose showed that 9.7% of the infused tracer and 26% of the plasma glucose 3H radioactivity were contaminants. In contrast, no contaminant was observed in the plasma during infusion of HPLC-purified [6-3H]glucose. During the last hour of the clamp, mean glucose turnover using commercially available [6-3H]glucose was less (P less than 0.01) than the mean glucose infusion rate (7.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 10.5 +/- 0.3 mg.kg-1.min-1) yielding apparent negative (P less than 0.001) hepatic glucose release. In contrast, when HPLC-purified [6-3H]glucose was employed, glucose turnover equaled the glucose infusion rate (10.4 +/- 0.9 vs. 10.2 +/- 0.9 mg.kg-1.min-1) and hepatic glucose release was no longer negative. We conclude that removal of a tritiated nonglucose contaminant in [6-3H]glucose by HPLC yields correct estimations of glucose turnover at steady state

  11. Hepatitis amebiana

    OpenAIRE

    Cortés Mendoza, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Se ha considerado habitualmente la hepatitis amebiana como una inflamación del parénquima hepático causada por localización del parásito mismo en el hígado, distinguiéndose la forma supurada o absceso y el estado presupurativo o hepatitis aguda.

  12. Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 간염: 아시아 또는 태평양군도 계 미국인의 숙지 사항 (Korean) Hepatitis B: Mga Tip para sa mga Amerikano ... hepatitis A virus typically spreads through contact with food or water that has been contaminated by an ...

  13. Combining Basal Insulin Analogs with Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Mimetics

    OpenAIRE

    Perfetti, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Basal insulin analogs are recognized as an effective method of achieving and maintaining glycemic control for patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the progressive nature of the disease means that some individuals may require additional ways to maintain their glycemic goals. Intensification in these circumstances has traditionally been achieved by the addition of short-acting insulin to cover postprandial glucose excursions that are not targeted by basal insulin. However, intensive insulin ...

  14. Acute inhibition of hepatic β-oxidation in APOE*3Leiden mice does not affect hepatic VLDL secretion or insulin sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivenvoorden, I.; Teusink, B.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Kuipers, F.; Romijn, J.A.; Havekes, L.M.; Voshol, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Hepatic VLDL and glucose production is enhanced in type 2 diabetes and associated with hepatic steatosis. Whether the derangements in hepatic metabolism are attributable to steatosis or to the increased availability of FA metabolites is not known. We used methyl palmoxirate (MP), an inhibitor of

  15. Glucose allostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stumvoll, Michael; Tataranni, P Antonio; Stefan, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    (insulin resistance), we propose to use the term "glucose allostasis." Allostasis (stability through change) ensures the continued homeostatic response (stability through staying the same) to acute stress at some cumulative costs to the system. With increasing severity and over time, the allostatic load......In many organisms, normoglycemia is achieved by a tight coupling of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion in the pancreatic beta-cell (acute insulin response [AIR]) and the metabolic action of insulin to stimulate glucose disposal (insulin action [M]). It is widely accepted that in healthy...

  16. Truncal vagotomy does not affect postabsorptive glucose metabolism in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corssmit, E. P.; van Lanschot, J. J.; Romijn, J. A.; Endert, E.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of hepatic vagal denervation on the adaptation of glucose metabolism to short-term starvation (i.e., <24 h), glucose metabolism was studied after 16 and again after 22 h of fasting in postsurgical patients with truncal vagotomy (n = 9; radical resection of esophageal

  17. Estimation of glucose carbon recycling in children with glycogen storage disease: A 13C NMR study using [U-13C]glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalderon, B.; Korman, S.H.; Gutman, A.; Lapidot, A.

    1989-01-01

    A stable isotope procedure to estimate hepatic glucose carbon recycling and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which glucose is produced in patients lacking glucose 6-phosphatase is described. A total of 10 studies was performed in children with glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) and type III (GSD-III) and control subjects. A primed dose-constant nasogastric infusion of D-[U- 13 C]glucose or an infusion diluted with nonlabeled glucose solution was administered following different periods of fasting. Hepatic glucose carbon recycling was estimated from 13 C NMR spectra. The values obtained for GSD-I patients coincided with the standard [U- 13 C]glucose dilution curve. These results indicate that the plasma glucose of GSD-I subjects comprises only a mixture of 99% 13 C-enriched D-[U- 13 C]glucose and unlabeled glucose but lacks any recycled glucose. Significantly different glucose carbon recycling values were obtained for two GSD-III patients in comparison to GSD-I patients. The results eliminate a mechanism for glucose production in GSD-I children involving gluconeogenesis. However, glucose release by amylo-1,6-glucosidase activity would result in endogenous glucose production of non- 13 C-labeled and nonrecycled glucose carbon, as was found in this study. In GSD-III patients gluconeogenesis is suggested as the major route for endogenous glucose synthesis. The contribution of the triose-phosphate pathway in these patients has been determined

  18. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Karthiga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Binkley and Johnson first reported this syndrome in 1951. But it was in 1960, Gorlin-Goltz established the association of basal cell epithelioma, jaw cyst and bifid ribs, a combination which is now frequently known as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as well as Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS. NBCCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance and variable expressivity. NBCCS is characterized by variety of cutaneous, dental, osseous, opthalmic, neurologic and sexual abnormalities. One such case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is reported here with good illustrations.

  19. Combining basal insulin analogs with glucagon-like peptide-1 mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, Riccardo

    2011-09-01

    Basal insulin analogs are recognized as an effective method of achieving and maintaining glycemic control for patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the progressive nature of the disease means that some individuals may require additional ways to maintain their glycemic goals. Intensification in these circumstances has traditionally been achieved by the addition of short-acting insulin to cover postprandial glucose excursions that are not targeted by basal insulin. However, intensive insulin regimens are associated with a higher risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain, which can contribute to a greater burden on patients. The combination of basal insulin with a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetic is a potentially attractive solution to this problem for some patients with type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 mimetics target postprandial glucose and should complement the activity of basal insulins; they are also associated with a relatively low risk of associated hypoglycemia and moderate, but significant, weight loss. Although the combination has not been approved by regulatory authorities, preliminary evidence from mostly small-scale studies suggests that basal insulins in combination with GLP-1 mimetics do provide improvements in A1c and postprandial glucose with concomitant weight loss and no marked increase in the risk of hypoglycemia. These results are promising, but further studies are required, including comparisons with basal-bolus therapy, before the complex value of this association can be fully appreciated.

  20. Impaired insulin-stimulated nonoxidative glucose metabolism in glucose-tolerant women with previous gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Vestergaard, H; Kühl, C

    1996-01-01

    euglycemic clamp including indirect calorimetry. All women were lean and had normal oral glucose tolerance test results. Activities of glycogen synthase, phosphofructokinase, and hexokinase were measured in vastus lateralis muscle biopsy specimens obtained in the basal state and after insulin stimulation....... RESULTS: Women with previous gestational diabetes had a decreased glucose disposal rate (pmetabolism (6.63 +/- 0.47 vs 9.04 +/- 0.57 mg/kg fat-free mass per minute, p

  1. Dietary Niacin Supplementation Suppressed Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of niacin supplementation on hepatic lipid metabolism in rabbits. Rex Rabbits (90 d, n = 32 were allocated to two equal treatment groups: Fed basal diet (control or fed basal diet with additional 200 mg/kg niacin supplementation (niacin. The results show that niacin significantly increased the levels of plasma adiponectin, hepatic apoprotein B and hepatic leptin receptors mRNA (p0.05. However, niacin treatment significantly inhibited the hepatocytes lipid accumulation compared with the control group (p<0.05. In conclusion, niacin treatment can decrease hepatic fatty acids synthesis, but does not alter fatty acids oxidation and triacylglycerol export. And this whole process attenuates lipid accumulation in liver. Besides, the hormones of insulin, leptin and adiponectin are associated with the regulation of niacin in hepatic lipid metabolism in rabbits.

  2. Postprandial gut hormone responses and glucose metabolism in cholecystectomized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, David P; Hare, Kristine J; Martens, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    -rich liquid meal (2,200 kJ). Basal and postprandial plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), cholecystokinin (CCK), and gastrin were measured. Furthermore, gastric emptying and duodenal and serum...... bile acids were measured. We found similar basal glucose concentrations in the two groups, whereas cholecystectomized subjects had elevated postprandial glucose excursions. Cholecystectomized subjects had reduced postprandial concentrations of duodenal bile acids, but preserved postprandial plasma GLP......-1 responses, compared with control subjects. Also, cholecystectomized patients exhibited augmented fasting glucagon. Basal plasma CCK concentrations were lower and peak concentrations were higher in cholecystectomized patients. The concentrations of GIP, GLP-2, and gastrin were similar in the two...

  3. Empagliflozin: a new sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J Neumiller

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is increasing in prevalence worldwide, and hyperglycemia is often poorly controlled despite a number of therapeutic options. Unlike previously available agents, sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors offer an insulin-independent mechanism for improving blood glucose levels, since they promote urinary glucose excretion (UGE by inhibiting glucose reabsorption in the kidney. In addition to glucose control, SGLT2 inhibitors are associated with weight loss and blood pressure reductions, and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Empagliflozin is a selective inhibitor of SGLT2, providing dose-dependent UGE increases in healthy volunteers, with up to 90 g of glucose excreted per day. It can be administered orally, and studies of people with renal or hepatic impairment indicated empagliflozin needed no dose adjustment based on pharmacokinetics. In Phase II trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, empagliflozin provided improvements in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and other measures of glycemic control when given as monotherapy or add-on to metformin, as well as reductions in weight and systolic blood pressure. As add-on to basal insulin, empagliflozin not only improved HbA1c levels but also reduced insulin doses. Across studies, empagliflozin was generally well tolerated with a similar rate of hypoglycemia to placebo; however, patients had a slightly increased frequency of genital infections, but not urinary tract infections, versus placebo. Phase III studies have also reported a good safety profile along with significant improvements in HbA1c, weight and blood pressure, with no increased risk of hypoglycemia versus placebo. Based on available data, it appears that empagliflozin may be a useful option in a range of patients; however, clinical decisions will be better informed by the results of ongoing studies, in particular, a large cardiovascular outcome study (EMPA-REG OUTCOME™.

  4. Propionate Increases Hepatic Pyruvate Cycling and Anaplerosis and Alters Mitochondrial Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Rachel J; Borders, Candace B; Cline, Gary W

    2016-01-01

    at doses previously used as a tracer, it increased VPyr-Cyc/VMito by 20-30-fold, increased hepatic TCA metabolite concentrations 2-3-fold, and increased endogenous glucose production rates by 20-100%. The physiologic stimuli, glucagon and epinephrine, both increased hepatic glucose production, but only...

  5. Free fatty acids increase hepatic glycogen content in obese males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allick, G.; Sprangers, F.; Weverling, G. J.; Ackermans, M. T.; Meijer, A. J.; Romijn, J. A.; Endert, E.; Bisschop, P. H.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased hepatic glycogen content. In vivo and in vitro data suggest that plasma free fatty acids (FFA) may cause this increase. In this study we investigated the effect of physiological plasma FFA levels on hepatic glycogen metabolism by studying intrahepatic glucose

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2018 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  8. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to Give Contact Us Privacy ...

  9. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Financial Assistance ALF HE Materials Suggested Reading Webinars Caregivers The Role of a Caregiver Signs and Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? ...

  10. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering to Your Treatment Plan Long-Term Considerations Patient Support Finding Support Services Peer Support Groups Financial Assistance Support for My Loved Ones Resources Find ...

  11. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When ... travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic ...

  12. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering to Your Treatment Plan Long-Term Considerations Patient Support Finding Support Services Peer Support Groups Financial Assistance ...

  13. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment ... treatment. Being a fully-informed participant in your medical care is an important factor in staying as ...

  14. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reading Webinars Caregivers The Role of a Caregiver Signs and Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver ... and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your ...

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? ... portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with ...

  16. Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American, Haitian, Alaskan Native, Vietnamese, Chinese, Korean, or Filipino. Patients with the following conditions should discuss hepatitis ... Employment Homeless Veterans Women Veterans Minority Veterans Plain Language Surviving Spouses & Dependents Adaptive Sports Program ADMINISTRATION Veterans ...

  17. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organ transplant before 1992. (Improvements in blood-screening technology were made in 1992.) Hepatitis C can’t ... Article >>Allergy Shots: Could They Help Your Allergies?Sports and Exercise at Every AgeRead Article >>Sports and ...

  18. Similar dose responsiveness of hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis to glucagon in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, R W; Steiner, K E; Davis, M A; Hendrick, G K; Williams, P E; Lacy, W W; Brown, L; Donahue, P; Lacy, D B; Cherrington, A D

    1987-03-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the dose-dependent effect of glucagon on gluconeogenesis parallels its effect on hepatic glycogenolysis in conscious overnight-fasted dogs. Endogenous insulin and glucagon secretion were inhibited by somatostatin (0.8 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1), and intraportal replacement infusions of insulin (213 +/- 28 microU X kg-1 X min-1) and glucagon (0.65 ng X kg-1 X min-1) were given to maintain basal hormone concentrations for 2 h (12 +/- 2 microU/ml and 108 +/- 23 pg/ml, respectively). The glucagon infusion was then increased 2-, 4-, 8-, or 12-fold for 3 h, whereas the rate of insulin infusion was left unchanged. Glucose production (GP) was determined with 3-[3H]glucose, and gluconeogenesis (GNG) was assessed with tracer (U-[14C]alanine conversion to [14C]glucose) and arteriovenous difference (hepatic fractional extraction of alanine, FEA) techniques. Increases in plasma glucagon of 53 +/- 8, 199 +/- 48, 402 +/- 28, and 697 +/- 149 pg/ml resulted in initial (15-30 min) increases in GP of 1.1 +/- 0.4 (N = 4), 4.9 +/- 0.5 (N = 4), 6.5 +/- 0.6 (N = 6), and 7.7 +/- 1.4 (N = 4) mg X kg-1 X min-1, respectively; increases in GNG (approximately 3 h) of 48 +/- 19, 151 +/- 50, 161 +/- 25, and 157 +/- 7%, respectively; and increases in FEA (3 h) of 0.14 +/- 0.07, 0.37 +/- 0.05, 0.42 +/- 0.04, and 0.40 +/- 0.17, respectively. In conclusion, GNG and glycogenolysis were similarly sensitive to stimulation by glucagon in vivo, and the dose-response curves were markedly parallel.

  19. Hepatic and visceral adipose tissue 11βHSD1 expressions are markers of body weight loss after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardina, Eva; Baena-Fustegueras, Juan Antonio; Fort, José Manuel; Ferrer, Roser; Rossell, Joana; Esteve, Montserrat; Peinado-Onsurbe, Julia; Grasa, Mar

    2015-09-01

    Cortisolemia and 11βHSD1 in liver and adipose tissue are altered in obesity. However, their participation in the development of obesity remains unclear. This study analyzed these parameters in the transition from morbid to type 1 obesity after bariatric surgery. A group of 34 patients with morbid obesity and 22 nonobese subjects were recruited. Initial hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) basal activity and 11βHSD1 mRNA expression in liver, subcutaneous (SAT), and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) were evaluated. A year after bariatric surgery (weight loss of 48 kg), these parameters were reappraised in plasma, SAT, and liver. Body weight loss was accompanied by a downshift in basal HPA activity and 11βHSD1 expression in SAT. In patients with morbid obesity, 11βHSD1 expression correlated positively with BMI in VAT and negatively in liver at 6 and 12 months after surgery. In SAT, a correlation was observed with body weight only when patients showed type 1 obesity. Insulin, glucose, and HOMA correlated positively with all the HPA indicators and 11βHSD1 expression in SAT. Body weight loss after bariatric surgery is accompanied by a downshift in basal HPA activity. Hepatic and VAT 11βHSD1 expressions in morbid obesity are predictors of body weight loss. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  20. What Is Hepatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by ingestion of contaminated food or water. Hepatitis B, C and D usually occur as a result of ... treatment Hepatitis B treatment Monitoring and evaluation of hepatitis B and C Hepatitis E waterborne outbreaks Development of national viral ...

  1. Hepatitis D (Delta agent)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complications may include: Chronic active hepatitis Acute liver failure ... Landaverde C, Perrillo R. Hepatitis D. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, ... 81. Thio CL, Hawkins C. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis delta ...

  2. Hepatitis B Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working on ... people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 11 Other Languages . Resource Video See More ...

  3. Basal cell carcinoma does metastasize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgediz, Doruk; Smith, E B; Zheng, Jie; Otero, Jose; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Corvera, Carlos U

    2008-08-15

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) rarely metastasizes. However, this unfortunate outcome can occur, usually in neglected tumors. We report a 52-year-old man with a BCC on the left chest that enlarged and then ulcerated over a 6-year period. Metastasis of the tumor to lymph nodes in the left axilla resulted, but the patient remains free of disease 24 months after wide excision, lymph node dissection, and local radiation therapy to the axilla.

  4. Neuroscience of glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Fleur, S E; Fliers, E; Kalsbeek, A

    2014-01-01

    Plasma glucose concentrations are homeostatically regulated and maintained within strict boundaries. Several mechanisms are in place to increase glucose output when glucose levels in the circulation drop as a result of glucose utilization, or to decrease glucose output and increase tissue glucose

  5. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.R.W.; Beckman, J.H.; Calne, D.B.; Adam, M.J.; Harrop, R.; Rogers, J.G.; Ruth, T.J.; Sayre, C.I.; Pate, B.D.

    1984-01-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization was measured in patients with predominantly unilateral Parkinson's disease using sup(18)F-2-fluoro-deoxyglucose and positron emission tomography. Preliminary results indicate the presence of asymmetric metabolic rates in the inferior basal ganglia. The structure comprising the largest portion of basal ganglia at this level is globus pallidus. These findings are consistent with metabolic studies on animals with unilateral nigrostriatal lesions in which pallidal hypermetabolism on the lesioned side has been demonstrated. Increased pallidal activity is likely secondary to a loss of inhibitory dopaminergic input to the striatum from substantia nigra

  6. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of age or older and persons with other liver diseases, such as hepatitis B or C.Hepatitis A vaccine can prevent hepatitis A. Hepatitis ... You use illegal drugs. You have a chronic liver disease such as hepatitis B or hepatitis C. You are being treated with clotting-factor concentrates. ...

  7. Basal cell carcinoma of penis: case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, M Z; Polacarz, S V; Partington, P E

    1988-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the penis is rare. A patient who presented with a penile and scrotal ulcer due to basal cell carcinoma is reported. Wide local excision and split skin grafting were performed to excise the lesion completely.

  8. Basal Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to Parotid Gland

    OpenAIRE

    Kurian, Rinsey Rose; Di Palma, Silvana; Barrett, A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis from basal cell carcinoma of the skin is very rare with cases being documented in the lymph nodes, lung, bone and parotid gland. The main histopathological differential diagnosis is the locally arising basal cell adenocarcinoma from which it is difficult to distinguish by morphology and routine immunohistochemistry. Approximately 85 % of all reported metastatic basal cell carcinomas arise in the head and neck region. Here we present a case of basal cell carcinoma of the skin of the...

  9. Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trials Physician Directory HBV Meeting What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS ...

