WorldWideScience

Sample records for baryonic matter experiment

  1. The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seddiki Sélim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experiment is a next-generation fixed-target detector which will operate at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR in Darmstadt. The goal of this experiment is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high net baryon densities using high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Its research program includes the study of the equation-of-state of nuclear matter at high baryon densities, the search for the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions and the search for the QCD critical point. The CBM detector is designed to measure both bulk observables with a large acceptance and rare diagnostic probes such as charm particles, multi-strange hyperons, and low mass vector mesons in their di-leptonic decay. The physics program of CBM will be summarized, followed by an overview of the detector concept, a selection of the expected physics performance, and the status of preparation of the experiment.

  2. The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhne, Claudia

    2018-02-01

    The CBM experiment will investigate highly compressed baryonic matter created in A+A collisions at the new FAIR research center. With a beam energy range up to 11 AGeV for the heaviest nuclei at the SIS 100 accelerator, CBM will investigate the QCD phase diagram in the intermediate range, i.e. at moderate temperatures but high net-baryon densities. This intermediate range of the QCD phase diagram is of particular interest, because a first order phase transition ending in a critical point and possibly new highdensity phases of strongly interacting matter are expected. In this range of the QCD phase diagram only exploratory measurements have been performed so far. CBM, as a next generation, high-luminosity experiment, will substantially improve our knowledge of matter created in this region of the QCD phase diagram and characterize its properties by measuring rare probes such as multi-strange hyperons, dileptons or charm, but also with event-by-event fluctuations of conserved quantities, and collective flow of identified particles. The experimental preparations with special focus on hadronic observables and strangeness is presented in terms of detector development, feasibility studies and fast track reconstruction. Preparations are progressing well such that CBM will be ready with FAIR start. As quite some detectors are ready before, they will be used as upgrades or extensions of already running experiments allowing for a rich physics program prior to FAIR start.

  3. The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höhne Claudia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The CBM experiment will investigate highly compressed baryonic matter created in A+A collisions at the new FAIR research center. With a beam energy range up to 11 AGeV for the heaviest nuclei at the SIS 100 accelerator, CBM will investigate the QCD phase diagram in the intermediate range, i.e. at moderate temperatures but high net-baryon densities. This intermediate range of the QCD phase diagram is of particular interest, because a first order phase transition ending in a critical point and possibly new highdensity phases of strongly interacting matter are expected. In this range of the QCD phase diagram only exploratory measurements have been performed so far. CBM, as a next generation, high-luminosity experiment, will substantially improve our knowledge of matter created in this region of the QCD phase diagram and characterize its properties by measuring rare probes such as multi-strange hyperons, dileptons or charm, but also with event-by-event fluctuations of conserved quantities, and collective flow of identified particles. The experimental preparations with special focus on hadronic observables and strangeness is presented in terms of detector development, feasibility studies and fast track reconstruction. Preparations are progressing well such that CBM will be ready with FAIR start. As quite some detectors are ready before, they will be used as upgrades or extensions of already running experiments allowing for a rich physics program prior to FAIR start.

  4. The Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Johann M.

    2013-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the region of high net baryon densities. The experiment is being laid out for nuclear collision rates from 0.1 to 10 MHz to access a unique wide spectrum of probes, including rarest particles like hadrons containing charm quarks, or multi-strange hyperons. The physics programme will be performed with ion beams of energies up to 45 GeV/nucleon. Those will be delivered by the SIS-300 synchrotron at the completed FAIR accelerator complex. Parts of the research programme can already be addressed with the SIS-100 synchrotron at the start of FAIR operation in 2018. The initial energy range of up to 11 GeV/nucleon for heavy nuclei, 14 GeV/nucleon for light nuclei, and 29 GeV for protons, allows addressing the equation of state of compressed nuclear matter, the properties of hadrons in a dense medium, the production and propagation of charm near the production threshold, and exploring the third, strange dimension of the nuclide chart. In this article we summarize the CBM physics programme, the preparation of the detector, and give an outline of the recently begun construction of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research

  5. The Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment at FAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuser J.M.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experiment is being planned at the international research centre FAIR, under realization next to the GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, Germany. Its physics programme addresses the QCD phase diagram in the region of highest net baryon densities. Of particular interest are the expected first order phase transition from partonic to hadronic matter, ending in a critical point, and modifications of hadron properties in the dense medium as a signal of chiral symmetry restoration. Laid out as a fixed-target experiment at the synchrotrons SIS-100/SIS-300, providing magnetic bending power of 100 and 300 T/m, the CBM detector will record both proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at beam energies up to 45A GeV. Hadronic, leptonic and photonic observables have to be measured with large acceptance. The nuclear interaction rates will reach up to 10 MHz to measure extremely rare probes like charm near threshold. Two versions of the experiment are being studied, optimized for either electron-hadron or muon identification, combined with silicon detector based charged-particle tracking and micro-vertex detection. The research programme will start at SIS-100 with ion beams between 2 and 11A GeV, and protons up to energies of 29 GeV using the HADES detector and an initial configuration of the CBM experiment. The CBM physics requires the development of novel detector systems, trigger and data acquisition concepts as well as innovative real-time reconstruction techniques. Progress with feasibility studies of the experiment and the development of its detector systems are discussed.

  6. Compressed baryonic matter experiment at FAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Eschke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experiment is being planned at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR, under realization next to the GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, Germany. Its physics programme addresses the QCD phase diagram in the region of highest net baryon densities. Of particular interest are the expected first order phase transition from partonic to hadronic matter, ending in a critical point, and modifcations of hadron properties in the dense medium as a signal of chiral symmetry restoration. Laid out as a fixed-target experiment at the synchrotrons SIS-100/SIS-300, providing magnetic bending power of 100 and 300 T/Fm, the CBM detector will record both proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at beam energies up to 45 AGeV. Hadronic, leptonic and photonic observables will be measured in a large acceptance. The nuclear interaction rates will reach up to 10 MHz to measure extremely rare probes like charm near threshold. This requires the development of novel detector systems, trigger and data acquisition concepts as well as in- novative real-time reconstruction techniques. A key observable of the physics program is a precise measurement of lowmass vector mesons and charmonium in their leptonic decay channel. In CBM, electrons will be identified using a gaseous RICH detector combined with several TRD detectors positioned after a system of silicon tracking stations which are located inside a magnetic dipole field. The concept of the RICH detector, results on R & D as well as feasibility studies and invariant mass distributions of charmonium will be discussed.

  7. Baryonic matter and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We summarize recent developments in identifying the ground state of dense baryonic matter and beyond. The topics include deconfinement from baryonic matter to quark matter, a diquark mixture, topological effect coupled with chirality and density, and inhomogeneous chiral condensates.

  8. Baryonic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    In the first two of these lectures, I present the evidence for baryonic dark matter and describe possible forms that it may take. The final lecture discusses formation of baryonic dark matter, and sets the cosmological context.

  9. Non-baryonic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkes, I.

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses the nature of the dark matter and the possibility of the detection of non-baryonic dark matter in an underground experiment. Among the useful detectors the low temperature bolometers are considered in some detail. (author)

  10. Challenges in QCD matter physics. The scientific programme of the Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablyazimov, T. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR-LIT), Dubna (Russian Federation). Lab. of Information Technologies; Abuhoza, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Adak, R.P. [Bose Institute, Kolkata (India). Dept. of Physics; and others

    2017-03-15

    Substantial experimental and theoretical efforts worldwide are devoted to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. At LHC and top RHIC energies, QCD matter is studied at very high temperatures and nearly vanishing net-baryon densities. There is evidence that a Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) was created at experiments at RHIC and LHC. The transition from the QGP back to the hadron gas is found to be a smooth cross over. For larger net-baryon densities and lower temperatures, it is expected that the QCD phase diagram exhibits a rich structure, such as a first-order phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter which terminates in a critical point, or exotic phases like quarkyonic matter. The discovery of these landmarks would be a breakthrough in our understanding of the strong interaction and is therefore in the focus of various high-energy heavy-ion research programs. The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will play a unique role in the exploration of the QCD phase diagram in the region of high net-baryon densities, because it is designed to run at unprecedented interaction rates. High-rate operation is the key prerequisite for high-precision measurements of multi-differential observables and of rare diagnostic probes which are sensitive to the dense phase of the nuclear fireball. The goal of the CBM experiment at SIS100 (√(s{sub NN}) = 2.7-4.9 GeV) is to discover fundamental properties of QCD matter: the phase structure at large baryon-chemical potentials (μ{sub B} > 500 MeV), effects of chiral symmetry, and the equation of state at high density as it is expected to occur in the core of neutron stars. In this article, we review the motivation for and the physics programme of CBM, including activities before the start of data taking in 2024, in the context of the worldwide efforts to explore high-density QCD matter. (orig.)

  11. Baryonic and Non-Baryonic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    Cosmological nucleosynthesis calculations imply that there should be both non-baryonic and baryonic dark matter. Recent data suggest that some of the non-baryonic dark matter must be "hot" (i.e. massive neutrinos) and there may also be evidence for "cold" dark matter (i.e. WIMPs). If the baryonic dark matter resides in galactic halos, it is likely to be in the form of compact objects (i.e. MACHOs) and these would probably be the remnants of a first generation of pregalactic or protogalactic P...

  12. A theory overview on the Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrgang, Marlene

    2014-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR offers for the first time in heavy-ion physics the opportunity to investigate extremely baryon-dense strongly interacting matter with large data samples as a basis for high precision measurements. This will allow us to put theories at test, answer questions about the structure of the phase diagram of QCD and the transport properties of the medium. In this overview I will highlight some recent advances on several key questions, which will be addressed by the CBM experiment.

  13. Non-baryonic dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkes, I.

    1996-12-31

    This article discusses the nature of the dark matter and the possibility of the detection of non-baryonic dark matter in an underground experiment. Among the useful detectors the low temperature bolometers are considered in some detail. (author). 19 refs.

  14. Baryonic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    De Paolis, F.; Jetzer, Ph.; Ingrosso, G.; Roncadelli, M.

    1997-01-01

    Reasons supporting the idea that most of the dark matter in galaxies and clusters of galaxies is baryonic are discussed. Moreover, it is argued that most of the dark matter in galactic halos should be in the form of MACHOs and cold molecular clouds.

  15. Baryonic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.; Gilmore, G.

    1990-01-01

    Dark matter, first definitely found in the large clusters of galaxies, is now known to be dominant mass in the outer parts of galaxies. All the mass definitely deduced could be made up of baryons, and this would fit well with the requirements of nucleosynthesis in a big bang of small Ω B . However, if inflation is the explanation of the expansion and large scale homogeneity of the universe and of baryon synthesis, and if the universe did not have an infinite extent at the big bang, then Ω should be minutely greater than unity. It is commonly hypothesized that most mass is composed of some unknown, non-baryonic form. This book first discusses the known forms, comets, planets, brown dwarfs, stars, gas, galaxies and Lyman α clouds in which baryons are known to exist. Limits on the amount of dark matter in baryonic form are discussed in the context of the big bang. Inhomogeneities of the right type alleviate the difficulties associated with Ω B = 1 cosmological nucleosynthesis

  16. Baryonic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Both canonical primordial nucleosynthesis constraints and large-scale structure measurements, as well as observations of the fundamental cosmological parameters, appear to be consistent with the hypothesis that the universe predominantly consists of baryonic dark matter (BDM). The arguments for BDM to consist of compact objects that are either stellar relics or substellar objects are reviewed. Several techniques for searching for halo BDM are described.

  17. Baryon destruction by asymmetric dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Morrissey, David E.; Tulin, Sean; Sigurdson, Kris

    2011-01-01

    We investigate new and unusual signals that arise in theories where dark matter is asymmetric and carries a net antibaryon number, as may occur when the dark matter abundance is linked to the baryon abundance. Antibaryonic dark matter can cause induced nucleon decay by annihilating visible baryons through inelastic scattering. These processes lead to an effective nucleon lifetime of 10 29 -10 32 yrs in terrestrial nucleon decay experiments, if baryon number transfer between visible and dark sectors arises through new physics at the weak scale. The possibility of induced nucleon decay motivates a novel approach for direct detection of cosmic dark matter in nucleon decay experiments. Monojet searches (and related signatures) at hadron colliders also provide a complementary probe of weak-scale dark-matter-induced baryon number violation. Finally, we discuss the effects of baryon-destroying dark matter on stellar systems and show that it can be consistent with existing observations.

  18. Compressed Baryonic Matter of Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yanjun; Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    Baryonic matter in the core of a massive and evolved star is compressed significantly to form a supra-nuclear object, and compressed baryonic matter (CBM) is then produced after supernova. The state of cold matter at a few nuclear density is pedagogically reviewed, with significant attention paid to a possible quark-cluster state conjectured from an astrophysical point of view.

  19. Radiation hardness investigation of avalanche photodiodes for the Projectile Spectator Detector readout at the Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kushpil, Vasilij; Mikhaylov, Vasily; Kushpil, Svetlana; Tlustý, Pavel; Svoboda, Ondřej; Kugler, Andrej

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 787, JUL (2015), s. 117-120 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG12007; GA MŠk LG14004; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : avalanche photodiodes * single protons detection * radiation hardness * neutron irradiation tests * compressed Baryonic Matter experiment * Projectile Spectator Detector Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear , Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2015

  20. Non--Baryonic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Berezinsky, V.; Bottino, A.; Mignola, G.

    1996-01-01

    The best particle candidates for non--baryonic cold dark matter are reviewed, namely, neutralino, axion, axino and Majoron. These particles are considered in the context of cosmological models with the restrictions given by the observed mass spectrum of large scale structures, data on clusters of galaxies, age of the Universe etc.

  1. Baryons and baryon resonances in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenske, Horst; Dhar, Madhumita; Gaitanos, Theodoros; Cao, Xu

    2018-01-01

    Theoretical approaches to the production of hyperons and baryon resonances in elementary hadronic reactions and heavy ion collisions are reviewed. The focus is on the production and interactions of baryons in the lowest SU(3) flavor octet and states from the next higher SU(3) flavor decuplet. Approaches using the SU(3) formalism for interactions of mesons and baryons and effective field theory for hyperons are discussed. An overview of application to free space and in-medium baryon-baryon interactions is given and the relation to a density functional theory is indicated. The intimate connection between baryon resonances and strangeness production is shown first for reactions on the nucleon. Pion-induced hypernuclear reactions are shown to proceed essentially through the excitation of intermediate nucleon resonances. Transport theory in conjunction with a statistical fragmentation model is an appropriate description of hypernuclear production in antiproton and heavy ion induced fragmentation reactions. The excitation of subnuclear degrees of freedom in peripheral heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies is reviewed. The status of in-medium resonance physics is discussed.

  2. Optimization of a transition radiation detector for the compressed baryonic matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arend, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR has to provide electron-pion separation as well as charged-particle tracking. Within this work, thin and symmetric Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) without additional drift region were proposed. the proposed prototypes feature a foil-based entrance window to minimize the material budget and to reduce the absorption probability of the generated TR photon. Based on the conceptual design of thin and symmetric MWPCs without drift region, multiple prototypes were constructed and their performance presented within this thesis. With the constructed prototypes of generations II and III the geometries of the wire and cathode planes were determined to be 4+4 mm and 5+5 mm. Based on the results of a performed test beam campaign in 2011 with this prototypes new prototypes of generation IV were manufactured and tested in a subsequent test beam campaign in 2012. Prototypes of different radiators were developed together with the MWPC prototypes. Along with regular foil radiators, foam-based radiator types made of polyethylene foam were utilized. Also radiators constructed in a sandwich design, which used different fiber materials confined with solid foam sheets, were used. For the prototypes without drift region, simulations of the electrostatic and mechanical properties were performed. The GARFIELD software package was used to simulate the electric field and to determine the resulting drift lines of the generated electrons. The mean gas amplification depending on the utilized gas and the applied anode voltage was simulated and the gas-gain homogeneity was verified. Since the thin foil-based entrance window experiences a deformation due to pressure differences inside and outside the MWPC, the variation on the gas gain depending on the deformation was simulated. The mechanical properties focusing on the stability of the entrance window was determined with a finiteelement

  3. Optimization of a transition radiation detector for the compressed baryonic matter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arend, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR has to provide electron-pion separation as well as charged-particle tracking. Within this work, thin and symmetric Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) without additional drift region were proposed. the proposed prototypes feature a foil-based entrance window to minimize the material budget and to reduce the absorption probability of the generated TR photon. Based on the conceptual design of thin and symmetric MWPCs without drift region, multiple prototypes were constructed and their performance presented within this thesis. With the constructed prototypes of generations II and III the geometries of the wire and cathode planes were determined to be 4+4 mm and 5+5 mm. Based on the results of a performed test beam campaign in 2011 with this prototypes new prototypes of generation IV were manufactured and tested in a subsequent test beam campaign in 2012. Prototypes of different radiators were developed together with the MWPC prototypes. Along with regular foil radiators, foam-based radiator types made of polyethylene foam were utilized. Also radiators constructed in a sandwich design, which used different fiber materials confined with solid foam sheets, were used. For the prototypes without drift region, simulations of the electrostatic and mechanical properties were performed. The GARFIELD software package was used to simulate the electric field and to determine the resulting drift lines of the generated electrons. The mean gas amplification depending on the utilized gas and the applied anode voltage was simulated and the gas-gain homogeneity was verified. Since the thin foil-based entrance window experiences a deformation due to pressure differences inside and outside the MWPC, the variation on the gas gain depending on the deformation was simulated. The mechanical properties focusing on the stability of the entrance window was determined with a finiteelement

  4. Critical opalescence in baryonic QCD matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, N G; Diakonos, F K; Kapoyannis, A S; Kousouris, K S

    2006-07-21

    We show that critical opalescence, a clear signature of second-order phase transition in conventional matter, manifests itself as critical intermittency in QCD matter produced in experiments with nuclei. This behavior is revealed in transverse momentum spectra as a pattern of power laws in factorial moments, to all orders, associated with baryon production. This phenomenon together with a similar effect in the isoscalar sector of pions (sigma mode) provide us with a set of observables associated with the search for the QCD critical point in experiments with nuclei at high energies.

  5. Unified origin for baryonic visible matter and antibaryonic dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Morrissey, David E; Sigurdson, Kris; Tulin, Sean

    2010-11-19

    We present a novel mechanism for generating both the baryon and dark matter densities of the Universe. A new Dirac fermion X carrying a conserved baryon number charge couples to the standard model quarks as well as a GeV-scale hidden sector. CP-violating decays of X, produced nonthermally in low-temperature reheating, sequester antibaryon number in the hidden sector, thereby leaving a baryon excess in the visible sector. The antibaryonic hidden states are stable dark matter. A spectacular signature of this mechanism is the baryon-destroying inelastic scattering of dark matter that can annihilate baryons at appreciable rates relevant for nucleon decay searches.

  6. Baryons and baryonic matter in four-fermion interaction models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urlichs, K.

    2007-02-23

    In this work we discuss baryons and baryonic matter in simple four-fermion interaction theories, the Gross-Neveu model and the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in 1+1 and 2+1 space-time dimensions. These models are designed as toy models for dynamical symmetry breaking in strong interaction physics. Pointlike interactions (''four-fermion'' interactions) between quarks replace the full gluon mediated interaction of quantum chromodynamics. We consider the limit of a large number of fermion flavors, where a mean field approach becomes exact. This method is formulated in the language of relativistic many particle theory and is equivalent to the Hartree-Fock approximation. In 1+1 dimensions, we generalize known results on the ground state to the case where chiral symmetry is broken explicitly by a bare mass term. For the Gross-Neveu model, we derive an exact self-consistent solution for the finite density ground state, consisting of a one-dimensional array of equally spaced potential wells, a baryon crystal. For the Nambu- Jona-Lasinio model we apply the derivative expansion technique to calculate the total energy in powers of derivatives of the mean field. In a picture akin to the Skyrme model of nuclear physics, the baryon emerges as a topological soliton. The solution for both the single baryon and dense baryonic matter is given in a systematic expansion in powers of the pion mass. The solution of the Hartree-Fock problem is more complicated in 2+1 dimensions. In the massless Gross-Neveu model we derive an exact self-consistent solution by extending the baryon crystal of the 1+1 dimensional model, maintaining translational invariance in one spatial direction. This one-dimensional configuration is energetically degenerate to the translationally invariant solution, a hint in favor of a possible translational symmetry breakdown by more general geometrical structures. In the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, topological soliton configurations induce a finite baryon

  7. Preamplifier-shaper prototype for the Fast Transition Detector of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Soltveit, Hans Kristian

    2007-01-01

    In this work a preamplifier-shaper prototype for the Fast Transition Detector of the Compressed BaryonicMatter (CBM) experiment at FAIR fabricated using a 0.35 μm CMOS technology will be presented. The ASIC integrates 16 identical Charge Sensitive Amplifiers (CSA) followed by a Pole-Zero network, two bridged-T filters, Common-Mode FeedBack (CMFB) network and two non-inverting level shifting stages. The circuit is optimized for a detector capacitance Cd of (5-10)pF. Measurement results confirm the noise of 330 e− + 12 e−/pF obtained in simulations for a pulse with a Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) of 71 ns. The circuit recovers to the baseline within 200 ns. The conversion gain is 12.64 mV/fC. An integral nonlinearity of 0.7% is also achieved. The maximum output swing is 2 V. The power consumption is 16 mW/channel where the main contributors are the input transistor and the level shifting stage with 5.3 mW and 6.6 mW, respectively. The total area of the chip is 12 mm2. Although the circuit was designed for...

  8. A search for non-baryonic dark matter using an ionisation bolometer in the edelweiss experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Stefano, Ph.

    1998-01-01

    The EDELWEISS experiment is an underground direct-detection search for hypothetical supersymmetric WIMPs that might solve the problem of dark matter. We have employed a cryogenic 70 g germanium ionisation bolometer, in which a WIMP would scatter elastically off a nucleus, creating both a heat and an ionisation signal. To offset the various electronic noises present in our necessarily small signals, we have s applied an optimal filtering technique in the frequency domain. This allows us to reach resolutions of 1.2 keV FWHM at 122 keV on north channels. It also provides good separation right down to low energies between the expected signal of nuclear recoils, and the photonic background of electron recoils which ionize more for a given energy. Calibration data show that we are able to reject 99.7 % of this background, while keeping 95% of the signal. However, our 1.17 kg.days of data searching for WIMPs show a third population encroaching on the expected signal. This is probably due to low energy photons or electrons interacting in the outer layers of the crystal, where charges are incompletely collected. Nevertheless, by trading off half of the conserved signal, we still manage to reject 98.5 % of the background. Thus the raw rate of 40 evts/d/kg/keV yields a conservative 90 % upper limit on the signal of 0.6 evts/d/kg/keV. This represents nearly a three orders of magnitude improvement for EDELWEISS, and puts the predicted supersymmetric phase space within two orders of magnitude. (author)

  9. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  10. The Evolution of Galaxies by the Incompatibility between Dark Matter and Baryonic Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Ding-Yu

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the evolution of galaxies is by the incompatibility between dark matter and baryonic matter. Due to the structural difference, baryonic matter and dark matter are incompatible to each other as oil droplet and water in emulsion. In the interfacial zone between dark matter and baryonic matter, this incompatibility generates the modification of Newtonian dynamics to keep dark matter and baryonic matter apart. The five periods of baryonic structure development in the order of incre...

  11. Candidates for non-baryonic dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Fornengo, Nicolao

    2002-01-01

    This report is a brief review of the efforts to explain the nature of non-baryonic dark matter and of the studies devoted to the search for relic particles. Among the different dark matter candidates, special attention is devoted to relic neutralinos, by giving an overview of the recent calculations of its relic abundance and detection rates in a wide variety of supersymmetric schemes.

  12. STRANGE BARYONIC MATTER AND KAON CONDENSATION

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gazda, Daniel; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 26, 3-4 (2011), s. 567-569 ISSN 0217-751X. [11th International Workshop on Meson Production , Properties and Interaction. Krakow, 10.06.2010-15.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1441 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : (K)over-bar-nuclear bound states * strange baryonic matter * kaon condensation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.053, year: 2011

  13. Shedding light on baryonic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Halo dark matter, if it is baryonic, may plausibly consist of compact stellar remnants. Jeans mass clouds containing 10 to the 6th to 10 to the 8th solar masses could have efficiently formed stars in the early universe and could plausibly have generated, for a suitably top-heavy stellar initial mass function, a high abundance of neutron stars as well as a small admixture of long-lived low mass stars. Within the resulting clusters of dark remnants, which eventually are tidally disrupted when halos eventually form, captures of neutron stars by nondegenerate stars resulted in formation of close binaries. These evolve to produce, by the present epoch, an observable X-ray signal associated with dark matter aggregations in galaxy cluster cores.

  14. Galaxy Formation by Cosmic Strings and Cooling of Baryonic Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Mizuo, IZAWA; Humitaka, SATO; Department of Physics, University of Tokyo; Department of Physics, Kyoto University

    1987-01-01

    Cooling and contraction of baryonic matter are investigated ina galaxy formation scenario by string loops. It is found that ~3% of virialized baryonic matter has cooled down and contracted. This virialized object may have a disk-halo structure and be considered a galaxy.

  15. Measurement of matter-antimatter differences in beauty baryon decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; , A. A. Alves, Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; D'Argent, P.; Romeu, J. Arnau; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; Beuzekom, M. Van; Bezshyiko, I.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Perez, D. H. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Sobral, C. M. Costa; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Marinho, F. Da Cunha; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; Francisco, O. De Aguiar; Bruyn, K. De; Capua, S. De; Cian, M. De; Miranda, J. M. De; Paula, L. De; Serio, M. De; Simone, P. De; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Buono, L. Del; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Canto, A. Di; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Prieto, A. Fernandez; Ferrari, F.; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Lima, V. Franco; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Martin, L. M. Garcia; Pardiñas, J. Garcıa; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Cazon, B. R. Gruberg; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; Herwijnen, E. Van; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Gac, R. Le; Leerdam, J. Van; Lees, J.-P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Cid, E. Lemos; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Martinez, M. Lucio; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Pernas, M. Ramos; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reis, A. C. Dos; Alepuz, C. Remon; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovskiy, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Silva, J. J. Saborido; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Mayordomo, C. Sanchez; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Coutinho, R. Silva; de Oliveira, L. Silva; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; de Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; Tilburg, J. Van; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Vecchi, S.; Veghel, M. Van; Velthuis, J. 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    2017-04-01

    Differences in the behaviour of matter and antimatter have been observed in K and B meson decays, but not yet in any baryon decay. Such differences are associated with the non-invariance of fundamental interactions under the combined charge-conjugation and parity transformations, known as CP violation. Here, using data from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, we search for CP-violating asymmetries in the decay angle distributions of Λb0 baryons decaying to pπ-π+π- and pπ-K+K- final states. These four-body hadronic decays are a promising place to search for sources of CP violation both within and beyond the standard model of particle physics. We find evidence for CP violation in Λb0 to pπ-π+π- decays with a statistical significance corresponding to 3.3 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. This represents the first evidence for CP violation in the baryon sector.

  16. Measurement of matter-antimatter differences in beauty baryon decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, V.V.; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, P H; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-01-30

    Differences in the behaviour of matter and antimatter have been observed in $K$ and $B$ meson decays, but not yet in any baryon decay. Such differences are associated with the non-invariance of fundamental interactions under the combined charge-conjugation and parity transformations, known as CP violation. Using data from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, a search is made for CP-violating asymmetries in the decay angle distributions of $\\Lambda_b^0$ baryons decaying to $p\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $p \\pi^- K^+ K^-$ final states. These four-body hadronic decays are a promising place to search for sources of CP violation both within and beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. We find evidence for CP violation in $\\Lambda_b^0$ to $p\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays with a statistical significance corresponding to 3.3 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. This represents the first evidence for CP violation in the baryon sector.

  17. Accurate initial conditions in mixed Dark Matter--Baryon simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Valkenburg, Wessel

    2017-06-01

    We quantify the error in the results of mixed baryon--dark-matter hydrodynamic simulations, stemming from outdated approximations for the generation of initial conditions. The error at redshift 0 in contemporary large simulations, is of the order of few to ten percent in the power spectra of baryons and dark matter, and their combined total-matter power spectrum. After describing how to properly assign initial displacements and peculiar velocities to multiple species, we review several approximations: (1) {using the total-matter power spectrum to compute displacements and peculiar velocities of both fluids}, (2) scaling the linear redshift-zero power spectrum back to the initial power spectrum using the Newtonian growth factor ignoring homogeneous radiation, (3) using longitudinal-gauge velocities with synchronous-gauge densities, and (4) ignoring the phase-difference in the Fourier modes for the offset baryon grid, relative to the dark-matter grid. Three of these approximations do not take into account that ...

  18. Modified dark matter: Relating dark energy, dark matter and baryonic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Douglas; Farrah, Duncan; Minic, Djordje; Ng, Y. Jack; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    Modified dark matter (MDM) is a phenomenological model of dark matter, inspired by gravitational thermodynamics. For an accelerating universe with positive cosmological constant (Λ), such phenomenological considerations lead to the emergence of a critical acceleration parameter related to Λ. Such a critical acceleration is an effective phenomenological manifestation of MDM, and it is found in correlations between dark matter and baryonic matter in galaxy rotation curves. The resulting MDM mass profiles, which are sensitive to Λ, are consistent with observational data at both the galactic and cluster scales. In particular, the same critical acceleration appears both in the galactic and cluster data fits based on MDM. Furthermore, using some robust qualitative arguments, MDM appears to work well on cosmological scales, even though quantitative studies are still lacking. Finally, we comment on certain nonlocal aspects of the quanta of modified dark matter, which may lead to novel nonparticle phenomenology and which may explain why, so far, dark matter detection experiments have failed to detect dark matter particles.

  19. Baryonic distributions in galaxy dark matter haloes - II. Final results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Emily E.; van Zee, L.; Barnes, K. L.; Staudaher, S.; Dale, D. A.; Braun, T. T.; Wavle, D. C.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; Chandar, R.

