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Sample records for basal epithelial cells

  1. CAMSAP3 orients the apical-to-basal polarity of microtubule arrays in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toya, Mika; Kobayashi, Saeko; Kawasaki, Miwa; Shioi, Go; Kaneko, Mari; Ishiuchi, Takashi; Misaki, Kazuyo; Meng, Wenxiang; Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2016-01-12

    Polarized epithelial cells exhibit a characteristic array of microtubules that are oriented along the apicobasal axis of the cells. The minus-ends of these microtubules face apically, and the plus-ends face toward the basal side. The mechanisms underlying this epithelial-specific microtubule assembly remain unresolved, however. Here, using mouse intestinal cells and human Caco-2 cells, we show that the microtubule minus-end binding protein CAMSAP3 (calmodulin-regulated-spectrin-associated protein 3) plays a pivotal role in orienting the apical-to-basal polarity of microtubules in epithelial cells. In these cells, CAMSAP3 accumulated at the apical cortices, and tethered the longitudinal microtubules to these sites. Camsap3 mutation or depletion resulted in a random orientation of these microtubules; concomitantly, the stereotypic positioning of the nucleus and Golgi apparatus was perturbed. In contrast, the integrity of the plasma membrane was hardly affected, although its structural stability was decreased. Further analysis revealed that the CC1 domain of CAMSAP3 is crucial for its apical localization, and that forced mislocalization of CAMSAP3 disturbs the epithelial architecture. These findings demonstrate that apically localized CAMSAP3 determines the proper orientation of microtubules, and in turn that of organelles, in mature mammalian epithelial cells. PMID:26715742

  2. Airway basal stem cells: a perspective on their roles in epithelial homeostasis and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Jason R; Randell, Scott H; Hogan, Brigid L M

    2010-01-01

    The small airways of the human lung undergo pathological changes in pulmonary disorders, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiolitis obliterans and cystic fibrosis. These clinical problems impose huge personal and societal healthcare burdens. The changes, termed 'pathological airway remodeling', affect the epithelium, the underlying mesenchyme and the reciprocal trophic interactions that occur between these tissues. Most of the normal human airway is lined by a pseudostratified epithelium of ciliated cells, secretory cells and 6-30% basal cells, the proportion of which varies along the proximal-distal axis. Epithelial abnormalities range from hypoplasia (failure to differentiate) to basal- and goblet-cell hyperplasia, squamous- and goblet-cell metaplasia, dysplasia and malignant transformation. Mesenchymal alterations include thickening of the basal lamina, smooth muscle hyperplasia, fibrosis and inflammatory cell accumulation. Paradoxically, given the prevalence and importance of airway remodeling in lung disease, its etiology is poorly understood. This is due, in part, to a lack of basic knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate the differentiation, maintenance and repair of the airway epithelium. Specifically, little is known about the proliferation and differentiation of basal cells, a multipotent stem cell population of the pseudostratified airway epithelium. This Perspective summarizes what we know, and what we need to know, about airway basal cells to evaluate their contributions to normal and abnormal airway remodeling. We contend that exploiting well-described model systems using both human airway epithelial cells and the pseudostratified epithelium of the genetically tractable mouse trachea will enable crucial discoveries regarding the pathogenesis of airway disease. PMID:20699479

  3. Epithelial basal cells are distinct from dendritic cells and macrophages in the mouse epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Winnie W; Smith, Tegan B; Cortez-Retamozo, Virna; Grigoryeva, Lubov S; Roy, Jeremy W; Hill, Eric; Pittet, Mikael J; Breton, Sylvie; Da Silva, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    The epithelium that lines the epididymal duct establishes the optimal milieu in which spermatozoa mature, acquire motility, and are stored. This finely tuned environment also protects antigenic sperm against pathogens and autoimmunity, which are potential causes of transient or permanent infertility. The epididymal epithelium is pseudostratified and contains basal cells (BCs) that are located beneath other epithelial cells. Previous studies showed that in the mouse epididymis, BCs possess macrophage-like characteristics. However, we previously identified a dense population of cells belonging to the mononuclear phagocyte (MP) system (comprised of macrophages and dendritic cells) in the basal compartment of the mouse epididymis and showed that a subset of MPs express the macrophage marker F4/80. In the present study, we evaluate the distribution of BCs and MPs in the epididymis of transgenic CD11c-EYFP mice, in which EYFP is expressed exclusively in MPs, using antibodies against the BC marker keratin 5 (KRT5) and the macrophage marker F4/80. Immunofluorescence labeling for laminin, a basement membrane marker, showed that BCs and most MPs are located in the basal region of the epithelium. Confocal microscopy showed that in the initial segment, both BCs and MPs project intraepithelial extensions and establish a very intricate network. Flow cytometry experiments demonstrated that epididymal MPs and BCs are phenotypically distinct. BCs do not express F4/80, and MPs do not express KRT5. Therefore, despite their proximity and some morphological similarities with peritubular macrophages and dendritic cells, BCs do not belong to the MP system. PMID:24648397

  4. Expression of p75NGFR, a Proliferative and Basal Cell Marker, in the Buccal Mucosa Epithelium during Re-epithelialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the expression of p75NGFR, a proliferative and basal cell marker, in the mouse buccal mucosa epithelium during wound healing in order to elucidate the role of epithelial stem cells. Epithelial defects were generated in the epithelium of the buccal mucosa of 6-week-old mice using CO2 laser irradiation. BrdU was immediately administered to mice following laser irradiation. They were then sacrificed after 1, 3, 7, and 14 days. Paraffin sections were prepared and the irradiated areas were analyzed using immunohistochemistry with anti-p75NGFR, BrdU, PCNA, and CK14 antibodies. During re-epithelialization, PCNA (–)/p75NGFR (+) cells extended to the wound, which then closed, whereas PCNA (+)/p75NGFR (+) cells were not observed at the edge of the wound. In addition, p75NGFR (–)/CK14 (+), which reflected the presence of post-mitotic differentiating cells, was observed in the supra-basal layers of the extended epithelium. BrdU (+)/p75NGFR (+), which reflected the presence of epithelial stem cells, was detected sparsely in buccal basal epithelial cells after healing, and disappeared after 7 days. These results suggest that p75NGFR (+) keratinocytes are localized in the basal layer, which contains oral epithelial stem cells, and retain the ability to proliferate in order to regenerate the buccal mucosal epithelium

  5. Computer simulation of wound closure in epithelial tissues: Cell-basal-lamina adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Tatsuzo; Honda, Hisao

    2009-12-01

    The mechanism of wound closure in epithelial tissues, i.e., cell monolayer sheets, is investigated through computer simulations. A wound means an area in which some cells have been removed from the normal tissue. The vertex dynamics cell model [T. Nagai and H. Honda, Philos. Mag. B 81, 699 (2001)], which describes morphogenesis of epithelial tissues using the concepts of statistical physics, is modified and applied to the closure of small wounds without mitosis. It is shown that cell-basal-lamina adhesion governs the wound closure competing with cell-cell adhesion and cell elasticity. The simulation results reproduce the actual wound closure process qualitatively and partly quantitatively. The closing proceeds with the translation of the edges of wound polygons toward the wound center and the intermittent reduction in the number of polygon edges. Over time, the process leads to an exponential decrease in the wound area. A shape factor is introduced to describe the wound shape quantitatively and is used to examine the time variation thereof. A method for determining model parameters by comparison with the experiments is given.

  6. Protein Profiling of Isolated Leukocytes, Myofibroblasts, Epithelial, Basal, and Endothelial Cells from Normal, Hyperplastic, Cancerous, and Inflammatory Human Prostate Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa I. Khamis, Kenneth A. Iczkowski, Ziad J. Sahab, Qing-Xiang Amy Sang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ neoplastic prostate cells are not lethal unless they become invasive and metastatic. For cells to become invasive, the prostate gland must undergo degradation of the basement membrane and disruption of the basal cell layer underneath the luminal epithelia. Although the roles of proteinases in breaking down the basement membrane have been well-studied, little is known about the factors that induce basal cell layer disruption, degeneration, and its eventual disappearance in invasive cancer. It is hypothesized that microenvironmental factors may affect the degradation of the basal cell layer, which if protected may prevent tumor progression and invasion. In this study, we have revealed differential protein expression patterns between epithelial and stromal cells isolated from different prostate pathologies and identified several important epithelial and stromal proteins that may contribute to inflammation and malignant transformation of human benign prostate tissues to cancerous tissues using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and proteomics methods. Cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 was downregulated in basal cells of benign prsotate. Caspase-1 and interleukin-18 receptor 1 were highly expressed in leukocytes of prostate cancer. Proto-oncogene Wnt-3 was downregulated in endothelial cells of prostatitis tissue and tyrosine phosphatase non receptor type 1 was only found in normal and benign endothelial cells. Poly ADP-ribose polymerase 14 was downregulated in myofibroblasts of prostatitis tissue. Interestingly, integrin alpha-6 was upregulated in epithelial cells but not detected in myofibroblasts of prostate cancer. Further validation of these proteins may generate new strategies for the prevention of basal cell layer disruption and subsequent cancer invasion.

  7. Expression of polycomb protein BMI-1 maintains the plasticity of basal bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torr, Elizabeth; Heath, Meg; Mee, Maureen; Shaw, Dominick; Sharp, Tyson V; Sayers, Ian

    2016-08-01

    The airway epithelium is altered in respiratory disease and is thought to contribute to disease etiology. A caveat to disease research is that the technique of isolation of bronchial epithelial cells from patients is invasive and cells have a limited lifespan. The aim of this study was to extensively characterize the plasticity of primary human bronchial epithelial cells that have been engineered to delay cell senescence including the ability of these cells to differentiate. Cells were engineered to express BMI-1 or hTERT using viral vector systems. Cells were characterized at passage (p) early (p5), mid (p10), and late (p15) stage for: BMI-1, p16, and CK14 protein expression, viability and the ability to differentiate at air-liquid interface (ALI), using a range of techniques including immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF), transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), MUC5AC and beta tubulin (BTUB) staining. BMI-1-expressing cells maintained elevated levels of the BMI-1 protein and the epithelial marker CK14 and showed a suppression of p16. BMI-1-expressing cells had a viability advantage, differentiated at ALI, and had a normal karyotype. In contrast, hTERT-expressing cells had a reduced viability, showed limited differentiation, and had an abnormal karyotype. We therefore provide extensive characterization of the plasticity of BMI-1 expressing cells in the context of the ALI model. These cells retain properties of wild-type cells and may be useful to characterize respiratory disease mechanisms in vitro over sustained periods. PMID:27558999

  8. Protein profile of basal prostate epithelial progenitor cells-stage-specific embryonal antigen 4 expressing cells have enhanced regenerative potential in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfner, Thomas; Klein, Corinna; Eisen, Christian; Rigo-Watermeier, Teresa; Haferkamp, Axel; Sprick, Martin R

    2016-04-01

    The long-term propagation of basal prostate progenitor cells ex vivo has been very difficult in the past. The development of novel methods to expand prostate progenitor cells in vitro allows determining their cell surface phenotype in greater detail. Mouse (Lin(-) Sca-1(+) CD49f(+) Trop2(high) -phenotype) and human (Lin(-) CD49f(+) TROP2(high) ) basal prostate progenitor cells were expanded in vitro. Human and mouse cells were screened using 242 anti-human or 176 antimouse monoclonal antibodies recognizing the cell surface protein profile. Quantitative expression was evaluated at the single-cell level using flow cytometry. Differentially expressed cell surface proteins were evaluated in conjunction with the known CD49f(+) /TROP2(high) phenotype of basal prostate progenitor cells and characterized by in vivo sandwich-transplantation experiments using nude mice. The phenotype of basal prostate progenitor cells was determined as CD9(+) /CD24(+) /CD29(+) /CD44(+) /CD47(+) /CD49f(+) /CD104(+) /CD147(+) /CD326(+) /Trop2(high) of mouse as well as human origin. Our analysis revealed several proteins, such as CD13, Syndecan-1 and stage-specific embryonal antigens (SSEAs), as being differentially expressed on murine and human CD49f(+) TROP2(+) basal prostate progenitor cells. Transplantation experiments suggest that CD49f(+) TROP2(high) SSEA-4(high) human prostate basal progenitor cells to be more potent to regenerate prostate tubules in vivo as compared with CD49f(+) TROP2(high) or CD49f(+) TROP2(high) SSEA-4(low) cells. Determination of the cell surface protein profile of functionally defined murine and human basal prostate progenitor cells reveals differentially expressed proteins that may change the potency and regenerative function of epithelial progenitor cells within the prostate. SSEA-4 is a candidate cell surface marker that putatively enables a more accurate identification of the basal PESC lineage. PMID:26849468

  9. Basal but not luminal mammary epithelial cells require PI3K/mTOR signaling for Ras-driven overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plichta, Kristin A; Mathers, Jessica L; Gestl, Shelley A; Glick, Adam B; Gunther, Edward J

    2012-11-15

    The mammary ducts of humans and mice are comprised of two main mammary epithelial cell (MEC) subtypes: a surrounding layer of basal MECs and an inner layer of luminal MECs. Breast cancer subtypes show divergent clinical behavior that may reflect properties inherent in their MEC compartment of origin. How the response to a cancer-initiating genetic event is shaped by MEC subtype remains largely unexplored. Using the mouse mammary gland, we designed organotypic three-dimensional culture models that permit challenge of discrete MEC compartments with the same oncogenic insult. Mammary organoids were prepared from mice engineered for compartment-restricted coexpression of oncogenic H-RAS(G12V) together with a nuclear fluorescent reporter. Monitoring of H-RAS(G12V)-expressing MECs during extended live cell imaging permitted visualization of Ras-driven phenotypes via video microscopy. Challenging either basal or luminal MECs with H-RAS(G12V) drove MEC proliferation and survival, culminating in aberrant organoid overgrowth. In each compartment, Ras activation triggered modes of collective MEC migration and invasion that contrasted with physiologic modes used during growth factor-initiated branching morphogenesis. Although basal and luminal Ras activation produced similar overgrowth phenotypes, inhibitor studies revealed divergent use of Ras effector pathways. Blocking either the phosphoinositide 3-kinase or the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway completely suppressed Ras-driven invasion and overgrowth of basal MECs, but only modestly attenuated Ras-driven phenotypes in luminal MECs. We show that MEC subtype defines signaling pathway dependencies downstream of Ras. Thus, cells-of-origin may critically determine the drug sensitivity profiles of mammary neoplasia. PMID:23010075

  10. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epithelioma, is the most common form of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma usually occurs on sun-damaged skin, especially ... other health issues. Infiltrating or morpheaform basal cell carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive ...

  11. Microtubule plus-end and minus-end capture at adherens junctions is involved in the assembly of apico-basal arrays in polarised epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellett, Gemma; Carter, Jane M; Keynton, Jennifer; Goldspink, Deborah; James, Colin; Moss, David K; Mogensen, Mette M

    2009-10-01

    Apico-basal polarisation of epithelial cells involves a dramatic reorganisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. The classic radial array of microtubules focused on a centrally located centrosome typical of many animal cells is lost or greatly reduced and a non-centrosomal apico-basal array develops. The molecules and mechanisms responsible for the assembly and positioning of these non-centrosomal microtubules have not been fully elucidated. Using a Nocodazole induced regrowth assay in invitro culture (MDCK) and in situ epithelial (cochlear Kolliker's) cell models we establish that the apico-basal array originates from the centrosome and that the non-centrosomal microtubule minus-end anchoring sites do not contribute significantly to their nucleation. Confocal and electron microscopy revealed that an extended radial array assembles with microtubule plus-ends targeting cadheren sites at adherens junctions and EB1 and CLIP-170 co-localising with beta-catenin and dynein clusters at the junction sites. The extended radial array is likely to be a vital intermediate step in the assembly process with cortical anchored dynein providing the mechanical force required for microtubule release, translocation and capture. Ultrastructural analyses of the apico-basal arrays in fully polarised MDCK and Kolliker's cells revealed microtubule minus-end association with the most apical adherens junction (Zonula adherens). We propose that a release and capture model involving both microtubule plus- and minus-end capture at adherens junctions is responsible for the generation of non-centrosomal apico-basal arrays in most centrosome containing polarised epithelial cells. PMID:19479825

  12. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Request Permissions Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/2016 What is Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome? Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is ...

  13. Basal and copper-induced expression of metallothionein isoform 1,2 and 3 genes in epithelial cancer cells: The role of tumor suppressor p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrakhovitch, E A; Song, Y P; Cherian, M G

    2016-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a ubiquitous low-molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins with a high affinity for metal ions. The expression and induction of MTs have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Our past research had shown that p53 is an important factor in metal regulation of MTs. The present study was undertaken to explore further the interrelationship between p53 and MTs. We investigated whether silencing of p53 could affect expression pattern of basal and copper induced metallothioneins. The silencing of wild-type p53 (wt-p53) in epithelial breast cancer MCF7 cells affected the basal level of MT-2A RNA, whereas the levels of MT-1A and MT-1X RNA remained largely unchanged. The expression of MT-3 was undetectable in MCF7 with either functional or silenced p53. MCF7 cells with silenced wt-p53 failed to upregulate MT-2A in response to copper and showed a reduced sensitivity toward copper induced cell apoptotic death. Similarly in MCF7-E6 and MDA-MB-231 cells, the presence of inactive/mutated p53 halted MT-1A and MT-2A gene expression in response to copper. Constitutive expression of MT-3 RNA was detectable in the presence of mutated p53 (mtp53). Transient transfection of MDA-MB-231 cells with wt-p53 enabled copper induced upregulation of both MT-1A and MT-2A but not basal level of MT-2A, MT-1E, MT-1X and MT-3. Inactivation of p53 in HepG2 cells amplified the basal expression of studied MT isoforms, including MT-3, as well as copper-induced mRNA expression of MTs except MT-1H and MT-3. Presented data demonstrate a direct relation between p53 and MT-1A and MT-2A and they also indicate that wt-p53 might be a negative regulator of MT-3 in epithelial cancer cells. PMID:27049123

  14. Clear Cell Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Wang; Tracey Harbert; Jennifer Olivella; Daniel Olson; Sarma, Deba P; Stephanie Ortman

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Clear cell basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is an uncommon and unusual variant of BCC, which is characterized by a variable component of clear cells. The pathogenesis of this histological variant and its clinical significance has not been clarified. Differentiation of this uncommon variant of BCC from other clear cell tumors is important for the treatment. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male presented with a 0.9 cm dome-shaped lesion on his upper chest. A shave biopsy revealed a der...

  15. Mammary epithelial cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kass, Laura; Erler, Janine Terra; Dembo, Micah;

    2007-01-01

    mammary gland. During breast development and cancer progression, the extracellular matrix is dynamically altered such that its composition, turnover, processing and orientation change dramatically. These modifications influence mammary epithelial cell shape, and modulate growth factor and hormonal...... organization, and promote cell invasion and survival. In this review, we discuss the role of stromal-epithelial interactions in normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell behavior. We specifically focus on how dynamic modulation of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular matrix elicit...

  16. Transgenic mice exhibiting inducible and spontaneous Cre activities driven by a bovine keratin 5 promoter that can be used for the conditional analysis of basal epithelial cells in multiple organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chih-Chia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cre/loxP-mediated genetic modification is the most widely used conditional genetic approach used in the mouse. Engineered Cre and the mutated ligand-binding domain of estrogen receptor fusion recombinase (CreERT allow temporal control of Cre activity. Results In this study, we have generated two distinct transgenic mouse lines expressing CreERT, which show 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT-inducible and spontaneous (4-OHT-independent Cre activities, referred to Tg(BK5-CreERTI and Tg(BK5-CreERTS, respectively. The transgenic construct is driven by the bovine Keratin 5 promoter, which is active in the basal epithelial lineage of stratified and pseudo-stratified epithelium across multiple organs. Despite the difference in 4-OHT dependency, the Tg(BK5-CreERTI and Tg(BK5-CreERTS mouse lines shared similar Cre-mediated recombination among various organs, except for unique mammary epithelial Cre activity in Tg(BK5-CreERTS females. Conclusion These two new transgenic mouse lines for the analysis of basal epithelial function and for the genetic modification have been created allowing the identification of these cell lineages and analysis of their differentiation during embryogenesis, during perinatal development and in adult mice.

  17. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... cell carcinoma public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  18. Cryotherapy in basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra A; Balachandran C; Shenoi S; Sabitha L; Pai Satish; Ravikumar B; Roy Alfred

    1999-01-01

    Cryotherapy has proved to be an effective tool in the management of various dermatoses. We report 6 patients with histopathologically proven basal cell carcinoma of variable sizes treated with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy by the open spray technique. Lesions tended to heal with depigmentation and scar formation. However depigmented areas often repigmented over a period of time.

  19. Distinctive Patterns of CTNNB1 (β-Catenin) Alterations in Salivary Gland Basal Cell Adenoma and Basal Cell Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Vickie Y; Sholl, Lynette M; Krane, Jeffrey F

    2016-08-01

    Salivary gland basaloid neoplasms are diagnostically challenging. Limited publications report that some basal cell adenomas harbor CTNNB1 mutations, and nuclear β-catenin expression is prevalent. We evaluated β-catenin expression in basal cell adenomas and adenocarcinomas in comparison with salivary tumors in the differential diagnosis and performed targeted genetic analysis on a subset of cases. β-catenin immunohistochemistry was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded whole sections from 73 tumors. Nuclear staining was scored semiquantitatively by extent and intensity. DNA was extracted from 6 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples (5 basal cell adenomas, 1 basal cell adenocarcinoma) for next-generation sequencing. Nuclear β-catenin staining was present in 18/22 (82%) basal cell adenomas; most were diffuse and strong and predominant in the basal component. Two of 3 basal cell adenocarcinomas were positive (1 moderate focal; 1 moderate multifocal). All adenoid cystic carcinomas (0/20) and pleomorphic adenomas (0/20) were negative; 2/8 epithelial-myoepithelial carcinomas showed focal nuclear staining. Most β-catenin-negative tumors showed diffuse membranous staining in the absence of nuclear staining. Four of 5 basal cell adenomas had exon 3 CTNNB1 mutations, all c.104T>C (p.I35T). Basal cell adenocarcinoma showed a more complex genomic profile, with activating mutations in PIK3CA, biallelic inactivation of NFKBIA, focal CYLD deletion, and without CTNNB1 mutation despite focal β-catenin expression. Nuclear β-catenin expression has moderate sensitivity (82%) for basal cell adenoma but high specificity (96%) in comparison with its morphologic mimics. CTNNB1 mutation was confirmed in most basal cell adenomas tested, and findings in basal cell adenocarcinoma suggest possible tumorigenic mechanisms, including alterations in PI3K and NF-κB pathways and transcriptional regulation. PMID:27259009

  20. Basal cell carcinoma of penis: case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, M Z; Polacarz, S V; Partington, P E

    1988-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the penis is rare. A patient who presented with a penile and scrotal ulcer due to basal cell carcinoma is reported. Wide local excision and split skin grafting were performed to excise the lesion completely.

  1. Pulmonary Metastasis of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Sang-Hee; Shim, Woo-Haing; SHIN, DONG-HOON; Kim, Yun-Seong; Sung, Hyun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Although basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, it rarely metastasizes. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma may, therefore, initially elude diagnosis and management. We describe the case of a patient with a metastatic basal cell carcinoma present in the lungs. The differential diagnosis of suspected metastatic lesions should include metastases from a cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, in addition to those from more commonly metastasizing carcinomas, especially in patients with a histor...

  2. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  3. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur S; Thami G; Kanwar A

    2003-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  4. Phorbol ester stimulates ethanolamine release from the metastatic basal prostate cancer cell line PC3 but not from prostate epithelial cell lines LNCaP and P4E6

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, J; Noble, A.; Otsuka, M; Berry, P.; Maitland, N J; Rumsby, M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Malignancy alters cellular complex lipid metabolism and membrane lipid composition and turnover. Here, we investigated whether tumorigenesis in cancer-derived prostate epithelial cell lines influences protein kinase C-linked turnover of ethanolamine phosphoglycerides (EtnPGs) and alters the pattern of ethanolamine (Etn) metabolites released to the medium. Methods: Prostate epithelial cell lines P4E6, LNCaP and PC3 were models of prostate cancer (PCa). PNT2C2 and PNT1A were models ...

  5. Coronaviruses in polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Bekker, C P; Voorhout, W F; Horzinek, M C; Van der Ende, A; Strous, G J; Rottier, P J

    1995-01-01

    Coronaviruses have a marked tropism for epithelial cells. In this paper the interactions of the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV-A59) with epithelial cells are compared. Porcine (LLC-PK1) and murine (mTAL) epithelial cells were grown on permeable supp

  6. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divvya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differentiation is practically very rare.

  7. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    OpenAIRE

    Divvya; Rehana; Viswanathan; Krishnaswamy; Anvar Ali

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differen...

  8. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD; Waseem-Asim Ghulam El-Charnoubi, MD; Julie Gehl, MD, PhD; Christen Krag, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstruct...

  9. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Accompanying Gorlin Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yeliz Bilir; Erkan Gokce; Banu Ozturk; Faik Alev Deresoy; Ruken Yuksekkaya; Emel Yaman

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity...

  10. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    OpenAIRE

    Nilton Nasser; Nilton Nasser Filho; Bruno Trauczynski Neto; Lissandra Melati da Silva

    2012-01-01

    The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no s...

  11. Perlecan and Dystroglycan act at the basal side of the Drosophila follicular epithelium to maintain epithelial organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Martina; Khalil, Ashraf A.; Poulton, John; Castillejo-Lopez, Casimiro; Egger-Adam, Diane; Wodarz, Andreas; Deng, Wu-Min; Baumgartner, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Dystroglycan (Dg) is a widely expressed extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor required for muscle viability, synaptogenesis, basement-membrane formation and epithelial development. As an integral component of the Dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex, Dg plays a central role in linking the ECM and the cytoskeleton. Disruption of this linkage in skeletal muscle leads to various types of muscular dystrophies. In epithelial cells, reduced expression of Dg is associated with increased invasiveness of cancer cells. We have previously shown that Dg is required for epithelial cell polarity in Drosophila, but the mechanisms of this polarizing activity and upstream/downstream components are largely unknown. Using the Drosophila follicle-cell epithelium (FCE) as a model system, we show that the ECM molecule Perlecan (Pcan) is required for maintenance of epithelial-cell polarity. Follicle cells that lack Pcan develop polarity defects similar to those of Dg mutant cells. Furthermore, Dg depends on Pcan but not on Laminin A for its localization in the basal-cell membrane, and the two proteins bind in vitro. Interestingly, the Dg form that interacts with Pcan in the FCE lacks the mucin-like domain, which is thought to be essential for Dg ligand binding activity. Finally, we describe two examples of how Dg promotes the differentiation of the basal membrane domain: (1) by recruiting/anchoring the cytoplasmic protein Dystrophin; and (2) by excluding the transmembrane protein Neurexin. We suggest that the interaction of Pcan and Dg at the basal side of the epithelium promotes basal membrane differentiation and is required for maintenance of cell polarity in the FCE. PMID:16943280

  12. Early recognition of basal cell naevus syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra-Knol, HE; Scheewe, JH; van der Vlist, GJ; van Doorn, ME; Ausems, MGEM

    2005-01-01

    The basal cell naevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterised by major manifestations such as basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, palmar or plantar pits, and intracranial calcifications. Early recognition is important in order to reduce morbidity due to cutaneous and cerebral malignan

  13. Abberent expression of oncogenic and tumor-suppressive microRNAs and their target genes in human adenocarcinoma alveolar basal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Tafsiri

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The significant differential expression level of these miRNAs made them as candidate biomarkers in NSCLC tumor tissues of patients. Perhaps Bcl-2 down-regulation and Akt-3 up-regulation can be linked with survival signals in A549 cell line. We can conclude that Bcl-2 and Akt-3 might be therapeutic targets to inhibit cell proliferation in NSCLC.

  14. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie;

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  15. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  16. Ancestral vascular lumen formation via basal cell surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Kucera

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular system of bilaterians developed from a common ancestor. However, no endothelial cells exist in invertebrates demonstrating that primitive cardiovascular tubes do not require this vertebrate-specific cell type in order to form. This raises the question of how cardiovascular tubes form in invertebrates? Here we discovered that in the invertebrate cephalochordate amphioxus, the basement membranes of endoderm and mesoderm line the lumen of the major vessels, namely aorta and heart. During amphioxus development a laminin-containing extracellular matrix (ECM was found to fill the space between the basal cell surfaces of endoderm and mesoderm along their anterior-posterior (A-P axes. Blood cells appear in this ECM-filled tubular space, coincident with the development of a vascular lumen. To get insight into the underlying cellular mechanism, we induced vessels in vitro with a cell polarity similar to the vessels of amphioxus. We show that basal cell surfaces can form a vascular lumen filled with ECM, and that phagocytotic blood cells can clear this luminal ECM to generate a patent vascular lumen. Therefore, our experiments suggest a mechanism of blood vessel formation via basal cell surfaces in amphioxus and possibly in other invertebrates that do not have any endothelial cells. In addition, a comparison between amphioxus and mouse shows that endothelial cells physically separate the basement membranes from the vascular lumen, suggesting that endothelial cells create cardiovascular tubes with a cell polarity of epithelial tubes in vertebrates and mammals.

  17. The many faces of basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most easily cured carcinoma, but because of the many forms it can take, and because it grows so slowly, it can be misdiagnosed or neglected. The author discusses its more common forms and etiologic considerations.

  18. Sequential development of apical-basal and planar polarities in aggregating epitheliomuscular cells of Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, Anna; Salvenmoser, Willi; Hobmayer, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Apical-basal and planar cell polarities are hallmarks of metazoan epithelia required to separate internal and external environments and to regulate trans- and intracellular transport, cytoskeletal organization, and morphogenesis. Mechanisms of cell polarization have been intensively studied in bilaterian model organisms, particularly in early embryos and cultured cells, while cell polarity in pre-bilaterian tissues is poorly understood. Here, we have studied apical-basal and planar polarization in regenerating (aggregating) clusters of epitheliomuscular cells of Hydra, a simple representative of the ancestral, pre-bilaterian phylum Cnidaria. Immediately after dissociation, single epitheliomuscular cells do not exhibit cellular polarity, but they polarize de novo during aggregation. Reestablishment of the Hydra-specific epithelial bilayer is a result of short-range cell sorting. In the early phase of aggregation, apical-basal polarization starts with an enlargement of the epithelial apical-basal diameter and by the development of belt-like apical septate junctions. Specification of the basal pole of epithelial cells occurs shortly later and is linked to synthesis of mesoglea, development of hemidesmosome-like junctions, and formation of desmosome-like junctions connecting the basal myonemes of neighbouring cells. Planar polarization starts, while apical-basal polarization is already ongoing. It is executed gradually starting with cell-autonomous formation, parallelization, and condensation of myonemes at the basal end of each epithelial cell and continuing with a final planar alignment of epitheliomuscular cells at the tissue level. Our findings reveal that epithelial polarization in Hydra aggregates occurs in defined steps well accessible by histological and ultrastructural techniques and they will provide a basis for future molecular studies. PMID:26921448

  19. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic ...

  20. CAMK1D amplification implicated in epithelial-mesenchymal transition in basal-like breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Kim, Young H.; Kwei, Kevin A; La Choi, Yoon; Bocanegra, Melanie; Langerod, Anita; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Huntsman, David G.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Pollack, Jonathan R

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer exhibits clinical and molecular heterogeneity, where expression-profiling studies have identified five major molecular subtypes. The basal-like subtype, expressing basal epithelial markers and negative for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2, is associated with higher overall levels of DNA copy number alteration (CNA), specific CNAs (like gain on chromosome 10p), and poor prognosis. Discovering the molecular genetic basis of tumor subtypes may provide new...

  1. Recurrent peripheral odontogenic fibroma associated with basal cell budding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Sreeja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm. It represents the soft tissue counterpart of central odontogenic fibroma. The embryonic source of POdF has been suggested by many as arising from the rest of dental lamina that has persisted in the gingiva following its disintegration. It presents clinically as a firm, slow growing and sessile gingival mass, which is difficult to distinguish with more common inflammatory lesions. Very few cases of recurrence have been documented. It has been stated that histological budding of basal cell layer of the surface squamous epithelium is associated with higher recurrence and the presence of calcification in direct apposition to the epithelial rest is associated with lower recurrence. Hereby, we present a case which histologically exhibited budding of the basal cell layer, which could have been the reason for its recurrence.

  2. Basal Cell Carcinoma in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Flohil (Sophie)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThere are many different cutaneous malignancies, but malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represent approximately 98% of all skin cancers.In literature, these three skin cancers are often divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC

  3. Sds22, a PP1 phosphatase regulatory subunit, regulates epithelial cell polarity and shape [Sds22 in epithelial morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Sung Hsin-Ho; Fletcher Georgina; Hidalgo Cristina; Grusche Felix A; Sahai Erik; Thompson Barry J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background How epithelial cells adopt their particular polarised forms is poorly understood. In a screen for genes regulating epithelial morphology in Drosophila, we identified sds22, a conserved gene previously characterised in yeast. Results In the columnar epithelia of imaginal discs or follicle cells, mutation of sds22 causes contraction of cells along their apical-basal axis, resulting in a more cuboidal morphology. In addition, the mutant cells can also display altered cell pol...

  4. Basal Cell Carcinoma in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Samet Vasfi Kuvat; Zuhal Gücin; Barış Keklik; Gülzade Özyalvaçlı; Karaca Başaran

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly seen nonmelanoma skin cancer which is rarely encountered in the childhood period. An 11-year old child was admitted to our clinic due to an erythematous and a slightly pigmented lesion with a 3 × 4 cm diameter on his posterior scalp. Macroscopically, the lesion was excised with a 10 mm safety margin. Pathologic examination revealed a basal cell carcinoma. No symptoms or signs of a syndrome were observed both in the patient and his family.

  5. Isolation, separation, and characterization of epithelial and connective cells from rat palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terranova, Victor Paul

    1979-01-01

    Epithelial and connective tissue cells were isolated from rat palate by sequential collagenase, hyaluronidase and trypsin digestion of the extracellular matrix. Differences between the two populations were noted with respect to total cell protein, total cell water, proline uptake and incorporation, percent collagen synthesized, effects of parathyroid hormone, metabolism of D-valine and cell density. Basal epithelial cells were subsequently separated from the heterogeneous epithelial cell population on shallow linear density gradients by velocity centrifugation. The type of collagen synthesized by the basal epithelial cells was compared to the type of collagen synthesized by the connective tissue cells by means of labeled amino acid incorporation ratios. Cells isolated from the epithelial and connective tissue were compared. From these studies it can be concluded that epithelial and connective tissue cells can be isolated from rat palate as viable and distinct populations with respect to the biochemical parameters examined. Furthermore, subpopulations can be separated and biochemically characterized.

  6. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  7. A Case Report of Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum Mimicking Basal Cell Carcinoma on the Face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Sezer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Syringocystadenoma papilliferum is clinically characterized by verrucous nodules or plaques, mainly observed on the scalp during childhood. Histopathologically, epidermal invagination showing luminal epithelial cells with decapitation secretion is diagnostic. Herein, we describe an unusual late-onset case of syringocystadenoma papilliferum mimicking basal cell carcinoma on the face.

  8. Morphometric characteristics of basal cell carcinoma peritumoral stroma varies among basal cell carcinoma subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Lesack Kyle; Naugler Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The role that the peritumoral stroma plays in the growth of tumours is currently poorly understood. In this manuscript the morphometric characteristics of basal cell carcinoma subtypes and their associated peritumoral stromas are presented. Methods Ninety eight digitized basal cell carcinoma histology slides were categorized as infiltrative, nodular, or superficial subtypes, and were analysed using a combination of manual and computer-assisted approaches. The morphometric ...

  9. Intestinal Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra, Dharam P.; Dombkowski, Alan A.; Stemmer, Paul M.; Parker, Graham C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in the biology of stem cells has resulted in significant interest in the development of normal epithelial cell lines from the intestinal mucosa, both to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells in tissue regeneration and to develop treatment models of degenerative disorders of the digestive tract. However, the difficulty of propagating cell lines of normal intestinal epithelium has impeded research into the molecular mechanisms underlying differentiation of stem/progeni...

  10. Linear Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ichinokawa, Yuko; Ohtuki, Akiko; Hattori, Mariko; Sadamasa, Hiroko; Hiruma, Masataro; Matumoto, Toshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) presents with diverse clinical features, and several morphologic and histologic variants of BCC have been reported [Sexton et al.: J Am Acad Dermatol 1990;23:1118-1126]. Linear BCC was first described as a new clinical subtype in 1985 by Lewis [Int J Dematol 1985;24:124-125]. Here, we present a case of linear BCC that we recently encountered in an elderly Japanese patient, and review other cases reported in Japan.

  11. Basal cell carcinoma of the perineum

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Adriane Ann; Dabade, Tushar; Dandekar, Monisha; Rogers, Gary; Rosmarin, David

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common nonmelanoma skin cancer. Most BCCs are found on areas of UV-damaged skin, The study of BCCs of sun-protected regions, however, suggests a more complex pathogenesis. We present a case of BCC of the perineum in a man with no previous history of skin cancer. This is the first report of BCC in this region and one of a small body of cases arising on or near the genital and perianal regions.

  12. Basal cell carcinoma in oculo-cutaneous albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Kumar; Ashish Chauhan; Subhash Kashyap

    2016-01-01

    The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin tumour especially affecting the white individuals worldwide. The exact incidence of basal cell carcinoma is not known from India but non melanoma skin cancers comprises about 1-2% of cutaneous tumour in India. The most common skin tumour is squamous cell carcinoma in albinism and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma is less. Hereby, we report a peculiar case of basal cell carcinoma in albinism to highlights the importance of early recognition ...

  13. Basal cell carcinoma of the skin with areas of squamous cell carcinoma: a basosquamous cell carcinoma?

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, J.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of basosquamous cell carcinoma is controversial. A review of cases of basal cell carcinoma showed 23 cases that had conspicuous areas of squamous cell carcinoma. This was distinguished from squamous differentiation and keratotic basal cell carcinoma by a comparative study of 40 cases of compact lobular and 40 cases of keratotic basal cell carcinoma. Areas of intermediate tumour differentiation between basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma were found. Basal cell carcinomas with ...

  14. Epithelial Stem Cells: Turning over New Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Blanpain, Cédric; Horsley, Valerie; Fuchs, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    Most epithelial tissues self-renew throughout adult life due to the presence of multipotent stem cells and/or unipotent progenitor cells. Epithelial stem cells are specified during development and are controlled by epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Despite morphological and functional differences among epithelia, common signaling pathways appear to control epithelial stem cell maintenance, activation, lineage determination, and differentiation. Additionally, deregulation of these pathways ...

  15. Myosin Id is required for planar cell polarity in ciliated tracheal and ependymal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegan, Peter S; Ostertag, Eric; Geurts, Aron M; Mooseker, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    In wild type (WT) tracheal epithelial cells, ciliary basal bodies are oriented such that all cilia on the cell surface beat in the same upward direction. This precise alignment of basal bodies and, as a result, the ciliary axoneme, is termed rotational planar cell polarity (PCP). Rotational PCP in the multi-ciliated epithelial cells of the trachea is perturbed in rats lacking myosin Id (Myo1d). Myo1d is localized in the F-actin and basal body rich subapical cortex of the ciliated tracheal epithelial cell. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of Myo1d knock out (KO) trachea revealed that the unidirectional bending pattern is disrupted. Instead, cilia splay out in a disordered, often radial pattern. Measurement of the alignment axis of the central pair axonemal microtubules was much more variable in the KO, another indicator that rotational PCP is perturbed. The asymmetric localization of the PCP core protein Vangl1 is lost. Both the velocity and linearity of cilia-driven movement of beads above the tracheal mucosal surface was impaired in the Myo1d KO. Multi-ciliated brain ependymal epithelial cells exhibit a second form of PCP termed translational PCP in which basal bodies and attached cilia are clustered at the anterior side of the cell. The precise asymmetric clustering of cilia is disrupted in the ependymal cells of the Myo1d KO rat. While basal body clustering is maintained, left-right positioning of the clusters is lost. PMID:26446290

  16. Early Onset Basal Cell Carcinoma: Surgical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Betekhtin M.; Ananiev J.; Tchernev G.; Zisova L.; Philipov S.; Hristova R.

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most frequent non-melanoma skin cancer. Only 5-15% of BCC cases can be found in patients aged 20-40 years (so-called early onset). The early onset BCC is characterized by active and aggressive tumour growth, clinically presenting in most of the cases as a morpheaform, locally infiltrating or recurrent BCC. Despite the advances in the study of the pathogenesis of this tumour, surgery remains the most used, most effective and most suitable treatment modality. W...

  17. Nonsurgical Treatment Options for Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary H. Lien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC remains the most common form of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC in Caucasians, with perhaps as many as 2 million new cases expected to occur in the United States in 2010. Many treatment options, including surgical interventions and nonsurgical alternatives, have been utilized to treat BCC. In this paper, two non-surgical options, imiquimod therapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT, will be discussed. Both modalities have demonstrated acceptable disease control rates, cosmetically superior outcomes, and short-term cost-effectiveness. Further studies evaluating long-term cure rates and long-term cost effectiveness of imiquimod therapy and PDT are needed.

  18. Evaluating alternative stem cell hypotheses for adultcorneal epithelial maintenance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John D West; Natalie J Dorà; Natalie J Dorà,

    2015-01-01

    In this review we evaluate evidence for three differenthypotheses that explain how the corneal epitheliumis maintained. The limbal epithelial stem cell (LESC)hypothesis is most widely accepted. This proposes thatstem cells in the basal layer of the limbal epithelium,at the periphery of the cornea, maintain themselvesand also produce transient (or transit) amplifying cells(TACs). TACs then move centripetally to the centre ofthe cornea in the basal layer of the corneal epitheliumand also replenish cells in the overlying suprabasallayers. The LESCs maintain the corneal epitheliumduring normal homeostasis and become more active torepair significant wounds. Second, the corneal epithelialstem cell (CESC) hypothesis postulates that, duringnormal homeostasis, stem cells distributed throughoutthe basal corneal epithelium, maintain the tissue.According to this hypothesis, LESCs are present in thelimbus but are only active during wound healing. We alsoconsider a third possibility, that the corneal epithelium ismaintained during normal homeostasis by proliferationof basal corneal epithelial cells without any input fromstem cells. After reviewing the published evidence,we conclude that the LESC and CESC hypotheses areconsistent with more of the evidence than the thirdhypothesis, so we do not consider this further. The LESCand CESC hypotheses each have difficulty accountingfor one main type of evidence so we evaluate the twokey lines of evidence that discriminate between them.Finally, we discuss how lineage-tracing experimentshave begun to resolve the debate in favour of theLESC hypothesis. Nevertheless, it also seems likely thatsome basal corneal epithelial cells can act as long-termprogenitors if limbal stem cell function is compromised.Thus, this aspect of the CESC hypothesis may have alasting impact on our understanding of corneal epithelialmaintenance, even if it is eventually shown that stemcells are restricted to the limbus as proposed by the

  19. Regulated Mucin Secretion from Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BurtonFDickey

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Secretory epithelial cells of the proximal airways synthesize and secrete gel-forming polymeric mucins. The secreted mucins adsorb water to form mucus that is propelled by neighboring ciliated cells, providing a mobile barrier which removes inhaled particles and pathogens from the lungs. Several features of the intracellular trafficking of mucins make the airway secretory cell an interesting comparator for the cell biology of regulated exocytosis. Polymeric mucins are exceedingly large molecules (up to 3x10^6 D per monomer whose folding and initial polymerization in the ER requires the protein disulfide isomerase Agr2. In the Golgi, mucins further polymerize to form chains and possibly branched networks comprising more than 20 monomers. The large size of mucin polymers imposes constraints on their packaging into transport vesicles along the secretory pathway. Sugar side chains account for >70% of the mass of mucins, and their attachment to the protein core by O-glycosylation occurs in the Golgi. Mature polymeric mucins are stored in large secretory granules ~1 um in diameter. These are translocated to the apical membrane to be positioned for exocytosis by cooperative interactions among MARCKS, cysteine string protein (CSP, HSP70 and the cytoskeleton. Mucin granules undergo exocytic fusion with the plasma membrane at a low basal rate and a high stimulated rate. Both rates are mediated by a regulated exocytic mechanism as indicated by phenotypes in both basal and stimulated secretion in mice lacking Munc13-2, a sensor of the second messengers calcium and diacylglycerol (DAG. Basal secretion is induced by low levels of activation of P2Y2 purinergic and A3 adenosine receptors by extracellular ATP released in paracrine fashion and its metabolite adenosine. Stimulated secretion is induced by high levels of the same ligands, and possibly by inflammatory mediators as well. Activated receptors are coupled to phospholipase C by Gq, resulting in the

  20. Niche-induced cell death and epithelial phagocytosis regulate hair follicle stem cell pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Kailin R; Rompolas, Panteleimon; Zito, Giovanni; Myung, Peggy; Sun, Thomas Y; Brown, Samara; Gonzalez, David G; Blagoev, Krastan B; Haberman, Ann M; Greco, Valentina

    2015-06-01

    Tissue homeostasis is achieved through a balance of cell production (growth) and elimination (regression). In contrast to tissue growth, the cells and molecular signals required for tissue regression remain unknown. To investigate physiological tissue regression, we use the mouse hair follicle, which cycles stereotypically between phases of growth and regression while maintaining a pool of stem cells to perpetuate tissue regeneration. Here we show by intravital microscopy in live mice that the regression phase eliminates the majority of the epithelial cells by two distinct mechanisms: terminal differentiation of suprabasal cells and a spatial gradient of apoptosis of basal cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that basal epithelial cells collectively act as phagocytes to clear dying epithelial neighbours. Through cellular and genetic ablation we show that epithelial cell death is extrinsically induced through transforming growth factor (TGF)-β activation and mesenchymal crosstalk. Strikingly, our data show that regression acts to reduce the stem cell pool, as inhibition of regression results in excess basal epithelial cells with regenerative abilities. This study identifies the cellular behaviours and molecular mechanisms of regression that counterbalance growth to maintain tissue homeostasis. PMID:25849774

  1. Niche induced cell death and epithelial phagocytosis regulate hair follicle stem cell pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Kailin R.; Rompolas, Panteleimon; Zito, Giovanni; Myung, Peggy; Sun, Thomas Yang; Brown, Samara; Gonzalez, David; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Haberman, Ann M.; Greco, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tissue homeostasis is achieved through a balance of cell production (growth) and elimination (regression)1,2. Contrary to tissue growth, the cells and molecular signals required for tissue regression remain unknown. To investigate physiological tissue regression, we use the mouse hair follicle, which cycles stereotypically between phases of growth and regression while maintaining a pool of stem cells to perpetuate tissue regeneration3. Here we show by intravital microscopy in live mice4–6 that the regression phase eliminates the majority of the epithelial cells by two distinct mechanisms: terminal differentiation of suprabasal cells and a spatial gradient of apoptosis of basal cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that basal epithelial cells collectively act as phagocytes to clear dying epithelial neighbors. Through cellular and genetic ablation we show that epithelial cell death is extrinsically induced through TGFβ activation and mesenchymal crosstalk. Strikingly, our data show that regression acts to reduce the stem cell pool as inhibition of regression results in excess basal epithelial cells with regenerative abilities. This study identifies the cellular behaviors and molecular mechanisms of regression that counterbalance growth to maintain tissue homeostasis. PMID:25849774

  2. Eosinophils promote epithelial to mesenchymal transition of bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Yasukawa

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic inflammation and remodeling of the airways including subepithelial fibrosis and myofibroblast hyperplasia are characteristic pathological findings of bronchial asthma. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT plays a critical role in airway remodelling. In this study, we hypothesized that infiltrating eosinophils promote airway remodelling in bronchial asthma. To demonstrate this hypothesis we evaluated the effect of eosinophils on EMT by in vitro and in vivo studies. EMT was assessed in mice that received intra-tracheal instillation of mouse bone marrow derived eosinophils and in human bronchial epithelial cells co-cultured with eosinophils freshly purified from healthy individuals or with eosinophilic leukemia cell lines. Intra-tracheal instillation of eosinophils was associated with enhanced bronchial inflammation and fibrosis and increased lung concentration of growth factors. Mice instilled with eosinophils pre-treated with transforming growth factor(TGF-β1 siRNA had decreased bronchial wall fibrosis compared to controls. EMT was induced in bronchial epithelial cells co-cultured with human eosinophils and it was associated with increased expression of TGF-β1 and Smad3 phosphorylation in the bronchial epithelial cells. Treatment with anti-TGF-β1 antibody blocked EMT in bronchial epithelial cells. Eosinophils induced EMT in bronchial epithelial cells, suggesting their contribution to the pathogenesis of airway remodelling.

  3. Clear Cell Basal Cell Carcinoma with Sialomucin Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Do Young; Cho, Sung Bin; Chung, Kee Yang; Kim, You Chan

    2006-01-01

    Clear cell basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a variant of BCC with a characteristic clear cell component that may occupy all or part of the tumor islands. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining for glycogen is variably positive, and mild deposition of sulfated mucin has been noted. However, to our knowledge, clear cell BCC with sialomucin deposition has not been reported. Here we report a case of clear cell BCC showing sialomucin deposition. The clear tumor cells stained with PAS and showed incomple...

  4. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Tattooed Eyebrow

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Park, Jin; Kim, Seong-min; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk

    2009-01-01

    Malignant skin tumors, including squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, have occurred in tattoos. Seven documented cases of basal cell carcinoma associated with tattoos have also been reported in the medical literature. We encountered a patient with basal cell carcinoma in a tattooed eyebrow. We report on this case as the eighth reported case of a patient with basal cell carcinoma arising in a tattooed area.

  5. Basal Cell Adenoma of Palate, a Rare Occurrence with Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achla Bharti Yadav

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell adenoma is an uncommon benign epithelial neoplasm of salivary gland which derives its name from the basaloid appearance of tumor cells and accounting for 1-2 % of all salivary gland epithelial tumors. This tumor usually arises in the major salivary glands, with the parotid being the most frequent site of occurrence, followed by the upper lip; while it is very rare in the minor salivary glands. Microscopically, it is composed of isomorphic cells similar to basal cells with nuclear palisading. We report a case of BCA presenting as an asymptomatic swelling over the right side of palate of 55-year-old female patient. A follow-up of 1 year revealed no recurrence. This report emphasizes the rare site of occurrence of this tumor and briefly reviews the literature.

  6. Basal Cell Adenoma of Palate, a Rare Occurrence with Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Achla Bharti; Narwal, Anjali; Devi, Anju; Kumar, Sanjay; Yadav, Sumit Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Basal cell adenoma is an uncommon benign epithelial neoplasm of salivary gland which derives its name from the basaloid appearance of tumor cells and accounting for 1-2 % of all salivary gland epithelial tumors. This tumor usually arises in the major salivary glands, with the parotid being the most frequent site of occurrence, followed by the upper lip; while it is very rare in the minor salivary glands. Microscopically, it is composed of isomorphic cells similar to basal cells with nuclear palisading. We report a case of BCA presenting as an asymptomatic swelling over the right side of palate of 55-year-old female patient. A follow-up of 1 year revealed no recurrence. This report emphasizes the rare site of occurrence of this tumor and briefly reviews the literature. PMID:26535412

  7. Cytokeratin changes in cell culture systems of epithelial cells isolated from oral mucosa: a short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparoni, Alberto; Squier, Christopher Alan; Fonzi, Luciano

    2005-01-01

    In the past three decades, many studies have analyzed ultrastructural and molecular markers of differentiation in squamous stratified epithelial tissues. In these tissues, epithelial cells migrating from the basal layer to the upper layers undergo drastic changes, which involve membrane-associated proteins, DNA synthesis, phenotypic aspects, lipid composition, and cytoskeletal components. Cytoskeletal components include a large and heterogeneous group, including intermediate filaments, components of the cornified envelope, and of the stratum corneum. When grown in mono- and multilayer cell cultures, epithelial cells isolated from the oral mucosa may reproduce many of the biochemical and morphological aspects of epithelial tissue in vivo. In the present paper, we examine phenotypic changes, development of suprabasal layer, and Involucrin expression occurring in differentiating oral epithelial cells, based on literature review and original data. PMID:16277157

  8. Early Onset Basal Cell Carcinoma: Surgical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betekhtin M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most frequent non-melanoma skin cancer. Only 5-15% of BCC cases can be found in patients aged 20-40 years (so-called early onset. The early onset BCC is characterized by active and aggressive tumour growth, clinically presenting in most of the cases as a morpheaform, locally infiltrating or recurrent BCC. Despite the advances in the study of the pathogenesis of this tumour, surgery remains the most used, most effective and most suitable treatment modality. We describe a case of a 39-year-old woman who developed an early onset BCC of the nasolabial fold. After the subsequent surgical excision an excellent cosmetic result was achieved.

  9. Basal cell carcinoma in oculo-cutaneous albinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin tumour especially affecting the white individuals worldwide. The exact incidence of basal cell carcinoma is not known from India but non melanoma skin cancers comprises about 1-2% of cutaneous tumour in India. The most common skin tumour is squamous cell carcinoma in albinism and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma is less. Hereby, we report a peculiar case of basal cell carcinoma in albinism to highlights the importance of early recognition and diagnosis of suspected lesions by performing histopathological examination in unusual circumstances. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2452-2454

  10. The excision width in surgical treatment of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mališ M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma originates from pluripotent cells of basal layer of epiderm, external covering of hair follicles, sebaceous glands or other skin adnexa. It is characterized by local infiltrating and sometimes destructive growth. There are several types of basal cell carcinomas that may be manifested in over 12 clinical forms. Surgical treatment depends to a large extent on the histological type, localization and its clinical manifestation. The analysis included 250 patients of both gender and different age, operated for basal cell carcinoma. Clinical characteristics of basal cell carcinoma and the width of the excision were described. It was concluded that the width of the excision of basal cell cancer was in relation to histological type. .