  10. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  11. Restricting glycolysis impairs brown adipocyte glucose and oxygen consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Sally; Isidor, Marie S; Basse, Astrid L

    2018-01-01

    )-stimulated respiration was fueled mainly by fatty acids, with a significant contribution from glucose oxidation. Knockdown of glucose transporters in brown adipocytes not only impaired ISO-stimulated glycolytic flux but also oxygen consumption. Diminishing glycolytic flux by knockdown of the first and final enzyme......During thermogenic activation, brown adipocytes take up large amounts of glucose. In addition, cold stimulation leads to an upregulation of glycolytic enzymes. Here we have investigated the importance of glycolysis for brown adipocyte glucose consumption and thermogenesis. Using si......RNA-mediated knockdown in mature adipocytes, we explored the effect of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes on brown adipocyte functions such as consumption of glucose and oxygen. Basal oxygen consumption in brown adipocytes was equally dependent on glucose and fatty acid oxidation, whereas isoproterenol (ISO...

  12. Ficus Deltoidea Enhance Glucose Uptake Activity in Cultured Muscle Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainah Adam; Shafii Khamis; Amin Ismail; Muhajir Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Ficus deltoidea or locally known as Mas cotek is one of the common medicinal plants used in Malaysia. Our previous studies showed that this plant have blood glucose lowering effect. Glucose uptake into muscle and adipocytes cells is one of the known mechanisms of blood glucose lowering effect. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of Ficus deltoidea on glucose uptake activity into muscle cells. The cells were incubated with Ficus deltoidea extracts either alone or combination with insulin. Amount of glucose uptake by L6 myotubes was determined using glucose tracer, 2-deoxy-(1- 3 H 1 )-glucose. The results showed that Ficus deltoidea extracts at particular doses enhanced basal or insulin-mediated glucose uptake into muscle cells significantly. Hot aqueous extract enhanced glucose uptake at the low concentration (10 μg/ ml) whereas methanolic extract enhanced glucose uptake at low and high concentrations. Methanolic extract also mimicked insulin activity during enhancing glucose uptake into L^ muscle cells. Glucose uptake activity of Ficus deltoidea could be attributed by the phenolic compound presence in the plant. This study had shown that Ficus deltoidea has the ability to enhance glucose uptake into muscle cells which is partly contributed the antidiabetic activity of this plant. (author)

  13. GLUT-1 Expression in Cutaneous Basal and Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Eldien, Marwa Mohammad Serag; Elsakka, Daliah

    2015-09-01

    Glucose uptake is a key regulating step in glucose metabolism and is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs), and GLUT-1 is the predominant glucose transporter in many types of human cells. Cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) represent the most common skin cancer in Egypt. The present study aimed at evaluation of the pattern and distribution of GLUT-1 in cutaneous BCC (16 cases) and SCC (16 cases) by means of immunohistochemistry. GLUT-1 was expressed in all SCC (100%) and in 62.5% of BCC. Membranous pattern of GLUT-1 was seen in 62.5% of SCC and 31.25% of BCC. Positivity (P = .02) and percentage (P = .000) of GLUT-1 expression were in favor of SCC in comparison to BCC. The high percentage of GLUT-1 expression was associated with high grade in SCC (P = .03). The immunoreactivity for GLUT-1 was more in the periphery of malignant nests of SCC while it was more in the center of BCC nests. GLUT-1 is overexpressed in cutaneous non-melanoma skin cancer. Its expression in SCC is related to differentiation status, and its expression in BCC is intimately associated with squamous metaplastic areas. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... items like razors and toothbrushes Tattoos or body piercings Blood transfusions done in the United States before ... glucose monitors. Do not get tattoos or body piercings from an unlicensed person or facility. Wear protective ...

  15. Insulin-Inducible SMILE Inhibits Hepatic Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Min; Seo, Woo-Young; Han, Hye-Sook; Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Don-Kyu; Choi, Seri; Choi, Byeong Hun; Harris, Robert A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The role of a glucagon/cAMP-dependent protein kinase-inducible coactivator PGC-1α signaling pathway is well characterized in hepatic gluconeogenesis. However, an opposing protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt-inducible corepressor signaling pathway is unknown. A previous report has demonstrated that small heterodimer partner-interacting leucine zipper protein (SMILE) regulates the nuclear receptors and transcriptional factors that control hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we show that hepatic SMILE expression was induced by feeding in normal mice but not in db/db and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Interestingly, SMILE expression was induced by insulin in mouse primary hepatocyte and liver. Hepatic SMILE expression was not altered by refeeding in liver-specific insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) or PKB β-deficient (PKBβ(-/-)) mice. At the molecular level, SMILE inhibited hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-mediated transcriptional activity via direct competition with PGC-1α. Moreover, ablation of SMILE augmented gluconeogenesis and increased blood glucose levels in mice. Conversely, overexpression of SMILE reduced hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and ameliorated hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in db/db and HFD-fed mice. Therefore, SMILE is an insulin-inducible corepressor that suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. Small molecules that enhance SMILE expression would have potential for treating hyperglycemia in diabetes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  16. Additional lunchtime basal insulin during insulin lispro intensive therapy in a randomized, multicenter, crossover study in adults - A real-life design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stades, Aline M. E.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; van den Tweel, Ingeborg; Erkelens, D. Willem; Holleman, Frits

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - This study vas performed to evaluate whether an additional dose of NPH insulin at lunchtime might overcome the deleterious effects of waning basal insulinemia on pre-dinner and evening glucose values during insulin lispro intensive therapy with once daily basal insulin at night, RESEARCH

  17. Chronic hepatitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infection by four diagnostic systems: first generation and second generation. ELlSA, second generation recombinant immunoblot assay and nested polymerase chain reaction analysis. HepatoJogy 1992; 16: 300-305. 14. Van der Poel CL, ... Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. Alcoholic hepatitis. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

  18. Hepatic haemangioma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp 630 Dual Core

    successful usage of transhepatic compression sutures using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) pledgets and selective ligation of large feeding vessels from right hepatic artery. Surgical resection may not be technically safe or possible in certain cases due to the massive or diffuse nature of the lesion, proximity to vascular ...

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When your liver is damaged it can no longer remove toxic substances from your blood. ... reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic ...

  20. Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 간염: 아시아 또는 태평양군도 계 미국인의 숙지 사항 (Korean) Hepatitis B: Mga Tip para sa mga Amerikano ... by an infected person drinking water or eating food hugging an infected person shaking hands or holding ...

  1. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 간염: 아시아 또는 태평양군도 계 미국인의 숙지 사항 (Korean) Hepatitis B: Mga Tip para sa mga Amerikano ... by an infected person drinking water or eating food hugging an infected person shaking hands or holding ...

  2. Hepatic gluconeogenesis from alanine following surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, K; Setsu, M; Mishina, T; Koyama, S; Muto, T

    1982-01-01

    To clarify alanine metabolism in the liver with special reference to gluconeogenesis, catheters were placed in hepatic, portal, femoral, and external jugular veins of six male mongrel dogs. A trace amount of 14C-alanine was administered as a single pulse into the external jugular vein on the first postoperative day, and the blood samples were taken from each vein for the subsequent two hours to measure 14C-glucose radioactivity. Cumulative radioactivity after 14C-alanine injection showed that 74 per cent of the radioactivity in whole protein-free serum was that of 14C-glucose. Therefore, it is considered that the metabolic pathway of alanine in the liver after surgery is mainly through gluconeogenesis to glucose. Our in vivo experiment clearly showed that hepatic gluconeogenesis from alanine is one of the important factors related to hyperglycemia after surgery.

  3. Does overnight normalization of plasma glucose by insulin infusion affect assessment of glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staehr, P.; Højlund, K.; Hother-Nielsen, O.

    2003-01-01

    infusion. We assessed whether the choice of either of these methods to obtain euglycaemia biases subsequent assessment of glucose metabolism and insulin action. METHODS: We studied seven obese Type 2 diabetic patients twice: once with (+ ON) and once without (- ON) prior overnight insulin infusion. Glucose...... turnover rates were quantified by adjusted primed-constant 3-3H-glucose infusions, and insulin action was assessed in 4-h euglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic (40 mU m-2 min-1) clamp studies using labelled glucose infusates (Hot-GINF). RESULTS: Basal plasma glucose levels (mean +/- sd) were 5.5 +/- 0.5 and 10.......7 +/- 2.9 mmol/l in the + ON and - ON studies, respectively, and were clamped at -5.5 mmol/l. Basal rates of glucose production (GP) were similar in the + ON and - ON studies, 83 +/- 13 vs. 85 +/- 14 mg m-2 min-1 (NS), whereas basal rates of glucose disappearance (Rd) were lower in the + ON than...

  4. Cardiac expression of human type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase increases glucose metabolism and protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eun-Gyoung; Kim, Brian W; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Yu, Tim; Seixas Da Silva, Wagner; Friedline, Randall H; Bianco, Suzy D; Seslar, Stephen P; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Berul, Charles I; Russell, Kerry S; Lee, Ki Won; Larsen, P Reed; Bianco, Antonio C; Kim, Jason K

    2013-10-01

    Altered glucose metabolism in the heart is an important characteristic of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Because thyroid hormones have major effects on peripheral metabolism, we examined the metabolic effects of heart-selective increase in T3 using transgenic mice expressing human type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) under the control of the α-myosin heavy chain promoter (MHC-D2). Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps showed normal whole-body glucose disposal but increased hepatic insulin action in MHC-D2 mice as compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in heart was not altered, but basal myocardial glucose metabolism was increased by more than two-fold in MHC-D2 mice. Myocardial lipid levels were also elevated in MHC-D2 mice, suggesting an overall up-regulation of cardiac metabolism in these mice. The effects of doxorubicin (DOX) treatment on cardiac function and structure were examined using M-mode echocardiography. DOX treatment caused a significant reduction in ventricular fractional shortening and resulted in more than 50% death in WT mice. In contrast, MHC-D2 mice showed increased survival rate after DOX treatment, and this was associated with a six-fold increase in myocardial glucose metabolism and improved cardiac function. Myocardial activity and expression of AMPK, GLUT1, and Akt were also elevated in MHC-D2 and WT mice following DOX treatment. Thus, our findings indicate an important role of thyroid hormone in cardiac metabolism and further suggest a protective role of glucose utilization in DOX-mediated cardiac dysfunction.

  5. Chronic maternal vitamin B12 restriction induced changes in body composition & glucose metabolism in the Wistar rat offspring are partly correctable by rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Anand Kumar

    Full Text Available Maternal under-nutrition increases the risk of developing metabolic diseases. We studied the effects of chronic maternal dietary vitamin B12 restriction on lean body mass (LBM, fat free mass (FFM, muscle function, glucose tolerance and metabolism in Wistar rat offspring. Prevention/reversibility of changes by rehabilitating restricted mothers from conception or parturition and their offspring from weaning was assessed. Female weaning Wistar rats (n = 30 were fed ad libitum for 12 weeks, a control diet (n = 6 or the same with 40% restriction of vitamin B12 (B12R (n = 24; after confirming deficiency, were mated with control males. Six each of pregnant B12R dams were rehabilitated from conception and parturition and their offspring weaned to control diet. While offspring of six B12R dams were weaned to control diet, those of the remaining six B12R dams continued on B12R diet. Biochemical parameters and body composition were determined in dams before mating and in male offspring at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of their age. Dietary vitamin B12 restriction increased body weight but decreased LBM% and FFM% but not the percent of tissue associated fat (TAF% in dams. Maternal B12R decreased LBM% and FFM% in the male offspring, but their TAF%, basal and insulin stimulated glucose uptake by diaphragm were unaltered. At 12 months age, B12R offspring had higher (than controls fasting plasma glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and impaired glucose tolerance. Their hepatic gluconeogenic enzyme activities were increased. B12R offspring had increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant status. Changes in body composition, glucose metabolism and stress were reversed by rehabilitating B12R dams from conception, whereas rehabilitation from parturition and weaning corrected them partially, highlighting the importance of vitamin B12 during pregnancy and lactation on growth, muscle development, glucose tolerance and metabolism in the offspring.

  6. Abnormalities of glucose metabolism in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouveia L.M.F.B.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in glucose metabolism and insulin action are frequently detected in patients with essential hypertension. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR have been used as an experimental model to understand this pathological condition. The objective of the present study was to assess glucose metabolism and insulin action in SHR and Wistar rats under fed and fasting conditions. Peripheral glucose utilization was estimated by kinetic studies with [6-³H]-glucose and gluconeogenetic activity was measured during continuous [14C]-bicarbonate infusion. Plasma glucose levels were higher in the SHR group. Plasma insulin levels in the fed state were higher in the SHR group (99.8 ± 6.5 µM than in the control group (70.4 ± 3.6 µM. Muscle glycogen content was reduced in SHR compared to control under the various experimental conditions. Peripheral glucose utilization was slightly lower in the SHR group in the fed state (8.72 ± 0.55 vs 9.52 ± 0.80 mg kg-1 min-1 in controls. Serum free fatty acid levels, hepatic glycogen levels, hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity and gluconeogenetic activity were similar in the two groups. The presence of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia and the slightly reduced peripheral glucose utilization suggest the presence of resistance to the action of insulin in peripheral tissues of SHR. Hepatic gluconeogenesis does not seem to contribute to the metabolic alterations detected in these animals.

  7. The serum level of soluble CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 increases in response to acute hyperglycemia after an oral glucose load in healthy subjects: association with high-molecular weight adiponectin and hepatic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yoshimasa; Terasawa, Tomoko; Kato, Kanako; Jojima, Teruo; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Iijima, Toshie; Kawagoe, Yoshiaki; Mikami, Shigeru; Kubota, Yoshiro; Inukai, Toshihiko; Kasai, Kikuo

    2013-11-01

    A soluble form of CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (sCD26/DPP4) is found in serum and it has DPP4 enzymatic activity. We investigated whether the serum level of sCD26/DPP4 was influenced by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in healthy subjects. The serum sCD26/DPP4 level increased significantly from 824.5 ng/mL (interquartile range, from 699.0 to 1050 ng/mL) at baseline to a peak of 985.0 ng/mL (interquartile range, from 796.5 to 1215 ng/mL) during the OGTT (P body mass index, and fasting plasma glucose (FPG), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), triglycerides (TG), alanine aminotransferase, and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) levels whereas it correlated negatively with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and the serum levels of total and high-molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin. Stepwise regression analysis was done with forward selection of variables, including age, FPG, HOMA-IR, TG, HDL cholesterol, uric acid, GGT, C-reactive protein, and HMW adiponectin. In a model that explained 57.5% of the variation of the peak sCD26/DPP4 level, GGT (β = 0.382, P = 0.007) and HOMA-IR (β = 0.307, P = 0.034) were independent determinants of the peak serum level of sCD26/DPP4. Serum HMW adiponectin decreased significantly from 4.43 μg/mL (interquartile range, from 2.80 to 6.65 μg/mL) at baseline to 4.17 μg/mL (interquartile range, from 2.48 to 6.96 μg/mL) 120 minutes after the oral glucose load (P < 0.0001). The baseline serum level of sCD26/DPP4 showed a significant negative correlation with the percent change of HMW adiponectin during the OGTT. In conclusion, the serum level of sCD26/DPP4 increased acutely after an oral glucose load in apparently healthy subjects. The abrupt increase of serum sCD26/DPP4 after a glucose load may be a marker of insulin resistance that could come from liver or muscle. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction with parkinsonism and symmetric hyperintense basal ganglia on T1 weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayalakshmi Sita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal high signal in the globus pallidus on T1 weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain has been well described in patients with chronic liver disease. It may be related to liver dysfunction or portal-systemic shunting. We report a case of extra hepatic portal vein obstruction with portal hypertension and esophageal varices that presented with extra pyramidal features. T1 weighted MRI brain scans showed increased symmetrical signal intensities in the basal ganglia. Normal hepatic function in this patient emphasizes the role of portal- systemic communications in the development of these hyperintensities, which may be due to deposition of paramagnetic substances like manganese in the basal ganglia.

  9. Glucose and cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, M.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; Mudde, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association and the World Health Organisation have recently redefined the spectrum of abnormal glucose tolerance. The criteria for diabetes mellitus were sharpened and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were classified as intermediate stages

  10. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hepatitis B KidsHealth / For Teens / Hepatitis B What's in this ... Prevented? Print en español Hepatitis B What Is Hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is an infection of the liver ...

  11. Focus on Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venura Samarasinghe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs, which include basal and squamous cell cancers are the most common human cancers. BCCs have a relatively low metastatic rate and slow growth and are frequently underreported. Whilst there is a definite role of sunexposure in the pathogenesis of BCC, several additional complex genotypic, phenotypic and environmental factors are contributory. The high prevalence and the frequent occurrence of multiple primary BCC in affected individuals make them an important public health problem. This has led to a substantial increase in search for newer noninvasive treatments for BCC. Surgical excision with predetermined margins remains the mainstay treatment for most BCC. Of the newer non-invasive treatments only photodynamic therapy and topical imiquimod have become established in the treatment of certain BCC subtypes, while the search for other more effective and tissue salvaging therapies continues. This paper focuses on the pathogenesis and management of BCC.

  12. Maintenance of Glucose Homeostasis through Acetylation of the Metabolic Transcriptional Coactivator PGC-1alpha

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Puigserver, Pere

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of this proposal is to test the hypothesis that acetylation of PGC-1alpha by GCN5 and associated proteins, Pc3 and WDR18, is a key regulatory modification that controls hepatic glucose production...

  13. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Taniwaki, Koukyo; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi

    1990-01-01

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs

  14. Control of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis by the Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyu; Qian, Jinchun; Shi, Xiaoli; Gao, Tingting; Liang, Tingming

    2014-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) protein is involved in major biological processes including energy metabolism, although its role remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that hepatic PLZF expression was induced in fasted or diabetic mice. PLZF promoted gluconeogenic gene expression and hepatic glucose output, leading to hyperglycemia. In contrast, hepatic PLZF knockdown improved glucose homeostasis in db/db mice. Mechanistically, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α and the glucocorticoid receptor synergistically activated PLZF expression. We conclude that PLZF is a critical regulator of hepatic gluconeogenesis. PLZF manipulation may benefit the treatment of metabolic diseases associated with gluconeogenesis. PMID:25333514

  15. AUTOIMMUNE HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Dianne Jurnalis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakHepatitis autoimun merupakan penyakit inflamasi hati yang berat dengan penyebab pasti yang tidak diketahui yang mengakibatkan morbiditas dan mortalitas yang tinggi. Semua usia dan jenis kelamin dapat dikenai dengan insiden tertinggi pada anak perempuan usia prepubertas, meskipun dapat didiagnosis pada usia 6 bulan. Hepatitis autoimun dapat diklasifikasikan menjadi 2 bagian berdasarkan adanya antibodi spesifik: Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA dengan anti-actin specificity dan/atau Anti Nuclear Antibody (ANA pada tipe 1 dan Liver-Kidney Microsome antibody (LKM1 dan/atau anti-liver cytosol pada tipe 2. Gambaran histologisnya berupa “interface hepatitis”, dengan infiltrasi sel mononuklear pada saluran portal, berbagai tingkat nekrosis, dan fibrosis yang progresf. Penyakit berjalan secara kronik tetapi keadaan yang berat biasanya menjadi sirosis dan gagal hati.Tipe onset yang paling sering sama dengan hepatitis virus akut dengan gagal hati akut pada beberapa pasien; sekitar sepertiga pasien dengan onset tersembunyi dengan kelemahan dan ikterik progresif ketika 10-15% asimptomatik dan mendadak ditemukan hepatomegali dan/atau peningkatan kadar aminotransferase serum. Adanya predominasi perempuan pada kedua tipe. Pasien LKM1 positif menunjukkan keadaan lebih akut, pada usia yang lebih muda, dan biasanya dengan defisiensi Immunoglobulin A (IgA, dengan durasi gejala sebelum diagnosis, tanda klinis, riwayat penyakit autoimun pada keluarga, adanya kaitan dengan gangguan autoimun, respon pengobatan dan prognosis jangka panjang sama pada kedua tipe.Kortikosteroid yang digunakan secara tunggal atau kombinasi azathioprine merupakan terapi pilihan yang dapat menimbulkan remisi pada lebih dari 90% kasus. Strategi terapi alternatif adalah cyclosporine. Penurunan imunosupresi dikaitkan dengan tingginya relap. Transplantasi hati dianjurkan pada penyakit hati dekom-pensata yang tidak respon dengan pengobatan medis lainnya.Kata kunci : hepatitis Autoimmune

  16. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Peris, Ketty

    2015-11-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy is an effective and safe noninvasive treatment for low-risk basal cell carcinoma, with the advantage of an excellent cosmetic outcome. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy in basal cell carcinoma is supported by substantial research and clinical trials. In this article, we review the procedure, indications and clinical evidences for the use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

  17. Modern basal insulin analogs: An incomplete story

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Gangopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The currently available basal insulin does not completely mimic the endogenous insulin secretion. This has continued to promote the search for ideal basal insulin. The newer basal insulin have primarily focused on increasing the duration of action, reducing variability, and reducing the incidence of hypoglycemia, particularly nocturnal. However, the changing criteria of hypoglycemia within a short span of a few years along with the surprising introduction of major cardiac events as another ou...