    2018-02-01

    Re-creating the observed diversity in the organization of baryonic mass within dark matter haloes represents a key challenge for galaxy formation models. To address the growth of galaxy discs in dark matter haloes, we have constrained the distribution of baryonic and non-baryonic matter in a statistically representative sample of 44 nearby galaxies defined from the Extended Disk Galaxy Exploration Science (EDGES) Survey. The gravitational potentials of each galaxy are traced using rotation curves derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations of neutral hydrogen (HI). The measured rotation curves are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6 μm images for the stellar content, the HI observations for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. The HI kinematics are supplemented with optical integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations to measure the central ionized gas kinematics in 26 galaxies, including 13 galaxies which are presented for the first time in this paper. Distributions of baryonic-to-total mass ratios are determined from the rotation curve decompositions under different assumptions about the contribution of the stellar component, and are compared to global and radial properties of the dominant stellar populations extracted from optical and near-infrared photometry. Galaxies are grouped into clusters of similar baryonic-to-total mass distributions to examine whether they also exhibit similar star and gas properties. The radial distribution of baryonic-to-total mass in a galaxy does not appear to correlate with any characteristics of its star formation history.

  20. Study of new germanium bolometers with interleaved concentric electrodes for non-baryonic cold dark matter direct detection in the Edelweiss-II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domange, J.

    2011-09-01

    EDELWEISS is a direct non-baryonic cold dark matter detection experiment in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (also known as WIMPs), which currently constitute the most popular candidates to account for the missing mass in the Universe. To this purpose, EDELWEISS uses germanium bolometers at cryogenic temperature (20 mK approximately) in the Underground Laboratory of Modane (LSM) at the French-Italian border. Since 2008, a new type of detector is operated, equipped with concentric electrodes to optimize the rejection of surface events (coplanar-grid detectors). This thesis work is divided into several research orientations. First, we carried out measurements concerning charge collection in the crystals. The velocity laws of the carriers (electrons and holes) have been determined in germanium at 20 mK in the orientation, and a complete study of charge sharing has been done, including an evaluation of the transport anisotropy and of the straggling of the carriers. These results lead to a better understanding of the inner properties of the EDELWEISS detectors. Then, studies relating to the improvement of the performances were carried out. In particular, we have optimized the space-charge cancellation procedure in the crystals and improved the passive rejection of surface events (β). The fiducial volume of the detectors has been evaluated using two X-ray lines from cosmically activated radionuclides: 68 Ge and 65 Zn. Finally, an exhaustive study of the low energy spectra has been carried out, which makes it possible to develop a systematic analysis method for the search of low-mass WIMPs in EDELWEISS. (author)

  1. Calculation of baryon chemical potential and strangeness chemical potential in resonance matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Yuanyong; Hu Shouyang; Lu Zhongdao

    2006-01-01

    Based on the high energy heavy-ion collisions statistical model, the baryon chemical potential and strangeness chemical potential are calculated for resonance matter with net baryon density and net strangeness density under given temperature. Furthermore, the relationship between net baryon density, net strangeness density and baryon chemical potential, strangeness chemical potential are analyzed. The results show that baryon chemical potential and strangeness chemical potential increase with net baryon density and net strangeness density increasing, the change of net baryon density affects baryon chemical potential and strangeness chemical potential more strongly than the change of net strangeness density. (authors)

  2. Measurement of matter-antimatter differences in beauty baryon decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufour, L.; Mulder, M; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Tolk, S.; van Veghel, M.

    Differences in the behaviour of matter and antimatter have been observed in K and B meson decays, but not yet in any baryon decay. Such differences are associated with the non-invariance of fundamental interactions under the combined chargeconjugation and parity transformations, known as CP

  3. Measurement of matter-antimatter differences in beauty baryon decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Everse, LA; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M-O.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; Bezshyiko, I.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.D.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, C.R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N.Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; de Miranda, J. M.; Paula, L.E.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T. M.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, Mark; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; Garcia Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Carvalho-Gaspar, M.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T. J.; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.Q.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffth, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.J.G.A.M.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.M.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.M.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T. E.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, S.C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli-Boneschi, F.; Martinez-Santos, D.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B. T.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, Karl; von Müller, L.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J.G.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, E.A.; Owen, R.P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Parker, W.S; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, D.A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, M. E.; Price, J.D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, C.A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, Y.W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, Jennifer S; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, L.E.T.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, R. H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; De Oliveira, L. Silva; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; Van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M. N.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, N.T.M.T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, M.A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel-Plandsoen, M.M.; Velthuis, M.J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; De Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, John; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, James F; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.J.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    Differences in the behaviour of matter and antimatter have been observed in K and B meson decays, but not yet in any baryon decay. Such differences are associated with the non-invariance of fundamental interactions under the combined charge-conjugation and parity transformations, known as CP

  4. Moduli induced cogenesis of baryon asymmetry and dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansi Dhuria

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We study a cogenesis mechanism in which the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe and the dark matter abundance can be produced simultaneously at low reheating temperature without violating baryon number in the fundamental interactions. In particular, we consider a model which can be realized in the context of type IIB large volume string compactifications. The matter superfields in this model include additional pairs of color triplet and singlet superfields in addition to the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM superfields. Assuming that the mass of the additional singlet fermions is O(GeV and of the color triplet fermions is O(TeV, we show that the modulus dominantly decays into the additional color triplet superfields. After soft supersymmetry (SUSY breaking, the lightest eigenstate of scalar component of color triplet superfield further decays into fermionic component of singlet superfield and quarks without violating baryon number. Imposing discrete Z2 symmetry, it follows that the singlet fermion will not further decay into the SM particles and therefore it can be considered as a stable asymmetric dark matter (ADM component. We find that the decay of the lightest eigenstate of scalar component of color triplet superfield gives the observed baryon asymmetry in the visible sector, an asymmetric dark matter component with the right abundance and naturally explains cosmic coincidence.

  5. Tying dark matter to baryons with self-interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplinghat, Manoj; Keeley, Ryan E; Linden, Tim; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2014-07-11

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) models have been proposed to solve the small-scale issues with the collisionless cold dark matter paradigm. We derive equilibrium solutions in these SIDM models for the dark matter halo density profile including the gravitational potential of both baryons and dark matter. Self-interactions drive dark matter to be isothermal and this ties the core sizes and shapes of dark matter halos to the spatial distribution of the stars, a radical departure from previous expectations and from cold dark matter predictions. Compared to predictions of SIDM-only simulations, the core sizes are smaller and the core densities are higher, with the largest effects in baryon-dominated galaxies. As an example, we find a core size around 0.3 kpc for dark matter in the Milky Way, more than an order of magnitude smaller than the core size from SIDM-only simulations, which has important implications for indirect searches of SIDM candidates.

  6. Sterile neutrinos as the origin of dark and baryonic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti, Laurent; Drewes, Marco; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2013-02-08

    We demonstrate for the first time that three sterile neutrinos alone can simultaneously explain neutrino oscillations, the observed dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe without new physics above the Fermi scale. The key new point of our analysis is leptogenesis after sphaleron freeze-out, which leads to resonant dark matter production, evading thus the constraints on sterile neutrino dark matter from structure formation and x-ray searches. We identify the range of sterile neutrino properties that is consistent with all known constraints. We find a domain of parameters where the new particles can be found with present day experimental techniques, using upgrades to existing experimental facilities.

  7. Ultimate energy density of observable cold baryonic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimer, James M; Prakash, Madappa

    2005-03-25

    We demonstrate that the largest measured mass of a neutron star establishes an upper bound to the energy density of observable cold baryonic matter. An equation of state-independent expression satisfied by both normal neutron stars and self-bound quark matter stars is derived for the largest energy density of matter inside stars as a function of their masses. The largest observed mass sets the lowest upper limit to the density. Implications from existing and future neutron star mass measurements are discussed.

  8. White noise from dark matter: 21 cm observations of early baryon collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurek, Kathryn M.; Hogan, Craig J.

    2007-01-01

    In concordance cosmology, dark matter density perturbations generated by inflation lead to nonlinear, virialized minihalos, into which baryons collapse at redshift z∼20. We survey here novel baryon evolution produced by a modification of the power spectrum from white noise density perturbations at scales below k∼10h Mpc -1 (the smallest scales currently measured with the Lyman-α forest). Exotic dark matter dynamics, such as would arise from scalar dark matter with a late phase transition (similar to an axion, but with lower mass), or primordial black hole dark matter, create such an amplification of small scale power. The dark matter produced in such a phase transition collapses into minihalos, with a size given by the dark matter mass within the horizon at the phase transition. If the mass of the initial minihalos is larger than ∼10 -3 M · , the modified power spectrum is found to cause widespread baryon collapse earlier than standard ΛCDM, leading to earlier gas heating. It also results in higher spin temperature of the baryons in the 21 cm line relative to ΛCDM at redshifts z>20 if the mass of the minihalo is larger than 1M · . It is estimated that experiments probing 21 cm radiation at high redshift will contribute a significant constraint on dark matter models of this type for initial minihalos larger than ∼10M · . These experiments may also detect (or rule out) primordial black holes as the dark matter in the window 30M · H 3 M · still left open by strong microlensing experiments and other astrophysical constraints. Early experiments reaching to z≅15 will constrain minihalos down to ∼10 3 M ·

  9. Simultaneous Generation of WIMP Miracle-like Densities of Baryons and Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, John

    2012-01-01

    The observed density of dark matter is of the magnitude expected for a thermal relic weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP). In addition, the observed baryon density is within an order of magnitude of the dark matter density. This suggests that the baryon density is physically related to a typical thermal relic WIMP dark matter density. We present a model which simultaneously generates thermal relic WIMP-like densities for both baryons and dark matter by modifying a large initial baryon asymmetry. Production of unstable scalars carrying baryon number at the LHC would be a clear signature of the model.

  10. Baryon-strangeness correlations: a diagnostic of stronglyinteracting matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Volker; Majumder, Abhijit; Randrup, Jorgen

    2005-10-07

    The correlation between baryon number and strangeness elucidates the nature of strongly interacting matter. This diagnostic can be extracted theoretically from lattice QCD calculations and experimentally from event-by-event fluctuations. The analysis of present lattice results above the critical temperature severely limits the presence of q{bar q} bound states, thus supporting a picture of independent (quasi)quarks. Details may be found in [1].

  11. Baryon-strangeness correlations: a diagnostic of stronglyinteracting matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Volker; Majumder, Abhijit; Randrup, Jorgen

    2005-09-29

    The correlation between baryon number and strangeness elucidates the nature of strongly interacting matter, such as that formed transiently in high-energy nuclear collisions. This diagnostic can be extracted theoretically from lattice QCD calculations and experimentally from event-by-event fluctuations. The analysis of present lattice results above the critical temperature severely limits the presence of q-qbarbound states, thus supporting a picture of independent (quasi)quarks.

  12. Vorticity and Λ polarization in baryon rich matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baznat, Mircea; Gudima, Konstantin; Prokhorov, George; Sorin, Alexander; Teryaev, Oleg; Zakharov, Valentin

    2018-02-01

    The polarization of Λ hyperons due to axial chiral vortical effect is discussed. The effect is proportional to (strange) chemical potential and is pronounced at lower energies in baryon-rich matter. The polarization of ¯ has the same sihn and larger magnitude. The emergence of vortical structures is observed in kinetic QGSM models. The hydrodynamical helicity separation receives the contribution of longitudinal velocity and vorticity implying the quadrupole structure of the latter. The transition from the quark vortical effects to baryons in confined phase may be achieved by exploring the axial charge. At the hadronic level the polarization corresponds to the cores of quantized vortices in pionic superfluid. The chiral vortical effects may be also studied in the frmework of Wigner function establishing the relation to the thermodynamical approach to polarization.

  13. Helioseismology with long-range dark matter-baryon interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, I.; Panci, Paolo; Silk, J.

    2014-01-01

    Assuming the existence of a primordial asymmetry in the dark sector, we study how long-range dark matter (DM)-baryon interactions, induced by the kinetic mixing of a new U(1) gauge boson and a photon, affect the evolution of the Sun and, in turn, the sound speed the profile obtained from...... helioseismology. Thanks to the explicit dependence on the exchanged momenta in the differential cross section (Rutherford-like scattering), we find that DM particles with a mass of similar to 10 GeV, kinetic mixing parameter of the order of 10(-9), and a mediator with a mass smaller than a few MeV improve...

  14. Dark matter as a weakly coupled dark baryon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitridate, Andrea; Redi, Michele; Smirnov, Juri; Strumia, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    Dark Matter might be an accidentally stable baryon of a new confining gauge interaction. We extend previous studies exploring the possibility that the DM is made of dark quarks heavier than the dark confinement scale. The resulting phenomenology contains new unusual elements: a two-stage DM cosmology (freeze-out followed by dark condensation), a large DM annihilation cross section through recombination of dark quarks (allowing to fit the positron excess). Light dark glue-balls are relatively long lived and give extra cosmological effects; DM itself can remain radioactive.

  15. Theories relating baryon asymmetry and dark matter: a Mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eMorisi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nature of dark matter and the origin of the baryon asymmetry are two of the deepest mysteries of modern particle physics. In the absence of hints regarding a possible solution to these mysteries, many approaches have been developed to tackle them simultaneously { leading to very diverse and rich models}. We give a short review where we describe the general features of some of these models and an overview on the general problem. We also propose a diagrammatic notation to label the different models.

  16. Development, simulation and test of transition radiation detector prototypes for the compressed baryonic matter experiment at the facility for antiproton and ion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Cyrano S.H.

    2014-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the development of a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR. The TRD sub-detector will contribute to the global particle identification and track reconstruction of charged particles. The technical design goal for the TRD is to identify 90% electrons with a maximum pion contamination of 1%. The TRD and Ring Image CHerenkov (RICH) detector should reach a common pion rejection of 10{sup 4}, in order to measure charmonium and low-mass vector mesons. The position resolution should be between 200 and 300 μm in the anode wire direction. The most demanding aspect of the CBM TRD design is the high interaction rate of up to 10{sup 7} Hz resulting in a charged particle rate of up to 100 kHz/cm{sup 2} in the central part of the detector planes at SIS300 conditions. It is crucial to find the optimal radiator detector combination with a minimum material budget to limit scattering and background due to conversions and at the same time reach a sufficient pion rejection and position resolution. In this thesis it is confirmed that a Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) with a Xe/CO{sub 2} gas thickness of 12mm provides sufficient absorption probability for TR-photons in combination with self-supporting low density PE foam or micro-structured foil radiators. A continuous investigation aiming at an optimal wire and pad-plane geometry, as well as a minimization of the material budget between active gas and radiator has been presented in hard- and software. A minimum photon absorption cross-section of the entrance window was realized with a thermally stretched aluminized Kapton foil, glued to a G11 support grid support frame. This structure limits the mechanical deformation of the entire window to 1mm/mbar. All MWPC prototypes include two wire planes. A symmetric amplification region of 2 x (3, 3.5 or 4)mm is followed by a short drift region of 6, 5 or 4 mm. The drift region reduces the gain

  17. Development, simulation and test of transition radiation detector prototypes for the compressed baryonic matter experiment at the facility for antiproton and ion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, Cyrano S.H.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the development of a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR. The TRD sub-detector will contribute to the global particle identification and track reconstruction of charged particles. The technical design goal for the TRD is to identify 90% electrons with a maximum pion contamination of 1%. The TRD and Ring Image CHerenkov (RICH) detector should reach a common pion rejection of 10 4 , in order to measure charmonium and low-mass vector mesons. The position resolution should be between 200 and 300 μm in the anode wire direction. The most demanding aspect of the CBM TRD design is the high interaction rate of up to 10 7 Hz resulting in a charged particle rate of up to 100 kHz/cm 2 in the central part of the detector planes at SIS300 conditions. It is crucial to find the optimal radiator detector combination with a minimum material budget to limit scattering and background due to conversions and at the same time reach a sufficient pion rejection and position resolution. In this thesis it is confirmed that a Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) with a Xe/CO 2 gas thickness of 12mm provides sufficient absorption probability for TR-photons in combination with self-supporting low density PE foam or micro-structured foil radiators. A continuous investigation aiming at an optimal wire and pad-plane geometry, as well as a minimization of the material budget between active gas and radiator has been presented in hard- and software. A minimum photon absorption cross-section of the entrance window was realized with a thermally stretched aluminized Kapton foil, glued to a G11 support grid support frame. This structure limits the mechanical deformation of the entire window to 1mm/mbar. All MWPC prototypes include two wire planes. A symmetric amplification region of 2 x (3, 3.5 or 4)mm is followed by a short drift region of 6, 5 or 4 mm. The drift region reduces the gain variation due to

  18. A simple testable model of baryon number violation: Baryogenesis, dark matter, neutron-antineutron oscillation and collider signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Dutta, Bhaskar

    2018-04-01

    We study a simple TeV-scale model of baryon number violation which explains the observed proximity of the dark matter and baryon abundances. The model has constraints arising from both low and high-energy processes, and in particular, predicts a sizable rate for the neutron-antineutron (n - n bar) oscillation at low energy and the monojet signal at the LHC. We find an interesting complementarity among the constraints arising from the observed baryon asymmetry, ratio of dark matter and baryon abundances, n - n bar oscillation lifetime and the LHC monojet signal. There are regions in the parameter space where the n - n bar oscillation lifetime is found to be more constraining than the LHC constraints, which illustrates the importance of the next-generation n - n bar oscillation experiments.

  19. The baryonic Tully-Fisher relation and its implication for dark matter halos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trachternach, C.; de Blok, W. J. G.; McGaugh, S. S.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Dettmar, R. -J.

    2009-01-01

    Context. The baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTF) is a fundamental relation between baryonic mass and maximum rotation velocity. It can be used to estimate distances, as well as to constrain the properties of dark matter and its relation with the visible matter. Aims. In this paper, we explore if

  20. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  1. The diverse density profiles of galaxy clusters with self-interacting dark matter plus baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andrew; Massey, Richard; Eke, Vincent; Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Bahé, Yannick; Barnes, David J.; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Kay, Scott T.; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop

    2018-02-01

    We present the first simulated galaxy clusters (M200 > 1014 M⊙) with both self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) and baryonic physics. They exhibit a greater diversity in both dark matter and stellar density profiles than their counterparts in simulations with collisionless dark matter (CDM), which is generated by the complex interplay between dark matter self-interactions and baryonic physics. Despite variations in formation history, we demonstrate that analytical Jeans modelling predicts the SIDM density profiles remarkably well, and the diverse properties of the haloes can be understood in terms of their different final baryon distributions.

  2. Baryonic forces and hyperons in nuclear matter from SU(3) chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petschauer, Stefan Karl

    2016-02-12

    In this work the baryon-baryon interaction is studied at next-to-leading order in SU(3) chiral effective field theory and applied to hyperon-nucleon scattering. The properties of hyperons in isospin-symmetric as well as asymmetric nuclear matter are calculated within the Bruecker-Hartree-Fock formalism. Moreover, the leading three-baryon interaction is derived and its low-energy constants are estimated from decuplet intermediate states. We conclude, that chiral effective field theory is a well-suited tool to describe the baryonic forces.

  3. Simultaneous generation of WIMP miracle-like densities of baryons and dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, John

    2011-11-01

    The observed density of dark matter is of the magnitude expected for a thermal relic weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP). In addition, the observed baryon density is within an order of magnitude of the dark matter density. This suggests that the baryon density is physically related to a typical thermal relic WIMP dark matter density. We present a model which simultaneously generates thermal relic WIMP-like densities for both baryons and dark matter by modifying a large initial baryon asymmetry. Dark matter is due to O(100) GeV gauge singlet scalars produced in the annihilation of the O(TeV) colored scalars which are responsible for the final thermal WIMP-like baryon asymmetry. The requirement of no baryon washout implies that there are two gauge singlet scalars. The low-temperature transfer of the asymmetry to conventional baryons can be understood if the long-lived O(TeV) colored scalars have large hypercharge, |Y|>4/3. Production of such scalars at the LHC would be a clear signature of the model.

  4. Measurement of matter-antimatter differences in beauty baryon decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Merli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Differences in the behaviour of matter and antimatter have been observed in $K$ and $B$ meson decays, but not yet in any baryon decay. Such differences are associated with the non-invariance of fundamental interactions under the combined charge-conjugation and parity transformations, known as $C\\!P$ violation. Using data from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, a search is made for $C\\!P$-violating asymmetries in the decay angle distributions of $\\Lambda_b^0$ baryons decaying to $p\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $p\\pi^-K^+K^-m$ final states. These four-body hadronic decays are a promising place to search for sources of $C\\!P$ violation both within and beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. We find evidence for $C\\!P$ violation in $\\Lambda_b^0$ to $p\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays with a statistical significance corresponding to 3.3 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. This represents the first evidence for $C\\!P$ violation in the baryon sector.

  5. The search for exotic baryons at the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deconinck, Wouter

    2008-07-15

    One of the interesting questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory that governs the interactions between quarks and gluons, has been whether it is possible to observe hadrons which can not be explained as a combination of only two or three valence quarks. In numerous searches the existence of these exotic hadrons could not be confirmed. Recently, calculations based on the quark soliton model predicted the narrow exotic baryons {theta}{sup +} and {xi}{sup --}. A narrow resonance identified as the {theta}{sup +} was observed by several experiments at the predicted mass of 1540 MeV, but later followed by several dedicated experiments that could not confirm these positive results. At the HERMES experiment a search for the quasi-real photoproduction of the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} on a deuterium target and the subsequent decay through pK{sup 0}{sub S} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} revealed a narrow resonance in the pK{sup 0}{sub S} invariant mass distribution at 1528 MeV. In the search for the corresponding antiparticle {xi}{sup --} the result is consistent with zero events. In this thesis we present the search for the exotic baryon {xi}{sup --} on a deuterium target in the data sample used for the observation of the {theta}{sup +}. An upper limit on the cross section of the exotic baryon {xi}{sup --} is determined. The search for the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} on hydrogen and deuterium targets at the HERMES experiment is extensively discussed. The event mixing method can be used to estimate the distribution of background events. Several difficulties with this method were addressed, but the background description in the case of the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} remains unconvincing. Between the years 2002 and 2005 the HERMES experiment operated with a magnetic holding field around the hydrogen target. A method for the reconstruction of displaced vertices in this field was developed. The data collected during the years 2006 and 2007 offer an integrated

  6. The search for exotic baryons at the HERMES experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconinck, Wouter

    2008-07-01

    One of the interesting questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory that governs the interactions between quarks and gluons, has been whether it is possible to observe hadrons which can not be explained as a combination of only two or three valence quarks. In numerous searches the existence of these exotic hadrons could not be confirmed. Recently, calculations based on the quark soliton model predicted the narrow exotic baryons Θ + and Ξ -- . A narrow resonance identified as the Θ + was observed by several experiments at the predicted mass of 1540 MeV, but later followed by several dedicated experiments that could not confirm these positive results. At the HERMES experiment a search for the quasi-real photoproduction of the exotic baryon Θ + on a deuterium target and the subsequent decay through pK 0 S → pπ + π - revealed a narrow resonance in the pK 0 S invariant mass distribution at 1528 MeV. In the search for the corresponding antiparticle Ξ -- the result is consistent with zero events. In this thesis we present the search for the exotic baryon Ξ -- on a deuterium target in the data sample used for the observation of the Θ + . An upper limit on the cross section of the exotic baryon Ξ -- is determined. The search for the exotic baryon Θ + on hydrogen and deuterium targets at the HERMES experiment is extensively discussed. The event mixing method can be used to estimate the distribution of background events. Several difficulties with this method were addressed, but the background description in the case of the exotic baryon Θ + remains unconvincing. Between the years 2002 and 2005 the HERMES experiment operated with a magnetic holding field around the hydrogen target. A method for the reconstruction of displaced vertices in this field was developed. The data collected during the years 2006 and 2007 offer an integrated luminosity that is several times higher than in previous data sets. After investigating all data sets collected with the HERMES

  7. The direct detection of non-baryonic dark matter in the Galaxy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, M. R. S.

    1998-05-01

    It has been argued in a number of recent papers that dark matter is in the form of Jupiter-mass primordial black holes that betray their presence by microlensing quasars. This lensing accounts for a number of characteristic properties of quasar light curves, in both single quasars and gravitationally lensed multiple systems, that are not explained on the basis of intrinsic variation. One prediction of this idea is that Jupiter-mass bodies will be detected by the MACHO experiment as short events of about 2 d duration, although the expected frequency of detection is still very hard to estimate. However, the recent report by the MACHO group of the detection of a Jupiter-mass body in the direction of the Galactic bulge is consistent with this prediction, and is possibly the first direct detection of non-baryonic matter in the Galaxy.

  8. Massive graviton dark matter with environment dependent mass: A natural explanation of the dark matter-baryon ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Katsuki; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2017-11-01

    We propose a scenario that can naturally explain the observed dark matter-baryon ratio in the context of bimetric theory with a chameleon field. We introduce two additional gravitational degrees of freedom, the massive graviton and the chameleon field, corresponding to dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The chameleon field is assumed to be nonminimally coupled to dark matter, i.e., the massive graviton, through the graviton mass terms. We find that the dark matter-baryon ratio is dynamically adjusted to the observed value due to the energy transfer by the chameleon field. As a result, the model can explain the observed dark matter-baryon ratio independently from the initial abundance of them.

  9. Baryon symmetric big-bang cosmology. [matter-antimatter symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    The framework of baryon-symmetric big-bang cosmology offers the greatest potential for deducing the evolution of the universe as a consequence of physical laws and processes with the minimum number of arbitrary assumptions as to initial conditions in the big-bang. In addition, it offers the possibility of explaining the photon-baryon ratio in the universe and how galaxies and galaxy clusters are formed, and also provides the only acceptable explanation at present for the origin of the cosmic gamma ray background radiation.

  10. Rocketborne instrument to search for infrared emission from baryonic dark matter in galactic halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James J.; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Lange, Andrew E.; Matsumoto, Toshio; Uemizu, K.; Watabe, Toyoki; Yost, S. A.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Forrest, William J.; Pipher, Judith L.; Price, Stephan D.

    1998-08-01

    We describe the design and performance of the near IR telescope experiment (NITE), a rocket-borne instrument designed to search for IR emission from baryonic dark matter in the halos of nearby edge-on spiral galaxies. A 256 X 256 InSb array at the focus of a 16.5 cm liquid-helium- cooled telescope achieves near-background-limited sensitivity in a 3.5-5.5 micrometers waveband where the local foreground from zodiacal emission is at a minimum. This experiment represents the first scientific application of a low-background IR InSb array, a precursor to the InSb arrays intended for SIRTF, in a space-borne observation. We describe the flight performance of the instrument and preliminary scientific result from an observation of NGC 4565.

  11. Study of Charm Baryons with the BaBar Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Brian Aa.

    2006-01-01

    The authors report on several studies of charm baryon production and decays by the BABAR collaboration. They confirm previous observations of the Ξ' c 0/+ , Ξ c (2980) + and Ξ c (3077) + baryons, measure branching ratios for Cabibbo-suppressed Λ c + decays and use baryon decays to study the properties of the light-quark baryons, (Omega) - and Ξ(1690) 0

  12. Properties of ΣQ*, ΞQ* and ΩQ* heavy baryons in cold nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, K.; Er, N.

    2018-02-01

    The in-medium properties of the heavy spin-3/2 ΣQ*, ΞQ* and ΩQ* baryons with Q being b or c quark are investigated. The shifts in some spectroscopic parameters of these particles due to the saturated cold nuclear matter are calculated. The variations of those parameters with respect to the changes in the density of the cold nuclear medium are studied, as well. It is observed that the parameters of ΣQ* baryons are considerably affected by the nuclear matter compared to the ΞQ* and ΩQ* particles that roughly do not see the medium. The results obtained may be used in analyses of the data to be provided by the in-medium experiments like PANDA.

  13. Distinguishing cold dark matter dwarfs from self-interacting dark matter dwarfs in baryonic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Emily; Fitts, Alex; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Our collaboration has simulated several high-resolution (mbaryon = 500Mo, mdm = 2500Mo) cosmological zoom-in simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies. We simulate each galaxy in standard cold dark matter (ΛCDM) as well as a self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) (with a cross section of σ/m ~ 1 cm2/g), both with and without baryons, to identify distinguishing characteristics between the two. The simulations are run using GIZMO, a meshless-finite-mass (MFM) hydrodynamical code, and are part of the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. By analyzing both the global properties and inner structure of the dwarfs in varying dark matter prescriptions, we provide a side-by-side comparison of isolated, dark matter dominated galaxies at the mass scale where differences in the two models of dark matter are thought to be the most obvious. We find that the edge of classical dwarfs and ultra-faint dwarfs (UFDs) (at ~105 Mo) provides the clearest window for distinguishing between the two theories. Here our SIDM galaxies continue to display a cored inner profile unlike their CDM counterparts. The SIDM versions of each galaxy also have measurably lower stellar velocity dispersions than their CDM counterparts.

  14. Constraints on the interaction between dark matter and Baryons from cooling flow clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, B; Wu, X P

    2001-08-06

    Other nongravitational heating processes are needed to resolve the disagreement between the absence of cool gas components in the centers of galaxy clusters revealed recently by Chandra and XMM observations and the expectations of conventional radiative cooling models. We propose that the interaction between dark matter and baryonic matter may act as an alternative for the reheating of intracluster medium (ICM) in the inner regions of clusters, in which kinetic energy of dark matter is transported to ICM to balance radiative cooling. Using the Chandra and XMM data, we set a useful constraint on the dark-matter-baryon cross section: sigma(xp)/m(x) approximately 1x10(-25) cm(2) GeV-1, where m(x) is the mass of dark matter particles.

  15. Lattice QCD for Baryon Rich Matter – Beyond Taylor Expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornyakov, V.; Boyda, D.; Goy, V.; Molochkov, A.; Nakamura, A.; Nikolaev, A.; Zakharov, V.I.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss our study for exploring the QCD phase diagram based on the lattice QCD. To go beyond the Taylor expansion and to reach higher density regions, we employ the canonical approach. In order to produce lattice data which meet experimental situation as much as possible, we propose a canonical approach with the charge and baryon number. We present our lattice QCD GPU code for this project which employs the clover improved Wilson fermions and Iwasaki gauge action to investigate pure imaginary chemical potential.