  11. The role of P63 postive basal cell in re-epithelialization of prostatic urethra after resection of prostate%P63阳性基底细胞在前列腺切除术后尿道再上皮化中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘旋; 孙兆林

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the role of P63 postive basal cell in re-epithelialization of prostatic urethra after resection of the prostate) . Methods:15 older male dogs were treated with resection of the prostate. Specimens of the residual wounds were taken at days 3, 7 and 14 postoperatively to evaluate the expression level of P63 and with HE and immunohistochemical staining. Results:P63 positive cells were detected occasionally in the wounds three days after surgery. At days 7, P63 postive cells appeared lamellar distri-bution connecting with remaining prostatic tissue and at days 14, P63 positive expression was observed in basal cells of newborn urothe-lium. Coclusion:The remaining prostatic tissue plays a great role in re-epithelialization of prostatic urethra after TmLRP and P63 pos-tive cells of basal lamina may be one of the origins of cells for the process.%目的::探讨前列腺切除术后P63阳性基底细胞在前列腺部尿道上皮修复过程中的作用。方法:15只老年家犬行前列腺增生切除术,术后第3、7、14天取材行HE染色和免疫组织化学染色分别观察前列腺部尿道上皮修复过程和P63蛋白表达水平。结果:术后3 d手术创面偶见P63阳性细胞;术后7 d可见片状P63阳性细胞,且这些细胞与残余前列腺组织相连续;术后14 d可见新生尿道上皮基底层细胞阳性表达P63。结论:残余前列腺组织是BPH术后尿道再上皮化的重要组织,而位于基底层的P63阳性细胞可能是这一修复过程的源细胞之一。

  12. PIGMENTED BASAL CELL CARCINOMA: A RARE CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL VARIANT

    OpenAIRE

    Chandralekha; Vijaya Bhaskar; Bhagyalakshmi; Sudhakar; Sumanlatha

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common malignant tumour of skin , commonly referred to as „rodent ulcer‟. It is common in the head and neck region. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is an important risk factor. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a clinical and histological variant of basal cell carcinoma that exhibits inc reased pigmentation. It is a rare variant that can clinically mimic malignant melanoma. It is more common in males than females. Herein , we are...

  13. Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chun-Hua [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Liu, Zhi-Qiang [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Huang, Shelly [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Zheng, Peng-Yuan, E-mail: medp7123@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Yang, Ping-Chang, E-mail: yangp@mcmaster.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

  14. Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. ► The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. ► Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. ► Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

  15. Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Forehead: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Rudić, Milan; Kranjčec, Zoran; Lisica-Šikić, Nataša; Kovačić, Marijan

    2012-01-01

    Giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC) is defined as a tumor 5cm or greater in diameter. They present less than 1% of all basal cell carcinomas. We present a case of an 85-year-old male patient with a giant ulcerating tumor of the left forehead (measuring 7x6cm). Under local anesthesia tumor was surgically excised. No involvement of the underlying periostal or bone structure was noted. Pathohystological exam revealed the giant basal cell carcinoma, with free surgical margins. Giant basal cell carc...

  16. Repair of tracheal epithelium by basal cells after chlorine-induced injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musah Sadiatu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlorine is a widely used toxic compound that is considered a chemical threat agent. Chlorine inhalation injures airway epithelial cells, leading to pulmonary abnormalities. Efficient repair of injured epithelium is necessary to restore normal lung structure and function. The objective of the current study was to characterize repair of the tracheal epithelium after acute chlorine injury. Methods C57BL/6 mice were exposed to chlorine and injected with 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU to label proliferating cells prior to sacrifice and collection of tracheas on days 2, 4, 7, and 10 after exposure. Airway repair and restoration of a differentiated epithelium were examined by co-localization of EdU labeling with markers for the three major tracheal epithelial cell types [keratin 5 (K5 and keratin 14 (K14 for basal cells, Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP for Clara cells, and acetylated tubulin (AcTub for ciliated cells]. Morphometric analysis was used to measure proliferation and restoration of a pseudostratified epithelium. Results Epithelial repair was fastest and most extensive in proximal trachea compared with middle and distal trachea. In unexposed mice, cell proliferation was minimal, all basal cells expressed K5, and K14-expressing basal cells were absent from most sections. Chlorine exposure resulted in the sloughing of Clara and ciliated cells from the tracheal epithelium. Two to four days after chlorine exposure, cell proliferation occurred in K5- and K14-expressing basal cells, and the number of K14 cells was dramatically increased. In the period of peak cell proliferation, few if any ciliated or Clara cells were detected in repairing trachea. Expression of ciliated and Clara cell markers was detected at later times (days 7–10, but cell proliferation was not detected in areas in which these differentiated markers were re-expressed. Fibrotic lesions were observed at days 7–10 primarily in distal trachea. Conclusion

  17. Basal cell hyperplasia and basal cell carcinoma of the prostate: a comprehensive review and discussion of a case with c-erbB-2 expression

    OpenAIRE

    Montironi, R; Mazzucchelli, R; Stramazzotti, D; Scarpelli, M; López Beltran, A; Bostwick, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    Prostatic basal cell proliferations range from ordinary basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) to florid basal cell hyperplasia to basal cell carcinoma. The distinction between these forms of BCH, including the variant with prominent nucleoli (formerly called atypical BCH), and basal cell carcinoma depends on morphological and immunohistochemical criteria and, in particular, on the degree of cell proliferation. In florid BCH, the proliferation index is intermediate between ordinary BCH and basal cell c...

  18. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies. Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser

  19. New basal cell carcinoma susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Simon N.; Helgason, Hannes; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zink, Florian; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Kehr, Birte; Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Grasa, Matilde; Planelles, Dolores; Sanmartin, Onofre; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Nexø, Bjørn A.; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jonasson, Jon G.; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kristinsdottir, Anna M.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Kong, Augustine; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vogel, Ulla; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Olafsson, Jon H.; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    In an ongoing screen for DNA sequence variants that confer risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 24,988,228 SNPs and small indels detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders and imputed into 4,572 BCC patients and 266,358 controls. Here we show the discovery of four new BCC susceptibility loci: 2p24 MYCN (rs57244888[C], OR=0.76, P=4.7 × 10−12), 2q33 CASP8-ALS2CR12 (rs13014235[C], OR=1.15, P=1.5 × 10−9), 8q21 ZFHX4 (rs28727938[G], OR=0.70, P=3.5 × 10−12) and 10p14 GATA3 (rs73635312[A], OR=0.74, P=2.4 × 10−16). Fine mapping reveals that two variants correlated with rs73635312[A] occur in conserved binding sites for the GATA3 transcription factor. In addition, expression microarrays and RNA-seq show that rs13014235[C] and a related SNP rs700635[C] are associated with expression of CASP8 splice variants in which sequences from intron 8 are retained. PMID:25855136

  20. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Biological Continuum of Basal Cell Carcinoma?

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Karaninder S.; Mahajan, Vikram K.; Pushpinder S Chauhan; Anju Lath Sharma; Vikas Sharma; Abhinav, C.; Gayatri Khatri; Neel Prabha; Saurabh Sharma; Muninder Negi

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) accounts for 80% of all nonmelanoma skin cancers. Its metastasis is extremely rare, ranging between 0.0028 and 0.55 of all BCC cases. The usual metastasis to lymph nodes, lungs, bones, or skin is from the primary tumor situated in the head and neck region in nearly 85% cases. A 69-year-old male developed progressively increasing multiple, fleshy, indurated, and at places pigmented noduloulcerative plaques over back, chest, and left axillary area 4 years after wide s...

  1. Epithelial TRPV1 Signaling Accelerates Gingival Epithelial Cell Proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, N; Matsuda, Y; Yamada, H; Tabeta, K; Nakajima, T; Murakami, S.; Yamazaki, K.

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), a member of the calcium-permeable thermosensitive transient receptor potential superfamily, is a sensor of thermal and chemical stimuli. TRPV1 is activated by noxious heat (> 43°C), acidic conditions (pH < 6.6), capsaicin, and endovanilloids. This pain receptor was discovered on nociceptive fibers in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 was recently found to be expressed by non-neuronal cells, such as epithelial cells. ...

  2. DNA repair in human bronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the response of human cell types (bronchial epithelial cells and fibroblasts and skin fibroblasts) to various DNA damaging agents. Repair of DNA single strand breaks (SSB) induced by 5 krads of X-ray was similar for all cell types; approximately 90% of the DNA SSB were rejoined within one hour. During excision repair of DNA damage from u.v.-radiation, the frequencies of DNA SSB as estimated by the alkaline elution technique, were similar in all cell types. Repair replication as measured by BND cellulose chromatography was also similar in epithelial and fibroblastic cells after u.v.-irradiation. Similar levels of SSB were also observed in epithelial and fibroblastic cells after exposure to chemical carcinogens: 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene; benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE); or N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Significant repair replication of BPDE-induced DNA damage was detected in both bronchial epithelial and fibroblastic cells, although the level in fibroblasts was approximately 40% of that in epithelial cells. The pulmonary carcinogen asbestos did not damage DNA. DNA-protein crosslinks induced by formaldehyde were rapidly removed in bronchial cells. Further, epithelial and fibroblastic cells, which were incubated with formaldehyde and the polymerase inhibitor combination of cytosine arabinoside and hydroxyurea, accumulated DNA SSB at approximately equal frequencies. These results should provide a useful background for further investigations of the response of human bronchial cells to various DNA damaging agents

  3. An Unusual Location of Basal Cell Carcinoma: Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Birgül Tepe

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant skin tumour. Chronic sun exposure is considered as the main etiologic factor in its development. Although it mainly occurs on sun-exposed areas as the face and neck, it rarely develops on the forearms and/or arms. The etiologic factors which affect the anatomic distribution of basal cell carcinoma are not well-known. Here we report two patients who developed basal cell carcinoma on the forearm. None of the patients had a specific etiologic fac...

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transmigrates at Epithelial Cell-Cell Junctions, Exploiting Sites of Cell Division and Senescent Cell Extrusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Golovkine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve systemic infection, bacterial pathogens must overcome the critical and challenging step of transmigration across epithelial barriers. This is particularly true for opportunistic pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an agent which causes nosocomial infections. Despite extensive study, details on the mechanisms used by this bacterium to transmigrate across epithelial tissues, as well as the entry sites it uses, remain speculative. Here, using real-time microscopy and a model epithelial barrier, we show that P. aeruginosa employs a paracellular transmigration route, taking advantage of altered cell-cell junctions at sites of cell division or when senescent cells are expelled from the cell layer. Once a bacterium transmigrates, it is followed by a cohort of bacteria using the same entry point. The basal compartment is then invaded radially from the initial penetration site. Effective transmigration and propagation require type 4 pili, the type 3 secretion system (T3SS and a flagellum, although flagellum-deficient bacteria can occasionally invade the basal compartment from wounded areas. In the basal compartment, the bacteria inject the T3SS toxins into host cells, disrupting the cytoskeleton and focal contacts to allow their progression under the cells. Thus, P. aeruginosa exploits intrinsic host cell processes to breach the epithelium and invade the subcellular compartment.

  5. Basal cell carcinoma arising in a smallpox vaccination site.

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, J D; Shesol, B F; Horne, D W

    1980-01-01

    A case of pigmented basal cell carcinoma developing in a smallpox revaccination site is presented. Any progressive change within a smallpox vaccination scar should be thoroughly evaluated and treated appropriately after tissue diagnosis.

  6. Cell-cell interactions promote mammary epithelial cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Mammary epithelium differentiates in a stromal milieu of adipocytes and fibroblasts. To investigate cell-cell interactions that may influence mammary epithelial cell differentiation, we developed a co-culture system of murine mammary epithelium and adipocytes and other fibroblasts. Insofar as caseins are specific molecular markers of mammary epithelial differentiation, rat anti-mouse casein monoclonal antibodies were raised against the three major mouse casein components to study this interac...

  7. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome: A Case Report and Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bala Subramanyam, S.; Naga Sujata, D.; Sridhar, K.; Pushpanjali, M

    2011-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, a rare autosomal dominant disorder, comprises of a number of abnormalities such as multiple nevoid basal cell carcinomas, skeletal abnormalities and multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Diagnosis may be difficult because of the variability of expressivity and different ages of onset for different traits of this disorder. The dental clinician may be the first to encounter and identify this syndrome, when the multiple cysts like radiolucencies are disc...

  8. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; Naevoid Basalzellkarzinom-Syndrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grgic, A.; Heinrich, M.; Heckmann, M.; Kramann, B. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Aliani, S. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin; Dill-Mueller, D. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Hautklinik und Poliklinik; Uder, M. [Erlange-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    2005-07-01

    Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, palmar/plantar pits, calcification of the falx cerebri, and spine and rib anomalies. The combination of clinical, imaging, and histological findings is helpful in identifying NBCCS patients. Imaging plays a crucial role in evaluation of these patients. We present a wide variety of clinical and radiological findings characteristic of this disease. (orig.)

  9. Transcriptional profiling of putative human epithelial stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koçer Salih S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human interfollicular epidermis is sustained by the proliferation of stem cells and their progeny, transient amplifying cells. Molecular characterization of these two cell populations is essential for better understanding of self renewal, differentiation and mechanisms of skin pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to obtain gene expression profiles of alpha 6+/MHCI+, transient amplifying cells and alpha 6+/MHCI-, putative stem cells, and to compare them with existing data bases of gene expression profiles of hair follicle stem cells. The expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I, previously shown to be absent in stem cells in several tissues, and alpha 6 integrin were used to isolate MHCI positive basal cells, and MHCI low/negative basal cells. Results Transcriptional profiles of the two cell populations were determined and comparisons made with published data for hair follicle stem cell gene expression profiles. We demonstrate that presumptive interfollicular stem cells, alpha 6+/MHCI- cells, are enriched in messenger RNAs encoding surface receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, transcripts encoding members of IFN-alpha family proteins and components of IFN signaling, but contain lower levels of transcripts encoding proteins which take part in energy metabolism, cell cycle, ribosome biosynthesis, splicing, protein translation, degradation, DNA replication, repair, and chromosome remodeling. Furthermore, our data indicate that the cell signaling pathways Notch1 and NF-κB are downregulated/inhibited in MHC negative basal cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates that alpha 6+/MHCI- cells have additional characteristics attributed to stem cells. Moreover, the transcription profile of alpha 6+/MHCI- cells shows similarities to transcription profiles of mouse hair follicle bulge cells known to be enriched for stem cells. Collectively, our data suggests that alpha 6+/MHCI- cells

  10. Polarized sorting and trafficking in epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinwang Cao; Michal A Surma; Kai Simons

    2012-01-01

    The polarized distribution of proteins and lipids at the surface membrane of epithelial cells results in the formation of an apical and a basolateral domain,which are separated by tight junctions.The generation and maintenance of epithelial polarity require elaborate mechanisms that guarantee correct sorting and vectorial delivery of cargo molecules.This dynamic process involves the interaction of sorting signals with sorting machineries and the formation of transport carriers.Here we review the recent advances in the field of polarized sorting in epithelial cells.We especially highlight the role of lipid rafts in apical sorting.

  11. Axillary basal cell carcinoma in patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome: report of basal cell carcinoma in both axilla of a woman with basal cell nevus syndrome and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Basal cell carcinoma of the axilla, an area that is not usually exposed to the sun, is rare. Individuals with basal cell nevus syndrome, a disorder associated with a mutation in the patch 1 (PTCH1) gene, develop numerous basal cell carcinomas.Purpose: To describe a woman with basal cell nevus syndrome who developed a pigmented basal cell carcinoma in each of her axilla and to review the features of axillary basal cell carcinoma patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome.Methods: Pubmed w...

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis invasion of gingival epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamont, R.J.; Chan, A.; Belton, C M; Izutsu, K. T.; Vasel, D; Weinberg, A

    1995-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, can invade primary cultures of gingival epithelial cells. Optimal invasion occurred at a relatively low multiplicity of infection (i.e., 100) and demonstrated saturation at a higher multiplicity of infection. Following the lag phase, during which bacteria invaded poorly, invasion was independent of growth phase. P. gingivalis was capable of replicating within the epithelial cells. Invasion was an active process requiring both bacterial and epi...

  13. Defined conditions for the isolation and expansion of basal prostate progenitor cells of mouse and human origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfner, Thomas; Eisen, Christian; Klein, Corinna; Rigo-Watermeier, Teresa; Goeppinger, Stephan M; Jauch, Anna; Schoell, Brigitte; Vogel, Vanessa; Noll, Elisa; Weichert, Wilko; Baccelli, Irène; Schillert, Anja; Wagner, Steve; Pahernik, Sascha; Sprick, Martin R; Trumpp, Andreas

    2015-03-10

    Methods to isolate and culture primary prostate epithelial stem/progenitor cells (PESCs) have proven difficult and ineffective. Here, we present a method to grow and expand both murine and human basal PESCs long term in serum- and feeder-free conditions. The method enriches for adherent mouse basal PESCs with a Lin(-)SCA-1(+)CD49f(+)TROP2(high) phenotype. Progesterone and sodium selenite are additionally required for the growth of human Lin(-)CD49f(+)TROP2(high) PESCs. The gene-expression profiles of expanded basal PESCs show similarities to ESCs, and NF-kB function is critical for epithelial differentiation of sphere-cultured PESCs. When transplanted in combination with urogenital sinus mesenchyme, expanded mouse and human PESCs generate ectopic prostatic tubules, demonstrating their stem cell activity in vivo. This novel method will facilitate the molecular, genomic, and functional characterization of normal and pathologic prostate glands of mouse and human origin. PMID:25702639

  14. Basal cell adenoma of the parotid gland: Cytological diagnosis of an uncommon tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Amoolya; Rao, Madhuri; Geethamani, V; Shetty, Archana C

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a rare benign epithelial tumor of the salivary gland, displaying monomorphic basaloid cells without a myxochondroid component, representing 1-3% of all salivary gland neoplasms seen predominantly in women over 50 years of age. It is uncommon in young adults. Cytodiagnosis of basaloid tumors chiefly basal cell adenoma of the salivary gland, is extremely challenging. The cytological differential diagnoses range from benign to malignant, neoplastic to non- neoplastic lesions. Histopathological examination is a must for definitive diagnosis, as these entities differ in prognosis and therapeutic aspects. We present a 22-years-old male with this uncommon diagnosis with a discussion on the role of cytological diagnosis. Fine needle aspiration cytology is a simple, minimally invasive method for the preoperative diagnosis of various types of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions. The knowledge of its pitfalls and limitations contributes to a more effective approach to treatment. PMID:26097318

  15. Basal cell adenoma of the parotid gland: Cytological diagnosis of an uncommon tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoolya Bhat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell adenoma (BCA is a rare benign epithelial tumor of the salivary gland, displaying monomorphic basaloid cells without a myxochondroid component, representing 1-3% of all salivary gland neoplasms seen predominantly in women over 50 years of age. It is uncommon in young adults. Cytodiagnosis of basaloid tumors chiefly basal cell adenoma of the salivary gland, is extremely challenging. The cytological differential diagnoses range from benign to malignant, neoplastic to non- neoplastic lesions. Histopathological examination is a must for definitive diagnosis, as these entities differ in prognosis and therapeutic aspects. We present a 22-years-old male with this uncommon diagnosis with a discussion on the role of cytological diagnosis. Fine needle aspiration cytology is a simple, minimally invasive method for the preoperative diagnosis of various types of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions. The knowledge of its pitfalls and limitations contributes to a more effective approach to treatment.

  16. Limbal stem cells: Central concepts of corneal epithelial homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinny; J; Yoon; Salim; Ismail; Trevor; Sherwin

    2014-01-01

    A strong cohort of evidence exists that supports the localisation of corneal stem cells at the limbus. The distinguishing characteristics of limbal cells as stem cells include slow cycling properties, high proliferative potential when required, clonogenicity, absence of differentiation marker expression coupled with positive expression of progenitor markers, multipotency, centripetal migration, requirement for a distinct niche environment and the ability of transplanted limbal cells to regenerate the entire corneal epithelium. The existence of limbal stem cells supports the prevailing theory of corneal homeostasis, known as the XYZ hypothesis where X represents proliferation and stratification of limbal basal cells, Y centripetal migration of basal cells and Z desquamation of superficial cells. To maintain the mass of cornea, the sum of X and Y must equal Z and very elegant cell tracking experiments provide strong evidence in support of this theory. However, several recent stud-ies have suggested the existence of oligopotent stem cells capable of corneal maintenance outside of the limbus. This review presents a summary of data which led to the current concepts of corneal epithelial homeostasis and discusses areas of controversy surrounding the existence of a secondary stem cell reservoir on the corneal surface

  17. The Wnt receptor, Lrp5, is expressed by mouse mammary stem cells and is required to maintain the basal lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha M Badders

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ectopic Wnt signaling induces increased stem/progenitor cell activity in the mouse mammary gland, followed by tumor development. The Wnt signaling receptors, Lrp5/6, are uniquely required for canonical Wnt activity. Previous data has shown that the absence of Lrp5 confers resistance to Wnt1-induced tumor development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that all basal mammary cells express Lrp5, and co-express Lrp6 in a similar fashion. Though Wnt dependent transcription of key target genes is relatively unchanged in mammary epithelial cell cultures, the absence of Lrp5 specifically depletes adult regenerative stem cell activity (to less than 1%. Stem cell activity can be enriched by >200 fold (over 80% of activity, based on high Lrp5 expression alone. Though Lrp5 null glands have apparent normal function, the basal lineage is relatively reduced (from 42% basal/total epithelial cells to 22% and Lrp5-/- mammary epithelial cells show enhanced expression of senescence-associated markers in vitro, as measured by expression of p16(Ink4a and TA-p63. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first single biomarker that has been demonstrated to be functionally involved in stem cell maintenance. Together, these results demonstrate that Wnt signaling through Lrp5 is an important component of normal mammary stem cell function.

  18. Coronavirus infection of polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Horzinek, M C; Rottier, P J

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cells are the first host cells to be infected by incoming c oronaviruses. Recent observations in vitro show that coronaviruses are released from a specific side of these polarized cells, and this polarized release might be important for the spread of the infection in vivo. Mechanisms for

  19. Thymic epithelial cells. I. Expression of strong suppressive (veto) activity in mouse thymic epithelial cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Ropke, C

    1990-01-01

    We show that thymic epithelial cells grown under serum-free conditions in a chemically defined culture medium can act as veto cells in vitro. The veto activity of thymic epithelial cells results in inactivation of specific alloreactive cytotoxic T-cell precursors at the clonal level. It is...... concluded that the epithelial stromal cells of the thymus, by acting as veto cells, may be responsible for the negative intrathymic selection of self-reactive thymocytes leading to elimination of the vast majority of immature thymic lymphocytes....

  20. Ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS) perturbs epididymal epithelial cell function in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of sperm granulomas in the epididymis following exposure to EDS, a Leydig cell toxicant, was reported by Cooper and Jackson in 1970. Recent work suggests that EDS may effect the epididymis directly. An in vitro system was developed to determine the nature of any direct effect. The caput epididymis from adult rats was dissected free of connective tissue and small pieces of the tissue were enzymatically digested until plaques of epididymal epithelial cells were obtained. Plaques were cultured on an extracellular matrix gelled on top of a semipermeable filter creating dual-compartment environments. The epithelial cells maintained typical morphology and protein secretion in this culture system for several days. Beginning on day 3, EDS (1 mM) was added to the basal compartment, with or without 35S-methionine. After 24 hours, 35S-labelled culture medium was taken from the apical compartment and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and fluorography. EDS caused decreased secretion of several proteins, including a 39 Kd molecule. Interestingly, a 39 Kd protein was also shown to disappear from sperm taken from the caput epididymidis following in vivo exposure to EDS. Unlabelled cultures were fixed and processed for light microscopy. No alterations in morphological integrity were observed. Thus, epididymal epithelial cell function is directly altered by EDS exposure

  1. Effects of α-particle radiation on rat tracheal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By a combination of methods, which included flow cytometry and magnetic cell sorting, we have demonstrated that the cells of the rat tracheal epithelium which have the greatest proliferative capacity in culture and in vivo are the basal cells. Because of these findings it seems reasonable to suppose that the basal cells are the most likely target for the action of α-particle radiation in pseudostratified respiratory epithelium. This hypothesis is further supported by the finding that the basal cells are the cells which appear to respond to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. The effects of 210Po α-particles on the survival and oncogenic transformation of rat tracheal epithelial cells in suspension were investigated. Since these effects were assayed in culture, the results pertain to the reaction of only the basal cells to irradiation. The results indicate that α-particles are extremely cytotoxic in that a track segment of 4 μm, on average, is sufficient to cause the reproductive death of basal cells. This finding is supported by similar results obtained with two cell lines, Mv1Lu and CHO-K1 BH4. Production of proliferating epithelial foci by α-particles was not distinguishable from control and sham treatments. These results are in direct conflict with many of the results that have been obtained with C3H 1OT1/2 cells in similar transformation assays. Some possible reasons for these disparities are discussed and supporting evidence is provided

  2. Effects of α-particle radiation on rat tracheal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By a combination of methods, which included flow cytometry and magnetic cell sorting, the author has demonstrated that the cells of the rat tracheal epithelium which have the greatest proliferative capacity in culture and in vivo are the basal cells. Because of these findings it seems reasonable to suppose that the basal cells are the most likely target for the action of α-particle radiation in pseudostratified respiratory epithelium. This hypothesis is further supported by the finding that the basal cells are the cells which appear to respond to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate. The effects of 210Po α-particles on the survival and oncogenic transformation of rat tracheal epithelial cells in suspension were investigated. Since these effects were assayed in culture, the results pertain to the reaction of only the basal cells to irradiation. The results indicate that α-particles are extremely cytotoxic in that a track segment of 4 μm, on average, is sufficient to cause the reproductive death of basal cells. This finding is supported by similar results obtained with two cell lines, Mv1Lu and CHO-K1 BH4. Production of proliferating epithelial foci by α-particles was not distinguishable from control and sham treatments. These results are in direct conflict with many of the results that have been obtained with C3H 10T1/2 cells in similar transformation assays. Some possible reasons for these disparities are discussed and supporting evidence is provided

  3. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA IN MIDDLE EAR: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a very common skin cancer, it is much more common in fair – skinned individuals with a family history of Basal cell carcinoma and increases closure to the equator or at higher attitude, this tumor is a extremely rarely found in the middle ear, accounts for 45% of all au ricular carcinomas and is more common than squamous cell carcinoma, it is most frequently found in patient between 40 and 60 years of age, sunlight exposure is the most common modifiable risk factor, we are here presenting a case of Basal cell carcinoma in middle ear presented with ear discharge and polyp in external auditory canal and middle ear, treated with radiotherapy

  4. Isolation of basal and mucous cell populations from rabbit trachea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of a unit gravity sedimentation procedure to monodispersed rabbit tracheal cells resulted in the isolation of enriched (2-fold to 2.5-fold) basal and mucous cell populations. Cellular integrity was confirmed by a trypan blue dye exclusion index of 93%, [3H] leucine incorporation, and ultrastructural analysis. Unit gravity sedimentation is an affective and rapid procedure for obtaining viable, homogeneous preparations of basal and mucous cells that may be used for in vitro studies of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and glycoprotein biosynthesis in respiratory mucous epithelia

  5. Destructive impact of t-lymphocytes, NK and mast cells on basal cell layers: implications for tumor invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous studies have suggested that the primary impact of immune cell infiltration into the normal or pre-invasive tissue component is associated with the physical destruction of epithelial capsules, which may promote tumor progression and invasion. Our current study attempted to further verify our previous observations and determine the primary type(s) of infiltrating immune cells and the possible mechanism associated with physical destructions of the epithelial capsules. In total, the study was conducted with 250 primary breast and prostate tumors, the primary immune cell of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL), Natural killer cells (NK) and Mast cells were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, fluorescent labeling and apoptosis assay. qRT-PCR was used for gene expression analysis. Our current study assessed the physical disruption of these immune cells and potential impact on the epithelial capsule of human breast and prostate tumors. Our study yield several clinically-relevant findings that have not been studied before. (1) A vast majority of these infiltrating immune cells are distributed in the normal-appearing or pre-invasive tissue components rather than in invasive cancer tissues. (2) These cells often form rings or semilunar structures that either surround focally-disrupted basal cell layers or physically attach to the basal cells. (3) Basal cells physically associated with these immune cells generally displayed distinct signs of degeneration, including substantially elevated apoptosis, necrosis, and reduced tumor suppressor p63 expression. In contrast, luminal cells overlying focally disrupted basal cell layers had a substantially increased proliferation rate and elevated expression of stem cell markers compared to their adjacent morphologically similar counterparts that overlie a non-disrupted capsule. Our findings suggest that at the early stage of tumor invasion, CTL, NK and Mast cells are the main types of tumor infiltrating immune cells involved in focal

  6. Sonic Hedgehog Opposes Epithelial Cell Cycle Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Hongran; Khavari, Paul A

    1999-01-01

    Stratified epithelium displays an equilibrium between proliferation and cell cycle arrest, a balance that is disrupted in basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation appears sufficient to induce BCC, however, the way it does so is unknown. Shh-induced epidermal hyperplasia is accompanied by continued cell proliferation in normally growth arrested suprabasal cells in vivo. Shh-expressing cells fail to exit S and G2/M phases in response to calcium-induced differentiation...

  7. An Unusual Location of Basal Cell Carcinoma: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Tepe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant skin tumour. Chronic sun exposure is considered as the main etiologic factor in its development. Although it mainly occurs on sun-exposed areas as the face and neck, it rarely develops on the forearms and/or arms. The etiologic factors which affect the anatomic distribution of basal cell carcinoma are not well-known. Here we report two patients who developed basal cell carcinoma on the forearm. None of the patients had a specific etiologic factor except for chronic sunlight exposure. The aim of our report is to show that this prevalant cutaneous malignancy can be encountered in rare/unusual areas. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 51-4

  8. Wound healing of intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiho Konno

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelial cells (IECs form a selective permeability barrier separating luminal content from underlying tissues. Upon injury, the intestinal epithelium undergoes a wound healing process. Intestinal wound healing is dependent on the balance of three cellular events; restitution, proliferation, and differentiation of epithelial cells adjacent to the wounded area. Previous studies have shown that various regulatory peptides, including growth factors and cytokines, modulate intestinal epithelial wound healing. Recent studies have revealed that novel factors, which include toll-like receptors (TLRs, regulatory peptides, particular dietary factors, and some gastroprotective agents, also modulate intestinal epithelial wound repair. Among these factors, the activation of TLRs by commensal bacteria is suggested to play an essential role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that mutations and dysregulation of TLRs could be major contributing factors in the predisposition and perpetuation of inflammatory bowel disease. Additionally, studies have shown that specific signaling pathways are involved in IEC wound repair. In this review, we summarize the function of IECs, the process of intestinal epithelial wound healing, and the functions and mechanisms of the various factors that contribute to gut homeostasis and intestinal epithelial wound healing.

  9. Evaluation of the ‘Hedgehog’ signaling pathways in squamous and basal cell carcinomas of the eyelids and conjunctiva

    OpenAIRE

    Celebi, Ali Riza Cenk; Kiratli, Hayyam; SOYLEMEZOGLU, FIGEN

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the role of hedgehog signaling pathway in the carcinogenesis of eyelid skin and conjunctival epithelial malignant tumors. The study was conducted on specimens from 41 patients with cutaneous eyelid basal cell carcinoma, 22 with bulbar conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma, 12 with bulbar conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia. Major molecules of Hedgehog signaling pathway (Sonic Hedgehog [Shh] and Patched-1 [Ptch-1] and Glioma-associated oncogene ...

  10. Optimal Surgical Safety Margin for Facial Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Olimpiu Hârceagă; Corina Baican; Rodica Cosgarea

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The major objective of this study is to establish optimal surgical margin for facial primary basal cell carcinoma smaller than 2.3 cm in diameter. Recommendations for this type of skin tumors are for 4 mm surgical margin, but on the face there is a tendency to use smaller margins, for example 2-3 mm.Material and Method. 38 patients with 40 primary facial basal cell carcinoma of less than 2.3 cm in diameter, nonsclerodermiform types, were included in the study. All tumors were init...

  11. Epithelial Cell Apoptosis and Lung Remodeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuyoshi Kuwano

    2007-01-01

    Lung epithelium is the primary site of lung damage in various lung diseases. Epithelial cell apoptosis has been considered to be initial event in various lung diseases. Apoptosis signaling is classically composed of two principle pathways. One is a direct pathway from death receptor ligation to caspase cascade activation and cell death. The other pathway triggered by stresses such as drugs, radiation, infectious agents and reactive oxygen species is mediated by mitochondria. Endoplasmic reticulum has also been shown to be the organelle to mediate apoptosis.Epithelial cell death is followed by remodeling processes, which consist of epithelial and fibroblast activation,cytokine production, activation of coagulation pathway, neoangiogenesis, re-epithelialization and fibrosis.Epithelial and mesenchymal interaction plays important roles in these processes. Further understanding of apoptosis signaling and its regulation by novel strategies may lead to effective treatments against various lung diseases. We review the recent advances in the understanding of apoptosis signaling and discuss the involvement of apoptosis in lung remodeling.

  12. Pigmented Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Clinical Variant, Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    K., Deepadarshan; M., Mallikarjun; N. Abdu, Noshin

    2013-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant tumour of skin, comprising 80% of non-melanoma cancers. Intermittent exposure to ultraviolet radiation is an important risk factor. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a clinical and histological variant of basal cell carcinoma that exhibits increased pigmentation. It is a very rare variant, although its frequency can reach upto 6% of total basal cell carcinomas in Hispanics. Herein, we are reporting 2 cases of pigmented basal cell carcinoma.

  13. Epithelial stem cell islands in the regenerated epidermis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Xiaobing; Sun Xiaoqing; Li Xiaokun; Sheng Zhiyong

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The effects of growth factors on wound healing have been studied extensively, however,their molecular and genetic mechanisms that regulate epidermal regeneration are not fully understood. In this study,we explore the cell reversion characteristics and epithelial stem cell distribution in human regenerated epidermis treated with recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF). Methods:Tissue biospies from 8 regenerated skins treated with rhEGF were used to evaluate the cell reversion and stem cell distribution in epidermis . The expression of β1 integrin, keratin 19 (K19), keratin 14 (K14) and keratin 10 (K10) in skins was detected with SP immunohistochemical methods. Another 8 biopsies from the regenerated epidermis treated without rhEGF, fetus, children and adults were used as the controls. Results:Immunohistochemical stain for β1 integrin and keratin 19 showed that there were some new stem cell islands in the epidermis treated with rhEGF. These cells were small, containing low RNA content and exhibiting positive expression with β1 integrin and K19 stain. They were isolated, bearing no anatomic relation with the epithelial stem cells in the basal layer. The serial identification experiments indicated that there treated without rhEGF. All of these results supported that these β1 integrin and K19 positive stain cells were the stem cells. Conclusions: The results indicated that these stem cell islands were the specific and individual cell structures in rhEGF treated wounds and rhEGF is the main factor in inducing the stem cell island formation. These results offer a direct evidence for epidermal cell reversion from the differentiated cells to undifferentiated stem cells in vivo and may be useful in the rational use of this growth factor to promote wound healing in clinic.

  14. Membrane lipidome of an epithelial cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampaio, Julio L; Gerl, Mathias J; Klose, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Tissue differentiation is an important process that involves major cellular membrane remodeling. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney cells as a model for epithelium formation and investigated the remodeling of the total cell membrane lipidome during the transition from a nonpolarized morphology to an...... epithelial morphology and vice versa. To achieve this, we developed a shotgun-based lipidomics workflow that enabled the absolute quantification of mammalian membrane lipidomes with minimal sample processing from low sample amounts. Epithelial morphogenesis was accompanied by a major shift from sphingomyelin...... to glycosphingolipid, together with an increase in plasmalogen, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol content, whereas the opposite changes took place during an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Moreover, during polarization, the sphingolipids became longer, more saturated, and more...

  15. Generation of ESC-derived Mouse Airway Epithelial Cells Using Decellularized Lung Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaie, Sharareh; Lee, Joyce; Wang, Jinxia; Ackerley, Cameron; Post, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Lung lineage differentiation requires integration of complex environmental cues that include growth factor signaling, cell-cell interactions and cell-matrix interactions. Due to this complexity, recapitulation of lung development in vitro to promote differentiation of stem cells to lung epithelial cells has been challenging. In this protocol, decellularized lung scaffolds are used to mimic the 3-dimensional environment of the lung and generate stem cell-derived airway epithelial cells. Mouse embryonic stem cell are first differentiated to the endoderm lineage using an embryoid body (EB) culture method with activin A. Endoderm cells are then seeded onto decellularized scaffolds and cultured at air-liquid interface for up to 21 days. This technique promotes differentiation of seeded cells to functional airway epithelial cells (ciliated cells, club cells, and basal cells) without additional growth factor supplementation. This culture setup is defined, serum-free, inexpensive, and reproducible. Although there is limited contamination from non-lung endoderm lineages in culture, this protocol only generates airway epithelial populations and does not give rise to alveolar epithelial cells. Airway epithelia generated with this protocol can be used to study cell-matrix interactions during lung organogenesis and for disease modeling or drug-discovery platforms of airway-related pathologies such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:27214388

  16. Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Sørlie, Therese;

    2012-01-01

    The majority of human breast cancers exhibit luminal epithelial differentiation. However, most aggressive behavior, including invasion and purported cancer stem cell activity, are considered characteristics of basal-like cells. We asked the following questions: Must luminal-like breast cancer cells....... We enriched for populations with or without prominent basal-like traits from individual tumors or single cell cloning from cell lines and recovered cells with a luminal-like phenotype. Tumor cells with basal-like traits mimicked phenotypic and functional behavior associated with stem cells assessed...... by gene expression, mammosphere formation and lineage markers. Luminal-like cells without basal-like traits, surprisingly, were fully capable of initiating invasive tumors in NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice. In fact, these phenotypically pure luminal-like cells generated larger and more invasive tumors...

  17. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stacey, S.N.; Sulem, P.; Masson, G.; Gudjonsson, S.A.; Thorleifsson, G.; Jakobsdottir, M.; Sigurdsson, A.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Sigurgeirsson, B.; Benediktsdottir, K.R.; Thorisdottir, K.; Ragnarsson, R.; Scherer, D.; Hemminki, K.; Rudnai, P.; Gurzau, E.; Koppova, K.; Botella-Estrada, R.; Soriano, V.; Juberias, P.; Saez, B.; Gilaberte, Y.; Fuentelsaz, V.; Corredera, C.; Grasa, M.; Hoiom, V.; Lindblom, A.; Bonenkamp, J.J.; Rossum, M.M. van; Aben, K.K.H.; Vries, E. de; Santinami, M.; Mauro, M.G. Di; Maurichi, A.; Wendt, J.; Hochleitner, P.; Pehamberger, H.; Gudmundsson, J.; Magnusdottir, D.N.; Gretarsdottir, S.; Holm, H.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Frigge, M.L.; Blondal, T.; Saemundsdottir, J.; Bjarnason, H.; Kristjansson, K.; Bjornsdottir, G.; Okamoto, I.; Rivoltini, L.; Rodolfo, M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Hansson, J.; Nagore, E.; Mayordomo, J.I.; Kumar, R.; Karagas, M.R.; Nelson, H.H.; Gulcher, J.R.; Rafnar, T.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Olafsson, J.H.; Kong, A.; Stefansson, K.

    2009-01-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 x 10(-9)). A vari

  18. Favourable results of Mohs micrographic surgery for basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gniadecki, Robert; Glud, Martin; Mortensen, Kia;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignant neoplasm with an annual incidence approaching 200/100,000 person-years. Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) is widely used in North America and in Europe for treatment of BCC. This technique ensures radical tumour removal, sparing of...

  19. Filaggrin Gene Mutations and Risk of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Jesper Rabølle; Thyssen, J P; Johansen, J D;

    2013-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is prevalent in lightly-pigmented Europeans. While ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an important risk factor, genetic predispositions to BCC have also been identified (1) . Atopic dermatitis (AD), a condition with a heritability that reaches 71-84%, might increase the risk...

  20. Defined Conditions for the Isolation and Expansion of Basal Prostate Progenitor Cells of Mouse and Human Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Höfner; Christian Eisen; Corinna Klein; Teresa Rigo-Watermeier; Stephan M. Goeppinger; Anna Jauch; Brigitte Schoell; Vanessa Vogel; Elisa Noll; Wilko Weichert; Irène Baccelli; Anja Schillert; Steve Wagner; Sascha Pahernik; Martin R. Sprick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Methods to isolate and culture primary prostate epithelial stem/progenitor cells (PESCs) have proven difficult and ineffective. Here, we present a method to grow and expand both murine and human basal PESCs long term in serum- and feeder-free conditions. The method enriches for adherent mouse basal PESCs with a Lin−SCA-1+CD49f+TROP2high phenotype. Progesterone and sodium selenite are additionally required for the growth of human Lin−CD49f+TROP2high PESCs. The gene-expression profiles ...

  1. Airway epithelial cell tolerance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verghese Margrith W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The respiratory tract epithelium is a critical environmental interface that regulates inflammation. In chronic infectious airway diseases, pathogens may permanently colonize normally sterile luminal environments. Host-pathogen interactions determine the intensity of inflammation and thus, rates of tissue injury. Although many cells become refractory to stimulation by pathogen products, it is unknown whether the airway epithelium becomes either tolerant or hypersensitive in the setting of chronic infection. Our goals were to characterize the response of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to understand whether repeated exposure induced tolerance and, if so, to explore the mechanism(s. Methods The apical surface of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cell cultures was repetitively challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates or the bacterial media control. Toxicity, cytokine production, signal transduction events and specific effects of dominant negative forms of signaling molecules were examined. Additional experiments included using IL-1β and TNFα as challenge agents, and performing comparative studies with a novel airway epithelial cell line. Results An initial challenge of the apical surface of polarized human airway epithelial cells with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates induced phosphorylation of IRAK1, JNK, p38, and ERK, caused degradation of IκBα, generation of NF-κB and AP-1 transcription factor activity, and resulted in IL-8 secretion, consistent with activation of the Toll-like receptor signal transduction pathway. These responses were strongly attenuated following a second Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or IL-1β, but not TNFα, challenge. Tolerance was associated with decreased IRAK1 protein content and kinase activity and dominant negative IRAK1 inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa -stimulated NF-κB transcriptional

  2. Protons sensitize epithelial cells to mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minli Wang

    Full Text Available Proton radiotherapy has gained more favor among oncologists as a treatment option for localized and deep-seated tumors. In addition, protons are a major constituent of the space radiation astronauts receive during space flights. The potential for these exposures to lead to, or enhance cancer risk has not been well studied. Our objective is to study the biological effects of low energy protons on epithelial cells and its propensity to enhance transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a process occurring during tumor progression and critical for invasion and metastasis. Non-transformed mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1Lu and hTERT- immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells (EPC were used in this study. EMT was identified by alterations in cell morphology, EMT-related gene expression changes determined using real-time PCR, and EMT changes in specific cellular markers detected by immunostaining and western blotting. Although TGFβ1 treatment alone is able to induce EMT in both Mv1Lu and EPC cells, low energy protons (5 MeV at doses as low as 0.1 Gy can enhance TGFβ1 induced EMT. Protons alone can also induce a mild induction of EMT. SD208, a potent TGFβ Receptor 1 (TGFβR1 kinase inhibitor, can efficiently block TGFβ1/Smad signaling and attenuate EMT induction. We suggest a model for EMT after proton irradiation in normal and cancerous tissue based on our results that showed that low and high doses of protons can sensitize normal human epithelial cells to mesenchymal transition, more prominently in the presence of TGFβ1, but also in the absence of TGFβ1.

  3. Protons Sensitize Epithelial Cells to Mesenchymal Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minli; Hada, Megumi; Saha, Janapriya; Sridharan, Deepa M.; Pluth, Janice M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy has gained more favor among oncologists as a treatment option for localized and deep-seated tumors. In addition, protons are a major constituent of the space radiation astronauts receive during space flights. The potential for these exposures to lead to, or enhance cancer risk has not been well studied. Our objective is to study the biological effects of low energy protons on epithelial cells and its propensity to enhance transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1)-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process occurring during tumor progression and critical for invasion and metastasis. Non-transformed mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1Lu) and hTERT- immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells (EPC) were used in this study. EMT was identified by alterations in cell morphology, EMT-related gene expression changes determined using real-time PCR, and EMT changes in specific cellular markers detected by immunostaining and western blotting. Although TGFβ1 treatment alone is able to induce EMT in both Mv1Lu and EPC cells, low energy protons (5 MeV) at doses as low as 0.1 Gy can enhance TGFβ1 induced EMT. Protons alone can also induce a mild induction of EMT. SD208, a potent TGFβ Receptor 1 (TGFβR1) kinase inhibitor, can efficiently block TGFβ1/Smad signaling and attenuate EMT induction. We suggest a model for EMT after proton irradiation in normal and cancerous tissue based on our results that showed that low and high doses of protons can sensitize normal human epithelial cells to mesenchymal transition, more prominently in the presence of TGFβ1, but also in the absence of TGFβ1. PMID:22844446

  4. Lung Cancer in Pulmonary Fibrosis: Tales of Epithelial Cell Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Königshoff, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Lung epithelial cells exhibit a high degree of plasticity. Alterations to lung epithelial cell function are critically involved in several chronic lung diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by repetitive injury and subsequent impaired repair of epithelial cells, which leads to aberrant growth factor activation and fibroblast accumulation. Increased proliferation and hyper- and metaplasia of epithelial cells upon injury have also been observed in pulmonary fi...

  5. Respiratory epithelial cells orchestrate pulmonary innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Alenghat, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial surfaces of the lungs are in direct contact with the environment and are subjected to dynamic physical forces as airway tubes and alveoli are stretched and compressed during ventilation. Mucociliary clearance in conducting airways, reduction of surface tension in the alveoli, and maintenance of near sterility have been accommodated by the evolution of a multi-tiered innate host-defense system. The biophysical nature of pulmonary host defenses are integrated with the ability of respiratory epithelial cells to respond to and 'instruct' the professional immune system to protect the lungs from infection and injury. PMID:25521682

  6. In vivo measurement of DNA synthesis rates of colon epithelial cells in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe here a highly sensitive technique for measuring DNA synthesis rates of colon epithelial cells in vivo. Male SD rats were given 2H2O (heavy water). Colon epithelial cells were isolated, DNA was extracted, hydrolyzed to deoxyribonucleosides, and the deuterium enrichment of the deoxyribose moiety was determined by gas chromatographic/mass spectrometry. Turnover time of colon crypts and the time for migration of cells from basal to top fraction of the crypts were measured. These data were consistent with cell cycle analysis and bromodeoxyuridine labeling. By giving different concentrations of a promoter, dose-dependent increases in DNA synthesis rates were detected, demonstrating the sensitivity of the method. Administration of a carcinogen increased DNA synthesis rates cell proliferation in all fractions of the crypt. In conclusion, DNA synthesis rates of colon epithelial cells can be measured directly in vivo using stable-isotope labeling. Potential applications in humans include use as a biomarker for cancer chemoprevention studies

  7. Lipid polarity and sorting in epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    van Meer, G.; Simons, K.

    1988-01-01

    Apical and basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cell plasma membranes possess unique lipid compositions. The tight junction, the structure separating the two domains, forms a diffusion barrier for membrane components and thereby prevents intermixing of the two sets of lipids. The barrier apparently resides in the outer, exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane bilayer. First data are now available on the generation of these differences in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, grown o...

  8. LATE PRESENTATION OF BASAL CELL CARCINOMA - A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phani Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To present a case of basal cell carcinoma with late presentation. METHODS: A 55year - old woman with gradual progressive, nodular, small brown lesion at the left lower eye lid for past 3 years was examined with, computed tomography (CT and then Excisional biopsy was done. RESULTS: The presenting symptom s of the patient were gradual progressive, nodular, sma ll brown lesion at the left lower eye lid . Excisional bi opsy with frozen section of the lesion was performed. Histopathologic evaluation of the eyelid lesion disclosed Trichoblastic (basal cell carcinoma of lower eye lid with large nodular and cribiform (a denoid patterns without any lymph - vascula r and perineural invasion. Post - operative period was uneventful. CONCLUSION: We are hereby reporting this case of eyelid BCC, with no history of skin cancer, or radiation treatment but exposure to sunlight. With earl y adequate treatment the prognosis is good KEYWORDS: B asal cell carcinoma, Excisional biopsy, Trichoblastic carcinoma .

  9. Epithelial morphogenesis in three-dimensional cell culture system

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Mengfei; 刘梦菲

    2014-01-01

    In human body, the most common structures formed by epithelial cells are hollow cysts or tubules. The key feature of the cysts and tubules is the central lumen, which is lined by epithelial cell sheets. The central lumen allows material exchange, thus it is indispensable for the proper function of the epithelial tissue. In order to understand the way that the epithelial cells form highly specialized structure, an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) culture system was established. The Caco-2 c...

  10. EDAC: Epithelial defence against cancer-cell competition between normal and transformed epithelial cells in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Mihoko; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2015-07-01

    During embryonic development or under certain pathological conditions, viable but suboptimal cells are often eliminated from the cellular society through a process termed cell competition. Cell competition was originally identified in Drosophila where cells with different properties compete for survival; 'loser' cells are eliminated from tissues and consequently 'winner' cells become dominant. Recent studies have shown that cell competition also occurs in mammals. While apoptotic cell death is the major fate for losers in Drosophila, outcompeted cells show more variable phenotypes in mammals, such as cell death-independent apical extrusion and cellular senescence. Molecular mechanisms underlying these processes have been recently revealed. Especially, in epithelial tissues, normal cells sense and actively eliminate the neighbouring transformed cells via cytoskeletal proteins by the process named epithelial defence against cancer (EDAC). Here, we introduce this newly emerging research field: cell competition in mammals. PMID:25991731

  11. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  12. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N K Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by odontogenic keratocysts in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the odontogenic keratocysts are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This case report presents a patient diagnosed as NBCCS by clinical, radiographic and histological findings in a 13-year-old boy. This paper highlights the importance of early diagnosis of NBCCS which can help in preventive multidisciplinary approach to provide a better prognosis for the patient.

  13. Novel Hedgehog pathway targets against Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jean Y.; So, Po-Lin; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2006-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a key role in directing growth and patterning during embryonic development and is required in vertebrates for the normal development of many structures, including the neural tube, axial skeleton, skin, and hair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in adult tissue is associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), medulloblastoma, and a subset of pancreatic, gastro-intestinal, and other cancers. This review will provide an overvi...

  14. Basal cell carcinoma arising in a sebaceous naevus

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Kavit; Orkar, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Sebaceous naevus is a rare non-melanocytic congenital skin hamartoma. Even more rare is the transformation of these lesions into malignant skin cancers, most notably basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). We discuss a case in an adult with later malignant transformation into BCC reported by clinical pathologists. There is dispute about the accurate incidence of malignant transformation. More recently, research has shown that transformation into BCC is unlikely, in that the origins of these lesions ari...

  15. Autofluorescence imaging of basal cell carcinoma by smartphone RGB camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihachev, Alexey; Derjabo, Alexander; Ferulova, Inesa; Lange, Marta; Lihacova, Ilze; Spigulis, Janis

    2015-12-01

    The feasibility of smartphones for in vivo skin autofluorescence imaging has been investigated. Filtered autofluorescence images from the same tissue area were periodically captured by a smartphone RGB camera with subsequent detection of fluorescence intensity decreasing at each image pixel for further imaging the planar distribution of those values. The proposed methodology was tested clinically with 13 basal cell carcinoma and 1 atypical nevus. Several clinical cases and potential future applications of the smartphone-based technique are discussed.

  16. Basal Cell Adenoma of the Upper Lip from Minor Salivary Gland Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Minicucci, Eliana Maria; de Campos, Eloisa Bueno Pires; Weber, Silke Anna Thereza; Domingues, Maria Aparecida Custodio; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2008-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma is an uncommon benign salivary gland neoplasm, presenting isomorphic basaloid cells with a prominent basal cell layer. Taking into account that basal cell adenomas represent 1% of all salivary gland tumors, being the majority of cases in the parotid glands, the goal of this paper is to report a case of basal cell adenoma of the upper lip arising from minor salivary gland.

  17. Apico-basal polarity complex and cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammed Khursheed; Murali Dharan Bashyam

    2014-03-01

    Apico-basal polarity is a cardinal molecular feature of adult eukaryotic epithelial cells and appears to be involved in several key cellular processes including polarized cell migration and maintenance of tissue architecture. Epithelial cell polarity is maintained by three well-conserved polarity complexes, namely, PAR, Crumbs and SCRIB. The location and interaction between the components of these complexes defines distinct structural domains of epithelial cells. Establishment and maintenance of apico-basal polarity is regulated through various conserved cell signalling pathways including TGF, Integrin and WNT signalling. Loss of cell polarity is a hallmark for carcinoma, and its underlying molecular mechanism is beginning to emerge from studies on model organisms and cancer cell lines. Moreover, deregulated expression of apico-basal polarity complex components has been reported in human tumours. In this review, we provide an overview of the apico-basal polarity complexes and their regulation, their role in cell migration, and finally their involvement in carcinogenesis.