  18. Preventing hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis A is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. You can take several steps to ... reduce your risk of spreading or catching the hepatitis A virus: Always wash your hands thoroughly after ...

  19. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is seen ... This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  20. Assessment of the antidiabetic potential of selected medicinal plants using in vitro bioassays of muscle glucose transport and liver glucose production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beidokhti, M N; Sanchez Villavicencio, M L; Eid, H M

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the most common type of diabetes mellitus. It is caused by decreased insulin sensitivity in target organs like liver, muscle and adipose tissue, and/or a deficiency in insulin secretion. In T2DM, increased hepatic glucose output and decreased glucose uptake by s...

  1. Does overnight normalization of plasma glucose by insulin infusion affect assessment of glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staehr, P; Højlund, Kurt; Hother-Nielsen, O

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: In order to perform euglycaemic clamp studies in Type 2 diabetic patients, plasma glucose must be reduced to normal levels. This can be done either (i) acutely during the clamp study using high-dose insulin infusion, or (ii) slowly overnight preceding the clamp study using a low-dose insulin...... infusion. We assessed whether the choice of either of these methods to obtain euglycaemia biases subsequent assessment of glucose metabolism and insulin action. METHODS: We studied seven obese Type 2 diabetic patients twice: once with (+ ON) and once without (- ON) prior overnight insulin infusion. Glucose...... turnover rates were quantified by adjusted primed-constant 3-3H-glucose infusions, and insulin action was assessed in 4-h euglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic (40 mU m-2 min-1) clamp studies using labelled glucose infusates (Hot-GINF). RESULTS: Basal plasma glucose levels (mean +/- sd) were 5.5 +/- 0.5 and 10...

  2. Adult Living with Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Directors & Staff Our Accomplishments Annual Reports Our Videos Quick Links Drug Watch Clinical Trials Physician Directory HBV Meeting What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta ...

  3. Modeling error and apparent isotope discrimination confound estimation of endogenous glucose production during euglycemic glucose clamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finegood, D.T.; Bergman, R.N.; Vranic, M.

    1988-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that conventional tracer methods applied to euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic glucose clamps result in substantially negative estimates for the rate of endogenous glucose production, particularly during the first half of 180-min clamps. We also showed that addition of tracer to the exogenous glucose infusate resulted in nonnegative endogenous glucose production (Ra) estimates. In this study, we investigated the underlying cause of negative estimates of Ra from conventional clamp/tracer methods and the reason for the difference in estimates when tracer is added to the exogenous glucose infusate. We performed euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic (300-microU/ml) clamps in normal dogs without (cold GINF protocol, n = 6) or with (hot GINF protocol, n = 6) tracer (D-[3-3H]glucose) added to the exogenous glucose infusate. In the hot GINF protocol, sufficient tracer was added to the exogenous glucose infusate such that arterial plasma specific activity (SAa) did not change from basal through the clamp period (P greater than .05). In the cold GINF studies, plasma SAa fell 81 +/- 2% from the basal level by the 3rd h of clamping. We observed a significant, transient, positive venous-arterial difference in specific activity (SAv-SAa difference) during the cold GINF studies. The SAv-SAa difference reached a peak of 27 +/- 6% at 30 min and diminished to a plateau of 7 +/- 1% between 70 and 180 min. We also observed a positive but constant SAv-SAa difference (4.6 +/- 0.2% between 10 and 180 min) during the hot GINF studies

  4. Combining a GLP-1 receptor agonist and basal insulin: study evidence and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carris, Nicholas W; Taylor, James R; Gums, John G

    2014-12-01

    Most patients with diabetes mellitus require multiple medications to achieve glycemic goals. Considering this and the increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes worldwide, the need for effective combination therapy is pressing. Basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are frequently used to treat type 2 diabetes. Though both classes of medication are exclusively injectable, which may cause initial hesitation from providers, evidence for their combined use is substantial. This review summarizes the theoretical benefit, supporting evidence, and implementation of a combined basal insulin-GLP-1 receptor agonist regimen. Basal insulin added to a GLP-1 receptor agonist reduces hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) without weight gain or significantly increased hypoglycemia. A GLP-1 receptor agonist added to basal insulin reduces HbA1c and body weight. Compared with the addition of meal-time insulin to basal insulin, a GLP-1 receptor agonist produces similar or greater reduction in HbA1c, weight loss instead of weight gain, and less hypoglycemia. Gastrointestinal adverse events are common with GLP-1 receptor agonists, especially during initiation and titration. However, combination with basal insulin is not expected to augment expected adverse events that come with using a GLP-1 receptor agonist. Basal insulin can be added to a GLP-1 receptor agonist with a slow titration to target goal fasting plasma glucose. In patients starting a GLP-1 receptor agonist, the dose of basal insulin should be decreased by 20 % in patients with an HbA1c ≤8 %. The evidence from 15 randomized prospective studies supports the combined use of a GLP-1 receptor agonist with basal insulin in a broad range of patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

  5. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engerix-B® ... as a combination product containing Haemophilus influenzae type b, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis, Hepatitis B, Polio Vaccine)

  6. Glucose turnover during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in liver-denervated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikines, K J; Sonne, B; Richter, Erik

    1985-01-01

    The role of hepatic autonomic nerves in glucose production during hypoglycemia was studied. Selective, surgical denervation of the liver was performed in rats, which reduced hepatic norepinephrine concentrations by 96%. Hypoglycemia was induced by 250 mU of insulin intra-arterially in anesthetize...

  7. Comparison of association of diabetes mellitus in hepatitis C virus infection and hepatitis B virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.A.; Bukhari, M.H.; Khokhar, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: While patients with liver disease are known to have a higher prevalence of glucose intolerance, preliminary studies suggest that hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may be an additional risk factor for the development of diabetes mellitus (DM). Objective: The presented study was aimed to study and determine a relationship between the relative proportions of Diabetes Mellitus in patients suffering from HCV infection. Study Design: This cross sectional study. Study Settings: Patients were registered from outdoor as well as indoor departments of different teaching hospitals (Services hospital Lahore and medical departments in Jinnah hospital, Mayo hospital, Sir Ganga Ram hospital) in Lahore, Pakistan. Methods: This cross sectional study was comprised of age and sex matched 258 patients of viral hepatitis B infection and viral hepatitis C infection, conducted at Hepatitis Clinic Services Hospital, affiliated with Post Graduate Medical Institute, Lahore. Diagnosis of HBV was made with evidence of hepatitis B surface antigen, HCV infection was diagnosed if patient was sero positive for anti HCV (ELISA methods) and HCV - RNA (By PCR). Diabetes Mellitus was diagnosed after fulfilling the American Diabetic Association Criteria, from November, 2000 to September, 2002. Results: A total of 318 patients were registered, out of which 258 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 164 hepatitis C infected and 94 hepatitis B infected cases, 16.46% hepatitis C infected cases were diagnosed as diabetics while 4.25% hepatitis B infected cases were diagnosed as diabetics. Conclusion: This study concludes that there is high Association and relationship of Diabetes Mellitus with Hepatitis C virus infection as compared with Hepatitis B virus infection. (author)

  8. Insulin secretion and incretin hormones after oral glucose in non-obese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, E; Olsson, T; Söderberg, S

    2004-01-01

    Subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are usually overweight and exhibit insulin resistance with a defective compensation of insulin secretion. In this study, we sought to establish the interrelation between insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity after oral glucose in non-obese subjects...... with IGT and we also examined this interrelation in relation to the 2 main incretins, glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP). To that end, 13 women with IGT and 17 women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with measurements...... of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1, and GIP. Insulin secretion (TIS) and insulin sensitivity (OGIS) were assessed using models describing the relationship between glucose, insulin and C-peptide data. These models allowed estimation also of the hepatic extraction of insulin. The age (54.2 +/- 9.7 [mean...

  9. Comparison of Insulin Detemir and Insulin Glargine for Hospitalized Patients on a Basal-Bolus Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sondra Davis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The primary purpose of this study is to determine whether insulin detemir is equivalent to insulin glargine in controlling hyperglycemia for the adult hospitalized patient on a basal-bolus treatment regimen. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted at two acute care hospitals within the same health system. Patients from both facilities who were initiated on a basal-bolus subcutaneous insulin regimen were included in the study. The basal-bolus regimen consisted of three components: basal, bolus, and corrective insulin with only the data from the first seven days analyzed. Once the basal-bolus protocol was initiated, all previous glycemic agents were discontinued. The target glycemic goal of the study was 100–180 mg/dL. RESULTS: In both groups, 50% of the patients had achieved the target glycemic control goal (100–180 mg/dL by day 2 (p = 0.3. However, on the seventh or last day of basal-bolus treatment, whichever came first, 36.36% of patients receiving insulin detemir (n = 88 achieved the blood glucose reading goal compared to 52.00% in patients receiving insulin glargine (n = 100 (p = 0.03. This corresponded to an adjusted odds ratio of 2.12 (1.08 to 4.15, p = 0.03. The adjusting variables were provider type, whether the patient was hospitalized within 30 days prior and diagnosis of stroke. The mean blood glucose readings for the insulin glargine and the insulin detemir groups while on basal-bolus therapy were 200 mg/dL and 215 mg/dL, respectively (p = 0.05. The total number of blood glucose readings less than 70 mg/dL and less than 45 mg/dL was very low and there were no differences in number of episodes with hypoglycemia between the two groups. CONCLUSION: There was not a statistical difference between the two groups at 2 days, however there was on the seventh day or the last day of basal-bolus treatment. There were nonsignificant hypoglycemia events between basal insulin groups and the results for the last or seventh day

  10. CSF glucose test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucose test - CSF; Cerebrospinal fluid glucose test ... The glucose level in the CSF should be 50 to 80 mg/100 mL (or greater than 2/3 ... Abnormal results include higher and lower glucose levels. Abnormal ... or fungus) Inflammation of the central nervous system Tumor

  11. Abomasal amino acid infusion in postpartum dairy cows: Effect on whole-body, splanchnic, and mammary glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galindo, C; Larsen, Mogens; Ouellet, D R

    2015-01-01

    -OH-butyrate (BHBA) in postpartum dairy cows according to a generalized randomized incomplete block design with repeated measures in time. At calving, cows were blocked according to parity (second and third or greater) and were allocated to 2 treatments: abomasal infusion of water (n=4) or abomasal infusion of free...... AA with casein profile (AA-CN; n=5) in addition to the same basal diet. The AA-CN infusion started with half the maximal dose at 1 d in milk (DIM) and then steadily decreased from 791 to 226 g/d from DIM 2 to 29 to cover the estimated essential AA deficit. On DIM 5, 15, and 29, D[6,6-(2)H2]-glucose...... (23.7 mmol/h) was infused into a jugular vein for 5h, and 6 blood samples were taken from arterial, portal, hepatic, and mammary sources at 45-min intervals, starting 1h after the initiation of the D[6,6-(2)H2]glucose infusion. Trans-organ fluxes were calculated as veno-arterial differences times...

  12. Increased glucose and placental GLUT-1 in large infants of obese nondiabetic mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Ometeotl; Ramirez, Vanessa I; Lager, Susanne; Gaccioli, Francesca; Dudley, Donald J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Obese women are at increased risk to deliver a large infant, however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Fetal glucose availability is critically dependent on placental transfer and is linked to fetal growth by regulating the release of fetal growth hormones such as insulin. We hypothesized that (1) umbilical vein glucose and insulin levels and (2) placental glucose transporter (GLUT) expression and activity are positively correlated with early pregnancy maternal body mass index and infant birthweight. Subjects in this prospective observational cohort study were nondiabetic predominantly Hispanic women delivered at term. Fasting maternal and umbilical vein glucose and insulin concentrations were determined in 29 women with varying early pregnancy body mass index (range, 18.0-54.3) who delivered infants with birthweights ranging from 2800-4402 g. We isolated syncytiotrophoblast microvillous and basal plasma membranes from 33 placentas and determined the expression of GLUT-1 and -9 (Western blot) and glucose uptake (radiolabeled glucose). Birthweight was positively correlated with umbilical vein glucose and insulin and maternal body mass index. Umbilical vein glucose levels were positively correlated with placental weight and maternal body mass index, but not with maternal fasting glucose. Basal plasma membranes GLUT-1 expression was positively correlated with birthweight. In contrast, syncytiotrophoblast microvillous GLUT-1 and -9, basal plasma membranes GLUT-9 expression and syncytiotrophoblast microvillous and basal plasma membranes glucose transport activity were not correlated with birthweight. Because maternal fasting glucose levels and placental glucose transport capacity were not increased in obese women delivering larger infants, we speculate that increased placental size promotes glucose delivery to these fetuses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many NIDDK research projects related to hepatitis and liver disease: A recent study concluded that about half of patients with chronic hepatitis C recovered after receiving initial treatments from two drugs, ...

  14. The future of basal insulin supplementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, Airin C. R.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2011-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the candidates for an improved basal insulin in the pharmaceutical pipeline. The first new basal insulin to enter the market is most likely insulin degludec (IDeg), currently reporting in phase 3 of development, from Novo Nordisk (Bagsvaerd, Denmark). IDeg has a

  15. Fusarium basal rot in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de C.L.M.; Broek, van den R.C.F.M.; Brink, van den L.

    2006-01-01

    Fusarium basal rot of onion, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cepae, is a steadily increasing problem in The Netherlands. Financial losses for Dutch farmers confronted with Fusarium basal rot is substantial, due to yield reduction and high storage costs. This paper describes the development and

  16. Cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with spasmodic torticollis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MagyarLehmann, S; Antonini, A; Roelcke, U; Maguire, RP; Missimer, J; Leenders, KL

    The pathophysiology of spasmodic torticollis is not clear. Basal ganglia dysfunction has been suggested to underlie this clinical syndrome. We studied resting cerebral glucose metabolism in 10 spasmodic torticollis patients and 10 healthy controls by using positron-emission tomography and

  17. Review of basal-plus insulin regimen options for simpler insulin intensification in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raccah, D; Huet, D; Dib, A; Joseph, F; Landers, B; Escalada, J; Schmitt, H

    2017-09-01

    To identify simple insulin regimens for people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus that can be accepted and implemented earlier in primary and specialist care, taking into consideration each individual's needs and capabilities. Using randomized clinical trials identified by a search of the PubMed database, as well as systematic reviews, meta-analyses and proof-of-concept studies, this review addresses topics of interest related to the progressive intensification of a basal insulin regimen to a basal-plus regimen (one basal insulin injection plus stepwise addition of one to three preprandial short-acting insulin injections/day) vs a basal-bolus regimen (basal insulin plus three short-acting insulin injections per day) in people with Type 2 diabetes. The review explores approaches that can be used to define the meal for first prandial injection with basal-plus regimens, differences among insulin titration algorithms, and the importance of self-motivation and autonomy in achieving optimum glycaemic control. A basal-plus regimen can provide glycaemic control equivalent to that obtained with a full basal-bolus regimen, with fewer injections of prandial insulin. The first critical step is to optimize basal insulin dosing to reach a fasting glucose concentration of ~6.7 mmol/l; this allows ~40% of patients with baseline HbA 1c >75 mmol/mol (9%) to be controlled with only one basal insulin injection per day. Compared with a basal-bolus regimen, a basal-plus insulin regimen is as effective but more practical, and has the best chance of acceptance and success in the real world. © 2017 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  18. Estimation of glucose carbon recycling in children with glycogen storage disease: A sup 13 C NMR study using (U- sup 13 C)glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalderon, B.; Korman, S.H.; Gutman, A.; Lapidot, A. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

    1989-06-01

    A stable isotope procedure to estimate hepatic glucose carbon recycling and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which glucose is produced in patients lacking glucose 6-phosphatase is described. A total of 10 studies was performed in children with glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) and type III (GSD-III) and control subjects. A primed dose-constant nasogastric infusion of D-(U-{sup 13}C)glucose or an infusion diluted with nonlabeled glucose solution was administered following different periods of fasting. Hepatic glucose carbon recycling was estimated from {sup 13}C NMR spectra. The values obtained for GSD-I patients coincided with the standard (U-{sup 13}C)glucose dilution curve. These results indicate that the plasma glucose of GSD-I subjects comprises only a mixture of 99% {sup 13}C-enriched D-(U-{sup 13}C)glucose and unlabeled glucose but lacks any recycled glucose. Significantly different glucose carbon recycling values were obtained for two GSD-III patients in comparison to GSD-I patients. The results eliminate a mechanism for glucose production in GSD-I children involving gluconeogenesis. However, glucose release by amylo-1,6-glucosidase activity would result in endogenous glucose production of non-{sup 13}C-labeled and nonrecycled glucose carbon, as was found in this study. In GSD-III patients gluconeogenesis is suggested as the major route for endogenous glucose synthesis. The contribution of the triose-phosphate pathway in these patients has been determined.

  19. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  20. [HOMA-IR in patients with chronic hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botshorishvili, T; Vashakidze, E

    2012-02-01

    The aim of investigation was to study the frequency of IR in type of viral hepatitis C, correlation with the degree of hepatic lesion and liver cirrhosis. 130 patients were investigated: 20 with acute hepatitis C; 38 with chronic hepatitis C; 72 with cirrhosis: among them 10 with Stage A, 14 with Stage B and 48 with Stage C. Also we used 30 healthy people as the controls. The study demonstrates significant changes of insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR type of viral hepatitis C, correlation with the degree of hepatic lesion and liver cirrhosis. In patients with liver cirrhosis levels of HOMA-IR is higher than in patients with chronic hepatitis C. In patients with acute hepatitis C levels of HOMA-IR was normal as in the control group. The results showed that various types of chronic viral hepatitis C and stages of cirrhosis set to increase HOMA-IR versus the controls., which were the most prominent in cases of severe hepatic lesion, which indicates that insulin resistance is a frequent companion of CHC.