  16. Is there a dichotomy in the Dark Matter as well as in the Baryonic Matter properties of ellipticals?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Napolitano, NR; Capaccioli, M; Arnaboldi, M; Merrifield, MR; Douglas, NG; Kuijken, K; Romanowsky, AJ; Freeman, KC; Ryder, SD; Pisano, DJ; Walker, MA; Freeman, KC

    2004-01-01

    We have found a correlation between the M/L global gradients and the structural parameters of the luminous components of a sample of 19 early-type galaxies. Such a correlation supports the hypothesis that there is a connection between the dark matter content and the evolution of the baryonic

  17. Emergence of the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation from dark matter-baryon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famaey, Benoit; Khoury, Justin; Penco, Riccardo

    2018-03-01

    The observed tightness of the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation (MDAR) poses a fine-tuning challenge to current models of galaxy formation. We propose that this relation could arise from collisional interactions between baryons and dark matter (DM) particles, without the need for modification of gravity or ad hoc feedback processes. We assume that these interactions satisfy the following three conditions: (i) the relaxation time of DM particles is comparable to the dynamical time in disk galaxies; (ii) DM exchanges energy with baryons due to elastic collisions; (iii) the product between the baryon-DM cross section and the typical energy exchanged in a collision is inversely proportional to the DM number density. As a proof of principle, we present an example of a particle physics model that gives a DM-baryon cross section with the desired density and velocity dependence. For consistency with direct detection constraints, our DM particles must be either very light (m ll mb) or very heavy (mgg mb), corresponding respectively to heating and cooling of DM by baryons. In both cases, our mechanism applies and an equilibrium configuration can in principle be reached. In this exploratory paper, we focus on the heavy DM/cooling case because it is technically simpler, since the average energy exchanged turns out to be approximately constant throughout galaxies. Under these assumptions, we find that rotationally-supported disk galaxies could naturally settle to equilibrium configurations satisfying a MDAR at all radii without invoking finely tuned feedback processes. We also discuss issues related to the small scale clumpiness of baryons, as well as predictions for pressure-supported systems. We argue in particular that galaxy clusters do not follow the MDAR despite being DM-dominated because they have not reached their equilibrium configuration. Finally, we revisit existing phenomenological, astrophysical and cosmological constraints on baryon-DM interactions in light

  18. Revisiting the gravitino dark matter and baryon asymmetry from Q-ball decay in gauge mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasuya, Shinta, E-mail: kasuya@kanagawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Kanagawa University, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, PO Box 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Kawasaki, Masahiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Yamada, Masaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2013-10-07

    We reconsider the Q-ball decay and reinvestigate the scenario that the amount of the baryons and the gravitino dark matter is naturally explained by the decay of the Q balls in the gauge-mediated SUSY breaking. We refine the decay rates into baryons, NLSPs, and gravitinos, and estimate their branching ratios based on the consideration of Pauli blocking. We obtain a smaller branching into gravitinos than the previous estimate, and the NLSPs are more produced by the Q-ball decay. However, the efficient annihilations of NLSPs occur afterward so that their abundance does not spoil the successful BBN and they only produce negligible amount of the gravitinos to the dark matter density by their decay. In this way, we find that the scenario with the direct production of the gravitino dark matter from the Q-ball decay works naturally.

  19. Evolution of Mass and Velocity Field in the Cosmic Web: Comparison between Baryonic and Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weishan; Feng, Long-Long

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the evolution of the cosmic web since z = 5 in grid-based cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, focusing on the mass and velocity fields of both baryonic and cold dark matter. The tidal tensor of density is used as the main method for web identification, with λ th = 0.2-1.2. The evolution trends in baryonic and dark matter are similar, although moderate differences are observed. Sheets appear early, and their large-scale pattern may have been set up by z = 3. In terms of mass, filaments supersede sheets as the primary collapsing structures from z ˜ 2-3. Tenuous filaments assembled with each other to form prominent ones at z dark matter field, and is even moderately stronger between {\\boldsymbol{ω }} and {{\\boldsymbol{e}}}1, and ω and {{\\boldsymbol{e}}}3. Compared with dark matter, there is slightly less baryonic matter found residing in filaments and clusters, and its vorticity developed more significantly below 2-3 Mpc. These differences may be underestimated because of the limited resolution and lack of star formation in our simulation. The impact of the change of dominant structures in overdense regions at z ˜ 2-3 on galaxy formation and evolution is shortly discussed.

  20. Was ordinary matter synthesised from mirror matter? An attempt to explain why $\\Omega_{Baryon} \\approx 0.2\\Omega_{Dark}$

    OpenAIRE

    Foot, R.; Volkas, R. R.

    2003-01-01

    The cosmological dust has begun to settle. A likely picture is a universe comprised (predominantly) of three components: ordinary baryons ($\\Omega_B \\approx 0.05$), non-baryonic dark matter ($\\Omega_{Dark} \\approx 0.22$) and dark energy ($\\Omega_{\\Lambda} \\approx 0.7$). We suggest that the observed similarity of the abundances of ordinary baryons and non-baryonic dark matter ($\\Omega_{B}/\\Omega_{Dark} \\approx 0.20$) hints at an underlying similarity between the fundamental properties of ordin...

  1. Interplay of mesonic and baryonic degrees of freedom in quark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Naseemuddin

    2015-11-03

    In this work we study the influence of mesonic and baryonic fluctuations on the phase diagram of quark matter with two flavors. By examining the hadronization process and related techniques, we derive effective low-energy models, where the gluons are integrated out. To be able to compare our model calculations with lattice results at finite chemical potential, we investigate a QCD-like theory with two colors, where the sign-problem is absent. To this end we introduce a quark-meson-diquark model, where the bosonic diquarks play the role of colorless, baryonic degrees of freedom competing with the mesons. To access the phase diagram and determine the phases of chiral and diquark condensation, we employ a functional renormalization group approach allowing for a systematic non-perturbative truncation scheme. Interesting phenomena arise that are known from condensed matter physics, as the BEC-BSC crossover and a phase of condensation within domains. We explore the impact of running wave function renormalizations and Yukawa couplings for the quarks and the boson fields on top of the scale dependence of the effective potential. In the course of this we discuss the Silver Blaze property and its realization within a functional approach. In parallel, we formulate a quark-meson-diquark-baryon model for physical QCD as a low-energy effective theory for baryonic matter at high density, and discuss the relevance of the diquark and baryon degrees of freedom. In this sense, we compute a phase diagram for QCD from functional methods, including a color superconducting phase.

  2. Marriage à-la-MOND: Baryonic dark matter in galaxy clusters and the cooling flow puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2008-05-01

    I start with a brief introduction to MOND phenomenology and its possible roots in cosmology—a notion that may turn out to be the most far reaching aspect of MOND. Next I discuss the implications of MOND for the dark matter (DM) doctrine: MOND's successes imply that baryons determine everything. For DM this would mean that the puny tail of leftover baryons in galaxies wags the hefty DM dog. This has to occur in many intricate ways, and despite the haphazard construction history of galaxies—a very tall order. I then concentrate on galaxy clusters in light of MOND, which still requires some yet undetected cluster dark matter, presumably in some baryonic form (CBDM). This CBDM might contribute to the heating of the X-ray emitting gas and thus alleviate the cooling flow puzzle. MOND, qua theory of dynamics, does not directly enter the microphysics of the gas; however, it does force a new outlook on the role of DM in shaping the cluster gas dynamics: MOND tells us that the cluster DM is not cold dark matter, is not so abundant, and is not expected in galaxies; it is thus not subject to constraints on baryonic DM in galaxies. The mass in CBDM required in a whole cluster is, typically, similar to that in hot gas, but is rather more centrally concentrated, totally dominating the core. The CBDM contribution to the baryon budget in the universe is thus small. Its properties, deduced for isolated clusters, are consistent with the observations of the "bullet cluster". Its kinetic energy reservoir is much larger than that of the hot gas in the core, and would suffice to keep the gas hot for many cooling times. Heating can be effected in various ways depending on the exact nature of the CBDM, from very massive black holes to cool, compact gas clouds.

  3. Charmed Baryon $\\Lambda_c$ in Nuclear Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtani, Keisuke; Araki, Ken-ji; Oka, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Density dependences of the mass and self-energies of $\\Lambda_c$ in nulear matter are studied in the parity projected QCD sum rule. Effects of nuclear matter are taken into account through the quark and gluon condensates. It is found that the four-quark condensates give dominant contributions. As the density dependences of the four-quark condensates are not known well, we examine two hypotheses. One is based on the factorization hypothesis (F-type) and the other is derived from the perturbati...

  4. The Matter Density Distribution for Mesons and Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Tsapalis, A; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2003-01-01

    The matter density distribution inside a hadron is evaluated using gauge-invariant correlation functions within the quenched and the unquenched theory. Comparison with the charge density distribution suggests that hadron deformation is a consequence of the relativistic motion of the quarks.

  5. Topology change and tensor forces for the EoS of dense baryonic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Kyu; Rho, Mannque

    2014-01-01

    When skyrmions representing nucleons are put on crystal lattice and compressed to simulate high density, there is a transition above the normal nuclear matter density (n 0 ) from a matter consisting of skyrmions with integer baryon charge to a state of half-skyrmions with half-integer baryon charge. We exploit this observation in an effective field theory framework to access dense baryonic system. We find that the topology change involved in the transition implies changeover from a Fermi liquid structure to a non-Fermi liquid with the chiral condensate in the ''melted-off'' nucleon. The ∝ 80% of the nucleon mass that remains ''unmelted'', invariant under chiral transformation, points to the possible origin of the (bulk of) proton mass that is not encoded in the standard mechanism of spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. The topology change engenders a drastic modification of the nuclear tensor forces, thereby non-trivially affecting the EoS, in particular, the symmetry energy, for compact star matter. It brings in stiffening of the EoS needed to accommodate a neutron star of ∝ 2 solar mass. The strong effect on the EoS in general and in the tensor force structure in particular will also have impact on processes that could be measured at RIB-type accelerators. (orig.)

  6. Does dark matter consist of baryons of new stable family quarks?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregar, G.; Mankoc Borstnik, N. S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that the dark matter consists of clusters of the heavy family quarks and leptons with zero Yukawa couplings to the lower families. Such a family is predicted by the approach unifying spin and charges as the fifth family. We make a rough estimation of properties of baryons of these new family members, of their behavior during the evolution of the Universe and when scattering on the ordinary matter, and study possible limitations on the family properties due to the cosmological and direct experimental evidences.

  7. Structure formation by the fifth force: Segregation of baryons and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Baojiu; Zhao Hongsheng

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of N-body simulations with a scalar field coupled differently to cold dark matter (CDM) and baryons. The scalar field potential and coupling function are chosen such that the scalar field acquires a heavy mass in regions with high CDM density and thus behaves like a chameleon. We focus on how the existence of the scalar field affects the formation of nonlinear large-scale structures, and how the different couplings of the scalar field to baryons and CDM particles lead to different distributions and evolutions for these two matter species, both on large scales and inside virialized halos. As expected, the baryon-CDM segregation increases in regions where the fifth force is strong, and little segregation in dense regions. We also introduce an approximation method to identify the virialized halos in coupled scalar field models which takes into account the scalar field coupling and which is easy to implement numerically. It is found that the chameleon nature of the scalar field makes the internal density profiles of halos dependent on the environment in a very nontrivial way.

  8. A search for non-baryonic dark matter using an ionisation bolometer in the edelweiss experiment; Recherche de matiere sombre non-baryonique au moyen d`un bolometre a ionisation dans le cadre de l`experience edelweiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Stefano, Ph. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee]|[Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1998-09-24

    The EDELWEISS experiment is an underground direct-detection search for hypothetical supersymmetric WIMPs that might solve the problem of dark matter. We have employed a cryogenic 70 g germanium ionisation bolometer, in which a WIMP would scatter elastically off a nucleus, creating both a heat and an ionisation signal. To offset the various electronic noises present in our necessarily small signals, we have s applied an optimal filtering technique in the frequency domain. This allows us to reach resolutions of 1.2 keV FWHM at 122 keV on north channels. It also provides good separation right down to low energies between the expected signal of nuclear recoils, and the photonic background of electron recoils which ionize more for a given energy. Calibration data show that we are able to reject 99.7 % of this background, while keeping 95% of the signal. However, our 1.17 kg.days of data searching for WIMPs show a third population encroaching on the expected signal. This is probably due to low energy photons or electrons interacting in the outer layers of the crystal, where charges are incompletely collected. Nevertheless, by trading off half of the conserved signal, we still manage to reject 98.5 % of the background. Thus the raw rate of 40 evts/d/kg/keV yields a conservative 90 % upper limit on the signal of 0.6 evts/d/kg/keV. This represents nearly a three orders of magnitude improvement for EDELWEISS, and puts the predicted supersymmetric phase space within two orders of magnitude. (author) 196 refs.

  9. Heavy baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, J.G.

    1994-06-01

    We review the experimental and theoretical status of baryons containing one heavy quark. The charm and bottom baryon states are classified and their mass spectra are listed. The appropriate theoretical framework for the description of heavy baryons is the Heavy Quark Effective Theory, whose general ideas and methods are introduced and illustrated in specific examples. We present simple covariant expressions for the spin wave functions of heavy baryons including p-wave baryons. The covariant spin wave functions are used to determine the Heavy Quark Symmetry structure of flavour-changing current-induced transitions between heavy baryons as well as one-pion and one-photon transitions between heavy baryons of the same flavour. We discuss 1/m Q corrections to the current-induced transitions as well as the structure of heavy to light baryon transitions. Whenever possible we attempt to present numbers to compare with experiment by making use of further model-dependent assumptions as e.g. the constituent picture for light quarks. We highlight recent advances in the theoretical understanding of the inclusive decays of hadrons containing one heavy quark including polarization. For exclusive semileptonic decays we discuss rates, angular decay distributions and polarization effects. We provide an update of the experimental and theoretical status of lifetimes of heavy baryons and of exclusive nonleptonic two body decays of charm baryons. (orig.)

  10. Neutron star properties and the relativistic nuclear equation of state of many-baryon matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, F.; Weigel, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    A relativistic model of baryons interacting via the exchange of σ-, ω-, π- and ρ-mesons (scalar-vector-isovector (SVI) theory) is used to describe the properties of both dense and superdense matter. For the theoretical frame, we used the temperature-dependent Green's function formalism. The equation of state (EOS) is calculated for nuclear as well as neutron matter in the Hartree (H) and Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. The existence of phase transitions has been investigated. The isotherms of pressure as a function of density show for nuclear matter a critical temperature of about T c HF =16.6 MeV. (As in the usual scalar-vector (SV) theory, the phase transition is absent for neutron matter. A phase transition of both many-baryon systems in the high-pressure and high-density region, which has been found within the SV many-baryon theory, appears in the SVI theory too. The calculated maximum stable masses of neutron stars depend on 1. the underlying parameter set and/or 2. on the chosen approximation (i.e., H, HF; SV-, SVI theory, respectively). Hartree calculations lead to a mass stability limit of M max H ≤2.87 M sun (M max H ≤2.44 M sun when hyperons are taken into account). For the HF calculations we obtained M max HF ≤3.00 M sun (M max HF ≤2.85 M sun ). The corresponding maximum radii are (same notation as above) R H ≤13.2 km (R H ≤11.8 km), R HF ≤14.0 km (R HF ≤13.94 km).) The influence of the approximations, parameter sets and hyperons on the neutron star's moment of inertia is exhibited. (orig.)

  11. Hadron calorimeter module prototype for baryonic matter studies at Nuclotron

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrishchuk, O. P.; Ladygin, V. P.; Petukhov, Yu. P.; Sychkov, S. Ya

    2014-01-01

    The prototype of the hadron calorimeter module consisting of 66 scintillator/lead layers with the 15x15 cm^2 cross section and 5 nuclear interaction lengths has been designed and produced for the zero degree calorimeter of the BM@N experiment. The prototype has been tested with high energy muon beam of the U-70 accelerator at IHEP. The results of the beam test for different types of photo multipliers and light guides are presented. The results of the Monte-Carlo simulation of the calorimeter ...

  12. Influence of baryons on the orbital structure of dark matter haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, S. E.; Mao, S.; Kay, S. T.; Schaye, J.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Booth, C. M.

    2012-05-01

    We explore the dynamical signatures imprinted by baryons on dark matter haloes during the formation process using the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS), a set of state-of-the-art high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We present a detailed study of the effects of the implemented feedback prescriptions on the orbits of dark matter particles, stellar particles and subhaloes, analysing runs with no feedback, with stellar feedback and with feedback from supermassive black holes. We focus on the central regions (0.25r200) of haloes with virial masses ˜6 × 1013 (˜7 × 1011) h-1 M⊙ at z= 0 (2). We also investigate how the orbital content (relative fractions of the different orbital types) of these haloes depends on several key parameters such as their mass, redshift and dynamical state. The results of spectral analyses of the orbital content of these simulations are compared, and the change in fraction of box, tube and irregular orbits is quantified. Box orbits are found to dominate the orbital structure of dark matter haloes in cosmological simulations. There is a strong anticorrelation between the fraction of box orbits and the central baryon fraction. While radiative cooling acts to reduce the fraction of box orbits, strong feedback implementations result in a similar orbital distribution to that of the dark matter only case. The orbital content described by the stellar particles is found to be remarkably similar to that drawn from the orbits of dark matter particles, suggesting that either they have forgotten their dynamical history, or subhaloes bringing in stars are not biased significantly with respect to the main distribution. The orbital content of the subhaloes is in broad agreement with that seen in the outer regions of the particle distributions.

  13. Dark matter annihilation in the milky way galaxy: effects of baryonic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, F; Klypin, A; Flix, J; Martínez, M; Simonneau, E

    2004-12-10

    If the dark matter (DM), which is considered to constitute most of the mass of galaxies, is made of supersymmetric particles, the central region of our Galaxy should emit gamma rays produced by their annihilation. We use detailed models of the Milky Way to make accurate estimates of continuum gamma-ray fluxes. We argue that the most important effect, which was previously neglected, is the compression of the dark matter due to the infall of baryons to the galactic center: it boosts the expected signal by a factor 1000. To illustrate this effect, we computed the expected gamma fluxes in the minimal supergravity scenario. Our models predict that the signal could be detected at high confidence levels by imaging atmospheric C erenkov telescopes assuming that neutralinos make up most of the DM in the Universe.

  14. Scale-invariant hidden local symmetry, topology change, and dense baryonic matter. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paeng, Won-Gi; Kuo, Thomas T. S.; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Ma, Yong-Liang; Rho, Mannque

    2017-07-01

    Exploiting certain robust topological inputs from the skyrmion description of compressed baryonic matter with a scale-chiral symmetric Lagrangian, we predict the equation of state that is consistent with the properties of nuclear matter at the equilibrium density, supports the maximum mass of massive compact star ˜2 M⊙ and surprisingly gives the sound velocity close to the "conformal velocity" 1 /√{3 } at densities ≳3 n0 . At the core of this result is the observation that parity-doubling occurs in the nucleon structure as density goes above ˜2 n0 with a chiral-singlet mass m0˜(0.6 - 0.9 )mN , hinting at a possible up-to-date unsuspected source of proton mass and an emergence at high density of scale symmetry and flavor local symmetry, both hidden in the QCD vacuum.

  15. Neutrino masses, Baryon asymmetry, dark matter and the moduli problem - A complete framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Piyush

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in string theory have led to 'realistic' string compactifications which lead to moduli stabilization while generating a hierarchy between the Electroweak and Planck scales at the same time. However, this seems to suggest a rethink of our standard notions of cosmological evolution after the end of inflation and before the beginning of BBN. This epoch is crucial for addressing the issues of neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry, Dark Matter (DM) abundance and the moduli (gravitino) problem. We argue that within classes of realistic string compactifications as defined above, there generically exists a light modulus with a mass comparable to that of the gravitino which is typically much smaller than the Hubble parameter during inflation. Therefore, it is destabilized and generates a large late-time entropy when it decays. Thus, all known elegant mechanisms of generating the baryon asymmetry of the Universe in the literature have to take this fact into account. In this work, we find that it is still possible to naturally generate the observed baryon asymmetry of the Universe as well as light left-handed neutrino masses from a period of Affleck-Dine (AD) leptogenesis shortly after the end of inflation, in classes of realistic string constructions with a minimal extension of the MSSM below the unification scale (consisting only of right-handed neutrinos) and satisfying certain microscopic criteria described in the text. The AD mechanism has already been used to generate the baryon asymmetry in the literature; however in this work we have embedded the above mechanism within a framework well motivated from string theory and have tried to describe the epoch from the end of inflation to the beginning of BBN in a complete and self-consistent manner. The consequences of our analysis are as follows. The lightest left-handed neutrino is required to be virtually massless. The moduli (gravitino) problem can be naturally solved in this framework both within gravity

  16. A Testable Conspiracy: Simulating Baryonic Effects on Self-interacting Dark Matter Halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbert, Oliver D.; Bullock, James S.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Graus, Andrew S.; Rocha, Miguel

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the response of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) halos to the growth of galaxy potentials using idealized simulations, with each run in tandem with collisionless cold dark matter (CDM). We find that if the stellar potential strongly dominates in the central parts of a galaxy, then SIDM halos can be as dense as CDM halos on observable scales. For extreme cases, core collapse can occur, leading to SIDM halos that are denser and cuspier than their CDM counterparts. If the stellar potential is not dominant, then SIDM halos retain isothermal cores with densities far below CDM predictions. When a disk is present, the inner SIDM halo becomes more flattened in the disk plane than the CDM halo. These results are in excellent quantitative agreement with the predictions of Kaplinghat et al. We also simulated a cluster halo with a central stellar distribution similar to the brightest central galaxy of the cluster A2667. An SIDM halo simulated with the cross-section over mass σ /m=0.1 {{cm}}2 {{{g}}}-1 provides a good match to the measured dark matter (DM) density profile, while an adiabatically contracted CDM halo is denser and cuspier. The profile of the same halo simulated with σ /m=0.5 {{cm}}2 {{{g}}}-1 is not dense enough. Our findings are in agreement with previous results that σ /m≳ 0.1 {{cm}}2 {{{g}}}-1 is disfavored for DM collision velocities above about 1500 km s‑1. More generally, the interaction between baryonic potentials and SIDM densities offers new directions for constraining SIDM cross-sections in galaxies where baryons are dynamically important.

  17. DISSECTING GALAXY FORMATION. II. COMPARING SUBSTRUCTURE IN PURE DARK MATTER AND BARYONIC MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Shlosman, Isaac; Heller, Clayton; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    We compare the substructure evolution in pure dark matter (DM) halos with those in the presence of baryons, hereafter PDM and BDM models, respectively. The prime halos have been analyzed in the previous work. Models have been evolved from identical initial conditions which have been constructed by means of the constrained realization method. The BDM model includes star formation and feedback from stellar evolution onto the gas. A comprehensive catalog of subhalo populations has been compiled and individual and statistical properties of subhalos analyzed, including their orbital differences. We find that subhalo population mass functions in PDM and BDM are consistent with a single power law, M α sbh , for each of the models in the mass range of ∼2 x 10 8 M sun -2 x 10 11 M sun . However, we detect a nonnegligible shift between these functions, the time-averaged α ∼ -0.86 for the PDM and -0.98 for the BDM models. Overall, α appears to be a nearly constant in time, with variations of ±15%. Second, we find that the radial mass distribution of subhalo populations can be approximated by a power law, R γ sbh with a steepening that occurs at the radius of a maximal circular velocity, R vmax , in the prime halos. Here we find that γ sbh ∼ -1.5 for the PDM and -1 for the BDM models, when averaged over time inside R vmax . The slope is steeper outside this region and approaches -3. We detect little spatial bias (less than 10%) between the subhalo populations and the DM distribution of the main halos. Also, the subhalo population exhibits much less triaxiality in the presence of baryons, in tandem with the shape of the prime halo. Finally, we find that, counter-intuitively, the BDM population is depleted at a faster rate than the PDM one within the central 30 kpc of the prime halo. The reason for this is that although the baryons provide a substantial glue to the subhalos, the main halo exhibits the same trend. This assures a more efficient tidal disruption of the

  18. Constraints on baryonic dark matter in the Galactic halo and Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richstone, Douglas; Gould, Andrew; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Flynn, Chris

    1992-01-01

    A four-color method and deep CCD data are used to search for very faint metal-poor stars in the direction of the south Galactic pole. The results make it possible to limit the contribution of ordinary old, metal-poor stars to the dynamical halo of the Galaxy or to the Local Group. The ratio of the mass of the halo to its ordinary starlight must be more than about 2000, unless the halo is very small. For the Local Group, this ratio is greater than about 400. If this local dark matter is baryonic, the process of compact-object formation must produce very few 'impurities' in the form of stars similar to those found in globular clusters. The expected number of unbound stars with MV not greater than 6 within 100 pc of the sun is less than 1 based on the present 90-percent upper limit to the Local Group starlight.

  19. Axino dark matter and baryon number asymmetry production by the Q-ball decay in gauge mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasuya, Shinta [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Kanagawa University, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Kawakami, Etsuko; Kawasaki, Masahiro, E-mail: kasuya@kanagawa-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kwkm@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the Q-ball decay into the axino dark matter in the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. In our scenario, the Q ball decays mainly into nucleons and partially into axinos to account respectively for the baryon asymmetry and the dark matter of the universe. The Q ball decays well before the big bang nucleosynthesis so that it is not affected by the decay. We show the region of the parameters which realizes this scenario.

  20. Addressing the too big to fail problem with baryon physics and sterile neutrino dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Mark R.; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Bose, Sownak; Boyarsky, Alexey; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2017-07-01

    N-body dark matter simulations of structure formation in the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model predict a population of subhaloes within Galactic haloes that have higher central densities than inferred for the Milky Way satellites, a tension known as the 'too big to fail' problem. Proposed solutions include baryonic effects, a smaller mass for the Milky Way halo and warm dark matter (WDM). We test these possibilities using a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation to generate luminosity functions for Milky Way halo-analogue satellite populations, the results of which are then coupled to the Jiang & van den Bosch model of subhalo stripping to predict the subhalo Vmax functions for the 10 brightest satellites. We find that selecting the brightest satellites (as opposed to the most massive) and modelling the expulsion of gas by supernovae at early times increases the likelihood of generating the observed Milky Way satellite Vmax function. The preferred halo mass is 6 × 1011 M⊙, which has a 14 per cent probability to host a Vmax function like that of the Milky Way satellites. We conclude that the Milky Way satellite Vmax function is compatible with a CDM cosmology, as previously found by Sawala et al. using hydrodynamic simulations. Sterile neutrino-WDM models achieve a higher degree of agreement with the observations, with a maximum 50 per cent chance of generating the observed Milky Way satellite Vmax function. However, more work is required to check that the semi-analytic stripping model is calibrated correctly for each sterile neutrino cosmology.

  1. Properties of Dark Matter Halos and Novel Signatures of Baryons in Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Douglas Seth

    This thesis investigates the properties of dark matter halos and places constraints on the baryons within them by utilizing observational data. In Chapter 2, we use spherical collapse dynamics to calculate the non-linear over-density of a dark matter halo at virialization given realistic initial and final density profiles in an Einstein-de Sitter cosmology and cosmologies with matter, dark energy and possible curvature. We find that the non-linear over-density at virialization can be reduced by as much as a factor of 10 as compared to the standard value. In Chapter 3 we present novel analytic solutions to the non-linear dynamics of dark matter structures. We use the spherical collapse model to consider collapsing over-dense regions, over-dense regions which never collapse (due to the cosmological constant) and under-dense voids. These calculations can be applied to studies about the formation and abundance of cosmic structure. In Chapter 4 we use a novel method to constrain the initial mass function (IMF) of stars in the Galactic center. We calculate the mass loss rate in the Galactic center due to stellar collisions given a present-day mass function (PDMF) of stars. We model the total x-ray luminosity due to the ejected mass and utilize x-ray observations of the Galactic center to constrain the PDMF. By considering several star formation histories, we are able to constrain the IMF of stars in the Galactic center. In the final chapter, we calculate the expected kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) signal from the diffuse gas associated with the Local Group (LG) halo. By modeling the distribution of gas in the LG we find that the kSZ sky map is dominated by a hot spot in the direction of M31. By performing a correlation analysis with the CMB temperature map measured by the Planck satellite, we find no statistical evidence that the LG kSZ signal is embedded in the Planck map. We constrain the total mass of the LG halo by limiting the kSZ temperature shift around the hot

  2. Rapidity dependence of thermal dileptons resulting from hadronizing quark-gluon matter with finite baryon charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaempfer, B.; Technische Univ. Dresden; Pavlenko, O.P.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev; Gorenstein, M.I.; Peshier, A.; Soff, G.

    1994-07-01

    The influence of a non-vanishing baryon charge on the rapidity distribution of dileptons produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is studied. We employ a frozen motion model with scaling invariant expansion of the hadronizing quark-gluon plasma as well as a realistic rapidity distribution of secondary particles (i.e., pions and baryons) expected for RHIC energies. We find a considerable suppression of the dilepton production yield at large rapidities due to the finite baryon density. To discriminate the thermal dileptons from Drell-Yan background we propose to utilize the dilepton yield scaled suitably by the pion multiplicity as function of rapidity. (orig.)

  3. Leptogenesis as an origin of hot dark matter and baryon asymmetry in the E6 inspired SUSY models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzorov, R.

    2018-04-01

    We explore leptogenesis within the E6 inspired U (1) extension of the MSSM in which exact custodial symmetry forbids tree-level flavour-changing transitions and the most dangerous baryon and lepton number violating operators. This supersymmetric (SUSY) model involves extra exotic matter beyond the MSSM. In the simplest phenomenologically viable scenarios the lightest exotic fermions are neutral and stable. These states should be substantially lighter than 1eV forming hot dark matter in the Universe. The low-energy effective Lagrangian of the SUSY model under consideration possesses an approximate global U(1)E symmetry associated with the exotic states. The U(1)E symmetry is explicitly broken because of the interactions between the right-handed neutrino superfields and exotic matter supermultiplets. As a consequence the decays of the lightest right-handed neutrino/sneutrino give rise to both U(1)E and U(1) B - L asymmetries. When all right-handed neutrino/sneutrino are relatively light ∼106-107GeV the appropriate amount of the baryon asymmetry can be induced via these decays if the Yukawa couplings of the lightest right-handed neutrino superfields to the exotic matter supermultiplets vary between ∼10-4-10-3.