  18. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid in Hispanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Koo Lin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lily Koo Lin1, Han Lee2, Eli Chang11Department of Oculoplastics, Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: Pigmented basal cell carcinoma (PBCC of the eyelid has not been well cited in the literature, and is often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of pigmented eyelid lesions. We aim to describe PBCC of the eyelid in Hispanic patients.Methods: Retrospective review of patients with eyelid skin cancer who presented to the Department of Dermatology at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California and the Doheny Eye Institute from January 2002 to November 2005.Results: Sixty-nine of the 79 patients with eyelid skin cancer had basal cell carcinoma. Eight of these patients were Hispanic. Four of the eight Hispanic patients had PBCC.Conclusions: Although eyelid PBCC is regarded as a rare condition, it may occur more commonly in the Hispanic population and should be remembered in the differential diagnosis of pigmented eyelid lesions.Keywords: pigmented basal cell carcinoma, eyelid, skin cancer, lesions

  19. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell skin cancer ENT-organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Volgin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of photodynamic therapy in 96 patients with primary and recurrent basal cell skin cancer of ENT-organs are represented. For photodynamic therapy the Russian-made photosensitizer Photoditazine at dose of 0.6–1.4 mg/kg was used. Parameters were selected taking into account type and extent of tumor and were as follows: output power – 0.1–3.0 W, power density – 0.1–1.3 W/cm2, light dose – 100–400 J/cm2. The studies showed high efficacy of treatment for primary and recurrent basal cell skin cancer of nose, ear and external auditory canal – from 87.5 to 94.7% of complete regression. Examples of efficacy of the method are represented in the article. High efficacy and good cosmetic effects allowed to make a conclusion about perspectivity of photodynamic therapy for recurrent basal cell skin cancer of ENT-organs. 

  20. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Lentivirus-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Giulia; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Chan, Mario; Meng, Cuixiang; Farley, Raymond; Brody, Steven L; Inoue, Makoto; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Alton, Eric W F W; Griesenbach, Uta

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge in pulmonary gene therapy for cystic fibrosis is to provide long-term correction of the genetic defect. This may be achievable by targeting airway epithelial stem/progenitor cells with an integrating vector. Here, we evaluated the ability of a lentiviral vector, derived from the simian immunodeficiency virus and pseudotyped with F and HN envelope proteins from Sendai virus, to transduce progenitor basal cells of the mouse nasal airways. We first transduced basal cell-enriched cultures ex vivo and confirmed efficient transduction of cytokeratin-5 positive cells. We next asked whether progenitor cells could be transduced in vivo. We evaluated the transduction efficiency in mice pretreated by intranasal administration of polidocanol to expose the progenitor cell layer. Compared to control mice, polidocanol treated mice demonstrated a significant increase in the number of transduced basal cells at 3 and 14 days post vector administration. At 14 days, the epithelium of treated mice contained clusters (4 to 8 adjacent cells) of well differentiated ciliated, as well as basal cells suggesting a clonal expansion. These results indicate that our lentiviral vector can transduce progenitor basal cells in vivo, although transduction required denudation of the surface epithelium prior to vector administration. PMID:26471068

  1. DNA typing of epithelial cells after strangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, P; Kleiber, M

    1997-01-01

    DNA typing was carried out on epithelial cells which were transferred from the hands of the suspect onto the neck of the victim. In an experimental study 16 suspect-victim combinations were investigated for estimating the typing success. Alternatively to an attack against the neck, the upper arm was used for "strangulation". PCR typing was carried out using the short tandem repeat systems (STRs) HumCD4, HumVWF31A (VWA) and Hum-FIBRA (FGA) and the success rate was > 70% for all 3 systems. In most of the cases mixed patterns containing the phenotype of the suspect and the victim were obtained. In a case where strangulation was the cause of death, epithelial cells could be removed from the neck of the victim. The DNA pattern of the suspect could be successfully amplified using four STRs, demonstrating the applicability of this approach for practical casework. PMID:9274940

  2. Wnt-10b promotes differentiation of skin epithelial cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the role of Wnt-10b in epithelial differentiation, we investigated the effects of Wnt-10b on adult mouse-derived primary skin epithelial cells (MPSEC). Recombinant Wnt-10b protein (rWnt-10b) was prepared using a gene engineering technique and MPSEC were cultured in its presence, which resulted in morphological changes from cuboidal to spindle-shaped and inhibited their proliferation. Further, involvement of the canonical Wnt signal pathway was also observed. MPSEC treated with rWnt-10b showed characteristics of the hair shaft and inner root sheath of the hair follicle, in results of Ayoub Shklar staining and immunocytochemistry. Further, the cells expressed mRNA for differentiated epithelial cells, including keratin 1, keratin 2, loricrin, mHa5, and mHb5, in association with a decreased expression of the basal cell marker keratin 5. These results suggest that Wnt-10b promotes the differentiation of MPSEC

  3. Polarization Affects Airway Epithelial Conditioning of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papazian, Dick; Chhoden, Tashi; Arge, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AECs) form polarized barriers that interact with inhaled allergens and are involved in immune homeostasis. We examined how monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) are affected by contact with the airway epithelium. In traditional setups, bronchial epithelial cell lines...... were allowed to polarize on filter inserts, and MDDCs were allowed to adhere to the epithelial basal side. In an optimized setup, the cell application was reversed, and the culture conditions were modified to preserve cellular polarization and integrity. These two parameters were crucial for the MDDCs....... In conclusion, we determined that AEC conditioning favoring cellular integrity leads to a tolerogenic MDDC phenotype, which is likely to be important in regulating immune responses against commonly inhaled allergens....

  4. Somatic Cell Fusions Reveal Extensive Heterogeneity in Basal-like Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Ying; Subedee, Ashim; Bloushtain-Qimron, Noga;

    2015-01-01

    heterogeneity in basal-like breast cancers that correlates with clinical outcome. We also found that protein extracts of basal-like cells are sufficient to induce a luminal-to-basal phenotypic switch, implying a trigger of basal-like autoregulatory circuits. We determined that KDM6A might be required for...

  5. Programmed Cell-to-Cell Variability in Ras Activity Triggers Emergent Behaviors during Mammary Epithelial Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Variability in signaling pathway activation between neighboring epithelial cells can arise from local differences in the microenvironment, noisy gene expression, or acquired genetic changes. To investigate the consequences of this cell-to-cell variability in signaling pathway activation on coordinated multicellular processes such as morphogenesis, we use DNA-programmed assembly to construct three-dimensional MCF10A microtissues that are mosaic for low-level expression of activated H-Ras. We find two emergent behaviors in mosaic microtissues: cells with activated H-Ras are basally extruded or lead motile multicellular protrusions that direct the collective motility of their wild-type neighbors. Remarkably, these behaviors are not observed in homogeneous microtissues in which all cells express the activated Ras protein, indicating that heterogeneity in Ras activity, rather than the total amount of Ras activity, is critical for these processes. Our results directly demonstrate that cell-to-cell variability in pathway activation within local populations of epithelial cells can drive emergent behaviors during epithelial morphogenesis.

  6. Transcriptional Landscape of Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gharib, Sina A; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Takamoto Ohse; Pickering, Scott G.; Krofft, Ronald D.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs ...

  7. Intestinal epithelial cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia; Roda; Alessandro; Sartini; Elisabetta; Zambon; Andrea; Calafiore; Margherita; Marocchi; Alessandra; Caponi; Andrea; Belluzzi; Enrico; Roda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) seems to involve a primary defect in one or more of the elements responsible for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and oral tolerance. The most important element is represented by the intestinal barrier, a complex system formed mostly by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs have an active role in producing mucus and regulating its composition; they provide a physical barrier capable of controlling antigen traff ic through the intestinal muco...

  8. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne - case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda P

    2016-06-01

    Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment-resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis. PMID:27398205

  9. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne – case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda P.

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment‐resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis.

  10. AGE-modified basement membrane cooperates with Endo180 to promote epithelial cell invasiveness and decrease prostate cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Breit, Claudia;

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical strain imposed by age-related thickening of the basal lamina and augmented tissue stiffness in the prostate gland coincides with increased cancer risk. Here we hypothesized that the structural alterations in the basal lamina associated with age can induce mechanotransduction pathways...... in prostate epithelial cells (PECs) to promote invasiveness and cancer progression. To demonstrate this, we developed a 3D model of PEC acini in which thickening and stiffening of basal lamina matrix was induced by advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-dependent non-enzymatic crosslinking of its major...... [myosin-light chain-2 (MLC2) phosphorylation], loss of cell polarity, loss of cell-cell junctions, luminal infiltration and basal invasion induced by AGE-modified basal lamina matrix in PEC acini. Our in vitro results were concordant with luminal occlusion of acini in the prostate glands of adult Endo180...

  11. Integrin α6β4 identifies human distal lung epithelial progenitor cells with potential as a cell-based therapy for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Li

    Full Text Available To develop stem/progenitor cell-based therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF lung disease, it is first necessary to identify markers of human lung epithelial progenitor/stem cells and to better understand the potential for differentiation into distinct lineages. Here we investigated integrin α6β4 as an epithelial progenitor cell marker in the human distal lung. We identified a subpopulation of α6β4(+ cells that localized in distal small airways and alveolar walls and were devoid of pro-surfactant protein C expression. The α6β4(+ epithelial cells demonstrated key properties of stem cells ex vivo as compared to α6β4(- epithelial cells, including higher colony forming efficiency, expression of stem cell-specific transcription factor Nanog, and the potential to differentiate into multiple distinct lineages including basal and Clara cells. Co-culture of α6β4(+ epithelial cells with endothelial cells enhanced proliferation. We identified a subset of adeno-associated virus (AAVs serotypes, AAV2 and AAV8, capable of transducing α6β4(+ cells. In addition, reconstitution of bronchi epithelial cells from CF patients with only 5% normal α6β4(+ epithelial cells significantly rescued defects in Cl(- transport. Therefore, targeting the α6β4(+ epithelial population via either gene delivery or progenitor cell-based reconstitution represents a potential new strategy to treat CF lung disease.

  12. Basal cell carcinoma develops in contact with the epidermal basal cell layer - a three-dimensional morphological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirici, Ionica; Ciurea, Marius Eugen; Mîndrilă, Ion; Avrămoiu, Ioan; Pirici, Alexandru; Nicola, Monica Georgiana; Rogoveanu, Otilia Constantina

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant tumor of the skin, and it develops most frequently on the areas of the body that make its treatment and care extremely difficult, especially in cases of neglecting or aggressive growth and invasion. Both typical mild cases as well as locally aggressive tumor types do not tend to metastasize, and it has been postulated that they should share some common biological and morphological features that might explain this behavior. In this study, we have utilized a high-resolution three-dimensional reconstruction technique on pathological samples from 15 cases of common aggressive (fibrosing and adenoid types) and mild (superficial type) basal cell carcinomas, and showed that all these types shared contact points and bridges with the underlying basal cell layer of the epidermis or with the outmost layer of the hair follicle. The connections found had in fact the highest number for fibrosing type (100%), compared to the superficial (85.71%) and adenoid (55%) types. The morphology of the connection bridges was also different, adjacent moderate to abundant inflammatory infiltrate seeming to lead to a loss of basaloid features in these areas. For the adenoid type, tumor islands seemed to be connected also to each other more strongly, forming a common "tumor lace", and while it has been showed that superficial and fibrosing types have higher recurrence risks, all together these data might iterate a connection between the number of bridging points and the biological and clinical manifestation of this skin tumor. PMID:27151694

  13. Specialized membrane biogenesis in mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apical membrane of the mammary gland epithelial cell is highly differentiated and adapted to participate in the process of fat secretion. Certain of the apical membrane differentiation antigens are frequently expressed on membrane carcinoma cells, and knowledge of the normal mechanisms by which these antigens are regulated may have implications for a better understanding of tumor antigen expression. Because the apical membrane of the cell is lost during secretion, active membrane biosynthesis must accompany fat secretion, and the cell represents a good model for studying membrane biogenesis in polarized epithelial cells. Experiments have been carried out using primary cultures of cells established from mammary glands of late pregnant mice and also a mouse cell line, COMMA-1-D, that differentiates in an appropriate milieu. When fat globule membranes are purified from mouse milk and the protein composition analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, four major proteins are identifiable with molecular weights of 55, 67, 90, and 150 kDa. The 67-kDa component was identified as butyrophilin and the 150-kDa one as xanthine oxidase. In addition, a high molecular weight carbohydrate rich glycoprotein, PAS-O, is also present. 3 refs., 3 figs

  14. Macrophage-specific RAM11 monoclonal antibody cross-reacts with basal cells of stratified squamous epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Cichocki

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available RAM11 is a mouse monoclonal anti-rabbit macrophage antibody recognizing connective tissue and vascular (atheromatous tissue macrophages. This study demonstrates a cross-reaction of RAM11 with an unknown antigen in rabbit normal epithelial cells. Formalin-fixed, paraffin sections of the New Zealand White rabbit normal skin, oral mucosa, esophagus, small intestine and lung were immunostained with RAM11 antibody followed by goat anti-mouse Cy-3-conjugated antiglobulin. RAM11-positive immunofluorescence was observed in basal layer cells of stratified squamous epithelia (skin, oral mucosa, esophagus. No RAM11 immunostaining was found in any cells of simple (intestinal, bronchial epithelia. These findings show that basal cells of stratified squamous keratinized and non-keratinized epithelia of the rabbit express an antigenic epitope which is common with that of macrophage antigen recognized by RAM11 monoclonal antibody.

  15. Macrophage-specific RAM11 monoclonal antibody cross-reacts with basal cells of stratified squamous epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Grzegorz J; Litwin, Jan A; Furgal-Borzych, Alicja; Zarzecka, Joanna; Cichocki, Tadeusz

    2007-01-01

    RAM11 is a mouse monoclonal anti-rabbit macrophage antibody recognizing connective tissue and vascular (atheromatous tissue) macrophages. This study demonstrates a cross-reaction of RAM11 with an unknown antigen in rabbit normal epithelial cells. Formalin-fixed, paraffin sections of the New Zealand White rabbit normal skin, oral mucosa, esophagus, small intestine and lung were immunostained with RAM11 antibody followed by goat anti-mouse Cy-3-conjugated antiglobulin. RAM11-positive immunofluorescence was observed in basal layer cells of stratified squamous epithelia (skin, oral mucosa, esophagus). No RAM11 immunostaining was found in any cells of simple (intestinal, bronchial) epithelia. These findings show that basal cells of stratified squamous keratinized and non-keratinized epithelia of the rabbit express an antigenic epitope which is common with that of macrophage antigen recognized by RAM11 monoclonal antibody. PMID:17951172

  16. Inverting adherent cells for visualizing ECM interactions at the basal cell side

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) govern a wide range of cellular functions, including survival, migration and invasion. However, in adherent cells these interactions occur primarily on the basal cell side, making them inaccessible to high-resolution, surface-scanning imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Here we describe a fast and reliable method for inverting adherent cells, exposing the basal cell membrane for direct analysis by AFM or SEM in combination with fluorescence microscopy. Cells including their matrix adhesion sites remain intact during the inversion process and are transferred together with the complete array of basally associated ECM proteins. Molecular features of ECM proteins, such as the characteristic 67 nm collagen D-periodicity, are well preserved after inversion. To demonstrate the versatility of the method, we compared basal interactions of fibroblasts with fibrillar collagen I and fibronectin matrices. While fibroblasts remodel the fibronectin layer exclusively from above, they actively invade even thin collagen layers by contacting individual collagen nanofibrils both basally and apically through a network of cellular extensions. Cell–matrix entanglement coincides with enhanced cell spreading and flattening, indicating that nanoscale ECM interactions govern macroscopic changes in cell morphology. The presented cell inversion technique can thus provide novel insight into nanoscale cell–matrix interactions at the basal cell side. - Highlights: ► We present a novel method for inverting adherent cells to expose the basal cell side. ► Basal cell sides can be imaged at high resolution by AFM and SEM. ► Cells can be inverted together with the underlying extracellular matrix. ► AFM images of inverted cells provide a nanoscale look at basal cell–ECM interactions

  17. Transcriptional Landscape of Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Sina A.; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Ohse, Takamoto; Pickering, Scott G.; Krofft, Ronald D.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs were highly enriched in PECs, we characterized several of their candidate members at the protein level. Collectively, our findings confirm that PECs are multifaceted cells and help define their diverse functional repertoire. PMID:25127402

  18. Transcriptional landscape of glomerular parietal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina A Gharib

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs. In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs were highly enriched in PECs, we characterized several of their candidate members at the protein level. Collectively, our findings confirm that PECs are multifaceted cells and help define their diverse functional repertoire.

  19. Dedifferentiation of committed epithelial cells into stem cells in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Tata, Purushothama Rao; Mou, Hongmei; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Zhao, Rui; Prabhu, Mythili; Law, Brandon M.; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Josalyn L Cho; Breton, Sylvie; Sahay, Amar; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cellular plasticity contributes to the regenerative capacity of plants, invertebrates, teleost fishes, and amphibians. In vertebrates, differentiated cells are known to revert into replicating progenitors, but these cells do not persist as stable stem cells. We now present evidence that differentiated airway epithelial cells can revert into stable and functional stem cells in vivo. Following the ablation of airway stem cells, we observed a surprising increase in the proliferation of c...

  20. Dedifferentiation of committed epithelial cells into stem cells in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Tata, Purushothama Rao; Mou, Hongmei; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Zhao, Rui; Prabhu, Mythili; Law, Brandon M.; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Josalyn L Cho; Breton, Sylvie; Sahay, Amar; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cellular plasticity contributes to the regenerative capacity of plants, invertebrates, teleost fishes, and amphibians. In vertebrates, differentiated cells are known to revert into replicating progenitors, but these cells do not persist as stable stem cells. We now present evidence that differentiated airway epithelial cells can revert into stable and functional stem cells in vivo. Following the ablation of airway stem cells, we observed a surprising increase in the proliferation of c...

  1. Attachment of Actinomyces naeslundii to human buccal epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders, J M; MILLER, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    A standardized assay was used to measure the attachment of Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 12104 to washed human buccal epithelial cells. Treatment of the A. naeslundii cells with hyaluronidases, wheat germ lipase, protease, trypsin, heat, or sonic oscillation significantly reduced their ability to attach to epithelial cells. Treatment of the epithelial cells with the above enzymes did not influence the attachment of A. naeslundii. Extraction of A. naeslundii with NaOH also significantly reduced ...

  2. Growth of cultured porcine retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, A.K.; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nicolini, Jair;

    2003-01-01

    To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation.......To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation....

  3. The role of the hedgehog/patched signaling pathway in epithelial stem cell proliferation:from fly to human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PARISIMICHAELJ; HAIFANLIN

    1998-01-01

    The hedgehog-patched(hh-ptc)intercellular signaling pathway has recently been shown to control the proliferation of epithelial stem cells in both Drosophila and Vertebrated.Mutant and ectopic expression analyses in Drosophila suggest that the HH protein diffuses from the signaling cells to promote the proliferation of nearby ovarian somatic stem cells by antagonizing the suppression of its receptor PTC towards the CI transcription factor in the stem cells.Consequently,the transcription of CIdependent genes leads to stem cell proliferation.This regulatory pathway appears to function also in vertebrates, where defects in ptc cause basal cell carcinoma,tumors of epidermal stem cell origin.Basal cell carcinoma can also be induced by ectopic expression of Sonic hedgehog (shh) or Glil,the vertebrate homolog of ci.These studies suggest the conservation of the hh signaling pathway in controlling epithelial stem cell divisions among different organisma.

  4. Delayed Diagnosis: Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of Scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Didar Balcı,

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Although basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common form of skin cancer, the scalp lesions of BCC have been rarely reported. Giant BCC is defined as a tumor larger than 5 cm in diameter and only 0.5-1 % of all BCCs achieve this size. We report a case of giant BCC on the scalp that was treated with topical coticosteroids and antifungal shampoo for five years. BCC should be considered in the differential diagnosis in erythematous plaque type lesions resistant to therapy with long duration localized on the scalp.

  5. Favourable results of Mohs micrographic surgery for basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gniadecki, Robert; Glud, Martin; Mortensen, Kia;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignant neoplasm with an annual incidence approaching 200/100,000 person-years. Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) is widely used in North America and in Europe for treatment of BCC. This technique ensures radical tumour removal, sparing of...... to 40% smaller skin defects than standard excisions with 4 or 6 mm margins. Closure of skin defects was achieved by side-to-side closure in 49% and by local flaps in 40%. There were no relapses during the observation time. The safety, cosmetic and functional outcome were excellent. CONCLUSIONS: We...

  6. Cell mechanics of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and macrophages (AMs).

    OpenAIRE

    Féréol, Sophie; Fodil, Redouane; Pelle, Gabriel; Louis, Bruno; Isabey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Cell mechanics provides an integrated view of many biological phenomena which are intimately related to cell structure and function. Because breathing constitutes a sustained motion synonymous with life, pulmonary cells are normally designed to support permanent cyclic stretch without breaking, while receiving mechanical cues from their environment. The authors study the mechanical responses of alveolar cells, namely epithelial cells and macrophages, exposed to well-controlled mechanical stre...

  7. Apoptosis of human intestinal epithelial cells after bacterial invasion.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, J. M.; Eckmann, L; Savidge, T. C.; Lowe, D C; Witthöft, T; Kagnoff, M F

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial cells that line the human intestinal mucosa are the initial site of host invasion by bacterial pathogens. The studies herein define apoptosis as a new category of intestinal epithelial cell response to bacterial infection. Human colon epithelial cells are shown to undergo apoptosis following infection with invasive enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella or enteroinvasive Escherichia coli. In contrast to the rapid onset of apoptosis seen after bacterial infection of mouse monocyte-ma...

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae Bind to Cytokeratin of Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Sharma, Ashu; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    The adherence of Porphyromonas gingivalis to host cells is likely a prerequisite step in the pathogenesis of P. gingivalis-induced periodontal disease. P. gingivalis binds to and invades epithelial cells, and fimbriae are shown to be involved in this process. Little is known regarding epithelial receptor(s) involved in binding of P. gingivalis fimbriae. Using an overlay assay with purified P. gingivalis fimbriae as a probe, two major epithelial cell proteins with masses of 50 and 40 kDa were ...

  9. Long-term delivery of nerve growth factor by encapsulated cell biodelivery in the Göttingen minipig basal forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjord-Larsen, L; Kusk, P; Tornøe, Jens;

    2010-01-01

    , capable of local delivery of NGF. The clinical device, named NsG0202, houses an NGF-secreting cell line (NGC-0295), which is derived from a human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line, stably genetically modified to secrete NGF. Bioactivity and correct processing of NGF was confirmed in vitro. Ns......G0202 devices were implanted in the basal forebrain of Göttingen minipigs and the function and retrievability were evaluated after 7 weeks, 6 and 12 months. All devices were implanted and retrieved without associated complications. They were physically intact and contained a high number of viable and...

  10. Clinical variants, stages, and management of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubomir A Dourmishev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common paraneoplastic disease among human neoplasms. The tumor affects mainly photoexposed areas, most often in the head and seldom appears on genitalia and perigenital region. BCC progresses slowly and metastases are found in less than 0.5% of the cases; however, a considerable local destruction and mutilation could be observed when treatment is neglected or inadequate. Different variants as nodular, cystic, micronodular, superficial, pigment BCC are described in literature and the differential diagnosis in some cases could be difficult. The staging of BCC is made according to Tumor, Node, Metastasis (TNM classification and is essential for performing the adequate treatment. Numerous therapeutic methods established for treatment of BCC, having their advantages or disadvantages, do not absolutely dissolve the risk of relapses. The early diagnostics based on the good knowledge and timely organized and adequate treatment is a precondition for better prognosis. Despite the slow progress and numerous therapeutic methods, the basal cell carcinoma should not be underestimated.

  11. Eosinophils Promote Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition of Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yasukawa, Atsushi; Hosoki, Koa; Toda, Masaaki; Miyake, Yasushi; Matsushima, Yuki; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Boveda-Ruiz, Daniel; Gil-Bernabe, Paloma; Nagao, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Mayumi; Hiraguchi, Yukiko; Tokuda, Reiko; Naito, Masahiro; Takagi, Takehiro; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic inflammation and remodeling of the airways including subepithelial fibrosis and myofibroblast hyperplasia are characteristic pathological findings of bronchial asthma. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in airway remodelling. In this study, we hypothesized that infiltrating eosinophils promote airway remodelling in bronchial asthma. To demonstrate this hypothesis we evaluated the effect of eosinophils on EMT by in vitro and in vivo studies. EMT was a...

  12. Cross-talk between intestinal epithelial cells and immune cells in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghadban, Sara; Kaissi, Samira; Homaidan, Fadia R.; Naim, Hassan Y.; El-Sabban, Marwan E.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involves functional impairment of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), concomitant with the infiltration of the lamina propria by inflammatory cells. We explored the reciprocal paracrine and direct interaction between human IECs and macrophages (MΦ) in a co-culture system that mimics some aspects of IBD. We investigated the expression of intercellular junctional proteins in cultured IECs under inflammatory conditions and in tissues from IBD patients. IECs establish functional gap junctions with IECs and MΦ, respectively. Connexin (Cx26) and Cx43 expression in cultured IECs is augmented under inflammatory conditions; while, Cx43-associated junctional complexes partners, E-cadherin, ZO-1, and β-catenin expression is decreased. The expression of Cx26 and Cx43 in IBD tissues is redistributed to the basal membrane of IEC, which is associated with decrease in junctional complex proteins’ expression, collagen type IV expression and infiltration of MΦ. These data support the notion that the combination of paracrine and hetero-cellular communication between IECs and MΦs may regulate epithelial cell function through the establishment of junctional complexes between inflammatory cells and IECs, which ultimately contribute to the dys-regulation of intestinal epithelial barrier. PMID:27417573

  13. Expression of IL-4/IL-13 receptors in differentiating human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Steven R; Martin, Linda D; Stern, Randi; Laxman, Bharathi; Marroquin, Bertha A

    2010-11-01

    IL-4 and IL-13 elicit several important responses in airway epithelium including chemokine secretion and mucous secretion that may contribute to airway inflammation, cell migration, and differentiation. These cytokines have overlapping but not identical effector profiles likely due to shared subunits in their receptor complexes. These receptors are variably described in epithelial cells, and the relative expression, localization, and function of these receptors in differentiated and repairing epithelial cells are not clear. We examined IL-4/IL-13 receptor expression and localization in primary airway epithelial cells collected from normal human lungs and grown under conditions yielding both undifferentiated and differentiated cells inclusive of basal, goblet, and ciliated cell phenotypes. Gene expression of the IL-4Rα, IL-2Rγc, IL-13Rα1, and IL-13Rα2 receptor subunits increased with differentiation, but different patterns of localization and protein abundance were seen for each subunit based on both differentiation and the cell subtypes present. Increased expression of receptor subunits observed in more differentiated cells was associated with more substantial functional responses to IL-4 stimulation including increased eotaxin-3 expression and accelerated migration after injury. We demonstrate substantial differences in IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunit expression and responsiveness to IL-4 based on the extent of airway epithelial cell differentiation and suggest that these differences may have functional consequences in airway inflammation. PMID:20729386

  14. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  15. Defined Conditions for the Isolation and Expansion of Basal Prostate Progenitor Cells of Mouse and Human Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Höfner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Methods to isolate and culture primary prostate epithelial stem/progenitor cells (PESCs have proven difficult and ineffective. Here, we present a method to grow and expand both murine and human basal PESCs long term in serum- and feeder-free conditions. The method enriches for adherent mouse basal PESCs with a Lin−SCA-1+CD49f+TROP2high phenotype. Progesterone and sodium selenite are additionally required for the growth of human Lin−CD49f+TROP2high PESCs. The gene-expression profiles of expanded basal PESCs show similarities to ESCs, and NF-kB function is critical for epithelial differentiation of sphere-cultured PESCs. When transplanted in combination with urogenital sinus mesenchyme, expanded mouse and human PESCs generate ectopic prostatic tubules, demonstrating their stem cell activity in vivo. This novel method will facilitate the molecular, genomic, and functional characterization of normal and pathologic prostate glands of mouse and human origin.

  16. Defined Conditions for the Isolation and Expansion of Basal Prostate Progenitor Cells of Mouse and Human Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfner, Thomas; Eisen, Christian; Klein, Corinna; Rigo-Watermeier, Teresa; Goeppinger, Stephan M.; Jauch, Anna; Schoell, Brigitte; Vogel, Vanessa; Noll, Elisa; Weichert, Wilko; Baccelli, Irène; Schillert, Anja; Wagner, Steve; Pahernik, Sascha; Sprick, Martin R.; Trumpp, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Methods to isolate and culture primary prostate epithelial stem/progenitor cells (PESCs) have proven difficult and ineffective. Here, we present a method to grow and expand both murine and human basal PESCs long term in serum- and feeder-free conditions. The method enriches for adherent mouse basal PESCs with a Lin−SCA-1+CD49f+TROP2high phenotype. Progesterone and sodium selenite are additionally required for the growth of human Lin−CD49f+TROP2high PESCs. The gene-expression profiles of expanded basal PESCs show similarities to ESCs, and NF-kB function is critical for epithelial differentiation of sphere-cultured PESCs. When transplanted in combination with urogenital sinus mesenchyme, expanded mouse and human PESCs generate ectopic prostatic tubules, demonstrating their stem cell activity in vivo. This novel method will facilitate the molecular, genomic, and functional characterization of normal and pathologic prostate glands of mouse and human origin. PMID:25702639

  17. Arecoline decreases interleukin-6 production and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human basal cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arecoline, the most abundant areca alkaloid, has been reported to decrease interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in epithelial cancer cells. Since IL-6 overexpression contributes to the tumorigenic potency of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), this study was designed to investigate whether arecoline altered IL-6 expression and its downstream regulation of apoptosis and the cell cycle in cultured BCC-1/KMC cells. BCC-1/KMC cells and a human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, were treated with arecoline at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 μg/ml, then IL-6 production and expression of apoptosis- and cell cycle progress-related factors were examined. After 24 h exposure, arecoline inhibited BCC-1/KMC cell growth and decreased IL-6 production in terms of mRNA expression and protein secretion, but had no effect on HaCaT cells. Analysis of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation showed that arecoline induced apoptosis of BCC-1/KMC cells in a dose-dependent manner, activated caspase-3, and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, arecoline induced progressive and sustained accumulation of BCC-1/KMC cells in G2/M phase as a result of reducing checkpoint Cdc2 activity by decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase levels and increasing p53 levels. Furthermore, subcutaneous injection of arecoline led to decreased BCC-1/KMC tumor growth in BALB/c mice by inducing apoptosis. This study demonstrates that arecoline has potential for preventing BCC tumorigenesis by reducing levels of the tumor cell survival factor IL-6, increasing levels of the tumor suppressor factor p53, and eliciting cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis. Highlights: ► Arecoline has potential to prevent against basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis. ► It has more effectiveness on BCC as compared with a human keratinocyte cell line. ► Mechanisms involved including reducing tumor cells’ survival factor IL-6, ► Decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase, enhancing tumor suppressor factor p53, ► Eliciting G2/M

  18. Arecoline decreases interleukin-6 production and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human basal cell carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Bau-Shan; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Hu, Yu-Chen [Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wen-Tsan [Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Division of Hepatobiliarypancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kee-Lung, E-mail: Chang.KeeLung@msa.hinet.net [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China)

    2012-01-15

    Arecoline, the most abundant areca alkaloid, has been reported to decrease interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in epithelial cancer cells. Since IL-6 overexpression contributes to the tumorigenic potency of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), this study was designed to investigate whether arecoline altered IL-6 expression and its downstream regulation of apoptosis and the cell cycle in cultured BCC-1/KMC cells. BCC-1/KMC cells and a human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, were treated with arecoline at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 μg/ml, then IL-6 production and expression of apoptosis- and cell cycle progress-related factors were examined. After 24 h exposure, arecoline inhibited BCC-1/KMC cell growth and decreased IL-6 production in terms of mRNA expression and protein secretion, but had no effect on HaCaT cells. Analysis of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation showed that arecoline induced apoptosis of BCC-1/KMC cells in a dose-dependent manner, activated caspase-3, and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, arecoline induced progressive and sustained accumulation of BCC-1/KMC cells in G2/M phase as a result of reducing checkpoint Cdc2 activity by decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase levels and increasing p53 levels. Furthermore, subcutaneous injection of arecoline led to decreased BCC-1/KMC tumor growth in BALB/c mice by inducing apoptosis. This study demonstrates that arecoline has potential for preventing BCC tumorigenesis by reducing levels of the tumor cell survival factor IL-6, increasing levels of the tumor suppressor factor p53, and eliciting cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis. Highlights: ► Arecoline has potential to prevent against basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis. ► It has more effectiveness on BCC as compared with a human keratinocyte cell line. ► Mechanisms involved including reducing tumor cells’ survival factor IL-6, ► Decreasing Cdc25C phosphatase, enhancing tumor suppressor factor p53, ► Eliciting G2/M

  19. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, M., E-mail: phyrenmq@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Rajendran, Reshmi [Lab of Molecular Imaging, Singapore Bioimaging Consotium, 11 Biopolis Way, 02-02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Ng, Mary [Department of Pharmacology, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Jenner, Andrew Michael [Illawara Health and Medical Research Institute (IHMRI), University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  20. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, M.; Rajendran, Reshmi; Ng, Mary; Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank; Jenner, Andrew Michael

    2011-10-01

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  1. Differential deposition of fibronectin by asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qi; Zeng, Qingxiang; Tjin, Gavin; Lau, Edmund; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G G; Burgess, Janette K

    2015-11-15

    Altered ECM protein deposition is a feature in asthmatic airways. Fibronectin (Fn), an ECM protein produced by human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs), is increased in asthmatic airways. This study investigated the regulation of Fn production in asthmatic or nonasthmatic HBECs and whether Fn modulated HBEC proliferation and inflammatory mediator secretion. The signaling pathways underlying transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-regulated Fn production were examined using specific inhibitors for ERK, JNK, p38 MAPK, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, and activin-like kinase 5 (ALK5). Asthmatic HBECs deposited higher levels of Fn in the ECM than nonasthmatic cells under basal conditions, whereas cells from the two groups had similar levels of Fn mRNA and soluble Fn. TGF-β1 increased mRNA levels and ECM and soluble forms of Fn but decreased cell proliferation in both cells. The rate of increase in Fn mRNA was higher in nonasthmatic cells. However, the excessive amounts of ECM Fn deposited by asthmatic cells after TGF-β1 stimulation persisted compared with nonasthmatic cells. Inhibition of ALK5 completely prevented TGF-β1-induced Fn deposition. Importantly, ECM Fn increased HBEC proliferation and IL-6 release, decreased PGE2 secretion, but had no effect on VEGF release. Soluble Fn had no effect on cell proliferation and inflammatory mediator release. Asthmatic HBECs are intrinsically primed to produce more ECM Fn, which when deposited into the ECM, is capable of driving remodeling and inflammation. The increased airway Fn may be one of the key driving factors in the persistence of asthma and represents a novel, therapeutic target. PMID:26342086

  2. Computational investigation of epithelial cell dynamic phenotype in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Debnath Jayanta; Mostov Keith; Park Sunwoo; Kim Sean HJ; Hunt C Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background When grown in three-dimensional (3D) cultures, epithelial cells typically form cystic organoids that recapitulate cardinal features of in vivo epithelial structures. Characterizing essential cell actions and their roles, which constitute the system's dynamic phenotype, is critical to gaining deeper insight into the cystogenesis phenomena. Methods Starting with an earlier in silico epithelial analogue (ISEA1) that validated for several Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epith...

  3. Evaluation of MCF10A as a Reliable Model for Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qu

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths for women worldwide. Various cell models have been developed to study breast cancer tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug sensitivity. The MCF10A human mammary epithelial cell line is a widely used in vitro model for studying normal breast cell function and transformation. However, there is limited knowledge about whether MCF10A cells reliably represent normal human mammary cells. MCF10A cells were grown in monolayer, suspension (mammosphere culture, three-dimensional (3D "on-top" Matrigel, 3D "cell-embedded" Matrigel, or mixed Matrigel/collagen I gel. Suspension culture was performed with the MammoCult medium and low-attachment culture plates. Cells grown in 3D culture were fixed and subjected to either immunofluorescence staining or embedding and sectioning followed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. Cells or slides were stained for protein markers commonly used to identify mammary progenitor and epithelial cells. MCF10A cells expressed markers representing luminal, basal, and progenitor phenotypes in two-dimensional (2D culture. When grown in suspension culture, MCF10A cells showed low mammosphere-forming ability. Cells in mammospheres and 3D culture expressed both luminal and basal markers. Surprisingly, the acinar structure formed by MCF10A cells in 3D culture was positive for both basal markers and the milk proteins β-casein and α-lactalbumin. MCF10A cells exhibit a unique differentiated phenotype in 3D culture which may not exist or be rare in normal human breast tissue. Our results raise a question as to whether the commonly used MCF10A cell line is a suitable model for human mammary cell studies.

  4. Evaluation of the ‘Hedgehog’ signaling pathways in squamous and basal cell carcinomas of the eyelids and conjunctiva

    Science.gov (United States)

    CELEBI, ALI RIZA CENK; KIRATLI, HAYYAM; SOYLEMEZOGLU, FIGEN

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the role of hedgehog signaling pathway in the carcinogenesis of eyelid skin and conjunctival epithelial malignant tumors. The study was conducted on specimens from 41 patients with cutaneous eyelid basal cell carcinoma, 22 with bulbar conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma, 12 with bulbar conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia. Major molecules of Hedgehog signaling pathway (Sonic Hedgehog [Shh] and Patched-1 [Ptch-1] and Glioma-associated oncogene [Gli-1]) were evaluated in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens using immunohistochemical staining. For each specimen, the percentage (50%) and the intensity of the immunohistochemical staining (graded from 0 to 3) were calculated and the scores obtained by multiplication of two values were analyzed using the Kruskall-Wallis test. Shh and Ptch-1 expression levels were statistically significantly lower in the basal cell carcinoma group compared with the squamous cell carcinoma group (P=0.043 for Shh; P=0.030 for Ptch-1). In the conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma group, the Ptch-1 score was 0 in ~25% of specimens and the Gli-1 score was ≤2 in ~45% of cases. In the conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia group, the Ptch-1 score was ≥2 in 66% of specimens, the Gli-1 score was ≤2 in ~92% of cases. Ptch-1 mutations contribute to the development of cutaneous eyelid basal cell carcinoma. The present study provides evidence that alterations in hedgehog signaling pathways may lead to transformation of the conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia into invasive squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27347166

  5. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  6. DARRIERS DISEASE WITH BASAL CELL CARCINOMA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anila P

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dariers disease (Keratosis follicularis is an autosomal dominantly inherited, acantholytic disorder due to mutation in ATP2A2 gene located on chromosome 12. Darriers disease can be localised to a segment due to postzygotic mutations where it is called as segmental darriers. Clinical features of DD include greasy, warty papules and plaques on seborrheic areas, dystrophic nails, palmo - plantar pits and papules on the dorsum of the hands and feet. There is increased predisposition to non - melanoma cutaneous m alignancies in darriers disease. We report a rare case of darriers disease with basal cell carcinoma A, with rapid progression over 4 months into ulcus penetrans with destruction of eye ball.

  7. Novel Hedgehog pathway targets against basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a key role in directing growth and patterning during embryonic development and is required in vertebrates for the normal development of many structures, including the neural tube, axial skeleton, skin, and hair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in adult tissue is associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), medulloblastoma, and a subset of pancreatic, gastrointestinal, and other cancers. This review will provide an overview of what is known about the mechanisms by which activation of Hedgehog signaling leads to the development of BCCs and will review two recent papers suggesting that agents that modulate sterol levels might influence the Hh pathway. Thus, sterols may be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of BCCs, and readily available agents such as statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) or vitamin D might be helpful in reducing BCC incidence

  8. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Stacey, Simon N.; Sulem, Patrick; Masson, Gisli; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jakobsdottir, Margret; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Daniel F Gudbjartsson; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Scherer, Dominique; Hemminki, Kari; Rudnai, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC)1, we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 × 10−9). A variant at 9p21 near CDKN2A and CDKN2B also confers susceptibility to BCC (rs2151280[C]; OR = 1.19, P = 6.9 × 10−9), as does rs157935[T] at 7q32 near the imprinted gene KLF14 (OR = 1.23, P = 5.7 × 10−10...

  9. Microscopic fluorescence spectral analysis of basal cell carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingli; Lui, Harvey; Zloty, David; Cowan, Bryce; Warshawski, Larry; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan

    2007-05-01

    Background and Objectives. Laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) is a promising tool for cancer diagnosis. This method is based on the differences in autofluorescence spectra between normal and cancerous tissues, but the underlined mechanisms are not well understood. The objective of this research is to study the microscopic origins and intrinsic fluorescence properties of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) for better understanding of the mechanism of in vivo fluorescence detection and margin delineation of BCCs on skin patients. A home-made micro- spectrophotometer (MSP) system was used to image the fluorophore distribution and to measure the fluorescence spectra of various microscopic structures and regions on frozen tissue sections. Materials and Methods. BCC tissue samples were obtained from 14 patients undergoing surgical resections. After surgical removal, each tissue sample was immediately embedded in OCT medium and snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen. The frozen tissue block was then cut into 16-μm thickness sections using a cryostat microtome and placed on microscopic glass slides. The sections for fluorescence study were kept unstained and unfixed, and then analyzed by the MSP system. The adjacent tissue sections were H&E stained for histopathological examination and also served to help identify various microstructures on the adjacent unstained sections. The MSP system has all the functions of a conventional microscope, plus the ability of performing spectral analysis on selected micro-areas of a microscopic sample. For tissue fluorescence analysis, 442nm He-Cd laser light is used to illuminate and excite the unstained tissue sections. A 473-nm long pass filter was inserted behind the microscope objective to block the transmitted laser light while passing longer wavelength fluorescence signal. The fluorescence image of the sample can be viewed through the eyepieces and also recorded by a CCD camera. An optical fiber is mounted onto the image plane of the photograph

  10. Basal Cell Carcinoma in Type 2 Segmental Darier's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Robertson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Darier's disease (DD, also known as Keratosis Follicularis or Darier-White disease, is a rare disorder of keratinization. DD can present as a generalized autosomal dominant condition as well as a localized or segmental postzygotic condition (Vázquez et al., 2002. Clinical features of DD include greasy, warty papules and plaques on seborrheic areas, dystrophic nails, palmo-plantar pits, and papules on the dorsum of the hands and feet. Objective. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma developing in a patient with type 2 segmental DD. Conclusion. According to the current literature, Type 2 segmental disease is a rare presentation of Darier's disease with only 8 previous cases reported to date. In addition, nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC arising from DD is rarely reported; however, there may be an association between DD and risk of carcinogenesis.

  11. Adherence and Blocking of Candida Albicans to Cultured Vaginal Epithelial Cells: Treatments to Decrease Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Larsen

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pathogenesis of mucosal microorganisms depends on adherence to the tissues they colonize and infect. For Candida albicans, cell surface hydrophobicity may play a significant role in tissue binding ability. Methods. A continuous cell line of vaginal epithelial cells (VEC was grown in keratinocyte serum-free medium (KSFM with supplements and harvested by trypsinization. VEC were combined with yeast cells to evaluate adherence and inhibition of adherence. In this experimental setup, yeast stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate were allowed to attach to VEC and the resulting fluorescent VEC were detected by flow cytometry. Results. VEC were cultured and examined daily after plating and showed morphology similar to basal epithelial cells. Culture media supplemented with estradiol showed increased VEC proliferation initially (first 24 h but cell morphology was not altered. Fluorescinated Candida cells bound effectively to the cultured VEC. Using fresh cells exposed to various preparations of K-Y, we showed that all formulations of the product reduced Candida binding to VEC by 25% to 50%. While VEC were generally harvested for use in experiments when they were near confluent growth, we allowed some cultures to grow beyond that point and discovered that cells allowed to become overgrown or stressed appeared to bind yeast cells more effectively. Conclusion. Flow cytometry is a useful method for evaluating binding of stained yeast cells to cultured VEC and has demonstrated that commercially available products have the ability to interfere with the process of yeast adherence to epithelial cells.

  12. Dystroglycan is required for polarizing the epithelial cells and the oocyte in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Wu-Min; Schneider, Martina; Frock, Richard;

    2003-01-01

    The transmembrane protein Dystroglycan is a central element of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex, which is involved in the pathogenesis of many forms of muscular dystrophy. Dystroglycan is a receptor for multiple extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules such as Laminin, agrin and perlecan......-autonomously for cellular polarity in two different cell types, the epithelial cells (apicobasal polarity) and the oocyte (anteroposterior polarity). Loss of Dystroglycan function in follicle and disc epithelia results in expansion of apical markers to the basal side of cells and overexpression results in a...... reduced apical localization of these same markers. In Dystroglycan germline clones early oocyte polarity markers fail to be localized to the posterior, and oocyte cortical F-actin organization is abnormal. Dystroglycan is also required non-cell-autonomously to organize the planar polarity of basal actin...

  13. Multipotent Capacity of Immortalized Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado, Oliver; Kaisani, Aadil A.; Spinola, Monica; Xie, Xian-Jin; Batten, Kimberly G.; Minna, John D.; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W.

    2011-01-01

    While the adult murine lung utilizes multiple compartmentally restricted progenitor cells during homeostasis and repair, much less is known about the progenitor cells from the human lung. Translating the murine stem cell model to humans is hindered by anatomical differences between species. Here we show that human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) display characteristics of multipotent stem cells of the lung. These HBECs express markers indicative of several epithelial types of the adult lun...

  14. Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines Co-Express Neuronal, Epithelial, and Melanocytic Differentiation Markers In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Qingbei Zhang; Hanli Fan; Jikun Shen; Hoffman, Robert M.; H Rosie Xing

    2010-01-01

    Differentiation programs are aberrant in cancer cells allowing them to express differentiation markers in addition to their tissue of origin. In the present study, we demonstrate the multi-lineage differentiation potential of breast cancer cell lines to express multiple neuronal/glial lineage-specific markers as well as mammary epithelial and melanocytic-specific markers. Multilineage expression was detected in luminal (MCF-7 and SKBR3) and basal (MDA-MB-231) types of human breast cancer cell...

  15. The Preliminary Experimental Study of Induced Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells into Corneal Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Yu; Jian Ge; Zhichong Wang; Bing Huang; Keming Yu; Chongde Long; Xigu Chen

    2001-01-01

    Purpose:To study preliminarily induced differentiation of embryonic stem cells intocorneal epithelial cells in vitro.Methods: Murine embryonic stem cells were co-cultured with Rabbit limbal cornealepithelial cells in Transwell system to induce differentiation. Mophological andimmunohistochemical examination were implemented.Results: The induced cells from embryonic stem cells have an epithelial appearance.The cells formed a network and were confluent into film gradually after beingco-cultured with rabbit limbal corneal epithelial cells for 24 ~ 96 hours. The cells rangedmosaic structure and localized together with clear rim. Most of the cells showedpolygonal appearance. Transmission electron microscope showed lots of microvilli on thesurface of induced cells and tight junctions between them. These epithelial-like cellsexpressed the corneal epithelial cell specific marker cytokeratin3/cytokeratinl2.Conclusion: The potential mechanism of the differentiation of murine embryonic stemcells into corneal epithelial cells induced by limbal corneal epithelial cell-derivedinducing activity is to be further verified.

  16. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma to the lungs: Case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Benson Nongrum; Debomaliya Bhuyan; Vanlalhuma Royte; Hughbert Dkhar

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer and it rarely metastasizes. The prevalence of metastatic basal cell carcinoma (MBCC) varies between 0.0028% and 0.55% of all cases. Over 250 MBCC have been reported in the literature. We present a case with large recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the face with radiological and histopathological findings indicating the presence of metastasis to the lungs.

  17. Photoletter to the editor: Basal cell carcinoma on the vermilion lip

    OpenAIRE

    Batalla, Ana; Encinas-Muñiz, Ana Isabel; Gutiérrez-González, Enrique; de la Mano, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The vermilion and vermilion border are rare locations for basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of a 72-year-old woman, who presented with an asymptomatic erosive lesion on the vermilion area of the upper lip. Histopathology examination was consistent with basal cell carcinoma. We suggest that basal cell carcinoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of erosive/ulcerative lesions arising on the vermilion area of the lip.

  18. Trichilemmoma in continuity with pigmented basal cell carcinoma; with dermatoscopy and dermatopathology

    OpenAIRE

    Kaptan, Moayad Al; Kattampallil, Joseph; Rosendahl, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    A case of trichilemmoma in continuity with a pigmented basal cell carcinoma is presented with dermatoscopy and dermatopathology. The distinction between the two lesions was evident dermatoscopically and was confirmed dermatopathologically. While trichilemmoma has been reported in association with basal cell carcinoma and dermatoscopy images of four previous cases of trichilemmoma have been published, no previous dermatoscopy image has been published of trichilemmoma associated with basal cell...

  19. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment...

  20. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment...

  1. Canine tracheal epithelial cells are more sensitive than rat tracheal epithelial cells to transforming growth factor beta induced growth inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) markedly inhibited growth of canine tracheal epithelial (CTE) cells. Reduced responsiveness to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition accompanied neoplastic progression of these cells from primary to transformed to neoplastic. This was similar to the relationship between neoplastic progression and increased resistance to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition seen for rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells. The canine cells were more sensitive than rat cells to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition at all stages in the neoplastic process. (author)

  2. Anti-apoptotic effects of Z alpha1-antitrypsin in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, C M

    2010-05-01

    alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)-AT) deficiency is a genetic disease which manifests as early-onset emphysema or liver disease. Although the majority of alpha(1)-AT is produced by the liver, it is also produced by bronchial epithelial cells, amongst others, in the lung. Herein, we investigate the effects of mutant Z alpha(1)-AT (ZAAT) expression on apoptosis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-) and delineate the mechanisms involved. Control, M variant alpha(1)-AT (MAAT)- or ZAAT-expressing cells were assessed for apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, cell viability, phosphorylation of Bad, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and induced expression of a selection of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Expression of ZAAT in 16HBE14o- cells, like MAAT, inhibited basal and agonist-induced apoptosis. ZAAT expression also inhibited caspase-3 activity by 57% compared with control cells (p = 0.05) and was a more potent inhibitor than MAAT. Whilst ZAAT had no effect on the activity of Bad, its expression activated NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression above control or MAAT-expressing cells. In 16HBE14o- cells but not HEK293 cells, ZAAT upregulated expression of cIAP-1, an upstream regulator of NF-kappaB. cIAP1 expression was increased in ZAAT versus MAAT bronchial biopsies. The data suggest a novel mechanism by which ZAAT may promote human bronchial epithelial cell survival.

  3. Multiple roles for keratin intermediate filaments in the regulation of epithelial barrier function and apico-basal polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Pedro J; Forteza, Radia; Mashukova, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    As multicellular organisms evolved a family of cytoskeletal proteins, the keratins (types I and II) expressed in epithelial cells diversified in more than 20 genes in vertebrates. There is no question that keratin filaments confer mechanical stiffness to cells. However, such a number of genes can hardly be explained by evolutionary advantages in mechanical features. The use of transgenic mouse models has revealed unexpected functional relationships between keratin intermediate filaments and intracellular signaling. Accordingly, loss of keratins or mutations in keratins that cause or predispose to human diseases, result in increased sensitivity to apoptosis, regulation of innate immunity, permeabilization of tight junctions, and mistargeting of apical proteins in different epithelia. Precise mechanistic explanations for these phenomena are still lacking. However, immobilization of membrane or cytoplasmic proteins, including chaperones, on intermediate filaments ("scaffolding") appear as common molecular mechanisms and may explain the need for so many different keratin genes in vertebrates. PMID:27583190

  4. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many org...

  5. Adrenomedullin Expression by Gastric Epithelial Cells in Response to Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Robert P. Allaker; Kapas, Supriya

    2003-01-01

    Many surface epithelial cells express adrenomedullin, a multifunctional peptide found in a wide number of body and cell systems. Recently, we and others have proposed that adrenomedullin has an important novel role in host defense. This peptide has many properties in common with other cationic antimicrobial peptides, including the human β-defensins. Upon exposure of human gastric epithelial cells to viable cells of invasive or noninvasive strains of Helicobacter pylori, Escherichia coli, Salm...

  6. Ciliated epithelial cell lifespan in the mouse trachea and lung

    OpenAIRE

    Rawlins, Emma L.; Brigid L M Hogan

    2008-01-01

    The steady-state turnover of epithelial cells in the lung and trachea is highly relevant to investigators who are studying endogenous stem cells, manipulating gene expression in vivo, or using viral vectors for gene therapy. However, the average lifetime of different airway epithelial cell types has not previously been assessed using currently available genetic techniques. Here, we use Cre/loxP genetic technology to indelibly label a random fraction of ciliated cells throughout the airways of...

  7. The Expression of p53 and Cox-2 in Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Actinic Keratosis Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Ülker KARAGECE YALÇIN; Selda SEÇKİN

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate p53 and COX-2 expressions in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, and to determine a possible relationship.Material and Method: 50 basal cell carcinoma, 45 squamous cell carcinoma and 45 actinic keratosis cases were evaluated. The type of tumor in basal cell carcinoma and tumor differentiation in squamous cell carcinoma were noted and the paraffin block that best represented the tumor was chosen. Immunostainin...

  8. Suprabasal expression of Ki-67 as a marker for the severity of oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Dwivedi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transition of the normal oral epithelium to dysplasia and to malignancy is featured by increased cell proliferation. To evaluate the hypothesis of distributional disturbances in proliferating and stem cells in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Aim: To evaluate layer wise expression of Ki-67 in oral epithelial dysplasia and in OSCC. Materials and Methods: Thirty histologically confirmed cases of oral epithelial dysplasia, fifteen cases of OSCC and five cases of normal buccal mucosa were immunohistochemically examined and nuclear expression of Ki-67 was counted according to basal, parabasal, and suprabasal layers in epithelial dysplasia and number of positive cells per 100 cells in OSCC as labeling index (LI. Results: Suprabasal expression of Ki-67 increased according to the severity of epithelial dysplasia and the difference was statistically significant ( P < 0.001. The mean Ki-67LI was 12.78 for low risk lesions, 28.68 for high risk lesions, 39.45 for OSCC and 13.6 for normal buccal mucosa. Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrate the use of proliferative marker Ki-67 in assessing the severity of epithelial dysplasia. Suprabasal expression of Ki-67 provides an objective criteria for determining the severity of epithelial dysplasia and histological grading of OSCC.