  1. Basal plasma insulin and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) are indicators of insulin sensitivity in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, D J; Rand, J S; Sunvold, G D

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare simpler indices of insulin sensitivity with the minimal model-derived insulin sensitivity index to identify a simple and reliable alternative method for assessing insulin sensitivity in cats. In addition, we aimed to determine whether this simpler measure or measures showed consistency of association across differing body weights and glucose tolerance levels. Data from glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests performed in 32 cats with varying body weights (underweight to obese), including seven cats with impaired glucose tolerance, were used to assess the relationship between Bergman's minimal model-derived insulin sensitivity index (S(I)), and various simpler measures of insulin sensitivity. The most useful overall predictors of insulin sensitivity were basal plasma insulin concentrations and the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), which is the product of basal glucose and insulin concentrations divided by 22.5. It is concluded that measurement of plasma insulin concentrations in cats with food withheld for 24 h, in conjunction with HOMA, could be used in clinical research projects and by practicing veterinarians to screen for reduced insulin sensitivity in cats. Such cats may be at increased risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Early detection of these cats would enable preventative intervention programs such as weight reduction, increased physical activity and dietary modifications to be instigated.

  2. Postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Role of hepatic and extrahepatic tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firth, R.G.; Bell, P.M.; Marsh, H.M.; Hansen, I.; Rizza, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have both preprandial and postprandial hyperglycemia. To determine the mechanism responsible for the postprandial hyperglycemia, insulin secretion, insulin action, and the pattern of carbohydrate metabolism after glucose ingestion were assessed in patients with NIDDM and in matched nondiabetic subjects using the dual isotope and forearm catheterization techniques. Prior to meal ingestion, hepatic glucose release was increased (P less than 0.001) in the diabetic patients measured using (2-/sup 3/H) or (3-/sup 3/H) glucose. After meal ingestion, patients with NIDDM had excessive rates of systemic glucose entry (1,316 +/- 56 vs. 1,018 +/- 65 mg/kg X 7 h, P less than 0.01), primarily owing to a failure to suppress adequately endogenous glucose release (680 +/- 50 vs. 470 +/- 32 mg/kg X 7 h, P less than 0.01) from its high preprandial level. Despite impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production during a hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp (P less than 0.001) and decreased postprandial C-peptide response (P less than 0.05) in NIDDM, percent suppression of hepatic glucose release after oral glucose was comparable in the diabetic and nondiabetic subjects (45 +/- 3 vs. 39 +/- 2%). Although new glucose formation from meal-derived three-carbon precursors (53 +/- 3 vs. 40 +/- 7 mg/kg X 7 h, P less than 0.05) was greater in the diabetic patients, it accounted for only a minor part of this excessive postprandial hepatic glucose release. Postprandial hyperglycemia was exacerbated by the lack of an appropriate increase in glucose uptake whether measured isotopically or by forearm glucose uptake. Thus excessive hepatic glucose release and impaired glucose uptake are involved in the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with NIDDM.

  3. Postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Role of hepatic and extrahepatic tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, R.G.; Bell, P.M.; Marsh, H.M.; Hansen, I.; Rizza, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have both preprandial and postprandial hyperglycemia. To determine the mechanism responsible for the postprandial hyperglycemia, insulin secretion, insulin action, and the pattern of carbohydrate metabolism after glucose ingestion were assessed in patients with NIDDM and in matched nondiabetic subjects using the dual isotope and forearm catheterization techniques. Prior to meal ingestion, hepatic glucose release was increased (P less than 0.001) in the diabetic patients measured using [2- 3 H] or [3- 3 H] glucose. After meal ingestion, patients with NIDDM had excessive rates of systemic glucose entry (1,316 +/- 56 vs. 1,018 +/- 65 mg/kg X 7 h, P less than 0.01), primarily owing to a failure to suppress adequately endogenous glucose release (680 +/- 50 vs. 470 +/- 32 mg/kg X 7 h, P less than 0.01) from its high preprandial level. Despite impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production during a hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp (P less than 0.001) and decreased postprandial C-peptide response (P less than 0.05) in NIDDM, percent suppression of hepatic glucose release after oral glucose was comparable in the diabetic and nondiabetic subjects (45 +/- 3 vs. 39 +/- 2%). Although new glucose formation from meal-derived three-carbon precursors (53 +/- 3 vs. 40 +/- 7 mg/kg X 7 h, P less than 0.05) was greater in the diabetic patients, it accounted for only a minor part of this excessive postprandial hepatic glucose release. Postprandial hyperglycemia was exacerbated by the lack of an appropriate increase in glucose uptake whether measured isotopically or by forearm glucose uptake. Thus excessive hepatic glucose release and impaired glucose uptake are involved in the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with NIDDM

  4. Loss of 50% of excess weight using a very low energy diet improves insulin-stimulated glucose disposal and skeletal muscle insulin signalling in obese insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jazet, I. M.; Schaart, G.; Gastaldelli, A.; Ferrannini, E.; Hesselink, M. K.; Schrauwen, P.; Romijn, J. A.; Maassen, J. A.; Pijl, H.; Ouwens, D. M.; Meinders, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Both energy restriction (ER) per se and weight loss improve glucose metabolism in obese insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients. Short-term ER decreases basal endogenous glucose production (EGP) but not glucose disposal. In contrast the blood glucose-lowering mechanism of long-term ER with

  5. NFIL3 is a negative regulator of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Geon; Han, Hye-Sook; Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2017-12-01

    Nuclear factor interleukin-3 regulated (NFIL3) has been known as an important transcriptional regulator of the development and the differentiation of immune cells. Although expression of NFIL3 is regulated by nutritional cues in the liver, the role of NFIL3 in the glucose metabolism has not been extensively studied. Thus, we wanted to explore the potential role of NFIL3 in the control of hepatic glucose metabolism. Mouse primary hepatocytes were cultured to perform western blot analysis, Q-PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. 293T cells were cultured to perform luciferase assay. Male C57BL/6 mice (fed a normal chow diet or high fat diet for 27weeks) as well as ob/ob mice were used for experiments with adenoviral delivery. We observed that NFIL3 reduced glucose production in hepatocytes by reducing expression of gluconeogenic gene transcription. The repression by NFIL3 required its basic leucine zipper DNA binding domain, and it competed with CREB onto the binding of cAMP response element in the gluconeogenic promoters. The protein levels of hepatic NFIL3 were decreased in the mouse models of genetic- and diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, and ectopic expression of NFIL3 in the livers of insulin resistant mice ameliorated hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, with concomitant reduction in expression of hepatic gluconeogenic genes. Finally, we witnessed that knockdown of NFIL3 in the livers of normal chow-fed mice promoted elevations in the glucose levels and expression of hepatic gluconeogenic genes. In this study, we showed that NFIL3 functions as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis in the liver by limiting CREB-mediated hepatic gluconeogenesis. Thus, enhancement of hepatic NFIL3 activity in insulin resistant state could be potentially beneficial in relieving glycemic symptoms in the metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabolic consequences of hepatic steatosis in overweight and obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklow, Brandy A; Wittmeier, Kristy D M; MacIntosh, Andrea C; Sellers, Elizabeth A C; Ryner, Lawrence; Serrai, Hacene; Dean, Heather J; McGavock, Jonathan M

    2012-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that hepatic steatosis is associated with risk factors for type 2 diabetes in overweight and obese youth, mediated by cardiorespiratory fitness. This was a cross-sectional study comparing insulin sensitivity between 30 overweight and obese adolescents with hepatic steatosis, 68 overweight and obese adolescents without hepatic steatosis, and 11 healthy weight adolescents without hepatic steatosis. Cardiorespiratory fitness was determined by a graded maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Secondary outcomes included presence of metabolic syndrome and glucose response to a 75-g oral glucose challenge. The presence of hepatic steatosis was associated with 55% lower insulin sensitivity (P = 0.02) and a twofold greater prevalence of metabolic syndrome (P = 0.001). Differences in insulin sensitivity (3.5 vs. 4.5 mU ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ min(-1), P = 0.03), prevalence of metabolic syndrome (48 vs. 20%, P = 0.03), and glucose area under the curve (816 vs. 710, P = 0.04) remained between groups after matching for age, sex, and visceral fat. The association between hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity (β = -0.24, t = -2.29, P < 0.025), metabolic syndrome (β = -0.54, t = -5.8, P < 0.001), and glucose area under the curve (β = 0.33, t = 3.3, P < 0.001) was independent of visceral and whole-body adiposity. Cardiorespiratory fitness was not associated with hepatic steatosis, insulin sensitivity, or presence of metabolic syndrome. Hepatic steatosis is associated with type 2 diabetes risk factors independent of cardiorespiratory fitness, whole-body adiposity, and visceral fat mass.

  7. Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy and Programs Resource Center Viral Hepatitis Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... What is the difference between Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C? Hepatitis A , Hepatitis B , and ...

  8. Is Insulin Action in the Brain Relevant in Regulating Blood Glucose in Humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Satya; Xiao, Changting; Morgantini, Cecilia; Koulajian, Khajag; Lewis, Gary F

    2015-07-01

    In addition to its direct action on the liver to lower hepatic glucose production, insulin action in the central nervous system (CNS) also lowers hepatic glucose production in rodents after 4 hours. Although CNS insulin action (CNSIA) modulates hepatic glycogen synthesis in dogs, it has no net effect on hepatic glucose output over a 4-hour period. The role of CNSIA in regulating plasma glucose has recently been examined in humans and is the focus of this review. Intransal insulin (INI) administration increases CNS insulin concentration. Hence, INI can address whether CNSIA regulates plasma glucose concentration in humans. We and three other groups have sought to answer this question, with differing conclusions. Here we will review the critical aspects of each study, including its design, which may explain these discordant conclusions. The early glucose-lowering effect of INI is likely due to spillover of insulin into the systemic circulation. In the presence of simultaneous portal and CNS hyperinsulinemia, portal insulin action is dominant. INI administration does lower plasma glucose independent of peripheral insulin concentration (between ∼3 and 6 h after administration), suggesting that CNSIA may play a role in glucose homeostasis in the late postprandial period when its action is likely greatest and portal insulin concentration is at baseline. The potential physiological role and purpose of this pathway are discussed in this review. Because the effects of INI are attenuated in patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity, this is unlikely to be of therapeutic utility.

  9. Glucose uptake in muscle cell cultures from endurance-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Jason R; Tanner, Charles J; Koves, Timothy R; Muoio, Deborah M; Houmard, Joseph A

    2005-04-01

    To examine noninsulin- (basal) and insulin-mediated glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle cells from endurance-trained and sedentary individuals. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were obtained from competitive, endurance-trained athletes (N=12; VO2peak 64.9+/-2.3 mL.kg-1.min-1) and their sedentary counterparts (N=8; VO2peak 51.8+/-2.2 mL.kg-1.min-1), and isolated satellite cells allowed to proceed to myotubes. The myotubes exhibited a dose response for glucose uptake with increasing insulin concentrations; maximal glucose uptake was approximately 1.5-fold over basal. In relation to exercise training status, basal glucose uptake was significantly (PetaM, although the relative increase in insulin-mediated glucose uptake (fold increase over basal) did not differ between the sedentary and endurance-trained cells. These data suggest that cultured skeletal muscle cells from endurance-trained athletes may differ in respect to basal glucose uptake.

  10. Glucose, Lactate and Glutamine but not Glutamate Support Depolarization-Induced Increased Respiration in Isolated Nerve Terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Andersen, Vibe H; Bak, Lasse K

    2017-01-01

    . Synaptosomal respiration using glutamate and glutamine as substrates was significantly higher compared to basal respiration, whereas oligomycin-dependent and FCCP-induced respiration was lower compared to the responses obtained in the presence of glucose as substrate. We provide evidence that synaptosomes...... are able to use besides glucose and pyruvate also the substrates lactate, glutamate and glutamine to support their basal respiration. Veratridine was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate, lactate and glutamine and FCCP was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate...

  11. Basal blood parameters of horses subjected to aerobic activity fed with lipidic concentrated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia de Oliveira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The feeding diets were evaluated containing low and high levels of soybean oil for horses athletes subjected to two protocols of aerobic training on the response of basal blood biochemical parameters. Four horses were used in latin square design with treatments in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement. Treatments consisted levels of 5 and 15% oil concentrates and two aerobic training, 40' and 60' minutes. Plasmatic parameters were monitored, triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, glucose (GLU and lactate (LAC, during basal metabolism. The TG, TC, GLU and LAC from horses at rest were not affected (P> 0.05 neither of diet and physical activity, 0.21, 3.79, 4.18, 0.93 mmol L-1, respectively. It can be concluded that offer concentrate with high content of soybean oil to athletic horses in aerobic activities can be performed without altering the blood biochemical profile of basal metabolism.

  12. Four grams of glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Wasserman, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Four grams of glucose circulates in the blood of a person weighing 70 kg. This glucose is critical for normal function in many cell types. In accordance with the importance of these 4 g of glucose, a sophisticated control system is in place to maintain blood glucose constant. Our focus has been on the mechanisms by which the flux of glucose from liver to blood and from blood to skeletal muscle is regulated. The body has a remarkable capacity to satisfy the nutritional need for glucose, while ...

  13. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  14. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  15. Basal encephalocele and morning glory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioli, J; Lesser, R L

    1983-01-01

    Basal encephaloceles are often associated with other midline anomalies such as hypertelorism, broad nasal root, cleft lip, and cleft palate. Optic disc anomalies such as pallor, dysplasia, optic pit, coLoboma, and megalopapilla have been reported to occur in patients with basal encephalocele We report a case of a child with a sphenoethmoidal encephalocele and morning glory syndrome of the optic nerve. The presence of such optic nerve anomalies with facial midline anomalies should alert the clinician to the possible presence of a basal encephalocele. Images PMID:6849854

  16. Alterations in hepatic gluconeogenic amino acid uptake and gluconeogenesis in the endotoxin treated conscious dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinz, H; Lacy, D B; Ejiofor, J; McGuinness, O P

    1998-04-01

    We examined the effect of a 240 min intraportal infusion of a nonlethal dose of Escherichia coli endotoxin (.21 g x kg(-1) x min[-1]) on hepatic amino acid and glucose metabolism in chronically catheterized 42 h fasted conscious dogs (n = 8). Hepatic metabolism was assessed using tracer (3-[3H]glucose [U-14C]alanine) and arteriovenous difference techniques. After endotoxin administration net hepatic glucose output increased twofold. Arterial plasma insulin levels decreased by 25%, whereas arterial plasma glucagon and cortisol levels increased 10- and 6-fold, respectively. Arterial lactate levels increased 6.4-fold, whereas net hepatic lactate uptake was not increased. Arterial alanine levels (1.6-fold) and net hepatic alanine uptake (1.3-fold) increased, whereas net hepatic alanine fractional extraction was unaltered. In contrast, the arterial levels of the other gluconeogenic amino acids (glutamine, glycine, serine, and threonine) decreased. Despite this decrease, net uptake of these amino acids by the liver did not decrease, because net hepatic amino acid fractional extraction increased. Total net hepatic gluconeogenic precursor uptake was unaltered (1.1 +/- .1 to 1.3 +/- .3 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) expressed in glucose equivalents). In summary, gluconeogenesis does not increase after endotoxin administration. Thus, an increase in net hepatic glycogenolysis accounts for the majority of the increase in hepatic glucose production. The lack of an increase in alanine fractional extraction, despite hyperglucagonemia and a rise in the fractional extraction of other gluconeogenic amino acids, suggests that endotoxin specifically impairs hepatic alanine entry in vivo.

  17. Kinetics of metabolism of glucose, propionate and CO2 in steers as affected by injecting phlorizin and feeding propionate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veenhuizen, J.J.; Russell, R.W.; Young, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of injecting phlorizin subcutaneously and/or feeding propionate on metabolism of glucose, propionate and CO2 were determined for four steers used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Isotope dilution techniques were used to determine a four-pool kinetic solution for the flux of carbon among plasma glucose, rumen propionate, blood CO2 and rumen CO2. Injecting 1 g of phlorizin twice daily for 19 d resulted in 7.1 mol glucose C/d being excreted in urine. The basal glucose production of 13.4 mol C/d was increased to 17.9 mol C/d with phlorizin. There was no change in glucose oxidation or propionate production. The percentage of plasma glucose derived from propionate was unaffected by phlorizin, but 54 +/- 0.4% of total propionate was converted to plasma glucose during phlorizin treatment versus 40 +/- 0.6% during the basal treatment. When propionate was fed (18.3 mol C/d) glucose production increased to 21.2 mol C/d from the basal value of 13.4 mol C/d, and propionate oxidation to CO2 increased to 14.9 mol C/d from the basal value of 4.1 mol C/d. Glucose derived from propionate was 43 +/- 5% for the basal treatment and 67 +/- 3% during propionate feeding. The percentage of propionate converted to plasma glucose and blood and rumen CO2 was not affected by feeding propionate. An increased need for glucose, because of glucose excretion during phlorizin treatment, caused an increased utilization of propionate for gluconeogenesis, but an increased availability of propionate caused an increase in glucose production without affecting the relative distribution of carbon from propionate

  18. Glucose effectiveness is a critical pathogenic factor leading to glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes: An ignored hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, F P; Henriksen, J E; Rantzau, C; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2018-02-16

    Although the ability of glucose to mediate its own in vivo metabolism is long documented, the quantitative measurement of whole body glucose-mediated glucose disposal at basal insulin levels (glucose effectiveness [GE]), followed the introduction of the Minimal Model intravenous glucose tolerance test technique. A literature review, combined with our own studies, of the role of GE in glucose metabolism in normal and "at risk" individuals, was undertaken to determine GE's contribution to glucose homeostasis. GE accounts for ~45% to 65% of glucose disposal in man. A negative association between GE and insulin meditated glucose disposal (Si), is present in normal subjects without a family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus but is absent in normoglycaemic "at risk" relatives with a positive family history of diabetes mellitus. Intracellular GE disposal is mediated by mass action of glucose through the skeletal muscle membrane via facilitated Glut 4 transporters. However, GE is frequently forgotten as a significant contributor to the development of glucose intolerance in "at risk" individuals. Only limited studies have examined the role of a lower GE in such normoglycemic subjects with preexisting mild insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. These studies demonstrate that in "at risk" individuals, an initial low GE is a key contributor and predictor of future glucose intolerance, whereas an initial raised GE is protective against future glucose intolerance. In "at risk" individuals, a low GE and genetically determined vulnerable β-cell function are more critical determinants of future glucose intolerance than their preexisting insulin-resistant state. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Hepatic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardino, M.E.; Sones, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The past several years have seen significant advances in diagnostic and interventional radiology. These advances have been particularly rewarding for the study of liver disease. Improved imaging and therapeutic procedures in oncology have generated changes in treatment protocols and in evaluating the results of therapy for hepatic malignancies. The enriched understanding of the anatomic and hemodynamic aspects of the portal system has greatly benefited patients with portal hypertension. Now physicians are confidently more aggressive in the therapeutic approach to the variceal bleeder, and they have modified their approach to the preservation of portal flow following shunt. All of the diagnostic modalities used to evaluate the liver are represented in this book. In its structure and organization this volume goes beyond a historical overview of imaging to present greater insight into the current state of the art, as well as possible future developments. Each chapter is designed to elucidate the advantages and weaknesses of the various diagnostic modalities

  20. Effect of glucagon on glucose production during insulin deficiency in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherrington, A D; Lacy, W W; Chiasson, J L

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the present experiments was to determine the effects of basal glucagon on glucose production after induction of prolonged insulin lack in normal conscious dogs fasted overnight. A selective deficiency of insulin or a combined deficiency of both pancreatic hormones was created by infusing somatostatin alone or in combination with an intraportal replacement infusion of glucagon. Glucose production (GP) was measured by a primed constant infusion of [3H-3]glucose, and gluconeogenesis (GNG) was assessed by determining the conversion rate of circulating [14C]alanine and [14C]lactate into [14C]glucose. When insulin deficiency was induced in the presence of basal glucagon the latter hormone caused GP to double and then to decline so that after 4 h it had returned to the conrol rate. The conversion of alanine and lactate into glucose, on the other hand, increased throughout the period of insulin lack. Withdrawal of glucagon after GP had normalized resulted in a 40% fall in GP, a 37% decrease in GNG, and a marked decrease in the plasma glucose concentration. Induction of insulin deficiency in the absence of basal glucagon resulted in an initial (30%) drop in GP followed by a restoration of normal GP after 2--3 h and moderately enhanced glucose formation from alanine and lactate. It can be concluded that (a) the effect of relative hyperglucagonemia on GP is short-lived; (b) the waning of the effect of glucagon is attributable solely to a diminution of glycogenolysis because GNG remains stimulated; (c) basal glucagon markedly enhances the GNG stimulation apparent after induction of insulin deficiency; and (d) basal glucagon worsens the hyperglycemia pursuant on the induction of insulin deficiency both by triggering an initial overproduction of glucose and by maintaining the basal production rate thereafter. PMID:690190

  1. The effect of hepatectomy on glucose homeostasis in pig and in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Torsten Leif Bunk; Grunnet, Niels; Rasmussen, Allan

    2002-01-01

    , blood glucose decreased with a halflife of about 26 min and blood lactate increased. Kidney gluconeogenesis was 0.116+/-0.016 mmol min(-1). Fifty percent of kidney glucose output could be accounted for by lactate- and glycerol uptake. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that in humans extra hepatic...... gluconeogenesis is sufficient to maintain normal blood glucose in the anhepatic phase of orthotopic liver transplantation, while in the pig this was not the case....