  4. DISENTANGLING BARYONS AND DARK MATTER IN THE SPIRAL GRAVITATIONAL LENS B1933+503

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyu, S. H.; Treu, T.; Auger, M. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Hensel, S. W.; Schneider, P. [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); McKean, J. P. [ASTRON, Oude Hoogeveensedijk 4, 7991 PD Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Fassnacht, C. D. [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Halkola, A. [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Norbury, M. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Jackson, N. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Thompson, D. [Large Binocular Telescope Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Koopmans, L. V. E. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Matthews, K., E-mail: suyu@physics.ucsb.edu [Caltech Optical Observatories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Measuring the relative mass contributions of luminous and dark matter in spiral galaxies is important for understanding their formation and evolution. The combination of a galaxy rotation curve and strong lensing is a powerful way to break the disk-halo degeneracy that is inherent in each of the methods individually. We present an analysis of the 10 image radio spiral lens B1933+503 at z{sub l} = 0.755, incorporating (1) new global very long baseline interferometry observations, (2) new adaptive-optics-assisted K-band imaging, and (3) new spectroscopic observations for the lens galaxy rotation curve and the source redshift. We construct a three-dimensionally axisymmetric mass distribution with three components: an exponential profile for the disk, a point mass for the bulge, and a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile for the halo. The mass model is simultaneously fitted to the kinematics and the lensing data. The NFW halo needs to be oblate with a flattening of a/c = 0.33{sup +0.07}{sub -0.05} to be consistent with the radio data. This suggests that baryons are effective at making the halos oblate near the center. The lensing and kinematics analysis probe the inner {approx}10 kpc of the galaxy, and we obtain a lower limit on the halo scale radius of 16 kpc (95% credible intervals). The dark matter mass fraction inside a sphere with a radius of 2.2 disk scale lengths is f{sub DM,2.2} = 0.43{sup +0.10}{sub -0.09}. The contribution of the disk to the total circular velocity at 2.2 disk scale lengths is 0.76{sup +0.05}{sub -0.06}, suggesting that the disk is marginally submaximal. The stellar mass of the disk from our modeling is log{sub 10}(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) = 11.06{sup +0.09}{sub -0.11} assuming that the cold gas contributes {approx}20% to the total disk mass. In comparison to the stellar masses estimated from stellar population synthesis models, the stellar initial mass function of Chabrier is preferred to that of Salpeter by a probability factor of 7.2.

  5. DISENTANGLING BARYONS AND DARK MATTER IN THE SPIRAL GRAVITATIONAL LENS B1933+503

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyu, S. H.; Treu, T.; Auger, M. W.; Hensel, S. W.; Schneider, P.; McKean, J. P.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Halkola, A.; Norbury, M.; Jackson, N.; Thompson, D.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Matthews, K.

    2012-01-01

    Measuring the relative mass contributions of luminous and dark matter in spiral galaxies is important for understanding their formation and evolution. The combination of a galaxy rotation curve and strong lensing is a powerful way to break the disk-halo degeneracy that is inherent in each of the methods individually. We present an analysis of the 10 image radio spiral lens B1933+503 at z l = 0.755, incorporating (1) new global very long baseline interferometry observations, (2) new adaptive-optics-assisted K-band imaging, and (3) new spectroscopic observations for the lens galaxy rotation curve and the source redshift. We construct a three-dimensionally axisymmetric mass distribution with three components: an exponential profile for the disk, a point mass for the bulge, and a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile for the halo. The mass model is simultaneously fitted to the kinematics and the lensing data. The NFW halo needs to be oblate with a flattening of a/c = 0.33 +0.07 –0.05 to be consistent with the radio data. This suggests that baryons are effective at making the halos oblate near the center. The lensing and kinematics analysis probe the inner ∼10 kpc of the galaxy, and we obtain a lower limit on the halo scale radius of 16 kpc (95% credible intervals). The dark matter mass fraction inside a sphere with a radius of 2.2 disk scale lengths is f DM,2.2 = 0.43 +0.10 –0.09 . The contribution of the disk to the total circular velocity at 2.2 disk scale lengths is 0.76 +0.05 –0.06 , suggesting that the disk is marginally submaximal. The stellar mass of the disk from our modeling is log 10 (M * /M ☉ ) = 11.06 +0.09 –0.11 assuming that the cold gas contributes ∼20% to the total disk mass. In comparison to the stellar masses estimated from stellar population synthesis models, the stellar initial mass function of Chabrier is preferred to that of Salpeter by a probability factor of 7.2.

  6. QCD inequalities for the nucleon mass and the free energy of baryonic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Thomas D

    2003-07-18

    The positivity of the integrand of certain Euclidean space functional integrals for two flavor QCD with degenerate quark masses implies that the free energy per unit volume for QCD with a baryon chemical potential mu(B) (and zero isospin chemical potential) is greater than the free energy with an isospin chemical potential mu(I)=(2 mu(B)/N(c)) (and zero baryon chemical potential). The same result applies to QCD with any number of heavy flavors in addition to the two light flavors so long as the chemical potential is understood as applying to the light quark contributions to the baryon number. This relation implies a bound on the nucleon mass: there exists a particle X in QCD (presumably the pion) such that M(N)> or =(N(c) m(X)/2 I(X)) where m(X) is the mass of the particle and I(X) is its isospin.

  7. The impact of ΛCDM substructure and baryon-dark matter transition on the image positions of quad galaxy lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomer, Matthew R.; Williams, Liliya L. R.

    2018-04-01

    The positions of multiple images in galaxy lenses are related to the galaxy mass distribution. Smooth elliptical mass profiles were previously shown to be inadequate in reproducing the quad population. In this paper, we explore the deviations from such smooth elliptical mass distributions. Unlike most other work, we use a model-free approach based on the relative polar image angles of quads, and their position in 3D space with respect to the fundamental surface of quads (FSQ). The FSQ is defined by quads produced by elliptical lenses. We have generated thousands of quads from synthetic populations of lenses with substructure consistent with Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) simulations, and found that such perturbations are not sufficient to match the observed distribution of quads relative to the FSQ. The result is unchanged even when subhalo masses are increased by a factor of 10, and the most optimistic lensing selection bias is applied. We then produce quads from galaxies created using two components, representing baryons and dark matter. The transition from the mass being dominated by baryons in inner radii to being dominated by dark matter in outer radii can carry with it asymmetries, which would affect relative image angles. We run preliminary experiments using lenses with two elliptical mass components with non-identical axial ratios and position angles, perturbations from ellipticity in the form of non-zero Fourier coefficients a4 and a6, and artificially offset ellipse centres as a proxy for asymmetry at image radii. We show that combination of these effects is a promising way of accounting for quad population properties. We conclude that the quad population provides a unique and sensitive tool for constraining detailed mass distribution in the centres of galaxies.

  8. Supercluster simulations: impact of baryons on the matter power spectrum and weak lensing forecasts for Super-CLASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Aaron; Brown, Michael L.; Kay, Scott T.; Barnes, David J.

    2018-03-01

    We use a combination of full hydrodynamic and dark matter only simulations to investigate the effect that supercluster environments and baryonic physics have on the matter power spectrum, by re-simulating a sample of supercluster sub-volumes. On large scales we find that the matter power spectrum measured from our supercluster sample has at least twice as much power as that measured from our random sample. Our investigation of the effect of baryonic physics on the matter power spectrum is found to be in agreement with previous studies and is weaker than the selection effect over the majority of scales. In addition, we investigate the effect of targeting a cosmologically non-representative, supercluster region of the sky on the weak lensing shear power spectrum. We do this by generating shear and convergence maps using a line-of-sight integration technique, which intercepts our random and supercluster sub-volumes. We find the convergence power spectrum measured from our supercluster sample has a larger amplitude than that measured from the random sample at all scales. We frame our results within the context of the Super-CLuster Assisted Shear Survey (Super-CLASS), which aims to measure the cosmic shear signal in the radio band by targeting a region of the sky that contains five Abell clusters. Assuming the Super-CLASS survey will have a source density of 1.5 galaxies arcmin-2, we forecast a detection significance of 2.7^{+1.5}_{-1.2}, which indicates that in the absence of systematics the Super-CLASS project could make a cosmic shear detection with radio data alone.

  9. Visible and dark matter from a first-order phase transition in a baryon-symmetric universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petraki, Kalliopi; Volkas, Raymond R.; Trodden, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The similar cosmological abundances observed for visible and dark matter suggest a common origin for both. By viewing the dark matter density as a dark-sector asymmetry, mirroring the situation in the visible sector, we show that the visible and dark matter asymmetries may have arisen simultaneously through a first-order phase transition in the early universe. The dark asymmetry can then be equal and opposite to the usual visible matter asymmetry, leading to a universe that is symmetric with respect to a generalised baryon number. We present both a general structure, and a precisely defined example of a viable model of this type. In that example, the dark matter is ''atomic'' as well as asymmetric, and various cosmological and astrophysical constraints are derived. Testable consequences for colliders include a Z' boson that couples through the B−L charge to the visible sector, but also decays invisibly to dark sector particles. The additional scalar particles in the theory can mix with the standard Higgs boson and provide other striking signatures

  10. Future prospects of baryon istability search in p-decay and n n(bar) oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, S.J.; Kamyshkov, Y.A. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    These proceedings contain thirty-one papers which review both the theoretical and the experimental status and near future of baryon instability research. Baryon instability is investigated from the vantage point of supersymmetric and unified theories. The interplay between baryogenesis and antimatter is examined. Double beta decay experiments are discussed. The huge Icarus experiment is described with its proton decay capabilities. Neutron-antineutron oscillations investigations are presented, especially efforts with ultra-cold neutrons. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Data Base.

  11. First Observation of An Excited Charm Baryon Decaying to Omega Charm Baryon at the BaBar Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bula, Rahmi; SUNY, Albany

    2007-01-01

    We have carried out a search for a charmed baryon (Omega) * c decaying to (Omega) 0 c and a γ where (Omega) c candidates are reconstructed using decay modes (Omega) - π + (c1), (Omega) - π + π 0 (c2), (Omega) - π + π - π + (c3) and Ξ - K - π + π + (c4). This search is performed by analyzing integrated luminosity of 230.7 fb -1 data collected by the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. In decay channel (Omega) * c → (Omega) 0 c ((Omega) - π + )γ (C1), we observe a signal yield of 39.2 +9.8 -9.1 (stat)±6.0(syst) events with a significance of 4.2 standard deviations. In decay channels (Omega) * c → (Omega) 0 c ((Omega) - π + π 0 )γ (C2) and (Omega) * c → (Omega) 0 c (Ξ - K - π + π + )γ (C4), we observe signal yields of 55.2 16.1 -15.2 ± 5.6 and 20.2 +9.3 -8.5 ± 3.1 with significances of 3.4 and 2.0 σ, respectively. As for the (Omega) * c → (Omega) 0 c ((Omega) - π + π - π + )γ (C3) decay channel, we observe signal yields of -5.1 +5.3.8 -4.7 ±1.0 without a positive significance. We assume the same production mechanism for the four decay channels of (Omega) * c studied. By combining these four channels, the fit results in a signal yield of 105.3 +21.2 -20.5 ± 6.0 events with a significance of 5.2 σ. We report the mass difference (Omega) * c - (Omega) 0 c ((delta)m) of the singly charmed baryon (Omega) * c to be 70.8 +1.0 -1.0 ± 1.1 MeV. Finally, the ratios of production cross sections are calculated: σ(e + e - →C1)/σ(e + e - →c1) = 0.71 +0.19 -0.18 ±0.11, σ(e + e - →C2)/σ(e + e - →c2) = 1.76 +0.71 -0.69 ±0.19, σ(e + e - →C3)/σ(e + e - →c3) = -0.66 +0.74 -0.66 ±0.13, σ(e + e - →C4)/σ(e + e - →c4) = 1.70 +1.0 -1.0 ±0.27 and σ(e + e - →(Omega) * c (combined))/σ(e + e - →(Omega) 0 c ) = 1.0 +0.23 -0.22 ±0.11

  12. $\\mathrm{\\Lambda_{c}^{+}}$ baryon production measurements with the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00416828; Dainton, John; Lemmon, Roy

    Quantum chromodynamics, the quantum field theory that describes the strong interaction, demonstrates a property known as asymptotic freedom which weakens the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ at high energies or short distances. The measurement of particles containing heavy quarks, i.e. charm and beauty, in high-energy particle collisions is a stringent test of the theory of quantum chromodynamics in the regime where $\\alpha_s$ is small. In addition, asymptotic freedom leads to a phase transition of nuclear matter at high temperatures or energy densities to a phase known as the Quark-Gluon Plasma, where quarks and gluons are deconfined, and this state of matter can be studied in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Particles containing heavy quarks, i.e. charm and beauty, have been proposed as probes of the properties of the Quark Gluon Plasma, where the measurement of mesons and baryons can offer insight into the transport properties of the medium and mechanisms related to the formation of hadrons during the...

  13. SEARCHING FOR COOLING SIGNATURES IN STRONG LENSING GALAXY CLUSTERS: EVIDENCE AGAINST BARYONS SHAPING THE MATTER DISTRIBUTION IN CLUSTER CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, Peter K.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; McDonald, Michael; Dahle, Håkon; Gladders, Michael D.; Sharon, Keren; Mushotzky, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The process by which the mass density profile of certain galaxy clusters becomes centrally concentrated enough to produce high strong lensing (SL) cross-sections is not well understood. It has been suggested that the baryonic condensation of the intracluster medium (ICM) due to cooling may drag dark matter to the cores and thus steepen the profile. In this work, we search for evidence of ongoing ICM cooling in the first large, well-defined sample of SL selected galaxy clusters in the range 0.1 0.2 and shows no statistically significant deviation from the total cluster population. Specific star formation rates, as traced by the strength of the 4000 Å break, D 4000 , are also consistent with the general cluster population. Finally, we use optical imaging of the SL clusters to measure the angular separation, R arc , between the arc and the center of mass of each lensing cluster in our sample and test for evidence of changing [O II] emission and D 4000 as a function of R arc , a proxy observable for SL cross-sections. D 4000 is constant with all values of R arc , and the [O II] emission fractions show no dependence on R arc for R arc > 10'' and only very marginal evidence of increased weak [O II] emission for systems with R arc < 10''. These results argue against the ability of baryonic cooling associated with cool core activity in the cores of galaxy clusters to strongly modify the underlying dark matter potential, leading to an increase in SL cross-sections

  14. Outlook for baryon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripp, R.D.

    1976-09-01

    The review of baryon spectroscopy includes a number of new generation experiments with greatly improved statistics which have emerged and are enhancing experimental knowledge of baryon resonances. The future research directions are pointed out, and some problems and deficiencies which can be resolved with contemporary techniques are mentioned

  15. Luminous matter distribution, bulk flows and baryon content in cosmological models with a local void

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Kenji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Yukawa Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2002-07-01

    First, we consider galaxy formation from the viewpoint of hierarchical clustering theory and discuss the possibility that inhomogeneous models with a local void may be compatible with the observed homogeneity of galactic distributions found in recent redshift surveys, because their inhomogeneity can be weakened by the difference in the feedback system of galaxy formation between the inner and outer regions. Next, it is shown with the results of numerical simulations that the observed inhomogeneity of two-point correlations of galaxies can be accounted for by these models. Also, the natural appearance of bulk flows for an off-central observer is demonstrated. Finally, the inhomogeneity of the baryon content is discussed from the viewpoint of our inhomogeneous models. (author)

  16. Single-particle potential of the Λ hyperon in nuclear matter with chiral effective field theory NLO interactions including effects of Y N N three-baryon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M.

    2018-03-01

    Adopting hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-nucleon-nucleon interactions parametrized in chiral effective field theory, single-particle potentials of the Λ and Σ hyperons are evaluated in symmetric nuclear matter and in pure neutron matter within the framework of lowest-order Bruckner theory. The chiral NLO interaction bears strong Λ N -Σ N coupling. Although the Λ potential is repulsive if the coupling is switched off, the Λ N -Σ N correlation brings about the attraction consistent with empirical data. The Σ potential is repulsive, which is also consistent with empirical information. The interesting result is that the Λ potential becomes shallower beyond normal density. This provides the possibility of solving the hyperon puzzle without introducing ad hoc assumptions. The effects of the Λ N N -Λ N N and Λ N N -Σ N N three-baryon forces are considered. These three-baryon forces are first reduced to normal-ordered effective two-baryon interactions in nuclear matter and then incorporated in the G -matrix equation. The repulsion from the Λ N N -Λ N N interaction is of the order of 5 MeV at normal density and becomes larger with increasing density. The effects of the Λ N N -Σ N N coupling compensate the repulsion at normal density. The net effect of the three-baryon interactions on the Λ single-particle potential is repulsive at higher densities.

  17. Does direct experience matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miralles, Francesc; Giones, Ferran; Gozun, Brian

    2017-01-01

    of being engaged in entrepreneurial behavior on entrepreneurial intention. We aim to shed light on whether the direct experience reinforces an individual’s entrepreneurial intention or reduces it. Building on an extended version of the planned behavior theory, we use the behavioral reasoning theory...... between older and younger participants. The results suggest that engagement in entrepreneurial activity modifies entrepreneurial intention and that these effects are contingent to the individual’s age. This research work contributes to the extant call to explore reverse causality between actual behavior...... and an individual’s intention by introducing behavioral reasoning theory. These results provide support to initiatives to adapt entrepreneurship promotion efforts to the specific characteristics of the participants....

  18. The DAMIC Dark Matter Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Mello Neto, J. R.T. [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). et al

    2015-10-07

    The DAMIC (DArk Matter In CCDs) experiment uses high-resistivity, scientific-grade CCDs to search for dark matter. The CCD’s low electronic noise allows an unprecedently low energy threshold of a few tens of eV; this characteristic makes it possible to detect silicon recoils resulting from interactions of low-mass WIMPs. In addition, the CCD’s high spatial resolution and the excellent energy response results in very effective background identification techniques. The experiment has a unique sensitivity to dark matter particles with masses below 10 GeV/c2. Previous results have motivated the construction of DAMIC100, a 100 grams silicon target detector currently being installed at SNOLAB. The mode of operation and unique imaging capabilities of the CCDs, and how they may be exploited to characterize and suppress backgrounds are discussed, as well as physics results after one year of data taking.

  19. Possible interaction between baryons and dark-matter particles revealed by the first stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkana, Rennan

    2018-03-01

    The cosmic radio-frequency spectrum is expected to show a strong absorption signal corresponding to the 21-centimetre-wavelength transition of atomic hydrogen around redshift 20, which arises from Lyman-α radiation from some of the earliest stars. By observing this 21-centimetre signal—either its sky-averaged spectrum or maps of its fluctuations, obtained using radio interferometers—we can obtain information about cosmic dawn, the era when the first astrophysical sources of light were formed. The recent detection of the global 21-centimetre spectrum reveals a stronger absorption than the maximum predicted by existing models, at a confidence level of 3.8 standard deviations. Here we report that this absorption can be explained by the combination of radiation from the first stars and excess cooling of the cosmic gas induced by its interaction with dark matter. Our analysis indicates that the spatial fluctuations of the 21-centimetre signal at cosmic dawn could be an order of magnitude larger than previously expected and that the dark-matter particle is no heavier than several proton masses, well below the commonly predicted mass of weakly interacting massive particles. Our analysis also confirms that dark matter is highly non-relativistic and at least moderately cold, and primordial velocities predicted by models of warm dark matter are potentially detectable. These results indicate that 21-centimetre cosmology can be used as a dark-matter probe.

  20. Possible interaction between baryons and dark-matter particles revealed by the first stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkana, Rennan

    2018-02-28

    The cosmic radio-frequency spectrum is expected to show a strong absorption signal corresponding to the 21-centimetre-wavelength transition of atomic hydrogen around redshift 20, which arises from Lyman-α radiation from some of the earliest stars. By observing this 21-centimetre signal-either its sky-averaged spectrum or maps of its fluctuations, obtained using radio interferometers-we can obtain information about cosmic dawn, the era when the first astrophysical sources of light were formed. The recent detection of the global 21-centimetre spectrum reveals a stronger absorption than the maximum predicted by existing models, at a confidence level of 3.8 standard deviations. Here we report that this absorption can be explained by the combination of radiation from the first stars and excess cooling of the cosmic gas induced by its interaction with dark matter. Our analysis indicates that the spatial fluctuations of the 21-centimetre signal at cosmic dawn could be an order of magnitude larger than previously expected and that the dark-matter particle is no heavier than several proton masses, well below the commonly predicted mass of weakly interacting massive particles. Our analysis also confirms that dark matter is highly non-relativistic and at least moderately cold, and primordial velocities predicted by models of warm dark matter are potentially detectable. These results indicate that 21-centimetre cosmology can be used as a dark-matter probe.

  1. Search for weakly interacting massive particles with the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saab, Tarek [Stanford U.

    2002-01-01

    From individual galaxies, to clusters of galaxies, to in between the cushions of your sofa, Dark Matter appears to be pervasive on every scale. With increasing accuracy, recent astrophysical measurements, from a variety of experiments, are arriving at the following cosmological model : a flat cosmology (Ωk = 0) with matter and energy densities contributing roughly 1/3 and 2/3 (Ωm = 0.35, ΩΛ = 0.65). Of the matter contribution, it appears that only ~ 10% (Ωb ~ 0.04) is attributable to baryons. Astrophysical measurements constrain the remaining matter to be non-realtivistic, interacting primarily gravitationally. Various theoretical models for such Dark Matter exist. A leading candidate for the non-baryonic matter are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (dubbed WIMPS). These particles, and their relic density may be naturally explained within the framework of Super-Symmetry theories. SuperSymmetry also offers predictions as to the scattering rates of WIMPs with baryonic matter allowing for the design and tailoring of experiments that search specifically for the WIMPs. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment is searching for evidence of WIMP interactions in crystals of Ge and Si. Using cryogenic detector technology to measure both the phonon and ionization response to a particle recoil the CDMS detectors are able to discriminate between electron and nuclear recoils, thus reducing the large rates of electron recoil backgrounds to levels with which a Dark Matter search is not only feasible, but far-reaching. This thesis will describe in some detail the physical principles behind the CDMS detector technology, highlighting the final step in the evolution of the detector design and characterization techniques. In addition, data from a 100 day long exposure of the current run at the Stanford Underground Facility will be presented, with focus given to detector performance as well as to the implications on allowable WIMP mass - cross-section parameter space.

  2. Investigation of the compressed baryonic matter at the GSI accelerator complex*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladygin V.P.

    2017-01-01

    We are focusing here on the contribution of JINR to the CBM experiment: design of the superconducting dipole magnet; manufacture of the straw and micro-strip silicon detectors, participation in the data taking and analysis algorithms and physics program.

  3. Constraining the baryon-dark matter relative velocity with the large-scale three-point correlation function of the SDSS BOSS DR12 CMASS galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepian, Zachary; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Blazek, Jonathan A.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; McEwen, Joseph E.; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana

    2018-02-01

    We search for a galaxy clustering bias due to a modulation of galaxy number with the baryon-dark matter relative velocity resulting from recombination-era physics. We find no detected signal and place the constraint bv baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method measurements of the cosmic distance scale using the two-point clustering. Our limit on the relative velocity bias indicates a systematic shift of no more than 0.3 per cent rms in the distance scale inferred from the BAO feature in the BOSS two-point clustering, well below the 1 per cent statistical error of this measurement. This constraint is the most stringent currently available and has important implications for the ability of upcoming large-scale structure surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) to self-protect against the relative velocity as a possible systematic.

  4. Dark matter detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, G.

    1995-01-01

    A fundamental question of astrophysics and cosmology is the nature of dark matter. Astrophysical observations show clearly the existence of some kind of dark matter, though they cannot yet reveal its nature. Dark matter can consist of baryonic particles, or of other (known or unknown) elementary particles. Baryonic dark matter probably exists in the form of dust, gas, or small stars. Other elementary particles constituting the dark matter can possibly be measured in terrestrial experiments. Possibilities for dark matter particles are neutrinos, axions and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). While a direct detection of relic neutrinos seems at the moment impossible, there are experiments looking for baryonic dark matter in the form of Massive Compact Halo Objects, and for particle dark matter in the form of axions and WIMPS. (orig.)

  5. Challenges in QCD matter physics -The scientific programme of the Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ablyazimov, T.; Abuhoza, A.; Adak, R. P.; Adamczyk, M.; Kugler, Andrej; Kushpil, Vasilij; Mikhaylov, Vasily; Petráček, V.; Pospíšil, V.; Prakash, Arun; Škoda, L.; Svoboda, Ondřej; Tlustý, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2017), č. článku 60. ISSN 1434-6001 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : FAIR * RHIC * LHC Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 2.833, year: 2016

  6. Large-Scale Distribution of Total Mass versus Luminous Matter from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations: First Search in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumagnac, M T; Barkana, R; Sabiu, C G; Loeb, A; Ross, A J; Abdalla, F B; Balan, S T; Lahav, O

    2016-05-20

    Baryon acoustic oscillations in the early Universe are predicted to leave an as yet undetected signature on the relative clustering of total mass versus luminous matter. A detection of this effect would provide an important confirmation of the standard cosmological paradigm and constrain alternatives to dark matter as well as nonstandard fluctuations such as compensated isocurvature perturbations (CIPs). We conduct the first observational search for this effect, by comparing the number-weighted and luminosity-weighted correlation functions, using the SDSS-III BOSS Data Release 10 CMASS sample. When including CIPs in our model, we formally obtain evidence at 3.2σ of the relative clustering signature and a limit that matches the existing upper limits on the amplitude of CIPs. However, various tests suggest that these results are not yet robust, perhaps due to systematic biases in the data. The method developed in this Letter used with more accurate future data such as that from DESI, is likely to confirm or disprove our preliminary evidence.

  7. Search for Decays of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ Baryon with the D0 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, Enrique [The Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Inst., Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-25

    This thesis presents work I performed within the D0 Collaboration to make the measurement of the Branching Ratio of Λ$0\\atop{b}$ baryon in the channel Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → J/ΨΛ0 . The b-hadron such as the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ are currently the subject of much research in both the theorical and experimental particle physics communities. Measurements of the production and decays of b-hadrons can improve the understanding of the electroweak and strong interactions described by the Standard Model of particle physics, as well as proving opportunities to search for physics beyond the Standard Model.

  8. Study of the strange baryons and mesons production (Λ and Ks0) in proton-proton collisions with the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricaud, H.

    2008-11-01

    The ALICE experiment at LHC is dedicated to the investigation of the transition of matter from the hadron gas to the Quark and Gluons Plasma in which partons are deconfined. Ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions offer indeed the possibility to create extreme temperature and pressure conditions which are required to reach a deconfined phase. Elementary collisions such as proton-proton are of great importance since they are regarded as the hadronic reference. The aim of this thesis was to prepare the analysis of strange baryon and meson production mechanisms in proton-proton collisions at the LHC energies by the detection of Λ and K s 0 particles with ALICE. Strange particles are a major tool to probe the matter created. The behaviour of the Λ/K s 0 ratio at intermediate transverse momentum in high energy proton-proton collisions, that we have studied with several theoretical models, could also sign the presence of collective phenomena. Up to now, these phenomena have been observed only in heavy-ion collisions. (author)

  9. Search for non-baryonic dark matter with cryogenic detectors based on ionisation and heat detection. Analysis of experimental data from the Edelweiss-I experiment; Recherche de la matiere noire non-baryonique a l'aide de detecteurs cryogeniques a double composante ionisation et chaleur: Analyse et Interpretation des donnees de l'experience EDELWEISS-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanglard, V

    2005-11-15

    The method of direct detection of WIMPs (weakly interactive massive particles) that are present in the halo of our galaxy rests on the detection of their interaction with a target nucleus. The Edelweiss experiment uses this technique with 3 cryogenic detectors operating on 2 modes ionization and heat. Each detector is made of a 320 g germanium crystal with 2 faces equipped with electrodes. In order to improve the collection of charges, an amorphous layer of Ge or Si is laid between the crystal surface and the electrodes. The validation of the detector system has been made with Co{sup 57} and Cs{sup 137} gamma sources and a Cf{sup 252} neutron source. We present a comparison with simulation results and experimental data for the validation of the response to nuclear recoils. The whole experimental data collected by Edelweiss-I from 2000 till 2003 has been analysed. 40 events have been selected, 6 among them with an energy over 30 keV. Limits for the interaction cross-section between a WIMP and a nucleon have been deduced from the experimental data. The Yellin method has enabled us to determine a limit without knowing the background noise. The best sensitivity appears to be 1.5*10{sup -6} pb for a WIMP's mass of 80 GeV/c{sup 2} and a confidence level of 90 per cent. In terms of events, the limit for an energy range of 30 - 100 keV is 0.12 events per kg and per day. (A.C.)

  10. DAMIC: a novel dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiffenberg, Javier; Bertou, Xavier [Centro Atomico Bariloche; Butner, Melissa J. [Fermilab; Cancelo, Gustavo [Fermilab; Chavarria, Alvaro [Chicago U., KICP; D' Olivo, Juan Carlos [Mexico U., ICN; Estrada Vigil, Juan Cruz [Fermilab; Moroni, Guillermo Fernandez [Bahia Blanca, U. Natl. Del Sur; Izraelevitch, Federico [Fermilab; Kilminster, Ben [Zurich U.; Lawson, Ian T. [SNOLAB, Lively; Marsal, Fernando [Asuncion Natl. U.; Molina, Jorge [Asuncion Natl. U.; Privitera, Paolo [Chicago U., KICP; Schwarz, Tom [Michigan U.; Sofo haro, Miguel [Centro Atomico Bariloche; Tiffenberg, Javier [Fermilab; Trillaud, Frederic [Mexico U.; Zhou, Jing [Chicago U., KICP

    2013-10-24

    DAMIC (Dark Matter in CCDs) is a novel dark matter experiment that has unique sensitivity to dark matter particles with masses below 10 GeV. Due to its low electronic readout noise (R.M.S. ~3 e-) this instrument is able to reach a detection threshold below 0.5 keV nuclear recoil energy, making the search for dark matter particles with low masses possible. We report on early results and experience gained from a detector that has been running at SNOLAB from Dec 2012. We also discuss the measured and expected backgrounds and present the plan for future detectors to be installed in 2014.