  9. Cholecystokinin octapeptide antagonizes apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Liu; Yueling Zhang; Zhaohui Gu; Lina Hao; Juan Du; Qian Yang; Suping Li; Liying Wang; Shilei Gong

    2014-01-01

    Although cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 is important for neurological function, its neuropro-tective properties remain unclear. We speculated that cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 can protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative injury. In this study, retinal pigment epithelial cells were treated with peroxynitrite to induce oxidative stress. Peroxynitrite triggered apoptosis in these cells, and increased the expression of Fas-associated death domain, Bax, caspa-se-8 and Bcl-2. These changes were suppressed by treatment with cholecystokinin octapeptide-8. These results suggest that cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 can protect human retinal pigment epi-thelial cells against apoptosis induced by peroxynitrite.

  10. Proteinase-activated receptor 4 stimulation-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Hiromasa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs; PAR1–4 that can be activated by serine proteinases such as thrombin and neutrophil catepsin G are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of various pulmonary diseases including fibrosis. Among these PARs, especially PAR4, a newly identified subtype, is highly expressed in the lung. Here, we examined whether PAR4 stimulation plays a role in the formation of fibrotic response in the lung, through alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which contributes to the increase in myofibroblast population. Methods EMT was assessed by measuring the changes in each specific cell markers, E-cadherin for epithelial cell, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA for myofibroblast, using primary cultured mouse alveolar epithelial cells and human lung carcinoma-derived alveolar epithelial cell line (A549 cells. Results Stimulation of PAR with thrombin (1 U/ml or a synthetic PAR4 agonist peptide (AYPGKF-NH2, 100 μM for 72 h induced morphological changes from cobblestone-like structure to elongated shape in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells and A549 cells. In immunocytochemical analyses of these cells, such PAR4 stimulation decreased E-cadherin-like immunoreactivity and increased α-SMA-like immunoreactivity, as observed with a typical EMT-inducer, tumor growth factor-β (TGF-β. Western blot analyses of PAR4-stimulated A549 cells also showed similar changes in expression of these EMT-related marker proteins. Such PAR4-mediated changes were attenuated by inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase and Src. PAR4-mediated morphological changes in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells were reduced in the presence of these inhibitors. PAR4 stimulation increased tyrosine phosphorylated EGFR or tyrosine phosphorylated Src level in A549 cells, and the former response being inhibited by Src inhibitor. Conclusion PAR4 stimulation of alveolar epithelial cells induced epithelial

  11. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells maintain intestinal epithelial stem cells after tissue damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Aparicio-Domingo (Patricia); M. Romera-Hernandez (Monica); J.J. Karrich (Julien J.); F.H.J. Cornelissen (Ferry); N. Papazian (Natalie); D.J. Lindenbergh-Kortleve (Dicky); J.A. Butler (James A.); L. Boon (Louis); M. Coles (Mark); J.N. Samsom (Janneke); T. Cupedo (Tom)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDisruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier allows bacterial translocation and predisposes to destructive inflammation. To ensure proper barrier composition, crypt-residing stem cells continuously proliferate and replenish all intestinal epithelial cells within days. As a consequence

  12. Co-culture of primary rat hepatocytes with rat liver epithelial cells enhances interleukin-6-induced acute-phase protein response

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, S.J.A.C.; Vanhaecke, T.; Papeleu, P.; Rogiers, V.; Haagsman, H.P.; Norren, van, K.

    2010-01-01

    Three different primary rat hepatocyte culture methods were compared for their ability to allow the secretion of fibrinogen and albumin under basal and IL-6-stimulated conditions. These culture methods comprised the co-culture of hepatocytes with rat liver epithelial cells (CC-RLEC), a collagen type I sandwich culture (SW) and a conventional primary hepatocyte monolayer culture (ML). Basal albumin secretion was most stable over time in SW. Fibrinogen secretion was induced by IL-6 in all cell ...

  13. Agonist binding to β-adrenergic receptors on human airway epithelial cells inhibits migration and wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzman, Elizabeth R; Zaidman, Nathan A; Maniak, Peter J; O'Grady, Scott M

    2015-12-15

    Human airway epithelial cells express β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs), which regulate mucociliary clearance by stimulating transepithelial anion transport and ciliary beat frequency. Previous studies using airway epithelial cells showed that stimulation with isoproterenol increased cell migration and wound repair by a cAMP-dependent mechanism. In the present study, impedance-sensing arrays were used to measure cell migration and epithelial restitution following wounding of confluent normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and Calu-3 cells by electroporation. Stimulation with epinephrine or the β2-AR-selective agonist salbutamol significantly delayed wound closure and reduced the mean surface area of lamellipodia protruding into the wound. Treatment with the β-AR bias agonist carvedilol or isoetharine also produced a delay in epithelial restitution similar in magnitude to epinephrine and salbutamol. Measurements of extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation following salbutamol or carvedilol stimulation showed no significant change in the level of phosphorylation compared with untreated control cells. However, inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A activity completely blocked the delay in wound closure produced by β-AR agonists. In Calu-3 cells, where CFTR expression was inhibited by RNAi, salbutamol did not inhibit wound repair, suggesting that β-AR agonist stimulation and loss of CFTR function share a common pathway leading to inhibition of epithelial repair. Confocal images of the basal membrane of Calu-3 cells labeled with anti-β1-integrin (clone HUTS-4) antibody showed that treatment with epinephrine or carvedilol reduced the level of activated integrin in the membrane. These findings suggest that treatment with β-AR agonists delays airway epithelial repair by a G protein- and cAMP-independent mechanism involving protein phosphatase 2A and a reduction in β1-integrin activation in the basal membrane. PMID:26491049

  14. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Simon N; Sulem, Patrick; Masson, Gisli; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jakobsdottir, Margret; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Scherer, Dominique; Hemminki, Kari; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Soriano, Virtudes; Juberias, Pablo; Saez, Berta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Grasa, Matilde; Höiom, Veronica; Lindblom, Annika; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; van Rossum, Michelle M; Aben, Katja K H; de Vries, Esther; Santinami, Mario; Di Mauro, Maria G; Maurichi, Andrea; Wendt, Judith; Hochleitner, Pia; Pehamberger, Hubert; Gudmundsson, Julius; Magnusdottir, Droplaug N; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Holm, Hilma; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Frigge, Michael L; Blondal, Thorarinn; Saemundsdottir, Jona; Bjarnason, Hjördis; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Okamoto, Ichiro; Rivoltini, Licia; Rodolfo, Monica; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Hansson, Johan; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I; Kumar, Rajiv; Karagas, Margaret R; Nelson, Heather H; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Olafsson, Jon H; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-08-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 x 10(-9)). A variant at 9p21 near CDKN2A and CDKN2B also confers susceptibility to BCC (rs2151280[C]; OR = 1.19, P = 6.9 x 10(-9)), as does rs157935[T] at 7q32 near the imprinted gene KLF14 (OR = 1.23, P = 5.7 x 10(-10)). The effect of rs157935[T] is dependent on the parental origin of the risk allele. None of these variants were found to be associated with melanoma or fair-pigmentation traits. A melanoma- and pigmentation-associated variant in the SLC45A2 gene, L374F, is associated with risk of both BCC and squamous cell carcinoma. Finally, we report conclusive evidence that rs401681[C] in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus confers susceptibility to BCC but protects against melanoma. PMID:19578363

  15. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of basal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchi, R.; Sestini, S.; De Giorgi, V.; Stambouli, D.; Carli, P.; Massi, D.; Pavone, F. S.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated human cutaneous basal cell carcinoma ex-vivo samples by combined time resolved two photon intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy. Morphological and spectroscopic differences were found between malignant skin and corresponding healthy skin tissues. In comparison with normal healthy skin, cancer tissue showed a different morphology and a mean fluorescence lifetime distribution slightly shifted towards higher values. Topical application of delta-aminolevulinic acid to the lesion four hours before excision resulted in an enhancement of the fluorescence signal arising from malignant tissue, due to the accumulation of protoporphyrines inside tumor cells. Contrast enhancement was prevalent at tumor borders by both two photon fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging. Fluorescence-based images showed a good correlation with conventional histopathological analysis, thereby supporting the diagnostic accuracy of this novel method. Combined morphological and lifetime analysis in the study of ex-vivo skin samples discriminated benign from malignant tissues, thus offering a reliable, non-invasive tool for the in-vivo analysis of inflammatory and neoplastic skin lesions.

  16. Gremlin Activates the Smad Pathway Linked to Epithelial Mesenchymal Transdifferentiation in Cultured Tubular Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Rodrigues-Diez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gremlin is a developmental gene upregulated in human chronic kidney disease and in renal cells in response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β. Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT is one process involved in renal fibrosis. In tubular epithelial cells we have recently described that Gremlin induces EMT and acts as a downstream TGF-β mediator. Our aim was to investigate whether Gremlin participates in EMT by the regulation of the Smad pathway. Stimulation of human tubular epithelial cells (HK2 with Gremlin caused an early activation of the Smad signaling pathway (Smad 2/3 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and Smad-dependent gene transcription. The blockade of TGF-β, by a neutralizing antibody against active TGF-β, did not modify Gremlin-induced early Smad activation. These data show that Gremlin directly, by a TGF-β independent process, activates the Smad pathway. In tubular epithelial cells long-term incubation with Gremlin increased TGF-β production and caused a sustained Smad activation and a phenotype conversion into myofibroblasts-like cells. Smad 7 overexpression, which blocks Smad 2/3 activation, diminished EMT changes observed in Gremlin-transfected tubuloepithelial cells. TGF-β neutralization also diminished Gremlin-induced EMT changes. In conclusion, we propose that Gremlin could participate in renal fibrosis by inducing EMT in tubular epithelial cells through activation of Smad pathway and induction of TGF-β.

  17. Epidemiologia do carcinoma basocelular Epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquiria Pessoa Chinem

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma basocelular é a neoplasia maligna mais comum em humanos e sua incidência vem aumentando nas últimas décadas. Sua grande frequência gera significativo ônus ao sistema de saúde, configurando problema de saúde pública. Apesar das baixas taxas de mortalidade e de rara ocorrência de metástases, o tumor pode apresentar comportamento invasivo local e recidivas após o tratamento, provocando importante morbidade. Exposição à radiação ultravioleta representa o principal fator de risco ambiental associado a sua gênese. Entretanto, descrevem-se outros elementos de risco: fotótipos claros, idade avançada, história familiar de carcinomas de pele, olhos e cabelos claros, sardas na infância e imunossupressão, além de aspectos comportamentais, como exercício profissional exposto ao sol, atividade rural e queimaduras solares na juventude. Entre 30% e 75% dos casos esporádicos estão associados à mutação do gene patched hedgehog, mas outras alterações genéticas são ainda descritas. A neoplasia é comumente encontrada concomitantemente com lesões cutâneas relacionadas à exposição solar crônica, tais como: queratoses actínicas, lentigos solares e telangiectasias faciais. A prevenção do carcinoma basocelular se baseia no conhecimento de fatores de risco, no diagnóstico e tratamento precoces e na adoção de medidas específicas, principalmente, nas populações susceptíveis. Os autores apresentam uma revisão da epidemiologia do carcinoma basocelular.Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant neoplasm in humans and its incidence has increased over the last decades. Its high frequency significantly burdens the health system, making the disease a public health issue. Despite the low mortality rates and the rare occurrence of metastases, the tumor may be locally invasive and relapse after treatment, causing significant morbidity. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the main environmental risk factor

  18. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio eRojas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes.Over a thirty year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been litlle employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases.

  19. Liver epithelial cells inhibit proliferation and invasiveness of hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Kuo-Shyang; Jeng, Chi-Juei; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Sheen, I-Shyan; Li, Shih-Yun; Hung, Zih-Hang; Hsiau, Hsin-I; Yu, Ming-Che; Chang, Chiung-Fang

    2016-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a worldwide malignancy with poor prognosis. Liver progenitors or stem cells could be a potential therapy for HCC treatment since they migrate toward tumors. Rat liver epithelial (RLE) cells have both progenitor and stem cell-like properties. Therefore, our study elucidated the therapeutic effect of RLE cells in rat hepatoma cells. RLE cells were isolated from 10-day old rats and characterized for stem cell marker expression. RLE cells and rat hepatoma cells (H4-IIE-C3 cells) were co-cultured and divided into four groups with different ratios of RLE and hepatoma cells. Group A had only rat hepatoma cells as a control group. The ratios of rat hepatoma and RLE cells in group B, C and D were 5:1, 1:1 and 1:5, respectively. Effective inhibition of cell proliferation and migration was found in group D when compared to group A. There was a significant decrease in Bcl2 expression and increase in late apoptosis of rat hepatoma cells when adding more RLE cells. RLE cells reduced cell proliferation and migration of rat hepatoma cells. These results suggested that RLE cells could be used as a potential cell therapy. PMID:26647726

  20. Ion transport in epithelial spheroids derived from human airway cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P S; Frederiksen, O; Holstein-Rathlou, N H;

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, we describe a novel three-dimensional airway epithelial explant preparation and demonstrate its use for ion transport studies by electrophysiological technique. Suspension cultures of sheets of epithelial cells released by protease treatment from cystic fibrosis (CF) and non...

  1. Wnt-10b secreted from lymphocytes promotes differentiation of skin epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wnt-10b was originally isolated from lymphoid tissue and is known to be involved in a wide range of biological actions, while recently it was found to be expressed early in the development of hair follicles. However, few studies have been conducted concerning the role of Wnt-10b with the differentiation of skin epithelial cells. To evaluate its role in epithelial differentiation, we purified Wnt-10b from the supernatant of a concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocyte culture using an affinity column and investigated its effects on the differentiation of adult mouse-derived primary skin epithelial cells (MPSEC). MPSEC cultured with Wnt-10b showed morphological changes from cuboidal to spindle-shaped with inhibited proliferation, and also obtained characteristics of the hair shaft and inner root sheath of the hair follicle, represented by red-colored Ayoub Shklar staining, and reactions to AE-13 and AE-15 as seen with immunocytology. Further, RT-PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of mRNA for keratin 1, keratin 2, loricrin, mHa5, and mHb5, in association with a decreased expression of the basal cell marker keratin 5, in Wnt-10b-treated MPSEC. In addition, involvement of the canonical Wnt signal pathway was demonstrated by a TCF reporter (pTOPFLASH) assay. These results suggest that Wnt-10b promotes the differentiation of MPSEC and may play an important role in hair follicle development by promoting differentiation of epithelial cells

  2. Sodium selectivity of Reissner's membrane epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyunghee X

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium absorption by Reissner's membrane is thought to contribute to the homeostasis of the volume of cochlear endolymph. It was previously shown that the absorptive transepithelial current was blocked by amiloride and benzamil. The most commonly-observed target of these drugs is the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, which is composed of the three subunits α-,β- and γ-ENaC. However, other less-selective cation channels have also been observed to be sensitive to benzamil and amiloride. The aim of this study was to determine whether Reissner's membrane epithelial cells could support parasensory K+ absorption via amiloride- and benzamil-sensitive electrogenic pathways. Results We determined the molecular and functional expression of candidate cation channels with gene array (GEO GSE6196, RT-PCR, and whole-cell patch clamp. Transcript expression analysis of Reissner's membrane detected no amiloride-sensitive acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC1a, ASIC2a, ASIC2b nor amiloride-sensitive cyclic-nucleotide gated channels (CNGA1, CNGA2, CNGA4, CNGB3. By contrast, α-,β- and γ-ENaC were all previously reported as present in Reissner's membrane. The selectivity of the benzamil-sensitive cation currents was observed in whole-cell patch clamp recordings under Cl--free conditions where cations were the only permeant species. The currents were carried by Na+ but not K+, and the permeability of Li+ was greater than that of Na+ in Reissner's membrane. Complete replacement of bath Na+ with the inpermeable cation NMDG+ led to the same inward current as with benzamil in a Na+ bath. Conclusions These results are consistent with the amiloride/benzamil-sensitive absorptive flux of Reissner's membrane mediated by a highly Na+-selective channel that has several key characteristics in common with αβγ-ENaC. The amiloride-sensitive pathway therefore absorbs only Na+ in this epithelium and does not provide a parasensory K+ efflux route from scala

  3. Andrographolide suppresses epithelial mesenchymal transition by inhibition of MAPK signalling pathway in lens epithelial cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Forum Kayastha; Kaid Johar; Devarshi Gajjar; Anshul Arora; Hardik Madhu; Darshini Ganatra; Abhay Vasavada

    2015-06-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells (LECs) may contribute to the development of posterior capsular opacification (PCO), which leads to visual impairment. Andrographolide has been shown to have therapeutic potential against various cancers. However, its effect on human LECs is still unknown. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of andrographolide on EMT induced by growth factors in the fetal human lens epithelial cell line (FHL 124). Initially the LECs were treated with growth factors (TGF-2 and bFGF) to induce EMT. Subsequently these EMT-induced cells were treated with andrographolide at 100 and 500 nM concentrations for 24 h. Our results showed that FHL 124 cells treated with growth factors had a significant decrease in protein and m-RNA levels of epithelial markers pax6 and E-Cadherin. After administering andrographolide, these levels significantly increased. It was noticed that EMT markers -SMA, fibronectin and collagen IV significantly decreased after treatment with andrographolide when compared to the other group. Treatment with andrographolide significantly inhibited phosphorylation of ERK and JNK. Cell cycle analysis showed that andrographolide did not arrest cells at G0/G1 or G2/M at tested concentrations. Our findings suggest that andrographolide helps sustain epithelial characteristics by modulating EMT markers and inhibiting the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway in LECs. Hence it can prove to be useful in curbing EMT-mediated PCO.

  4. Andrographolide suppresses epithelial mesenchymal transition by inhibition of MAPK signalling pathway in lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayastha, Forum; Johar, Kaid; Gajjar, Devarshi; Arora, Anshul; Madhu, Hardik; Ganatra, Darshini; Vasavada, Abhay

    2015-06-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells (LECs) may contribute to the development of posterior capsular opacification (PCO), which leads to visual impairment. Andrographolide has been shown to have therapeutic potential against various cancers. However, its effect on human LECs is still unknown. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of andrographolide on EMT induced by growth factors in the fetal human lens epithelial cell line (FHL 124). Initially the LECs were treated with growth factors (TGF-beta 2 and bFGF) to induce EMT. Subsequently these EMT-induced cells were treated with andrographolide at 100 and 500 nM concentrations for 24 h. Our results showed that FHL 124 cells treated with growth factors had a significant decrease in protein and m-RNA levels of epithelial markers pax6 and E-Cadherin. After administering andrographolide, these levels significantly increased. It was noticed that EMT markers alpha-SMA, fibronectin and collagen IV significantly decreased after treatment with andrographolide when compared to the other group. Treatment with andrographolide significantly inhibited phosphorylation of ERK and JNK. Cell cycle analysis showed that andrographolide did not arrest cells at G0/G1 or G2/M at tested concentrations. Our findings suggest that andrographolide helps sustain epithelial characteristics by modulating EMT markers and inhibiting the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway in LECs. Hence it can prove to be useful in curbing EMT-mediated PCO. PMID:25963259

  5. Sepsis-associated AKI: epithelial cell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emlet, David R; Shaw, Andrew D; Kellum, John A

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs frequently in critically ill patients with sepsis, in whom it doubles the mortality rate and half of the survivors suffer permanent kidney damage or chronic kidney disease. Failure in the development of viable therapies has prompted studies to better elucidate the cellular and molecular etiologies of AKI, which have generated novel theories and paradigms for the mechanisms of this disease. These studies have shown multifaceted origins and elements of AKI that, in addition to/in lieu of ischemia, include the generation of damage-associated molecular patterns and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, the inflammatory response, humoral and cellular immune activation, perturbation of microvascular flow and oxidative stress, bioenergetic alterations, cell-cycle alterations, and cellular de-differentiation/re-differentiation. It is becoming clear that a major etiologic effector of all these inputs is the renal tubule epithelial cell (RTEC). This review discusses these elements and their effects on RTECs, and reviews the current hypotheses of how these effects may determine the fate of RTECs during sepsis-induced AKI. PMID:25795502

  6. Basal Cell Carcinoma in Gorlin's Patients: a Matter of Fibroblasts-Led Protumoral Microenvironment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Gache

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the commonest tumor in human. About 70% sporadic BCCs bear somatic mutations in the PATCHED1 tumor suppressor gene which encodes the receptor for the Sonic Hedgehog morphogen (SHH. PATCHED1 germinal mutations are associated with the dominant Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS, a major hallmark of which is a high susceptibility to BCCs. Although the vast majority of sporadic BCCs arises exclusively in sun exposed skin areas, 40 to 50% BCCs from NBCCS patients develop in non photo-exposed skin. Since overwhelming evidences indicate that microenvironment may both be modified by- and influence the- epithelial tumor, we hypothesized that NBCCS fibroblasts could contribute to BCCs in NBCCS patients, notably those developing in non photo-exposed skin areas. The functional impact of NBCCS fibroblasts was then assessed in organotypic skin cultures with control keratinocytes. Onset of epidermal differentiation was delayed in the presence of primary NBCCS fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, keratinocyte proliferation was severely reduced and showed high levels of nuclear P53 in both organotypic skin cultures and in fibroblast-led conditioning experiments. However, in spite of increased levels of senescence associated β-galactosidase activity in keratinocytes cultured in the presence of medium conditioned by NBCCS fibroblasts, we failed to observe activation of P16 and P21 and then of bona fide features of senescence. Constitutive extinction of P53 in WT keratinocytes resulted in an invasive phenotype in the presence of NBCCS fibroblasts. Finally, we found that expression of SHH was limited to fibroblasts but was dependent on the presence of keratinocytes. Inhibition of SHH binding resulted in improved epidermal morphogenesis. Altogether, these data suggest that the repertoire of diffusible factors (including SHH expressed by primary NBCCS fibroblasts generate a stress affecting keratinocytes behavior and epidermal homeostasis

  7. The role of the epithelial cell in asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Mota-Pinto, Anabela; Todo-Bom, Ana

    2009-01-01

    It is done a review of the intervention of the epithelial bronchial cell in the pathophysiology of asthma. The respiratory epithelium acts as a physical barrier that separates the external environment from the pulmonary internal environment. It controls the intercellular and trans -cellular permeability and this way the accessibility of the inhaled pathogens to the antigen presenting cells involved in the immuno -inflammatory response. Epithelial cells connected by tight junctions contribute ...

  8. Epithelial cell invasion and survival of Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    OpenAIRE

    SCHIPPER, H; Krohne, G F; R. Gross

    1994-01-01

    Wild-type Bordetella bronchiseptica and a bvg mutant strain were used for invasion and survival experiments in human Caco-2 and A549 epithelial cells. Both bacterial strains were able to enter and persist within the host cells for at least a week. A significant proportion of the bacteria from both B. bronchiseptica strains but not from Bordetella pertussis were found free in the cytoplasm, suggesting different invasion and survival strategies of the two species in epithelial cells.

  9. Alignment of cell division axes in directed epithelial cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell division is an essential dynamic event in tissue remodeling during wound healing, cancer and embryogenesis. In collective migration, tensile stresses affect cell shape and polarity, hence, the orientation of the cell division axis is expected to depend on cellular flow patterns. Here, we study the degree of orientation of cell division axes in migrating and resting epithelial cell sheets. We use microstructured channels to create a defined scenario of directed cell invasion and compare this situation to resting but proliferating cell monolayers. In experiments, we find a strong alignment of the axis due to directed flow while resting sheets show very weak global order, but local flow gradients still correlate strongly with the cell division axis. We compare experimental results with a previously published mesoscopic particle based simulation model. Most of the observed effects are reproduced by the simulations. (paper)

  10. Neglected Basal Cell Carcinomas in the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Varga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although tumors on the surface of the skin are considered to be easily recognizable, neglected advanced skin neoplasms are encountered even in the 21st century. There can be numerous causes of the delay in the diagnosis: fear of the diagnosis and the treatment, becoming accustomed to a slowly growing tumor, old age, a low social milieu, and an inadequate hygienic culture are among the factors leading some people not to seek medical advice. The treatment of such advanced neoplasms is usually challenging. The therapy of neglected cases demands an individual multidisciplinary approach and teamwork. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC, the most common cutaneous tumor, usually develops in the elderly, grows slowly, and has an extremely low metastatic potential; these factors are suggesting that BCCs might well be the “ideal candidates” for neglected tumors. Five neglected advanced cases of BCC were diagnosed in our dermatological institute between 2000 and 2009. The clinical characteristics and treatment modalities of these neoplasms are discussed, together with the possible causes of the neglect.

  11. Ionizing Radiation Exposure and Basal Cell Carcinoma Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changzhao; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    This commentary summarizes studies showing risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) development in relationship to environmental, occupational and therapeutic exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). BCC, the most common type of human cancer, is driven by the aberrant activation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Ptch, a tumor suppressor gene of Hh signaling pathway, and Smoothened play a key role in the development of radiation-induced BCCs in animal models. Epidemiological studies provide evidence that humans exposed to radiation as observed among the long-term, large scale cohorts of atomic bomb survivors, bone marrow transplant recipients, patients with tinea capitis and radiologic workers enhances risk of BCCs. Overall, this risk is higher in Caucasians than other races. People who were exposed early in life develop more BCCs. The enhanced IR correlation with BCC and not other common cutaneous malignancies is intriguing. The mechanism underlying these observations remains undefined. Understanding interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways and those which drive BCC development may be important in unraveling the mechanism associated with this enhanced risk. Recent studies showed that Vismodegib, a Smoothened inhibitor, is effective in treating radiation-induced BCCs in humans, suggesting that common strategies are required for the intervention of BCCs development irrespective of their etiology. PMID:26930381

  12. Mitosis orientation in prostate epithelial cells changed by endocrine effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-yun LIU; Dong-mei Li; Xiao-fang ZHANG; Jian-hui WU; Zu-yue SUN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of androgen and estrogen on mitosis orientation in the prostate epithelial cells of male rats. Methods: Castrated rats were treated with a single injection of testosterone propionate (TP) or benzogynestry (E2). There were 8 rats in the control group and TP-treated or E2-treated group. Prostate, liver, a specimen of skin, and a segment of the jejunum and colon were removed after the corresponding treatment. The results were observed through immunohistochemistry and iron hematoxylin-eosin staining.Results: All mitoses found in the prostate epithelial cells of castrated rats with TP were oriented parallel to the basement membrane; however, mitoses found in the prostate epithelial cells of castrated rats in E2 and the control group were oriented perpendicular to the basement membrane. TP treatment resulted in marked changes in mitosis orientation in the prostate epithelial cells. Bromodeoxyuridine-labeled positive cells could be seen throughout the stroma and prostate epithelial cells with an injection of TP; however, the positive cells could only be seen in the stroma of prostate with an injection of E2, and the positive cells could hardly be seen in the control group. Conclusion: We found a novel effect of TP in the prostate as a marked change of mitosis orientation in prostate epithelial cells.

  13. Tumor suppression in basal keratinocytes via dual non-cell-autonomous functions of a Na,K-ATPase beta subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzold, Julia; Beleggia, Filippo; Herzig, Hannah; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Bloch, Wilhelm; Wollnik, Bernd; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The molecular pathways underlying tumor suppression are incompletely understood. Here, we identify cooperative non-cell-autonomous functions of a single gene that together provide a novel mechanism of tumor suppression in basal keratinocytes of zebrafish embryos. A loss-of-function mutation in atp1b1a, encoding the beta subunit of a Na,K-ATPase pump, causes edema and epidermal malignancy. Strikingly, basal cell carcinogenesis only occurs when Atp1b1a function is compromised in both the overlying periderm (resulting in compromised epithelial polarity and adhesiveness) and in kidney and heart (resulting in hypotonic stress). Blockade of the ensuing PI3K-AKT-mTORC1-NFκB-MMP9 pathway activation in basal cells, as well as systemic isotonicity, prevents malignant transformation. Our results identify hypotonic stress as a (previously unrecognized) contributor to tumor development and establish a novel paradigm of tumor suppression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14277.001 PMID:27240166

  14. Thrombin promotes epithelial ovarian cancer cell invasion by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Yi-Cun; Zhang, Ting; Di, Wen; Li, Wei-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Objective Over-expression of thrombin in ovarian cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis. In this study, we investigated the role of thrombin in inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in SKOV3 epithelial ovarian cancer cells. Methods After thrombin treatment SKOV3 cells were subjected to western blots, reverse-transcription PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantify EMT-related proteins, mRNA expression of SMAD2, DKK1, and sFRP1, and the secretion of matrix metall...

  15. Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma with Curettage Followed by Imiquimod 3.75% Cream

    OpenAIRE

    Zeichner, Joshua A.; Patel, Rita V.; Birge, Miriam B.

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of nonmelanoma skin cancer in the United States. Treatment modalities include both surgical, medical, or combination therapy. In the following case, the authors report the successful treatment of a basal cell carcinoma on the nose with curettage followed by topical imiquimod 3.75% cream.

  16. Diversity of epithelial stem cell types in adult lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; He, Jinxi; Wei, Jun; Cho, William C; Liu, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Lung is a complex organ lined with epithelial cells. In order to maintain its homeostasis and normal functions following injuries caused by varied extraneous and intraneous insults, such as inhaled environmental pollutants and overwhelming inflammatory responses, the respiratory epithelium normally undergoes regenerations by the proliferation and differentiation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells that resided in distinct niches along the airway tree. The importance of local epithelial stem cell niches in the specification of lung stem/progenitor cells has been recently identified. Studies using cell differentiating and lineage tracing assays, in vitro and/or ex vivo models, and genetically engineered mice have suggested that these local epithelial stem/progenitor cells within spatially distinct regions along the pulmonary tree contribute to the injury repair of epithelium adjacent to their respective niches. This paper reviews recent findings in the identification and isolation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells and local niches along the airway tree and the potential link of epithelial stem cells for the development of lung cancer. PMID:25810726

  17. Diversity of Epithelial Stem Cell Types in Adult Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung is a complex organ lined with epithelial cells. In order to maintain its homeostasis and normal functions following injuries caused by varied extraneous and intraneous insults, such as inhaled environmental pollutants and overwhelming inflammatory responses, the respiratory epithelium normally undergoes regenerations by the proliferation and differentiation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells that resided in distinct niches along the airway tree. The importance of local epithelial stem cell niches in the specification of lung stem/progenitor cells has been recently identified. Studies using cell differentiating and lineage tracing assays, in vitro and/or ex vivo models, and genetically engineered mice have suggested that these local epithelial stem/progenitor cells within spatially distinct regions along the pulmonary tree contribute to the injury repair of epithelium adjacent to their respective niches. This paper reviews recent findings in the identification and isolation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells and local niches along the airway tree and the potential link of epithelial stem cells for the development of lung cancer.

  18. CUX1/Wnt signaling regulates Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition in EBV infected epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a refractory and lethal interstitial lung disease characterized by alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis, fibroblast proliferation and extra-cellular matrix protein deposition. EBV, localised to alveolar epithelial cells of pulmonary fibrosis patients is associated with a poor prognosis. A strategy based on microarray-differential gene expression analysis to identify molecular drivers of EBV-associated lung fibrosis was utilized. Alveolar epithelial cells were infected with EBV to identify genes whose expression was altered following TGFβ1-mediated lytic phase. EBV lytic reactivation by TGFβ1 drives a selective alteration in CUX1 variant (a) (NCBI accession number NM181552) expression, inducing activation of non-canonical Wnt pathway mediators, implicating it in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), the molecular event underpinning scar production in tissue fibrosis. The role of EBV in EMT can be attenuated by antiviral strategies and inhibition of Wnt signaling by using All-Trans Retinoic Acids (ATRA). Activation of non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway by EBV in epithelial cells suggests a novel mechanism of EMT via CUX1 signaling. These data present a framework for further description of the link between infectious agents and fibrosis, a significant disease burden.

  19. CUX1/Wnt signaling regulates Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition in EBV infected epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malizia, Andrea P.; Lacey, Noreen [Clinical Research Centre, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin. 21, Nelson Street. Dublin, 7. Ireland (Ireland); Walls, Dermot [School of Biotechnology, Dublin City University. Dublin, 9. Ireland (Ireland); Egan, Jim J. [Advanced Lung Disease and Lung Transplant Program, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital. 44, Eccles Street. Dublin, 7. Ireland (Ireland); Doran, Peter P., E-mail: peter.doran@ucd.ie [Clinical Research Centre, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin. 21, Nelson Street. Dublin, 7. Ireland (Ireland)

    2009-07-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a refractory and lethal interstitial lung disease characterized by alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis, fibroblast proliferation and extra-cellular matrix protein deposition. EBV, localised to alveolar epithelial cells of pulmonary fibrosis patients is associated with a poor prognosis. A strategy based on microarray-differential gene expression analysis to identify molecular drivers of EBV-associated lung fibrosis was utilized. Alveolar epithelial cells were infected with EBV to identify genes whose expression was altered following TGF{beta}1-mediated lytic phase. EBV lytic reactivation by TGF{beta}1 drives a selective alteration in CUX1 variant (a) (NCBI accession number NM{sub 1}81552) expression, inducing activation of non-canonical Wnt pathway mediators, implicating it in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), the molecular event underpinning scar production in tissue fibrosis. The role of EBV in EMT can be attenuated by antiviral strategies and inhibition of Wnt signaling by using All-Trans Retinoic Acids (ATRA). Activation of non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway by EBV in epithelial cells suggests a novel mechanism of EMT via CUX1 signaling. These data present a framework for further description of the link between infectious agents and fibrosis, a significant disease burden.

  20. MFGE8 regulates TGF-β-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition in endometrial epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Hu, Rong; Sullivan, Claretta; Swanson, R James; Oehninger, Sergio; Sun, Ying-Pu; Bocca, Silvina

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the role of milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor-factor 8 (MFGE8) in TGF-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of endometrial epithelial cells. These were in vitro studies using human endometrial epithelial cells and mouse blastocysts. We investigated the ability of TGF-β to induce EMT in endometrial epithelial cells (HEC-1A) by assessment of cytological phenotype (by light and atomic force microscopy), changes in expression of the markers of cell adhesion/differentiation E- and N-cadherin, and of the transcription factor Snail (by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting), and competence to support embryo attachment in a mouse blastocyst outgrowth assay. We also studied the effects of E-cadherin expression in cells transfected by retroviral shRNA vectors specifically silencing MFGE8. Results demonstrated that TGF-β induced EMT as demonstrated by phenotypic cell changes, by a switch of cadherin expression as well as by upregulation of the expression of the mesenchymal markers Snail and Vimentin. Upon MFGE8 knockdown, these processes were interfered with, suggesting that MFGE8 and TGF-β together may participate in regulation of EMT. This study demonstrated for the first time that endometrial MFGE8 modulates TGF-β-induced EMT in human endometrium cells. PMID:27340235

  1. Blood group glycolipids as epithelial cell receptors for Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, B J; Douglas, L J

    1996-01-01

    The role of glycosphingolipids as possible epithelial cell receptors for Candida albicans was examined by investigating the binding of biotinylated yeasts to lipids extracted from human buccal epithelial cells and separated on thin-layer chromatograms. Binding was visualized by the addition of 125I-streptavidin followed by autoradiography. Five C. albicans strains thought from earlier work to have a requirement for fucose-containing receptors all bound to the same three components in the lipi...

  2. Diversity of Epithelial Stem Cell Types in Adult Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Li; Jinxi He; Jun Wei; Cho, William C.; Xiaoming Liu

    2015-01-01

    Lung is a complex organ lined with epithelial cells. In order to maintain its homeostasis and normal functions following injuries caused by varied extraneous and intraneous insults, such as inhaled environmental pollutants and overwhelming inflammatory responses, the respiratory epithelium normally undergoes regenerations by the proliferation and differentiation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells that resided in distinct niches along the airway tree. The importance of local e...

  3. Respiratory epithelial cell invasion by group B streptococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Rubens, C E; Smith, S; Hulse, M; Chi, E Y; van Belle, G.

    1992-01-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) are the most common cause of pneumonia and sepsis during the neonatal period; however, the pathogenesis of this infection is poorly understood. We investigated the ability of GBS to enter epithelial cells in culture. Two strains of GBS were capable of invading immortalized respiratory epithelial cell lines in vitro at different levels, suggesting strain differences in invasiveness. Intracellular replication was not observed. Invasion required actin microfilaments bu...

  4. Conjugation of 1-naphthol in human gastric epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Déchelotte, P; Varrentrapp, M; Meyer, H.J.; Schwenk, M.

    1993-01-01

    The biotransformation of xenobiotics is essential to the maintenance of the body's integrity. Mucosal biotransformation has been well documented in the small and large intestine of animals and humans but whether the gastric mucosa plays a role in detoxifying ingested compounds remains largely unknown. The conjugation of the model phenolic compounds, 1-naphthol, by human gastric epithelial cells was assessed in vitro. Freshly isolated and cultured epithelial cells were prepared from surgical s...

  5. Endotoxin-induced basal respiration alterations of renal HK-2 cells: A sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quoilin, C., E-mail: cquoilin@ulg.ac.be [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Mouithys-Mickalad, A. [Center of Oxygen Research and Development, Department of Chemistry, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Duranteau, J. [Department of Anaesthesia and Surgical ICU, CHU Bicetre, University Paris XI Sud, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Gallez, B. [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Hoebeke, M. [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A HK-2 cells model of inflammation-induced acute kidney injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two oximetry methods: high resolution respirometry and ESR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen consumption rates of renal cells decrease when treated with LPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells do not recover normal respiration when the LPS treatment is removed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This basal respiration alteration is a sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation. -- Abstract: To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) both by high-resolution respirometry and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These two complementary methods have shown that HK-2 cells exhibit a decreased oxygen consumption rate when treated with LPS. Surprisingly, this cellular respiration alteration persists even after the stress factor was removed. We suggested that this irreversible decrease in renal oxygen consumption after LPS challenge is related to a pathologic metabolic down-regulation such as a lack of oxygen utilization by cells.

  6. Endotoxin-induced basal respiration alterations of renal HK-2 cells: A sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A HK-2 cells model of inflammation-induced acute kidney injury. ► Two oximetry methods: high resolution respirometry and ESR spectroscopy. ► Oxygen consumption rates of renal cells decrease when treated with LPS. ► Cells do not recover normal respiration when the LPS treatment is removed. ► This basal respiration alteration is a sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation. -- Abstract: To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) both by high-resolution respirometry and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These two complementary methods have shown that HK-2 cells exhibit a decreased oxygen consumption rate when treated with LPS. Surprisingly, this cellular respiration alteration persists even after the stress factor was removed. We suggested that this irreversible decrease in renal oxygen consumption after LPS challenge is related to a pathologic metabolic down-regulation such as a lack of oxygen utilization by cells.

  7. Long-noncoding RNAs in basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Michael; Bechara, Falk G; Sand, Daniel; Gambichler, Thilo; Hahn, Stephan A; Bromba, Michael; Stockfleth, Eggert; Hessam, Schapoor

    2016-08-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are fundamental regulators of pre- and post-transcriptional gene regulation. Over 35,000 different lncRNAs have been described with some of them being involved in cancer formation. The present study was initiated to describe differentially expressed lncRNAs in basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Patients with BCC (n = 6) were included in this study. Punch biopsies were harvested from the tumor center and nonlesional epidermal skin (NLES, control, n = 6). Microarray-based lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles were identified through screening for 30,586 lncRNAs and 26,109 protein-coding transcripts (mRNAs). The microarray data were validated by RT-PCR in a second set of BCC versus control samples. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment analyses of mRNAs were performed to assess biologically relevant pathways. A total of 1851 lncRNAs were identified as being significantly up-regulated, whereas 2165 lncRNAs were identified as being significantly down-regulated compared to nonlesional skin (p < 0.05). Oncogenic and/or epidermis-specific lncRNAs, such as CASC15 or ANRIL, were among the differentially expressed sequences. GO analysis showed that the highest enriched GO targeted by up-regulated transcripts was "extracellular matrix." KEGG pathway analysis showed the highest enrichment scores in "Focal adhesion." BCC showed a significantly altered lncRNA and mRNA expression profile. Dysregulation of previously described lncRNAs may play a role in the molecular pathogenesis of BCC and should be subject of further analysis. PMID:26861560

  8. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  9. The infection of chicken tracheal epithelial cells with a H6N1 avian influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-I Shen

    Full Text Available Sialic acids (SAs linked to galactose (Gal in α2,3- and α2,6-configurations are the receptors for avian and human influenza viruses, respectively. We demonstrate that chicken tracheal ciliated cells express α2,3-linked SA, while goblet cells mainly express α2,6-linked SA. In addition, the plant lectin MAL-II, but not MAA/MAL-I, is bound to the surface of goblet cells, suggesting that SA2,3-linked oligosaccharides with Galβ1-3GalNAc subterminal residues are specifically present on the goblet cells. Moreover, both α2,3- and α2,6-linked SAs are detected on single tracheal basal cells. At a low multiplicity of infection (MOI avian influenza virus H6N1 is exclusively detected in the ciliated cells, suggesting that the ciliated cell is the major target cell of the H6N1 virus. At a MOI of 1, ciliated, goblet and basal cells are all permissive to the AIV infection. This result clearly elucidates the receptor distribution for the avian influenza virus among chicken tracheal epithelial cells and illustrates a primary cell model for evaluating the cell tropisms of respiratory viruses in poultry.

  10. Role of autophagy in the regulation of epithelial cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nighot, Prashant; Ma, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism by which bulk cytoplasmic material, including soluble macromolecules and organelles, is targeted for lysosomal degradation. The role of autophagy in diverse cellular processes such as metabolic stress, neurodegeneration, cancer, aging, immunity, and inflammatory diseases is being increasingly recognized. Epithelial cell junctions play an integral role in the cell homeostasis via physical binding, regulating paracellular pathways, integrating extracellular cues into intracellular signaling, and cell-cell communication. Recent data indicates that cell junction composition is very dynamic. The junctional protein complexes are actively regulated in response to various intra- and extra-cellular clues by intracellular trafficking and degradation pathways. This review discusses the recent and emerging information on how autophagy regulates various epithelial cell junctions. The knowledge of autophagy regulation of epithelial junctions will provide further rationale for targeting autophagy in a wide variety of human disease conditions. PMID:27583189

  11. Lingual Epithelial Stem Cells and Organoid Culture of Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Hisha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As tongue cancer is one of the major malignant cancers in the world, understanding the mechanism of maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue, which is known to be the origin of tongue cancer, is unquestionably important. However, the actual stem cells that are responsible for the long-term maintenance of the lingual epithelium have not been identified. Moreover, a simple and convenient culture method for lingual epithelial stem cells has not yet been established. Recently, we have shown that Bmi1-positive cells, residing at the second or third layer of the epithelial cell layer at the base of the interpapillary pit (IPP, were slow-cycling and could supply keratinized epithelial cells for over one year, indicating that Bmi1-positive cells are long-term lingual epithelial stem cells. In addition, we have developed a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Here, we discuss current progress in the identification of lingual stem cells and future applications of the lingual culture system for studying the regulatory mechanisms of the lingual epithelium and for regenerative medicine.

  12. Lateral adhesion drives reintegration of misplaced cells into epithelial monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstralh, Dan T; Lovegrove, Holly E; St Johnston, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Cells in simple epithelia orient their mitotic spindles in the plane of the epithelium so that both daughter cells are born within the epithelial sheet. This is assumed to be important to maintain epithelial integrity and prevent hyperplasia, because misaligned divisions give rise to cells outside the epithelium. Here we test this assumption in three types of Drosophila epithelium; the cuboidal follicle epithelium, the columnar early embryonic ectoderm, and the pseudostratified neuroepithelium. Ectopic expression of Inscuteable in these tissues reorients mitotic spindles, resulting in one daughter cell being born outside the epithelial layer. Live imaging reveals that these misplaced cells reintegrate into the tissue. Reducing the levels of the lateral homophilic adhesion molecules Neuroglian or Fasciclin 2 disrupts reintegration, giving rise to extra-epithelial cells, whereas disruption of adherens junctions has no effect. Thus, the reinsertion of misplaced cells seems to be driven by lateral adhesion, which pulls cells born outside the epithelial layer back into it. Our findings reveal a robust mechanism that protects epithelia against the consequences of misoriented divisions. PMID:26414404

  13. Immunohistochemical evaluation of E-cadherin expression in basal cell carcinoma of the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Bartoš

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: E-cadherin is important cell-cell adhesion molecule, that plays a crucial role in the maintenance of tissue microarchitecture. In many human malignancies, reduced or loss of E-cadherin production in neoplastic cells correlates with tumor dedifferentiation and acquisition of the invasive and metastatic potential. In contrast to most other cancers, basal cell carcinoma (BCC of the skin possess some unique features, such as slow local growth, strong stroma-dependency, and virtual absence of metastases. Aim: In the present study, we immunohistochemically evaluated expression of E-cadherin in a set of cutaneous BCCs. Material and methods: Study group consisted of 41 primary BCCs cathegorized into non-infiltrative subroup (superfical and nodular subtypes and infiltrative subroup (nodular-infiltrative and infiltrative subtypes. Results: E-cadherin was expressed in all tumor specimens with variable quantitative range and intensity. There were 19 cases (46.3 % with preserved and 22 cases (53.7 % with reduced E-cadherin expression. In superficial, nodular, nodular-infiltrative and infiltrative BCC subtypes, reduced E-cadherin immunoreactivity was found in 40 % (2/5, 56.2 % (9/16, 54.5 % (6/11 and 55.5 % (5/9, respectively. We did not confirm a significant correlation between expression of E-cadherin and both given, non-infiltrative and infiltrative BCC subgroup. None of the tumors examined showed apparent decreasing immunostaining intensity in tumor tissue with increasing depth of invasion. There were not convincing differences either between the central and peripheral parts of tumor mass, or in the vertical dimension. Conclusions: Reduction of E-cadherin expression per se does not seem to directly contribute to the acqusition of more aggressive phenotype in cutaneous BCC. This may represent another peculiarity, by which BCC differs from the most other epithelial malignancies and reflect a distinct tumor biology.

  14. Effect of ionizing radiation on nitric oxide production in mouse mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nitric oxide (NO) is an important biological molecule with a wide variety of functions in physiological and pathophysiological events. We reported previously the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms such as inducible, endothelial and neuronal types in the rat mammary glands. In addition, we demonstrated that a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS and NO-specific scavenger prevent radiation-induced rat mammary tumors, and that radiation-induced NO might contribute to tumor initiation of mammary glands in rat. However, the production and action of NO in the epithelium of mammary glands after the exposure of radiation are still unclear. In this current study we, therefore, examined the effects of ionizing radiation on a mouse mammary epithelial cell line (HC11) to provide a concrete evidence regarding the production of NO in the mammary epithelial cells after irradiation. The HC11 cells, established from COMMA-1D mouse mammary epithelial cell line, were cultured in RPMI-1640 growth medium containing 10% FCS, EGF and insulin until become confluence, then irradiated by X-ray with a dose at 10 or 30 Gy (1 Gy/min). After the irradiation, NO produced and secreted by HC11 cells into culture medium was estimated by the measurement of nitrite concentration in the culture medium with a Griess assay. HC11 cells produced NO spontaneously, and NO concentration was gradually increased during the experimented period. On the other hand, NO production was transiently enhanced immediately after irradiation of the cells in a dose-dependent manner. It, then, descended in an hour after irradiation, and returned to a basal level in 24 hours. These indicate that NO production was undoubtedly increased by irradiation in mammary epithelial cells, and support our previous propose that radiation-induced NO might contribute to initiation of tumorigenesis of mammary glands

  15. Induction of apoptosis in oral epithelial cells by Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, C Cunha; Chukwuedum Aniemeke, J; Zhao, X-R; Huynh-Ba, G

    2012-12-01

    During infection, interactions between Candida albicans and oral epithelial cells result in oral epithelial cell death. This is clinically manifested by the development of oral mucosal ulcerations generally associated with discomfort. In vitro studies have shown that C. albicans induces early apoptotic alterations in oral epithelial cells; however, these studies have also shown that treatment of infected cells with caspase inhibitors does not prevent their death. The reasons for these contradictory results are unknown and it is still not clear if C. albicans stimulates oral epithelial signaling pathways that promote apoptotic cell death. Activation of specific death pathways in response to microbial organisms plays an essential role in modulating the pathogenesis of a variety of infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to (i) characterize C. albicans-induced apoptotic morphological alterations in oral epithelial cells, and (ii) investigate the activation of apoptotic signaling pathways and expression of apoptotic genes during infection. Candida albicans induced early apoptotic changes in over 50% of oral epithelial cells. However, only 15% of those showed mid-late apoptotic alterations. At the molecular level, C. albicans caused a loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and translocation of mitochondrial cytochrome c. Caspase-3/9 activities increased only during the first hours of infection. Moreover, poly[ADP ribose] polymerase 1 was cleaved into apoptotic and necrotic-like fragments. Finally, five anti-apoptotic genes were significantly upregulated and two pro-apoptotic genes were downregulated during infection. Altogether, these findings indicate that epithelial apoptotic pathways are activated in response to C. albicans, but fail to progress and promote apoptotic cell death. PMID:23134609

  16. Photodynamic Therapy for Basal Cell Carcinoma in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    OpenAIRE

    Myn Wee Lee; George Varigos; Peter Foley; Gayle Ross

    2011-01-01

    A 22-year-old male with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa with a large superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma on his right forehead was treated with photodynamic therapy. The treatment was well tolerated, and the site healed well. Patients with epidermolysis bullosa are at increased risk of developing skin cancers, particularly squamous cell carcinomas. However, basal cell carcinomas are rare in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. As patients with epidermolysis bullosa ...

  17. Giant cell temporal arteritis associated with overlying basal cell carcinoma: co-incidence or connection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Alowami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis is a granulomatous vasculitis of large and medium sized arteries manifesting as temporal arteritis and/or polymyalgia rheumatica. The histological assessment of temporal artery biopsies is frequently encountered in anatomical pathology and has important diagnostic consequences in patients clinically suspected of having giant cell arteritis. We present an intriguing case of giant cell arteritis associated with a Basal cell carcinoma and discuss the ongoing controversy pertaining to the association of giant cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica with malignancy.

  18. Epithelial cell detachment by Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm and planktonic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lijia; van Loveren, Cor; Ling, Junqi; Wei, Xi; Crielaard, Wim; Deng, Dong Mei

    2016-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is present as a biofilm at the sites of periodontal infections. The detachment of gingival epithelial cells induced by P. gingivalis biofilms was examined using planktonic cultures as a comparison. Exponentially grown planktonic cultures or 40-h biofilms were co-incubated with epithelial cells in a 24-well plate for 4 h. Epithelial cell detachment was assessed using imaging. The activity of arginine-gingipain (Rgp) and gene expression profiles of P. gingivalis cultures were examined using a gingipain assay and quantitative PCR, respectively. P. gingivalis biofilms induced significantly higher cell detachment and displayed higher Rgp activity compared to the planktonic cultures. The genes involved in gingipain post-translational modification, but not rgp genes, were significantly up-regulated in P. gingivalis biofilms. The results underline the importance of including biofilms in the study of bacterial and host cell interactions. PMID:26963862

  19. Change in cell shape is required for matrix metalloproteinase-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2008-06-26

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a 'cuboidal' epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-{beta}-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents.

  20. Rap1 integrates tissue polarity, lumen formation, and tumorigenicpotential in human breast epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Masahiko; Nelson, Celeste M.; Myers, Connie A.; Bissell,Mina J.

    2006-09-29

    Maintenance of apico-basal polarity in normal breast epithelial acini requires a balance between cell proliferation, cell death, and proper cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix signaling. Aberrations in any of these processes can disrupt tissue architecture and initiate tumor formation. Here we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is a crucial element in organizing acinar structure and inducing lumen formation. Rap1 activity in malignant HMT-3522 T4-2 cells is appreciably higher than in S1 cells, their non-malignant counterparts. Expression of dominant-negative Rap1 resulted in phenotypic reversion of T4-2 cells, led to formation of acinar structures with correct apico-basal polarity, and dramatically reduced tumor incidence despite the persistence of genomic abnormalities. The resulting acini contained prominent central lumina not observed when other reverting agents were used. Conversely, expression of dominant-active Rap1 in T4-2 cells inhibited phenotypic reversion and led to increased invasiveness and tumorigenicity. Thus, Rap1 acts as a central regulator of breast architecture, with normal levels of activation instructing apical polarity during acinar morphogenesis, and increased activation inducing tumor formation and progression to malignancy.