  2. Sonic hedgehog signaling in basal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela; Couvé-Privat, Sophie

    2005-07-28

    The development of basal cell carcinoma, the commonest human cancer in fair skinned populations, is clearly associated with constitutive activation of sonic hedgehog signaling. Insight into the genesis of BCC came from the identification of germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene, PATCHED, a key regulatory component of hedgehog signaling in the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Analysis of sporadic basal cell carcinomas and those from repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients has revealed mutational inactivation of PATCHED and gain of function mutations of the proto-oncogenes, SMOOTHENED and SONIC HEDGEHOG associated with solar UV exposure. The molecular mechanisms involved in alterations of the hedgehog signaling pathway that lead to the formation of basal cell carcinomas are being unraveled and has already allowed the investigation of future therapeutic strategies for treating these skin cancers.

  3. Trichoepithelioma And Multiple Basal Cell Epithelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey S.K

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of multiple trichoepithelioma and basal cell epithelioma is reported. Although malignant degeneration of trichoepithelioma is debated, clinical and histopathological studies, in our case, hint at that. The case is reported for its rarity.

  4. Molecular basis of basal cell carcinoma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Erik; Lopes, Otávio Sérgio

    2017-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer, presenting low mortality but high morbidity, and it has as risk factor exposure to sunlight, especially UVB spectrum. The most important constitutional risk factors for basal cell carcinoma development are clear phototypes (I and II, Fitzpatrick classification), family history of basal cell carcinoma (30-60%), freckles in childhood, eyes and light hair. The environmental risk factor better established is exposure to ultraviolet radiation. However, different solar exposure scenarios probably are independent risk factors for certain clinical and histological types, topographies and prognosis of this tumor, and focus of controversy among researchers. Studies confirm that changes in cellular genes Hedgehog signaling pathway are associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma. The cellular Hedgehog signaling pathway is activated in organogenesis, but is altered in various types of tumors. PMID:28954101

  5. Molecular basis of basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Erik; Lopes, Otávio Sérgio

    2017-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer, presenting low mortality but high morbidity, and it has as risk factor exposure to sunlight, especially UVB spectrum. The most important constitutional risk factors for basal cell carcinoma development are clear phototypes (I and II, Fitzpatrick classification), family history of basal cell carcinoma (30-60%), freckles in childhood, eyes and light hair. The environmental risk factor better established is exposure to ultraviolet radiation. However, different solar exposure scenarios probably are independent risk factors for certain clinical and histological types, topographies and prognosis of this tumor, and focus of controversy among researchers. Studies confirm that changes in cellular genes Hedgehog signaling pathway are associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma. The cellular Hedgehog signaling pathway is activated in organogenesis, but is altered in various types of tumors.

  6. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Hyperglycemia is the technical term for high blood glucose (blood sugar). High ... We Are Research Leaders We Support Your Doctor Student Resources Patient Access to Research Research Resources Practice ...

  7. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Hyperglycemia is the technical term for high blood glucose (blood sugar). High ... Type 2 Diabetes program to get help and support during your first year. Featured Book Type 2 ...

  8. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and eAG Hypoglycemia (Low blood glucose) Hyperglycemia (High blood glucose) Dawn Phenomenon Checking for Ketones Tight Diabetes Control donate en -- A Future Without Diabetes - a-future- ...

  9. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day ... DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ...

  10. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a protein that ...

  11. Glucose test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person with diabetes constantly manages their blood's sugar (glucose) levels. After a blood sample is taken and tested, it is determined whether the glucose levels are low or high. Following your health ...

  12. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms include the following: High blood glucose High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased ... you should check and what your blood glucose levels should be. Checking your blood and then treating ...

  13. Reversible cortical blindness in a case of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Kanti Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy is a frequent and often fatal manifestation of chronic liver disease. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is believed to be multifactorial including impaired blood-brain barrier function, imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in cortex, accumulation of various toxic and false neurotransmitters, and lack of nutrients like oxygen and glucose. Signs and symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy varies and commonly ranges from personality changes, disturbed consciousness, sleep pattern alternation, intellectual deterioration, speech disturbances, asterixis to frank coma and even death. Reversible or transient cortical blindness is rare manifestation of hepatic encephalopathy. It may even precede the phase of altered consciousness in such patients. Very few similar cases have been reported worldwide. Hence, we would like to report a case of transient cortical blindness in a patient of hepatic encephalopathy.

  14. Relative maxima of diameter and basal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas B. Lynch; Difei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    It has often been observed that maximum dbh growth occurs at an earlier age than maximum individual tree basal area growth. This can be deduced from the geometry of the tree stem, by observing that a dbh increment at a given radius will be associated with a larger basal area increment than an equal dbh increment occurring at a shorter radius from the stem center. Thus...

  15. Degludec insulin: A novel basal insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Baruah, Manash; Kalra, Bharti

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews a novel insulin analogue, degludec, which has the potential to emerge as an ideal basal insulin. It reviews the limitations of existing basal insulin and analogues, and highlights the need for a newer molecule. The paper discusses the potential advantages of degludec, while reviewing its pharmacologic and clinical studies done so far. The paper assesses the potential role of insulin degludec and degludec plus in clinical diabetes practice.

  16. Basal and postprandial change in serum fibroblast growth factor-21 concentration in type 1 diabetic mellitus and in healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibar, Karin; Blaslov, Kristina; Bulum, Tomislav; Ćuća, Jadranka Knežević; Smirčić-Duvnjak, Lea

    2015-04-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) appears to have an important role in glucose and lipid metabolism. FGF-21 secretion is mainly determined by nutritional status. The aim of this study was to measure basal and postprandial FGF-21 and postprandial change of FGF-21 concentration in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients and in healthy controls, and to investigate the differences between the groups. The cross-sectional study included 30 C-peptide negative T1DM patients, median age 37 years (20-59), disease duration 22 years (3-45), and nine healthy controls, median age 30 years (27-47). Basal and postprandial FGF-21 concentrations were measured by ELISA. The associations of FGF-21 with glucose, lipids, and insulin were analyzed. Individuals with T1DM showed significantly lower basal FGF-21 concentration (P=0.046) when compared with healthy controls (median value 28.2 vs 104 pg/mL) and had significantly different postprandial change (∆ 30'-0') of FGF-21 (P=0.006) in comparison with healthy controls (median value -1.1 vs -20.5 pg/mL). The glucose and lipid status did not correlate with FGF-21. In healthy controls, postprandial insulin level correlated with basal FGF-21 (ρ=0.7, P=0.036). Multiple regression analysis showed that they are independently associated after adjustment for confounding factors (β=1.824, P=0.04). We describe the pathological pattern of basal and postprandial change of FGF-21 secretion not associated with glucose, lipid levels, or insulin therapy in patients with T1DM. Since FGF-21 has numerous protective metabolic effects in the experimental model, the lower basal FGF-21 concentration in T1DM patients opens the question about the potential role of recombinant FGF-21 therapy.

  17. [Blood glucose self monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wascher, Thomas C; Stechemesser, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Self monitoring of blood glucose contributes to the integrated management of diabetes mellitus. It, thus, should be available for all patients with diabetes mellitus type-1 and type-2. Self monitoring of blood glucose improves patients safety, quality of life and glucose control. The current article represents the recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association for the use of blood glucose self monitoring according to current scientific evidence.

  18. Basal cell carcinoma metastatic to parotid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Rinsey Rose; Di Palma, Silvana; Barrett, A W

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis from basal cell carcinoma of the skin is very rare with cases being documented in the lymph nodes, lung, bone and parotid gland. The main histopathological differential diagnosis is the locally arising basal cell adenocarcinoma from which it is difficult to distinguish by morphology and routine immunohistochemistry. Approximately 85 % of all reported metastatic basal cell carcinomas arise in the head and neck region. Here we present a case of basal cell carcinoma of the skin of the left lateral canthus of the eye which metastasized to the intraparotid lymph nodes with infiltration of the adjacent parotid parenchyma. More awareness and vigilance is required on the part of the reporting pathologist to consider metastasis in the presence of a parotid tumour. Features favouring metastasis include history of primary cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, histological similarity to the primary lesion and absence of any demonstrable direct extension from the skin lesion. We also review the literature on metastatic basal cell carcinoma and discuss the need for adequate follow up in high risk patients.

  19. [Basal cell carcinoma of unusual site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlika, Rym Benmously; Kerkeni, Nadia; Jebali, Amel; Zghal, Mohamed; Debbiche, Achraf; Ayed, Mohamed Ben; Mokhtar, Insaf; Fenniche, Samy

    2011-02-01

    Labial mucosa is an atypical site of basal cell carcinoma. The involvement of the vermilion lip, devoid of hair follicles and sweat glands, contrasts with the concept of its origin from pilar structures. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma developed on the vermilion upper lip. A 49-year-old woman, presented with an asymptomatic, 1-cm-diameter, erythematous, telangiectatic and crusted nodule on the upper lip evolving for 9 months and having once interested the vermilion border. There were no cervical lymph nodes. Diagnosis of infiltrative basal cell carcinoma was made by histological study, which showed a tumoral proliferation of epithelial basal cells infiltrating the dermis with perineural and muscular infiltration. Our report illustrates a rare but not exceptional site of basal cell carcinoma. The nodule, initially confined to the vermilion border, has then developed onto the mucosal and the cutaneous areas. Histopathological study revealed, as previously reported, infiltarative features. Basal cell carcinoma of the lip should be rapidly managed since its invasion to deeper structures occurs early. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of the DISST model to estimate the HOMA and Matsuda indexes using only a basal insulin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Shaun M; Docherty, Paul D; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2014-07-01

    It is hypothesized that early detection of reduced insulin sensitivity (SI) could prompt intervention that may reduce the considerable financial strain type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) places on global health care. Reduction of the cost of already inexpensive SI metrics such as the Matsuda and HOMA indexes would enable more widespread, economically feasible use of these metrics for screening. The goal of this research was to determine a means of reducing the number of insulin samples and therefore the cost required to provide an accurate Matsuda Index value. The Dynamic Insulin Sensitivity and Secretion Test (DISST) model was used with the glucose and basal insulin measurements from an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) to predict patient insulin responses. The insulin response to the OGTT was determined via population based regression analysis that incorporated the 60-minute glucose and basal insulin values. The proposed method derived accurate and precise Matsuda Indices as compared to the fully sampled Matsuda (R = .95) using only the basal assay insulin-level data and 4 glucose measurements. Using a model employing the basal insulin also allows for determination of the 1-day HOMA value. The DISST model was successfully modified to allow for the accurate prediction an individual's insulin response to the OGTT. In turn, this enabled highly accurate and precise estimation of a Matsuda Index using only the glucose and basal insulin assays. As insulin assays account for the majority of the cost of the Matsuda Index, this model offers a significant reduction in assay cost. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  1. Inducible overexpression of adiponectin receptors highlight the roles of adiponectin-induced ceramidase signaling in lipid and glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L. Holland

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: These observations reveal that adiponectin is critical for AdipoR-induced ceramidase activation which enhances hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism via rapidly acting “cross-talk” between liver and adipose tissue sphingolipids.

  2. Immunoglobulins for preventing hepatitis A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jian Ping; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Fei, Yutong

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis A (infectious hepatitis) is a common epidemic disease. Immunoglobulins for passive immunisation are used as prevention.......Hepatitis A (infectious hepatitis) is a common epidemic disease. Immunoglobulins for passive immunisation are used as prevention....

  3. Measurement of lactate formation from glucose using [6-3H]- and [6-14C]glucose in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virkamaeki, A.P.; Puhakainen, I.; Nurjhan, N.; Gerich, J.E.; Yki-Jaervinen, H.

    1990-01-01

    To assess the validity of determining the origin of plasma lactate from the ratio of lactate and glucose specific activities (SA) during infusion of labeled glucose, normal subjects received infusions of [6-3H]- and [6-14C]glucose for 4 h after a 12 h fast, and, on another day, cold glucose labeled with both tracers during 4-6 h of hyperinsulinemia (approximately 650 microU/ml). Basally, less lactate was derived from plasma glucose when measured with [6-3H]glucose (27 +/- 2%) than with [6-14C]glucose (40 +/- 2%, P less than 0.001). Insulin did not increase the percent of lactate derived from plasma glucose when measured with [6-3H]glucose (29 +/- 2%) but did increase when measured with [6-14C]glucose (60 +/- 4%). The arterialized blood (A) [3H]lactate SA was 30-40% higher (P less than 0.01) than deep venous blood (V) [3H]lactate SA, whereas A and V [14C]lactate SA were similar. During conversion of alanine to lactate with glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in vitro, 32 +/- 2% of 3H in [3-3H]alanine was found in water and 68 +/- 2% in lactate. During infusion of [6-3H]- and [6-14C]glucose, the ratio of [14C]alanine to lactate SA (0.88 +/- 0.05) was less than the ratio of [3H]alanine to lactate SA (0.31 +/- 0.03, P less than 0.001). In conclusion (1) loss of 3H relative to 14C from position 6 in glucose occurs during lactate formation in extrahepatic tissues possibly due to the GPT reaction (alanine conversion to pyruvate), and (2) even under supraphysiologic hyperinsulinemic conditions not all of plasma lactate originates from plasma glucose

  4. Combination therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus: adding empagliflozin to basal insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ahmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM management is complex, with few patients successfully achieving recommended glycemic targets with monotherapy, most progressing to combination therapy, and many eventually requiring insulin. Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors are an emerging class of antidiabetes agents with an insulin-independent mechanism of action, making them suitable for use in combination with any other class of antidiabetes agents, including insulin. This review evaluates a 78-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating the impact of empagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, as add-on to basal insulin in patients with inadequate glycemic control on basal insulin, with or without metformin and/or a sulfonylurea. Empagliflozin added on to basal insulin resulted in significant and sustained reductions in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels compared with placebo. Empagliflozin has previously been shown to induce weight loss, and was associated with sustained weight loss in this study. This combination therapy was well tolerated, with similar levels of hypoglycemic adverse events in the empagliflozin and placebo groups over the 78-week treatment period. Urinary tract infections and genital infections, side effects associated with SGLT2 inhibitors, were reported more commonly in the empagliflozin group; however, such events led to treatment discontinuation in very few patients. These findings suggest that, with their complementary mechanisms of action, empagliflozin added on to basal insulin may be a useful treatment option in patients on basal insulin who need additional glycemic control without weight gain.

  5. Insulin pump basal adjustment for exercise in type 1 diabetes: a randomised crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Sybil A; Horsburgh, Jodie C; Ward, Glenn M; La Gerche, André; Gooley, Judith L; Jenkins, Alicia J; MacIsaac, Richard J; O'Neal, David N

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise, vs rest, on circulating insulin and glucose, following pre-exercise insulin pump basal rate reduction. This was an open-label, two-stage randomised crossover study of 14 adults (seven women, seven men) with type 1 diabetes established on insulin pump therapy. In each stage, participants fasted and insulin delivery was halved following a single insulin basal rate overnight. Exercise (30 min moderate-intensity stationary bicycle exercise, starting 60 min post-basal reduction) and rest stages were undertaken in random order at a university hospital. Randomisation was computer-generated, and allocation concealed via sequentially numbered sealed opaque envelopes. Venous blood was collected at 15 min intervals from 60 min pre- until 210 min post-basal rate reduction. Changes in plasma free insulin (the primary outcome), and changes in plasma glucose, with exercise were compared with changes when resting. Outcomes were assessed blinded to group assignment. Following basal rate reduction when rested, mean (± SE) free insulin decreased by 4.9 ± 2.9%, 16.2 ± 2.6% and 18.6 ± 3.2% at 1, 2 and 3 h, respectively (p insulin increased by 6 ± 2 pmol/l after 15 min and 5 ± 2 pmol/l after 30 min (p insulin rate 1 h prior to exercise did not significantly reduce circulating free insulin by exercise commencement. Exercise itself transiently increased insulin levels. In participants with low-normal glucose pre-exercise, hypoglycaemia was not prevented by insulin basal rate reduction alone. Greater insulin basal rate reduction and supplemental carbohydrate may be required to prevent exercise-induced hypoglycaemia. ANZCTR.org.au ACTRN12613000581763 FUNDING: Australian Diabetes Society, Hugh DT Williamson Foundation, Lynne Quayle Charitable Trust Fund.