  11. Excited baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  12. Excited baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested

  13. Chemical and dynamics properties of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies by the measurement of the production of the doubly strange baryons in the STAR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estienne, M.

    2005-04-01

    Lattice QCD calculations predict, at μ B ∼ 0, a crossover from ordinary hadronic matter to a Quark Gluon Plasma. Heavy ion collisions have been proposed to recreate it in the laboratory and to study its properties. The Au+Au, d+Au collisions at √(S NN ) = 200 GeV and the Au+Au ones at 62.4 GeV delivered at RHIC have been probed by the measurement of the Ξ particles in the STAR experiment. Their yield evolution with collision energy and system size gives size to the chemical properties of the reaction in the framework of hadronic and statistical models. The Ξ R CP shows: (1) a meson/baryon dependence for 2 pT CP suppression at pT > 3 GeV/c, (3) strong interactions between constituents suggesting the existence of strong collectivity in the medium. The Ξ transverse flow seems to be interesting to probe the early stage the collision with presumably partonic degrees of freedom. (author)

  14. Baryonic B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kichimi, H. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies

    2005-07-01

    We present recent results of Baryonic B decays from Belle, which contain charmed and charmless baryonic decays into two to four body final states. We report the branching fractions, including new observations of the baryonic decays into two charmed baryons in the final states, and the charmless baryonic decay proceeding through b {yields} s{gamma} transition, and the low di-baryon mass enhancement structures observed in the three-body decays, based on 357 fb{sup -1} data. (author)

  15. Chemical and dynamics properties of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies by the measurement of the production of the doubly strange baryons in the STAR experiment; Proprietes chimiques et dynamiques des collisions d'ions lourds aux energies du RHIC par la mesure de la production des baryons doublement etranges dans l'experience STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estienne, M

    2005-04-15

    Lattice QCD calculations predict, at {mu}{sub B} {approx} 0, a crossover from ordinary hadronic matter to a Quark Gluon Plasma. Heavy ion collisions have been proposed to recreate it in the laboratory and to study its properties. The Au+Au, d+Au collisions at {radical}(S{sub NN}) = 200 GeV and the Au+Au ones at 62.4 GeV delivered at RHIC have been probed by the measurement of the {xi} particles in the STAR experiment. Their yield evolution with collision energy and system size gives size to the chemical properties of the reaction in the framework of hadronic and statistical models. The {xi} R{sub CP} shows: (1) a meson/baryon dependence for 2 < {sub pT} < 5 GeV/c well reproduced by quark coalescence and recombination models, (2) the formation of a dense matter signed by a R{sub CP} suppression at {sub pT} > 3 GeV/c, (3) strong interactions between constituents suggesting the existence of strong collectivity in the medium. The {xi} transverse flow seems to be interesting to probe the early stage the collision with presumably partonic degrees of freedom. (author)

  16. Baryons with functional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Christian S.

    2017-01-01

    We summarise recent results on the spectrum of ground-state and excited baryons and their form factors in the framework of functional methods. As an improvement upon similar approaches we explicitly take into account the underlying momentum-dependent dynamics of the quark-gluon interaction that leads to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. For light octet and decuplet baryons we find a spectrum in very good agreement with experiment, including the level ordering between the positive- and negative-parity nucleon states. Comparing the three-body framework with the quark-diquark approximation, we do not find significant differences in the spectrum for those states that have been calculated in both frameworks. This situation is different in the electromagnetic form factor of the Δ, which may serve to distinguish both pictures by comparison with experiment and lattice QCD.

  17. Charmed baryonic resonances in medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolos Laura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the behavior of dynamically-generated charmed baryonic resonances in matter within a unitarized coupled-channel model consistent with heavy-quark spin symmetry. We analyze the implications for the formation of D-meson bound states in nuclei and the propagation of D mesons in heavy-ion collisions from RHIC to FAIR energies.

  18. Baryon number fluctuations and the phase structure in the PNJL model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Guo-yun; Tang, Zhan-duo; Gao, Xue-yan; He, Wei-bo

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the kurtosis and skewness of net-baryon number fluctuations in the Polyakov loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model, and discuss the relations between fluctuation distributions and the phase structure of quark-gluon matter. The calculation shows that the traces of chiral and deconfinement transitions can be effectively reflected by the kurtosis and skewness of net-baryon number fluctuations not only in the critical region but also in the crossover region. The contour plot of baryon number kurtosis derived in the PNJL model can qualitatively explain the behavior of net-proton number kurtosis in the STAR beam energy scan experiments. Moreover, the three-dimensional presentations of the kurtosis and skewness in this study are helpful to understand the relations between baryon number fluctuations and QCD phase structure.

  19. Filtering microphonics in dark matter germanium experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, J.; Garcia, E.; Ortiz de Solorzano, A.; Morales, A.; Nunz-Lagos, R.; Puimedon, J.; Saenz, C.; Villar, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    A technique for reducing the microphonic noise in a germanium spectrometer used in dark matter particles searches is described. Filtered energy spectra, corresponding to 48.5 kg day of data in a running experiment in the Canfranc tunnel are presented. Improvements of this filtering procedure with respect to the method of rejecting those events not distributed evenly in time are also discussed. (orig.)

  20. Structure and reactions of pentaquark baryons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baryons containing five valence quarks are totally new form of hadrons. The importance of knowing the nature of multi-quark states lies, for instance, in understanding the origin of matter. It is believed that in the early stage of the Universe, the matter was highly dense and was in the form of quark matter rather than ordinary ...

  1. Weakly interacting dark matter and baryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Peihong; Lindner, Manfred; Sarkar, Utpal; Zhang Xinmin

    2011-01-01

    In the present Universe visible and dark matter contribute comparable energy density although they have different properties. This phenomenon can be explained if the dark matter relic density, originating from a dark matter asymmetry, is fully determined by the baryon asymmetry. Thus the dark matter mass is not arbitrary; rather, it becomes predictive. We realize this scenario in baryon (lepton) number conserving models where two or more neutral singlet scalars decay into two or three baryonic (leptonic) dark matter scalars, and also decay into quarks (leptons) through other on-shell and/or off-shell exotic scalar bilinears. The produced baryon (lepton) asymmetries in the dark matter scalar and in the standard model quarks (leptons) are thus equal and opposite. The dark matter mass can be predicted in a range from a few GeV to a few TeV, depending on the baryon (lepton) numbers of the decaying scalars and the dark matter scalar. The dark matter scalar can interact with the visible matter through the exchange of the standard model Higgs boson, opening a window for the dark matter direct detection experiments. These models also provide testable predictions in the searches for the exotic scalar bilinears at LHC.

  2. Baryon Chiral Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher,

    2002-08-08

    After contrasting the low energy effective theory for the baryon sector with one for the Goldstone sector, I use the example of pion nucleon scattering to discuss some of the progress and open issues in baryon chiral perturbation theory.

  3. Baryon Spectroscopy at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Austregesilo, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    At the COMPASS experiment, diffractive dissociation of the beam proton is one of the dominant processes for the 190GeV$/c$ positive hadron beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target. The status of the analysis of the reactions $pp\\rightarrow p_{f}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}p_{s}$ and $pp\\rightarrow p_{f}pp -> p_{f}K^{+} K^{-}p_{s}$ is presented, where dominant features of the light-baryon spectrum become clearly visible. Furthermore, partial-wave analysis techniques to disentangle these spectra are discussed.

  4. Baryon symmetric big bang cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Both the quantum theory and Einsteins theory of special relativity lead to the supposition that matter and antimatter were produced in equal quantities during the big bang. It is noted that local matter/antimatter asymmetries may be reconciled with universal symmetry by assuming (1) a slight imbalance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, annihilation, and a subsequent remainder of matter; (2) localized regions of excess for one or the other type of matter as an initial condition; and (3) an extremely dense, high temperature state with zero net baryon number; i.e., matter/antimatter symmetry. Attention is given to the third assumption, which is the simplest and the most in keeping with current knowledge of the cosmos, especially as pertains the universality of 3 K background radiation. Mechanisms of galaxy formation are discussed, whereby matter and antimatter might have collided and annihilated each other, or have coexisted (and continue to coexist) at vast distances. It is pointed out that baryon symmetric big bang cosmology could probably be proved if an antinucleus could be detected in cosmic radiation.

  5. Dark matter search with the PICASSO experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambault, S.; Debris, F.; Giroux, G.; Jakson, C.M.; Kumaratunga, S.; Lafreniere, M.; Laurin, M.; Lessard, L.; Martin, J.-P.; Piro, M.-C.; Scallon, O.; Starinski, N.; Zacek, V.; Behnke, E.; Grace, E.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Das, M.; Saha, S.; Seth, S.; Dai, X.; Davour, A.; Kamaha, A.; Levy, C.; Noble, A.J.; Xie, T.; Dhungana, N.; Farine, J.; Podviyanuk, R.; Wichoski, U.; Gagnebin, S.; Krauss, C.; MacDonald, R.P.; Marlisov, D.; Mitra, P.; Lawson, L.; Pospisil, S.; Stekl, I.

    2012-01-01

    A low background PICASSO experiment to search for dark matter is in progress at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (Canada) by using 10 detectors with total target mass of 0.72 kg of 19 F and exposure time of 114 kgd. Recoil energy thresholds are 1.7 keV which allows the sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV/c 2 . No dark matter signal was found till now. The limits in the spin dependent sector were obtained for WIMP masses of 20 GeV/c 2 with a cross section on protons of σ p sd = 0.032 pb (90% C.L.), in the spin independent sector close to the low WIMP mass region of 7 GeV/c 2 with cross section on protons σ p Sl =1.41 · 10 -4 pb (90 % C.L.)

  6. Thermodynamics of Hot Hadronic Gases at Finite Baryon Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Michael Glenn

    matter. This generalizes previous works by incorporating baryon chemical potential and a vector mean field into the formalism. We show that the theory is thermodynamically self-consistent and it obeys the Landau-Lifshitz conditions of fit. The formulas should be very useful for predicting transport coefficients in future heavy-ion collision experiments at RHIC and other colliders. This thesis is based upon work published in Refs. [1, 2, 3]. [1] M. Albright, J. Kapusta, and C. Young, Phys. Rev. C 90 , 024915 (2014). [2] M. Albright, J. Kapusta, and C. Young, Phys. Rev. C 92 , 044904 (2015). [3] M. Albright and J. Kapusta, submitted to Phys. Rev. C, preprint, arXiv:1508.02696.

  7. The XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Giboni, K.L.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Stern, M.; Tatananni, D.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Doets, M.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A.; Walet, R. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Othegraven, R.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Antunes, B.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, LIBPhys, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Balata, M.; Bruno, G.; Corrieri, R.; Disdier, J.M.; Rosso, A.G.; Molinario, A.; Orlandi, D.; Parlati, S.; Tatananni, L.; Wang, Z. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; James, A.; Kazama, S.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Maier, R.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B.; Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Moraa, K.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Breskin, A.; Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Front, D.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H.; Wack, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Sivers, M. von [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics; Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Chiarini, A.; Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [CNRS/IN2P3, Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, IMT Atlantique, Nantes (France); Fei, J.; Lombardi, F.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Huhmann, C.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Vargas, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Wittweg, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Tunnell, C.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Lindemann, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Messina, M. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Pienaar, J. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Garcia, D.R. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Reichard, S. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Lavina, L.S. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Wei, Y. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-12-15

    The XENON1T experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is the first WIMP dark matter detector operating with a liquid xenon target mass above the ton-scale. Out of its 3.2 t liquid xenon inventory, 2.0 t constitute the active target of the dual-phase time projection chamber. The scintillation and ionization signals from particle interactions are detected with low-background photomultipliers. This article describes the XENON1T instrument and its subsystems as well as strategies to achieve an unprecedented low background level. First results on the detector response and the performance of the subsystems are also presented. (orig.)

  8. The XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Antunes, B.; Arneodo, F.; Balata, M.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breskin, A.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Chiarini, A.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Corrieri, R.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; Gangi, P. Di; Giovanni, A. Di; Diglio, S.; Disdier, J.-M.; Doets, M.; Duchovni, E.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Franco, D.; Front, D.; Fulgione, W.; Rosso, A. Gallo; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Giboni, K.-L.; Goetzke, L. W.; Grandi, L.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Huhmann, C.; Itay, R.; James, A.; Kaminsky, B.; Kazama, S.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lombardi, F.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Maier, R.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Molinario, A.; Morå, K.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Orlandi, D.; Othegraven, R.; Pakarha, P.; Parlati, S.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Pizzella, V.; Piro, M.-C.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; García, D. Ramírez; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, N.; Santos, J. M. F. dos; Saldanha, R.; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Lavina, L. Scotto; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Shockley, E.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. v.; Stern, M.; Stein, A.; Tatananni, D.; Tatananni, L.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Upole, N.; Vargas, M.; Wack, O.; Walet, R.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wittweg, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The XENON1T experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is the first WIMP dark matter detector operating with a liquid xenon target mass above the ton-scale. Out of its 3.2 t liquid xenon inventory, 2.0 t constitute the active target of the dual-phase time projection chamber. The scintillation and ionization signals from particle interactions are detected with low-background photomultipliers. This article describes the XENON1T instrument and its subsystems as well as strategies to achieve an unprecedented low background level. First results on the detector response and the performance of the subsystems are also presented.

  9. Search for Baryons with Two Charm Quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Mark Edward [Carnegie Mellon U.

    2002-01-01

    Using data from the SELEX experiment, we searched for baryons having two charm quarks. No one has yet observed a doubly-charmed baryon. We investigated the reconstruction $\\Lambda^+_c K⁻ \\pi^+\\pi^+$, a decay mode consistent with a baryon having $ccu$ quarks. We observe an excess of 20 events above an expected background of 31 events, at a mass of 3.76 GeV/$c^2$. We observe differences between the signal events and the background. The mass resolution, mass, and decay mode are consistent with a $ccu$ baryon. The mass and production are higher than theoretical predictions for the ground state $\\Xi^{++}_{cc}$. If the signal is real and not a doubly-charmed baryon, then it is not accounted for by current physics

  10. Why co-creation experience matters?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füller, Johann; Hutter, Kajta; Faullant, Rita

    2011-01-01

    successful idea and design competitions. While innovation managers may be interested in creative contributions, for participants, it is the experience which matters. Fully featured community platforms rather than single idea submission websites are required to attract creative users to submit their ideas......This article introduces ‘virtual design competitions’ as a new means of opening up the innovation process and enriching the companies, ‘design‐ideas’ by utilizing the creativity of a multiplicity of external designers and enthused consumers all over the world. The ‘Swarovski Enlightened™ jewellery...... design competition’, explored in this study, demonstrates the enormous potential of virtual co‐creation platforms. It further highlights the importance of the co‐creation experience and its impact on the quantity and quality of designs submitted. First, we introduce the idea of virtual co...

  11. Detector Simulation and WIMP Search Analysis for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kevin [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Astrophysical and cosmological measurements on the scales of galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the universe indicate that 85% of the matter in the universe is composed of dark matter, made up of non-baryonic particles that interact with cross-sections on the weak scale or lower. Hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, represent a potential solution to the dark matter problem, and naturally arise in certain Standard Model extensions. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) collaboration aims to detect the scattering of WIMP particles from nuclei in terrestrial detectors. Germanium and silicon particle detectors are deployed in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These detectors are instrumented with phonon and ionization sensors, which allows for discrimination against electromagnetic backgrounds, which strike the detector at rates orders of magnitude higher than the expected WIMP signal. This dissertation presents the development of numerical models of the physics of the CDMS detectors, implemented in a computational package collectively known as the CDMS Detector Monte Carlo (DMC). After substantial validation of the models against data, the DMC is used to investigate potential backgrounds to the next iteration of the CDMS experiment, known as SuperCDMS. Finally, an investigation of using the DMC in a reverse Monte Carlo analysis of WIMP search data is presented.

  12. Review of dark matter direct detection experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Matter, as we know it, makes up less than 5% of the Universe. Various astrophysical observations have confirmed that one quarter of the Universe and most of the matter content in the Universe is made up of dark matter. The nature of dark matter is yet to be discovered and is one of the biggest questions in physics. Particle ...

  13. Detectors calibration and research of luminescent materials for non baryonic dark matter detection; Calibration de detecteurs et recherche de materiaux luminescents pour la detection de la matiere noire non baryonique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messous, M.Y.

    1995-03-01

    This work is dedicated to the characterization of luminescent materials in order to build bolometers for the simultaneous detection of heat an light in the search for WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles) candidates for non baryonic dark matter. These double bolometers should enable the identification and measurement of recoil ions after collision between a WIMPs and material nucleus. In our search for highly luminescent materials, we have studied the emission spectra, the time response and the spectra response resulting from laser excitation or ionizing particles bombardment of some crystals such as CaF{sub 2}(Eu), CaF{sub 2}, CeF{sub 3}(Ce) and In{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}. These studies were conducted down to liquid Helium temperature (4 K). After showing the good performance of CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator, we have measured the quenching effect resulting from {sup 19}F and Ca ions recoil in CaF{sub 2}(Eu). This was done at the 14 MeV Tandem accelerator of Bruyeres-Le-Chatel with a pulsed neutron beam, simulating the WIMPs. The data obtained allowed the exploitation of the results of the BPRS (Beijing - Rome - Paris - Saclay) experiments carried out at Gran-Sasso. This results showed a gain of up to an order of magnitude in the exclusion graph of axially coupled WIMPs compared to NaI. With the apparatus developed at IPN Lyon (Nuclear Physical Institute of Lyon), we have also measured the ionization induced by Ge ion recoils in Germanium detector, which is one of the most promising crystals for WIMPs detection in the energy range of 2.8 keV-37.8 keV. An ionization efficiency of 24% to 29% was obtained. (author). refs., figs., tabs.

  14. Results from the LUX dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Markus, E-mail: markus.horn@yale.edu [Yale University, Dept. of Physics, 217 Prospect St., New Haven CT 06511 (United States); Akerib, D.S [Case Western Reserve University, Dept. of Physics, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Araújo, H.M. [Imperial College London, High Energy Physics, Blackett Laboratory, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, 501 East St Joseph St., Rapid City SD 57701 (United States); Bailey, A.J. [Imperial College London, High Energy Physics, Blackett Laboratory, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Balajthy, J. [University of Maryland, Dept. of Physics, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bernard, E. [Yale University, Dept. of Physics, 217 Prospect St., New Haven CT 06511 (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Bradley, A. [Case Western Reserve University, Dept. of Physics, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Byram, D. [University of South Dakota, Dept. of Physics, 414E Clark St., Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Cahn, S.B. [Yale University, Dept. of Physics, 217 Prospect St., New Haven CT 06511 (United States); Carmona-Benitez, M.C. [University of California Santa Barbara, Dept. of Physics, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Chan, C.; Chapman, J.J. [Brown University, Dept. of Physics, 182 Hope St., Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Chiller, A.A.; Chiller, C. [University of South Dakota, Dept. of Physics, 414E Clark St., Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Currie, A. [Imperial College London, High Energy Physics, Blackett Laboratory, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Viveiros, L. de [LIP-Coimbra, Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Dobi, A. [University of Maryland, Dept. of Physics, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); and others

    2015-06-01

    The LUX (Large Underground Xenon) experiment aims at the direct detection of dark matter particles via their collisions with xenon nuclei. The 370 kg two-phase liquid xenon time projection chamber measures simultaneously the scintillation and ionization from interactions in the target. The ratio of these two signals provides very good discrimination between potential nuclear recoil and electronic recoil signals to search for WIMP-nucleon scattering. The LUX detector operates at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (Lead, South Dakota, USA) since February 2013. First results were presented in late 2013 setting the world's most stringent limits on WIMP-nucleon scattering cross-sections over a wide range of WIMP masses. A 300 day run beginning in 2014 will further improve the sensitivity and new calibration techniques will reduce systematics for the WIMP signal search.

  15. Baryon superfluids in AdS/CFT with flavor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyos, Carlos [Department of Physics, Universidad de Oviedo,Avda. Calvo Sotelo 18, ES-33007 Oviedo (Spain); Itsios, Georgios [Department of Physics, Universidad de Oviedo,Avda. Calvo Sotelo 18, ES-33007 Oviedo (Spain); Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista,R. Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, Bl. II, Sao Paulo 01140-070, SP (Brazil); Vasilakis, Orestis [Department of Physics, Universidad de Oviedo,Avda. Calvo Sotelo 18, ES-33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2017-01-31

    Baryonic matter is notoriously difficult to deal with in the large-N limit, as baryons become operators of very large dimension with N fields in the fundamental representation. This issue is also present in gauge/gravity duals as baryons are described by very heavy localized objects. There are however alternative large-N extrapolations of QCD where small baryonic operators exist and can be treated on an equal footing to mesons. We explore the possibility of turning on a finite density of “light” baryons in a theory with a hadronic mass gap using a gauge/gravity construction based on the D3/D7 intersection. We find a novel phase with spontaneous breaking of baryon symmetry at zero temperature.

  16. The baryon content of the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Big-Bang nucleosynthesis indicates that baryons account for 5% of the Universe’s total energy content[1]. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two[2,3]. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not yet condensed into virialised halos, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web: a low-density plasma at temperature 105–107 K known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM)[3,4,5,6]. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars[7,8,9,10] and hot gas between interacting clusters[11,12,13,14]. These observations were however unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of ten-million-degree gas associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster[15] were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we reveal hot gas structures that are coherent over 8 Mpc scales. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10% of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster's gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. PMID:26632589

  17. The baryonic mass function of galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, J I; Trentham, Neil

    2005-12-15

    In the Big Bang about 5% of the mass that was created was in the form of normal baryonic matter (neutrons and protons). Of this about 10% ended up in galaxies in the form of stars or of gas (that can be in molecules, can be atomic, or can be ionized). In this work, we measure the baryonic mass function of galaxies, which describes how the baryonic mass is distributed within galaxies of different types (e.g. spiral or elliptical) and of different sizes. This can provide useful constraints on our current cosmology, convolved with our understanding of how galaxies form. This work relies on various large astronomical surveys, e.g. the optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey (to observe stars) and the HIPASS radio survey (to observe atomic gas). We then perform an integral over our mass function to determine the cosmological density of baryons in galaxies: Omega(b,gal)=0.0035. Most of these baryons are in stars: Omega(*)=0.0028. Only about 20% are in gas. The error on the quantities, as determined from the range obtained between different methods, is ca 10%; systematic errors may be much larger. Most (ca 90%) of the baryons in the Universe are not in galaxies. They probably exist in a warm/hot intergalactic medium. Searching for direct observational evidence and deeper theoretical understanding for this will form one of the major challenges for astronomy in the next decade.

  18. B decays to baryons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We note that two-body decays to baryons are suppressed relative to three- and four-body decays. In most of these analyses, the invariant baryon–antibaryon mass shows an enhancement near the threshold. We propose a phenomenological interpretation of this quite common feature of hadronization to baryons.

  19. EXTRAGALACTIC DARK MATTER AND DIRECT DETECTION EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baushev, A. N.

    2013-01-01

    Recent astronomical data strongly suggest that a significant part of the dark matter content of the Local Group and Virgo Supercluster is not incorporated into the galaxy halos and forms diffuse components of these galaxy clusters. A portion of the particles from these components may penetrate the Milky Way and make an extragalactic contribution to the total dark matter containment of our Galaxy. We find that the particles of the diffuse component of the Local Group are apt to contribute ∼12% to the total dark matter density near Earth. The particles of the extragalactic dark matter stand out because of their high speed (∼600 km s –1 ), i.e., they are much faster than the galactic dark matter. In addition, their speed distribution is very narrow (∼20 km s –1 ). The particles have an isotropic velocity distribution (perhaps, in contrast to the galactic dark matter). The extragalactic dark matter should provide a significant contribution to the direct detection signal. If the detector is sensitive only to the fast particles (v > 450 km s –1 ), then the signal may even dominate. The density of other possible types of the extragalactic dark matter (for instance, of the diffuse component of the Virgo Supercluster) should be relatively small and comparable with the average dark matter density of the universe. However, these particles can generate anomaly high-energy collisions in direct dark matter detectors.

  20. Revisiting First-Year College Students' Mattering: Social Support, Academic Stress, and the Mattering Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayle, Andrea Dixon; Chung, Kuo-Yi

    2008-01-01

    In this study, Nancy Schlossberg's (1989) theory of college students' mattering to others was revisited. Mattering is the experience of others depending on us, being interested in us, and being concerned with our fate. The relationships of gender, mattering to college friends and the college environment, and friend and family social support with…

  1. Status and Prospects of the DMTPC Directional Dark Matter Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Monroe, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    The DMTPC directional dark matter detection experiment is a low-pressure CF4 gas time projection chamber, instrumented with charge and scintillation photon readout. This detector design strategy emphasizes reconstruction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoil tracks, in order to determine the direction of incident dark matter particles. Directional detection has the potential to make the definitive observation of dark matter using the unique angular signature of the dark matter wind, which is distinc...

  2. The cosmic axion spin precession experiment (CASPEr): a dark-matter search with nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcon, Antoine; Aybas, Deniz; Blanchard, John W.; Centers, Gary; Figueroa, Nataniel L.; Graham, Peter W.; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson; Rajendran, Surjeet; Gil Sendra, Marina; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Trahms, Lutz; Wang, Tao; Wickenbrock, Arne; Wu, Teng; Budker, Dmitry

    2018-01-01

    The cosmic axion spin precession experiment (CASPEr) is a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment (NMR) seeking to detect axion and axion-like particles which could make up the dark matter present in the Universe. We review the predicted couplings of axions and axion-like particles with baryonic matter that enable their detection via NMR. We then describe two measurement schemes being implemented in CASPEr. The first method, presented in the original CASPEr proposal, consists of a resonant search via continuous-wave NMR spectroscopy. This method offers the highest sensitivity for frequencies ranging from a few Hz to hundreds of MHz, corresponding to masses {m}{{a}}∼ {10}-14–{10}-6 eV. Sub-Hz frequencies are typically difficult to probe with NMR due to the diminishing sensitivity of magnetometers in this region. To circumvent this limitation, we suggest new detection and data processing modalities. We describe a non-resonant frequency-modulation detection scheme, enabling searches from mHz to Hz frequencies ({m}{{a}}∼ {10}-17–{10}-14 eV), extending the detection bandwidth by three decades.

  3. Neutron-antineutron oscillation and baryonic majoron: low scale spontaneous baryon violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhiani, Zurab [Universita dell' Aquila, Dipartimento delle Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    We discuss the possibility that baryon number B is spontaneously broken at low scales, of the order of MeV or even smaller, inducing the neutron-antineutron oscillation at the experimentally accessible level. An associated Goldstone particle-baryonic majoron can have observable effects in neutron to antineutron transitions in nuclei or dense nuclear matter. By extending baryon number to an anomaly-free B - L symmetry, the baryo-majoron can be identified with the ordinary majoron associated with the spontaneous breaking of lepton number, and it can have interesting implications for neutrinoless 2β decay with the majoron emission. We also discuss the hypothesis that baryon number can be spontaneously broken by QCD itself via the six-quark condensates. (orig.)

  4. Strategies for dark matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    The present status of alternative forms of dark matter, both baryonic and nonbaryonic, is reviewed. Alternative arguments are presented for the predominance of either cold dark matter (CDM) or of baryonic dark matter (BDM). Strategies are described for dark matter detection, both for dark matter that consists of weakly interacting relic particles and for dark matter that consists of dark stellar remnants

  5. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II) Experiment: First Results from the Soudan Mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Clarence Leeder [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2004-09-01

    There is an abundance of evidence that the majority of the mass of the universe is in the form of non-baryonic non-luminous matter that was non-relativistic at the time when matter began to dominate the energy density. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, are attractive cold dark matter candidates because they would have a relic abundance today of ~0.1 which is consistent with precision cosmological measurements. WIMPs are also well motivated theoretically. Many minimal supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model have WIMPs in the form of the lightest supersymmetric partner, typically taken to be the neutralino. The CDMS II experiment searches for WIMPs via their elastic scattering off of nuclei. The experiment uses Ge and Si ZIP detectors, operated at <50 mK, which simultaneously measure the ionization and athermal phonons produced by the scattering of an external particle. The dominant background for the experiment comes from electromagnetic interactions taking place very close to the detector surface. Analysis of the phonon signal from these interactions makes it possible to discriminate them from interactions caused by WIMPs. This thesis presents the details of an important aspect of the phonon pulse shape analysis known as the ''Lookup Table Correction''. The Lookup Table Correction is a position dependent calibration of the ZIP phonon response which improves the rejection of events scattering near the detector surface. The CDMS collaboration has recently commissioned its experimental installation at the Soudan Mine. This thesis presents an analysis of the data from the first WIMP search at the Soudan Mine. The results of this analysis set the world's lowest exclusion limit making the CDMS II experiment at Soudan the most sensitive WIMP search to this date.

  6. Baryons with chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isgur, N.

    1981-01-01

    Many of the phenomenological difficulties of the non-relativistic quark model for baryons are overcome when some current prejudices from chromodynamics about quark forces are imposed. The effects of flavour independent confinement, symmetry breaking through quark masses, and colour hyperfine interactions are most prominent, leading to a satisfactory understanding of both the spectroscopy of low-lying baryons and of the signs and magnitudes of baryon couplings. The previously worrisome absence in partial wave analyses of a large number of the states expected in the nonrelativistic quark model is explained in terms of decouplings of the resonances from their elastic channels

  7. Implications of the DAMA and CRESST experiments for mirror matter-type dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foot, R.