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis invades oral epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandros, J; Papapanou, P; Dahlén, G

    1993-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the adhesive and invasive potential of a number of P. gingivalis strains, in an in vitro system utilizing cultures of human oral epithelial cells (KB cell line, ATCC CCL 17). P. gingivalis strains W50 and FDC 381 (laboratory strains) and OMGS 1738, 1743 and 1439 (clinical isolates) as well as E. coli strain HB 101 (non-adhering, non-invasive control) were used. Adherence was assessed by means of scintillation counting and light microscopy, after incubation of radiolabelled bacteria with epithelial cells. In the invasion assay, monolayers were infected with the P. gingivalis and E. coli strains and further incubated with an antibiotic mixture (metronidazole 0.1 mg/ml and gentamicin 0.5 mg/ml). Invasion was evaluated by (i) assessing presence of bacteria surviving the antibiotic treatment, and (ii) electron microscopy. All P. gingivalis strains adhered to and entered into the oral epithelial cells. After 3 hours of incubation, bacteria were frequently identified intracellularly by means of electron microscopy. The cellular membranes, encapsulating the microorganisms in early stages of the invasive process, appeared later to disintegrate. The presence of coated pits on the epithelial cell surfaces suggested that internalization of P. gingivalis was associated with receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME). Formation of outer membrane vesicles (blebs) by intracellular bacteria indicated that internalized P. gingivalis was able to retain its viability. E. coli strain HB 101 neither adhered to nor invaded epithelial cells. PMID:8388449

  2. Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae Bind to Cytokeratin of Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Sharma, Ashu; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    The adherence of Porphyromonas gingivalis to host cells is likely a prerequisite step in the pathogenesis of P. gingivalis-induced periodontal disease. P. gingivalis binds to and invades epithelial cells, and fimbriae are shown to be involved in this process. Little is known regarding epithelial receptor(s) involved in binding of P. gingivalis fimbriae. Using an overlay assay with purified P. gingivalis fimbriae as a probe, two major epithelial cell proteins with masses of 50 and 40 kDa were identified by immunoblotting with fimbria-specific antibodies. Iodinated purified fimbriae also bound to the same two epithelial cell proteins. An affinity chromatography technique was utilized to isolate and purify the epithelial components to which P. gingivalis fimbriae bind. Purified fimbriae were coupled to CNBr-activated Sepharose-4B, and the solubilized epithelial cell extract proteins bound to the immobilized fimbriae were isolated from the column. A major 50-kDa component and a minor 40-kDa component were purified and could be digested with trypsin, suggesting that they were proteins. These affinity-eluted 50- and 40-kDa proteins were then subjected to amino-terminal sequencing, and no sequence could be determined, suggesting that these proteins have blocked amino-terminal residues. CNBr digestion of the 50-kDa component resulted in an internal sequence homologous to that of Keratin I molecules. Further evidence that P. gingivalis fimbriae bind to cytokeratin molecule(s) comes from studies showing that multicytokeratin rabbit polyclonal antibodies cross-react with the affinity-purified 50-kDa epithelial cell surface component. Also, binding of purified P. gingivalis fimbriae to epithelial components can be inhibited in an overlay assay by multicytokeratin rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Furthermore, we showed that biotinylated purified fimbriae bind to purified human epidermal keratin in an overlay assay. These studies suggest that the surface-accessible epithelial

  3. Differentiation of porcine mesenchymal stem cells into epithelial cells as a potential therapeutic application to facilitate epithelial regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubun, Kelsey; Pankajakshan, Divya; Kim, Min-Jung; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-02-01

    Epithelial denudation is one of the characteristics of chronic asthma. To restore its functions, the airway epithelium has to rapidly repair the injuries and regenerate its structure and integrity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to differentiate into many cell lineages. However, the differentiation of MSCs into epithelial cells has not been fully studied. Here, we examined the differentiation of MSCs into epithelial cells using three different media compositions with various growth supplementations. The MSCs were isolated from porcine bone marrow by density gradient centrifugation. The isolated MSCs were CD11(-) CD34(-) CD45(-) CD44(+) CD90(+) and CD105(+) by immunostaining and flow cytometry. MSCs were stimulated with EpiGRO (Millipore), BEpiCM (ScienCell) and AECGM (PromoCell) media for 5 and 10 days, and epithelial differentiation was assessed by qPCR (keratin 14, 18 and EpCAM), fluorometry (cytokeratin 7-8, cytokeratin 14-15-16-19 and EpCAM), western blot analysis (pancytokeratin, EpCAM) and flow cytometry (cytokeratin 7-8, cytokeratin 14-15-16-19 and EpCAM). The functional marker MUC1 was also assessed after 10 days of air-liquid interface (ALI) culture in optimized media. Cells cultured in BEpiCM containing fibroblast growth factor and prostaglandin E2 showed the highest expression of the epithelial markers: CK7-8 (85.90%); CK-14-15-16-19 (10.14%); and EpCAM (64.61%). The cells also expressed functional marker MUC1 after ALI culture. The differentiated MSCs when cultured in BEpiCM medium ex vivo in a bioreactor on a decellularized trachea for 10 days retained the epithelial-like phenotype. In conclusion, porcine bone marrow-derived MSCs demonstrate commitment to the epithelial lineage and might be a potential therapy for facilitating the repair of denuded airway epithelium. PMID:23696537

  4. Co-culture of primary rat hepatocytes with rat liver epithelial cells enhances interleukin-6-induced acute-phase protein response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, S.J.A.C.; Vanhaecke, T.; Papeleu, P.; Rogiers, V.; Haagsman, H.P.; Norren, van K.

    2010-01-01

    Three different primary rat hepatocyte culture methods were compared for their ability to allow the secretion of fibrinogen and albumin under basal and IL-6- stimulated conditions. These culture methods comprised the co-culture of hepatocytes with rat liver epithelial cells (CCRLEC), a collagen type

  5. The Potential Role of Hedgehog Signaling in the Luminal/Basal Phenotype of Breast Epithelia and in Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Arwa Flemban; David Qualtrough

    2015-01-01

    The epithelium of the lactiferous ducts in the breast is comprised of luminal epithelial cells and underlying basal myoepithelial cells. The regulation of cell fate and transit of cells between these two cell types remains poorly understood. This relationship becomes of greater importance when studying the subtypes of epithelial breast carcinoma, which are categorized according to their expression of luminal or basal markers. The epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in t...

  6. No junctional communication between epithelial cells in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Laat, S W; Tertoolen, L G; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1980-01-01

    Diffusion gradients of morphogens have been inferred as a basis for the control of morphogenesis in hydra, and morphogenetic substances have been found which, on the basis of their molecular weight (MW), should be able to pass gap junctions. There have been several reports of the presence of gap...... junctions between epithelial cells of hydra. However, until now, there has been no report published on whether these junctions enable the epithelial cells to exchange molecules of small molecular weight, as has been described in other organisms. Therefore we decided to investigate the communicative...... properties of the junctional membranes by electrophysiological methods and by intracellular-dye iontophoresis. We report here that no electrotonic coupling is detectable between epithelial cells of Hydra attenuata in: (1) intact animals, (2) head-regenerating animals, (3) cell re-aggregates, and (4) hydra...

  7. VISUALIZATION OF LIP AND BASAL-CELL SKIN CANCER IN HIGH-FREQUENCY ELECTRICAL FIELD

    OpenAIRE

    Zabunyan G. A.; Ovsiyenko P. G.

    2015-01-01

    In patients, there has been registered luminescence of skin sites affected by basal cell skin cancer at stage III in high-frequency electric field. The diagnosis was confirmed by histological analysis of excised cancer sites

  8. Basal Cell Carcinomas in Gorlin Syndrome: A Review of 202 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome (Naevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in the PTCH gene with a birth incidence of approximately 1 in 19,000. Patients develop multiple basal cell carcinomas of the skin frequently in early life and also have a predisposition to additional malignancies such as medulloblastoma. Gorlin Syndrome patients also have developmental defects such as bifid ribs and other complications such as jaw keratocysts. We studied the incidence and frequency of basal cell carcinomas in 202 Gorlin syndrome patients from 62 families and compared this to their gender and mutation type. Our data suggests that the incidence of basal cell carcinomas is equal between males and females and the mutation type cannot be used to predict disease burden.

  9. Imaging of basal cell carcinoma tissue using en-face OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penmetsa, Bhanu Rakesh; Khandwala, Mona; Bradu, Adrian; Hughes, Michael; Jones, Carole A.; Schofield, John; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-09-01

    We have investigated the applicability of en-face OCT in imaging freshly excised biopsies of Basal Cell Carcinoma. Encouraging results have been obtained in identifying tumor features and abnormal skin architecture.

  10. Jaw cyst-Basal cell nevus-Bifid rib syndrome: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Rai S; Gauba K

    2007-01-01

    Jaw cyst-Basal cell nevus-Bifid rib syndrome or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome involves multiple organ system. The most common findings include multiple odontogenic keratocysts in the jaws and basal cell nevus on the skin that have an early age onset. These multiple odontogenic keratocysts warrant aggressive treatment at the earliest because of the damage and possible complications associated with them. Recurrence in these lesions is the most characteristic feature that has to be taken in consideratio...

  11. Panoramic zonography in evaluation of recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the face

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine patients with recurrent, facial basal cell carcinoma were followed up both clinically and radiographically using a panoramic technique. A cylindrical image track was used for panoramic radiography. Five patients had bony destruction due to tumour re-occurence, four patients had bony defects caused by surgery. The confirmation of the results by surgery and/or follow-up shows that the spread of basal cell carcinoma into bone can be diagnosed using a panoramic technique. (orig.)

  12. Multiple metastatic basal cell carcinoma with concurrent metastatic pleomorphic sarcoma in chronic lymphedema area - Case report *

    OpenAIRE

    Giuliano da Paz Oliveira; Régio José Santiago Girão; Cléverson Teixeira Soares; Edgard Jose Franco Mello Junior

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphedema presents as interstitial fluid retention due to a failure in the lymphatic system drainage. The affected region becomes more vulnerable immunologically and predisposed to the onset of neoplasms. Basal Cell Carcinoma is the most common sort of neoplasm, nevertheless it rarely metastisizes. Sarcomas are malignant mesenchymal neoplasms, locally aggressive, which can spread. Here is reported an infrequent case of multiple basal cell carcinoma, synchronous to a poorly differenti...

  13. Risk factors for basal cell carcinoma: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus Maia; Nelson Guimarães Proença; José Cássio de Moraes

    1995-01-01

    A controlled trial was performed with the purpose of investigating which factors could be considered of significant risk for the development of basal cell carcinoma. A total of 259 cases of basal cell carcinoma diagnosed from July 1991 to July 1992 were compared with 518 controls matched for age and sex. All subjects in both groups were white. Protocol data were submitted to statistical analysis by the chi-square test and by multiple conditional logistic regression analysis and the following ...

  14. Basal cell carcinoma of the scrotum: report of a case and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-wei; MAN Li-bo; HE Feng; HUANG Guang-lin; LI Gui-zhong; WANG Hai-dong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer of the skin. However, BCC occurring on non-sun-exposed sites, especially the genital regions such as scrotum and labia, are very rare. An estimated annual incidence of basal cell carcinoma of the scrotum is 1 per 1 000 000 population.1 Here, we report a man with scrotal BCC with the lesion for 51 years, the longest one in the documents. He was successfully treated by circumferential excision.

  15. Respiratory epithelial cells orchestrate pulmonary innate immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Alenghat, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial surfaces of the lungs are in direct contact with the environment and are subjected to dynamic physical forces as airway tubes and alveoli are stretched and compressed during ventilation. Mucociliary clearance in conducting airways, reduction of surface tension in the alveoli, and maintenance of near sterility have been accommodated by the evolution of a multi-tiered innate host-defense system. The biophysical nature of pulmonary host defenses are integrated with the ability of ...

  16. Sphingolipid trafficking and protein sorting in epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slimane, TA; Hoekstra, D

    2002-01-01

    Sphingolipids represent a minor, but highly dynamic subclass of lipids in all eukaryotic cells. They are involved in functions that range from structural protection to signal transduction and protein sorting, and participate in lipid raft assembly. In polarized epithelial cells, which display an asy

  17. [Epithelial cell in intestinal homeostasis and inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouiten-Mekki, Lilia; Serghini, Meriem; Fekih, Monia; Kallel, Lamia; Matri, Samira; Ben Mustapha, Nadia; Boubaker, Jalel; Filali, Azza

    2013-12-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the principal inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) which physiopathology is currently poorly elucidated. During these diseases, the participation of the epithelial cell in the installation and the perpetuation of the intestinal inflammation is now clearly implicated. In fact, the intestinal epithelium located at the interface between the internal environment and the intestinal luminal, is key to the homeostatic regulation of the intestinal barrier. This barrier can schematically be regarded as being three barriers in one: a physical, chemical and immune barrier. The barrier function of epithelial cell can be altered by various mechanisms as occurs in IBD. The goal of this article is to review the literature on the role of the epithelial cell in intestinal homeostasis and its implication in the IBD. PMID:24356146

  18. Alveolar epithelial type II cell: defender of the alveolus revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Fehrenbach Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Abstract In 1977, Mason and Williams developed the concept of the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cell as a defender of the alveolus. It is well known that AE2 cells synthesise, secrete, and recycle all components of the surfactant that regulates alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. AE2 cells influence extracellular surfactant transformation by regulating, for example, pH and [Ca2+] of the hypophase. AE2 cells play various roles in alveolar fluid balance, coagulation/fibrinolysis, a...

  19. Regenerative capacity of adult cortical thymic epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rode, Immanuel; Boehm, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Involution of the thymus is accompanied by a decline in the number of thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and a severely restricted peripheral repertoire of T-cell specificities. TECs are essential for T-cell differentiation; they originate from a bipotent progenitor that gives rise to cells of cortical (cTEC) and medullary (mTEC) phenotypes, via compartment-specific progenitors. Upon acute selective near-total ablation during embryogenesis, regeneration of TECs fails, suggesting that losses from ...

  20. Developmental kinetics, turnover, and stimulatory capacity of thymic epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Daniel H.D.; Seach, Natalie; Ueno, Tomoo; Milton, Morag K; Liston, Adrian; Lew, Andrew M.; Christopher C Goodnow; Boyd, Richard L.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the importance of thymic stromal cells to T-cell development, relatively little is known about their biology. Here, we use single-cell analysis of stromal cells to analyze extensive changes in the number and composition of thymic stroma throughout life, revealing a surprisingly dynamic population. Phenotypic progression of thymic epithelial subsets was assessed at high resolution in young mice to provide a developmental framework. The cellular and molecular requirements of adult epith...

  1. Epithelial cell cultures from normal and cancerous human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, R B; Smith, H S; Nelson-Rees, W A; Springer, E L

    1976-04-01

    Thirty epithelial cell strains were isolated from human carcinomas and normal epithelial tissues by collagenase digestion and selective removal of fibroblasts with trypsin-Versene. Most strains were obtained from metastatic carcinomas or epithelia of the urinary and intestinal tracts. The success rate for growth of both neoplastic and normal tissues (excluding skin) was 38%. Six of these strains showed gross morphologic and chromosome changes typical of malignant cells. Nine resembled normal epithelium. The other 15 exhibited some degree of morphologic change from normal. PMID:176412

  2. Evidence from a mouse model that epithelial cell migration and mesenchymal-epithelial transition contribute to rapid restoration of uterine tissue integrity during menstruation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona L Cousins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In women dynamic changes in uterine tissue architecture occur during each menstrual cycle. Menses, characterised by the shedding of the upper functional layer of the endometrium, is the culmination of a cascade of irreversible changes in tissue function including stromal decidualisation, inflammation and production of degradative enzymes. The molecular mechanisms that contribute to the rapid restoration of tissue homeostasis at time of menses are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY: A modified mouse model of menses was developed to focus on the events occurring within the uterine lining during endometrial shedding/repair. Decidualisation, vaginal bleeding, tissue architecture and cell proliferation were evaluated at 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours after progesterone (P4 withdrawal; mice received a single injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU 90 mins before culling. Expression of genes implicated in the regulation of mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET was determined using a RT2 PCR profiler array, qRTPCR and bioinformatic analysis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice exhibited vaginal bleeding between 4 and 12 hours after P4 withdrawal, concomitant with detachment of the decidualised cell mass from the basal portion of the endometrial lining. Immunostaining for BrdU and pan cytokeratin revealed evidence of epithelial cell proliferation and migration. Cells that appeared to be in transition from a mesenchymal to an epithelial cell identity were identified within the stromal compartment. Analysis of mRNAs encoding genes expressed exclusively in the epithelial or stromal compartments, or implicated in MET, revealed dynamic changes in expression, consistent with a role for reprogramming of mesenchymal cells so that they could contribute to re-epithelialisation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies have provided novel insights into the cellular processes that contribute to re-epithelialisation post-menses implicating both epithelial cell migration and

  3. A pure population of lung alveolar epithelial type II cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dachun; Haviland, David L.; Burns, Alan R.; Zsigmond, Eva; Wetsel, Rick A.

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells are small, cuboidal cells that constitute ≈60% of the pulmonary alveolar epithelium. These cells are crucial for repair of the injured alveolus by differentiating into alveolar epithelial type I cells. ATII cells derived from human ES (hES) cells are a promising source of cells that could be used therapeutically to treat distal lung diseases. We have developed a reliable transfection and culture procedure, which facilitates, via genetic selection, the ...

  4. A Case of Basal Cell Carcinoma with Outer Hair Follicle Sheath Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Masazumi; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Fumihiko; Akasaka, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old Japanese man presented at our hospital with an asymptomatic, blackish, irregularly shaped plaque with a gray nodule in the periphery on his left lower leg. The lesion had been present for 10 years and had recently enlarged, associated with bleeding. Histopathologically, the tumor consisted of three distinct parts: The first part showed massive aggregation of basophilic basaloid cells with peripheral palisading and abundant melanin granules, and was diagnosed as solid-type basal cell carcinoma. The second part showed aggregation of clear cells with squamous eddies, and was diagnosed as proliferating trichilemmal tumor. The third part showed reticular aggregation of basaloid cells with infundibular cysts in the papillary dermis, and was diagnosed as infundibulocystic basal cell carcinoma. We diagnosed this tumor as basal cell carcinoma with various forms of hair follicle differentiation, including differentiation into the outer root sheath. PMID:26955331

  5. A Case of Basal Cell Carcinoma with Outer Hair Follicle Sheath Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masazumi Onishi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old Japanese man presented at our hospital with an asymptomatic, blackish, irregularly shaped plaque with a gray nodule in the periphery on his left lower leg. The lesion had been present for 10 years and had recently enlarged, associated with bleeding. Histopathologically, the tumor consisted of three distinct parts: The first part showed massive aggregation of basophilic basaloid cells with peripheral palisading and abundant melanin granules, and was diagnosed as solid-type basal cell carcinoma. The second part showed aggregation of clear cells with squamous eddies, and was diagnosed as proliferating trichilemmal tumor. The third part showed reticular aggregation of basaloid cells with infundibular cysts in the papillary dermis, and was diagnosed as infundibulocystic basal cell carcinoma. We diagnosed this tumor as basal cell carcinoma with various forms of hair follicle differentiation, including differentiation into the outer root sheath.

  6. Cell volume regulation in epithelial physiology and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The physiological function of epithelia is transport of ions, nutrients, and fluid either in secretory or absorptive direction. All of these processes are closely related to cell volume changes, which are thus an integrated part of epithelial function. Transepithelial transport and cell volume re...... transporters and channels with key physiological functions in epithelia and known roles in the development of cancer in these tissues. Their roles in cell survival, cell cycle progression, and development of drug resistance in epithelial cancers will be discussed.......The physiological function of epithelia is transport of ions, nutrients, and fluid either in secretory or absorptive direction. All of these processes are closely related to cell volume changes, which are thus an integrated part of epithelial function. Transepithelial transport and cell volume...... regulation both rely on the spatially and temporally coordinated function of ion channels and transporters. In healthy epithelia, specific ion channels/transporters localize to the luminal and basolateral membranes, contributing to functional epithelial polarity. In pathophysiological processes such as...

  7. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai A

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke.

  8. PRIMARY CULTURE OF CHOROIDAL EPITHELIAL CELLS: CHARACTERIZATION OF AN IN VITRO MODEL OF BLOOD-CSF BARRIER

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHENG, WEI; ZHAO, QIUQU; GRAZIANO, JOSEPH H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A primary rat choroidal epithelial cell culture system was developed to investigate mechanisms of heavy metal toxicity on the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier. Epithelial cells were dissociated from choroidal tissue by pronase digestion and cultured in standard DMEM culture media supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 10 ng epithelial growth factor per ml. The procedure yielded 2–5 × 104 cells from pooled plexuses of three to four rats, and a viability of 77–85%. The cultures displayed a dominant polygonal type of epithelial cells, with a population doubling time of 2–3 d. The cultures were of distinct choroidal epithelial origins. For example, immunocytochemical studies using monospecific rabbit anti-rat TTR polyclonal antibody revealed a strong positive stain of transthyretin (TTR), a thyroxine transport protein exclusively produced by the choroidal epithelia. Also, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed the presence of specific TTR mRNA in the cultures. The cultures were further adapted to grow on a freely permeable membrane sandwiched between two culture chambers. The formation of an impermeable confluent monolayer occurred within 5 d after seeding and was verified by the presence of a steady electrical resistance across the membrane (80 ± 10 ohm per cm2). The epithelial barriers appeared to actively transport [125I]-thyroxine from the basal to apical chamber. These results suggest that this primary cell culture system possesses typical choroidal epithelial characteristics and appears to be a suitable model for in vitro mechanistic investigations of blood–CSF barrier. PMID:9542634

  9. Adherence of Candida albicans to oral epithelial cells differentiated by Papanicolaou staining.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, D. W.; Walker, R; Lewis, M.A.; Allison, R T; Potts, A J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relative adherence of Candida albicans to oral epithelial cells differentiated by Papanicolaou staining. METHODS: Oral epithelial cells were collected from 10 healthy adults (five male, five female) and counted. Equal volumes of oral epithelial cells and candida were mixed and incubated. The epithelial cells from this mix were collected by filtration through 10 microns polycarbonate membrane filters. Cells retained on the membrane filters were stained with crystal vi...

  10. Heterogeneity of thymic epithelial cells in promoting T-lymphocyte differentiation in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez, J C; Palacios, R

    1991-01-01

    To study in vivo the contribution of different thymic epithelial cells to T-lymphocyte differentiation, we have established several nontransformed thymic epithelial cell lines and developed an in vivo assay, not involving exposure to drugs or radiation, that permitted us to study the capacity of these epithelial lines to support T-cell differentiation. We found that cell lines EA2 and ET, which express markers of cortical epithelial cells, produce interleukin 7 mRNA and after being injected i...

  11. AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONSE TO HUMAN METAPNEUMOVIRUS INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    X, Bao; T, Liu; L, Spetch; D, Kolli; R.P, Garofalo; A, Casola

    2007-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-κB, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immuno-modulatory mediators. PMID:17655903

  12. Apicobasal Polarity Controls Lymphocyte Adhesion to Hepatic Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Reglero-Real

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Loss of apicobasal polarity is a hallmark of epithelial pathologies. Leukocyte infiltration and crosstalk with dysfunctional epithelial barriers are crucial for the inflammatory response. Here, we show that apicobasal architecture regulates the adhesion between hepatic epithelial cells and lymphocytes. Polarized hepatocytes and epithelium from bile ducts segregate the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 adhesion receptor onto their apical, microvilli-rich membranes, which are less accessible by circulating immune cells. Upon cell depolarization, hepatic ICAM-1 becomes exposed and increases lymphocyte binding. Polarized hepatic cells prevent ICAM-1 exposure to lymphocytes by redirecting basolateral ICAM-1 to apical domains. Loss of ICAM-1 polarity occurs in human inflammatory liver diseases and can be induced by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. We propose that adhesion receptor polarization is a parenchymal immune checkpoint that allows functional epithelium to hamper leukocyte binding. This contributes to the haptotactic guidance of leukocytes toward neighboring damaged or chronically inflamed epithelial cells that expose their adhesion machinery.

  13. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Aoshiba K; Nagai A

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inapprop...

  14. Basal Cell Skin Cancer after Total-Body Irradiation and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Robert W. Mathes; Leisenring, Wendy M; Friedman, Debra L.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies identified radiation therapy as a key modifier of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) risk in survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In the present analysis, risk of BCC was analyzed in relation to age at transplant, attained age, race, total-body irradiation (TBI), and radiation fractionation in 6,306 patients who received HCT at ages 0–65 years after conditioning regimens with (n = 3870) or without (n = 2436) TBI, and who were followed from 100 days to 36.2 years aft...

  15. Polarized entry of canine parvovirus in an epithelial cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Basak, S; Compans, R W

    1989-01-01

    The binding and uptake of canine parvovirus (CPV) in polarized epithelial cells were investigated by growing the cells on a permeable support and inoculating with the virus either from the apical or basolateral surface. Binding of radiolabeled CPV occurred preferentially on the basolateral surface. In contrast, when a similar experiment was carried out on nonpolarized A72 cells, virus binding occurred regardless of the direction of virus input. Binding appeared to be specific for CPV and coul...

  16. Requirements for invasion of epithelial cells by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    OpenAIRE

    Sreenivasan, P K; Meyer, D H; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1993-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium implicated in human periodontal disease, was recently demonstrated to invade cultured epithelial cells (D. H. Meyer, P. K. Sreenivasan, and P. M. Fives-Taylor, Infect. Immun. 59:2719-2726, 1991). This report characterizes the requirements for invasion of KB cells by A. actinomycetemcomitans. The roles of bacterial and host factors were investigated by using selective agents that influence specific bacterial or host cell functions. Inhibi...

  17. Mechanisms of asbestos-induced squamous metaplasia in tracheobronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within 1 to 4 weeks after exposure to asbestos, differentiated rodent and human tracheobronchial epithelial cells in organ culture undergo squamous metaplasia, a putative preneoplastic lesion characterized by conversion of mucociliary cell types to keratinizing cells. The exogenous addition of retinal acetate (RA) to culture medium of hamster tracheal organ cultures reverses preestablished, asbestos-induced squamous metaplasia, although data suggest that the effectiveness of RA decreases as the length of time between exposure to asbestos and initial application of RA increases. Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), inhibits squamous metaplasia caused by asbestos or vitamin A deficiency, whereas addition of methylglyoxal bis(guanyl-hydrazone) (MGBG), a structural analog of spermidine and inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, causes an enhancement of metaplasia under both circumstances. Basal cell hyperplasia and increased incorporation of 3H-thymidine by tracheal epithelial cells also are seen after addition of the polyamines, putrescine or spermidine, to tracheal organ cultures, an observation supporting the importance of polyamines in the development of this lesion. The use of retinoids and inhibitors of ODC could be promising as preventive and/or therapeutic approaches for individuals at high risk for development of asbestos-associated diseases

  18. The similarity between human embryonic stem cell-derived epithelial cells and ameloblast-lineage cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Wei Zheng; Logan Linthicum; Pamela K DenBesten; Yan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare epithelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to human ameloblast-lineage cells (ALCs), as a way to determine their potential use as a cell source for ameloblast regeneration. Induced by various concentrations of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), retinoic acid (RA) and lithium chloride (LiCI) for 7 days, hESCs adopted cobble-stone epithelial phenotype (hESC-derived epithelial cells (ES-ECs)) and expressed cytokeratin 14. Compared with ALCs and oral epithelial cells (OE), ES-ECs expressed amelogenesis-associated genes similar to ALCs. ES-ECs were compared with human fetal skin epithelium, human fetal oral buccal mucosal epithelial cells and human ALCs for their expression pattern of cytokeratins as well. ALCs had relatively high expression levels of cytokeratin 76, which ,vas also found to be upregulated in ES-ECs. Based on the present study, with the similarity of gene expression with ALCs, ES-ECs are a promising potential cell source for regeneration, which are not available in erupted human teeth for regeneration of enamel.

  19. Basal HIF-1a expression levels are not predictive for radiosensitivity of human cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, D.; Multhoff, G. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Helmholtz Center Munich, CCG - Innate Immunity in Tumor Biology, Munich (Germany). German Research Center for Environmental Health - Inst. of Pathology; Bayer, C.; Emmerich, K.; Molls, M.; Vaupel, P. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Huber, R.M. [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Pneumology

    2012-04-15

    High levels of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1a in tumors are reported to be associated with tumor progression and resistance to therapy. To examine the impact of HIF-1a on radioresistance under normoxia, the sensitivity towards irradiation was measured in human tumor cell lines that differ significantly in their basal HIF-1a levels. HIF-1a levels were quantified in lysates of H1339, EPLC-272H, A549, SAS, XF354, FaDu, BHY, and CX- tumor cell lines by ELISA. Protein levels of HIF-1a, HIF-2a, carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), and GAPDH were assessed by Western blot analysis. Knock-down experiments were performed using HIF-1a siRNA. Clonogenic survival after irradiation was determined by the colony forming assay. According to their basal HIF-1a status, the tumor cell lines were divided into low (SAS, XF354, FaDu, A549, CX-), intermediate (EPLC-272H, BHY), and high (H1339) HIF-1a expressors. The functionality of the high basal HIF-1a expression in H1339 cells was proven by reduced CA IX expression after knocking-down HIF-1a. Linear regression analysis revealed no correlation between basal HIF-1a levels and the survival fraction at either 2 or 4 Gy in all tumor cell lines investigated. Our data suggest that basal HIF-1a levels in human tumor cell lines do not predict their radiosensitivity under normoxia. (orig.)

  20. Illustration of extensive extracellular matrix at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface within the renal stem/progenitor cell niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minuth Will W

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem/progenitor cells are promising candidates to treat diseased renal parenchyma. However, implanted stem/progenitor cells are exposed to a harmful atmosphere of degenerating parenchyma. To minimize hampering effects after an implantation investigations are in progress to administer these cells within an artificial polyester interstitum supporting survival. Learning from nature the renal stem/progenitor cell niche appears as a valuable model. At this site epithelial stem/progenitor cells within the collecting duct ampulla face mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells. Both cell types do not have close contact but are separated by a wide interstitium. Methods To analyze extracellular matrix in this particular interstitium, special contrasting for transmission electron microscopy was performed. Kidneys of neonatal rabbits were fixed in solutions containing glutaraldehyde (GA or in combination with cupromeronic blue, ruthenium red and tannic acid. Results GA revealed a basal lamina at the ampulla and a bright but inconspicuously looking interstitial space. In contrast, GA containing cupromeronic blue exhibits numerous proteoglycan braces lining from the ampulla towards the interstitial space. GA containing ruthenium red or tannic acid demonstrates clouds of extracellular matrix protruding from the basal lamina of the ampulla to the surface of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells. Conclusions The actual data show that the interstitium between epithelial and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells contains much more and up to date unknown extracellular matrix than earlier observed by classical GA fixation.

  1. Sodium selectivity of semicircular canal duct epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harbidge Donald G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium absorption by semicircular canal duct (SCCD epithelial cells is thought to contribute to the homeostasis of the volume of vestibular endolymph. It was previously shown that the epithelial cells could absorb Na+ under control of a glucocorticoid hormone (dexamethasone and the absorptive transepithelial current was blocked by amiloride. The most commonly-observed target of amiloride is the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, comprised of the three subunits α-, β- and γ-ENaC. However, other cation channels have also been observed to be sensitive in a similar concentration range. The aim of this study was to determine whether SCCD epithelial cells absorb only Na+ or also K+ through an amiloride-sensitive pathway. Parasensory K+ absorption could contribute to regulation of the transduction current through hair cells, as found to occur via vestibular transitional cells [S. H. Kim and D. C. Marcus. Regulation of sodium transport in the inner ear. Hear.Res. doi:10.1016/j.heares.2011.05.003, 2011]. Results We determined the molecular and functional expression of candidate cation channels with gene array (GEO GSE6197, whole-cell patch clamp and transepithelial recordings in primary cultures of rat SCCD. α-, β- and γ-ENaC were all previously reported as present. The selectivity of the amiloride-sensitive transepithelial and cell membrane currents was observed in Ussing chamber and whole-cell patch clamp recordings. The cell membrane currents were carried by Na+ but not K+, but the Na+ selectivity disappeared when the cells were cultured on impermeable supports. Transepithelial currents across SCCD were also carried exclusively by Na+. Conclusions These results are consistent with the amiloride-sensitive absorptive flux of SCCD mediated by a highly Na+-selective channel, likely αβγ-ENaC. These epithelial cells therefore absorb only Na+ via the amiloride-sensitive pathway and do not provide a parasensory K+ efflux from the

  2. Establishment of a long-term three-dimensional primary culture of mouse glandular stomach epithelial cells within the stem cell niche

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We established a 3D culture system to allow long-term culture of stomach cells. ► In this culture system, gastric epithelial cells grew for about 3 months. ► The cultured cells differentiated into multi-units of the stomach. ► This culture method should be useful for elucidating the cause of gastric diseases. -- Abstract: Compared to the small intestine and colon, little is known about stem cells in the stomach because of a lack of specific stem cell markers and an in vitro system that allows long-term culture. Here we describe a long-term three-dimensional (3D) primary gastric culture system within the stem cell niche. Glandular stomach cells from neonatal mice cultured in collagen gel yielded expanding sphere-like structures for 3 months. The wall of the gastrospheres consisted of a highly polarized epithelial monolayer with an outer lining of myofibroblasts. The epithelial cells showed a tall columnar cell shape, basal round nuclei, and mucus-filled cytoplasm as well as expression of MUC5AC, indicating differentiation into gastric surface mucous cells. These cells demonstrated the features of fully differentiated gastric surface mucous cells such as microvilli, junctional complexes, and glycogen and secretory granules. Fewer than 1% of cultured epithelial cells differentiated into enteroendocrine cells. Active proliferation of the epithelial cells and many apoptotic cells in the inner lumen revealed the rapid cell turnover in gastrospheres in vitro. This method enables us to investigate the role of signaling between cell–cell and epithelial–mesenchymal interactions in an environment that is extremely similar to the in vivo environment

  3. Establishment of a long-term three-dimensional primary culture of mouse glandular stomach epithelial cells within the stem cell niche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katano, Takahito [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Ootani, Akifumi [Department of Gastroenterology and GI Endoscopy Center, Shin-Kokura Hospital, Federation of National Public Service Personnel Mutual Aid Associations, 1-3-1 Kanada, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu 803-0816 (Japan); Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Mizoshita, Tsutomu, E-mail: tmizoshi@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Tanida, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Ozeki, Keiji; Ebi, Masahide; Mori, Yoshinori; Kataoka, Hiromi; Kamiya, Takeshi [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Toda, Shuji [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Joh, Takashi [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We established a 3D culture system to allow long-term culture of stomach cells. ► In this culture system, gastric epithelial cells grew for about 3 months. ► The cultured cells differentiated into multi-units of the stomach. ► This culture method should be useful for elucidating the cause of gastric diseases. -- Abstract: Compared to the small intestine and colon, little is known about stem cells in the stomach because of a lack of specific stem cell markers and an in vitro system that allows long-term culture. Here we describe a long-term three-dimensional (3D) primary gastric culture system within the stem cell niche. Glandular stomach cells from neonatal mice cultured in collagen gel yielded expanding sphere-like structures for 3 months. The wall of the gastrospheres consisted of a highly polarized epithelial monolayer with an outer lining of myofibroblasts. The epithelial cells showed a tall columnar cell shape, basal round nuclei, and mucus-filled cytoplasm as well as expression of MUC5AC, indicating differentiation into gastric surface mucous cells. These cells demonstrated the features of fully differentiated gastric surface mucous cells such as microvilli, junctional complexes, and glycogen and secretory granules. Fewer than 1% of cultured epithelial cells differentiated into enteroendocrine cells. Active proliferation of the epithelial cells and many apoptotic cells in the inner lumen revealed the rapid cell turnover in gastrospheres in vitro. This method enables us to investigate the role of signaling between cell–cell and epithelial–mesenchymal interactions in an environment that is extremely similar to the in vivo environment.

  4. {gamma}-irradiation deregulates cell cycle control and apoptosis in nevoid basal cell carcinomas syndrome-derived cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Katsunori; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Masao [National Children' s Medical Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Sugita, Katsuo; Kohno, Yoichi; Nishie, Haruko; Yasumoto, Shin-ichiro; Furue, Masutaka

    1999-12-01

    The nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by nevi, palmar and plantar pits, falx calcification, vertebrate anomalies and basal cell carcinomas. It is well known in NBCCS that {gamma}-irradiation to the skin induces basal cell carcinomas or causes an enlargement of the tumor size, although the details of the mechanism remain unknown. We have established lymphoblastoid cell lines from three NBCCS patients, and we present here the first evidence of abnormal cell cycle and apoptosis regulations. A novel mutation (single nucleotide deletion) in the coding region of the human patched gene, PTCH, was identified in two sibling patients, but no apparent abnormalities were detected in the gene of the remaining patient. Nevertheless, the three established cell lines showed similar features in the following analyses. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that the NBCCS-derived cells were accumulated in the G{sub 2}M phase after {gamma}-irradiation, whereas normal cells showed cell cycle arrest both in the G{sub 0}G{sub 1} and G{sub 2}M phases. The fraction of apoptotic cells after {gamma}-irradiation was smaller in the NBCCS cells. The level of p27 expression markedly decreased after {gamma}-irradiation in the NBCCS cells, although the effects of the irradiation on the expression profiles for p53, p21 and Rb did not differ in normal and NBCCS cells. These findings may provide a clue to the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis in NBCCS. (author)

  5. Computational investigation of epithelial cell dynamic phenotype in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debnath Jayanta

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When grown in three-dimensional (3D cultures, epithelial cells typically form cystic organoids that recapitulate cardinal features of in vivo epithelial structures. Characterizing essential cell actions and their roles, which constitute the system's dynamic phenotype, is critical to gaining deeper insight into the cystogenesis phenomena. Methods Starting with an earlier in silico epithelial analogue (ISEA1 that validated for several Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK epithelial cell culture attributes, we built a revised analogue (ISEA2 to increase overlap between analogue and cell culture traits. Both analogues used agent-based, discrete event methods. A set of axioms determined ISEA behaviors; together, they specified the analogue's operating principles. A new experimentation framework enabled tracking relative axiom use and roles during simulated cystogenesis along with establishment of the consequences of their disruption. Results ISEA2 consistently produced convex cystic structures in a simulated embedded culture. Axiom use measures provided detailed descriptions of the analogue's dynamic phenotype. Dysregulating key cell death and division axioms led to disorganized structures. Adhering to either axiom less than 80% of the time caused ISEA1 to form easily identified morphological changes. ISEA2 was more robust to identical dysregulation. Both dysregulated analogues exhibited characteristics that resembled those associated with an in vitro model of early glandular epithelial cancer. Conclusion We documented the causal chains of events, and their relative roles, responsible for simulated cystogenesis. The results stand as an early hypothesis–a theory–of how individual MDCK cell actions give rise to consistently roundish, cystic organoids.

  6. Interactions between Periodontal Bacteria and Human Oral Epithelial Cells: Fusobacterium nucleatum Adheres to and Invades Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yiping W.; Shi, Wenyuan; Huang, George T.-J.; Kinder Haake, Susan; Park, No-Hee; Kuramitsu, Howard; Genco, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteria are causative agents of periodontal diseases. Interactions between oral bacteria and gingival epithelial cells are essential aspects of periodontal infections. Using an in vitro tissue culture model, a selected group of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria frequently associated with periodontal diseases, including Bacteroides forsythus, Campylobacter curvus, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, were examined for their ability to adhere to and invade primary cultures of human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC). The effects of these bacteria on the production of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a proinflammatory chemokine, were also measured. These studies provided an initial demonstration that F. nucleatum adhered to and invaded HGEC and that this was accompanied by high levels of IL-8 secretion from the epithelial cells. The attachment and invasion characteristics of F. nucleatum were also tested using KB cells, an oral epithelial cell line. The invasion was verified by transmission electron microscopy and with metabolic inhibitors. Invasion appeared to occur via a “zipping” mechanism and required the involvement of actins, microtubules, signal transduction, protein synthesis, and energy metabolism of the epithelial cell, as well as protein synthesis by F. nucleatum. A spontaneous mutant, lam, of F. nucleatum, isolated as defective in autoagglutination, was unable to attach to or invade HGEC or KB cells, further indicating the requirement of bacterial components in these processes. Sugar inhibition assays indicated that lectin-like interactions were involved in the attachment of F. nucleatum to KB cells. Investigation of these new virulence phenotypes should improve our understanding of the role of F. nucleatum in periodontal infections. PMID:10816455

  7. Epithelial cells with hepatobiliary phenotype: Is it another stem cell candidate for healthy adult human liver?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dung Ngoc Khuu; Mustapha Najimi; Etienne M Sokal

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence and role of liver epithelial cells in the healthy human adult liver.METHODS: Fifteen days after human hepatocyte primary culture, epithelial like cells emerged and started proliferating. Cell colonies were isolated and sub-cultured for more than 160 d under specific culture conditions. Cells were analyzed for each passage using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).RESULTS: Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that liver epithelial cells expressed common markers for hepatic and stem cells such as CD90, CD44 and CD29 but were negative for CD34 and CD117. Using immunofluorescence we demonstrated that liver epithelial cells expressed not only immature (a-fetoprotein) but also differentiated hepatocyte (albumin and CK-18) and biliary markers (CK-7 and 19), whereas they were negative for OV-6. RT-PCR analysis confirmed immunofluorescence data and revealed that liver epithelial cells did not express mature hepatocyte markers such as CYP2B6, CYP3A4 and tyrosine amino-transferase. Purified liver epithelial cells were transplanted into SCID mice. One month after transplantation, albumin positive cell foci were detected in the recipient mouse parenchyma.CONCLUSION: According to their immature and bipotential phenotype, liver epithelial cells might represent a pool of precursors in the healthy human adult liver other than oval cells.

  8. Beneficial effect of intralesionally injected 5-fluorouracil on basal cell epithelioma associated with radiodermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Seiichiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1984-06-01

    A 81-year-old male had perioral radiodermatitis of 50 years' duration which was associated with Bowen's disease and basal cell epitheliomas since age 59 years. One of those basal cell epitheliomas treated with topical 5-FU and bleomycin ointments increased to form an ulcer of 25 x 15mm in size nearby the right side of nose, accompanying with a fistule to the oral cavity while he hesitated to visit the hospital. 5-FU was intralesionally injected into the tumor. After the injections in total dose of 6,550mg the ulcer got epithelized and the biopsy could not reveal the tumor cell. The case proves the effectiveness of intralesional injection of 5-FU for basal cell epithelioma which avoids the surgical excision.

  9. Ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and accelerates corneal epithelial wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingjun; Chen, Peng; Di, Guohu; Zhang, Yangyang; Wang, Yao; Qi, Xia; Duan, Haoyun; Xie, Lixin

    2015-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a well-known neuroprotective cytokine, has been found to play an important role in neurogenesis and functional regulations of neural stem cells. As one of the most innervated tissue, however, the role of CNTF in cornea epithelium remains unclear. This study was to explore the roles and mechanisms of CNTF in the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and wound healing of both normal and diabetic mouse corneal epithelium. In mice subjecting to mechanical removal of corneal epithelium, the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing were promoted by exogenous CNTF application, while delayed by CNTF neutralizing antibody. In cultured corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells, CNTF enhanced the colony-forming efficiency, stimulated the mitogenic proliferation, and upregulated the expression levels of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell-associated transcription factors. Furthermore, the promotion of CNTF on the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing was mediated by the activation of STAT3. Moreover, in diabetic mice, the content of CNTF in corneal epithelium decreased significantly when compared with that of normal mice, and the supplement of CNTF promoted the diabetic corneal epithelial wound healing, accompanied with the advanced activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and the regeneration of corneal nerve fibers. Thus, the capability of expanding corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and promoting corneal epithelial wound healing and nerve regeneration indicates the potential application of CNTF in ameliorating limbal stem cell deficiency and treating diabetic keratopathy. PMID:25546438

  10. Acitretin systemic and retinoic acid 0.1% cream supression of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Bao Zhang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Retinoids have been used for years as monotherapy and/or in combination for treatment and suppression of cutaneous malignancies in patients with basal cell nevus syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, or cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL basal cell carcinoma (BCC. We report 4 cases with BCC confirmed by histopathology who were treated by short-term systemic acitretin combined with retinoic acid 0.1% cream. The 4 cases with BCC showed good response to the treatment without severe adverse effects during treatment and follow-up. The finding suggests that acitretin may be an appropriate treatment option for elderly patients who require less invasive treatment for BCC.

  11. PD-L1 Expression Is Increased in a Subset of Basal Type Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Soliman, Hatem; Khalil, Farah; Antonia, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor cells express programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) and is a key immune evasion mechanism. PD-L1 expression in multiple breast cancer cell lines was evaluated to identify intrinsic differences that affect their potential for immune evasion. Methods PD-L1 expression was analyzed in six breast cancer cell lines: AU565&MCF7 (luminal), BT20&HCC1143 (basal A), MDA231&HCC38 (basal B). Surface and intracellular PD-L1 expression +/− interferon γ for 48 hours was measured by flow cytometr...

  12. The Expression of p53 and Cox-2 in Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Actinic Keratosis Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülker KARAGECE YALÇIN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate p53 and COX-2 expressions in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, and to determine a possible relationship.Material and Method: 50 basal cell carcinoma, 45 squamous cell carcinoma and 45 actinic keratosis cases were evaluated. The type of tumor in basal cell carcinoma and tumor differentiation in squamous cell carcinoma were noted and the paraffin block that best represented the tumor was chosen. Immunostaining by p53 and COX-2 was performed on sections of the paraffin blocks.Results: p53 expression was observed in 98% of basal cell carcinoma, 88.9% of squamous cell carcinoma and all actinic keratosis cases. p53 expression was also noted in non-dysplastic appearing epithelium in actinic keratosis cases. COX-2 expression was seen in 90, 100 and 88.9% of the basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis groups, respectively. Skin appendages, inflammatory cells and vascular structures were also stained by COX-2 besides tumor tissue. COX-2 expression increased by the p53 expression increase in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. p53 and COX-2 expressions were not related in terms of tumor type in the BCC and were not related in terms of differentiation in SCC.Conclusion: The existence of p53 expression in actinic keratosis cases has supported the idea that p53 plays a role in the early steps of carcinogenesis in skin cancers. The fact that the expression of COX-2 increases in line with the increase of p53 expression in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cases indicates that COX-2 expression may be affected by p53

  13. Biomechanics of epithelial cell islands analyzed by modeling and experimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Coburn, Luke; Noppe, Adrian; Caldwell, Benjamin J; Moussa, Elliott; Yap, Chloe; Priya, Rashmi; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Roberts, Anthony P; Yap, Alpha S; Neufeld, Zoltan; Gomez, Guillermo A

    2016-01-01

    We generated a new computational approach to analyze the biomechanics of epithelial cell islands that combines both vertex and contact-inhibition-of-locomotion models to include both cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion. Examination of the distribution of cell protrusions (adhesion to the substrate) in the model predicted high order profiles of cell organization that agree with those previously seen experimentally. Cells acquired an asymmetric distribution of protrusions (and traction forces) that decreased when moving from the edge to the island center. Our in silico analysis also showed that tension on cell-cell junctions (and monolayer stress) is not homogeneous across the island. Instead it is higher at the island center and scales up with island size, which we confirmed experimentally using laser ablation assays and immunofluorescence. Moreover, our approach has the minimal elements necessary to reproduce mechanical crosstalk between both cell-cell and cell substrate adhesion systems. We found that an i...

  14. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang, E-mail: wenfang64@hotmail.com; Zhang, Yi, E-mail: syzi960@yahoo.com

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  15. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients

  16. Aurora A Kinase Regulates Mammary Epithelial Cell Fate by Determining Mitotic Spindle Orientation in a Notch-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L. Regan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell fate determination in the progeny of mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells remains poorly understood. Here, we have examined the role of the mitotic kinase Aurora A (AURKA in regulating the balance between basal and luminal mammary lineages. We find that AURKA is highly expressed in basal stem cells and, to a lesser extent, in luminal progenitors. Wild-type AURKA expression promoted luminal cell fate, but expression of an S155R mutant reduced proliferation, promoted basal fate, and inhibited serial transplantation. The mechanism involved regulation of mitotic spindle orientation by AURKA and the positioning of daughter cells after division. Remarkably, this was NOTCH dependent, as NOTCH inhibitor blocked the effect of wild-type AURKA expression on spindle orientation and instead mimicked the effect of the S155R mutant. These findings directly link AURKA, NOTCH signaling, and mitotic spindle orientation and suggest a mechanism for regulating the balance between luminal and basal lineages in the mammary gland.

  17. Uranium induces oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, antitank weapons, tank armor, and also as a pigment to color ceramics and glass. Effective management of waste uranium compounds is necessary to prevent exposure to avoid adverse health effects on the population. Health risks associated with uranium exposure includes kidney disease and respiratory disorders. In addition, several published results have shown uranium or depleted uranium causes DNA damage, mutagenicity, cancer and neurological defects. In the current study, uranium toxicity was evaluated in rat lung epithelial cells. The study shows uranium induces significant oxidative stress in rat lung epithelial cells followed by concomitant decrease in the antioxidant potential of the cells. Treatment with uranium to rat lung epithelial cells also decreased cell proliferation after 72 h in culture. The decrease in cell proliferation was attributed to loss of total glutathione and superoxide dismutase in the presence of uranium. Thus the results indicate the ineffectiveness of antioxidant system's response to the oxidative stress induced by uranium in the cells. (orig.)

  18. Inactivation of Rb in stromal fibroblasts promotes epithelial cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Adam; Cichon, Ann-Christin; Barry, Anna; Kieran, Declan; Patel, Daksha; Hamilton, Peter; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; James, Jacqueline; McCance, Dennis J

    2012-07-18

    Stromal-derived growth factors are required for normal epithelial growth but are also implicated in tumour progression. We have observed inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb), through phosphorylation, in cancer-associated fibroblasts in oro-pharyngeal cancer specimens. Rb is well known for its cell-autonomous effects on cancer initiation and progression; however, cell non-autonomous functions of Rb are not well described. We have identified a cell non-autonomous role of Rb, using three-dimensional cultures, where depletion of Rb in stromal fibroblasts enhances invasive potential of transformed epithelia. In part, this is mediated by upregulation of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), which is produced by the depleted fibroblasts. KGF drives invasion of epithelial cells through induction of MMP1 expression in an AKT- and Ets2-dependent manner. Our data identify that stromal fibroblasts can alter the invasive behaviour of the epithelium, and we show that altered expression of KGF can mediate these functions. PMID:22643222

  19. Culture and immortalization of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Terence; Ouellette, Michel; Kolar, Carol; Hollingsworth, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Some populations of the epithelial cells from the duct and ductular network of the mammalian pancreas have been isolated and maintained in vitro for up to 3 mo. These cells express many of the surface factors that are unique to them in vivo. They also retain significant drug- and carcinogen-metabolizing capacity in vitro. In this chapter we review the progression of the methods for the isolation, culture and maintenance in vitro for these cells from the earliest when only duct/ductular fragments were obtainable to the current ones which provide epithelial cells. The critical steps in the isolation process are identified and strategies are provided to facilitate these steps. These include the selection of tissue digestive enzymes, the importance of extensive mincing before culture and the importance of roles of some co-factors used in the culture medium. PMID:15542901

  20. Interactions between Periodontal Bacteria and Human Oral Epithelial Cells: Fusobacterium nucleatum Adheres to and Invades Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Yiping W.; Shi, Wenyuan; HUANG, GEORGE T.-J.; Kinder Haake, Susan; Park, No-Hee; Kuramitsu, Howard; Genco, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteria are causative agents of periodontal diseases. Interactions between oral bacteria and gingival epithelial cells are essential aspects of periodontal infections. Using an in vitro tissue culture model, a selected group of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria frequently associated with periodontal diseases, including Bacteroides forsythus, Campylobacter curvus, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, were examined for their ability ...

  1. Hemoglobin is Expressed in Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaskaran, Manoj; Chen, Haifeng; Chen, Zhongmong; Liu, Lin

    2005-01-01

    Hemoglobin is the main oxygen carrying heme protein in erythrocytes. In an effort to study the differential gene expression of alveolar epithelial type I and type II cells using DNA microarray technique, we found that the mRNAs of hemoglobin α- and β-chains were expressed in type II cells, but not in type I cells. The microarray data were confirmed by RT-PCR. The mRNA expression of both chains decreased when type II cells trans-differentiated into type I-like cells. Immunocyto/histochemistry ...

  2. Epithelial Cell Apoptosis Causes Acute Lung Injury Masquerading as Emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    Mouded, Majd; Egea, Eduardo E.; Brown, Matthew J.; Hanlon, Shane M.; Houghton, A. McGarry; Tsai, Larry W; Ingenito, Edward P.; Shapiro, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Theories of emphysema traditionally revolved around proteolytic destruction of extracellular matrix. Models have recently been developed that show airspace enlargement with the induction of pulmonary cell apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which a model of epithelial cell apoptosis caused airspace enlargement. Mice were treated with either intratracheal microcystin (MC) to induce apoptosis, intratracheal porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE), or their respectiv...

  3. Oral microbial biofilm stimulation of epithelial cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S.; Novak, Karen F.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Oral bacterial biofilms trigger chronic inflammatory responses in the host that can result in the tissue destructive events of periodontitis. However, the characteristics of the capacity of specific host cell types to respond to these biofilms remain ill-defined. This report describes the use of a novel model of bacterial biofilms to stimulate oral epithelial cells and profile select cytokines and chemokines that contribute to the local inflammatory environment in the periodontium. Monoinfect...

  4. Midbody remnant licenses primary cilia formation in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Carolyn M

    2016-08-01

    Tethered midbody remnants dancing across apical microvilli, encountering the centrosome, and beckoning forth a cilium-who would have guessed this is how polarized epithelial cells coordinate the end of mitosis and the beginning of ciliogenesis? New evidence from Bernabé-Rubio et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201601020) supports this emerging model. PMID:27482049

  5. The Epithelial Cell in Lung Health and Emphysema Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mercer, Becky A; Lemaître, Vincent; Powell, Charles A.; D’Armiento, Jeanine

    2006-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of the irreversible lung disease emphysema. Historically, inflammatory cells such as macrophages and neutrophils have been studied for their role in emphysema pathology. However, recent studies indicate that the lung epithelium is an active participant in emphysema pathogenesis and plays a critical role in the lung’s response to cigarette smoke. Tobacco smoke increases protease production and alters cytokine expression in isolated epithelial cells, sugge...