  6. Disassembly of the actin network inhibits insulin-dependent stimulation of glucose transport and prevents recruitment of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridis, T; Vranic, M; Klip, A

    1994-11-25

    In muscle and fat tissues, insulin stimulates glucose transport through the translocation of glucose transporter proteins from an intracellular storage pool to the plasma membrane. The mechanism of this translocation is unknown. We have examined the possible role of the actin microfilament network in the stimulation of glucose transport by insulin and on the distribution of glucose transporters, in differentiated L6 rat skeletal muscle cells. Insulin (10(-7) M for 30 min) caused a major reorganization of the actin network of differentiated L6 myotubes. Cytochalasin D, a widely used inhibitor of actin filament formation, caused a dose- and time-dependent disassembly of the actin network, which was associated with an 80% inhibition of the insulin stimulation of glucose transport, without affecting the basal rate of glucose uptake. L6 myotubes express three glucose transporter isoforms, named GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4. Disassembly of the actin network by cytochalasin D did not affect the number of basal glucose transporters in the plasma membrane but reduced the content of all three glucose transporters in intracellular membranes and prevented their appearance at the plasma membrane response to insulin. The inhibitory effect of cytochalasin D treatment on the insulin stimulation of glucose transport occurred downstream of tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 and of binding of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to the insulin receptor substrate-1. Using immunoprecipitation of intact membranes, we detected specific association of the actin-binding protein spectrin with GLUT4 glucose transporter-containing vesicles. We conclude that an intact actin network is required for the correct intracellular localization of glucose transporters, as well as for their incorporation into the plasma membrane in response to insulin. A direct interaction may exist between the actin network and the glucose transporter vesicles which may be mediated through a spectrin

  7. Glucose screening tests during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral glucose tolerance test - pregnancy; OGTT - pregnancy; Glucose challenge test - pregnancy; Gestational diabetes - glucose screening ... During the first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare ...

  8. Microbiological diagnostics of viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    HASDEMİR, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is an infection that primarily affects the liverbut may also have systemic clinical manifestations. The vastmajority of viral hepatitis are caused by one of five hepatotropicviruses: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), andhepatitis E virus (HEV) (Table I) [1]. HBV, HCV, and HDValso cause chronic hepatitis, whereas HAV does not. HEVcauses acute hepatitis in normal hosts but can cause protractedand chronic he...

  9. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Clinical Trials Primary Biliary Cholangitis Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Wilson Disease Hepatitis (Viral) View or Print All Sections What ...

  10. Regional brain glucose metabolism and blood flow in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Nedergaard, M.; Aarslew-Jensen, M.; Diemer, N.H.

    1990-01-01

    Brain regional glucose metabolism and regional blood flow were measured from autoradiographs by the uptake of [ 3 H]-2-deoxy-D-glucose and [ 14 C]iodoantipyrine in streptozocin-induced diabetic (STZ-D) rats. After 2 days of diabetes, glucose metabolism in the neocortex, basal ganglia, and white matter increased by 34, 37, and 8%, respectively, whereas blood flow was unchanged. After 4 mo, glucose metabolism in the same three regions was decreased by 32, 43, and 60%. This reduction was paralleled by a statistically nonsignificant reduction in blood flow in neocortex and basal ganglia. It is suggested that the decrease of brain glucose metabolism in STZ-D reflects increased ketone body oxidation and reduction of electrochemical work

  11. Hepatitis C (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis C is a virus-caused liver inflammation which may cause jaundice, fever and cirrhosis. Persons who are most at risk for contracting and spreading hepatitis C are those who share needles for injecting drugs ...

  12. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  13. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a pathogenic microorganism that can cause potentially life- threatening disease in humans. HBV infection is transmitted through exposure ...

  14. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; Grobbelaar, Marie; Steyn, Freda; Mapukata, Ayanda; Plessis, Jaco du [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Hospital, P.O. BOX 19063, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2006-11-15

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  15. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; Grobbelaar, Marie; Steyn, Freda; Mapukata, Ayanda; Plessis, Jaco du

    2006-01-01

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  16. Assessment and mathematical modeling of glucose turnover and insulin sensitivity in lean and obese cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenig, M; Thomaseth, K; Brandao, J; Waldron, M; Ferguson, D C

    2006-11-01

    Insulin sensitivity (SI) of glucose disposal can be quantified with the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (EHC) with tracer glucose infusion. True steady state is, however, difficult to achieve, and non-steady state analysis of EHC data is preferred. This analysis requires information on glucose kinetics that can be obtained from bolus injection of cold and tracer glucose. The aim of this study was to assess glucose kinetics in cats. Mathematical modeling and non-steady state analysis was applied to assess effects of obesity on glucose turnover, glycolysis/glycogen synthesis, SI, and inhibition of endogenous glucose production (EGP) in lean cats (L) and obese cats (O). D-[3-(3)H]-glucose kinetics and 3H-H2O production were analyzed in 4 L and 4 O with three-compartment modeling. Frequently sampled insulin-modified intravenous glucose tolerance tests (FSIGT) with minimal model analysis were performed in 5L and 3 O to assess glucose kinetics and SI. EHC was performed in 10 L and 10 O with primed-constant infusion of 3H-glucose. Data were analyzed with a modified minimal model segregating suppression of EGP by insulin using a non-linear mixed-effects population approach. FSIGT provided estimates of SI, glucose effectiveness SG, and distribution volume. EHC provided estimates of SI, SG, glycolysis, and suprabasal insulin concentration for 50% EGP inhibition. Obesity appears to affect glucose distribution but not utilization at basal insulin, and reduces SI estimated by FSIGT and EHC. Differences in SI between FSIGT and EHC depend on different descriptions of EGP inhibition by insulin. Finally, glucose disposal at basal insulin appears to occur entirely through glycolysis, whereas significant amounts of glucose are sequestrated from oxidation during EHC.

  17. Insulin-independent regulation of hepatic triglyceride synthesis by fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatner, Daniel F; Majumdar, Sachin K; Kumashiro, Naoki; Petersen, Max C; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Gattu, Arijeet K; Bears, Mitchell; Camporez, João-Paulo G; Cline, Gary W; Jurczak, Michael J; Samuel, Varman T; Shulman, Gerald I

    2015-01-27

    A central paradox in type 2 diabetes is the apparent selective nature of hepatic insulin resistance--wherein insulin fails to suppress hepatic glucose production yet continues to stimulate lipogenesis, resulting in hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hepatic steatosis. Although efforts to explain this have focused on finding a branch point in insulin signaling where hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism diverge, we hypothesized that hepatic triglyceride synthesis could be driven by substrate, independent of changes in hepatic insulin signaling. We tested this hypothesis in rats by infusing [U-(13)C] palmitate to measure rates of fatty acid esterification into hepatic triglyceride while varying plasma fatty acid and insulin concentrations independently. These experiments were performed in normal rats, high fat-fed insulin-resistant rats, and insulin receptor 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotide-treated rats. Rates of fatty acid esterification into hepatic triglyceride were found to be dependent on plasma fatty acid infusion rates, independent of changes in plasma insulin concentrations and independent of hepatocellular insulin signaling. Taken together, these results obviate a paradox of selective insulin resistance, because the major source of hepatic lipid synthesis, esterification of preformed fatty acids, is primarily dependent on substrate delivery and largely independent of hepatic insulin action.

  18. Aberrant hepatic artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstam, M.A.; Novelline, R.A.; Athanasoulis, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    In a patient undergoing selective hepatic arteriography for suspected liver trauma, a nonopacified area of the liver, initially thought to represent a hepatic hematoma, was later discovered to be due to the presence of an accessory right hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery. This case illustrates the need for a search for aberrant vasculature whenever a liver hematoma is suspected on the basis of a selective hepatic arteriogram. (orig.) [de

  19. Hepatic and cerebral energy metabolism after neonatal canine alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliegman, R M; Miettinen, E L; Morton, S K

    1983-04-01

    Intrahepatic and intracerebral metabolic responses to neonatal fasting or enteric carbohydrate alimentation were investigated among newborn dogs. Pups were either fasted or given an intravenous glucose infusion (alimented) before an enteric feeding of physiologic quantities of either glucose or galactose. These pups were also compared to another group which was completely starved throughout the study period. Gastrointestinal carbohydrate feeding resulted in enhanced hepatic glycogen content among pups after a prior state of fasting. Though there were no differences of glycogen content between glucose or galactose feeding in this previously fasted group, combined intravenous glucose and enteric galactose administration produced the greatest effect on hepatic glycogen synthesis. Intrahepatic fructose 1, 6-diphosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate levels were increased among previously fasted pups fed enteric monosaccharides compared to completely starved control pups, whereas intrahepatic phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate levels were elevated after combined intravenous and enteric carbohydrate administration. Of greater interest was the observation that hepatic levels of ATP were significantly elevated among all groups given exogenous carbohydrates compared to the completely starved control group. In contrast to the augmented hepatic glycogen and ATP levels, there were no alterations of cerebral glycogen or ATP after alimentation. Nevertheless, cerebral pyruvate and/or phosphoenolpyruvate concentrations were elevated after enteric or combined intravenous and enteric alimentation compared to the totally starved control pups.

  20. The autonomic nervous system regulates postprandial hepatic lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinstroop, Eveline; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Foppen, Ewout; Wortel, Joke; Kooijman, Sander; Berbée, Jimmy F. P.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2013-01-01

    The liver is a key organ in controlling glucose and lipid metabolism during feeding and fasting. In addition to hormones and nutrients, inputs from the autonomic nervous system are also involved in fine-tuning hepatic metabolic regulation. Previously, we have shown in rats that during fasting an

  1. Topical treatment of Basal cell carcinomas in nevoid Basal cell carcinoma syndrome with a smoothened inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skvara, Hans; Kalthoff, Frank; Meingassner, Josef G.; Wolff-Winiski, Barbara; Aschauer, Heinrich; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Wu, Xu; Pan, Shifeng; Mickel, Lesanka; Schuster, Christopher; Stary, Georg; Jalili, Ahmad; David, Olivier J.; Emotte, Corinne; Antunes, Ana Monica Costa; Rose, Kristine; Decker, Jeremy; Carlson, Ilene; Gardner, Humphrey; Stuetz, Anton; Bertolino, Arthur P.; Stingl, Georg; de Rie, Menno A.

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a distinctive manifestation in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) patients. Both inherited and acquired mutations of patched 1 (PTCH1), a tumor-suppressor gene controlling the activity of Smoothened (SMO), are the primary cause of the constitutive activation

  2. The CREB coactivator CRTC2 links hepatic ER stress and fasting gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiguo; Vera, Liliana; Fischer, Wolfgang H; Montminy, Marc

    2009-07-23

    In fasted mammals, circulating pancreatic glucagon stimulates hepatic gluconeogenesis in part through the CREB regulated transcription coactivator 2 (CRTC2, also referred to as TORC2). Hepatic glucose production is increased in obesity, reflecting chronic increases in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that promote insulin resistance. Whether ER stress also modulates the gluconeogenic program directly, however, is unclear. Here we show that CRTC2 functions as a dual sensor for ER stress and fasting signals. Acute increases in ER stress triggered the dephosphorylation and nuclear entry of CRTC2, which in turn promoted the expression of ER quality control genes through an association with activating transcription factor 6 alpha (ATF6alpha, also known as ATF6)--an integral branch of the unfolded protein response. In addition to mediating CRTC2 recruitment to ER stress inducible promoters, ATF6alpha also reduced hepatic glucose output by disrupting the CREB-CRTC2 interaction and thereby inhibiting CRTC2 occupancy over gluconeogenic genes. Conversely, hepatic glucose output was upregulated when hepatic ATF6alpha protein amounts were reduced, either by RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown or as a result of persistent stress in obesity. Because ATF6alpha overexpression in the livers of obese mice reversed CRTC2 effects on the gluconeogenic program and lowered hepatic glucose output, our results demonstrate how cross-talk between ER stress and fasting pathways at the level of a transcriptional coactivator contributes to glucose homeostasis.

  3. Hepatocytes contribute to residual glucose production in a mouse model for glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijmans, Brenda S; Boss, Andreas; van Dijk, Theo H; Soty, Maud; Wolters, Henk; Mutel, Elodie; Groen, Albert K; Derks, Terry G J; Mithieux, Gilles; Heerschap, Arend; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Rajas, Fabienne; Oosterveer, Maaike H

    2017-12-01

    It is a long-standing enigma how glycogen storage disease (GSD) type I patients retain a limited capacity for endogenous glucose production despite the loss of glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Insight into the source of residual endogenous glucose production is of clinical importance given the risk of sudden death in these patients, but so far contradictory mechanisms have been proposed. We investigated glucose-6-phosphatase-independent endogenous glucose production in hepatocytes isolated from a liver-specific GSD Ia mouse model (L-G6pc -/- mice) and performed real-time analysis of hepatic glucose fluxes and glycogen metabolism in L-G6pc -/- mice using state-of-the-art stable isotope methodologies. Here we show that G6pc-deficient hepatocytes are capable of producing glucose. In vivo analysis of hepatic glucose metabolism revealed that the hepatic glucokinase flux was decreased by 95% in L-G6pc -/- mice. It also showed increased glycogen phosphorylase flux in L-G6pc -/- mice, which is coupled to the release of free glucose through glycogen debranching. Although the ex vivo activities of debranching enzyme and lysosomal acid maltase, two major hepatic α-glucosidases, were unaltered in L-G6pc -/- mice, pharmacological inhibition of α-glucosidase activity almost completely abolished residual glucose production by G6pc-deficient hepatocytes. Our data indicate that hepatocytes contribute to residual glucose production in GSD Ia. We show that α-glucosidase activity, i.e. glycogen debranching and/or lysosomal glycogen breakdown, contributes to residual glucose production by GSD Ia hepatocytes. A strong reduction in hepatic GCK flux in L-G6pc-/- mice furthermore limits the phosphorylation of free glucose synthesized by G6pc-deficient hepatocytes, allowing the release of glucose into the circulation. The almost complete abrogation of GCK flux in G6pc-deficient liver also explains the contradictory reports on residual glucose production in GSD Ia patients. (Hepatology

  4. Know More Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of every 4 were born from 1945-1965. Hepatitis C can cause liver damage and liver failure. Over time, chronic Hepatitis ... body and prevent liver damage, cirrhosis, and even liver cancer. “Hepatitis C: Did You Know?” Watch this video encouraging ...

  5. Hepatitis viruses overview

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis is major cause of morbidity or mortality worldwide, particularly in the developing world. The major causes of infective hepatitis are hepatitis viruses. A, B, C, D or E. In the acute phase, there are no clinical features that can reliably differentiate between these viruses. Infection may be asymptomatic or can present as.

  6. Hepatitis E Virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis in the developing world. It is a waterborne virus that can cause epidemics in the face of overcrowding and poor sanitation. Although the hepatitis illness is usually self-limiting, it has a high mortality in pregnant women and can become a ...

  7. Hepatitis C in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    where none of the thirty-eight patients presenting with acute self-limiting sporadic non-A, non-B hepatitis tested positive for hepatitis C virus antibody.(Khuroo MS 1993) However subsequent reports have found that HCV is indeed a minor player in the wide spectrum of acute hepatitis. A study from. Delhi studied 32 patients ...

  8. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... television star Larry Hagman was diagnosed with advanced hepatitis C liver disease. He received a life-saving liver transplant in 1995 and has gone on to advocate for organ donation. Photo: AP Photo ... singer Natalie Cole was diagnosed with hepatitis C in early 2008. She is currently undergoing dialysis ...

  9. The Effect of Basal Analog Insulin on the Glycemic Variability in Type 2 Diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Cander

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of insulin detemir and glargine on glycemic variability as determined by capillary blood glucose measurements in Type 2 diabetics treated with oral antidiabetic drugs. Material and Method: A total of 64 insulin-naive type 2 diabetics with a HbA1c level of 7.5%-10% were included in the study. The patients were randomized into 3 groups according to the basal insulin analog started; Group 1 (n=22 was started on once-daily detemir, Group 2 (n=22 twice-daily detemir, and Group 3 (n=20 insulin glargine. Basal insulin doses were titrated according to the morning/evening fasting capillary blood glucose levels. Standard deviations of the 8-point intraday fasting and postprandial blood glucose values were compared. Results: The fasting blood glucose intraday standard deviation values showed an improvement of 22.4% in Group 1, 21.4% in Group 2, and 26.4% in Group 3, while the intraday standard deviation for the postprandial values showed an improvement of 14.4%, 15.2%, and 38.7%, respectively (p>0.05. The standard deviation values did not show statistical significance when the groups were compared with each other. Baseline HbA1c values and insulin doses negatively correlated with the glycemic variability. Dicussion: Basal insulin added to treatment in Type 2 diabetics provided an improvement of 14.4% to 38.7% in glycemic variability. There was no significant difference between insulin glargine and detemir regarding this effect. Turk Jem 2014; 2: 33-38

  10. Unraveling the Regulation of Hepatic Metabolism by Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titchenell, Paul M; Lazar, Mitchell A; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2017-07-01

    During insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin fails to suppress hepatic glucose production but promotes lipid synthesis leading to hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia. Defining the downstream signaling pathways underlying the control of hepatic metabolism by insulin is necessary for understanding both normal physiology and the pathogenesis of metabolic disease. We summarize recent literature highlighting the importance of both hepatic and extrahepatic mechanisms in insulin regulation of liver glucose and lipid metabolism. We posit that a failure of insulin to inappropriately regulate liver metabolism during T2DM is not exclusively from an inherent defect in canonical liver insulin signaling but is instead due to a combination of hyperinsulinemia, altered substrate supply, and the input of several extrahepatic signals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. ATF3 mediates inhibitory effects of ethanol on hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Wei; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Liu, Weiyi; Phillips, Naomi G; Sonntag, Tim; Hao, Ergeng; Lee, Soon; Hai, Tsonwin; Montminy, Marc

    2015-03-03

    Increases in circulating glucagon during fasting maintain glucose balance by stimulating hepatic gluconeogenesis. Acute ethanol intoxication promotes fasting hypoglycemia through an increase in hepatic NADH, which inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis by reducing the conversion of lactate to pyruvate. Here we show that acute ethanol exposure also lowers fasting blood glucose concentrations by inhibiting the CREB-mediated activation of the gluconeogenic program in response to glucagon. Ethanol exposure blocked the recruitment of CREB and its coactivator CRTC2 to gluconeogenic promoters by up-regulating ATF3, a transcriptional repressor that also binds to cAMP-responsive elements and thereby down-regulates gluconeogenic genes. Targeted disruption of ATF3 decreased the effects of ethanol in fasted mice and in cultured hepatocytes. These results illustrate how the induction of transcription factors with overlapping specificity can lead to cross-coupling between stress and hormone-sensitive pathways.

  12. Genotype variation in grain yield response to basal N fertilizer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    So, a field experiment was conducted at Wuxi, China, under non-basal N and basal N fertilizer conditions, to identify the variation of grain yield response to basal fertilizer among 199 rice varieties with different genetic background, and finally choose the suitable rice varieties for us to increase basal N fertilizer efficiency and ...