    2004-01-01

    Mirror atoms are expected to be a significant component of the galactic dark matter halo if mirror matter is identified with the nonbaryonic dark matter in the Universe. Mirror matter can interact with ordinary matter via gravity and via the photon-mirror photon kinetic mixing interaction--causing mirror charged particles to couple to ordinary photons with an effective electric charge εe. This means that the nuclei of mirror atoms can elastically scatter off the nuclei of ordinary atoms, leading to nuclear recoils, which can be detected in existing dark matter experiments. We show that the dark matter experiments most sensitive to this type of dark matter candidate (via the nuclear recoil signature) are the DAMA/NaI and CRESST/Sapphire experiments. Furthermore, we show that the impressive annual modulation signal obtained by the DAMA/NaI experiment can be explained by mirror matter-type dark matter for vertical bar ε vertical bar ∼5x10 -9 and is supported by DAMA's absolute rate measurement as well as the CRESST/Sapphire data. This value of vertical bar ε vertical bar is consistent with the value obtained from various solar system anomalies including the Pioneer spacecraft anomaly, anomalous meteorite events and lack of small craters on the asteroid Eros. It is also consistent with standard big bang nucleosynthesis

  8. Galaxy-galaxy lensing constraints on the relation between baryons and dark matter in galaxies in the Red Sequence Cluster Survey 2

    OpenAIRE

    van Uitert, Edo; Hoekstra, Henk; Velander, Malin; Gilbank, David G.; Gladders, Michael D.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a study of weak gravitational lensing by galaxies using imaging data that were obtained as part of the second Red Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). In order to compare to the baryonic properties of the lenses we focus here on the ~300 square degrees that overlap with the DR7 of the SDSS. The depth and image quality of the RCS2 enables us to significantly improve upon earlier work for luminous galaxies at z>=0.3. Comparison with dynamical masses from the SDSS shows a go...

  9. BM@N and MPD experiments at NICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekelidze, Vladimir; Kolesnikov, Vadim; Sorin, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    The project NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) aims to study hot and baryon rich QCD matter in heavy ion collisions in the energy range = 4 - 11 GeV. The rich heavy-ion physics program will be performed at two experiments, BM@N (Baryonic Matter at Nuclotron) at beams extracted from the Nuclotron, and at MPD (Multi-Purpose Detector) at the NICA collider. This program covers a variety of phenomena in strongly interacting matter of the highest baryonic density, which includes study of collective effects, production of hyperon and hypernuclei, in-medium modification of meson properties, and event-by-event fluctuations.

  10. EDELWEISS-II, direct Dark Matter search experiment: first data analysis and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorza, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest mysteries of the universe that, for the present, puzzles the mind of most astronomers, cosmologists and physicists is the question: 'What makes up our universe?'. This is due to how a certain substance named Dark Matter came under speculation. It is believed this enigmatic substance, of type unknown, accounts for almost three-quarters of the cosmos within the universe, could be the answer to several questions raised by the models of the expanding universe astronomers have created, and even decide the fate of the expansion of the universe. There is strong observational evidence for the dominance of non-baryonic Dark Matter (DM) over baryonic matter in the universe. Such evidence comes from many independent observations over different length scales. The most stringent constraint on the abundance of DM comes from the analysis of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. In particular, the WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe) experiment restricts the abundance of matter and the abundance of baryonic matter in good agreement with predictions from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. It is commonly believed that such a non-baryonic component could consist of new, as yet undiscovered, particles, usually referred to as WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles). Some extensions of the standard model (SM) of particle physics predict the existence of particles that would be excellent DM candidates. In particular great attention has been dedicated to candidates arising in supersymmetric theories: the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP). In the most supersymmetric scenarios, the so-called neutralino seems to be a natural candidate, being stable in theories with conservation of R-parity and having masses and cross sections of typical WIMPs. The EDELWEISS collaboration is a direct dark matter search experiment, aiming to detect directly a WIMP interaction in a target material, high purity germanium crystal working at cryogenic temperatures. It

  11. Phenomenology of Baryon Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doring, Michael [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Landay, Justin [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Mai, Maxim [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Molina, Raquel [Univ. of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ronchen, Deborah [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)

    2018-04-01

    Results for light baryon spectroscopy by different collaborations and the state of the art in the subfield is reviewed. Highlights contain common efforts of different phenomenology groups and the impact of recent high-precision data from ELSA, JLab, MAMI, and other facilities. Questions will be addressed, on one side, of how to proceed to reach conclusive answers in baryon spectroscopy, and, on the other side, how phenomenology can be connected to theory in a meaningful way.

  12. Constraints on Leptophilic Dark Matter from the AMS-02 Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavasonza, Leila Ali; Gast, Henning; Schael, Stefan; Krämer, Michael; Pellen, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    The annihilation of dark matter particles in the Galactic halo of the Milky Way may lead to cosmic ray signatures that can be probed by the AMS-02 experiment, which has measured the composition and fluxes of charged cosmic rays with unprecedented precision. Given the absence of characteristic spectral features in the electron and positron fluxes measured by AMS-02, we derive upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section for leptophilic dark matter models. Our limits are based on a new background model that describes all recent measurements of the energy spectra of cosmic-ray positrons and electrons. For thermal dark matter relics, we can exclude dark matter masses below about 100 GeV. We include the radiation of electroweak gauge bosons in the dark matter annihilation process and compute the antiproton signal that can be expected within leptophilic dark matter models.

  13. Fundamental statistical limitations of future dark matter direct detection experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strege, C.; Trotta, F.; Bertone, G.; Peter, A.H.G.; Scott, P.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss irreducible statistical limitations of future ton-scale dark matter direct detection experiments. We focus in particular on the coverage of confidence intervals, which quantifies the reliability of the statistical method used to reconstruct the dark matter parameters and the bias of the

  14. The Adolescent Mattering Experience: Gender Variations in Perceived Mattering, Anxiety, and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrea L.; Scheidegger, Corey; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2009-01-01

    Individuals who perceive that they matter to others are likely to experience lower anxiety and depression levels. The effects of young adolescents' perceived mattering on their anxiety and depression levels were examined. Results indicated that female adolescents reported lower anxiety levels but greater depression levels than did male…

  15. Validity - a matter of resonant experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbæk, Line

    This paper is about doing interview analysis drawing on researcher’s own lived experience concerning the question of inquiry. The paper exemplifies analyzing case study participants’ experience from the resonant experience of researcher’s own life evoked while listening to recorded interview mate...... entry processes. The validity of doing interview analysis drawing on the resonant experience of researcher is argued from a pragmatist perspective....

  16. Implication of collider experiments for detecting cold dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednyakov, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    Investigation of Minimal Supersymmetry Standard Model shows, that any discovery with high-energy colliders at least one supersymmetric particle would strongly enhance importance of very accurate experiments. which search for lightest supersymmetric neutralinos as cold dark matter particles. Form other side, non-observations of any signal of cold dark matter in such experiments would force us to change strategy of searching for, for instance, light charged Higgs bosons at high energies [ru

  17. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of exper- iments for some time, it is interesting compute this spectrum from QCD and compare results between lattice calculations and continuum theoretical models. Several lattice calculations ex- ist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. Here, we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. We present preliminary results for the ground state spectrum.

  18. Structure of strange baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoccola, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    In this work it is shown how it is possible to study the physics of the baryons within the context of the soliton models based on the QCD behaviour at low energies. In particular, the existing models for strange baryons are studied pointing out the main problems they present. It is also shown how it is possible to obtain satisfactory results in the bound state approximation when the dynamics is appropriately treated. With this aim, a model that includes explicitly vector mesons is considered, and in which the eigenvalue problem for the kaons is treated exactly. The results obtained suggest the possibility of constructing a chiral bag model for strange baryons that will contribute to a better understanding of some conceptual aspects of the low energy hadronic physics. (Author) [es

  19. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search low ionization-threshold experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu Thakur, Ritoban [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Over 80 years ago we discovered the presence of Dark Matter in our universe. Endeavors in astronomy and cosmology are in consensus with ever improving precision that Dark Matter constitutes an essential 27% of our universe. The Standard Model of Particle Physics does not provide any answers to the Dark Matter problem. It is imperative that we understand Dark Matter and discover its fundamental nature. This is because, alongside other important factors, Dark Matter is responsible for formation of structure in our universe. The very construct in which we sit is defined by its abundance. The Milky Way galaxy, hence life, wouldn't have formed if small over densities of Dark Matter had not caused sufficient accretion of stellar material. Marvelous experiments have been designed based on basic notions to directly and in-directly study Dark Matter, and the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment has been a pioneer and forerunner in the direct detection field. Generations of the CDMS experiment were designed with advanced scientific upgrades to detect Dark Matter particles of mass O(100) GeV/c2. This mass-scale was set primarily by predictions from Super Symmetry. Around 2013 the canonical SUSY predictions were losing some ground and several observations (rather hints of signals) from various experiments indicated to the possibility of lighter Dark Matter of mass O(10) GeV/c2. While the SuperCDMS experiment was probing the regular parameter space, the CDMSlite experiment was conceived to dedicatedly search for light Dark Matter using a novel technology. "CDMSlite" stands for CDMS - low ionization threshold experiment. Here we utilize a unique electron phonon coupling mechanism to measure ionization generated by scattering of light particles. Typically signals from such low energy recoils would be washed under instrumental noise. In CDMSlite via generation of Luke-Neganov phonons we can detect the small ionization energies, amplified in

  20. Strong coupling QCD at finite baryon-number density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsch, F.; Muetter, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    We present a new representation of the partition function for strong-coupling QCD which is suitable also for finite baryon-number-density simulations. This enables us to study the phase structure in the canonical formulation (with fixed baryon number B) as well as the grand canonical one (with fixed chemical potential μ). We find a clear signal for a first-order chiral phase transition at μ c a=0.63. The critical baryon-number density n c a 3 =0.045 is only slightly higher than the density of nuclear matter. (orig.)

  1. Search for Nφ(1960) baryon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balatz, M.Ya.; Belyaev, I.M.; Dorofeev, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the experiments at the SPHINX facility in the 70 GeV proton beam of the IHEP accelerator the diffractive production reactions p + N → [Σ(1385) 0 K + ] + N and p + N → [Σ(1385) 0 K + ] + N + (neutral particles) were studied. In the effective mass spectra of the [Σ(1385) 0 K + ] system in these processes there were no signals from the anomalously narrow baryon state N φ (1960), which had been observed earlier in the measurement at the BIS-2 setup. 6 refs., 7 figs

  2. The Static Baryon Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Tsapalis, A; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2002-01-01

    Using state of the art lattice techniques we investigate the static baryon potential. We employ the multi-hit procedure for the time links and a variational approach to determine the ground state with sufficient accuracy that, for distances up to $\\sim 1.2$ fm, we can distinguish the $Y$- and $\\Delta$- Ans\\"atze for the baryonic Wilson area law. Our analysis shows that the $\\Delta$-Ansatz is favoured. This result is also supported by the gauge-invariant nucleon wave function which we measure for the first time.

  3. Problems in baryon spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capstick, S. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Current issues and problems in the physics of ground- and excited-state baryons are considered, and are classified into those which should be resolved by CEBAF in its present form, and those which may require CEBAF to undergo an energy upgrade to 8 GeV or more. Recent theoretical developments designed to address these problems are outlined.

  4. Baryons in the plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarts, Gert; Allton, Chris; Boni, Davide de

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the fate of baryons made out of u, d and s quarks in the hadronic gas and the quark-gluon plasma, using nonperturbative lattice simulations, employing the FASTSUM anisotropic Nf=2+1 ensembles. In the confined phase a strong temperature dependence is seen in the masses of the negative...

  5. B decays to baryons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-10

    Nov 10, 2012 ... Figure 3. Effective Feynman diagrams for the initial meson–meson configuration. Figure 4. Effective Feynman diagrams for the initial diquark–antidiquark configuration. explain the absence of a threshold enhancement in B decays to baryons. There, all con- tributing Feynman diagrams are divided into two ...

  6. Supersymmetric dark matter: Indirect detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, L.

    2000-01-01

    Dark matter detection experiments are improving to the point where they can detect or restrict the primary particle physics candidates for non baryonic dark matter. The methods for detection are usually categorized as direct, i.e., searching for signals caused by passage of dark matter particles in terrestrial detectors, or indirect. Indirect detection methods include searching for antimatter and gamma rays, in particular gamma ray lines, in cosmic rays and high-energy neutrinos from the centre of the Earth or Sun caused by accretion and annihilation of dark matter particles. A review is given of recent progress in indirect detection, both on the theoretical and experimental side

  7. An Overview of Dark Matter Experiments at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyce, James R

    2012-01-01

    Dark Matter research at Jefferson Lab started in 2006 with the LIght Pseudoscalar and Scalar Search (LIPSS) collaboration to check the validity of results reported by the PVLAS collaboration. In the intervening years interest in dark matter laboratory experiments has grown at Jefferson Lab. Current research underway or in planning stages probe various mass regions covering 14 orders of magnitude: from 10 −6 eV to 100 MeV. This presentation will be an overview of our dark matter searches, three of which focus on the hypothesized A' gauge boson.

  8. BGO scintillating bolometer: Its application in dark matter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coron, N; Gironnet, J; Leblanc, J; Marcillac, P de; Martinez, M; Redon, T; Torres, L; Cuesta, C; Garcia, E; Ortigoza, Y; Ortiz de Solorzano, A; Pobes, C; Puimedon, J; Rolon, T; Salinas, A; Sarsa, M L; Villar, J A

    2010-01-01

    In the frame of the ROSEBUD (Rare Objects SEarch with Bolometers UndergrounD) collaboration, we have tested at surface level (Orsay) and underground (Canfranc) properties at low temperature of a BGO scintillating bolometer developed as a prototype for dark matter searches. The response of the detector to different particles, both in heat and light, using internal and external radioactive sources is reported. We have focused on its sensitivity as dark matter target and as γ-ray spectrometer to monitor external background. An algorithm implemented to analyze high energy events, which produce saturated pulses in low energy experiments (like dark matter searches), is also discussed.

  9. BGO scintillating bolometer: Its application in dark matter experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coron, N; Gironnet, J; Leblanc, J; Marcillac, P de; Martinez, M; Redon, T; Torres, L [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS), Batiment 121, Universite Paris-Sud 11 and CNRS (UMR 8617), 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Cuesta, C; Garcia, E; Ortigoza, Y; Ortiz de Solorzano, A; Pobes, C; Puimedon, J; Rolon, T; Salinas, A; Sarsa, M L; Villar, J A, E-mail: ortigoza@unizar.e [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-01-01

    In the frame of the ROSEBUD (Rare Objects SEarch with Bolometers UndergrounD) collaboration, we have tested at surface level (Orsay) and underground (Canfranc) properties at low temperature of a BGO scintillating bolometer developed as a prototype for dark matter searches. The response of the detector to different particles, both in heat and light, using internal and external radioactive sources is reported. We have focused on its sensitivity as dark matter target and as {gamma}-ray spectrometer to monitor external background. An algorithm implemented to analyze high energy events, which produce saturated pulses in low energy experiments (like dark matter searches), is also discussed.

  10. IFC Annual Report 2016 : Experience Matters

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation

    2016-01-01

    IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, is the largest global development institution focused on the private sector in developing countries. Established in 1956, IFC is owned by 184 member countries, a group that collectively determines our policies. We have six decades of experience in the world’s most challenging markets. With a global presence in more than 100 countries, a network consisting of hundreds of financial institutions, and more than 2,000 private sector ...

  11. Digital Advances in Triggering and Data Acquisition Systems for Large Scale Dark Matter Search Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druszkiewicz, Eryk Filip

    With a wealth of astrophysical evidence that confirms that the baryonic matter we understand accounts for only 5% of the matter and energy in the universe, the search is on for the mysterious dark matter, that is said to account for 25% of the universe composition. The leading candidate for dark matter is the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP). Large Underground Xenon (LUX), a 370 kg two-phase (liquid/gas) xenon time projection chamber operating at 4850 feet underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), has recently completed its operation, setting the world's best limit on the WIMP-nucleon cross section. This thesis presents the author's research and development of a novel, FPGA-based, triggering system. This system has operated at SURF since 2011 and through digital signal processing techniques identified events of interest in real-time. The system processes the incoming data at its filter stages with a rate of 5,100 MB/s and does so consuming a total of only 15 W. The firmware and software were entirely developed by the author, while the custom-built hardware was developed in close collaboration with the author. The system offers great flexibility through the reconfigurability feature of FPGAs, which was exercised often during the course of the experiment. The system allows for fully remote operation, minimizing the personnel needs one mile underground. For this type of detectors, this triggering system has shown to offer the highest efficiency in detecting signals as small as few liquid electrons. An FIR digital filter implementation is presented, that has been tailored for this application and offers an up to 99% and 97% savings in scalars and summers utilization, respectively. LUX-Zepplin (LZ) is a next-generation dark matter detector, that is scheduled to start probing the remainder of the uncharted WIMP-nucleon cross section in 2020. It is a significantly larger successor of LUX, with a total xenon mass of 10 tonne. It will be

  12. The Inner Experience of Living Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Asger

    The dialectical aspect in the work of George Bataille is often neglected. At the suggestion of Foucault and Derrida, Bataille is most often even taken to be a non-dialectical thinker. But Bataille worked intensely with Hegel's ideas, his thought was expressed in Hegelian terms, and both his...... epistemology and his ontology can be considered a determinate negation of Hegel's position in the Phenomenology. This is shown, first, by analyzing Bataille's notions of `inner experience', and, second, by showing how Bataille extends dialectics to the natural, non-human realm, and even conceives the link...

  13. The Inner Experience of Living Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Asger

    epistemology and his ontology can be considered a determinate negation of Hegel's position in the Phenomenology. This is shown, first, by analyzing Bataille's notions of `inner experience', and, second, by showing how Bataille extends dialectics to the natural, non-human realm, and even conceives the link...... between the human and non-human as itself dialectical. However, once we see the dialectical nature of his theoretical stance, we are struck by a great vagueness in his practical conception of where society ought to be going.......The dialectical aspect in the work of George Bataille is often neglected. At the suggestion of Foucault and Derrida, Bataille is most often even taken to be a non-dialectical thinker. But Bataille worked intensely with Hegel's ideas, his thought was expressed in Hegelian terms, and both his...

  14. Flavour tagging with baryons and a study of two body $\\Lambda_b$ decays with the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Storey, James William

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb experiment will perform precision measurements of CP-violation and search for rare B decays at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is due to begin operation in 2008. The LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system provides the particle identification crucial for these studies. The Multi-Anode photomultiplier tube (MaPMT)is a candidate photon detector for the LHCb RICH system. Performance studies of the MaPMT in a charged particle beam at CERN demonstrate that the pulse shape of the BeetleMA readout ASIC does not return to zero after 125ns, which will lead to ghost pixel hits and the possible drift of the pedestal outside the dynamic range of the amplifier. Measurement of key CP asymmetries at LHCb requires that the flavour of the B-meson at creation is known. Flavour tagging using protons is shown to have potentially useful tagging performance, but the implementation is found to be challenging. A correlation between b-quark and Lambda flavour is observed for a Lambda produced in the same fragmentati...

  15. Quantization State of Baryonic Mass in Clusters of Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The rotational velocity curves for clusters of galaxies cannot be explained by Newtonian gravitation using the baryonic mass nor does MOND succeed in reducing this discrepancy to acceptable differences. The dark matter hypothesis appears to offer a solution; however, non-baryonic dark matter has never been detected. As an alternative approach, quantum celestial mechanics (QCM predicts that galactic clusters are in quantization states determined solely by the total baryonic mass of the cluster and its total angular momentum. We find excellent agreement with QCM for ten galactic clusters, demonstrating that dark matter is not needed to explain the rotation velocities and providing further support to the hypothesis that all gravitationally bound systems have QCM quantization states.

  16. Photoproduction of charmed baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a search for the photoproduction of charmed baryons in the broad-band neutral beam at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are reported. The lowest lying charmed baryon (Λ/sub c/ + ) is observed through its decay to p-anti K 0 . The cross section times branching ratio of γ + C → Λ/sub c/ + + X, γ + C → p + anti K 0 is measured to be sigma B = 3 nanobarns/nucleon. The total error on this measurement is estimated to be -20% to +40%. The mass of the Λ/sub c/ + is found to be 2.284 +- 0.001 GeV/c 2 , in good agreement with the Mark II result from SPEAR. Upper limits (90% confidence level) are set on sigma B for the modes Λ 0 π, Λ 0 πππ, pKπ

  17. Tidal Dwarf Galaxies and Missing Baryons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Bournaud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tidal dwarf galaxies form during the interaction, collision, or merger of massive spiral galaxies. They can resemble “normal” dwarf galaxies in terms of mass, size, and become dwarf satellites orbiting around their massive progenitor. They nevertheless keep some signatures from their origin, making them interesting targets for cosmological studies. In particular, they should be free from dark matter from a spheroidal halo. Flat rotation curves and high dynamical masses may then indicate the presence of an unseen component, and constrain the properties of the “missing baryons,” known to exist but not directly observed. The number of dwarf galaxies in the Universe is another cosmological problem for which it is important to ascertain if tidal dwarf galaxies formed frequently at high redshift, when the merger rate was high, and many of them survived until today. In this paper, “dark matter” is used to refer to the nonbaryonic matter, mostly located in large dark halos, that is, CDM in the standard paradigm, and “missing baryons” or “dark baryons” is used to refer to the baryons known to exist but hardly observed at redshift zero, and are a baryonic dark component that is additional to “dark matter”.

  18. Baryons in the chiral regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knippschild, Bastian

    2012-03-05

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of strong interactions, one of the four fundamental forces in our Universe. It describes the interaction of gluons and quarks which build up hadrons like protons and neutrons. Most of the visible matter in our universe is made of protons and neutrons. Hence, we are interested in their fundamental properties like their masses, their distribution of charge and their shape. The only known theoretical, non-perturbative and ab initio method to investigate hadron properties at low energies is lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). However, up-to-date simulations (especially for baryonic quantities) do not achieve the accuracy of experiments. In fact, current simulations do not even reproduce the experimental values for the form factors. The question arises wether these deviations can be explained by systematic effects in lattice QCD simulations. This thesis is about the computation of nucleon form factors and other hadronic quantities from lattice QCD. So called Wilson fermions are used and the u- and d-quarks are treated fully dynamically. The simulations were performed using gauge ensembles with a range of lattice spacings, volumes and pion masses. First of all, the lattice spacing was set to be able to make contact between the lattice results and their experimental complement and to be able to perform a continuum extrapolation. The light quark mass has been computed and found to be m{sub ud}{sup MS}(2 GeV)=3.03(17)(38) MeV. This value is in good agreement with values from experiments and other lattice determinations. Electro-magnetic and axial form factors of the nucleon have been calculated. From these form factors the nucleon radii and the coupling constants were computed. The different ensembles enabled us to investigate systematically the dependence of these quantities on the volume, the lattice spacing and the pion mass. Finally we perform a continuum extrapolation and chiral extrapolations to the physical point

  19. Baryons in the chiral regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knippschild, Bastian

    2012-01-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of strong interactions, one of the four fundamental forces in our Universe. It describes the interaction of gluons and quarks which build up hadrons like protons and neutrons. Most of the visible matter in our universe is made of protons and neutrons. Hence, we are interested in their fundamental properties like their masses, their distribution of charge and their shape. The only known theoretical, non-perturbative and ab initio method to investigate hadron properties at low energies is lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). However, up-to-date simulations (especially for baryonic quantities) do not achieve the accuracy of experiments. In fact, current simulations do not even reproduce the experimental values for the form factors. The question arises whether these deviations can be explained by systematic effects in lattice QCD simulations. This thesis is about the computation of nucleon form factors and other hadronic quantities from lattice QCD. So called Wilson fermions are used and the u- and d-quarks are treated fully dynamically. The simulations were performed using gauge ensembles with a range of lattice spacings, volumes and pion masses. First of all, the lattice spacing was set to be able to make contact between the lattice results and their experimental complement and to be able to perform a continuum extrapolation. The light quark mass has been computed and found to be m ud MS (2 GeV)=3.03(17)(38) MeV. This value is in good agreement with values from experiments and other lattice determinations. Electro-magnetic and axial form factors of the nucleon have been calculated. From these form factors the nucleon radii and the coupling constants were computed. The different ensembles enabled us to investigate systematically the dependence of these quantities on the volume, the lattice spacing and the pion mass. Finally we perform a continuum extrapolation and chiral extrapolations to the physical point. In

  20. Investigation of the source size and strong interaction with the femtoscopic correlations of baryons and antibaryons in heavy-ion collisions registered by ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00508100

    The strong interaction is one of the four fundamental forces of nature. It binds together quarks inside protons and neutrons (which are example of baryons - particles composed of three quarks) and assures the stability of the atomic nucleus. Parameters describing the strong potential are also crucial for the neutron stars models used in astrophysics. What is more, a precise study of strongly interacting particles may help to better understand the process of baryon annihilation. The current knowledge of the strong interactions between baryons other than nucle- ons is limited - there exist only a few measurements of the cross sections for pairs of (anti)baryons. The reason is that in many cases it is not possible to perform scattering experiments with beams of particles and antiparticles, as the exotic matter (such as Λ, Ξ or Σ baryons) is very shot-living. This issue can be solved thanks to the recent particle colliders like the Large Hadron Collider and experiments dedicated to study the heavy-ion collisio...

  1. Spin precession experiments for light axionic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W.; Kaplan, David E.; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Terrano, William A.; Trahms, Lutz; Wilkason, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Axionlike particles are promising candidates to make up the dark matter of the Universe, but it is challenging to design experiments that can detect them over their entire allowed mass range. Dark matter in general, and, in particular, axionlike particles and hidden photons, can be as light as roughly 10-22 eV (˜10-8 Hz ), with astrophysical anomalies providing motivation for the lightest masses ("fuzzy dark matter"). We propose experimental techniques for direct detection of axionlike dark matter in the mass range from roughly 10-13 eV (˜102 Hz ) down to the lowest possible masses. In this range, these axionlike particles act as a time-oscillating magnetic field coupling only to spin, inducing effects such as a time-oscillating torque and periodic variations in the spin-precession frequency with the frequency and direction of these effects set by the axion field. We describe how these signals can be measured using existing experimental technology, including torsion pendulums, atomic magnetometers, and atom interferometry. These experiments demonstrate a strong discovery capability, with future iterations of these experiments capable of pushing several orders of magnitude past current astrophysical bounds.

  2. Charmed baryons photoproduced in FOCUS at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Ratti, S P

    2001-01-01

    FOCUS collected over 7 * 10/sup 7/ triggers and more than 10/sup 6/ fully reconstructed charm particles in a photoproduction experiment at Fermilab. The experimental setup is an upgraded version of a multiparticle spectrometer used in the previous experiment E687. Data on charmed meson spectroscopy have been presented by F.L Fabbri in this Section. Here data on photoproduction of charmed baryons are presented.

  3. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  4. Baryons and the Borromeo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Craig D.; Segovia, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The kernels in the tangible matter of our everyday experience are composed of light quarks. At least, they are light classically; but they don’t remain light. Dynamical effects within the Standard Model of Particle Physics change them in remarkable ways, so that in some configurations they appear nearly massless, but in others possess masses on the scale of light nuclei. Modern experiment and theory are exposing the mechanisms responsible for these remarkable transformations. The rewards are great if we can combine the emerging sketches into an accurate picture of confinement, which is such a singular feature of the Standard Model; and looming larger amongst the emerging ideas is a perspective that leads to a Borromean picture of the proton and its excited states. (author)

  5. Dark matter spin determination with directional direct detection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catena, Riccardo; Conrad, Jan; Döring, Christian; Ferella, Alfredo Davide; Krauss, Martin B.

    2018-01-01

    If dark matter has spin 0, only two WIMP-nucleon interaction operators can arise as leading operators from the nonrelativistic reduction of renormalizable single-mediator models for dark matter-quark interactions. Based on this crucial observation, we show that about 100 signal events at next generation directional detection experiments can be enough to enable a 2 σ rejection of the spin 0 dark matter hypothesis in favor of alternative hypotheses where the dark matter particle has spin 1 /2 or 1. In this context, directional sensitivity is crucial since anisotropy patterns in the sphere of nuclear recoil directions depend on the spin of the dark matter particle. For comparison, about 100 signal events are expected in a CF4 detector operating at a pressure of 30 torr with an exposure of approximately 26,000 cubic-meter-detector days for WIMPs of 100 GeV mass and a WIMP-fluorine scattering cross section of 0.25 pb. Comparable exposures require an array of cubic meter time projection chamber detectors.

  6. Baryon Spectroscopy at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Austregesilo, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Diffractive dissociation of the beam proton is one of the dominant processes for the 190GeV$/c$ positive hadron beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target in COMPASS. The status of the analysis of the reactions $pp\\rightarrow$ $p_{f}$ $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}p_{s}$ and $pp\\rightarrow$ $p_{f}$ $K^{+}K^{−}p_{s}$ will be presented, where dominant features of the light baryon spectrum become clearly visible. Furthermore, partial-wave analysis techniques to disentangle these spectra are discussed.

  7. Geneva University: Dark matter Search with the CDMS experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Wednesday 21 September 2011 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium “ Dark matter Search with the CDMS experiment ” Par Dr. Sebastian Arrenberg, Université de Zürich The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment (CDMS) employs a total of 30 germanium and silicon detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory to detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their scattering from the target nuclei. Previous CDMS results, released in December 2009, set the world leading limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section above WIMP masses of ~50 GeV/c2 assuming elastic scattering.  In a subsequent analysis we investigated the inelastic dark matter scenario which was proposed to reconcile the disagreement between the results of DAMA/LIBRA and other existing dark matter searc...