  6. Vectorial secretion of proteoglycans by polarized rat uterine epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    We have studied proteoglycan secretion using a recently developed system for the preparing of polarized primary cultures of rat uterine epithelial cells. To mimic their native environment better and provide a system for discriminating apical from basolateral compartments, we cultured cells on semipermeable supports impregnated with biomatrix. Keratan sulfate proteoglycans (KSPG) as well as heparan sulfate- containing molecules (HS[PG]) were the major sulfated products synthesized and secreted...

  7. Acrolein stimulates eicosanoid release from bovine airway epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Injury to the airway mucosa after exposure to environmental irritants is associated with pulmonary inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. To better understand the relationships between mediator release and airway epithelial cell injury during irritant exposures, we studied the effects of acrolein, a low-molecular-weight aldehyde found in cigarette smoke, on arachidonic acid metabolism in cultured bovine tracheal epithelial cells. Confluent airway epithelial cell monolayers, prelabeled with [3H]arachidonic acid, released significant levels of 3H activity when exposed (20 min) to 100 microM acrolein. [3H]arachidonic acid products were resolved using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Under control conditions the released 3H activity coeluted predominantly with the cyclooxygenase product, prostaglandin (PG) E2. After exposure to acrolein, significant peaks in 3H activity coeluted with the lipoxygenase products 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) and 15-HETE, as well as with PGE2, PGF2 alpha, and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. Dose-response relationships for acrolein-induced release of immunoreactive PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from unlabeled epithelial monolayers demonstrated 30 microM acrolein as the threshold dose, with 100 microM acrolein inducing nearly a fivefold increase in both PGF2 alpha and PGE2. Cellular viability after exposure to 100 microM acrolein, determined by released lactate dehydrogenase activity, was not affected until exposure periods were greater than or equal to 2 h. These results implicate the airway epithelial cell as a possible source of eicosanoids after exposure to acrolein

  8. Nonlinear spectral imaging of human normal skin, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S. Y.; Yang, J. G.; Zhuang, J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we use nonlinear spectral imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for analyzing the morphology of collagen and elastin and their biochemical variations in basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and normal skin tissue. It was found in this work that there existed apparent differences among BCC, SCC and normal skin in terms of their thickness of the keratin and epithelial layers, their size of elastic fibers, as well as their distribution and spectral characteristics of collagen. These differences can potentially be used to distinguish BCC and SCC from normal skin, and to discriminate between BCC and SCC, as well as to evaluate treatment responses.

  9. Basal cell ameloblastoma: a rare case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastomas are an enigmatic group of oral tumors. The name implies a resemblance tocells of the enamel-forming organ. The general agreement that ameloblastomas areodontogenic in origin occurs largely on the basis of the histologic similarities of the tumorand the developing enamel organ. Basal cell ameloblastoma is believed to be the raresthistologic subtype. It is reported to occur primarily in peripheral location but has been seenintraosseously, albeit rarely. Till date only 6 cases of Basal cell Ameloblastoma has beenreported in literature out of which five were in 3rd – 4th decade and only one case wasreported in 2nd decade. Numerous cases of ameloblastomas have been reported in adults inthe literature. However, only a few articles discuss ameloblastomas in children andadolescents. Considering the rarity of the lesion, we report here an interesting and uniquecase of Basal cell ameloblastoma of the mandible occurring in a very young patient.

  10. Review of photodynamic therapy in actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica B Ericson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Marica B Ericson1,2, Ann-Marie Wennberg1, Olle Larkö11Department of Dermatology; 2Department of Physics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, SwedenAbstract: The number of non-melanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide, and so also the demand for effective treatment modalities. Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT using aminolaevulinic acid or its methyl ester has recently become good treatment options for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma; especielly when treating large areas and areas with field cancerization. The cure rates are usually good, and the cosmetic outcomes excellent. The only major side effect reported is the pain experienced by the patients during treatment. This review covers the fundamental aspects of topical PDT and its application for treatment of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. Both potentials and limitations will be reviewed, as well as some recent development within the field.Keywords: photodynamic therapy, actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma

  11. 980nm laser for difficult-to-treat basal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derjabo, A. D.; Cema, I.; Lihacova, I.; Derjabo, L.

    2013-06-01

    Begin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is most common skin cancer over the world. There are around 20 modalities for BCC treatment. Laser surgery is uncommon option. We demonstrate our long term follow up results. Aim: To evaluate long term efficacy of a 980nm diode laser for the difficult-to-treat basal cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods: 167 patients with 173 basal cell carcinoma on the nose were treated with a 980 nm diode laser from May 1999 till May 2005 at Latvian Oncology center. All tumors were morphologically confirmed. 156 patients were followed for more than 5 years. Results: The lowest recurrence rate was observed in cases of superficial BCC, diameterConclusions: 980 nm diode laser is useful tool in dermatology with high long term efficacy, good acceptance by the patients and good cosmetics results.

  12. Estradiol increases mucus synthesis in bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Tam

    Full Text Available Airway epithelial mucus hypersecretion and mucus plugging are prominent pathologic features of chronic inflammatory conditions of the airway (e.g. asthma and cystic fibrosis and in most of these conditions, women have worse prognosis compared with male patients. We thus investigated the effects of estradiol on mucus expression in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells from female donors grown at an air liquid interface (ALI. Treatment with estradiol in physiological ranges for 2 weeks caused a concentration-dependent increase in the number of PAS-positive cells (confirmed to be goblet cells by MUC5AC immunostaining in ALI cultures, and this action was attenuated by estrogen receptor beta (ER-β antagonist. Protein microarray data showed that nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT in the nuclear fraction of NHBE cells was increased with estradiol treatment. Estradiol increased NFATc1 mRNA and protein in ALI cultures. In a human airway epithelial (1HAE0 cell line, NFATc1 was required for the regulation of MUC5AC mRNA and protein. Estradiol also induced post-translational modification of mucins by increasing total fucose residues and fucosyltransferase (FUT-4, -5, -6 mRNA expression. Together, these data indicate a novel mechanism by which estradiol increases mucus synthesis in the human bronchial epithelium.

  13. Sef Regulates Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Gong, Yan; Gower, Lindsey; Yang, Xuehui; Friesel, Robert E

    2016-10-01

    Sef (similar expression to fgf), also know as IL17RD, is a transmembrane protein shown to inhibit fibroblast growth factor signaling in developmental and cancer contexts; however, its role as a tumor suppressor remains to be fully elucidated. Here, we show that Sef regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cell lines. Sef expression was highest in the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A, intermediate expression in MCF-7 cells and lowest in MDA-MB-231 cells. Knockdown of Sef increased the expression of genes associated with EMT, and promoted cell migration, invasion, and a fibroblastic morphology of MCF-7 cells. Overexpression of Sef inhibited the expression of EMT marker genes and inhibited cell migration and invasion in MCF-7 cells. Induction of EMT in MCF10A cells by TGF-β and TNF-α resulted in downregulation of Sef expression concomitant with upregulation of EMT gene expression and loss of epithelial morphology. Overexpression of Sef in MCF10A cells partially blocked cytokine-induced EMT. Sef was shown to block β-catenin mediated luciferase reporter activity and to cause a decrease in the nuclear localization of active β-catenin. Furthermore, Sef was shown to co-immunoprecipitate with β-catenin. In a mouse orthotopic xenograft model, Sef overexpression in MDA-MB-231 cells slowed tumor growth and reduced expression of EMT marker genes. Together, these data indicate that Sef plays a role in the negative regulation of EMT in a β-catenin dependent manner and that reduced expression of Sef in breast tumor cells may be permissive for EMT and the acquisition of a more metastatic phenotype. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2346-2356, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26950413

  14. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M;

    1998-01-01

    apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction of...... induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  15. Alveolar epithelial type II cell: defender of the alveolus revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehrenbach Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1977, Mason and Williams developed the concept of the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2 cell as a defender of the alveolus. It is well known that AE2 cells synthesise, secrete, and recycle all components of the surfactant that regulates alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. AE2 cells influence extracellular surfactant transformation by regulating, for example, pH and [Ca2+] of the hypophase. AE2 cells play various roles in alveolar fluid balance, coagulation/fibrinolysis, and host defence. AE2 cells proliferate, differentiate into AE1 cells, and remove apoptotic AE2 cells by phagocytosis, thus contributing to epithelial repair. AE2 cells may act as immunoregulatory cells. AE2 cells interact with resident and mobile cells, either directly by membrane contact or indirectly via cytokines/growth factors and their receptors, thus representing an integrative unit within the alveolus. Although most data support the concept, the controversy about the character of hyperplastic AE2 cells, reported to synthesise profibrotic factors, proscribes drawing a definite conclusion today.

  16. Ancestral vascular lumen formation via basal cell surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Tomás Kucera; Boris Strilić; Kathrin Regener; Michael Schubert; Vincent Laudet; Eckhard Lammert

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular system of bilaterians developed from a common ancestor. However, no endothelial cells exist in invertebrates demonstrating that primitive cardiovascular tubes do not require this vertebrate-specific cell type in order to form. This raises the question of how cardiovascular tubes form in invertebrates? Here we discovered that in the invertebrate cephalochordate amphioxus, the basement membranes of endoderm and mesoderm line the lumen of the major vessels, namely aorta and he...

  17. A case of multiple basal cell carcinoma associated with Bowen`s disease developed after radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Hiroyuki; Isei, Taiki; Harada, Akira; Horio, Takesi [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan); Kitamura, Koichi

    1995-12-01

    We describe here a 73-year-old female patient with multiple basal cell carcinomas associated with Bowen`s disease at the area which had received radiotherapy, 30 years ago after the operation of uterus carcinoma. She developed dark-brown-colored eruptions 3 years ago in the abdominal area. The number and size of the eruptions gradually increased. Histopathological examination showed a variety of features of basal cell carcinoma, including superficial type, solid type, premalignant fibroepithelial tumor, and also Bowen`s disease. (author).

  18. Carcinoma basocelular em localizações incomuns Basal cell carcinoma in unusual locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Beatriz Mautari Niwa

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam cinco pacientes que desenvolveram carcinomas basocelulares em locais incomuns de ocorrência desse tumor. O objetivo é relatar a raridade topográfica da neoplasia cutânea e discutir o conceito de localização incomum para o carcinoma basocelular.The authors present five patients who develop basal cell carcinomas in sites this tumor rarely occurs. The aim is to report the rare location of this frequent cutaneous malignancy and to briefly discuss the concept of unusual location of basal cell carcinoma.

  19. Effect of Photofrin on skin reflection of basal cell nevus syndrome patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossweiner, Leonard I.; Jones, Linda R.; Koehler, Irmgard K.; Bilgin, Mehmet D.

    1996-04-01

    Skin reflection spectra were measured before and 24 hours after administration of Photofrin (Reg. TM) to basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) patients. The drug reduced the reflectivity of uninvolved BCNS skin and increased the reflectivity of basal cell cancers. Photofrin (Reg. TM) absorption in normal rat skin and uninvolved BCNS skin was resolved by the diffusion approximation. Optical constants calculated with a two-layer skin model indicate that the drug increased light scattering in tumor tissues. The possible use of reflection spectra for PDT light dosimetry is discussed.

  20. Patients' perceptions of their cosmetic appearance more than ten years after radiotherapy for basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 47 elderly patients treated by simple radiotherapeutic techniques for basal cell carcinomas, 12 are alive and free of disease more than 10 years after treatment. They were asked to rate their perception of the current cosmetic appearance of their lesions on a scale consisting of: excellent, very good, good, mediocre, and poor. Six of the 12 rated their cosmetic appearance as excellent, three considered it very good, and three called it good. Despite undeniable objective deterioration of the cosmetic appearance of irradiated basal cell carcinomas, patients appear to be pleased with the results. (author)

  1. A child with xeroderma pigmentosum for excision of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridevi M Mulimani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is characterized by hypersensitivity to sunlight, ocular involvement, and progressive neurological complications. These manifestations are due to a cellular hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation leading to a defect in repair of DNA by the process of nucleotide excision repair. Basal cell carcinoma which is rare in children can occur with XP. Though the XP induced changes are predominately dermatologic, pose several challenges in anaesthetic management. Hence, we are reporting a 9-year-old child with XP scheduled for excision of basal cell carcinoma under general anaesthesia.

  2. DNA analysis of epithelial cell suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.S.; Johnson, N.F.; Holland, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    Cell suspensions of skin were obtained by animals exposed by skin painting of several crude oils. DNA analysis of these cell suspensions labeled with mithramycin provide determination of percentages of cells in the G/sub 1/, S and G/sub 2/M phases of the cell cycle. Data acquired showed differences from control animals occurring as early as 7 days after treatment and persisting through 21 days afterwards. There was histological evidence of erythema and hyperplasia in shale oil-exposed skins. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content in shale-oil-exposed skin cells showed an increased percentage of cycling cells plus evidence of aneuploidy. Similar data from simply abraded skin showed increased percentages of cycling cells, but no aneuploidy. The shale-oil-exposed group, when compared to a standard petroleum-exposed group, had significantly increased percentages of cycling cells. This early indication of differing response to different complex mixtures was also seen in long-term skin exposures to these compounds. Similar analytical techniques were applied to tracheal cell suspensions from ozone-exposed rats. 12 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs. (DT)

  3. Dkk-1 Inhibits Intestinal Epithelial Cell Migration by Attenuating Directional Polarization of Leading Edge Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Stefan; Capaldo, Christopher T.; Samarin, Stanislav; Nava, Porfirio; Neumaier, Irmgard; Skerra, Arne; Sacks, David B; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2009-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways regulate proliferation, motility, and survival in a variety of human cell types. Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is a secreted Wnt antagonist that has been proposed to regulate tissue homeostasis in the intestine. In this report, we show that Dkk-1 is secreted by intestinal epithelial cells after wounding and that it inhibits cell migration by attenuating the directional orientation of migrating epithelial cells. Dkk-1 exposure induced mislocalized activation of Cdc42 in migrating c...

  4. Expression of Connexin43 in Rat Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To explore the role of connexin43 (Cx43) in gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and propagated sensation along meridians, the expression of Cx43 in the rat epithelial cells and fibroblasts was studied both in vitro and in vivo. With the in vitro study, the rat epithelial cells and fibroblasts were cultured together, and the localization of Cx43 was detected by immunohistochemistry and indirect immunofluorescent cytochemistry and under confocal microscopy . And the expression of Cx43 on the surface of the cells was examined by flow cytometry. With the in vivo examination, 20 SD rats were randomized into control group (n = 10) and electrical acupuncture group (EAgroup, n=10). EA ( 0.5-1.5 V, 4-16 Hz , 30 min) was applied to"Zusanli"acupoint for 30 min at rat's hind paw, the localization of Cx43 was immunohistochemically detected.The immunohistochemical staining and indirect immunfluorescent cytochemistry showed that Cx43was localized on the surface of the cells and in the cytoplasm. The relative expression level of Cx43on the cellular membrane surfaces of the rat epithelial cells and fibroblasts, as determined by FACS, were 13.91 % and 29.53 % respectively. Our studied suggested that Cx43 might be involved in GJIC and propagated sensation along meridians.

  5. Progressive transformation of immortalized esophageal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-YingShen; Li-YanXu; Min-HuaChen; JianShen; Wei-JiaCai; YiZeng

    2002-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the progressive transformation of immortal cells of human fetal esophageal epithelium induced by human papillomavirus,and to examine biological criteria of sequential passage of cells,including cellular phenotype,proliferative rate,telomerase,chromosome and tumorigenicity.

  6. The physiological expression of scavenger receptor SR-B1 in canine endometrial and placental epithelial cells and its potential involvement in pathogenesis of pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, C; Becher-Deichsel, A; Hlavaty, J; Mair, G; Walter, I

    2016-06-01

    , where basal and basal and/or apical expression patterns were observed. The physiological expression of SR-B1 in metestrous endometrial surface epithelia might be related to the implantation process and embryo development, as SR-B1 was also identified in the epithelial cells of the canine placental chambers. The increased levels of SR-B1 in pyometra-affected uteri indicate a potential role for this scavenger receptor in endometrial bacterial adhesion. PMID:26898415

  7. Gene expressions changes in bronchial epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remy, S.; Verstraelen, S.; Van Den Heuvel, R.;

    2014-01-01

    cells were exposed during 6, 10, and 24 h to 4 respiratory sensitizers and 6 non-respiratory sensitizers (3 skin sensitizers and 3 respiratory irritants) at a concentration inducing 20% cell viability loss after 24 h. Changes in gene expression were evaluated using Agilent Whole Human Genome 4 x 44 K...... differentially expressed compared to vehicle control for each chemical. The results show that the NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response is activated in the cell line after stimulation with all of the chemicals that were selected in our study, and that - at the level of gene expression - this pathway shows no...

  8. Water fluxes through aquaporin-9 prime epithelial cells for rapid wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, T.; Lagerholm, B. C.; Vikstrom, E.;

    2013-01-01

    about the impact on migrating epithelial sheets during wound healing and epithelial renewal. Here, we investigate and compare the effects of AQP9 on single cell and epithelial sheet migration. To achieve this, MDCK-1 cells stably expressing AQP9 were subjected to migration assessment. We found that AQP9...

  9. Interaction exists between matriptase inhibitors and intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pászti-Gere, Erzsebet; Barna, Réka Fanni; Ujhelyi, Gabriella; Steinmetzer, Torsten

    2016-10-01

    The type II trypsin-like transmembrane serine protease matriptase, is mainly expressed in epithelial cells and one of the key regulators in the formation and maintenance of epithelial barrier integrity. Therefore, we have studied the inhibition of matriptase in a non-transformed porcine intestinal IPEC-J2 cell monolayer cultured on polyester membrane inserts by the non-selective 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzosulphonylfluoride (AEBSF) and four more selective 3-amidinophenylalanine-derived matriptase inhibitors. It was found that suppression of matriptase activity by MI-432 and MI-460 led to decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of the cell monolayer and to an enhanced transport of fluorescently labelled dextran, a marker for paracellular transport between apical and basolateral compartments. To this date this is the first report in which the inhibition of matriptase activity by synthetic inhibitors has been correlated to a reduced barrier integrity of a non-cancerous IPEC-J2 epithelial cell monolayer in order to describe interaction between matriptase activity and intestinal epithelium in vitro. PMID:26118419

  10. Photodynamic treatment of lens epithelial cells for cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingua, Robert W.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Simon, Gabriel; Li, Kam

    1991-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) eiiploying Dihematopor*iyrin ethers (DHE) (Photofrin II) at pharmacologic lvels, has been denonstrate3 to kill rabbit lens epithelial cells, in vivo. This in vitro study, reports on the minimal necessary parameters for rabbit lens epithelial cell death. Explants of rabbit lenses were incubated in various concentrations of DHE (1O,, 100, 500, 1000 ug/ml) for 1, 2, or 5 minutes. 30 to 120 Joules/an of collimated 514.5 nm Argon laser light re delivered to the locier concentrations of 10, 50, and 100 ug,'ml DHE treated cells. One hundre1 fifteen explants were treated, in all. Higher concentrations of DHE alone (500 and 1000 ug/ml) were sufficient to induce cellular swelling. Lower concentrations required light for cellular effect. Trypan blue staining revealed cell death at these minimal pa9ieters: DHE 50 ug/ml, incubation 1 minute, 514.5 r Argon light 1.0 Watt/an for 30 sec (30 Joules) . In future studies, these rameters will be tested in vivo, for their ability to eliminate lens epithelial proliferation after cataract surgery.

  11. Epigenetics in Intestinal Epithelial Cell Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostaee, Alireza; Benoit, Yannick D; Boudjadi, Salah; Beaulieu, Jean-François

    2016-11-01

    A controlled balance between cell proliferation and differentiation is essential to maintain normal intestinal tissue renewal and physiology. Such regulation is powered by several intracellular pathways that are translated into the establishment of specific transcription programs, which influence intestinal cell fate along the crypt-villus axis. One important check-point in this process occurs in the transit amplifying zone of the intestinal crypts where different signaling pathways and transcription factors cooperate to manage cellular proliferation and differentiation, before secretory or absorptive cell lineage terminal differentiation. However, the importance of epigenetic modifications such as histone methylation and acetylation in the regulation of these processes is still incompletely understood. There have been recent advances in identifying the impact of histone modifications and chromatin remodelers on the proliferation and differentiation of normal intestinal crypt cells. In this review we discuss recent discoveries on the role of the cellular epigenome in intestinal cell fate, development, and tissue renewal. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2361-2367, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061836

  12. A noninvasive transfer system for polarized renal tubule epithelial cell sheets using temperature-responsive culture dishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushida A.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available We used temperature-responsive culture dishes onto which the temperature-responsive polymer, poly(Nisopropylacrylamide, was covalently grafted for tissue engineering. Confluent cells harvested as intact sheets from these surfaces by simple temperature reduction can be transferred to various surfaces including additional culture dishes, other cell sheets, and tissues. In order to examine the maintenance of cell polarity, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and human primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells which had developed apical-basal cell polarity in culture, were subjected to cell sheet transfer. This functional and structural cell polarity, which is susceptible to treatment with trypsin, was examined by immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Using our cell-sheet method, the noninvasive transfer of these cell sheets retaining typical distributions of Na+/K+-ATPase, GLUT-1, SGLT-1, aquaporin-1, neutral endopeptidase and dipeptidylendopeptidase IV, could be achieved. The transferred cell sheets also developed numerous microvilli and tight junctions at the apical and lateral membranes, respectively. For biochemical analysis, immunoblotting of occludin, a transmembrane protein that composes tight junctions, was conducted and results confirmed that occludin remained intact after cell sheet transfer. This two-dimensional cell sheet manipulation method promises to be useful for tissue engineering as well as in the investigation of epithelial cell polarity.

  13. Origin of Ameloblastoma From Basal Cells of the Oral Epithelium- Establishing the Relation Using Neuroectodermal Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneela, S; Narayan, T V; Shreedhar, Balasundari; Mohanty, Leeky; Shenoy, Sadhana; Swaminathan, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Basal cell layer of the oral epithelium has been rightfully regarded as a potential source of odontogenic tumours and cysts, but, without substantial evidence. Also, whether the basal cell layer retains within it, some properties of ectomesenchyme, which was imbibed during the early embryogenesis and hence its neuroectodermal relation, is not known. Here, an attempt is made to establish the hidden neuroectodermal potential of the oral epithelium, especially the basal layer, by observing the expression of known neuroectodermal markers, NSE (Neuron Specific Enolase), Synaptophysin and CD99. The expression of the same markers has also been studied in Ameloblastoma, connecting it with oral epithelium, in turn establishing basal cell layer as a potential source of Ameloblastoma. Materials and Methods: Sections of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue samples of 20 cases of Ameloblastoma and 10 cases of Normal Retromolar mucosa, were stained immunohistochemically with NSE, Synaptophysin, CD99 and also with CK-19 and evaluated for positive expression. Results: Positive reaction was obtained in all the cases of Ameloblastoma and NRM (Normal Retromolar mucosa) with NSE, all the cases of Ameloblastoma and eight cases of NRM with Synaptophysin and in six cases of Ameloblastoma and NRM with CD99. The staining was diffuse and more marked in case of NSE than Synaptophysin and CD99. CK19 staining done to assure that the tissue antigenicity was maintained was positive in all the samples. Interpretation and Conclusion: A strong relationship between the neuroectoderm, Ameloblastoma and the basal layer of the oral epithelium is established by the study. It favours the hypothesis that the basal cell layer of oral mucosa may be the sought out culprit in most cases of the Ameloblastomas, especially those occurring in the non-tooth bearing area. This would call for the need to incorporate additional therapy in the form of mucosal striping along with the

  14. Cerebellar and basal ganglion involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I.; Baskan, O.; Haliloglu, M.; Aydingoz, U. [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Sihhiye 06100, Ankara (Turkey)

    1999-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disease of unknown cause characterised by proliferation of histiocytic granulomas in tissues; the primary cerebral manifestation is diabetes insipidus caused by hypothalamic infiltration. We present a patient in whom, except for the absence of high signal on T 1 weighting in the posterior pituitary, consistent with central diabetes insipidus, MRI showed no evidence of hypothalamic involvement by histiocytosis, despite the long duration of the disease. However, there was bilateral, symmetrical involvement of the cerebellum and globus pallidus in addition to a calvarial lesion. High signal in the cerebellar white matter on T 2-weighted images may represent demyelination, gliosis and cell loss, as previously reported on pathologic examination. (orig.) With 5 figs., 22 refs.

  15. Cerebellar and basal ganglion involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disease of unknown cause characterised by proliferation of histiocytic granulomas in tissues; the primary cerebral manifestation is diabetes insipidus caused by hypothalamic infiltration. We present a patient in whom, except for the absence of high signal on T 1 weighting in the posterior pituitary, consistent with central diabetes insipidus, MRI showed no evidence of hypothalamic involvement by histiocytosis, despite the long duration of the disease. However, there was bilateral, symmetrical involvement of the cerebellum and globus pallidus in addition to a calvarial lesion. High signal in the cerebellar white matter on T 2-weighted images may represent demyelination, gliosis and cell loss, as previously reported on pathologic examination. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of the Blood and Lymphatic Microvessel Density of Pleomorphic Adenoma and Basal Cell Adenoma

    OpenAIRE

    Andresa Borges Soares; Albina Altemani; Thais Ribeiro de Oliveira; Felipe de Oliveira Fonseca Rodrigues; Alfredo Ribeiro-Silva; Danilo Figueiredo Soave; Fabricio Passador-Santos; Suellen Trentin Brum; Marcelo Henrique Napimoga; Vera Cavalcanti de Araújo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pleomorphic adenoma (PA) is the most common tumor of the salivary gland, while basal cell adenoma (BCA) is an uncommon neoplasm. Blood and lymphatic vessels are crucial for tumor metabolism. The aim of this study was to compare the blood and lymphatic vascular density and vascular and endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in PA and BCA tumors. In addition, cell proliferation was evaluated in these tumors. METHODS Blood and lymphatic vessel content, VEGF expression, and cell p...

  17. Multipotent capacity of immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Delgado

    Full Text Available While the adult murine lung utilizes multiple compartmentally restricted progenitor cells during homeostasis and repair, much less is known about the progenitor cells from the human lung. Translating the murine stem cell model to humans is hindered by anatomical differences between species. Here we show that human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs display characteristics of multipotent stem cells of the lung. These HBECs express markers indicative of several epithelial types of the adult lung when experimentally tested in cell culture. When cultured in three different three-dimensional (3D systems, subtle changes in the microenvironment result in unique responses including the ability of HBECs to differentiate into multiple central and peripheral lung cell types. These new findings indicate that the adult human lung contains a multipotent progenitor cell whose differentiation potential is primarily dictated by the microenvironment. The HBEC system is not only important in understanding mechanisms for specific cell lineage differentiation, but also for examining changes that correlate with human lung diseases including lung cancer.

  18. Oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, R; Kirakodu, S S; Novak, K F; Ebersole, J L

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the use of a novel model of multispecies biofilms to stimulate profiles of cytokines/chemokines from oral epithelial cells that contribute to local inflammation in the periodontium. Streptococcus gordonii (Sg)/S. oralis (So)/S. sanguinis (Ss) and Sg/Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn)/Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) biofilms elicited significantly elevated levels of IL-1α and showed synergistic stimulatory activity compared with an additive effect of the 3 individual bacteria. Only the Sg/Actinomyces naeslundii (An)/Fn multispecies biofilms elicited IL-6 levels above those of control. IL-8 was a primary response to the Sg/An/Fn biofilms, albeit the level was not enhanced compared with a predicted composite level from the monospecies challenges. These results represent some of the first data documenting alterations in profiles of oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies biofilms. PMID:23300185

  19. Tension-oriented cell divisions limit anisotropic tissue tension in epithelial spreading during zebrafish epiboly

    OpenAIRE

    Campinho, Pedro; Behrndt, Martin; Ranft, Jonas; Risler, Thomas; Minc, Nicolas; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial spreading is a common and fundamental aspect of various developmental and disease-related processes such as epithelial closure and wound healing. A key challenge for epithelial tissues undergoing spreading is to increase their surface area without disrupting epithelial integrity. Here we show that orienting cell divisions by tension constitutes an efficient mechanism by which the enveloping cell layer (EVL) releases anisotropic tension while undergoing spreading during zebrafish ep...

  20. Polarizing intestinal epithelial cells electrically through Ror2

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, L; McCaig, CD; Scott, RH; Zhao, S.; G. Milne; Clevers, H; Zhao, M; Pu, J

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The apicobasal polarity of enterocytes determines where the brush border membrane (apical membrane) will form, but how this apical membrane faces the lumen is not well understood. The electrical signal across the epithelium could serve as a coordinating cue, orienting and polarizing enterocytes. Here, we show that applying a physiological electric field to intestinal epithelial cells, to mimic the natural electric field created by the transepithelial potential difference, polarized p...

  1. IDIOPATHIC PULMONARY FIBROSIS: A DISORDER OF EPITHELIAL CELL DYSFUNCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Zoz, Donald F.; Lawson, William E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by progressive dyspnea, interstitial infiltrates in lung parenchyma, and restriction on pulmonary function testing. IPF is the most common and severe of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), with most individuals progressing to respiratory failure. Multiple lines of evidence reveal prominent roles for alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) in disease. Our current disease paradigm is that ongoing or repetitive injurious stimuli in the pre...

  2. Microscopic morphology of epithelial cells on functionalized diamond and glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rezek, Bohuslav; Ukraintsev, Egor; Krátká, Marie; Taylor, Andrew; Fendrych, František; Mandys, V.

    Bratislava : Comenius University, 2013 - (Brunner, R.), s. 153-154 ISBN 978-80-223-3501-0. [Solid State Surfaces and Interfaces /8./. Smolenice (SK), 25.11.2013-28.11.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0996 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * biotechnology * epithelial cell s * morphology * adhesion Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  3. Oral Epithelial Cell Responses to Multispecies Microbial Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Peyyala, R.; Kirakodu, S.S.; Novak, K.F.; Ebersole, J L

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the use of a novel model of multispecies biofilms to stimulate profiles of cytokines/chemokines from oral epithelial cells that contribute to local inflammation in the periodontium. Streptococcus gordonii (Sg)/S. oralis (So)/S. sanguinis (Ss) and Sg/Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn)/Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) biofilms elicited significantly elevated levels of IL-1α and showed synergistic stimulatory activity compared with an additive effect of the 3 individual bacteria. On...

  4. Ivermectin inhibits growth of Chlamydia trachomatis in epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Pettengill

    Full Text Available Ivermectin is currently approved for treatment of both clinical and veterinary infections by nematodes, including Onchocerca cervicalis in horses and Onchocerca volvulus in humans. However, ivermectin has never been shown to be effective against bacterial pathogens. Here we show that ivermectin also inhibits infection of epithelial cells by the bacterial pathogen, Chlamydia trachomatis, at doses that could be envisioned clinically for sexually-transmitted or ocular infections by Chlamydia.

  5. Ivermectin inhibits growth of Chlamydia trachomatis in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettengill, Matthew A; Lam, Verissa W; Ollawa, Ikechukwu; Marques-da-Silva, Camila; Ojcius, David M

    2012-01-01

    Ivermectin is currently approved for treatment of both clinical and veterinary infections by nematodes, including Onchocerca cervicalis in horses and Onchocerca volvulus in humans. However, ivermectin has never been shown to be effective against bacterial pathogens. Here we show that ivermectin also inhibits infection of epithelial cells by the bacterial pathogen, Chlamydia trachomatis, at doses that could be envisioned clinically for sexually-transmitted or ocular infections by Chlamydia. PMID:23119027

  6. Crystal violet staining to quantity Candida adhesion to epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Negri, M.; Gonçalves, Vera M.; Silva, Sónia Carina; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-01-01

    In vitro studies of adhesion capability are essential to characterise the virulence of Candida species. However, the assessment of adhesion by traditional methods is timeconsuming. The aim of the present study is the development of a simple methodology using crystal violet staining to quantify in vitro adhesion of different Candida species to epithelial cells. The experiments are performed using Candida albicans (ATCC 90028), C. glabrata (ATCC 2001), C. parapsilosis (ATCC 22019) and C. tropic...

  7. Proliferation of Cultured Mouse Choroid Plexus Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Barkho, Basam Z.; Monuki, Edwin S.

    2015-01-01

    The choroid plexus (ChP) epithelium is a multifunctional tissue found in the ventricles of the brain. The major function of the ChP epithelium is to produce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that bathes and nourishes the central nervous system (CNS). In addition to the CSF, ChP epithelial cells (CPECs) produce and secrete numerous neurotrophic factors that support brain homeostasis, such as adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Accordingly, damage and dysfunction to CPECs are thought to accelerate and inte...

  8. Internalization of Proteus mirabilis by human renal epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Chippendale, G R; Warren, J W; Trifillis, A. L.; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common agent of bacteriuria in humans, causes acute pyelonephritis and bacteremia. Renal epithelium provides a barrier between luminal organisms and the renal interstitium. We have hypothesized that P. mirabilis may be internalized into renal epithelium. To test this hypothesis, we added suspensions of three P. mirabilis strains (10(8) CFU) to confluent monolayers of primary cultures of human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (HRPTEC) and, after 3 h, found the bacte...

  9. Attachment of Giardia lamblia to rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Inge, P M; Edson, C M; Farthing, M J

    1988-01-01

    The human enteric protozoan, Giardia lamblia, has surface membrane lectin activity which mediates parasite adherence to erythrocytes. To determine whether an intestinal binding site exists for this lectin we have studied the interaction in vitro between axenically cultured Giardia trophozoites and isolated rat intestinal epithelial cells. Scanning electron microscopy showed that Giardia attached to the apical microvillus membrane and basolateral membrane of rat enterocytes. Any location on th...

  10. Entry of genital Chlamydia trachomatis into polarized human epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrick, P B; Choong, J; Davis, C H; Knight, S T; Royal, M O; Maslow, A S; Bagnell, C R

    1989-01-01

    To study the initial invasion process(es) of genital chlamydiae, a model system consisting of hormonally maintained primary cultures of human endometrial gland epithelial cells (HEGEC), grown in a polarized orientation on collagen-coated filters, was utilized. After Chlamydia trachomatis inoculation of the apical surface of polarized HEGEC, chlamydiae were readily visualized, by transmission electron microscopy, in coated pits and coated vesicles. This was true for HEGEC maintained in physiol...

  11. Maintenance of human amnion epithelial cell phenotype in pulmonary surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Courtney A.; Melville, Jacqueline M; Graeme R Polglase; Jenkin, Graham; Moss, Timothy JM

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Preterm newborns often require mechanical respiratory support that can result in ventilation-induced lung injury (VILI), despite exogenous surfactant treatment. Human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) reduce lung inflammation and resultant abnormal lung development in preterm animals; co-administration with surfactant is a potential therapeutic strategy. We aimed to determine whether hAECs remain viable and maintain function after combination with surfactant. Methods hAECs were inc...

  12. TCDD exposure disrupts mammary epithelial cell differentiation and function

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Loretta L.; Lew, Betina J.; Lawrence, B. Paige

    2009-01-01

    Mammary gland growth and differentiation during pregnancy is a developmental process that is sensitive to the toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). TCDD is a widespread environmental contaminant and a potent ligand for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We demonstrate reduced β-casein protein induction in mouse mammary glands and in cultured SCp2 mammary epithelial cells following exposure to TCDD. SCp2 cells exposed to TCDD also show reduced cell clustering and less ...

  13. Isolation of intestinal epithelial cells and evaluation of transport functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmich, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Epithelial cells can be isolated from the small intestine of chickens by a procedure involving hyaluronidase treatment of the intact tissue. The isolated cells retain a high degree of functional activity as assessed by the formation of 70-fold gradients of alpha-MG. Stability of the sugar gradients reflects maintenance of stable electrochemical Na+ gradients across the plasma membrane. The cells can be used to evaluate the properties of Na(+)-dependent sugar transport, Na(+)-independent sugar transport, ion transport, metabolism, membrane potentials, and the integration of these events, all of which are important to achieving a stable sugar gradient.

  14. Isolation of intestinal epithelial cells and evaluation of transport functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial cells can be isolated from the small intestine of chickens by a procedure involving hyaluronidase treatment of the intact tissue. The isolated cells retain a high degree of functional activity as assessed by the formation of 70-fold gradients of alpha-MG. Stability of the sugar gradients reflects maintenance of stable electrochemical Na+ gradients across the plasma membrane. The cells can be used to evaluate the properties of Na(+)-dependent sugar transport, Na(+)-independent sugar transport, ion transport, metabolism, membrane potentials, and the integration of these events, all of which are important to achieving a stable sugar gradient

  15. Functional Expression of a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) Channel Modulator Involved in Ion Transport and Epithelial Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Jun

    2016-01-01

      Cl(-)-permeable channels and transporters expressed on the cell membranes of various mammalian cell types play pivotal roles in the transport of electrolytes and water, pH regulation, cell volume and membrane excitability, and are therefore expected to be useful molecular targets for drug discovery. Both TMEM16A (a possible candidate for Ca(2+)-regulated Cl(-) channels recently identified) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) (or cAMP-regulated Cl(-) channels) have been known to be involved in Cl(-) secretion and reabsorption in the rat salivary gland. Crosstalk between two types of regulatory pathways through these two types of channels has also been described. Previously, we demonstrated that CLCA, a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel modulator, was involved in Cl(-) absorption in rat salivary ducts. In addition to Ca(2+), basal NF-κB activity in a mouse keratinocyte line was shown to be involved in the transcriptional regulation of CLCA. Conversely, a truncated isoform of CLCA was found in undifferentiated epithelial cells present in the rat epidermal basal layers. Under regulation by Ca(2+) and PKC, the surface expression of β1-integrin and cell adhesion were decreased in the CLCA-overexpressing cells. Knockdown of this isoform elevated the expression of β1-integrin in rat epidermis in vivo. These results indicate that the specific differentiation-dependent localization of CLCA, and transcriptional regulation through Ca(2+), are likely to affect ion permeability and the adhesive potential of epithelial cells. In summary, these types of Cl(-) channels and their modulators may function in a coordinated manner in regulating the functions of epithelial cells under different physiological conditions. PMID:26935091

  16. Basal cell carcinomas in a young woman with Steinert’s disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Miraglia, E; Cantisani, C.; Giustini, S; Ambrifi, M; Soda, G.; Calvieri, S.

    2014-01-01

    Steinert’s disease or Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by myotonia, muscular dystrophy, cataracts, hypogonadism, frontal balding, and electrocardiographic alterations.Several tumors have been associated with DM1 such as pilomatricoma, thymomas and insulinomas. Herein, we describe the unusual onset of multiple basal cell carcinomas in a young woman with DM1.

  17. Basal cell nevus syndrome. Presentation of six cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Fernández, José María; Infante-Cossío, Pedro; Belmonte-Caro, Rodolfo; Ruiz-Laza, Luis; García-Perla-García, Alberto; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome, also known as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder which is characterised by the presence of multiple maxillary keratocysts and facial basal cell carcinomas, along with other less frequent clinical characteristics such us musculo-skeletal disturbances (costal and vertebrae malformations), characteristic facies, neurological (calcification of the cerebral falx, schizophrenia, learning difficulties), skin (cysts, lipomas, fibromas), sight, hormonal, etc. On occasions it can be associated with aggressive basal cell carcinomas and malignant neoplasias, for which early diagnosis and treatment is essential, as well as family detection and genetic counselling. Currently there are new lines of investigation based on biomolecular studies, which aim at identifying the molecules responsible for these cysts and thus allowing an early diagnosis of these patients. In its clinical management and follow up, the odonto-stomatologist, the maxillofacial surgeon and several other medical specialists are involved. In this paper a review of the literature, and six cases of patients affected by multi-systemic and varied clinical expression of basal cell nevus syndrome, are presented. PMID:15800468

  18. Cutaneous head and neck basal and squamous cell carcinomas with perineural invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendenhall, W.M.; Ferlito, A.; Takes, R.P.; Bradford, C.R.; Corry, J.; Fagan, J.J.; Rinaldo, A.; Strojan, P.; Rodrigo, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) occurs in 2% to 6% of cutaneous head and neck basal and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and is associated with mid-face location, recurrent tumors, high histologic grade, and increasing tumor size. Patients may be asymptomatic with PNI appreciated on pathologic examination

  19. Basal Cell Carcinoma Of The Lower Extremities - A Report Of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Ritambhra

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common malignancy of the skin is basal cell carcinoma (BCC, usually occurring in the head and neck. It can occur elsewhere as also in the lower extremity. We describe two patients with BCC in the lower extremities, which were nodular type and without any predisposing factors.

  20. Which histological characteristics of basal cell carcinomas influence the quality of optical coherence tomography imaging?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, M.; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini;

    2009-01-01

    We explore how histopathology parameters influence OCT imaging of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and address whether such parameters correlate with the quality of the recorded OCT images. Our results indicate that inflammation impairs OCT imaging and that sun-damaged skin can sometimes provide more...

  1. Imaging of basal cell carcinoma by high-definition optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boone, M A L M; Norrenberg, S; Jemec, G B E;

    2012-01-01

    With the continued development of noninvasive therapies for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) such as photodynamic therapy and immune therapies, noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring become increasingly relevant. High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) is a high-resolution imaging tool, with...

  2. Daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy of basal cell carcinomas - an explorative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S R; Skødt, V; Wulf, H C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that daylight-photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective treatment of actinic keratoses, nearly pain free and more convenient for both the clinics and patients. Treatment of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) is another main indication for PDT. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this...

  3. Improved quality of optical coherence tomography imaging of basal cell carcinomas using speckle reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Thrane, Lars;

    2010-01-01

    suggests a method for improving OCT image quality for skin cancer imaging. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: OCT is an optical imaging method analogous to ultrasound. Two basal cell carcinomas (BCC) were imaged using an OCT speckle reduction technique (SR-OCT) based on repeated scanning by altering the distance between...

  4. A massive neglected giant basal cell carcinoma in a schizophrenic patient treated successfully with vismodegib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Lei, Ulrikke

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule vismodegib is a great treatment alternative to patients challenged, e.g. psychiatric disorders, suffering from severe basal cell carcinoma of the skin in which surgery or other treatment modalities is not possible because of patient's wish or condition. We present a case of a 73...

  5. Fibroepithelioma of Pinkus in continuity with nodular basal cell carcinoma: A rare presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongre, Atul M.; Khopkar, Uday S.; Kalyanpad, Yogesh N.; Gole, Prachi V.

    2016-01-01

    Fibroepithelioma of Pinkus and nodular basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are different morphological variants of BCC. It is very rare to see both the variants together in a single lesion. Here we report a case of a 56-year-old female who presented with a nodule on the trunk, which on biopsy showed features of both nodular BCC and fibroepithelioma of Pinkus. PMID:27559504

  6. Basal cell carcinoma, oculo-cutaneous albinism and actinic keratosis in a native Indian

    OpenAIRE

    Kingshuk Chatterjee; Farhan Rasool; Anita Chaudhuri; Gautam Chatterjee; Sehgal, Virendra N; Navjeeven Singh

    2013-01-01

    The report highlights the occurrence of basal cell carcinoma in a native Indian with oculo-cutaneous albinism, an association not frequently encountered. The clinical and histopathological features, which assisted to form the diagnosis, are outlined. A high degree of suspicion and timely recognition of the potentially aggressive neoplasm, under this unusual circumstance, is the key to its diagnosis.

  7. Human alveolar epithelial type II cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Pu; Wu, Songling; Li, Jianchun; Fu, Wei; He, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Slutsky, Arthur S; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Yimin

    2015-02-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells are a key structure and defender in the lung but also are the targets in many lung diseases, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, ventilator-induced lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis. We sought to establish an optimized method for high yielding and long maintenance of characteristics of primary human AEII cells to facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms of lung diseases at the cellular and molecular levels. Adult human peripheral normal lung tissues of oncologic patients undergoing lung resection were collected. The AEII cells were isolated and identified by the expression of pro-surfactant protein (SP)C, epithelial sodium channel (αENaC) and cytokeratin (CK)-8, the lamellar bodies specific for AEII cells, and confirmed by the histology using electron microscopy. The phenotype of AEII cells was characterized by the expression of surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D), CK-8, KL-6, αENaC, and aquaporin (AQP)-3, which was maintained over 20 days. The biological activity of the primary human AEII cells producing SP-C, cytokines, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was vigorous in response to stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α. We have modified previous methods and optimized a method for isolation of high purity and long maintenance of the human AEII cell phenotype in primary culture. This method provides an important tool for studies aiming at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of lung diseases exclusively in AEII cells. PMID:25677546

  8. Serum-Free Cryopreservation of Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Niknejad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: One of the important issues in long term storage of cells is removal of animal serum from cell culture environments. The aim of this study was to evaluate amni-otic fluid (AF, which is full of growth factors, as substitute for fetal bovine serum (FBS in the cryopreservation protocol. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study human amniotic epithelial cells were isolated from placentas which were seronegative for microbial infections. The cells were preserved in 24 different patterns for 12 months in -196 ?C (liquid nitrogen and viability of cells were determined before and after cryopreservation by trypan blue and MTT assay. Moreover, Oct-4 expression was studied to determine pluripotency before and after cryopreservation with immunocytochemistry. Results were compared between groups with ANOVA (Tukey Post-Test. P.value under 0.01 and 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The presence of DMEM, FBS or AF is necessary for amniotic cell cryopreservation. Trypan-blue, MTT and immunocytochemistry showed that there isn’t significant difference between using AF and FBS in viability and pluripotency of cells. Moreover, results showed that DMSO is a better cryoprotectant compared to glycerol. Conclusion : Results showed that amniotic fluid can be a proper substitute for FBS in amniotic epithelial cells cryopreservation. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (1:15-24

  9. Stochastic homeostasis in human airway epithelium is achieved by neutral competition of basal cell progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Vitor H.; Nadarajan, Parthiban; Graham, Trevor A; Pipinikas, Christodoulos P; Brown, James M; Falzon, Mary; Nye, Emma; Poulsom, Richard; Lawrence, David; Wright, Nicholas A.; McDonald, Stuart; Giangreco, Adam; Simons, Benjamin D; Janes, Sam M.

    2013-01-01

    eLife digest As air flows into our lungs, the lining of the nasal cavity, the throat and the rest of the respiratory tract prevents microbes, bacteria, dust and other small particles from entering the lungs. The lining of these airways is made up of many different types of cells, which must be continuously replaced as they become damaged. Experiments in mice have shown that cells called basal cells act as progenitor cells to keep the lining supplied with new cells. Progenitor cells are simila...

  10. TCDD alters medial epithelial cell differentiation during palatogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S. (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1989-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a widely distributed, persistent environmental contaminant that is teratogenic in mice, where it induces hydronephrosis and cleft palate. The incidence of clefting has been shown to be dose dependent after exposure on either gestation Day (GD) 10 or 12, although the embryo is more susceptible on GD 12. TCDD-exposed palatal shelves meet but do not fuse, and programmed cell death of the medial epithelial cells is inhibited. The mechanism of action through which TCDD alters the program of medial cell development has not been examined in earlier studies, and it is not known whether the mechanism is the same regardless of the dose or developmental stage of exposure. In this study, C57BL/6N mice, a strain sensitive to TCDD, were dosed orally on GD 10 or 12 with 0, 6, 12, 24, or 30 micrograms/kg body wt, in 10 ml corn oil/kg. Embryonic palatal shelves were examined on GD 14, 15, or 16. The degree of palatal closure, epithelial surface morphology, and cellular ultrastructure, the incorporation of (3H)TdR, the expression of EGF receptors, and the binding of 125I-EGF were assessed. After exposure on GD 10 or 12, TCDD altered the differentiation pathway of the medial epithelial cells. The palatal shelves were of normal size and overall morphology, but fusion of the medial epithelia of the opposing shelves did not occur. TCDD prevented programmed cell death of the medial peridermal cells. The expression of EGF receptors by medial cells continued through Day 16 and the receptors were able to bind ligand. The medial cells differentiated into a stratified, squamous, keratinizing epithelium. The shift in phenotype to an oral-like epithelium occurred after exposure on either GD 10 or 12. At the lower dose (6 micrograms/kg), fewer cleft palates were produced, but those shelves which did respond had a fully expressed shift in differentiation.

  11. TCDD alters medial epithelial cell differentiation during palatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a widely distributed, persistent environmental contaminant that is teratogenic in mice, where it induces hydronephrosis and cleft palate. The incidence of clefting has been shown to be dose dependent after exposure on either gestation Day (GD) 10 or 12, although the embryo is more susceptible on GD 12. TCDD-exposed palatal shelves meet but do not fuse, and programmed cell death of the medial epithelial cells is inhibited. The mechanism of action through which TCDD alters the program of medial cell development has not been examined in earlier studies, and it is not known whether the mechanism is the same regardless of the dose or developmental stage of exposure. In this study, C57BL/6N mice, a strain sensitive to TCDD, were dosed orally on GD 10 or 12 with 0, 6, 12, 24, or 30 micrograms/kg body wt, in 10 ml corn oil/kg. Embryonic palatal shelves were examined on GD 14, 15, or 16. The degree of palatal closure, epithelial surface morphology, and cellular ultrastructure, the incorporation of [3H]TdR, the expression of EGF receptors, and the binding of 125I-EGF were assessed. After exposure on GD 10 or 12, TCDD altered the differentiation pathway of the medial epithelial cells. The palatal shelves were of normal size and overall morphology, but fusion of the medial epithelia of the opposing shelves did not occur. TCDD prevented programmed cell death of the medial peridermal cells. The expression of EGF receptors by medial cells continued through Day 16 and the receptors were able to bind ligand. The medial cells differentiated into a stratified, squamous, keratinizing epithelium. The shift in phenotype to an oral-like epithelium occurred after exposure on either GD 10 or 12. At the lower dose (6 micrograms/kg), fewer cleft palates were produced, but those shelves which did respond had a fully expressed shift in differentiation

  12. Colonisation of basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis by malignant melanoma in situ in a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise J. Smith

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Although malignant melanoma (MM and both basal cell carcinoma (BCC and actinic keratosis (AK are sun-induced lesions, the coexistence of these entities at the same anatomical site (collision tumour is exceedingly rare. We report the case of a 54-year-old woman with a known history of xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV who presented with 2 separate skin lesions over the middle and upper right forearm, respectively. The clinical impression was that of BCCs or squamous cell lesions. On histological examination, both specimens showed features of melanoma in situ (MIS. In the first lesion, MIS merged with and colonised a superficial and focally invasive BCC. In the second lesion, MIS merged with an AK. No separate invasive nests of malignant melanoma were seen in either specimen. The atypical melanocytes were highlighted by Melan-A and HMB-45 immunostaining, whereas the epithelial cells in both the BCC and AK stained with the pancytokeratin MNF-116. The patient had a previous history of multiple MMs and non-melanomatous skin cancers and finally developed widespread metastatic malignant melanoma, which proved fatal. The rare and interesting phenomenon of collision tumours may pose diagnostic difficulties. To our knowledge, this is the first reported simultaneous presentation of cytologically malignant collision tumours in a patient with XPV.

  13. Loss of EP2 receptor subtype in colonic cells compromise epithelial barrier integrity by altering claudin-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, Manigandan; Moreau, France; Chadee, Kris

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a bioactive lipid mediator that exerts its biological function through interaction with four different subtypes of E-Prostanoid receptor namely EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4. It has been known that EP2 receptor is differentially over-expressed in the epithelia of inflamed human colonic mucosa. However, the significance of the differential expression in altering epithelial barrier function is not known. In this study, we used Caco-2 cells expressing EP2 receptor, either high (EP2S) or low (EP2A), as a model epithelia and determined the barrier function of these cell monolayers by measuring the trans epithelial resistance (TER). Basal TER of EP2A (but not EP2S) monolayer was significantly lower suggesting a loss of colonic epithelial barrier integrity. In comparison, the TER of wild type Caco-2 was decreased in response to an EP2 receptor specific antagonist (AH-6809) indicating an important role for EP2 receptor in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. The decrease TER in EP2A monolayer corresponded with a significant loss of the tight junction (TJ) protein claudin-4 without affecting other major TJ proteins. Similarly, EP2 receptor antagonism/siRNA based silencing significantly decreased claudin-4 expression in EP2S cells. Surprisingly, alteration in claudin-4 was not transcriptionally regulated in EP2A cells but rather undergoes increased proteosomal degradation. Moreover, among the TER compromising cytokines examined (IL-8, IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ) only IFN-γ was significantly up regulated in EP2A cells. However, IFN-γ did not significantly decreased claudin-4 expression in Caco-2 cells indicating no role for IFN-γ in degrading claudin-4. We conclude that differential down-regulation of EP2 receptor play a major role in compromising colonic epithelial barrier function by selectively increasing proteosomal degradation of claudin-4. PMID:25396731

  14. Low Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome 1 Gene Transcript Levels in Basal-like Breast Cancer Associate with Mesenchymal-to-epithelial Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Bao; Ling-juan Ruan; Juan-fen Mo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate trichorhinophalangeal syndrome 1 gene (TRPS-1) expression patterns in different subtypes of breast cancer and its correlations with other genes and survival using microarray data sets. Methods The transcripts of TRPS-1 and its role in survival in breast cancer were analyzed using published microarray data sets-Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) cohort andWang cohort. Results TRPS-1 expression was lower in basal-like breast cancer. The mRNA levels of TRPS-1 negatively correlated with Slug (Pearson correlation coefficient=−0.1366, P=0.0189 in NKI data set and Pearson correlation coefficient=−0.1571, P=0.0078 in Wang data set), FOXC1 (Pearson correlation coefficient=−0.1211, P=0.0376 in NKI data set and Pearson correlation coefficient=−0.1709, P=0.0037 in Wang data set), and CXCL1 (Pearson correlation coefficient=−0.1197, P=0.0399 in NKI data set and Pearson correlation coefficient=−0.3436, P Conclusion The strong expression of TRPS-1 may serve as a good prognostic marker in breast cancer.