  13. The connectome of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Oliver; Eipert, Peter; Kettlitz, Richard; Leßmann, Felix; Wree, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The basal ganglia of the laboratory rat consist of a few core regions that are specifically interconnected by efferents and afferents of the central nervous system. In nearly 800 reports of tract-tracing investigations the connectivity of the basal ganglia is documented. The readout of connectivity data and the collation of all the connections of these reports in a database allows to generate a connectome. The collation, curation and analysis of such a huge amount of connectivity data is a great challenge and has not been performed before (Bohland et al. PloS One 4:e7200, 2009) in large connectomics projects based on meta-analysis of tract-tracing studies. Here, the basal ganglia connectome of the rat has been generated and analyzed using the consistent cross-platform and generic framework neuroVIISAS. Several advances of this connectome meta-study have been made: the collation of laterality data, the network-analysis of connectivity strengths and the assignment of regions to a hierarchically organized terminology. The basal ganglia connectome offers differences in contralateral connectivity of motoric regions in contrast to other regions. A modularity analysis of the weighted and directed connectome produced a specific grouping of regions. This result indicates a correlation of structural and functional subsystems. As a new finding, significant reciprocal connections of specific network motifs in this connectome were detected. All three principal basal ganglia pathways (direct, indirect, hyperdirect) could be determined in the connectome. By identifying these pathways it was found that there exist many further equivalent pathways possessing the same length and mean connectivity weight as the principal pathways. Based on the connectome data it is unknown why an excitation pattern may prefer principal rather than other equivalent pathways. In addition to these new findings the local graph-theoretical features of regions of the connectome have been determined. By

  14. Radiologic study of basal cell nevus syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tae Won

    1988-01-01

    Several cases of jaw cyst-basal cell nevus-bifid rib syndrome are presented. This syndrome consists principally of multiple jaw cysts, basal cell nevi, and bifid ribs but no one component is present in all patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the multiple characteristics of this syndrome and present three cases in a family and additional 4 cases. The many malformations associated with the syndrome have variable expressively. In the cases, multiple jaw cysts, pal mar and plantar pittings, bridging of sella, temporoparietal bossing, hypertelorism, cleft palate, and dystopia canthoru m have been observed.

  15. Hepatic denervation alters the transition from the fed to the food-deprived state in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M C; Pagliassotti, M J; Wasserman, D H; Goldstein, R; Asher, J; Neal, D W; Cherrington, A D

    1993-10-01

    The hepatic nerves can modulate hepatic glycogenolysis and glycogenesis and thus might be expected to be involved in the response of the animal to the transition from the fed to the food-deprived state. Therefore the arterial concentrations and net hepatic balance of glucose and its metabolites, as well as the hepatic glycogen concentrations, were compared in hepatic-innervated and -denervated dogs 18, 24 and 42 h after their usual daily meal. Arterial concentrations of glucose, alanine, lactate and glycerol; net hepatic balances of glucose, alanine and glycerol; and glycogen concentrations were similar in hepatic-innervated and -denervated dogs at each time investigated. Net hepatic balances of lactate (with negative values indicating uptake) in hepatic-innervated and -denervated dogs, respectively, were: 18 h, 4.1 +/- 4.3 vs. -4.3 +/- 3.6 mumol.kg-1 x min-1; 24 h, 4.8 +/- 3.6 vs. -6.7 +/- 1.7 mumol.kg-1 x min-1 (P < 0.05); 42 h, -7.0 +/- 2.0 vs. -6.8 +/- 1.0 mumol.kg-1 x min-1. Based on changes in net hepatic lactate balance, the denervated liver responds more rapidly to food deprivation than the innervated liver, but the metabolic state of the liver appears similar by 42 h after a meal.

  16. Measuring brain glucose phosphorylation with labeled glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brondsted, H.E.; Gjedde, A.

    1988-01-01

    This study tested whether glucose labeled at the C-6 position generates metabolites that leave brain so rapidly that C-6-labeled glucose cannot be used to measure brain glucose phosphorylation (CMRGlc). In pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, the parietal cortex uptake of [ 14 C]glucose labeled in the C-6 position was followed for times ranging from 10 s to 60 min. We subtracted the observed radioactivity from the radioactivity expected with no loss of labeled metabolites from brain by extrapolation of glucose uptake in an initial period when loss was negligible. The observed radioactivity was a monoexponentially declining function of the total radioactivity expected in the absence of metabolite loss. The constant of decline was 0.0077.min-1 for parietal cortex. Metabolites were lost from the beginning of the experiment. However, with correction for the loss of labeled metabolites, it was possible to determine an average CMRGlc between 4 and 60 min of circulation of 64 +/- 4 (SE; n = 49) mumol.hg-1.min-1

  17. Alcoholic hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard Sandahl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute inflammatory syndrome causing significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis is strongly dependent on disease severity, as assessed by clinical scoring systems. Reliable epidemiological data as well as knowledge of the clinical course of AH are essential for planning and resource allocation within the health care system. Likewise, individual evaluation of risk is desirable in the clinical handling of patients with AH as it can guide treatment, improve patient information, and serve as strata in clinical trials. The present PhD thesis is based on three studies using a cohort of nearly 2000 patients diagnosed with AH in Denmark from 1999 to 2008 as a cohort, in a population-based study design. The aims of this thesis were as follows. (1) To describe the incidence and short- and long-term mortality, of AH in Denmark (Study I). (2) To validate and compare the ability of the currently available prognostic scores to predict mortality in AH (Study II). (3) To investigate the short- and long-term causes of death of patients with AH (Study III). During the study decade, the annual incidence rate in the Danish population rose from 37 to 46 per 106 for men and from 24 to 34 per 106 for women. Both short- and long-term mortality rose for men and women, and the increase in short-term mortality was attributable to increasing patient age and prevalence of cirrhosis. Our evaluation of the most commonly used prognostic scores for predicting the mortality of patients with AH showed that all scores performed similarly, with Area under the Receiver Operator Characteristics curves giving values between 0.74 and 0.78 for 28-day mortality assessed on admission. Our study on causes of death showed that in the short-term (thesis provides novel warranted epidemiological information about AH that shows increasing incidence and mortality rates. Consequently, it reiterates the fact that AH is a life-threatening disease and suggests that AH is an

  18. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  19. Effect of extradural blockage upon glucose and urea kinetics in surgical patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J.H.; Galler, L.; Holdaway, I.M.; Holdaway, C.M.

    1987-09-01

    We have determined the metabolic effects induced by the use of extradural blockage with 0.5 per cent bupivacaine hydrochloride in a group of surgical patients. Turnover rates of glucose and urea were determined isotopically using radioisotopes and studies were performed both in the basal state and during total parenteral nutrition. In the basal state, extradural blockade resulted in a decrease in the turnover rates of both glucose and urea. In addition, when extradural blockade was instituted while the patients were receiving total parenteral nutrition, there was also a significant fall in glucose turnover. We conclude that the use of extradural blockade is effective as a means of conserving bodily resources in surgical patients both in the basal state and during total parenteral nutrition.

  20. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ...

  1. Biostable glucose permeable polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A new biostable glucose permeable polymer has been developed which is useful, for example, in implantable glucose sensors. This biostable glucose permeable polymer has a number of advantageous characteristics and, for example, does not undergo hydrolytic cleavage and degradation, thereby providing...... a composition that facilitates long term sensor stability in vivo. The versatile characteristics of this polymer allow it to be used in a variety of contexts, for example to form the body of an implantable glucose sensor. The invention includes the polymer composition, sensor systems formed from this polymer...

  2. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ...

  3. Association of Basal hyperglucagonemia with impaired glucagon counterregulation in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhy, Leon S; Chan, Alice; Breton, Marc D; Anderson, Stacey M; Kovatchev, Boris P; McCall, Anthony L

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon counterregulation (GCR) protects against hypoglycemia, but is impaired in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). A model-based analysis of in vivo animal data predicts that the GCR defects are linked to basal hyperglucagonemia. To test this hypothesis we studied the relationship between basal glucagon (BasG) and the GCR response to hypoglycemia in 29 hyperinsulinemic clamps in T1DM patients. Glucose levels were stabilized in euglycemia and then steadily lowered to 50 mg/dL. Glucagon was measured before induction of hypoglycemia and at 10 min intervals after glucose reached levels below 70 mg/dL. GCR was assessed by CumG, the cumulative glucagon levels above basal; MaxG, the maximum glucagon response; and RIG, the relative increase in glucagon over basal. Analysis of the results was performed with our mathematical model of GCR. The model describes interactions between islet peptides and glucose, reproduces the normal GCR axis and its impairment in diabetes. It was used to identify a control mechanism consistent with the observed link between BasG and GCR. Analysis of the clinical data showed that higher BasG was associated with lower GCR response. In particular, CumG and RIG correlated negatively with BasG (r = -0.46, p = 0.012 and r = -0.74, p model of GCR in which the secretion of glucagon has two components. The first is under (auto) feedback control and drives a pulsatile GCR and the second is feedback independent (basal secretion) and its increase suppresses the GCR. Our simulations showed that this model explains the observed relationships between BasG and GCR during a three-fold simulated increase in BasG. Our findings support the hypothesis that basal hyperglucagonemia contributes to the GCR impairment in T1DM and show that the predictive power of our GCR animal model applies to human pathophysiology in T1DM.

  4. Effects of hypopituitarism and growth hormone replacement therapy on the production and utilization of glucose in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougneres, P F; Artavia-Loria, E; Ferre, P; Chaussain, J L; Job, J C

    1985-12-01

    Glucose metabolism during fasting was investigated in 10 children aged 1.5 month-11.5 yr with deficiency of GH with or without other pituitary hormone deficiencies. After 10-16 h of fasting, mean plasma glucose was 56 +/- 4 (SEM) mg/dl, the result of decreased hepatic production of glucose (3.3 +/- 0.3 mg kg-1 min-1) insufficient to match glucose utilization (3.6 +/- 0.4 mg kg-1 min-1). The diminution of plasma glucose and of glucose production was similar whether ACTH deficiency was present (3.2 +/- mg kg-1 min-1) or not (3.5 +/- 0.6 mg kg-1 min-1). These results indicate that the lack of GH was the primary cause of hypoglycemia. Fasting plasma alanine (212 +/- 41 mumol/liter) and lactate (1222 +/- 136 mumol/liter), the main gluconeogenic substrates, were normal and did not correlate with the decrease of hepatic glucose release. Both plasma FFA (552 +/- 35 microM) and beta-hydroxybutyrate (654 +/- 158 microM) were in the low normal range, and neither correlated with the rate of glucose utilization. hGH replacement therapy resulted in a normalization of fasting plasma glucose concentration (78.5 +/- 6 mg/dl, P less than 0.005) and hepatic glucose production (6.1 +/- 1.2 mg kg-1 min-1). No significant changes occurred in the plasma concentrations of gluconeogenic or lipid substrates. These results, together with the known stimulatory effects of GH on carbohydrate-induced insulin secretion and storage of hepatic glycogen, suggest that the changes in glucose production in untreated and GH treated patients reflect the degree of hepatic glycogen replenishment.

  5. Proximity Interactions among Basal Body Components in Trypanosoma brucei Identify Novel Regulators of Basal Body Biogenesis and Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Quang Dang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The basal body shares similar architecture with centrioles in animals and is involved in nucleating flagellar axonemal microtubules in flagellated eukaryotes. The early-branching Trypanosoma brucei possesses a motile flagellum nucleated from the basal body that consists of a mature basal body and an adjacent pro-basal body. Little is known about the basal body proteome and its roles in basal body biogenesis and flagellar axoneme assembly in T. brucei. Here, we report the identification of 14 conserved centriole/basal body protein homologs and 25 trypanosome-specific basal body proteins. These proteins localize to distinct subdomains of the basal body, and several of them form a ring-like structure surrounding the basal body barrel. Functional characterization of representative basal body proteins revealed distinct roles in basal body duplication/separation and flagellar axoneme assembly. Overall, this work identified novel proteins required for basal body duplication and separation and uncovered new functions of conserved basal body proteins in basal body duplication and separation, highlighting an unusual mechanism of basal body biogenesis and inheritance in this early divergent eukaryote.

  6. Induced resistance: an enhancement of basal resistance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. de; Robben, C.; Pelt, J.A. van; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Upon primary pathogen attack, plants activate resistance mechanisms at the site of infection. Besides this so-called basal resistance, plants have also the ability to enhance their defensive capacity against future pathogen attack. There are at least two types of biologically induced resistance.

  7. Basal Cell Carcinoma in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Flohil (Sophie)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThere are many different cutaneous malignancies, but malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represent approximately 98% of all skin cancers.In literature, these three skin cancers are often divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers

  8. Adhesion molecule expression in basal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegh, M.; Beljaards, R.; Veraart, J.; Hoekzema, R.; Neumann, M.

    1998-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are frequently associated with a peritumoral mononuclear infiltrate. Until now, the function of this inflammatory infiltrate and its possible role in the control of tumor growth is unclear. Mechanisms controlling endothelial and target cell adhesiveness for leukocytes

  9. TEMPORAL VARIABILITY IN BASAL ISOPRENE EMISSION FACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seasonal variability in basal isoprene emission factor (micrograms C /g hr or nmol/ m2 sec, leaf temperature at 30 degrees C and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) at 1000 micromol/ m2 sec) was studied during the 1998 growing season at Duke Forest in the North Carolina Pie...

  10. Optical coherence tomography of basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yücel, D.; Themstrup, L.; Manfredi, Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most prevalent malignancy in Caucasians. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging technology using the principle of interferometry. OCT has shown a great potential in diagnosing, monitoring, and follow-up of BCC. So far most...

  11. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  12. Panoramic study of mandibular basal bone height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raviraj Jayam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To provide information regarding the changes of mandibular basal bone height using panoramic radiography, in relation to age, sex, and the state of dentulousness, which could be utilized in clinical practice, especially in implantology and pre-prosthetic surgery. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 subjects, who were categorized according to age, sex, and state of dentulousness, were subjected to vertical measurements of mandibular basal bone in panoramic radiographs. Two measurements were made, D 1 and D 2 . The distance measured between the lower border of mental foramen to the lower border of the mandible was termed as D 1 . The distance between the lowest point of mandibular canal to the lower border of the mandible was termed as D 2 . These measurements were compared between males/females and dentulous/edentulous, which were further subjected to statistical analysis with Student′s t-test. Results: Males had higher D 1 and D 2 values compared to females and edentulous groups had higher D 1 and D 2 values compared to dentulous subjects. Conclusions: Men have higher values of mandibular basal bone height compared to females and also that there exists some potential for mandibular basal bone to increase in height as the age progresses.

  13. Basal Cell Carcinoma: 10 Years of Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigna, E.; Tarallo, M.; Maruccia, M.; Sorvillo, V.; Pollastrini, A.; Scuderi, N.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a locally invasive malignant epidermal tumour. Incidence is increasing by 10% per year; incidence of metastases is minimal, but relapses are frequent (40%-50%). The complete excision of the BCC allows reduction of relapse. Materials and Methods. The study cohort consists of 1123 patients underwent surgery for basal cell carcinoma between 1999 and 2009. Patient and tumor characteristics recorded are: age; gender; localization (head and neck, trunk, and upper and lower extremities), tumor size, excisional margins adopted, and relapses. Results. The study considered a group of 1123 patients affected by basal cell carcinoma. Relapses occurred in 30 cases (2,67%), 27 out of 30 relapses occurred in noble areas, where peripheral margin was <3mm. Incompletely excised basal cell carcinoma occurred in 21 patients (1,87%) and were treated with an additional excision. Discussion. Although guidelines indicate 3mm peripheral margin of excision in BCC <2cm, in our experience, a margin of less than 5mm results in a high risk of incomplete excisions

  14. Apico-basal polarity complex and cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Loss of cell polarity is a hallmark for carcinoma, and its underlying molecular mechanism is beginning to emerge from studies on model organisms and cancer cell lines. Moreover, deregulated expression of apico-basal polarity complex components has been reported in human tumours. In this review, we provide an ...

  15. Neglected basal cell carcinoma on scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant basal cell carcinoma (BCC is a very rare entity. Usually, they occur due to the negligence of the patient. Local or distant metastasis is present in most cases. Here, we present a case of giant BCC that clinically resembled squamous cell carcinoma and demonstrated no metastasis at presentation.

  16. Apico-basal polarity complex and cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Apico-basal polarity is a cardinal molecular feature of adult eukaryotic epithelial cells and appears to be involved in several key cellular processes including polarized cell migration and maintenance of tissue architecture. Epithelial cell polarity is maintained by three well-conserved polarity complexes, namely, PAR, Crumbs ...

  17. Heterogeneity of limbal basal epithelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Yasutaka; Li, Wei; Chen, Ying-Ting; He, Hua; Chen, Szu-yu; Kheirkah, Ahmad; Zhu, Ying-Tien; Matsumoto, Yukihiro; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2010-11-01

    Although corneal epithelial stem cells (SCs) are located at the limbus between the cornea and the conjunctiva, not all limbal basal epithelial cells are SCs. Using 2 dispase digestions to remove different amounts of limbal basal epithelial cells for cross-sections, flat mounts, and cytospin preparations, double immunostaining to pancytokeratins (PCK) and vimentin (Vim) identified 3 p63+ epithelial progenitors such as PCK-/Vim+, PCK/Vim, and PCK-/Vim+ and 1 p63+ mesenchymal cell, PCK-/Vim+. PCK-/Vim- progenitors had the smallest cell size were 10-20 times more enriched on collagen I-coated dishes in the 5-minute rapid adherent fraction that contained the highest percentage of p63+ cells but the lowest percentage of cytokeratin12+ cells, and gave rise to high Ki67 labeling and vivid clonal growth. In contrast, PCK+/Vim+ and PCK+/Vim- progenitors were found more in the slow-adherent fraction and yielded poor clonal growth. PCK/Vim progenitors and clusters of PCK-/Vim+ mesenchymal cells, which were neither melanocytes nor Langerhans cells, were located in the limbal basal region. Therefore, differential expression of PCK and Vim helps identify small PCK-/Vim- cells as the most likely candidate for SCs among a hierarchy of heterogeneous limbal basal progenitors, and their close association with PCK-/Vim+ presumed "niche" cells.

  18. [Parotid basal cell adenoma of membranous type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah-Klibi, Faten; Ferchiou, Malek; Kourda, Jihène; El Amine, Olfa; Ferjaoui, Mohamed; Ben Jilani, Sarrah; Zermani, Rachida

    2009-02-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a rare benign neoplasm characterized by the basaloid appearance of the tumour cells and the lack of myxo-chondroid stromal component present in pleomorphic adenoma. We report a case of basal cell adenoma of membranous type, highly suspected of malignancy because of the presence of mediastinal lymph nodes and pulmonary nodules which finally were related to an associated sarcoidosis. Our patient was an 80-year-old woman who presented a swelling of the right parotid two years ago. The clinical examination revealed a solid, indolent and mobile mass. A chest radiography noted mediastinal lymph nodes. The CT-scan confirmed the presence of mediastinal and tracheal lymph nodes with pulmonary nodules. So the diagnosis of metastatic malignant salivary gland tumor was suspected. Finally, the histological examination concluded to a basal cell adenoma of membranous type with sarcoidosis granulomas in the parotid and in the lymph nodes. The BCA is a benign tumor located generally in the parotid gland. When the malignancy is suspected, like in our case, this tumor must be differentiated from the basal cell adenocarcinoma using histological criteria.

  19. Phytanic acid stimulates glucose uptake in a model of skeletal muscles, the primary porcine myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Che, Brita Ngum; Oksbjerg, Niels; Hellgren, Lars

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Phytanic acid (PA) is a chlorophyll metabolite with potentials in regulating glucose metabolism, as it is a natural ligand of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) that is known to regulate hepatic glucose homeostasis. This study aimed to establish primary...... and tritiated 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) was used to measure glucose uptake, in relation to PA and 2-DOG exposure times and also in relation to PA and insulin concentrations. The MIXED procedure model of SAS was used for statistical analysis of data. RESULTS: PA increased glucose uptake by approximately 35...