  8. Results from the DarkSide-50 Dark Matter Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Alden [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    While there is tremendous astrophysical and cosmological evidence for dark matter, its precise nature is one of the most significant open questions in modern physics. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a particularly compelling class of dark matter candidates with masses of the order 100 GeV and couplings to ordinary matter at the weak scale. Direct detection experiments are aiming to observe the low energy (<100 keV) scattering of dark matter off normal matter. With the liquid noble technology leading the way in WIMP sensitivity, no conclusive signals have been observed yet. The DarkSide experiment is looking for WIMP dark matter using a liquid argon target in a dual-phase time projection chamber located deep underground at Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) in Italy. Currently filled with argon obtained from underground sources, which is greatly reduced in radioactive 39Ar, DarkSide-50 recently made the most sensitive measurement of the 39Ar activity in underground argon and used it to set the strongest WIMP dark matter limit using liquid argon to date. This work describes the full chain of analysis used to produce the recent dark matter limit, from reconstruction of raw data to evaluation of the final exclusion curve. The DarkSide- 50 apparatus is described in detail, followed by discussion of the low level reconstruction algorithms. The algorithms are then used to arrive at three broad analysis results: The electroluminescence signals in DarkSide-50 are used to perform a precision measurement of ii longitudinal electron diffusion in liquid argon. A search is performed on the underground argon data to identify the delayed coincidence signature of 85Kr decays to the 85mRb state, a crucial ingredient in the measurement of the 39Ar activity in the underground argon. Finally, a full description of the WIMP search is given, including development of cuts, efficiencies, energy scale, and exclusion

  9. New paradigm for baryon and lepton number violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fileviez Pérez, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The possible discovery of proton decay, neutron–antineutron oscillation, neutrinoless double beta decay in low energy experiments, and exotic signals related to the violation of the baryon and lepton numbers at collider experiments will change our understanding of the conservation of fundamental symmetries in nature. In this review we discuss the rare processes due to the existence of baryon and lepton number violating interactions. The simplest grand unified theories and the neutrino mass generation mechanisms are discussed. The theories where the baryon and lepton numbers are defined as local gauge symmetries spontaneously broken at the low scale are discussed in detail. The simplest supersymmetric gauge theory which predicts the existence of lepton number violating processes at the low scale is investigated. The main goal of this review is to discuss the main implications of baryon and lepton number violation in physics beyond the Standard Model.

  10. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small, within...

  11. Test of right-handed currents in baryon semileptonic decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.; Huerta, R.; Maya, M.; Perez Marcial, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of a right-handed boson on baryon semileptonic decay is considered. The analysis of polarized and unpolarized decays is carried out and it is shown that the best place to look for a right-handed current (RHC) signature is in polarized baryon decay. However, our results are useful for high statistics experiments. In order to see the contribution of the right-handed currents in the case of unpolarized hyperon decay, the Cabibbo theory should be assumed. (orig.)

  12. Searching for light dark matter with the SLAC millicharge experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, M; Schuster, P

    2013-11-27

    New sub-GeV gauge forces ("dark photons") that kinetically mix with the photon provide a promising scenario for MeV-GeV dark matter and are the subject of a program of searches at fixed-target and collider facilities around the world. In such models, dark photons produced in collisions may decay invisibly into dark-matter states, thereby evading current searches. We reexamine results of the SLAC mQ electron beam dump experiment designed to search for millicharged particles and find that it was strongly sensitive to any secondary beam of dark matter produced by electron-nucleus collisions in the target. The constraints are competitive for dark photon masses in the ~1-30 MeV range, covering part of the parameter space that can reconcile the apparent (g-2)(μ) anomaly. Simple adjustments to the original SLAC search for millicharges may extend sensitivity to cover a sizable portion of the remaining (g-2)(μ) anomaly-motivated region. The mQ sensitivity is therefore complementary to ongoing searches for visible decays of dark photons. Compared to existing direct-detection searches, mQ sensitivity to electron-dark-matter scattering cross sections is more than an order of magnitude better for a significant range of masses and couplings in simple models.

  13. Model-independent approach for dark matter phenomenology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    progress in recent years. Especially, the observation of cosmic microwave back- ground anisotropies by the WMAP has revealed the existence of a non-baryonic cold dark matter (DM) [1]. In order to detect the DM, many experiments have been performed and are now on-going. However, the DM has not been discovered.

  14. Finite temperature system of strongly interacting baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, R.L.; Gleeson, A.M.; Pedigo, R.D.; Wheeler, J.W.

    1976-07-01

    A fully relativistic finite temperature many body theory is constructed and used to examine the bulk properties of a system of strongly interacting baryons. The strong interactions are described by a two parameter phenomenological model fit to a simple description of nuclear matter at T = 0. The zero temperature equation of state for such a system which has already been discussed in the literature was developed to give a realistic description of nuclear matter. The model presented here is the exact finite temperature extension of that model. The effect of the inclusion of baryon pairs for T greater than or equal to 2mc/sup 2//k is discussed in detail. The phase transition identified with nuclear matter vanishes for system temperatures in excess of T/sub C/ = 1.034 x 10/sup 11/ /sup 0/K. All values of epsilon (P,T) correspond to systems that are causal in the sense that the locally determined speed of sound never exceeds the speed of light.

  15. Finite temperature system of strongly interacting baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, R.L.; Gleeson, A.M.; Pedigo, R.D.; Wheeler, J.W.

    1976-07-01

    A fully relativistic finite temperature many body theory is constructed and used to examine the bulk properties of a system of strongly interacting baryons. The strong interactions are described by a two parameter phenomenological model fit to a simple description of nuclear matter at T = 0. The zero temperature equation of state for such a system which has already been discussed in the literature was developed to give a realistic description of nuclear matter. The model presented here is the exact finite temperature extension of that model. The effect of the inclusion of baryon pairs for T greater than or equal to 2mc 2 /k is discussed in detail. The phase transition identified with nuclear matter vanishes for system temperatures in excess of T/sub C/ = 1.034 x 10 11 0 K. All values of epsilon (P,T) correspond to systems that are causal in the sense that the locally determined speed of sound never exceeds the speed of light

  16. Recent developments in dark matter searches

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    large scale structure (LSS) data, indicates that the matter content of the Universe cannot be completely comprised of visible baryonic matter. In fact, what is suggested by the data is that the visible baryonic matter can only be a small fraction of the total matter content, ∼4% only, with the remainder comprised of dark energy ...

  17. Effects of baryons on the statistical properties of large scale structure of the Universe; Effets des baryons sur les proprietes statistiques des grandes structures de l'Univers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillet, T.

    2010-09-23

    Observations of weak gravitational lensing will provide strong constraints on the cosmic expansion history and the growth rate of large scale structure, yielding clues to the properties and nature of dark energy. Their interpretation is impacted by baryonic physics, which are expected to modify the total matter distribution at small scales. My work has focused on determining and modeling the impact of baryons on the statistics of the large scale matter distribution in the Universe. Using numerical simulations, I have extracted the effect of baryons on the power spectrum, variance and skewness of the total density field as predicted by these simulations. I have shown that a model based on the halo model construction, featuring a concentrated central component to account for cool condensed baryons, is able to reproduce accurately, and down to very small scales, the measured amplifications of both the variance and skewness of the density field. Because of well-known issues with baryons in current cosmological simulations, I have extended the central component model to rely on as many observation-based ingredients as possible. As an application, I have studied the effect of baryons on the predictions of the upcoming Euclid weak lensing survey. During the course of this work, I have also worked at developing and extending the RAMSES code, in particular by developing a parallel self-gravity solver, which offers significant performance gains, in particular for the simulation of some astrophysical setups such as isolated galaxy or cluster simulations. (author) [French] Les observations de lentilles faibles gravitationnelles sont en mesure de fournir des pistes quant a la nature de l'energie noire et ses proprietes. Leur interpretation est rendue plus difficile par la physique des baryons qui modifie la distribution totale de matiere a petite echelle. Mon travail s'est axe sur la determination et la modelisation des effets des baryons sur les statistiques de la

  18. SOLAR CONSTRAINTS ON ASYMMETRIC DARK MATTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The dark matter content of the universe is likely to be a mixture of matter and antimatter, perhaps comparable to the measured asymmetric mixture of baryons and antibaryons. During the early stages of the universe, the dark matter particles are produced in a process similar to baryogenesis, and dark matter freezeout depends on the dark matter asymmetry and the annihilation cross section (s-wave and p-wave annihilation channels) of particles and antiparticles. In these η-parameterized asymmetric dark matter (ηADM) models, the dark matter particles have an annihilation cross section close to the weak interaction cross section, and a value of dark matter asymmetry η close to the baryon asymmetry η B . Furthermore, we assume that dark matter scattering of baryons, namely, the spin-independent scattering cross section, is of the same order as the range of values suggested by several theoretical particle physics models used to explain the current unexplained events reported in the DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT, and CRESST experiments. Here, we constrain ηADM by investigating the impact of such a type of dark matter on the evolution of the Sun, namely, the flux of solar neutrinos and helioseismology. We find that dark matter particles with a mass smaller than 15 GeV, a spin-independent scattering cross section on baryons of the order of a picobarn, and an η-asymmetry with a value in the interval 10 –12 -10 –10 , would induce a change in solar neutrino fluxes in disagreement with current neutrino flux measurements. This result is also confirmed by helioseismology data. A natural consequence of this model is suppressed annihilation, thereby reducing the tension between indirect and direct dark matter detection experiments, but the model also allows a greatly enhanced annihilation cross section. All the cosmological ηADM scenarios that we discuss have a relic dark matter density Ωh 2 and baryon asymmetry η B in agreement with the current WMAP measured values, Ω DM h 2 = 0

  19. A Baryonic Solution to the Missing Satellites Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Kuhlen, Michael; Zolotov, Adi; Hooper, Dan

    2013-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that the inclusion of baryonic physics can alter the dark matter densities in the centers of low-mass galaxies, making the central dark matter slope more shallow than predicted in pure cold dark matter simulations. This flattening of the dark matter profile can occur in the most luminous subhalos around Milky Way mass galaxies. Zolotov et al. have suggested a correction to be applied to the central masses of dark matter-only satellites in order to mimic the affect of (1) the flattening of the dark matter cusp due to supernova feedback in luminous satellites and (2) enhanced tidal stripping due to the presence of a baryonic disk. In this paper, we apply this correction to the z = 0 subhalo masses from the high resolution, dark matter-only Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, and find that the number of massive subhalos is dramatically reduced. After adopting a stellar mass to halo mass relationship for the VL2 halos, and identifying subhalos that are (1) likely to be destroyed by stripping and (2) likely to have star formation suppressed by photo-heating, we find that the number of massive, luminous satellites around a Milky Way mass galaxy is in agreement with the number of observed satellites around the Milky Way or M31. We conclude that baryonic processes have the potential to solve the missing satellites problem

  20. High-Energy Neutron Backgrounds for Underground Dark Matter Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Direct dark matter detection experiments usually have excellent capability to distinguish nuclear recoils, expected interactions with Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter, and electronic recoils, so that they can efficiently reject background events such as gamma-rays and charged particles. However, both WIMPs and neutrons can induce nuclear recoils. Neutrons are then the most crucial background for direct dark matter detection. It is important to understand and account for all sources of neutron backgrounds when claiming a discovery of dark matter detection or reporting limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section. One type of neutron background that is not well understood is the cosmogenic neutrons from muons interacting with the underground cavern rock and materials surrounding a dark matter detector. The Neutron Multiplicity Meter (NMM) is a water Cherenkov detector capable of measuring the cosmogenic neutron flux at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, which has an overburden of 2090 meters water equivalent. The NMM consists of two 2.2-tonne gadolinium-doped water tanks situated atop a 20-tonne lead target. It detects a high-energy (>~ 50 MeV) neutron via moderation and capture of the multiple secondary neutrons released when the former interacts in the lead target. The multiplicity of secondary neutrons for the high-energy neutron provides a benchmark for comparison to the current Monte Carlo predictions. Combining with the Monte Carlo simulation, the muon-induced high-energy neutron flux above 50 MeV is measured to be (1.3 ± 0.2) ~ 10-9 cm-2s-1, in reasonable agreement with the model prediction. The measured multiplicity spectrum agrees well with that of Monte Carlo simulation for multiplicity below 10, but shows an excess of approximately a factor of three over Monte Carlo prediction for multiplicities ~ 10 - 20. In an effort to reduce neutron backgrounds for the dark matter experiment SuperCDMS SNO- LAB, an active neutron veto was developed

  1. Status and prospects of the China Dark Matter Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shukui; Yue, Qian

    2015-05-01

    The China Dark Matter Experiment (CDEX) pursues direct searches of light Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL), which is the deepest operating laboratory for astroparticle research in the world. Results from a prototype CDEX-0 20 g germanium detector array and CDEX-1 994 g pPCGe(p-type Point Contact Germanium) detector are reported. The new result from CDEX-1 pPCGe excludes the CoGeNT-2013 allowed region with an identical detector technique. CDEX-10 with a PCGearray of 10 kg target mass range enclosed in a liquid argon anti-Compton detector is being constructed and tested. The CDEX program evolves into the targets of "CDEX-1T Experiment". The CDEX-1T experiment will be located in CJPL-II which is under construction and will be finished by the end of 2016.

  2. Baryon number and strangeness: signals of a deconfinedantecedent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumder, A.; Koch, V.; Randrup, J.

    2005-06-29

    The correlation between baryon number and strangeness is used to discern the nature of the deconfined matter produced at vanishing chemical potential in high-energy nuclear collisions at the BNL RHIC. Comparisons of results of various phenomenological models with correlations extracted from lattice QCD calculations suggest that a quasi-particle picture applies. At finite baryon densities, such as those encountered at the CERN SPS, it is demonstrated that the presence of a first-order phase transition and the accompanying development of spinodal decomposition would significantly enhance the number of strangeness carriers and the associated fluctuations.

  3. High baryon density from relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Y.; Kahana, S.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Schlagel, T.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1993-10-01

    A quantitative model, based on hadronic physics, is developed and applied to heavy ion collisions at BNL-AGS energies. This model is in excellent agreement with observed particle spectra in heavy ion collisions using Si beams, where baryon densities of three and four times the normal nuclear matter density ({rho}{sub 0}) are reached. For Au on Au collisions, the authors predict the formation of matter at very high densities (up to 10 {rho}{sub 0}).

  4. LHC experiments present new results at Quark Matter 2011 Conference

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office

    2011-01-01

    The three LHC experiments that study lead ion collisions all presented their latest results today at the annual Quark Matter conference, held this year in Annecy, France. The results are based on analysis of data collected during the last two weeks of the 2010 LHC run, when the LHC switched from protons to lead-ions. All experiments report highly subtle measurements, bringing heavy-ion physics into a new era of high precision studies.   Events recorded by the ALICE experiment from the first lead ion collisions (Nov-Dec 2010). “These results from the LHC lead ion programme are already starting bring new understanding of the primordial universe,” said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer. “The subtleties they are already seeing are very impressive.” In its infancy, just microseconds after the Big Bang, the universe consisted of a plasma of quarks and gluons (QGP), the fundamental building blocks of matter. By colliding heavy ions, physicists can turn back time an...

  5. Status of the DAMIC Direct Dark Matter Search Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; et al.

    2015-09-30

    The DAMIC experiment uses fully depleted, high resistivity CCDs to search for dark matter particles. With an energy threshold $\\sim$50 eV$_{ee}$, and excellent energy and spatial resolutions, the DAMIC CCDs are well-suited to identify and suppress radioactive backgrounds, having an unrivaled sensitivity to WIMPs with masses $<$6 GeV/$c^2$. Early results motivated the construction of a 100 g detector, DAMIC100, currently being installed at SNOLAB. This contribution discusses the installation progress, new calibration efforts near the threshold, a preliminary result with 2014 data, and the prospects for physics results after one year of data taking.

  6. The AMS-02 Experiment and the Dark Matter Search

    CERN Document Server

    Masi, Nicolo

    AMS-02 is running after great scientific goals since one year and a half: a final setting up for dark matter searches has been achieved, allowing to study the so important antiparticle to particle ratios, which will probably be the first dark matter signals ever corroborated. Even if primary cosmic rays fluxes are subjected to a lot of uncertainties sources, some statements can be done and have been written down about dark matter properties: DM should be a heavy Majorana fermion or Spin 0 or 1 boson, with a mass from about 1 TeV to 10 TeV - unveiling a new TeV-ish search age - which could be able to originate antiparticle fluxes enhancements at high energies, both for positrons and antiprotons. All the observations, direct and indirect, point to these new paradigms or can be traced back to them quite easily. These enhancements perfectly fall into the research window of AMS-02, allowing the experiment to attack each today credible theory. Also an investigation of the Sommerfeld effect-associated dark boson wil...

  7. Experiments on extreme states of matter towards HIF at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharkov, B.; Varentsov, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities allowing for a large variety of unprecedented frontier research in extreme state of matter physics and applied science. Indeed, it is the largest basic research project on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum of Research Infrastructures (ESFRI), and it is cornerstone of the European Research Area. FAIR offers to scientists from the whole world an abundance of outstanding research opportunities, broader in scope than any other contemporary large-scale facility worldwide. More than 2500 scientists are involved in setting up and exploiting the FAIR facility. They will push the frontiers of our knowledge in plasma, nuclear, atomic, hadron and applied physics far ahead, with important implications also for other fields in science such as cosmology, astro and particle physics, and technology. It includes 14 initial experiments, which form the four scientific pillars of FAIR. The main thrust of intense heavy ion and laser beam-matter interaction research focuses on the structure and evolution of extreme state of matter on both a microscopic and on a cosmic scale. (authors)

  8. Detailed Characterization of Nuclear Recoil Pulse Shape Discrimination in the Darkside-50 Direct Dark Matter Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludert, Erin Edkins

    While evidence of non-baryonic dark matter has been accumulating for decades, its exact nature continues to remain a mystery. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are a well motivated candidate which appear in certain extensions of the Standard Model, independently of dark matter theory. If such particles exist, they should occasionally interact with particles of normal matter, producing a signal which may be detected. The DarkSide-50 direct dark matter experiment aims to detect the energy of recoiling argon atoms due to the elastic scattering of postulated WIMPs. In order to make such a discovery, a clear understanding of both the background and signal region is essential. This understanding requires a careful study of the detector's response to radioactive sources, which in turn requires such sources may be safely introduced into or near the detector volume and reliably removed. The CALibration Insertaion System (CALIS) was designed and built for this purpose in a joint effort between Fermi National Laboratory and the University of Hawaii. This work describes the design and testing of CALIS, its installation and commissioning at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and the multiple calibration campaigns which have successfully employed it. As nuclear recoils produced by WIMPs are indistinguishable from those produced by neutrons, radiogenic neutrons are both the most dangerous class of background and a vital calibration source for the study of the potential WIMP signal. Prior to the calibration of DarkSide-50 with radioactive neutron sources, the acceptance region was determined by the extrapolation of nuclear recoil data from a separate, dedicated experiment, ScENE, which measured the distribution of the pulse shape discrimination parameter, f 90, for nuclear recoils of known energies. This work demonstrates the validity of the extrapolation of ScENE values to DarkSide-50, by direct comparison of the f90 distribution of nuclear recoils from Sc

  9. Baryonic Higgs at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerr, Michael [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fileviez Perez, Pavel [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). CERCA, Physics Dept.; Smirnov, Juri [INFN, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Florence Univ., Sesto Fiorentino (Italy). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2017-04-15

    We investigate the possible collider signatures of a new Higgs in simple extensions of the Standard Model where baryon number is a local symmetry spontaneously broken at the low scale. We refer to this new Higgs as ''Baryonic Higgs''. This Higgs has peculiar properties since it can decay into all Standard Model particles, the leptophobic gauge boson, and the vector-like quarks present in these theories to ensure anomaly cancellation. We investigate in detail the constraints from the γγ, Zγ, ZZ, and WW searches at the Large Hadron Collider, needed to find a lower bound on the scale at which baryon number is spontaneously broken. The di-photon channel turns out to be a very sensitive probe in the case of small scalar mixing and can severely constrain the baryonic scale. We also study the properties of the leptophobic gauge boson in order to understand the testability of these theories at the LHC.

  10. Calm Multi-Baryon Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkowitz Evan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many outstanding problems in nuclear physics which require input and guidance from lattice QCD calculations of few baryons systems. However, these calculations suffer from an exponentially bad signal-to-noise problem which has prevented a controlled extrapolation to the physical point. The variational method has been applied very successfully to two-meson systems, allowing for the extraction of the two-meson states very early in Euclidean time through the use of improved single hadron operators. The sheer numerical cost of using the same techniques in two-baryon systems has so far been prohibitive. We present an alternate strategy which offers some of the same advantages as the variational method while being significantly less numerically expensive. We first use the Matrix Prony method to form an optimal linear combination of single baryon interpolating fields generated from the same source and different sink interpolating fields. Very early in Euclidean time this optimal linear combination is numerically free of excited state contamination, so we coin it a calm baryon. This calm baryon operator is then used in the construction of the two-baryon correlation functions.To test this method, we perform calculations on the WM/JLab iso-clover gauge configurations at the SU(3 flavor symmetric point with mπ~ 800 MeV — the same configurations we have previously used for the calculation of two-nucleon correlation functions. We observe the calm baryon significantly removes the excited state contamination from the two-nucleon correlation function to as early a time as the single-nucleon is improved, provided non-local (displaced nucleon sources are used. For the local two-nucleon correlation function (where both nucleons are created from the same space-time location there is still improvement, but there is significant excited state contamination in the region the single calm baryon displays no excited state contamination.

  11. Searching for Axion Dark Matter with the ADMX experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carosi, G.; Asztalos, S. J.; Bradley, R.; Hagmann, C.; Hoskins, J.; Hotz, M.; Hwang, J.; Kinion, D.; Rosenberg, L.; Rybka, G.; Sikivie, P.; Tanner, D. B.; van Bibber, K.

    2010-02-01

    Axions are hypothetical pseudoscalar particles that exist as a consequence of the Peccei-Quinn solution to the strong-CP problem. Light axions (μeV-meV) are also a natural cold dark matter candidate and may be detected by their resonant conversion to microwave photons in a high-Q cavity immersed in a strong magnetic field. This detection strategy provides the basis for the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX) which has been taking data at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for over a decade. In this experiment, the signal from the cavity is amplified by an ultralow noise amplifier, and mixed down to the audio frequency range in a double-heterodyne receiver. The signal is digitized and a Fourier transform produces a power spectrum, in which the axion would appear as a narrow line at f=mac^2/h. This talk will present an overview of ADMX, with particular attention to the successful implementation of new ultralow-noise first stage cryogenic SQUID amplifiers, and the first results from this new configuration. )

  12. Asymmetric Dark Matter Models and the LHC Diphoton Excess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of dark matter (DM) and the origin of the baryon asymmetry are persistent indications that the SM is incomplete. More recently, the ATLAS and CMS experiments have observed an excess of diphoton events with invariant mass of about 750 GeV. One interpretation of this excess is decays...... have for models of asymmetric DM that attempt to account for the similarity of the dark and visible matter abundances....

  13. Study of the characteristics of gas electron multipliers for the FAIR experiment CBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, S.; Abuhoza, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Hehner, J.; Schmidt, C.J.; Traeger, M.; Schmidt, H.R.; Colafranceschi, S.; Marinov, A.; Sharma, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany will use proton and heavy ion beams to study matter at extreme conditions. The CBM experiment at FAIR is designed to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities. With CBM we will enter a new era of nuclear matter research by measuring rare diagnostic probes never observed before at FAIR energies, and thus CBM has a unique discovery potential. This will only be possible with the application of advanced instrumentation, including highly segmented and fast gaseous detectors

  14. Exploring the mirror matter interpretation of the DAMA experiment: Has the dark matter problem been solved?

    OpenAIRE

    Foot, R.

    2004-01-01

    The self consistency between the impressive DAMA annual modulation signal and the differential energy spectrum is an important test for dark matter candidates.Mirror matter-type dark matter passes this test while other dark matter candidates, including standard (spin-independent) WIMPs and mini-electric charged particle dark matter, do not do so well.We argue that the unique properties of mirror matter-type dark matter seem to be just those required to fully explain the data, suggesting that ...

  15. Testing light dark matter coannihilation with fixed-target experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaguirre, Eder; Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Moschella, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel program of fixed-target searches for thermal-origin Dark Matter (DM), which couples inelastically to the Standard Model. Since the DM only interacts by transitioning to a heavier state, freeze-out proceeds via coannihilation and the unstable heavier state is depleted at later times. For sufficiently large mass splittings, direct detection is kinematically forbidden and indirect detection is impossible, so this scenario can only be tested with accelerators. Here we propose new searches at proton and electron beam fixed-target experiments to probe sub-GeV coannihilation, exploiting the distinctive signals of up- and down-scattering as well as decay of the excited state inside the detector volume. We focus on a representative model in which DM is a pseudo-Dirac fermion coupled to a hidden gauge field (dark photon), which kinetically mixes with the visible photon. We define theoretical targets in this framework and determine the existing bounds by reanalyzing results from previous experiments. We find that LSND, E137, and BaBar data already place strong constraints on the parameter space consistent with a thermal freeze-out origin, and that future searches at Belle II and MiniBooNE, as well as recently-proposed fixed-target experiments such as LDMX and BDX, can cover nearly all remaining gaps. We also briefly comment on the discovery potential for proposed beam dump and neutrino experiments which operate at much higher beam energies.

  16. Development of Precision Rotor Experiment for Matter Creation Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, George Robert, Jr.

    An apparatus designed to test for spontaneous matter creation by the spin-down of an ultra-low friction precision rotor has been made functional and tested extensively. Modifications to an earlier system allow true corotation of the gas atmosphere around the inner test rotor while removing a previous dynamic type of coupling-"cranking" by the rotating magnetic suspension. A computerized data acquisition system allows for the gathering of huge amounts of information on these precisions rotations. Inherent limits, however, make it unlikely that this room temperature model can reach a target rate of m/m = 10('-10) yr('-1). The sensitivity of this realization of the experiment for yielding an estimate of matter creation is presently limited by a torsional coupling between the inner rotor and corotating vacuum chamber which was persistent, and which caused an oscillation in the angular position of the rotor with respect to the chamber while rotating. The focus of the present study was therefore on how various physical conditions, such as magnetic, thermal, and acoustic shielding, affected the properties of this oscillation. Oscillation properties of interest included the amplitude of the oscillation, and its minimum residual noise level of excitation, the period of the oscillation, and the drift in the average relative position between the rotor and the rotating vacuum chamber. The minimum residual amplitude of the 28 min oscillation was (TURN)0.5(DEGREES), which for this rotor, with a 3 s rotational period, corresponds to 7.6 x 10(' -7) erg, 10('-10) of the rotational energy. The decay rate of the energy of the oscillation approaching this level is (TURN)10('-19) W. The ability of the measurements to imply matter exchange or creation was in addition limited by inordinately high thermal drifts. Information on much of the behavior of the corotations was obtained, however, and several concrete suggestions can be made for large -scale improvements in sensitivity to m/m.

  17. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment Cryogenic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Hannah; ADMX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX) searches for dark matter axions by looking for their resonant conversion to photons in a microwave cavity in a high magnetic field. The mass of the axion (unknown) determines the frequency at which the axion couples to the magnetic field, so the cavity is tuned through a wide range of frequencies while measuring the power deposited in it with ultra-sensitive quantum electronics. The dominant systematic noise is from the noise temperature of the electronics; during the last data run they were cooled to 1.5K with a pumped He-4 refrigerator. Currently, we are installing a large dilution refrigerator, which will cool the cavity and first stage amplifiers to ~100 mK. I will discuss our progress, describe some of the challenges we have faced and how we have overcome them, and describe our plans for operation. Supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-97ER41029, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE- AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, and the Livermore LDRD program.

  18. Dark Matter searches with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ippolito, Valerio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The presence of a non-baryonic Dark Matter component in the Universe is inferred from the observation of its gravitational interaction. If Dark Matter interacts weakly with the Standard Model particles it may be produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), escaping detection and leaving large missing transverse momentum as its signature. New results from the Dark Matter search programme of the ATLAS experiment are presented, based on LHC proton-proton collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  19. Unbound particles in dark matter halos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Loeb, Abraham; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2013-06-13

    We investigate unbound dark matter particles in halos by tracing particle trajectories in a simulation run to the far future (a = 100). We find that the traditional sum of kinetic and potential energies is a very poor predictor of which dark matter particles will eventually become unbound from halos. We also study the mass fraction of unbound particles, which increases strongly towards the edges of halos, and decreases significantly at higher redshifts. We discuss implications for dark matter detection experiments, precision calibrations of the halo mass function, the use of baryon fractions to constrain dark energy, and searches for intergalactic supernovae.

  20. Dark Matter from new Technicolor Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarke Gudnason, Sven; Kouvaris, Christoforos; Sannino, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    We investigate dark matter candidates emerging in recently proposed technicolor theories. We determine the relic density of the lightest, neutral, stable technibaryon having imposed weak thermal equilibrium conditions and overall electric neutrality of the Universe. In addition we consider...... sphaleron processes that violate baryon, lepton and technibaryon number. Our analysis is performed in the case of a first order electroweak phase transition as well as a second order one. We argue that, in both cases, the new technibaryon contributes to the dark matter in the Universe. Finally we examine...... the problem of the constraints on these types of dark matter components from earth based experiments....

  1. The Inner Regions of Disk Galaxies: A Constant Baryonic Fraction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For disk galaxies (spirals and irregulars, the inner circular-velocity gradient dRV0 (inner steepness of the rotation curve correlates with the central surface brightness ∑*,0 with a slope of ~0.5. This implies that the central dynamical mass density scales almost linearly with the central baryonic density. Here I show that this empirical relation is consistent with a simple model where the central baryonic fraction ƒbar,0 is fixed to 1 (no dark matter and the observed scatter is due to differences in the baryonic mass-to-light ratio Mbar / LR (ranging from 1 to 3 in the R-band and in the characteristic thickness of the central stellar component Δz (ranging from 100 to 500 pc. Models with lower baryonic fractions are possible, although they require some fine-tuning in the values of Mbar/LR and Δz. Regardless of the actual value of ƒbar,0, the fact that different types of galaxies do not show strong variations in ƒbar,0 is surprising, and may represent a challenge for models of galaxy formation in a Λ Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM cosmology.

  2. Unconventional Ideas for Axion and Dark Matter Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution an entirely different way compared to conventional approaches for axion, hidden photon and dark matter (DM) detection is proposed for discussion. The idea is to use living plants which are known to be very sensitive to all kind of environmental parameters, as detectors. A possible observable in such living plants could be the natural bio-photon level, a kind of metabolism related chemoluminescence. Another observable might be morphological changes or systematic leave movements. However a big problem for such kind of experiment would be the availability of a known, controllable and calibrated DM source. The objective of this small paper is primarily to trigger a debate and not so much to present a well-defined and clearly structured proposal.