  15. Differential Glutamate Metabolism in Proliferating and Quiescent Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloff, Jonathan L; Murphy, J Patrick; Braun, Craig R; Harris, Isaac S; Shelton, Laura M; Kami, Kenjiro; Gygi, Steven P; Selfors, Laura M; Brugge, Joan S

    2016-05-10

    Mammary epithelial cells transition between periods of proliferation and quiescence during development, menstrual cycles, and pregnancy, and as a result of oncogenic transformation. Utilizing an organotypic 3D tissue culture model coupled with quantitative metabolomics and proteomics, we identified significant differences in glutamate utilization between proliferating and quiescent cells. Relative to quiescent cells, proliferating cells catabolized more glutamate via transaminases to couple non-essential amino acid (NEAA) synthesis to α-ketoglutarate generation and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle anaplerosis. As cells transitioned to quiescence, glutamine consumption and transaminase expression were reduced, while glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD) was induced, leading to decreased NEAA synthesis. Highly proliferative human tumors display high transaminase and low GLUD expression, suggesting that proliferating cancer cells couple glutamine consumption to NEAA synthesis to promote biosynthesis. These findings describe a competitive and partially redundant relationship between transaminases and GLUD, and they reveal how coupling of glutamate-derived carbon and nitrogen metabolism can be regulated to support cell proliferation. PMID:27133130

  16. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER): a functional parameter to monitor the quality of oviduct epithelial cells cultured on filter supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; Einspanier, Ralf; Schoen, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    Cultivation of oviduct epithelial cells on porous filters fosters in vivo-like morphology and functionality. However, due to the optical properties of the filter materials and the cells' columnar shape, cell quality is hard to assess via light microscopy. In this study, we aim to evaluate transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurement as a prognostic quality indicator for the cultivation of porcine oviduct epithelial cells (POEC). POEC were maintained in four different types of media for 3 and 6 w to achieve diverse culture qualities, and TEER was measured before processing samples for histology. Culture quality was scored using morphological criteria (presence of cilia, confluence and cell polarity). We furthermore analyzed the correlation between cellular height (as a measure of apical-basal polarization) and TEER in fully differentiated routine cultures (biological variation) and in cultures with altered cellular height due to hormonal stimulation. Fully differentiated cultures possessed a moderate TEER between 500 and 1100 Ω*cm(2). Only 5% of cultures which exhibited TEER values in this defined range had poor quality. Sub-differentiated cultures showed either very low or excessively high TEER. We unveiled a highly significant (P monitor the differentiation status of oviduct epithelial cells in vitro. PMID:26223877

  17. Adherence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1 to human epithelial cells and to hexadecane.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, M; Perry, A; Bayer, E A; Gutnick, D. L.; Rosenberg, E.; Ofek, I.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1 to adhere to human epithelial cells was investigated and compared with its ability to adhere to a test hydrocarbon (hexadecane). RAG-1, a microorganism originally isolated for growth on hydrocarbon, adhered to epithelial cells when grown under conditions which promote its adherence to hexadecane; similarly, RAG-1 cells adhered poorly to epithelial cells when grown under conditions which cause the cells to possess low affinity towards hexadecane...

  18. Rho GTPases and regulation of cell migration and polarization in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Epithelial cell migration is required for regeneration of tissues and can be defective in a number of ocular surface diseases. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of Rho family small G-proteins in human corneal epithelial cells to test their requirement in directional cell migration. METHODS: Rho family small G-protein expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Dominant-inhibitory constructs encoding Rho proteins or Rho protein targeting small interfering RNA were transfected into human corneal epithelial large T antigen cells, and wound closure rate were evaluated by scratch wounding assay, and a complementary non-traumatic cell migration assay. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to study cell polarization and to assess Cdc42 downstream effector. RESULTS: Cdc42, Chp, Rac1, RhoA, TC10 and TCL were expressed in human corneal epithelial cells. Among them, Cdc42 and TCL were found to significantly affect cell migration in monolayer scratch assays. These results were confirmed through the use of validated siRNAs directed to Cdc42 and TCL. Scramble siRNA transfected cells had high percentage of polarized cells than Cdc42 or TCL siRNA transfected cells at the wound edge. We showed that the Cdc42-specific effector p21-activated kinase 4 localized predominantly to cell-cell junctions in cell monolayers, but failed to translocate to the leading edge in Cdc42 siRNA transfected cells after monolayer wounding. CONCLUSION: Rho proteins expressed in cultured human corneal epithelial cells, and Cdc42, TCL facilitate two-dimensional cell migration in-vitro. Although silencing of Cdc42 and TCL did not noticeably affect the appearance of cell adhesions at the leading edge, the slower migration of these cells indicates both GTP-binding proteins play important roles in promoting cell movement of human corneal epithelial cells.

  19. Henipavirus Pathogenesis in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Carmical, J. Russ; Prusak, Deborah; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz; Rockx, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed for human use. Henipavirus infection causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis. Although the exact route of transmission in human is unknown, epidemiological studies and in vivo studies suggest that the respiratory tract is important for virus replication. However, the target cells in the respiratory tract are unknown, as are the mechanisms by which henipaviruses ca...

  20. Oral epithelial cells are susceptible to cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 infection in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial cells lining the oral cavity are exposed to HIV-1 through breast-feeding and oral-genital contact. Genital secretions and breast milk of HIV-1-infected subjects contain both cell-free and cell-associated virus. To determine if oral epithelial cells can be infected with HIV-1 we exposed gingival keratinocytes and adenoid epithelial cells to cell-free virus and HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes. Using primary isolates we determined that gingival keratinocytes are susceptible to HIV-1 infection via cell-free CD4-independent infection only. R5 but not X4 viral strains were capable of infecting the keratinocytes. Further, infected cells were able to release infectious virus. In addition, primary epithelial cells isolated from adenoids were also susceptible to infection; both cell-free and cell-associated virus infected these cells. These data have potential implications in the transmission of HIV-1 in the oral cavity

  1. Changes of TIZ expression in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Yu Zheng; Hong-Yu Zheng; Yun-Tao Zhou; En-Ling Liu; Jie Li; Yan-Mei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the change ofTIZ expression in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.Methods:HO8910 cells were transinfected with siRNA to inhibit the expression ofTIZ. pcDNA3.1-TIZ vectors were combined to increase theTIZ expression level.The cell viability, colony forming efficiency and cycle distribution ofHO8910,HO8910/NC,HO8910/pcDNA3.1-NC,HO8910/TIZ-573 andHO8910/pcDNA3.1-TIZ were compared, and the invasion rate, migration rate and adhesion rate between5 groups of cells were compared.Results:Compared with those ofHO8910,HO8910/NC andHO8910/pcDNA3.1-NC, the cell viability, colony forming efficiency and cell cycle distribution ofHO8910/TIZ-573 were increased, while the indexes ofHO8910/pcDNA3.1-NC were decreased with statistical significant difference(P0.05). Conclusions:The expression ofTIZ can inhibit the proliferation of epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

  2. Claudin 1 Expression Levels Affect miRNA Dynamics in Human Basal-Like Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer, Anna; Blanchard, Anne A; Medina, Sarah; Booth, Stephanie A; Myal, Yvonne

    2016-07-01

    Deemed a putative tumor suppressor in breast cancer, the tight junction protein claudin 1 has now been shown to be highly expressed in the basal-like molecular subtype. Moreover, recent in vitro studies show that claudin 1 can regulate breast cancer cell motility and proliferation. Herein, we investigated whether microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation is associated with alterations in the level of claudin 1. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS), we identified seven miRNAs (miR-9-5p, miR-9-3p, let-7c, miR-127-3p, miR-99a-5p, miR-129-5p, and miR-146a-5p) that were deregulated as a consequence of claudin 1 overexpression in the MDA-MB231 human breast cancer (HBC) cell line. Most of these miRNAs have been associated with tumor suppression in a variety of cancers, including breast cancer. Moreover, through gene expression profiling analysis, we identified epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFRB) and cadherin 1 (CDH1, E cadherin), whose downregulation correlated with claudin 1 overexpression. Collectively, we show for the first time that in HBC, claudin 1 can alter the dynamics of a number of miRNAs involved in tumor progression. Our data suggest that the dysregulated expression of these miRNAs, in conjunction with the high claudin 1 levels, could serve as a useful biomarker that identifies a subset of tumors within the poorly characterized basal-like subtype of breast cancer. Further studies are warranted to determine the role of these miRNAs in facilitating the function of claudin 1 in breast cancer. PMID:26982264

  3. Targeted disruption of the LAMA3 gene in mice reveals abnormalities in survival and late stage differentiation of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M C; Lee, K; Miyashita, Y; Carter, W G

    1999-06-14

    Laminin 5 regulates anchorage and motility of epithelial cells through integrins alpha6beta4 and alpha3beta1, respectively. We used targeted disruption of the LAMA3 gene, which encodes the alpha3 subunit of laminin 5 and other isoforms, to examine developmental functions that are regulated by adhesion to the basement membrane (BM). In homozygous null animals, profound epithelial abnormalities were detected that resulted in neonatal lethality, consistent with removal of all alpha3-laminin isoforms from epithelial BMs. Alterations in three different cellular functions were identified. First, using a novel tissue adhesion assay, we found that the mutant BM could not induce stable adhesion by integrin alpha6beta4, consistent with the presence of junctional blisters and abnormal hemidesmosomes. In the absence of laminin 5 function, we were able to detect a new ligand for integrin alpha3beta1 in the epidermal BM, suggesting that basal keratinocytes can utilize integrin alpha3beta1 to interact with an alternative ligand. Second, we identified a survival defect in mutant epithelial cells that could be rescued by exogenous laminin 5, collagen, or an antibody against integrin alpha6beta4, suggesting that signaling through beta1 or beta4 integrins is sufficient for survival. Third, we detected abnormalities in ameloblast differentiation in developing mutant incisors indicating that events downstream of adhesion are affected in mutant animals. These results indicate that laminin 5 has an important role in regulating tissue organization, gene expression, and survival of epithelium. PMID:10366601

  4. Endothelial induced EMT in breast epithelial cells with stem cell properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Valgardur; Hilmarsdottir, Bylgja; Sigmundsdottir, Hekla;

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical event in cancer progression and is closely linked to the breast epithelial cancer stem cell phenotype. Given the close interaction between the vascular endothelium and cancer cells, especially at the invasive front, we asked whether...... endothelial cells might play a role in EMT. Using a 3D culture model we demonstrate that endothelial cells are potent inducers of EMT in D492 an immortalized breast epithelial cell line with stem cell properties. Endothelial induced mesenchymal-like cells (D492M) derived from D492, show reduced expression of...... keratins, a switch from E-Cadherin (E-Cad) to N-Cadherin (N-Cad) and enhanced migration. Acquisition of cancer stem cell associated characteristics like increased CD44(high)/CD24(low) ratio, resistance to apoptosis and anchorage independent growth was also seen in D492M cells. Endothelial induced EMT in D...

  5. Altered lung morphogenesis, epithelial cell differentiation and mechanics in mice deficient in the Wnt/β-catenin antagonist Chibby.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon Love

    Full Text Available The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays crucial roles in various aspects of lung morphogenesis and regeneration/repair. Here, we examined the lung phenotype and function in mice lacking the Wnt/β-catenin antagonist Chibby (Cby. In support of its inhibitory role in canonical Wnt signaling, expression of β-catenin target genes is elevated in the Cby(-/- lung. Notably, Cby protein is prominently associated with the centrosome/basal body microtubule structures in embryonic lung epithelial progenitor cells, and later enriches as discrete foci at the base of motile cilia in airway ciliated cells. At birth, Cby(-/- lungs are grossly normal but spontaneously develop alveolar airspace enlargement with reduced proliferation and abnormal differentiation of lung epithelial cells, resulting in altered pulmonary function. Consistent with the Cby expression pattern, airway ciliated cells exhibit a marked paucity of motile cilia with apparent failure of basal body docking. Moreover, we demonstrate that Cby is a direct downstream target for the master ciliogenesis transcription factor Foxj1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that Cby facilitates proper postnatal lung development and function.

  6. Intercellular Protein Transfer from Thymocytes to Thymic Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Promiscuous expression of tissue restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is crucial for negative selection of self-reactive T cells to establish central tolerance. Intercellular transfer of self-peptide-MHC complexes from mTECs to thymic dendritic cells (DCs) allows DCs to acquire TRAs, which in turn contributes to negative selection and regulatory T cell generation. However, mTECs are unlikely to express all TRAs, such as immunoglobulins generated only in B cells after somatic recombination, hyper-mutation, or class-switches. We report here that both mTECs and cortical TECs can efficiently acquire not only cell surface but also intracellular proteins from thymocytes. This reveals a previously unappreciated intercellular sharing of molecules from thymocytes to TECs, which may broaden the TRA inventory in mTECs for establishing a full spectrum of central tolerance. PMID:27022746

  7. Plasticity of airway epithelial cell transcriptome in response to flagellin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan G Clark

    Full Text Available Airway epithelial cells (AEC are critical components of the inflammatory and immune response during exposure to pathogens. AECs in monolayer culture and differentiated epithelial cells in air-liquid interface (ALI represent two distinct and commonly used in vitro models, yet differences in their response to pathogens have not been investigated. In this study, we compared the transcriptional effects of flagellin on AECs in monolayer culture versus ALI culture using whole-genome microarrays and RNA sequencing. We exposed monolayer and ALI AEC cultures to flagellin in vitro and analyzed the transcriptional response by microarray and RNA-sequencing. ELISA and RT-PCR were used to validate changes in select candidates. We found that AECs cultured in monolayer and ALI have strikingly different transcriptional states at baseline. When challenged with flagellin, monolayer AEC cultures greatly increased transcription of numerous genes mapping to wounding response, immunity and inflammatory response. In contrast, AECs in ALI culture had an unexpectedly muted response to flagellin, both in number of genes expressed and relative enrichment of inflammatory and immune pathways. We conclude that in vitro culturing methods have a dramatic effect on the transcriptional profile of AECs at baseline and after stimulation with flagellin. These differences suggest that epithelial responses to pathogen challenges are distinctly different in culture models of intact and injured epithelium.

  8. Plasticity of airway epithelial cell transcriptome in response to flagellin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joan G; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Basom, Ryan S; Gharib, Sina A

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are critical components of the inflammatory and immune response during exposure to pathogens. AECs in monolayer culture and differentiated epithelial cells in air-liquid interface (ALI) represent two distinct and commonly used in vitro models, yet differences in their response to pathogens have not been investigated. In this study, we compared the transcriptional effects of flagellin on AECs in monolayer culture versus ALI culture using whole-genome microarrays and RNA sequencing. We exposed monolayer and ALI AEC cultures to flagellin in vitro and analyzed the transcriptional response by microarray and RNA-sequencing. ELISA and RT-PCR were used to validate changes in select candidates. We found that AECs cultured in monolayer and ALI have strikingly different transcriptional states at baseline. When challenged with flagellin, monolayer AEC cultures greatly increased transcription of numerous genes mapping to wounding response, immunity and inflammatory response. In contrast, AECs in ALI culture had an unexpectedly muted response to flagellin, both in number of genes expressed and relative enrichment of inflammatory and immune pathways. We conclude that in vitro culturing methods have a dramatic effect on the transcriptional profile of AECs at baseline and after stimulation with flagellin. These differences suggest that epithelial responses to pathogen challenges are distinctly different in culture models of intact and injured epithelium. PMID:25668187

  9. IL-22 contributes to TGF-β1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jill R.; Nishioka, Michiyoshi; Chakir, Jamila; Risse, Paul-André; Almaghlouth, Ibrahim; Bazarbashi, Ahmad N; Plante, Sophie; Martin, James G.; Eidelman, David; Hamid, Qutayba

    2013-01-01

    Background Allergic asthma is characterized by airway inflammation in response to antigen exposure, leading to airway remodeling and lung dysfunction. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) may play a role in airway remodeling through the acquisition of a mesenchymal phenotype in airway epithelial cells. TGF-β1 is known to promote EMT; however, other cytokines expressed in severe asthma with extensive remodeling, such as IL-22, may also contribute to this process. In this study, we evaluated...

  10. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising from Xeroderma Pigmentosum: A Case Report and an Immunohistochemical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Furudate, Sadanori; Fujimura, Taku; Tojo, Gen-ichi; Haga, Takahiro; Aiba, Setsuya

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 26-year-old Japanese patient with basal cell carcinoma arising from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). Immunohistochemical staining revealed dense infiltration of CD163+ M2 macrophages, together with Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. Interestingly, MMP9, which was reported as one of the functional markers for immunosuppressive macrophages, was also detected in the CD163+ M2 macrophage-infiltrated areas. Our case suggests the immunological background of tumor development in a patient with XP.

  11. Two cases of basal cell carcinoma arising from chronic radiation dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 48-year-old female and a 51-year-old male with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) arising from chronic radiation dermatitis are reviewed. They are treated with radiotherapy for hemangioma on their right cheek in their childhood. Review in the literature showed high incidence of the histological diagnosis of malignant skin tumors arising from chronic radiation dermatitis are follows: squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), BCC, sarcoma, and Bowen's disease. (author)

  12. Targeting Superficial or Nodular Basal Cell Carcinoma with Topically Formulated Small Molecule Inhibitor of Smoothened

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Tracy; Tang, Jean Y.; Li, Dongwei(Department of Physics, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, 453007, China); Reich, Mike; Callahan, Christopher A.; Fu, Ling; Yauch, Robert L.; Wang, Frank; Kotkow, Karen; Chang, Kris S.; Shpall, Elana; Wu, Angela; Rubin, Lee; Marsters, James C.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Inappropriate activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in skin is critical for the development of basal cell carcinomas (BCC). We have investigated the anti-BCC efficacy of topically-applied CUR61414, an inhibitor of the Hh signal transduction molecule Smoothened. Experimental Design: In preclinical studies, we used a depilatory model to evaluate the ability of topical formulations of CUR61414 to repress Hh responsive cells found at the base of hair follicles in normal sk...

  13. Analysis of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Receptors (VDR) in Basal Cell Carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Reichrath, Jörg; Kamradt, Jörn; Hong Zhu, Xue; Fu Kong, Xiang; Tilgen, Wolfgang; Holick, Michael F.

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed expression of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor (VDR) protein and mRNA in basal cell carcinomas (BCC) of human skin. VDR immunoreactivity in BCCs was compared with the staining pattern of the proliferation marker Ki-67 in the same tumors. Additionally, VDR staining was compared to staining pattern of apoptotic cells by terminal UTP nucleotide end labeling assay. Frozen sections of superficial type, nodular type, and fibrosing type BCCs were consistently immunoreactive for VDR...

  14. Two cases of basal cell carcinoma arising from chronic radiation dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakamori, Takeshi; Takenaka, Hideya; Ueda, Eiichiro; Katoh, Norito; Kishimoto, Saburo [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    A 48-year-old female and a 51-year-old male with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) arising from chronic radiation dermatitis are reviewed. They are treated with radiotherapy for hemangioma on their right cheek in their childhood. Review in the literature showed high incidence of the histological diagnosis of malignant skin tumors arising from chronic radiation dermatitis are follows: squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), BCC, sarcoma, and Bowen's disease. (author)

  15. Establishment of a Novel Lingual Organoid Culture System: Generation of Organoids Having Mature Keratinized Epithelium from Adult Epithelial Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kanno, Shohei; Tokuyama, Yoko; Komai, Yoshihiro; Ohe, Shuichi; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Omachi, Taichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-11-01

    Despite the strong need for the establishment of a lingual epithelial cell culture system, a simple and convenient culture method has not yet been established. Here, we report the establishment of a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Histological analyses showed that the generated organoids had both a stratified squamous epithelial cell layer and a stratum corneum. Very recently, we showed via a multicolor lineage tracing method that Bmi1-positive stem cells exist at the base of the epithelial basal layer in the interpapillary pit. Using our new culture system, we found that organoids could be generated by single Bmi1-positive stem cells and that in the established organoids, multiple Bmi1-positive stem cells were generated at the outermost layer. Moreover, we observed that organoids harvested at an early point in culture could be engrafted and maturate in the tongue of recipient mice and that the organoids generated from carcinogen-treated mice had an abnormal morphology. Thus, this culture system presents valuable settings for studying not only the regulatory mechanisms of lingual epithelium but also lingual regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  16. Vulvar basal cell carcinoma in a 20-year-old: Case report and review of the literature☆

    OpenAIRE

    Fleury, Aimee C.; Junkins-Hopkins, Jacqueline M.; Diaz-Montes, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    ► Vulvar basal cell carcinoma is a rare tumor. ► This report highlights the presentation of vulvar basal cell carcinoma in a very young, non-White patient. ► The importance of provider vigilance and timely biopsy of vulvar lesions is highlighted.

  17. High glucose stimulates the expression of erythropoietin in rat glomerular epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Seul Ki; Park, Soo Hyun

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that the levels of erythropoietin are associated with diabetes mellitus. Glomerular epithelial cells, located in the renal cortex, play an important role in the regulation of kidney function and hyperglycemia-induced cell loss of glomerular epithelial cells is implicated in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. This study investigated the effect of high glucose on erythropoietin and erythropoietin receptor expression in rat glomerular epithelial cells. We found that 25 mM D-...

  18. Intestinal immune homeostasis is regulated by the crosstalk between epithelial cells and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Monica; Chieppa, Marcello; Salucci, Valentina; Avogadri, Francesca; Sonzogni, Angelica; Sampietro, Gianluca M; Nespoli, Angelo; Viale, Giuseppe; Allavena, Paola; Rescigno, Maria

    2005-05-01

    The control of damaging inflammation by the mucosal immune system in response to commensal and harmful ingested bacteria is unknown. Here we show epithelial cells conditioned mucosal dendritic cells through the constitutive release of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and other mediators, resulting in the induction of 'noninflammatory' dendritic cells. Epithelial cell-conditioned dendritic cells released interleukins 10 and 6 but not interleukin 12, and they promoted the polarization of T cells toward a 'classical' noninflammatory T helper type 2 response, even after exposure to a T helper type 1-inducing pathogen. This control of immune responses seemed to be lost in patients with Crohn disease. Thus, the intimate interplay between intestinal epithelial cells and dendritic cells may help to maintain gut immune homeostasis. PMID:15821737

  19. Bacterial Wall Components such as Lipothecoid Acid, Peptidoglycan, Liposaccharide and Lipid A Stimulate Cell Proliferation in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Olaya, Jaime H.; Neopikhanov, Vadim; Söderman, Charlotte; Uribe, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies indicate that the microflora contains mitogens to intestinal epithelial cells. Our aim is to examine whether cell wall components of both Gram-negative and positive bacteria influence cell proliferation in small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. A human colonic epithelial cell line from adenocarcinoma (IEC-6) and a nontransformed small intestinal cell line from germ-free rats (LS-123) were incubated with (a) lipothecoid acid from Streptococcus faecalis at 1.56–50 ...

  20. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidjanin, D. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Grdina, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Woloschak, G.E. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  1. Interleukin-23 Increases Intestinal Epithelial Cell Permeability In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzerling, Nathan P; Donohoe, Deborah; Fredrich, Katherine; Gourlay, David M; Liedel, Jennifer L

    2016-06-01

    Background Breast milk has a heterogeneous composition that differs between mothers and changes throughout the first weeks after birth. The proinflammatory cytokine IL-23 has a highly variable expression in human breast milk. We hypothesize that IL-23 found in human breast milk is biologically active and promotes epithelial barrier dysfunction. Methods The immature rat small intestinal epithelial cell line, IEC-18, was grown on cell inserts or standard cell culture plates. Confluent cultures were exposed to human breast milk with high or low levels of IL-23 and barrier function was measured using a flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-70). In addition, protein and mRNA expression of occludin and ZO-1 were measured and immunofluorescence used to stain occludin and ZO-1. Results Exposure to breast milk with high levels of IL-23 caused an increase flux of FD-70 compared with both controls and breast milk with low levels of IL-23. The protein expression of ZO-1 but not occludin was decreased by exposure to high levels of IL-23. These results correlate with immunofluorescent staining of ZO-1 and occludin which show decreased staining of occludin in both the groups exposed to breast milk with high and low IL-23. Conversely, cells exposed to high IL-23 breast milk had little peripheral staining of ZO-1 compared with controls and low IL-23 breast milk. Conclusion IL-23 in human breast milk is biologically active and negatively affects the barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells through the degradation of tight junction proteins. PMID:26007691

  2. Oral microbial biofilm stimulation of epithelial cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S; Novak, Karen F; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2012-04-01

    Oral bacterial biofilms trigger chronic inflammatory responses in the host that can result in the tissue destructive events of periodontitis. However, the characteristics of the capacity of specific host cell types to respond to these biofilms remain ill-defined. This report describes the use of a novel model of bacterial biofilms to stimulate oral epithelial cells and profile select cytokines and chemokines that contribute to the local inflammatory environment in the periodontium. Monoinfection biofilms were developed with Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses. Biofilms, as well as planktonic cultures of these same bacterial species, were incubated under anaerobic conditions with a human oral epithelial cell line, OKF4, for up to 24h. Gro-1α, IL1α, IL-6, IL-8, TGFα, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, and IP-10 were shown to be produced in response to a range of the planktonic or biofilm forms of these species. P. gingivalis biofilms significantly inhibited the production of all of these cytokines and chemokines, except MIP-1α. Generally, the biofilms of all species inhibited Gro-1α, TGFα, and Fractalkine production, while F. nucleatum biofilms stimulated significant increases in IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and IP-10. A. naeslundii biofilms induced elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IP-10. The oral streptococcal species in biofilms or planktonic forms were poor stimulants for any of these mediators from the epithelial cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that oral bacteria in biofilms elicit a substantially different profile of responses compared to planktonic bacteria of the same species. Moreover, certain oral species are highly stimulatory when in biofilms and interact with host cell receptors to trigger pathways of responses that appear quite divergent from individual bacteria. PMID:22266273

  3. Naevi as a risk factor for basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians: a Danish case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lock-Andersen, J; Drzewiecki, K T; Wulf, H C

    1999-01-01

    The number of melanocytic naevi in Caucasians is related to previous exposure to the sun and is a well-documented major risk factor for cutaneous malignant melanoma. Basal cell carcinoma, which is the most common form of skin cancer, has also been shown to be related to exposure to the sun. To...... higher number of naevi on the arms and the legs than did female controls, but also had more naevi on the trunk. For females, the risk for basal cell carcinoma increased with increasing number of naevi. Naevi were not a risk factor for basal cell carcinoma in males....... investigate whether the number of common naevi is a risk factor for basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians we performed whole-body counting of naevi > or =2 mm in a Danish case-control study with 145 cases of primary basal cell carcinoma and 119 controls matched on age, gender and place of residence. Naevi were...

  4. IL-4 attenuates pulmonary epithelial cell-mediated suppression of T cell priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Melanie; Arnhold, Markus; Lingner, Sandra; Mahapatra, Subhashree; Bruder, Dunja; Hansen, Gesine; Dittrich, Anna-Maria

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that Th2-polarized airway inflammation facilitates sensitization towards new, protein antigens. In this context, we could demonstrate that IL-4 needs to act on cells of the hematopoetic and the structural compartment in order to facilitate sensitization towards new antigens. We thus aimed to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of IL-4 on structural cells choosing to analyze pulmonary epithelial cells as an important part of the lung's structural system. We used a co-culture system of DC- or APC-dependent in vitro priming of T cells, co-cultivated on a layer of cells of a murine pulmonary epithelial cell line (LA-4) pretreated with or without IL-4. Effects on T cell priming were analyzed via CFSE-dilution and flow cytometric assessment of activation status. Pulmonary epithelial cells suppressed T cell proliferation in vitro but this effect was attenuated by pre-treatment of the epithelial cells with IL-4. Transwell experiments suggest that epithelial-mediated suppression of T cell activation is mostly cell-contact dependent and leads to attenuation in an early naive T cell phenotype. Secretion of soluble factors like TARC, TSLP, GM-CSF and CCL20 by epithelial cells did not change after IL-4 treatment. However, analysis of co-stimulatory expression on pulmonary epithelial cells revealed that pre-treatment of epithelial cells with IL-4 changed expression GITR-L, suggesting a possible mechanism for the effects observed. Our studies provide new insight into the role of IL-4 during the early phases of pulmonary sensitization: The inhibitory activity of pulmonary epithelial cells in homeostasis is reversed in the presence of IL-4, which is secreted in the context of Th2-dominated allergic airway inflammation. This mechanism might serve to explain facilitated sensitization in the clinical context of polysensitization where due to a pre-existing sensitization increased levels of IL-4 in the airways might facilitate T cell priming towards new

  5. Ultrastructural analysis of primary human urethral epithelial cell cultures infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H A; Ketterer, M R; Preston, A; Lubaroff, D; Williams, R; Apicella, M A

    1997-06-01

    In men with gonococcal urethritis, the urethral epithelial cell is a site of infection. To study the pathogenesis of gonorrhea in this cell type, we have developed a method to culture primary human urethral epithelial cells obtained at the time of urologic surgery. Fluorescent analysis demonstrated that 100% of the cells stained for keratin. Microscopic analyses indicated that these epithelial cells arrayed in a pattern similar to that seen in urethral epithelium. Using immunoelectron and confocal microscopy, we compared the infection process seen in primary cells with events occurring during natural infection of the same cell type in men with gonococcal urethritis. Immunoelectron microscopy studies of cells infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae 1291 Opa+ P+ showed adherence of organisms to the epithelial cell membrane, pedestal formation with evidence of intimate association between the gonococcal and the epithelial cell membranes, and intracellular gonococci present in vacuoles. Confocal studies of primary urethral epithelial cells showed actin polymerization upon infection. Polyclonal antibodies to the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) demonstrated the presence of this receptor on infected cells in the primary urethral cell culture. In situ hybridization using a fluorescent-labeled probe specific to the ASGP-R mRNA demonstrated this message in uninfected and infected cells. These features were identical to those seen in urethral epithelial cells in exudates from males with gonorrhea. Infection of primary urethral cells in culture mimics events seen in natural infection and will allow detailed molecular analysis of gonococcal pathogenesis in a human epithelial cell which is commonly infected. PMID:9169783

  6. Toxic mechanisms of copper oxide nanoparticles in epithelial kidney cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thit, Amalie; Selck, Henriette; Bjerregaard, Henning F.

    2015-01-01

    CuO NPs have previously been reported as toxic to a range of cell cultures including kidney epithelial cells from the frog, Xenopus laevis (A6). Here we examine the molecular mechanisms affecting toxicity of Cu in different forms and particle sizes. A6 cells were exposed to ionic Cu (Cu2+) or CuO...... particles of three different sizes: CuO NPs of 6 nm (NP6), larger Poly-dispersed CuO NPs of <100 nm (Poly) and CuO Micro particles of <5 μm (Micro), at 200 μM, equal to 12.7 mg Cu/L. Poly was significantly more toxic than NP6, Micro and Cu2+ to A6 cells, causing DNA damage, decreased cell viability and...

  7. Reconstitution of mammary epithelial morphogenesis by murine embryonic stem cells undergoing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxian Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammary stem cells are maintained within specific microenvironments and recruited throughout lifetime to reconstitute de novo the mammary gland. Mammary stem cells have been isolated through the identification of specific cell surface markers and in vivo transplantation into cleared mammary fat pads. Accumulating evidence showed that during the reformation of mammary stem cell niches by dispersed epithelial cells in the context of the intact epithelium-free mammary stroma, non-mammary epithelial cells may be sequestered and reprogrammed to perform mammary epithelial cell functions and to adopt mammary epithelial characteristics during reconstruction of mammary epithelium in regenerating mammary tissue in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine whether other types of progenitor cells are able to contribute to mammary branching morphogenesis, we examined the potential of murine embryonic stem (mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to support mammary reconstitution in vivo. We observed that cells from day 14 embryoid bodies (EBs under hematopoietic differentiation condition, but not supernatants derived from these cells, when transplanted into denuded mammary fat pads, were able to contribute to both the luminal and myoepithelial lineages in branching ductal structures resembling the ductal-alveolar architecture of the mammary tree. No teratomas were observed when these cells were transplanted in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide evidence for the dominance of the tissue-specific mammary stem cell niche and its role in directing mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to reprogram into mammary epithelial cells and to promote mammary epithelial morphogenesis. These studies should also provide insights into regeneration of damaged mammary gland and the role of the mammary microenvironment in reprogramming cell fate.

  8. Multiple superficial basal cell carcinoma of the skin that appeared macroscopically healthy after radiotherapy. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handa, Yoshihiro; Takakuwa, Sachiko; Yamada, Motohito; Ono, Hiroki; Tomita, Yasushi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-01-01

    The patient was a 76-year-old woman with multiple superficial basal cell carcinomas. She had undergone radiotherapy for a 1-year period after hysterectomy for uterine carcinoma 38 years previously, and the basal cell carcinomas coincided with the irradiated parts. No clear symptoms of chronic radioepithelitis could be found macroscopically, but the lesions were thought to represent radiation-induced carcinoma based on the histopathological findings (atrophy of the epidermis, hyalinization and sclerosis of dermal connective tissue, inflammatory cell infiltration, and capillary dilatation). The lesion was removed to the depth of the adipose tissue with a 5 mm margin around the tumor, and primary closure was achieved. No recurrences or new carcinomas have been detected during the 16 months since the operation. (K.H.)

  9. Aldose reductase inhibition prevents metaplasia of airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh C S Yadav

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Goblet cell metaplasia that causes mucus hypersecretion and obstruction in the airway lumen could be life threatening in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Inflammatory cytokines such as IL-13 mediate the transformation of airway ciliary epithelial cells to mucin-secreting goblet cells in acute as well as chronic airway inflammatory diseases. However, no effective and specific pharmacologic treatment is currently available. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which aldose reductase (AR regulates the mucus cell metaplasia in vitro and in vivo. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Metaplasia in primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC was induced by a Th2 cytokine, IL-13, without or with AR inhibitor, fidarestat. After 48 h of incubation with IL-13 a large number of SAEC were transformed into goblet cells as determined by periodic acid-schiff (PAS-staining and immunohistochemistry using antibodies against Mucin5AC. Further, IL-13 significantly increased the expression of Mucin5AC at mRNA and protein levels. These changes were significantly prevented by treatment of the SAEC with AR inhibitor. AR inhibition also decreased IL-13-induced expression of Muc5AC, Muc5B, and SPDEF, and phosphorylation of JAK-1, ERK1/2 and STAT-6. In a mouse model of ragweed pollen extract (RWE-induced allergic asthma treatment with fidarestat prevented the expression of IL-13, phosphorylation of STAT-6 and transformation of epithelial cells to goblet cells in the lung. Additionally, while the AR-null mice were resistant, wild-type mice showed goblet cell metaplasia after challenge with RWE. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that exposure of SAEC to IL-13 caused goblet cell metaplasia, which was significantly prevented by AR inhibition. Administration of fidarestat to mice prevented RWE-induced goblet cell metaplasia and AR null mice were largely resistant to allergen induced changes in the lung. Thus our results indicate that AR inhibitors

  10. Isolating Epithelial and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Populations from Primary Tumors by Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Nicole M; Rhim, Andrew D; Stanger, Ben Z

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice that express conditional reporters allow for the isolation of specific cell lineages. These cells can be further stratified by gene expression and collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) for further analysis. Using Cre-recombinase (Cre) technology we have generated a transgenic mouse line termed PKCY in which all pancreatic epithelial cells and therefore all pancreatic cancer cells are constitutively labeled with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). We have used immunofluorescent staining for E-cadherin to divide the YFP(+) tumor population into epithelial cells (E-cadherin positive) and cells that have undergone an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT; E-cadherin negative). This protocol describes how to prepare a tumor sample for FACS, with an emphasis on separating epithelial and EMT populations. These cells can then be used for a number of applications including, but not limited to, the generation of cell lines, gene-expression analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) or RNA sequencing, DNA sequencing, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and western blots. PMID:26729901

  11. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  12. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Charles, E-mail: Charles_Lin@health.qld.gov.au [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Tripcony, Lee; Keller, Jacqui [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Poulsen, Michael [Mater Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Martin, Jarad [St. Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Jackson, James; Dickie, Graeme [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  13. Preferential Secretion of Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) by Terminally Differentiated Esophageal Epithelial Cells: Relevance to Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M; Shen, Dawen; Lee, Anna J; Benitez, Alain; Dods, Kara; Gambanga, Fiona; Wilkins, Benjamin J; Merves, Jamie; Noah, Yuliana; Toltzis, Sarit; Yearley, Jennifer H; Spergel, Jonathan M; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Malefyt, Rene deWaal; Muir, Amanda B; Wang, Mei-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic Th2 and food antigen-mediated disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilic infiltration. Thymic stromal lymphopoetin (TSLP), an epithelial derived cytokine which bridges innate and Th2-type adaptive immune responses in other allergic conditions, is overexpressed in esophageal biopsies of EoE subjects. However, the triggers of TSLP expression in the esophageal epithelium are unknown. The objective of the current study was to characterize TSLP expression in human esophageal epithelium in EoE in vivo and to determine the role of food antigens upon epithelial TSLP expression in vitro. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we localized TSLP in esophageal biopsies of active EoE (≥15 eos/hpf), inactive EoE (<15 eos/hpf) and non-EoE control subjects, and found that TSLP expression was restricted to the differentiated suprabasal layer of the epithelium in actively inflamed EoE biopsies. Consistent with these results in vivo, inducible TSLP protein secretion was higher in CaCl2 differentiated telomerase-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells (EPC2-hTERT) compared to undifferentiated cells of the basal phenotype, following stimulation with the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C). To determine whether food antigens could directly induce epithelial TSLP secretion, differentiated and undifferentiated primary esophageal epithelial cells from EoE and non-EoE subjects were challenged with food antigens clinically relevant to EoE: Chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA), wheat, and milk proteins beta-lactoglobulin (blg) and beta-casein. Food antigens failed to induce TSLP secretion by undifferentiated cells; in contrast, only OVA induced TSLP secretion in differentiated epithelial cells from both EoE and control cell lines, an effect abolished by budesonide and NF-κb inhibition. Together, our study shows that specific food antigens can trigger innate immune mediated esophageal TSLP secretion, suggesting that esophageal epithelial cells at the barrier surface

  14. Preferential Secretion of Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP by Terminally Differentiated Esophageal Epithelial Cells: Relevance to Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna M Chandramouleeswaran

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE is a chronic Th2 and food antigen-mediated disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilic infiltration. Thymic stromal lymphopoetin (TSLP, an epithelial derived cytokine which bridges innate and Th2-type adaptive immune responses in other allergic conditions, is overexpressed in esophageal biopsies of EoE subjects. However, the triggers of TSLP expression in the esophageal epithelium are unknown. The objective of the current study was to characterize TSLP expression in human esophageal epithelium in EoE in vivo and to determine the role of food antigens upon epithelial TSLP expression in vitro. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC, we localized TSLP in esophageal biopsies of active EoE (≥15 eos/hpf, inactive EoE (<15 eos/hpf and non-EoE control subjects, and found that TSLP expression was restricted to the differentiated suprabasal layer of the epithelium in actively inflamed EoE biopsies. Consistent with these results in vivo, inducible TSLP protein secretion was higher in CaCl2 differentiated telomerase-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells (EPC2-hTERT compared to undifferentiated cells of the basal phenotype, following stimulation with the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C. To determine whether food antigens could directly induce epithelial TSLP secretion, differentiated and undifferentiated primary esophageal epithelial cells from EoE and non-EoE subjects were challenged with food antigens clinically relevant to EoE: Chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA, wheat, and milk proteins beta-lactoglobulin (blg and beta-casein. Food antigens failed to induce TSLP secretion by undifferentiated cells; in contrast, only OVA induced TSLP secretion in differentiated epithelial cells from both EoE and control cell lines, an effect abolished by budesonide and NF-κb inhibition. Together, our study shows that specific food antigens can trigger innate immune mediated esophageal TSLP secretion, suggesting that esophageal epithelial cells at the

  15. Characterization of an epithelial cell line from bovine mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Tania; Barash, Itamar

    2002-05-01

    Elucidation of the bovine mammary gland's unique characteristics depends on obtaining an authentic cell line that will reproduce its function in vitro. Representative clones from bovine mammary cell populations, differing in their attachment capabilities, were cultured. L-1 cells showed strong attachment to the plate, whereas H-7 cells detached easily. Cultures established from these clones were nontumorigenic upon transplantation to an immunodeficient host; they exhibited the epithelial cell characteristics of positive cytokeratin but not smooth muscle actin staining. Both cell lines depended on fetal calf serum for proliferation. They exhibited distinct levels of differentiation on Matrigel in serum-free, insulin-supplemented medium on the basis of their organization and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) secretion. H-7 cells organized into mammospheres, whereas L-1 cells arrested in a duct-like morphology. In both cell lines, prolactin activated phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription, Stat5-a regulator of milk protein gene transcription, and of PHAS-I-an inhibitor of translation initiation in its nonphosphorylated form. De novo synthesis and secretion of BLG were detected in differentiated cultures: in L-1 cells, BLG was dependent on lactogenic hormones for maximal induction but was less stringently controlled than was beta-casein in the mouse CID-9 cell line. L-1 cells also encompassed a near-diploid chromosomal karyotype and may serve as a tool for studying functional characteristics of the bovine mammary gland. PMID:12418925

  16. Nerve Growth Factor Modulate Proliferation of Cultured Rabbit Corneal Endothelial Cells and Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells, the in vitro cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells were treated with different concentrations of NGF.MTT assay was used to examine the clonal growth and proliferation of the cells by determining the absorbency values at 570nm. The results showed that NGF with three concentrations ranging from 5 U/mL to 500 U/mL enhanced the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner.50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF got more increase of proliferation than that of 5 U/mL NGF did.Meanwhile, 50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF could promote the proliferation of the rabbit corneal epithelial cells significantly in a concentration-dependent manner. However, 5 U/mL NGF did not enhance the proliferation of epithelial cells. It was suggested that exogenous NGF can stimulate the proliferation of both rabbit corneal endothelial and epithelial cells, but the extent of modulation is different.

  17. Epigenetic dysregulation of interleukin 8 (CXCL8) hypersecretion in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Anna; Patel, Jamie K; Clifford, Rachel L; Knox, Alan J

    2016-08-01

    Airway epithelial cells in cystic fibrosis (CF) overexpress Interleukin 8 (CXCL8) through poorly defined mechanisms. CXCL8 transcription is dependent on coordinated binding of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)β, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and activator protein (AP)-1 to the promoter. Here we show abnormal epigenetic regulation is responsible for CXCL8 overexpression in CF cells. Under basal conditions CF cells had increased bromodomain (Brd)3 and Brd4 recruitment and enhanced NF-κB and C/EBPβ binding to the CXCL8 promoter compared to non-CF cells due to trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and DNA hypomethylation at CpG6. IL-1β increased NF-κB, C/EBPβ and Brd4 binding. Furthermore, inhibitors of bromodomain and extra-terminal domain family (BET) proteins reduced CXCL8 production in CF cells suggesting a therapeutic target for the BET pathway. PMID:27240956

  18. Novel strategies to enforce an epithelial phenotype in mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, Ana-Maria; Swiss, Rachel; Gao, Beile; Agaisse, Hervé

    2014-07-15

    E-cadherin downregulation in cancer cells is associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastatic prowess, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely characterized. In this study, we probed E-cadherin expression at the plasma membrane as a functional assay to identify genes involved in E-cadherin downregulation. The assay was based on the E-cadherin-dependent invasion properties of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. On the basis of a functional readout, automated microscopy and computer-assisted image analysis were used to screen siRNAs targeting 7,000 human genes. The validity of the screen was supported by its definition of several known regulators of E-cadherin expression, including ZEB1, HDAC1, and MMP14. We identified three new regulators (FLASH, CASP7, and PCGF1), the silencing of which was sufficient to restore high levels of E-cadherin transcription. In addition, we identified two new regulators (FBXL5 and CAV2), the silencing of which was sufficient to increase E-cadherin expression at a posttranscriptional level. FLASH silencing regulated the expression of E-cadherin and other ZEB1-dependent genes, through posttranscriptional regulation of ZEB1, but it also regulated the expression of numerous ZEB1-independent genes with functions predicted to contribute to a restoration of the epithelial phenotype. Finally, we also report the identification of siRNA duplexes that potently restored the epithelial phenotype by mimicking the activity of known and putative microRNAs. Our findings suggest new ways to enforce epithelial phenotypes as a general strategy to treat cancer by blocking invasive and metastatic phenotypes associated with EMT. PMID:24845104

  19. What will happen when human lens epithelial cells are irradiated?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the suffering of crystalline lens from radiation cataract has been classified as a non-stochastic effect, the potential of being stochastic effect has also been reported. This study examined the radiation response of crystalline lens epithelial cells, which have proliferative capability solely among crystalline lens and are considered susceptible to the effect of radiation. In an experiment, primary human lens epithelial cells (HLEC1) were irradiated with X-rays using a colony formation method, which is an evaluation method for lethal sensitivity against radiation. It was found that HLEC1 was not significantly different in survival rate from primary human lung fibroblasts (WI-38) as a control, showing the same degree of radiation sensitivity. As for the area of colonies obtained by the experiment based on the colony formation method, it significantly reduced in WI-38, while it reversely increased significantly in HLEC1. This result in combination with other analyses clarified that when HLEC1 is irradiated, a portion of the cells are inactivated, while other cells were promoted in proliferation. The mechanism elucidation of radiation response that seems to be binary is meaningful considering the radiation protection and radiotherapy. The experiment based on the colony formation method of HLEC1 is useful as an experimental system capable of evaluating the proliferation stimulation and deactivation after irradiation under culture system. (A.O.)

  20. Generation of airway epithelial cells with native characteristics from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshie, Susumu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Ikeda, Masakazu; Nomoto, Yukio; Wada, Ikuo; Omori, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    Airway epithelial cells derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are expected to be a useful source for the regeneration of airway epithelium. Our preliminary study of embryoid body (EB) formation and the air-liquid interface (ALI) method suggested that mouse iPS cells can differentiate into airway epithelial cells. However, whether the cells generated from mouse iPS cells had the character and phenotype of native airway epithelial cells remained uninvestigated. In this study, we generated airway epithelial cells from EBs by culturing them under serum-free conditions supplemented with Activin and bFGF and by the ALI method and characterized the iPS cell-derived airway epithelial cells in terms of their gene expression, immunoreactivity, morphology, and function. Analysis by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) revealed that the expression of the undifferentiated cell marker Nanog decreased time-dependently after the induction of differentiation, whereas definitive endoderm markers Foxa2 and Cxcr4 were transiently up-regulated. Thereafter, the expression of airway epithelium markers such as Tubb4a, Muc5ac, and Krt5 was detected by RT-PCR and immunostaining. The formation of tight junctions was also confirmed by immunostaining and permeability assay. Analysis by hematoxylin and eosin staining and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the cells generated from mouse iPS cells formed airway-epithelium-like tissue and had cilia, the movement of which was visualized and observed to be synchronized. These results demonstrate that the airway epithelial cells generated by our method have native characteristics and open new perspectives for the regeneration of injured airway epithelium. PMID:26590823

  1. Effects of different Helicobacter pylori culture filtrates on growth of gastric epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Guo Yan; Gang Zhao; Jin-Ping Ma; Shi-Rong Cai; Wen-Hua Zhan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of different Helicobacter pylori (H py/orl) culture filtrates on growth of gastric epithelial cells.METHODS: Broth culture filtrates of H pylori were prepared. Gastric epithelial cells were treated with the filtrates, and cell growth was determined by growth curve and flow cytometry. DNA damage of gastric epithelial cells was measured by single-cell microgel electrophoresis.RESULTS: Gastric epithelial cells proliferated actively when treated by CagA-gene-positive broth culture filtrates, and colony formation reached 40%. The number of cells in S phase increased compared to controls. Comet assay showed 41.2% comet cells in GES-1 cells treated with CagA-positive filtrates (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: CagA-positive filtrates enhance the changes in morphology and growth characteristics of human gastric epithelial tumor cells. DNA damage maybe one of the mechanisms involved in the growth changes.

  2. Gene 33/Mig6 inhibits hexavalent chromium-induced DNA damage and cell transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyoung; Li, Cen; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Xu, Dazhong

    2016-01-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human lung carcinogens and environmental/occupational hazards. The molecular mechanisms of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis appear to be complex and are poorly defined. In this study, we investigated the potential role of Gene 33 (ERRFI1, Mig6), a multifunctional adaptor protein, in Cr(VI)-mediated lung carcinogenesis. We show that the level of Gene 33 protein is suppressed by both acute and chronic Cr(VI) treatments in a dose- and time-dependent fashion in BEAS-2B lung epithelial cells. The inhibition also occurs in A549 lung bronchial carcinoma cells. Cr(VI) suppresses Gene 33 expression mainly through post-transcriptional mechanisms, although the mRNA level of gene 33 also tends to be lower upon Cr(VI) treatments. Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage appears primarily in the S phases of the cell cycle despite the high basal DNA damage signals at the G2M phase. Knockdown of Gene 33 with siRNA significantly elevates Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage in both BEAS-2B and A549 cells. Depletion of Gene 33 also promotes Cr(VI)-induced micronucleus (MN) formation and cell transformation in BEAS-2B cells. Our results reveal a novel function of Gene 33 in Cr(VI)-induced DNA damage and lung epithelial cell transformation. We propose that in addition to its role in the canonical EGFR signaling pathway and other signaling pathways, Gene 33 may also inhibit Cr(VI)-induced lung carcinogenesis by reducing DNA damage triggered by Cr(VI). PMID:26760771

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation modulates store-operated calcium entry in cultured rat epididymal basal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wu-Lin; Du, Jian-Yang; Huang, Jie-Hong; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Geng; Chen, Si-Liang; Ruan, Ye-Chun; Cheng, Christopher H K; Zhou, Wen-Liang

    2011-04-01

    Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) is essential for many cellular processes. In this study, we investigated modulation of SOCE by tyrosine phosphorylation in rat epididymal basal cells. The intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) measurement showed that SOCE occurred in rat epididymal basal cells by pretreating the cells with thapsigargin (Tg), the inhibitor of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase. To identify the role of Ca(2+) channels in this response, we examined the effects of transient receptor potential canonical channel blockers 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), 1-[β-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)pro-poxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl]-1H-imidazole hydrochloride(SKF96365), Gd(3+), and non-selective cation channel blocker Ni(2+) respectively on SOCE and found that these blockers could inhibit the Ca(2+) influx to different extent. Furthermore, we studied the regulation of SOCE by tyrosine kinase pathway. The inhibitor of tyrosine kinase genistein remarkably suppressed the SOCE response, whereas sodium orthovanadate, the inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatase, greatly enhanced it. The results suggest that tyrosine kinase pathway plays a significant role in the initiation of SOCE and positively modulates SOCE in epididymal basal cells. PMID:20857412

  4. In vitro culture and characterization of a mammary epithelial cell line from Chinese Holstein dairy cow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to establish a culture system and elucidate the unique characteristics of a bovine mammary epithelial cell line in vitro. METHODOLOGY: Mammary tissue from a three year old lactating dairy cow (ca. 100 d relative to parturition was used as a source of the epithelial cell line, which was cultured in collagen-coated tissue culture dishes. Fibroblasts and epithelial cells successively grew and extended from the culturing mammary tissue at the third day. Pure epithelial cells were obtained by passages culture. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The strong positive immunostaining to cytokeratin 18 suggested that the resulting cell line exhibited the specific character of epithelial cells. Epithelial cells cultured in the presence of 10% FBS, supraphysiologic concentrations of insulin, and hydrocortisone maintained a normal diploid chromosome modal number of 2n=60. Furthermore, they were capable of synthesizing beta-casein (CSN2, acetyl-CoA carboxylase-alpha (ACACA and butyrophilin (BTN1A1. An important finding was that frozen preservation in a mixture of 90% FBS and 10% DMSO did not influence the growth characteristics, chromosome number, or protein secretion of the isolated epithelial cell line. CONCLUSIONS: The obtained mammary epithelial cell line had normal morphology, growth characteristics, cytogenetic and secretory characteristics, thus, it might represent an useful tool for studying the function of Chinese Holstein dairy cows mammary epithelial cell (CMECs.

  5. Phototoxicity and cytotoxicity of fullerol in human lens epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water-soluble, hydroxylated fullerene [fullerol, nano-C60(OH)22-26] has several clinical applications including use as a drug carrier to bypass the blood ocular barriers. We have assessed fullerol's potential ocular toxicity by measuring its cytotoxicity and phototoxicity induced by UVA and visible light in vitro with human lens epithelial cells (HLE B-3). Accumulation of nano-C60(OH)22-26 in the cells was confirmed spectrophotometrically at 405 nm and cell viability estimated using MTS and LDH assays. Fullerol was cytotoxic to HLE B-3 cells maintained in the dark at concentrations higher than 20 μM. Exposure to either UVA or visible light in the presence of > 5 μM fullerol-induced phototoxic damage. When cells were pretreated with non-toxic antioxidants: 20 μM lutein, 1 mM N-acetyl cysteine, or 1 mM L-ascorbic acid prior to irradiation, only the singlet oxygen quencher-lutein significantly protected against fullerol photodamage. Apoptosis was observed in lens cells treated with fullerol whether or not the cells were irradiated, in the order UVA > visible light > dark. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that in the presence of the endogenous lens protein α-crystallin, large aggregates of fullerol were reduced. In conclusion, fullerol is both cytotoxic and phototoxic to human lens epithelial cells. Although the acute toxicity of water-soluble nano-C60(OH)22-26 is low, these compounds are retained in the body for long periods, raising concern for their chronic toxic effect. Before fullerols are used to deliver drugs to the eye, they should be tested for photo- and cytotoxicity in vivo

  6. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Bilirubin-Induced Lung Alveolar Epithelial Cell Death In Vitro and In Vivo*

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Jian; Zhao, Hailin; Yi, Bin; Zeng, Jing; Lu, Kaizhi; Ma, Daqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate bilirubin-induced lung alveolar epithelial cell injury together with the protection afforded by dexmedetomidine. Design: Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting: Research laboratory. Subjects: Sprague Dawley rats. Interventions: Alveolar epithelial A549 cell lines were cultured and received bilirubin (from 0 to 160 μM) to explore the protective pathway of dexmedetomidine on bilirubin-induced alveolar epithelial cell injury assessed by immunochemistry and f...