  20. Changes in blood glucose and insulin responses to intravenous glucose tolerance tests and blood biochemical values in adult female Japanese black bears (Ursus thibetanus japonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamine, Akari; Shimozuru, Michito; Shibata, Haruki; Tsubota, Toshio

    2012-02-01

    The metabolic mechanisms to circannual changes in body mass of bears have yet to be elucidated. We hypothesized that the Japanese black bear (Ursus thibetanus japonicus) has a metabolic mechanism that efficiently converts carbohydrates into body fat by altering insulin sensitivity during the hyperphagic stage before hibernation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the changes in blood biochemical values and glucose and insulin responses to intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT) during the active season (August, early and late November). Four, adult, female bears (5-17 years old) were anesthetized with 6 mg/kg TZ (tiletamine HCl and zolazepam HCl) in combination with 0.1 mg/kg acepromazine maleate. The bears were injected intravenously with glucose (0.5 g/kg of body mass), and blood samples were obtained before, at, and intermittently after glucose injection. The basal triglycerides concentration decreased significantly with increase in body mass from August to November. Basal levels of plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations were not significantly different among groups. The results of IVGTT demonstrated the increased peripheral insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in early November. In contrast, peripheral insulin resistance was indicated by the exaggerated insulin response in late November. Our findings suggest that bears shift their glucose and lipid metabolism from the stage of normal activity to the hyperphagic stage in which they show lipogenic-predominant metabolism and accelerate glucose uptake by increasing the peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  1. The Acute Effects of Low-Dose TNF-α on Glucose Metabolism and β-Cell Function in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, Tobias; Fischer, Christian Philip; Plomgaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    , nondiabetic young men (n = 10) during a 4-hour basal period followed by an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). TNF-α lowered insulin levels by 12% during the basal period (P .... Compared to placebo, TNF-α did not affect EGP during the basal period. Our results indicate that TNF-α acutely lowers basal plasma insulin levels but does not impair GSIS. The mechanisms behind this are unknown but we suggest that it may be due to TNF-α increasing clearance of insulin from plasma without...

  2. Basal C-peptide Level as a Surrogate Marker of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Tae Kim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRecent studies have revealed that C-peptide induces smooth muscle cell proliferation and causes human atherosclerotic lesions in diabetic patients. The present study was designed to examine whether the basal C-peptide levels correlate with cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients.MethodsData was obtained from 467 patients with T2DM from two institutions who were followed for four years. The medical findings of all patients were reviewed, and patients with creatinine >1.4 mg/dL, any inflammation or infection, hepatitis, or type 1 DM were excluded. The relationships between basal C-peptide and other clinical values were statistically analyzed.ResultsA simple correlation was found between basal C-peptide and components of metabolic syndrome (MS. Statistically basal C-peptide levels were significantly higher than the three different MS criteria used in the present study, the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III of the National Cholesterol Education Program's (NCEP's, World Health Organization (WHO, and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria (NCEP-ATP III, P=0.001; IDF, P<0.001; WHO, P=0.029. The multiple regression analysis between intima-media thickness (IMT and clinical values showed that basal C-peptide significantly correlated with IMT (P=0.043, while the analysis between the 10-year coronary heart disease risk by the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine and clinical values showed that basal C-peptide did not correlate with IMT (P=0.226.ConclusionBasal C-peptide is related to cardiovascular predictors (IMT of T2DM, suggesting that basal C-peptide does provide a further indication of cardiovascular disease.

  3. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Carbs Count Glycemic Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And Stay Fit Types ... the following: High blood glucose High levels of sugar in the ... Part of managing your diabetes is checking your blood glucose often. Ask your ...

  4. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page ... and-how-tos, . In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Testing Checking Your Blood ...

  5. Blood Test: Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth / For Parents / Blood Test: Glucose What's ... español Análisis de sangre: glucosa What Is a Blood Test? A blood test is when a sample of ...

  6. Glut-1 Expression Correlates with Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Yaser R; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Semaan, Assaad; Ahmed, Quratulain; Albashiti, Bassam; Jazaerly, Tarek; Nahleh, Zeina; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba

    2011-12-01

    Glucose transporter 1 (Glut-1) is a facilitative glucose transporter expressed in many cancers including breast cancer. Basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) is a high-risk disease associated with poor prognosis and lacks the benefit of targeted therapy. The aim of this study was to characterize the immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of Glut-1 in patients with BLBC compared with non-BLBC. We identified 523 cases of invasive breast carcinoma from our database. The clinicopathologic findings and the biologic markers including estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) status were reviewed. IHC stains for cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), p53, and Glut-1 were performed on tissue microarray using standard procedures. BLBC was defined as ER-,PR-, Her2-, and CK5/6+ and/or EGFR+. Of informative cases, 14.7% were categorized as BLBC versus 85.3% as non-BLBC. Glut-1 was expressed in 42 (76.4%) of 55 BLBCs, whereas only 55 (23.8%) of 231 non-BLBCs showed immunostaining for Glut-1 (P Glut-1 expression was significantly associated with high histologic grade, ER negativity, PR negativity, CK5/6 positivity, EGFR expression, and high p53 expression (P Glut-1 immunostaining and patient's outcome. Our results show that Glut-1 is significantly associated with BLBC and might be a potential therapeutic target for this aggressive subgroup of breast cancer, and this warrants further investigations.

  7. Bezafibrate ameliorates diabetes via reduced steatosis and improved hepatic insulin sensitivity in diabetic TallyHo mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Franko

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Our data showed that BEZ ameliorates diabetes probably via reduced steatosis, enhanced hepatic mitochondrial mass, improved metabolic flexibility and elevated hepatic insulin sensitivity in TallyHo mice, suggesting that BEZ treatment could be beneficial for patients with NAFLD and impaired glucose metabolism.

  8. Activity of the basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease estimated by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohye, Chihiro

    1995-01-01

    Positron emission tomographic (PET) studies on the local cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolic rate, glucose metabolic rate in the basal ganglia of Parkinson's disease are reviewed. PET has demonstrated that blood flow was decreased in the cerebral cortex, especially the frontal region, of Parkinson's disease and that specific change in blood flow or metabolic rate in the basal ganglia was detected only in patients with hemi-parkinsonism. In authors' study on PET using 18 FDG in patients with tremor type and rigid type Parkinson's disease, changes in blood flow and metabolic rate were minimal at the basal ganglia level in tremor type patients, but cortical blood flow was decreased and metabolic rate was more elevated in the basal ganglia in rigid type patients. These findings were correlated with depth micro-recordings obtained by stereotactic pallidotomy. PET studies have also revealed that activity in the nerve terminal was decreased with decreasing dopamine and that dopamine (mainly D 2 ) activity was remarkably increased. PET studies with specific tracers are promising in providing more accurate information about functional state of living human brain with minimal invasion to patients. (N.K.)

  9. Nanomaterials in glucose sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Burugapalli, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    The smartness of nano-materials is attributed to their nanoscale and subsequently unique physicochemical properties and their use in glucose sensing has been aimed at improving performance, reducing cost and miniaturizing the sensor and its associated instrumentation. So far, portable (handheld) glucose analysers were introduced for hospital wards, emergency rooms and physicians' offices; single-use strip systems achieved nanolitre sampling for painless and accurate home glucose monitoring; advanced continuous monitoring devices having 2 to 7 days operating life are in clinical and home use; and continued research efforts are being made to develop and introduce increasingly advanced glucose monitoring systems for health as well as food, biotechnology, cell and tissue culture industries. Nanomaterials have touched every aspect of biosensor design and this chapter reviews their role in the development of advanced technologies for glucose sensing, and especially for diabetes. Research shows that overall, nanomat...

  10. Hepatitis viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma. Michael C. Kew. Of the hepatitis viruses that have been identified and their pathological consequences characterised, three - hepatitis. B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis D virus. (HDV) - have been implicated as risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ...

  11. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M'rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy.

  12. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Sensors: Past, Present and Future Algorithmic Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Facchinetti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM sensors are portable devices that allow measuring and visualizing the glucose concentration in real time almost continuously for several days and are provided with hypo/hyperglycemic alerts and glucose trend information. CGM sensors have revolutionized Type 1 diabetes (T1D management, improving glucose control when used adjunctively to self-monitoring blood glucose systems. Furthermore, CGM devices have stimulated the development of applications that were impossible to create without a continuous-time glucose signal, e.g., real-time predictive alerts of hypo/hyperglycemic episodes based on the prediction of future glucose concentration, automatic basal insulin attenuation methods for hypoglycemia prevention, and the artificial pancreas. However, CGM sensors’ lack of accuracy and reliability limited their usability in the clinical practice, calling upon the academic community for the development of suitable signal processing methods to improve CGM performance. The aim of this paper is to review the past and present algorithmic challenges of CGM sensors, to show how they have been tackled by our research group, and to identify the possible future ones.

  13. CNC-bZIP protein Nrf1-dependent regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongzhi; Fu, Jingqi; Xue, Peng; Zhao, Rui; Dong, Jian; Liu, Dianxin; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Tong, Qingchun; Teng, Weiping; Qu, Weidong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E; Pi, Jingbo

    2015-04-01

    The inability of pancreatic β-cells to secrete sufficient insulin in response to glucose stimulation is a major contributing factor to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We investigated both the in vitro and in vivo effects of deficiency of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 1 (Nrf1) in β-cells on β-cell function and glucose homeostasis. Silencing of Nrf1 in β-cells leads to a pre-T2D phenotype with disrupted glucose metabolism and impaired insulin secretion. Specifically, MIN6 β-cells with stable knockdown of Nrf1 (Nrf1-KD) and isolated islets from β-cell-specific Nrf1-knockout [Nrf1(b)-KO] mice displayed impaired glucose responsiveness, including elevated basal insulin release and decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Nrf1(b)-KO mice exhibited severe fasting hyperinsulinemia, reduced GSIS, and glucose intolerance. Silencing of Nrf1 in MIN6 cells resulted in oxidative stress and altered glucose metabolism, with increases in both glucose uptake and aerobic glycolysis, which is associated with the elevated basal insulin release and reduced glucose responsiveness. The elevated glycolysis and reduced glucose responsiveness due to Nrf1 silencing likely result from altered expression of glucose metabolic enzymes, with induction of high-affinity hexokinase 1 and suppression of low-affinity glucokinase. Our study demonstrated a novel role of Nrf1 in regulating glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in β-cells and characterized Nrf1 as a key transcription factor that regulates the coupling of glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism and GSIS. Nrf1 plays critical roles in regulating glucose metabolism, mitochondrial function, and insulin secretion, suggesting that Nrf1 may be a novel target to improve the function of insulin-secreting β-cells.

  14. Glucose metabolism during fasting is altered in experimental porphobilinogen deaminase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collantes, María; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Benito, Marina; Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Delgado, Mercedes; Vinaixa, María; Sampedro, Ana; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Prieto, Elena; Pozo, Miguel A; Peñuelas, Iván; Corrales, Fernando J; Barajas, Miguel; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) haploinsufficiency (acute intermittent porphyria, AIP) is characterized by neurovisceral attacks when hepatic heme synthesis is activated by endogenous or environmental factors including fasting. While the molecular mechanisms underlying the nutritional regulation of hepatic heme synthesis have been described, glucose homeostasis during fasting is poorly understood in porphyria. Our study aimed to analyse glucose homeostasis and hepatic carbohydrate metabolism during fasting in PBGD-deficient mice. To determine the contribution of hepatic PBGD deficiency to carbohydrate metabolism, AIP mice injected with a PBGD-liver gene delivery vector were included. After a 14 h fasting period, serum and liver metabolomics analyses showed that wild-type mice stimulated hepatic glycogen degradation to maintain glucose homeostasis while AIP livers activated gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis due to their inability to use stored glycogen. The serum of fasted AIP mice showed increased concentrations of insulin and reduced glucagon levels. Specific over-expression of the PBGD protein in the liver tended to normalize circulating insulin and glucagon levels, stimulated hepatic glycogen catabolism and blocked ketone body production. Reduced glucose uptake was observed in the primary somatosensorial brain cortex of fasted AIP mice, which could be reversed by PBGD-liver gene delivery. In conclusion, AIP mice showed a different response to fasting as measured by altered carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and modified glucose consumption in the brain cortex. Glucose homeostasis in fasted AIP mice was efficiently normalized after restoration of PBGD gene expression in the liver. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Resolving futile glucose cycling and glycogenolytic contributions to plasma glucose levels following a glucose load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunes, P.M.; Jarak, I.; Heerschap, A.; Jones, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: After a glucose load, futile glucose/glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) cycling (FGC) generates [2-(2) H]glucose from (2) H2 O thereby mimicking a paradoxical glycogenolytic contribution to plasma glucose levels. Contributions of load and G6P derived from gluconeogenesis, FGC, and glycogenolysis to

  16. Uptake and release of glucose by the human kidney. Postabsorptive rates and responses to epinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumvoll, M; Chintalapudi, U; Perriello, G; Welle, S; Gutierrez, O; Gerich, J

    1995-11-01

    Despite ample evidence that the kidney can both produce and use appreciable amounts of glucose, the human kidney is generally regarded as playing a minor role in glucose homeostasis. This view is based on measurements of arteriorenal vein glucose concentrations indicating little or no net release of glucose. However, inferences from net balance measurements do not take into consideration the simultaneous release and uptake of glucose by the kidney. Therefore, to assess the contribution of release and uptake of glucose by the human kidney to overall entry and removal of plasma glucose, we used a combination of balance and isotope techniques to measure renal glucose net balance, fractional extraction, uptake and release as well as overall plasma glucose appearance and disposal in 10 normal volunteers under basal postabsorptive conditions and during a 3-h epinephrine infusion. In the basal postabsorptive state, there was small but significant net output of glucose by the kidney (66 +/- 22 mumol.min-1, P = 0.016). However, since renal glucose fractional extraction averaged 2.9 +/- 0.3%, there was considerable renal glucose uptake (2.3 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1) which accounted for 20.2 +/- 1.7% of systemic glucose disposal (11.4 +/- 0.5 mumol.kg-1.min-1). Renal glucose release (3.2 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1) accounted for 27.8 +/- 2.1% of systemic glucose appearance (11.4 +/- 0.5 mumol.kg-1.min-1). Epinephrine infusion, which increased plasma epinephrine to levels observed during hypoglycemia (3722 +/- 453 pmol/liter) increased renal glucose release nearly twofold (5.2 +/- 0.5 vs 2.8 +/- 0.1 mol.kg-1.min-1, P = 0.01) so that at the end of the infusion, renal glucose release accounted for 40.3 +/- 5.5% of systemic glucose appearance and essentially all of the increase in systemic glucose appearance. These observations suggest an important role for the human kidney in glucose homeostasis.

  17. Hepatitis isquémica Ischemic hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Amuchástegui (h

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available La hepatitis isquémica es una complicación sumamente infrecuente de cirugía cardiovascular. Las biopsias muestran necrosis centrolobulillar. El término de "hepatitis" fue propuesto debido al aumento de transaminasas similar a aquellas de origen infeccioso, e "isquémica" por falla en la perfusión hepática. Posteriormente se definió el término de hepatitis isquémica como cuadro de elevación aguda y reversible (dentro de las 72 horas de transaminasas de hasta 20 veces el valor normal, asociado a trastornos en la perfusión hepática, luego de haber excluido otras causas de hepatitis aguda o daño hepatocelular. Se describe el caso de un paciente de 53 años que consulta por dolor epigástrico de 12 h de evolución sin fiebre, náuseas ni vómitos, resistente a la medicación. Tenía antecedentes inmediatos de reemplazo de válvula aórtica, y estaba anticoagulado. Evolucionó con shock y fallo multiorgánico. El examen evidenció marcada ictericia y signos de taponamiento pericárdico, asociado a un aumento considerable de enzimas hepáticas. Un ecocardiograma informó signos de taponamiento cardíaco y ausencia de disección aórtica. Se decidió pericardiocentesis, extrayéndose 970 cc. de líquido sanguinolento, y hemodiálisis, con notable mejoría de su estado hemodinámico. Los valores enzimáticos disminuyeron. Los marcadores virales fueron negativos.Ischemic hepatitis is an uncommon cardiovascular surgery complication. Hepatic biopsies show centrolobulillar necrosis. The term "hepatitis" was proposed because of a raise in hepatic enzymes similar with infectious disease, and "ischemic" because of failure in hepatic perfusion. Ischemic hepatitis was then defined as an acute and reversible elevation of hepatic enzymes (within 72 h, associated with disturbance in hepatic perfusion after excluding other causes of acute hepatitis. A 53 year-old male presented complaining of a 12 h epigastric pain, without nausea or vomiting, resistant

  18. Implanted electroenzymatic glucose sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, L C; Duggan, C A

    1982-01-01

    The advent of electrochemical sensors for intermittent sampling of blood gases and hydrogen ions in the clinic, intensive care, and surgical units has revolutionized diagnostic and critical care medical technics. The use of electrochemical sensors for continuous transcutaneous monitoring of blood gases is further enhancing the medical surveillance of patients. The more recent introduction of glucose and other electroenzymatic sensors has stimulated broad research in the development of metabolic monitoring. For the present research, the glucose sensor widely used for the rapid specific micro-analysis of whole blood and plasma is explored for possible use as an in vivo intravascular or tissue-implanted sensor. This sensor is based on the polarographic measurement of hydrogen peroxide generated by glucose oxidase (EC 1.1.3.4) held between two membranes. The first membrane allows the diffusion of glucose, ions, and many other small molecules, while the second membrane allows the diffusion of the glucose-generated hydrogen peroxide to the platinum surface, but excludes ascorbic acid, bilirubin, and uric acid. Such sensors respond rapidly and specifically when acutely implanted subcutaneously in cats and dogs. They function well as glucose-sensor-tipped venous catheters. One sensor was repeatedly used for in vitro polarograms, subcutaneous and blood glucose monitoring, over a period of ten months, with storage in the cold between uses, with the complete retention of its response characteristics.

  19. Learning Reward Uncertainty in the Basal Ganglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Mikhael

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning the reliability of different sources of rewards is critical for making optimal choices. However, despite the existence of detailed theory describing how the expected reward is learned in the basal ganglia, it is not known how reward uncertainty is estimated in these circuits. This paper presents a class of models that encode both the mean reward and the spread of the rewards, the former in the difference between the synaptic weights of D1 and D2 neurons, and the latter in their sum. In the models, the tendency to seek (or avoid options with variable reward can be controlled by increasing (or decreasing the tonic level of dopamine. The models are consistent with the physiology of and synaptic plasticity in the basal ganglia, they explain the effects of dopaminergic manipulations on choices involving risks, and they make multiple experimental predictions.

  20. Common Standards of Basal Insulin Titration in T2DM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnolds, Sabine; Heise, Tim; Flacke, Frank; Sieber, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus has become a worldwide major health problem, and the number of people affected is steadily increasing. Thus, not all patients suffering from the disease can be treated by specialized diabetes centers or outpatient clinics, but by primary care physicians. The latter, however, might have time constraints and have to deal with many kinds of diseases or with multimorbid patients, so their focus is not so much on lowering high blood glucose values. Thus, the physicians, as well as the patients themselves, are often reluctant to initiate and adjust insulin therapy, although basal insulin therapy is considered the appropriate strategy after oral antidiabetic drug failure, according to the latest international guidelines. A substantial number of clinical studies have shown that insulin initiation and optimization can be managed successfully by using titration algorithms—even in cases where patients themselves are the drivers of insulin titration. Nevertheless, tools and strategies are needed to facilitate this process in the daily life of both primary health care professionals and patients with diabetes. PMID:23759411