  7. Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma: A 12-Year Follow-up Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Hernández, Fabiola; Caballero-Centeno, Ana M; Barrera-Pérez, María; Ramos-Garibay, José A

    2016-01-01

    Giant basal cell carcinomas (GBCCs) are a strange and aggressive variety of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs); they are characterized by deep tissue invasion, rapid growth, high risk of metastasis, and a poor prognosis. GBCCs represent 0.4%-1% of all BCCs. The pathogenesis of GBCC is sometimes linked to a spontaneous mutation in the PTCH gene, mapped to the q22.33 locus of chromosome 9. The key factor in the development of GBCC, in at least 30% of the cases, is the delay in seeking medical attention (7.5 ± 3.1 years). This is associated to a poor socioeconomic level, deficient hygiene, mental illness, advanced age, and the fact that BCCs are painless lesions. The authors present a Mexican female with a 2-year ulcer diagnosed as a GBCC in the year 2000, its initial therapeutic approach, and her follow-up during the next 12 years. PMID:26332533

  8. Low-energy X-ray treatment of basal-cell carcinomas on and around eyelids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results and experience gained with soft-radiation therapy of eyelid basal-cell carcinomas at the Dermatological University Clinic of Munich are presented in this thesis which supplies statistical data specific of patients and basilomas, discusses the irradiation technique used and compares it with those applied in other medical centres. Next it submits the curative results of eyelid basiloma irradiation comparing these with those obtained in other clinics. A separate chapter is dedicated to relapses showing i.a. possible recidivation causes followed by a presentation of each relapse case. The thesis concludes with a comparison of X-ray therapy and its results in the treatment of eyelid basal-cell carcinomas with other therapeutical methods and their results. (orig./MG)

  9. Dynamic focus optical coherence tomography: feasibility for improved basal cell carcinoma investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri-Avanaki, M. R.; Aber, Ahmed; Hojjatoleslami, S. A.; Sira, Mano; Schofield, John B.; Jones, Carole; Podoleanu, A. Gh.

    2012-03-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer. To improve the diagnostic accuracy, additional non-invasive methods of making a preliminary diagnosis have been sought. We have implemented an En-Face optical coherence tomography (OCT) for this study in which the dynamic focus was integrated into it. With the dynamic focus scheme, the coherence gate moves synchronously with the peak of confocal gate determined by the confocal interface optics. The transversal resolution is then conserved throughout the depth range and an enhanced signal is returned from all depths. The Basal Cell Carcinoma specimens were obtained from the eyelid a patient. The specimens under went analysis by DF-OCT imaging. We searched for remarkable features that were visualized by OCT and compared these findings with features presented in the histology slices.

  10. Characterization of rabbit limbal epithelial side population cells using RNA sequencing and single-cell qRT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameishi, Sumako; Umemoto, Terumasa; Matsuzaki, Yu; Fujita, Masako; Okano, Teruo; Kato, Takashi; Yamato, Masayuki

    2016-05-01

    Corneal epithelial stem cells reside in the limbus, a transitional zone between the cornea and conjunctiva, and are essential for maintaining homeostasis in the corneal epithelium. Although our previous studies demonstrated that rabbit limbal epithelial side population (SP) cells exhibit stem cell-like phenotypes with Hoechst 33342 staining, the different characteristics and/or populations of these cells remain unclear. Therefore, in this study, we determined the gene expression profiles of limbal epithelial SP cells by RNA sequencing using not only present public databases but also contigs that were created by de novo transcriptome assembly as references for mapping. Our transcriptome data indicated that limbal epithelial SP cells exhibited a stem cell-like phenotype compared with non-SP cells. Importantly, gene ontology analysis following RNA sequencing demonstrated that limbal epithelial SP cells exhibited significantly enhanced expression of mesenchymal/endothelial cell markers rather than epithelial cell markers. Furthermore, single-cell quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that the limbal epithelial SP population consisted of at least two immature cell populations with endothelial- or mesenchymal-like phenotypes. Therefore, our present results may propose the presence of a novel population of corneal epithelial stem cells distinct from conventional epithelial stem cells. PMID:26546824

  11. 45Ca uptake by retinal pigment epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uptake of 45Ca was studied in isolated frog retinal pigment epithelial cells. 45Ca accumulation was found to be a saturable, temperature-dependent event. Kinetic analysis of this accumulation revealed two transport systems with apparent km of 2.0 and 0.3 mM. We found the presence of a Na-Ca exchanger mechanism that releases Ca2 under depolarized conditions. Light induced an increase of 45Ca uptake due to activation of the Na-K-ATPase and consequent decrease of extracellular potassium concentration

  12. AGE-RAGE interaction in the TGFβ2-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition of human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Cibin T; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2016-08-01

    Basement membrane (BM) proteins accumulate chemical modifications with age. One such modification is glycation, which results in the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). In a previous study, we reported that AGEs in the human lens capsule (BM) promote the TGFβ2-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells, which we proposed as a mechanism for posterior capsule opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract formation. In this study, we investigated the role of a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT in a human lens epithelial cell line (FHL124). RAGE was present in FHL124 cells, and its levels were unaltered in cells cultured on either native or AGE-modified BM or upon treatment with TGFβ2. RAGE overexpression significantly enhanced the TGFβ2-mediated EMT responses in cells cultured on AGE-modified BM compared with the unmodified matrix. In contrast, treatment of cells with a RAGE antibody or EN-RAGE (an endogenous ligand for RAGE) resulted in a significant reduction in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT response. This was accompanied by a reduction in TGFβ2-mediated Smad signaling and ROS generation. These results imply that the interaction of matrix AGEs with RAGE plays a role in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT of lens epithelial cells and suggest that the blockade of RAGE could be a strategy to prevent PCO and other age-associated fibrosis. PMID:27263094

  13. Cellular and Nuclear Alignment Analysis for Determining Epithelial Cell Chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Michael J; Ray, Poulomi; Kaur, Gurleen; Singh, Ajay V; Wan, Leo Q

    2016-05-01

    Left-right (LR) asymmetry is a biologically conserved property in living organisms that can be observed in the asymmetrical arrangement of organs and tissues and in tissue morphogenesis, such as the directional looping of the gastrointestinal tract and heart. The expression of LR asymmetry in embryonic tissues can be appreciated in biased cell alignment. Previously an in vitro chirality assay was reported by patterning multiple cells on microscale defined geometries and quantified the cell phenotype-dependent LR asymmetry, or cell chirality. However, morphology and chirality of individual cells on micropatterned surfaces has not been well characterized. Here, a Python-based algorithm was developed to identify and quantify immunofluorescence stained individual epithelial cells on multicellular patterns. This approach not only produces results similar to the image intensity gradient-based method reported previously, but also can capture properties of single cells such as area and aspect ratio. We also found that cell nuclei exhibited biased alignment. Around 35% cells were misaligned and were typically smaller and less elongated. This new imaging analysis approach is an effective tool for measuring single cell chirality inside multicellular structures and can potentially help unveil biophysical mechanisms underlying cellular chiral bias both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26294010

  14. A child with xeroderma pigmentosum for excision of basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mulimani, Sridevi M; Talikoti, Dayanand G

    2013-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by hypersensitivity to sunlight, ocular involvement, and progressive neurological complications. These manifestations are due to a cellular hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation leading to a defect in repair of DNA by the process of nucleotide excision repair. Basal cell carcinoma which is rare in children can occur with XP. Though the XP induced changes are predominately dermatologic, pose several challenges in anaesthetic management. Hence, we...

  15. Metastatic Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma Deposit Arising Within a Cutaneous Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Elinor; Jones, Simon D; Griffiths, Paul; Baxter, Prue

    2011-01-01

    Skin metastases are rare complications of internal malignancies, and most commonly arise from primary lung carcinoma (Brownstein and Helwig in Arch Dermatol 105:82–68, 1972). Metastatic cutaneous lesions have not previously been documented to arise within other skin tumours. We report our experience of a solitary pulmonary adenocarcinoma metastasis that arose within a pre-existing basal cell carcinoma in a patient with undiagnosed lung cancer. Immunohistochemistry was invaluable in confirming...

  16. Increase of bcl-2 Protein Expression in Aggressive Basal Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Cláudia CAZAL; ELY Mariana Roesch; Ana Paula Veras SOBRAL; Wilton Wilney Nascimento PADILHA

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to verify the bcl-2 protein expression in 22 cutaneous basal cell carcinomas (BCC) of the head and neck, and to compare it with its aggressive behavior. Method: Tumors were histologically classified in non-aggressive (BCC 1) and aggressive (BCC 2) and then submitted to the immunohistochemistry technique with the streptavidin-biotin peroxidase method using the anti-bcl-2 antibody. Results: After proceeding to morphological analysis, sixteen tumors (72.7%) w...

  17. In Vivo Reflectance Confocal Microscopy of Basal Cell Carcinoma: Feasibility of Preoperative Mapping of Cancer Margins

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Zhan-Yan; Lin, Jing-Ran; Cheng, Ting-Ting; Wu, Jia-Qiang; Wu, Wen-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) images skin at cellular resolution and has shown utility for the diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer in vivo. It has the potential to define lesion margins before surgical therapy. Objectives To investigate the feasibility of RCM in defining the margins of basal cell carcinoma before surgery. Methods The margins of 10 lesions were evaluated using RCM. Biopsies of the margins were used to confirm the results. A protocol was constructed to define margins. ...

  18. Basal cell carcinoma superimposed on a cutaneous leishmaniasis lesion in an immunocompromised patient

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Asilian; Iman Momeni; Parastou Khosravani

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a protozoan infection due to organisms of the genus Leishmania. The differential diagnosis of cutane-ous leishmaniasis includes arthropod bites, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and other malignancies. BCC is the most com-mon form of skin cancer. We present a case of cutaneous leishmaniasis resistant to standard intralesional glucantime injection in an immunocompromised patient, which was proved to be BCC after surgical excision.

  19. Impact of some constitutional characteristics on the development of basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ražnatović Milena; Maksimović Nataša; Janković Janko; Musić Davor

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer in the white population. Increasing incidence of BCC imposes the requirement to identify the risk factors due to eventual preventive action. The aim of this study was to assess the role of some constitutional characteristics in development of BCC among the Montenegrin population. Methods. A case-control study was conducted at the Dermatology Department of Clinical Center of Montenegro in Podgorica from 2002−2003...

  20. PTCH mutations in basal cell carcinomas from azathioprine-treated organ transplant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Harwood, C.A.; Attard, N R; O'Donovan, P.; Chambers, P; Perrett, C. M.; Proby, C M; McGregor, J. M.; Karran, P.

    2008-01-01

    The immunosuppressant azathioprine is used to prevent graft rejection after organ transplantation. To investigate whether azathioprine-associated mutagenesis contributes to the high incidence of skin tumours in organ transplant recipients (OTRs), we analysed PTCH gene mutations in 60 basal cell carcinomas (BCC); 39 from OTRs receiving azathioprine and 21 from individuals never exposed to azathioprine. PTCH was mutated in 55% of all tumours, independent of azathioprine treatment. In both the a...

  1. Significance of androgen receptor and CD10 expression in cutaneous basal cell carcinoma and trichoepithelioma

    OpenAIRE

    ASTARCI, HESNA M.; GURBUZ, GULFEM A.; Sengul, Demet; Hucumenoglu, Sema; Kocer, Ugur; USTUN, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of trichoepithelioma (TE) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) on the basis of clinical symptoms and laboratory investigations may be difficult in certain patients. The aim of the present study was to compare cluster of differentiation 10 (CD10) and androgen receptor (AR) expression patterns in BCC and TE, to investigate the predictive power of these proteins as markers of the two conditions. A total of 39 cases of BCC and 15 cases of TE were retrieved from the pathology depa...

  2. Basal cell adenoma in the parotid: a bizarre myoepithelial-derived stroma rich variant

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a specific entity that lacks the myxochondroid stromal component of a pleomorphic adenoma. There are six histopathological types of BCA: solid, tubular, trabecular, membranous, cribriform, and myoepithelial-derived stroma rich. Myoepithelial-derived stroma rich variant is so rare, especially with cellular atypia. Herin we describe a rare case of BCA arising in the parotid on a 25-year-old man. A well-demarcated nodule arising in the parotid that was composed of bas...

  3. GATA3 Inhibits Lysyl Oxidase Mediated Metastases of Human Basal Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Isabel M.; Michalowski, Aleksandra M.; Hoenerhoff, Mark; Kornelia M. Szauter; Luger, Dror; Sato, Misako; Flanders, Kathy; Oshima, Akira; Csiszar, Katalin; Green, Jeffrey E

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of mechanisms that impede the aggressive and metastatic phenotype of human basal triple-negative type breast cancers (BTNBC) could provide novel targets for therapy for this form of breast cancer that has a relatively poor prognosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of GATA3, the master transcriptional regulator of mammary luminal differentiation, can reduce the tumorigenicity and metastatic propensity of the human BTNBC MDA-MB-231 cell line (MB231), although t...

  4. DUSP10 regulates intestinal epithelial cell growth and colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, C W; Weerasooriya, M; Guo, J; James, S J; Poh, H M; Osato, M; Flavell, R A; Dong, C; Yang, H; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-14

    Dual specificity phosphatase 10 (DUSP10), also known as MAP kinase phosphatase 5 (MKP5), negatively regulates the activation of MAP kinases. Genetic polymorphisms and aberrant expression of this gene are associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in humans. However, the role of DUSP10 in intestinal epithelial tumorigenesis is not clear. Here, we showed that DUSP10 knockout (KO) mice had increased intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation and migration and developed less severe colitis than wild-type (WT) mice in response to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) treatment, which is associated with increased ERK1/2 activation and Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) expression in IEC. In line with increased IEC proliferation, DUSP10 KO mice developed more colon tumours with increased severity compared with WT mice in response to administration of DSS and azoxymethane (AOM). Furthermore, survival analysis of CRC patients demonstrated that high DUSP10 expression in tumours was associated with significant improvement in survival probability. Overexpression of DUSP10 in Caco-2 and RCM-1 cells inhibited cell proliferation. Our study showed that DUSP10 negatively regulates IEC growth and acts as a suppressor for CRC. Therefore, it could be targeted for the development of therapies for colitis and CRC. PMID:25772234

  5. Epithelial cell apoptosis causes acute lung injury masquerading as emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouded, Majd; Egea, Eduardo E; Brown, Matthew J; Hanlon, Shane M; Houghton, A McGarry; Tsai, Larry W; Ingenito, Edward P; Shapiro, Steven D

    2009-10-01

    Theories of emphysema traditionally revolved around proteolytic destruction of extracellular matrix. Models have recently been developed that show airspace enlargement with the induction of pulmonary cell apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which a model of epithelial cell apoptosis caused airspace enlargement. Mice were treated with either intratracheal microcystin (MC) to induce apoptosis, intratracheal porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE), or their respective vehicles. Mice from all groups were inflated and morphometry was measured at various time points. Physiology measurements were performed for airway resistance, tissue elastance, and lung volumes. The groups were further analyzed by air-saline quasistatic measurements, surfactant staining, and surfactant functional studies. Mice treated with MC showed evidence of reversible airspace enlargement. In contrast, PPE-treated mice showed irreversible airspace enlargement. The airspace enlargement in MC-treated mice was associated with an increase in elastic recoil due to an increase in alveolar surface tension. PPE-treated mice showed a loss of lung elastic recoil and normal alveolar surface tension, a pattern more consistent with human emphysema. Airspace enlargement that occurs with the MC model of pulmonary epithelial cell apoptosis displays physiology distinct from human emphysema. Reversibility, restrictive physiology due to changes in surface tension, and alveolar enlargement associated with heterogeneous alveolar collapse are most consistent with a mild acute lung injury. Inflation near total lung capacity gives the appearance of enlarged alveoli as neighboring collapsed alveoli exert tethering forces. PMID:19188661

  6. Lens Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Cell Density in Human Age-related Cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xialin Liu; Yizhi Liu; Jianliang Zheng; Qiang Huang; Huling Zheng

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss the potential effect of the lens epithelial cell proliferation in age-related cataract.Methods: In vitro cell proliferation was assayed by MTT method to evaluate the lens epithelial cell density, index, and proliferation capacity in normal lens and all kinds of age-related cataract. Capsulotomy specimens from all kinds of patients who underwent cataract phacoemulsification extraction surgery were compared with the lens epithelial specimens from non-cataract lenses of Eye Bank eyes.Results: Lens epithelial cell density of central anterior capsule (LECD) in female normal lens was higher than that in male, LECD in nuclear cataract( > NⅢ ) was higher than that in normal lens, but in the mature cortical cataract, LF CD was lower. Mitotic index of three kinds of age-related cataracts in vivo had no statistical difference, neither did cell proliferation capacity of cultivated cells in vitro.Conclusion: The individual difference of lens epithelial cell density and proliferation capacity in vivo may be an important underlying cause for senile cataract in the cellular level, especially for nuclear cataract.

  7. Basal cell epithelioma with lymphogenic and hematogenic formation of metastases (a. o. into the myocardium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with a basal cell epithelioma, partially adenoid and partially morphea-like in structure, which despite intensive X-ray treatment relapsed constantly and which finally developed into an ulcus terebrans. Approximately 13 years after the primary tumor had developed (located on the left wing of the nose) both a lymphogenic and a hematogenic formation of metastases occurred with a subsequent exitus letalis 4 months later. Besides the metastases of the skin, there were multiple metastases in the lymph nodes, vertebral column, ribs, spleen, liver, stomach, pleura, and peritoneum as well as in the myocard of both ventricles and in the perimysium of the skeletal muscles. Their histological structure was similar to a partly adenoid, partily morphea-like basal cell epithelioma. The possible influence of X-ray treatment on the tumor tissue in way of benignity or malignancy is discussed in view of relevant literature on this topic. The alteration of basal cell epitheliomas into the socalled transitional epitheliomas is also analyzed. (orig.)

  8. Early imaging findings in germ cell tumors arising from the basal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Mi [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In-One; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun-Hae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Woman' s University Mokdong Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); You, Sun Kyoung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chungnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is difficult to diagnosis early stage germ cell tumors originating in the basal ganglia, but early recognition is important for better outcome. To evaluate serial MR images of basal ganglia germ cell tumors, with emphasis on the features of early stage tumors. We retrospectively reviewed serial MR images of 15 tumors in 14 children and young adults. We categorized MR images of the tumors as follows: type I, ill-defined patchy lesions (<3 cm) without cyst; type II, small mass lesions (<3 cm) with cyst; and type III, large lesions (≥3 cm) with cyst. We also assessed temporal changes of the MR images. On the initial images, 8 of 11 (73%) type I tumors progressed to types II or III, and 3 of 4 (75%) type II tumors progressed to type III. The remaining 4 tumors did not change in type. All type II tumors (5/5, 100%) that changed from type I had a few tiny cysts. Intratumoral hemorrhage was observed even in the type I tumor. Ipsilateral hemiatrophy was observed in most of the tumors (13/15, 87%) on initial MR images. As tumors grew, cystic changes, intratumoral hemorrhage, and ipsilateral hemiatrophy became more apparent. Early stage basal ganglia germ cell tumors appear as ill-defined small patchy hyperintense lesions without cysts on T2-weighted images, are frequently associated with ipsilateral hemiatrophy, and sometimes show microhemorrhage. Tumors develop tiny cysts at a relatively early stage. (orig.)

  9. Early imaging findings in germ cell tumors arising from the basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is difficult to diagnosis early stage germ cell tumors originating in the basal ganglia, but early recognition is important for better outcome. To evaluate serial MR images of basal ganglia germ cell tumors, with emphasis on the features of early stage tumors. We retrospectively reviewed serial MR images of 15 tumors in 14 children and young adults. We categorized MR images of the tumors as follows: type I, ill-defined patchy lesions (<3 cm) without cyst; type II, small mass lesions (<3 cm) with cyst; and type III, large lesions (≥3 cm) with cyst. We also assessed temporal changes of the MR images. On the initial images, 8 of 11 (73%) type I tumors progressed to types II or III, and 3 of 4 (75%) type II tumors progressed to type III. The remaining 4 tumors did not change in type. All type II tumors (5/5, 100%) that changed from type I had a few tiny cysts. Intratumoral hemorrhage was observed even in the type I tumor. Ipsilateral hemiatrophy was observed in most of the tumors (13/15, 87%) on initial MR images. As tumors grew, cystic changes, intratumoral hemorrhage, and ipsilateral hemiatrophy became more apparent. Early stage basal ganglia germ cell tumors appear as ill-defined small patchy hyperintense lesions without cysts on T2-weighted images, are frequently associated with ipsilateral hemiatrophy, and sometimes show microhemorrhage. Tumors develop tiny cysts at a relatively early stage. (orig.)

  10. A case of multiple basal cell carcinomas developed about 50 years after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Chu; Minamimoto, Toshiyuki; Hamada, Yoshimi; Sasaki, Harue; Furuya, Kazuhiko [Hakodate Central General Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan); Funayama, Emi

    1998-10-01

    Malignant skin tumors are known to develop in areas of chronic radiodermatitis. We experienced a patient with multiple basal cell carcinomas that developed about 50 years after irradiation. The patient was a 77-year-old man who underwent radiotherapy in his twenties for caries in the left shoulder joint. The dose given was unknown. Black skin tumor appeared initially about 10 years before the first consultation. The skin around the tumor began to erode about six months before presentation. Biopsy of the tumor was done at another institution and revealed basal cell carcinoma (BCC), so the patients was referred to our department. In addition to the BCC measuring 35 x 20 mm in the left shoulder, BCC measuring 17 x 20 mm and 15 x 15 mm were found on the chest and the left axilla, respectively. The lesions were excised with a margin of 5 mm from the radiodermatitis, and the resultant skin defects were covered with latissimus dorsi flaps. All three tumors were basal cell carcinomas. The patients died of an unrelated disease six years after surgery and there was no recurrence of his tumors. (author)

  11. Cell surface marker profiling of human tracheal basal cells reveals distinct subpopulations, identifies MST1/MSP as a mitogenic signal, and identifies new biomarkers for lung squamous cell carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Van de Laar, Emily; Clifford, Monica; Hasenoeder, Stefan; Kim, Bo Ram; Wang, Dennis; Lee, Sharon; Paterson, Josh; Vu, Nancy M; Waddell, Thomas K; Keshavjee, Shaf; Tsao, Ming-sound; Ailles, Laurie; Moghal, Nadeem

    2014-01-01

    Background The large airways of the lungs (trachea and bronchi) are lined with a pseudostratified mucociliary epithelium, which is maintained by stem cells/progenitors within the basal cell compartment. Alterations in basal cell behavior can contribute to large airway diseases including squamous cell carcinomas (SQCCs). Basal cells have traditionally been thought of as a uniform population defined by basolateral position, cuboidal cell shape, and expression of pan-basal cell lineage markers l...

  12. Entry and release of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus are restricted to apical surfaces of polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Bekker, C P; Voorhout, W F; Strous, G J; van der Ende, A; Rottier, P J

    1994-01-01

    The transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) infects the epithelial cells of the intestinal tract of pigs, resulting in a high mortality rate in piglets. This study shows the interaction of TGEV with a porcine epithelial cell line. To determine the site of viral entry, LLC-PK1 cells were gro

  13. Interactions of virulent and avirulent leptospires with primary cultures of renal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballard, S A; Williamson, M; Adler, B;

    1986-01-01

    copenhageni did not adhere to epithelial cells at all within the experimental period of 24 h. The saprophytic Leptospira biflexa serovar patoc became attached non-specifically to inert glass surfaces as well as to the cells. The adhesion of leptospires to epithelial cells was not inhibited by homologous...

  14. A novel electrospun biphasic scaffold provides optimal three-dimensional topography for in vitro co-culture of airway epithelial and fibroblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional airway in vitro models focus upon the function of individual structural cells cultured in a two-dimensional monolayer, with limited three-dimensional (3D) models of the bronchial mucosa. Electrospinning offers an attractive method to produce defined, porous 3D matrices for cell culture. To investigate the effects of fibre diameter on airway epithelial and fibroblast cell growth and functionality, we manipulated the concentration and deposition rate of the non-degradable polymer polyethylene terephthalate to create fibres with diameters ranging from nanometre to micrometre. The nanofibre scaffold closely resembles the basement membrane of the bronchiole mucosal layer, and epithelial cells cultured at the air–liquid interface on this scaffold showed polarized differentiation. The microfibre scaffold mimics the porous sub-mucosal layer of the airway into which lung fibroblast cells showed good penetration. Using these defined electrospinning parameters we created a biphasic scaffold with 3D topography tailored for optimal growth of both cell types. Epithelial and fibroblast cells were co-cultured onto the apical nanofibre phase and the basal microfibre phase respectively, with enhanced epithelial barrier formation observed upon co-culture. This biphasic scaffold provides a novel 3D in vitro platform optimized to mimic the different microenvironments the cells encounter in vivo on which to investigate key airway structural cell interactions in airway diseases such as asthma. (paper)

  15. Human thymic epithelial cells express functional HLA-DP molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Röpke, C; Nielsen, M;

    1996-01-01

    HLA-DP molecules function as restriction elements in the presentation of foreign antigens to T cells by antigen presenting cells and certain HLA-DP molecules confer susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Because HLA molecules play an essential role in thymic selection and elimination of autoreactive...... T lymphocytes, we examined whether human thymic epithelial cells (TEC) expressed HLA-DP molecules. We present evidence that TEC obtained from short time culture express low but significant levels of HLA-DP molecules. The expression of HLA-DP molecules was comparable to or higher than the expression...... of HLA-DQ but lower than that of HLA-DR. Upon IFN-gamma treatment, HLA-DP expression was strongly upregulated. Since HLA-DQ and DR expression was upregulated in parallel, the hierarchy between MHC class II isotypes remained unchanged following interferon treatment. TEC elicited significant...

  16. Invasion of epithelial cells by Trichinella spiralis: in vitro observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romarís F.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been known for many years that Trichinella spiralis initiates infection by penetrating the columnar epithelium of the small intestine, however, the mechanisms used by the parasite in the establishment of its intramulticellular niche in the intestine are unknown. The recent demonstration that invasion also occurs in vitro when infective larvae of T. spiralis are inoculated onto cultures of epithelial cells provides a model that allows the direct observation of the process by which the parasite recognizes, invades and migrates within the epithelium. The finding that penetration of the cell membrane or Induction of plasma membrane wounds by larvae do not always result in invasion argue in favor of some kind of host-parasite communication in successful invasion. In this sense, the in vitro model of invasion provides a readily manipulated and controlled system to investigate both parasite, and host cell requirements for invasion.

  17. Stepwise Protocol for Cytospin-enhanced Smearing for Scraped Corneal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyalatha, Mani V; Malathi, Jambulingam; Madhavan, Hajib N

    2016-01-01

    Proteins and antigens present on the cell surface are usually determined by immunofluorescence staining. Uniform distribution of cells is required to appreciate the presence of surface proteins. Improper smearing or crushing of the corneal epithelial cells can potentially destroy the cellular integrity. Thus a simplified, systemic method was designed to smear the cells scraped from the cornea. The procedure includes trypsinisation for dissociation of corneal epithelial cells and cytospinning for concentrating the cells in a smear. The standardized protocol was found to be efficient in maintaining the integrity of the corneal epithelial cells and also the distribution of the cells in the smear. PMID:26633702

  18. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millaku, Agron; Drobne, Damjana; Torkar, Matjaz; Novak, Sara; Remškar, Maja; Pipan-Tkalec, Živa

    2013-09-15

    We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells. PMID:23742956

  19. Magnetite induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Vani; Ravichandran, Prabakaran; Copeland, Clinton L; Gopikrishnan, Ramya; Biradar, Santhoshkumar; Goornavar, Virupaxi; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Hall, Joseph C

    2012-04-01

    There is an ongoing concern regarding the biocompatibility of nanoparticles with sizes less than 100 nm as compared to larger particles of the same nominal substance. In this study, we investigated the toxic properties of magnetite stabilized with polyacrylate sodium. The magnetite was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis, and the mean particle diameter was calculated using the Scherrer formula and was found to be 9.3 nm. In this study, we treated lung epithelial cells with different concentrations of magnetite and investigated their effects on oxidative stress and cell proliferation. Our data showed an inhibition of cell proliferation in magnetite-treated cells with a significant dose-dependent activation and induction of reactive oxygen species. Also, we observed a depletion of antioxidants, glutathione, and superoxide dismutase, respectively, as compared with control cells. In addition, apoptotic-related protease/enzyme such as caspase-3 and -8 activities, were increased in a dose-dependent manner with corresponding increased levels of DNA fragmentation in magnetite-treated cells compared to than control cells. Together, the present study reveals that magnetite exposure induces oxidative stress and depletes antioxidant levels in the cells to stimulate apoptotic pathway for cell death. PMID:22147200

  20. DNA damage in Human Limbal Epithelial Cells expanded ex vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Lorenzo Corrales

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Limbal stem cell deficiency, secondary to insults and diseases, may be treated by transplantation of ex vivo engineered epithelial grafts. We here present preliminary data on levels of cellular DNA damage in grafts produced in two different types of culture medium. Cultures were initiated using corneo-limbal donor tissue after removal of the central area for transplant purposes. Explants (approx. 2x2 mm were positioned epithelial side down on tissue culture treated polyester membranes and expanded for four weeks in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium F12 Nutrient Mixture (Ham [DMEM/F12 (1:1] with either (1 H. medium; 10% human serum or (2 COM; 5% fetal bovine serum (FBS, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF, insulin-transferrin-sodiumselenzine (ITS , cholera toxin-A, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and hydrocortisone. Cells were dissociated using Trypsin-EDTA (0.05% for 30 min., the enzyme activity was inhibited by medium and serum. The cell suspension was transferred to tubes on ice and processed using the Comet Assay. Duplicate samples from each culture were analyzed in each assay by visual scoring. Using a fluorescence microscope, 100 comets (50 from each gel were classified into five categories, 0-4, representing increasing relative tail intensities. Summing the scores (0-4 of 100 comets therefore gives an overall score of between 0 and 400 arbitrary units. Preliminary data show some levels of DNA damage in cells dissociated from the grafts regardless of the type of culture medium used. Anyway more experiments with other donors have to be done to have some conclusions. Recent studies have shown that medium with human serum equally support production of grafts containing differentiated as well as undifferentiated cells suitable for clinical transplantation. Preliminary data from our experiments indicate that levels of molecular damage to the DNA do not increase in cells cultured in H. medium despite its lacks of complexity.

  1. Endothelial cells stimulate growth of normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells in 3D culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Magnus K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial-stromal interaction provides regulatory signals that maintain correct histoarchitecture and homeostasis in the normal breast and facilitates tumor progression in breast cancer. However, research on the regulatory role of the endothelial component in the normal and malignant breast gland has largely been neglected. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of endothelial cells on growth and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D co-culture assay. Methods Breast luminal and myoepithelial cells and endothelial cells were isolated from reduction mammoplasties. Primary cells and established normal and malignant breast cell lines were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane in direct co-culture with endothelial cells and by separation of Transwell filters. Morphogenic and phenotypic profiles of co-cultures was evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Results In co-culture, endothelial cells stimulate proliferation of both luminal- and myoepithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells induce a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells to form large acini/ducts with a large and clear lumen. Endothelial cells also stimulate growth and cloning efficiency of normal and malignant breast epithelial cell lines. Transwell and gradient co-culture studies show that endothelial derived effects are mediated - at least partially - by soluble factors. Conclusion Breast endothelial cells - beside their role in transporting nutrients and oxygen to tissues - are vital component of the epithelial microenvironment in the breast and provide proliferative signals to the normal and malignant breast epithelium. These growth promoting effects of endothelial cells should be taken into consideration in breast cancer biology.

  2. Equine tracheal epithelial membrane strips - An alternate method for examining epithelial cell arachidonic acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arachidonic acid metabolism by tracheal epithelium can be studied using enzymatically dispersed cell suspensions or cell cultures. Both techniques require considerable tissue disruption and manipulation and may not accurately represent in vivo activity. The authors have developed an alternate method for obtaining strips of equine tracheal epithelium without enzymatic digestion. In the horse, a prominent elastic lamina supports the tracheal epithelium. By physical splitting this lamina, they obtained strips (≤12 x 1.5 cm) of pseudostratified columnar epithelium attached to a layer of elastic tissue 30-100 μm thick. Epithelial strips (1.2 x 0.5 cm) were attached to plexiglass rods and incubated with [3H]arachidonic acid in M199 medium (0.5 μCi/ml) for 24 hours at 37C. The strips incorporated 36±4% (mean ± SEM) of the total radioactivity and released 8.0±1.2% of incorporated radioactivity when stimulated by 5.0 μM calcium ionophore A23187. The extracted supernatant was processed using HPLC, resulting in peaks of radioactivity that co-eluted with authentic PGE2, PGF2α, and 12-HETE standards. The greatest activity corresponded to the PGE2 and PGF2α standards, which is a similar pattern to that reported for cultured human tracheal epithelium

  3. The Integrin-Mediated ILK-Parvin-αPix Signaling Axis Controls Differentiation in Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Nicholas; Wang, Pengbo; Brennan, Keith; Gilmore, Andrew P; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-11-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion to the surrounding extracellular matrix is necessary for their proper behavior and function. During pregnancy and lactation, mammary epithelial cells (MECs) receive signals from their interaction with laminin via β1-integrin (β1-itg) to establish apico-basal polarity and to differentiate in response to prolactin. Downstream of β1-itg, the scaffold protein Integrin Linked Kinase (ILK) has been identified as the key signal transducer that is required for both lactational differentiation and the establishment of apico-basal polarity. ILK is an adaptor protein that forms the IPP complex with PINCH and Parvins, which are central to its adaptor functions. However, it is not known how ILK and its interacting partners control tissue-specific gene expression. Expression of ILK mutants, which weaken the interaction between ILK and Parvin, revealed that Parvins have a role in mammary epithelial differentiation. This conclusion was supported by shRNA-mediated knockdown of the Parvins. In addition, shRNA knockdown of the Parvin-binding guanine nucleotide exchange factor αPix prevented prolactin-induced differentiation. αPix depletion did not disrupt focal adhesions, MEC proliferation, or polarity. This suggests that αPix represents a differentiation-specific bifurcation point in β1-itg-ILK adhesive signaling. In summary, this study has identified a new role for Parvin and αPix downstream of the integrin-ILK signaling axis for MEC differentiation. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2408-2417, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27019299

  4. Multiple basal cell carcinomas arising in a port-wine stain with a remote history of therapeutic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coexistence of a basal cell carcinoma and a port-wine stain is a very rare condition that may be associated with previous treatments. We present a case of multiple basal cell carcinomas developing within the boundaries of a port-wine stain, which had been treated with a tholium X and argon laser. Our case suggests that port-wine stains which were previously treated with irradiation or argon laser should be examined carefully and regularly by both physician and patient, because they may hide basal cell carcinomas. (author)

  5. Epithelial progenitor cell lines as models of normal breast morphogenesis and neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, René;

    2003-01-01

    delineating the origin of the epithelial cell types. A major step forward was the purification of each cell type by the application of immunomagnetic cell sorting based on expression of lineage-specific surface antigens. We then developed chemically defined media that could support either the luminal...... epithelial or the myoepithelial cell phenotype in primary cultures. Having succeeded in continuous propagation presumably without loss of markers, we could show that a subset of the luminal epithelial cells could convert to myoepithelial cells, signifying the possible existence of a progenitor cell...

  6. Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Timothy J.; Kullas, Amy L.; Southern, Peter J.; Davis, Dana A.

    2016-01-01

    The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals. C. albicans colonizes mucosal surfaces of most people, adhering to and interacting with epithelial cells. At low concentrations, C. albicans is not pathogenic nor does it cause epithelial cell damage in vitro; at high concentrations, C. albicans causes mucosal infections and kills epithelial cells in vitro. Here we show that while there are quantitative dose-dependent differences in exposed epithelial cell populations, these reflect a fundamental qualitative difference in host cell response to C. albicans. Using transcriptional profiling experiments and real time PCR, we found that wild-type C. albicans induce dose-dependent responses from a FaDu epithelial cell line. However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage. Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional. This places epithelial cells at a pivotal position in the interaction with C. albicans as epithelial cells themselves promote C. albicans stimulated damage. PMID:27088599

  7. Periocular basal cell carcinoma: cost of topical immunotherapy versus estimated cost of surgical treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Erick Marcet Santiago de Macedo; Rachel Camargo Carneiro; Pedro Carlos Carricondo; Suzana Matayoshi

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to compare the estimated cost of clinical and surgical treatment for basl cell carcinoma of the eyelid. METHODS: This was a pilot study of 12 patients with basal cell carcinoma receiving treatment with 5% imiquimod cream at the ocular plastic surgery center, medical school University of São Paulo (HC-FMUSP, Brazil). The cost of clinical treatment was estimated based on the time of treatment and amount of medication consumed by patients in the home sett...

  8. Functionality of unliganded VDR in breast cancer cells: repressive action on CYP24 basal transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Alimirah, Fatouma; Vaishnav, Avani; McCormick, Michael; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Chatterjee, Bandana; Mehta, Rajendra G.; Peng, Xinjian

    2010-01-01

    It is well-established that CYP24, an immediate target gene of VDR is upregulated by VDR ligands. This study is focused on the functional role of unliganded VDR by investigating the correlation between the expression of VDR protein and basal mRNA levels of CYP24 in breast cancer cell lines. Analyses of multiple breast cancer cell lines demonstrated an inverse correlation between VDR protein expression and CYP24 mRNA expression levels; while in the presence of ligand, VDR protein level was pos...

  9. How histological features of basal cell carcinomas influence image quality in optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Nürnberg, Birgit M.; Thrane, Lars;

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to diagnose and measure the depth of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in skin, but some lesions appear blurred in OCT images. The aim of this study is to identify histological characteristics of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) that correlate with good...... quality OCT images of the same lesions. A total of 34 patients with BCC were OCT scanned. The influence of histology parameters (e.g. inflammation, sun damage of skin, carcinoma cell size) on OCT image quality was studied by comparing 15 BCC lesions easily identified compared to 19 BCC lesions that...

  10. Identification and transcript analysis of a novel wallaby (Macropus eugenii basal-like breast cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefèvre Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide variety of animal models have been used to study human breast cancer. Murine, feline and canine mammary tumor cell lines have been studied for several decades and have been shown to have numerous aspects in common with human breast cancer. It is clear that new comparative approaches to study cancer etiology are likely to be productive. Results A continuous line of breast carcinoma cells (WalBC was established from a primary breast cancer that spontaneously arose in a female tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii. The primary tumor was 1.5 cm3 and although large, did not appear to invade the stroma and lacked vimentin expression. The WalBC cell line was cultured from the primary tumor and passaged for 22 months. WalBC cells displayed an epithelial morphology when grown on plastic, were not EGF responsive, stained strongly for cyto-keratin and negatively for vimentin. WalBC cells were shown to be non-invasive within a Matrigel invasion assay and failed to produce tumors following transplantation into nude mice. Gene expression profiling of WalBC cells was performed using a cDNA microarray of nearly 10,000 mammary gland cDNA clones and compared to normal primary mammary cells and profiles of human breast cancer. Seventy-six genes were down-regulated and sixty-six genes were up-regulated in WalBC cells when compared to primary mammary cells. WalBC cells exhibited expression of known markers of basal invasive human breast cancers as well as increased KRT17, KRT 14 and KRT 19, DSP, s100A4, NDRG-1, ANXA1, TK1 and AQP3 gene expression and decreased gene expression of TIMP3, VIM and TAGLN. New targets for breast cancer treatment were identified such as ZONAB, PACSIN3, MRP8 and SUMO1 which have human homologues. Conclusion This study demonstrates how novel models of breast cancer can provide new fundamental clues regarding cancer etiology which may lead to new human treatments and therapies.

  11. Ferritinophagy drives uropathogenic Escherichia coli persistence in bladder epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauckman, Kyle A; Mysorekar, Indira U

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling pathway, which in many cases, protects host cells from infections by degrading pathogens. However, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs), persist within the urinary tract epithelium (urothelium) by forming reservoirs within autophagosomes. Iron is a critical nutrient for both host and pathogen, and regulation of iron availability is a key host defense against pathogens. Iron homeostasis depends on the shuttling of iron-bound ferritin to the lysosome for recycling, a process termed ferritinophagy (a form of selective autophagy). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that UPEC shuttles with ferritin-bound iron into the autophagosomal and lysosomal compartments within the urothelium. Iron overload in urothelial cells induces ferritinophagy in an NCOA4-dependent manner causing increased iron availability for UPEC, triggering bacterial overproliferation and host cell death. Addition of even moderate levels of iron is sufficient to increase and prolong bacterial burden. Furthermore, we show that lysosomal damage due to iron overload is the specific mechanism causing host cell death. Significantly, we demonstrate that host cell death and bacterial burden can be reversed by inhibition of autophagy or inhibition of iron-regulatory proteins, or chelation of iron. Together, our findings suggest that UPEC persist in host cells by taking advantage of ferritinophagy. Thus, modulation of iron levels in the bladder may provide a therapeutic avenue to controlling UPEC persistence, epithelial cell death, and recurrent UTIs. PMID:27002654

  12. Citrus consumption and risk of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaowei; Cho, Eunyoung; Feskanich, Diane; Li, Wen-Qing; Sun, Qi; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2015-10-01

    Animal experiments have demonstrated the photocarcinogenic properties of furocoumarins, a group of naturally occurring chemicals that are rich in citrus products. We conducted a prospective study for citrus consumption and risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin based on data from 41530 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2010) and 63759 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1984-2010) who were free of cancers at baseline. Over 24-26 years of follow-up, we documented 20840 incident BCCs and 3544 incident SCCs. Compared to those who consumed citrus products less than twice per week, the pooled multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were 1.03 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.99-1.08] for BCC and 1.14 (95% CI: 1.00-1.30) for SCC for those who consumed two to four times per week, 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01-1.11) for BCC and 1.15 (95% CI: 1.02-1.28) for SCC for five to six times per week, 1.11 (95% CI: 1.06-1.16) for BCC and 1.22 (95% CI: 1.08-1.37) for SCC for once to 1.4 times per day and 1.16 (95% CI: 1.09-1.23) for BCC and 1.21 (95% Cl: 1.06-1.38) for SCC for 1.5 times per day or more (P trend = 0.001 for BCC and 0.04 for SCC). In contrast, consumption of non-citrus fruit and juice appeared to be inversely associated with risk of BCC and SCC. Our findings support positive associations between citrus consumption and risk of cutaneous BCC and SCC in two cohorts of men and women, and call for further investigations to better understand the potential photocarcinogenesis associated with dietary intakes. PMID:26224304

  13. Rhinovirus infection induces cytotoxicity and delays wound healing in bronchial epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantopoulos Andreas G

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human rhinoviruses (RV, the most common triggers of acute asthma exacerbations, are considered not cytotoxic to the bronchial epithelium. Recent observations, however, have questioned this knowledge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of RV to induce epithelial cytotoxicity and affect epithelial repair in-vitro. Methods Monolayers of BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells, seeded at different densities were exposed to RV serotypes 1b, 5, 7, 9, 14, 16. Cytotoxicity was assessed chromatometrically. Epithelial monolayers were mechanically wounded, exposed or not to RV and the repopulation of the damaged area was assessed by image analysis. Finally epithelial cell proliferation was assessed by quantitation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA by flow cytometry. Results RV1b, RV5, RV7, RV14 and RV16 were able to induce considerable epithelial cytotoxicity, more pronounced in less dense cultures, in a cell-density and dose-dependent manner. RV9 was not cytotoxic. Furthermore, RV infection diminished the self-repair capacity of bronchial epithelial cells and reduced cell proliferation. Conclusion RV-induced epithelial cytotoxicity may become considerable in already compromised epithelium, such as in the case of asthma. The RV-induced impairment on epithelial proliferation and self-repair capacity may contribute to the development of airway remodeling.

  14. Control of cell mechanics by RhoA and calcium fluxes during epithelial scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haws, Hillary J; McNeil, Melissa A; Hansen, Marc D H

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial tissues use adherens junctions to maintain tight interactions and coordinate cellular activities. Adherens junctions are remodeled during epithelial morphogenesis, including instances of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, or EMT, wherein individual cells detach from the tissue and migrate as individual cells. EMT has been recapitulated by growth factor induction of epithelial scattering in cell culture. In culture systems, cells undergo a highly reproducible series of cell morphology changes, most notably cell spreading followed by cellular compaction and cell migration. These morphology changes are accompanied by striking actin rearrangements. The current evidence suggests that global changes in actomyosin-based cellular contractility, first a loss of contractility during spreading and its activation during cell compaction, are the main drivers of epithelial scattering. In this review, we focus on how spreading and contractility might be controlled during epithelial scattering. While we propose a central role for RhoA, which is well known to control cellular contractility in multiple systems and whose role in epithelial scattering is well accepted, we suggest potential roles for additional cellular systems whose role in epithelial cell biology has been less well documented. In particular, we propose critical roles for vesicle recycling, calcium channels, and calcium-dependent kinases. PMID:27583192

  15. Uterine epithelial cell proliferation and endometrial hyperplasia: evidence from a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Li, Shu; Li, Qinglei

    2014-08-01

    In the uterus, epithelial cell proliferation changes during the estrous cycle and pregnancy. Uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation results in implantation failure and/or cancer development. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is a fundamental regulator of diverse biological processes and is indispensable for multiple reproductive functions. However, the in vivo role of TGF-β signaling in uterine epithelial cells remains poorly defined. We have shown that in the uterus, conditional deletion of the Type 1 receptor for TGF-β (Tgfbr1) using anti-Müllerian hormone receptor type 2 (Amhr2) Cre leads to myometrial defects. Here, we describe enhanced epithelial cell proliferation by immunostaining of Ki67 in the uteri of these mice. The aberration culminated in endometrial hyperplasia in aged females. To exclude the potential influence of ovarian steroid hormones, the proliferative status of uterine epithelial cells was assessed following ovariectomy. Increased uterine epithelial cell proliferation was also revealed in ovariectomized Tgfbr1 Amhr2-Cre conditional knockout mice. We further demonstrated that transcript levels for fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10) were markedly up-regulated in Tgfbr1 Amhr2-Cre conditional knockout uteri. Consistently, treatment of primary uterine stromal cells with TGF-β1 significantly reduced Fgf10 mRNA expression. Thus, our findings suggest a potential involvement of TGFBR1-mediated signaling in the regulation of uterine epithelial cell proliferation, and provide genetic evidence supporting the role of uterine epithelial cell proliferation in the pathogenesis of endometrial hyperplasia. PMID:24770950

  16. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Feng

    Full Text Available Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI and B(aP compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells. This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery.

  17. Age and the means of bypassing stasis are determinants of the intrinsic subtypes of immortalized human mammary epithelial cells

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    Jonathan K Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on molecular features, breast cancers are grouped into intrinsic subtypes that have different prognoses and therapeutic response profiles. With increasing age, breast cancer incidence increases, with hormone receptor-positive and other luminal-like subtype tumors comprising a majority of cases. It is not known at what stage of tumor progression subtype specification occurs, nor how the process of aging affects the intrinsic subtype. We examined subtype markers in immortalized human mammary epithelial cell lines established following exposure of primary cultured cell strains to a two-step immortalization protocol that targets the two main barriers to immortality: stasis (stress-associated senescence and replicative senescence. Cell lines derived from epithelial cells obtained from non-tumorous pre- and post-menopausal breast surgery tissues were compared. Additionally, comparisons were made between lines generated using two different genetic interventions to bypass stasis: transduction of either an shRNA that down-regulated p16INK4A, or overexpressed constitutive active cyclin D1/CDK2. In all cases, the replicative senescence barrier was bypassed by transduction of c-Myc. Cells from all resulting immortal lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and gene expression analyses of lineage-specific markers were used to categorize the intrinsic subtypes of the immortalized lines. Bypassing stasis with p16 shRNA in young strains generated cell lines that were invariably basal-like, but the lines examined from older strains exhibited some luminal features such as keratin 19 and estrogen receptor expression. Overexpression of cyclin D1/CDK2 resulted in keratin 19 positive, luminal-like cell lines from both young and old strains, and the lines examined from older strains exhibited estrogen receptor expression. Thus age and the method of bypassing stasis are independent determinants of subtype in immortalized human

  18. Age and the means of bypassing stasis influence the intrinsic subtype of immortalized human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan K; Garbe, James C; Vrba, Lukas; Miyano, Masaru; Futscher, Bernard W; Stampfer, Martha R; LaBarge, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Based on molecular features, breast cancers are grouped into intrinsic subtypes that have different prognoses and therapeutic response profiles. With increasing age, breast cancer incidence increases, with hormone receptor-positive and other luminal-like subtype tumors comprising a majority of cases. It is not known at what stage of tumor progression subtype specification occurs, nor how the process of aging affects the intrinsic subtype. We examined subtype markers in immortalized human mammary epithelial cell lines established following exposure of primary cultured cell strains to a two-step immortalization protocol that targets the two main barriers to immortality: stasis (stress-associated senescence) and replicative senescence. Cell lines derived from epithelial cells obtained from non-tumorous pre- and post-menopausal breast surgery tissues were compared. Additionally, comparisons were made between lines generated using two different genetic interventions to bypass stasis: transduction of either an shRNA that down-regulated p16(INK4A), or overexpressed constitutive active cyclin D1/CDK2. In all cases, the replicative senescence barrier was bypassed by transduction of c-Myc. Cells from all resulting immortal lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and gene expression analyses of lineage-specific markers were used to categorize the intrinsic subtypes of the immortalized lines. Bypassing stasis with p16 shRNA in young strains generated cell lines that were invariably basal-like, but the lines examined from older strains exhibited some luminal features such as keratin 19 and estrogen receptor expression. Overexpression of cyclin D1/CDK2 resulted in keratin 19 positive, luminal-like cell lines from both young and old strains, and the lines examined from older strains exhibited estrogen receptor expression. Thus age and the method of bypassing stasis independently influence the subtype of immortalized human mammary epithelial cells

  19. Generation and functional characterization of epithelial cells with stable expression of SLC26A9 Cl- channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Johanna J; Spahn, Stephan; Wang, Xiaohui; Füllekrug, Joachim; Bertrand, Carol A; Mall, Marcus A

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies identified the SLC26A9 Cl(-) channel as a modifier and potential therapeutic target in cystic fibrosis (CF). However, understanding of the regulation of SLC26A9 in epithelia remains limited and cellular models with stable expression for biochemical and functional studies are missing. We, therefore, generated Fisher rat thyroid (FRT) epithelial cells with stable expression of HA-tagged SLC26A9 via retroviral transfection and characterized SLC26A9 expression and function using Western blotting, immunolocalization, whole cell patch-clamp, and transepithelial bioelectric studies in Ussing chambers. We demonstrate stable expression of SLC26A9 in transfected FRT (SLC26A9-FRT) cells on the mRNA and protein level. Immunolocalization and Western blotting detected SLC26A9 in different intracellular compartments and to a lesser extent at the cell surface. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings demonstrated significantly increased constitutive Cl(-) currents in SLC26A9-FRT compared with control-transduced FRT (Control-FRT) cells (P < 0.01). Similar, transepithelial measurements showed that the basal short circuit current was significantly increased in SLC26A9-FRT vs. Control-FRT cell monolayers (P < 0.01). SLC26A9-mediated Cl(-) currents were increased by cAMP-dependent stimulation (IBMX and forskolin) and inhibited by GlyH-101, niflumic acid, DIDS, and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB), as well as RNAi knockdown of WNK1 implicated in epithelial osmoregulation. Our results support that these novel epithelial cells with stable expression of SLC26A9 will be a useful model for studies of pharmacological regulation including the identification of activators of SLC26A9 Cl(-) channels that may compensate deficient cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR)-mediated Cl(-) secretion and serve as an alternative therapeutic target in patients with CF and potentially other muco-obstructive lung diseases. PMID:26801567

  20. Ionizing radiation induces heritable disruption of epithelial cell interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a known human breast carcinogen. Although the mutagenic capacity of IR is widely acknowledged as the basis for its action as a carcinogen, we and others have shown that IR can also induce growth factors and extracellular matrix remodeling. As a consequence, we have proposed that an additional factor contributing to IR carcinogenesis is the potential disruption of critical constraints that are imposed by normal cell interactions. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether IR affected the ability of nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo tissue-specific morphogenesis in culture by using confocal microscopy and imaging bioinformatics. We found that irradiated single HMEC gave rise to colonies exhibiting decreased localization of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and connexin-43, proteins necessary for the establishment of polarity and communication. Severely compromised acinar organization was manifested by the majority of irradiated HMEC progeny as quantified by image analysis. Disrupted cell-cell communication, aberrant cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and loss of tissue-specific architecture observed in the daughters of irradiated HMEC are characteristic of neoplastic progression. These data point to a heritable, nonmutational mechanism whereby IR compromises cell polarity and multicellular organization