  3. Nanostructured Soft Matter Experiment, Theory, Simulation and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Zvelindovsky, Andrei V

    2007-01-01

    This book provides an interdisciplinary overview of a new and broad class of materials under the unifying name Nanostructured Soft Matter. It covers materials ranging from short amphiphilic molecules to block copolymers, proteins, colloids and their composites, microemulsions and bio-inspired systems such as vesicles. The book considers several fundamental questions, including: how self-assembly of various soft materials with internal structure at the nanoscale can be understood, controlled and in future used in the newly emerging field of soft nanotechnology. The book offers readers a view on the subject from different perspectives, combining modern experimental approaches from physical chemistry and physics with various theoretical techniques from physics, mathematics and the most advanced computer modelling. It is the first book of this sort in the field. All chapters are written by leading international experts, bringing together experience from Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Japan, the Netherlands, Russ...

  4. Holographic baryons from oblate instantons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozali, Moshe; Stang, Jared B.; Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2014-02-01

    We investigate properties of baryons in a family of holographic field theories related to the Sakai-Sugimoto model of holographic QCD. Starting with the N f = 2 Sakai-Sugimoto model, we truncate to a 5D Yang-Mills action for the gauge fields associated with the noncompact directions of the flavor D8-branes. We define a free parameter γ that controls the strength of this Yang-Mills term relative to the Chern-Simons term that couples the Abelian gauge field to the SU(2) instanton density. Moving away from γ = 0 should incorporate some of the effects of taking the Sakai-Sugimoto model away from large 't Hooft coupling λ. In this case, the baryon ground state corresponds to an oblate SU(2) instanton on the bulk flavor branes: the usual SO(4) symmetric instanton is deformed to spread more along the field theory directions than the radial direction. We numerically construct these anisotropic instanton solutions for various values of γ and calculate the mass and baryon charge profile of the corresponding baryons. Using the value γ = 2.55 that has been found to best fit the mesonic spectrum of QCD, we find a value for the baryon mass of 1.19 GeV, significantly more realistic than the value 1.60 GeV computed previously using an SO(4) symmetric ansatz for the instanton.

  5. Mass and Width Measurements of $\\Sigma_{c}$ Baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaandering, Eric Wayne [Colorado U.

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of several charmed baryons decaying to $\\Lambda^+_c$ are presented. The data for these analyses were collected by FOCUS, Fermilab Experiment E831. FOCUS is a high statistics charm photoproduction experiment and accumulated data during the 1996{1997 Fermilab Fixed Target run....

  6. Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter at direct detection experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Giudice, Gian F.; Kim, Doojin; Park, Jong-Chul; Shin, Seodong

    2018-01-01

    We explore a novel class of multi-particle dark sectors, called Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter (iBDM). These models are constructed by combining properties of particles that scatter off matter by making transitions to heavier states (Inelastic Dark Matter) with properties of particles that are produced with a large Lorentz boost in annihilation processes in the galactic halo (Boosted Dark Matter). This combination leads to new signals that can be observed at ordinary direct detection experimen...

  7. Search for the doubly charmed baryon at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Liang

    The doubly charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}^+$, containing two charm quarks, is a baryon predicted by the SU(4) quark model. Experimentally its existence has not been established yet. Many Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) based theoretical models have predicted its properties with a mass in the range 3500-3700 MeV/$c^2$ and a lifetime in the range 110-250 fs. The experimental searches for the $\\Xi_{cc}^+$ baryon and the measurements of its properties can test these models directly, providing an important input for the understanding of the non-perturbative aspect of QCD. The SELEX collaboration claimed the observation of the $\\Xi_{cc}^+$ baryon in the $\\Xi_{cc}^+ \\to \\Lambda_{c}^+K^-\\pi^+$ decay in 2003. However, the measured lifetime was much shorter than theoretical predictions. Searches for the $\\Xi_{cc}^+$ baryon in the same decay mode by FOCUS, Belle and BaBar experiments failed to reproduce the results. This does not mean that the SELEX result is excluded, however, since production environments at these experi...

  8. Magnetic moments of Jsup(P) = 1/2+ baryons in broken SU(8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Symmetry breaking effects on the magnetic moments of baryons are studied in the SU(8) framework. We obtain a low value of μ(Σ + ) in agreement with a recent experiment. The transition moment (p|μ|Δ + ) seems to require isospin breaking , which also improves the overall fit to magnetic moments. Charmed baryon magnetic moments are calculated with and without isospin breaking. (author)

  9. Search for Baryon-Number Violating Ξb0 Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alfonso Albero, A.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; D'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Beliy, N.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Berninghoff, D.; Bertholet, E.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M. O.; Van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørn, M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J.V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brundu, D.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Byczynski, W.; Cadeddu, S.; Cai, H.; Calabrese, R.; Calladine, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chitic, S. G.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Colombo, T.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H. P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Douglas, L.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fazzini, D.; Federici, L.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Fernandez Declara, P.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gabriel, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Grabowski, J. P.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greim, R.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruber, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hancock, T. H.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hasse, C.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Hecker, M.; Heinicke, K.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P. H.; Huard, Z. C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Ibis, P.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kazeev, N.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Kopecna, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Lionetto, F.; Lisovskyi, V.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Loi, A.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Macko, V.; Mackowiak, P.; Maddrell-Mander, S.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Maisuzenko, D.; Majewski, M. W.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Marangotto, D.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Mead, J. V.; Meadows, B.; Meaux, C.; Meier, F.; Meinert, N.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Millard, E.; Minard, M. N.; Minzoni, L.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Mombacher, T.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J.G.; Ossowska, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poli Lener, M.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Ponce, S.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Pullen, H.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Quintana, B.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Ravonel Salzgeber, M.; Reboud, M.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Ruiz Vidal, J.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarpis, G.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schreiner, H. F.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepulveda, E. S.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva De Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Soares Lavra, L.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J.P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stepanova, M.; Stevens, H.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, J.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; Szymanski, M.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; Van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Toriello, F.; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R.; Tournefier, E.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Usachov, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagner, A.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Verlage, T. A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; De Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Winn, M.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zonneveld, J. B.; Zucchelli, S.

    2017-01-01

    A search for baryon-number violating Ξb0 oscillations is performed with a sample of pp collision data recorded by the LHCb experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1. The baryon number at the moment of production is identified by requiring that the Ξb0 come from the decay of a

  10. Terrestrial effects on dark matter-electron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emken, Timon; Kouvaris, Chris; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2017-01-01

    techniques involving detection of dark matter-electron scattering offer new sensitivity to sub-GeV dark matter. Typically however it is implicitly assumed that the dark matter is not altered as it traverses the Earth to arrive at the detector. In this paper we study in detail the effects of terrestrial...

  11. Electromagnetic corrections to baryon masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Loyal; Ha, Phuoc

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the electromagnetic contributions to the octet and decuplet baryon masses using the heavy-baryon approximation in chiral effective field theory and methods we developed in earlier analyses of the baryon masses and magnetic moments. Our methods connect simply to Morpurgo's general parametrization of the electromagnetic contributions and to semirelativistic quark models. Our calculations are carried out including the one-loop mesonic corrections to the basic electromagnetic interactions, so to two loops overall. We find that to this order in the chiral loop expansion there are no three-body contributions. The Coleman-Glashow relation and other sum rules derived in quark models with only two-body terms therefore continue to hold, and violations involve at least three-loop processes and can be expected to be quite small. We present the complete formal results and some estimates of the matrix elements here. Numerical calculations will be presented separately

  12. Compact non-baryonic objects and the first generation of stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, M.; Stachniewicz, S.

    1995-12-01

    We study properties of the first generation of stars in the Galaxy, in a class of dark matter models which predict the formation of compact non-baryonic objects in the early Universe. Those object become cores of first stars formed in the Galaxy. Global parameters of stars which contain these anomalous cores are studied. Simple physical models of non baryonic cores are used. The HR diagram of stars with non baryonic cores is constructed. Implications for determination of the age of globular clusters, which contain the oldest stars, are considered. (author). 12 refs, 8 figs

  13. Baryon number violation via Majorana neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yue [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-06-21

    We propose and investigate a novel, minimal, and experimentally testable framework for baryo- genesis, dubbed dexiogenesis, using baryon number violating effective interactions of right-handed Majorana neutrinos responsible for the seesaw mechanism. The distinct LHC signature of our framework is same-sign top quark final states, possibly originating from displaced vertices. The region of parameters relevant for LHC phenomenology can also yield concomitant signals in nucleon decay experiments. We provide a simple ultraviolet origin for our effective operators, by adding a color-triplet scalar, which could ultimately arise from a grand unified theory.

  14. Pulse Shape Discrimination in the LUX Dark Matter Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaitan, Dev Ashish; LUX Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is a dual-phase xenon time projection chamber (TPC), with an active mass of approx. 250 kg, located in the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, USA. The experiment searches for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), a leading candidate for the dark matter content of the universe. It is expected that their interaction will be nuclear recoils (NR) and must be distinguished from background due to gamma rays and beta decays which will create electron recoil (ER) interactions. Typically, this is accomplished using the ratio of collected ionization charge to scintillation light. We present a new analysis of LUX calibration data that studies the time structure of liquid xenon scintillation in an attempt to improve ER/NR discrimination using Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD). Using an advanced photon counting and timing algorithm, we reconstruct the detection time of photons and optimize a prompt fraction discriminator to distinguish between ER and NR interactions. We quantify how this discriminator performs and demonstrate how it can be used, in conjunction with the charge-to-light ratio, to improve the overall discrimination in LUX. This work was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Award Number DE-SC0006605.

  15. Gauged baryon and lepton numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foot, R.; Joshi, G.C.; Lew, H.

    1989-01-01

    A possible extension of the Standard Model can be defined by gauging the global baryon and lepton number U(1) symmetries. Gauging baryon and lepton numbers provide a natural framework for the see-saw mechanism in the lepton sector, and the Peccei-Quinn mechanism in the quark sector. Another consequence of this extension is that the usual three generations of fermions are not anomaly free. However the authors consider a wider framework involving the existence of generations with exotic SU(2) L tensor product U(1) Y quantum numbers. This allows them to derive a minimal spectrum of fermions which contain the known quarks and leptons. 12 refs

  16. Baryon symmetric big bang cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecker, F.W.

    1978-01-01

    It is stated that the framework of baryon symmetric big bang (BSBB) cosmology offers our greatest potential for deducting the evolution of the Universe because its physical laws and processes have the minimum number of arbitrary assumptions about initial conditions in the big-bang. In addition, it offers the possibility of explaining the photon-baryon ratio in the Universe and how galaxies and galaxy clusters are formed. BSBB cosmology also provides the only acceptable explanation at present for the origin of the cosmic γ-ray background radiation. (author)

  17. Superdense matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    introduce effective theories that describe low energy excitations at high baryon density. Finally, we comment on the ... these conditions are maintained for essentially infinite periods of time and the material is quite cold. At low density ... exchange between quarks in a color anti-symmetric ¯3 state. High density quark matter is.

  18. Phonon Sensor Dynamics for Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, Jeffrey [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the quasiparticle diffusion process inside sputtered aluminum (Al thin films (~ 0.1-1 μm is critical for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS experiment to further optimize its detectors to directly search for dark matter. An initial study with Al films was undertaken by our group ~ 20 years ago, but some important questions were not answered at the time. This thesis can be considered a continuation of that critical study. The CDMS experiment utilizes high purity silicon and germanium crystals to simultaneously measure ionization and phonons created by particle interactions. In addition to describing some of the rich physics involved in simultaneously detecting ionization and phonons with a CDMS detector, this thesis focuses on the detailed physics of the phonon sensors themselves, which are patterned onto CDMS detector surfaces. CDMS detectors use thin sputtered Al films to collect phonon energy when it propagates to the surfaces of the detector crystals. The phonon energy breaks Cooper pairs and creates quasiparticles (qps). These qps diffuse until they get trapped in an proximitized “overlap” region where lower-Tc tungsten films connect to the Al film. These tungsten films are the transition edge sensors (W-TESs CDMS uses to readout phonon signals. We performed a wide range of experiments using several sets of test devices designed and fabricated specifically for this work. The devices were used mostly to study quasiparticle (qp transport in Al films and qp transmission through Al/W interfaces. The results of this work are being used to optimize the design of detectors for SuperCDMS SNOLAB. This thesis is intended for CDMS collaborators who are interested in knowing more about the detailed fundamentals of how our phonon sensors work so they can take full advantage of their benefits. However, this work can also be read by general readers who are interested in particle detection using TES technology. This thesis contains eight chapters. The

  19. Continuum-mediated dark matter–baryon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Andrey; Sajjad, Aqil

    2016-01-01

    Many models of dark matter scattering with baryons may be treated either as a simple contact interaction or as the exchange of a light mediator particle. We study an alternative, in which a continuum of light mediator states may be exchanged. This could arise, for instance, from coupling to a sector which is approximately conformal at the relevant momentum transfer scale. In the non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter-baryon scattering, which is useful for parametrizing direct detection signals, the effect of such continuum mediators is to multiply the amplitude by a function of the momentum transfer q, which in the simplest case is just a power law. We develop the basic framework and study two examples: the case where the mediator is a scalar operator coupling to the Higgs portal (which turns out to be highly constrained) and the case of an antisymmetric tensor operator ${\\cal O}_{\\mu \

  20. Baryonic spectroscopy and its immediate future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalitz, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The quark model is reviewed briefly for baryons and the various versions of SU(6) symmetry which were proposed and used in connection with baryon spectroscopy are reviewed. A series of basic questions are reviewed which experimental work in this field should aim to settle, as a minimal program. One also heralds the beginning of a new baryon spectroscopy associated with psi physics

  1. Leptogenesis and gravity: Baryon asymmetry without decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.I. McDonald

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A popular class of theories attributes the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe to CP-violating decays of super-heavy BSM particles in the Early Universe. Recently, we discovered a new source of leptogenesis in these models, namely that the same Yukawa phases which provide the CP violation for decays, combined with curved-spacetime loop effects, lead to an entirely new gravitational mechanism for generating an asymmetry, driven by the expansion of the Universe and independent of the departure of the heavy particles from equilibrium. In this Letter, we build on previous work by analysing the full Boltzmann equation, exploring the full parameter space of the theory and studying the time-evolution of the asymmetry. Remarkably, we find regions of parameter space where decays play no part at all, and where the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is determined solely by gravitational effects.

  2. Leptogenesis and gravity: Baryon asymmetry without decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.I., E-mail: pymcdonald@swansea.ac.uk; Shore, G.M., E-mail: g.m.shore@swansea.ac.uk

    2017-03-10

    A popular class of theories attributes the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe to CP-violating decays of super-heavy BSM particles in the Early Universe. Recently, we discovered a new source of leptogenesis in these models, namely that the same Yukawa phases which provide the CP violation for decays, combined with curved-spacetime loop effects, lead to an entirely new gravitational mechanism for generating an asymmetry, driven by the expansion of the Universe and independent of the departure of the heavy particles from equilibrium. In this Letter, we build on previous work by analysing the full Boltzmann equation, exploring the full parameter space of the theory and studying the time-evolution of the asymmetry. Remarkably, we find regions of parameter space where decays play no part at all, and where the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is determined solely by gravitational effects.

  3. Baryon spectroscopy: symmetries, symmetry breaking and hadronic loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenczykowski, P.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of hadronic loop effects in baryon spectroscopy is thoroughly discussed. It is argued that such effects very likely constitute the dominant contribution to the observed splitting and mixing pattern of the (56,0 + ) and (70,1 - ) baryon multiplets. In particular, this dominance is demonstrated in the original Isgur-Karl-Koniuk model of baryons, in which hadronic loops are shown to provide an explanation for at least 2/3 of the observed size of splittings, both for the ground-state and excited baryons. The unitarity-induced mixing angles in the (70,1 - )-multiplet are also shown to be in good agreement with experiment. For the ground-state baryons the formula relating Σ-Λ and Δ-Ν mass differences - as originally derived by de Rujula, Georgi and Glashow from the single gluon exchange-is obtained from the hadronic loop effects as well. This (and other) results are derived after taking into account a complete set of symmetry-related hadronic loops. Consideration of such a complete set of symmetry-related processes is shown to be crucial in restoring proper symmetry properties of the calculated spectrum. 74 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs. (author)

  4. Predictions for Excited Strange Baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando, Ishara P.; Goity, Jose L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    An assessment is made of predictions for excited hyperon masses which follow from flavor symmetry and consistency with a 1/N c expansion of QCD. Such predictions are based on presently established baryonic resonances. Low lying hyperon resonances which do not seem to fit into the proposed scheme are discussed.

  5. Magnetic monopoles and baryon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pak, N.; Panagiotakopoulos, C.; Shafi, Q.

    1982-08-01

    The scattering of a non-relativistic quark from a GUT monopole is affected by the anomalous magnetic moment of the quark. In order that monopole catalysis of baryon decay can occur, it must be assumed that the anomalous magnetic moment decreases sufficiently rapidly below the QCD scale. (author)

  6. Algebraic model of baryon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijker, R.; Leviatan, A.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss recent calculations of electromagnetic form factors and strong decay widths of nucleon and delta resonances. The calculations are done in a collective constituent model of the nucleon, in which the baryons are interpreted as rotations and vibrations of an oblate top

  7. Flux-ratio anomalies from discs and other baryonic structures in the Illustris simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Jen-Wei; Despali, Giulia; Vegetti, Simona; Xu, Dandan; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Metcalf, R. Benton

    2018-04-01

    The flux ratios in the multiple images of gravitationally lensed quasars can provide evidence for dark matter substructure in the halo of the lensing galaxy if the flux ratios differ from those predicted by a smooth model of the lensing galaxy mass distribution. However, it is also possible that baryonic structures in the lensing galaxy, such as edge-on discs, can produce flux-ratio anomalies. In this work, we present the first statistical analysis of flux-ratio anomalies due to baryons from a numerical simulation perspective. We select galaxies with various morphological types in the Illustris simulation and ray trace through the simulated haloes, which include baryons in the main lensing galaxies but exclude any substructures, in order to explore the pure baryonic effects. Our ray-tracing results show that the baryonic components can be a major contribution to the flux-ratio anomalies in lensed quasars and that edge-on disc lenses induce the strongest anomalies. We find that the baryonic components increase the probability of finding high flux-ratio anomalies in the early-type lenses by about 8 per cent and by about 10-20 per cent in the disc lenses. The baryonic effects also induce astrometric anomalies in 13 per cent of the mock lenses. Our results indicate that the morphology of the lens galaxy becomes important in the analysis of flux-ratio anomalies when considering the effect of baryons, and that the presence of baryons may also partially explain the discrepancy between the observed (high) anomaly frequency and what is expected due to the presence of subhaloes as predicted by the cold dark matter simulations.

  8. Rapid Thermalization by Baryon Injection in Gauge/Gravity Duality

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Koji; Oka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Using the AdS/CFT correspondence for strongly coupled gauge theories, we calculate thermalization of mesons caused by a time-dependent change of a baryon number chemical potential. On the gravity side, the thermalization corresponds to a horizon formation on the probe flavor brane in the AdS throat. Since heavy ion collisions are locally approximated by a sudden change of the baryon number chemical potential, we discuss implication of our results to RHIC and LHC experiments, to find a rough estimate of rather rapid thermalization time-scale t_{th} < 1 [fm/c]. We also discuss universality of our analysis against varying gauge theories.

  9. Excited baryons from Bayesian priors and overlap fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.X. Lee; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; K.F. Liu; N. Mathur; J.B. Zhang

    2003-05-01

    Using the constrained-fitting method based on Bayesian priors, we extract the masses of the two lowest states of octet and decouplet baryons with both parities. The calculation is done on quenched 163 x 28 lattices of a = 0.2 fm using an improved gauge action and overlap fermions, with the pion mass as low as 180 MeV. The Roper state N(1440)+ is clearly observed for the first time as the 1st-excited state of the nucleon from the standard interpolating field. Together with other baryons, our preliminary results indicate that the level-ordering of the low-lying baryon states on the lattice is largely consistent with experiment. The realization is helped by cross-overs between the excited + and - states in the region of mp 300 to 400 MeV.

  10. BM@N and MPD experiments at NICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekelidze Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The project NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility aims to study hot and baryon rich QCD matter in heavy ion collisions in the energy range SNN = 4 − 11 GeV. The rich heavy-ion physics program will be performed at two experiments, BM@N (Baryonic Matter at Nuclotron at beams extracted from the Nuclotron, and at MPD (Multi-Purpose Detector at the NICA collider. This program covers a variety of phenomena in strongly interacting matter of the highest baryonic density, which includes study of collective effects, production of hyperon and hypernuclei, in-medium modification of meson properties, and event-by-event fluctuations.

  11. A BARYONIC EFFECT ON THE MERGER TIMESCALE OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Congyao; Yu, Qingjuan; Lu, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of the merger timescales of galaxy clusters is important for understanding the cluster merger process and further understanding the formation and evolution of the large-scale structure of the universe. In this paper, we explore a baryonic effect on the merger timescale of galaxy clusters by using hydrodynamical simulations. We find that the baryons play an important role in accelerating the merger process. The merger timescale decreases upon increasing the gas fraction of galaxy clusters. For example, the merger timescale is shortened by a factor of up to 3 for merging clusters with gas fractions of 0.15, compared with the timescale obtained with 0 gas fractions. The baryonic effect is significant for a wide range of merger parameters and is particularly more significant for nearly head-on mergers and high merging velocities. The baryonic effect on the merger timescale of galaxy clusters is expected to have an impact on the structure formation in the universe, such as the cluster mass function and massive substructures in galaxy clusters, and a bias of “no-gas” may exist in the results obtained from the dark matter-only cosmological simulations

  12. Production of doubly charmed baryons nearly at rest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groote, Stefan; Koshkarev, Sergey [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics, Tartu (Estonia)

    2017-08-15

    We investigate the production cross sections, momentum distributions and rapidity distributions for doubly charmed baryons which according to the intrinsic heavy quark mechanism are produced nearly at rest. These events should be measurable at fixed-target experiments like STAR rate at RHIC and AFTER rate at LHC. (orig.)

  13. Observation of Two New Xi(-)(b) Baryon Resonances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casanova Mohr, R. C. M.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. -M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, U.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griftith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Mann; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Martin Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Moggi, N.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. -B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obratsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Sena, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Sheychenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; Van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Barbosa, J. V. V. B. Viana; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Wraldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyae, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-01-01

    Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the Xi(0)(b)pi(-) mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1), recorded by the LEICb experiment. In the quark model, two baryonic resonances with quark content bds

  14. Baryon pair production with large decay Q-value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filho, J.B.; Cardoso, J.L. Jr.; Chinellato, J.A.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Lattes, C.M.G.; Menon, M.; Navia, C.E. O.; Oliveira, A.M.; Rodrigues, W.A. Jr.; Santos, M.B.C.; Silva, E.; Shibuya, E.H.; Tanaka, K.; Turtelli, A. Jr.; Amato, N.M.; Castro, F.M.O.; Aoki, H.; Fujimoto, Y.; Hasegawa, S.; Kumano, H.; Sawayanagi, K.; Semba, H.; Tabuki, T.; Tamada, M.; Yamashita, S.; Arata, N.; Shibata, T.; Yokoi, K.; Ohsawa, A.

    1979-01-01

    Events of a new type have been observed by the Chacaltaya Emulsion Chamber Experiment,/sup 1,2/ which can consistently be interpreted as ''baryon'' pair decay of a heavy intermetiate state of rest mass 20--30 GeV/c 2

  15. Searches for dark matter beyond mono-jets at the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Rui; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Dark matter can be sought in complementary experiments: direct detection, indirect detection and colliders all contribute to a comprehensive set of searches for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). This talk underlines the searches for Dark Matter by the ATLAS experiment in the context of this complementarity, using models that include a mediator particle between SM and DM.

  16. Searches for Dark Matter at the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00143063; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Searches for strongly produced dark matters in events with jets, photons, heavy-flavor quarks or massive gauge bosons recoiling against large missing transverse momentum in ATLAS are presented. These "MET+X" signatures provide powerful probes to dark matter production at the LHC, allowing us to interpret results in terms of effective field theory and/or simplified models with pair production of Weakly Interactions Particles. Recent ATLAS results on dark matter searches at LHC Run I and the connection to astroparticle physics are discussed.

  17. Light asymmetric dark matter from new strong dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Sarkar, Subir; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai

    2011-01-01

    A ~5 GeV `dark baryon' with a cosmic asymmetry similar to that of baryons is a natural candidate for the dark matter. We study the possibility of generating such a state through dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking, and show that it can share the relic baryon asymmetry via sphaleron interactions...

  18. Aharonov–Bohm protection of black hole's baryon/skyrmion hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gia Dvali

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The baryon/skyrmion correspondence implies that the baryon number is encoded into a topological surface integral. Under certain conditions that we clarify, this surface integral can be measured by an asymptotic observer in form of an Aharonov–Bohm phase-shift in an experiment in which the skyrmion passes through a loop of a probe string. In such a setup the baryon/skyrmion number must be respected by black holes, despite the fact that it produces no long-range classical field. If initially swallowed by a black hole, the baryon number must resurface in form of a classical skyrmion hair, after the black hole evaporates below a certain critical size. Needless to say, the respect of the baryon number by black holes is expected to have potentially-interesting astrophysical consequences.

  19. Aharonov–Bohm protection of black hole's baryon/skyrmion hair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvali, Gia [Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, 80333 München (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Werner-Heisenberg-Institut, 80805 München (Germany); Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Gußmann, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.gussmann@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, 80333 München (Germany)

    2017-05-10

    The baryon/skyrmion correspondence implies that the baryon number is encoded into a topological surface integral. Under certain conditions that we clarify, this surface integral can be measured by an asymptotic observer in form of an Aharonov–Bohm phase-shift in an experiment in which the skyrmion passes through a loop of a probe string. In such a setup the baryon/skyrmion number must be respected by black holes, despite the fact that it produces no long-range classical field. If initially swallowed by a black hole, the baryon number must resurface in form of a classical skyrmion hair, after the black hole evaporates below a certain critical size. Needless to say, the respect of the baryon number by black holes is expected to have potentially-interesting astrophysical consequences.

  20. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Matthew R.; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-01-01

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: the dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption, and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark elect...

  1. Femtosecond laser-matter interaction theory, experiments and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gamaly, Eugene G

    2011-01-01

    Basics of Ultra-Short Laser-Solid InteractionsSubtle Atomic Motion Preceding a Phase Transition: Birth, Life and Death of PhononsUltra-Fast Disordering by fs-Lasers: Superheating Prior to Entropy CatastropheAblation of SolidsUltra-Short Laser-Matter Interaction Confined Inside a Bulk of Transparent SolidApplications of Ultra-Short Laser-Matter InteractionsConclusion Remarks.

  2. Critical point in the phase diagram of primordial quark-gluon matter from black hole physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critelli, Renato; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn; Portillo, Israel; Ratti, Claudia; Rougemont, Romulo

    2017-11-01

    Strongly interacting matter undergoes a crossover phase transition at high temperatures T ˜1012 K and zero net-baryon density. A fundamental question in the theory of strong interactions, QCD, is whether a hot and dense system of quarks and gluons displays critical phenomena when doped with more quarks than antiquarks, where net-baryon number fluctuations diverge. Recent lattice QCD work indicates that such a critical point can only occur in the baryon dense regime of the theory, which defies a description from first principles calculations. Here we use the holographic gauge/gravity correspondence to map the fluctuations of baryon charge in the dense quark-gluon liquid onto a numerically tractable gravitational problem involving the charge fluctuations of holographic black holes. This approach quantitatively reproduces ab initio results for the lowest order moments of the baryon fluctuations and makes predictions for the higher-order baryon susceptibilities and also for the location of the critical point, which is found to be within the reach of heavy-ion collision experiments.

  3. Effects of baryons on the statistical properties of large scale structure of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, T.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of weak gravitational lensing will provide strong constraints on the cosmic expansion history and the growth rate of large scale structure, yielding clues to the properties and nature of dark energy. Their interpretation is impacted by baryonic physics, which are expected to modify the total matter distribution at small scales. My work has focused on determining and modeling the impact of baryons on the statistics of the large scale matter distribution in the Universe. Using numerical simulations, I have extracted the effect of baryons on the power spectrum, variance and skewness of the total density field as predicted by these simulations. I have shown that a model based on the halo model construction, featuring a concentrated central component to account for cool condensed baryons, is able to reproduce accurately, and down to very small scales, the measured amplifications of both the variance and skewness of the density field. Because of well-known issues with baryons in current cosmological simulations, I have extended the central component model to rely on as many observation-based ingredients as possible. As an application, I have studied the effect of baryons on the predictions of the upcoming Euclid weak lensing survey. During the course of this work, I have also worked at developing and extending the RAMSES code, in particular by developing a parallel self-gravity solver, which offers significant performance gains, in particular for the simulation of some astrophysical setups such as isolated galaxy or cluster simulations. (author) [fr

  4. Big-bang nucleosynthesis and the baryon density of the universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copi, C J; Schramm, D N; Turner, M S

    1995-01-13

    For almost 30 years, the predictions of big-bang nucleosynthesis have been used to test the big-bang model to within a fraction of a second of the bang. The agreement between the predicted and observed abundances of deuterium, helium-3, helium-4, and lithium-7 confirms the standard cosmology model and allows accurate determination of the baryon density, between 1.7 x 10(-31) and 4.1 x 10(-31) grams per cubic centimeter (corresponding to about 1 to 15 percent of the critical density). This measurement of the density of ordinary matter is pivotal to the establishment of two dark-matter problems: (i) most of the baryons are dark, and (ii) if the total mass density is greater than about 15 percent of the critical density, as many determinations indicate, the bulk of the dark matter must be "non-baryonic," composed of elementary particles left from the earliest moments.

  5. Baryon helicity in B decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mahiko [Department of Physics and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The unexpectedly large transverse polarization measured in the decay B {yields} {phi}K* poses the question whether it is accounted for as a strong interaction effect or possibly points to a hidden nonstandard weak interaction. We extend here the perturbative argument to the helicity structure of the two-body baryonic decay and discuss qualitatively on how the baryonic B decay modes might help us in understanding the issue raised by B {yields} {phi}K*. We find among others that the helicity +1/2 amplitude dominates the leading order in the B(b-barq) decay and that unlike the B {yields} VV decay the dominant amplitude is sensitive to the right-handed b {yields} s current, if any, in the penguin interaction.

  6. Q-ball dark matter and baryogenesis in high-scale inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinta Kasuya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the scenario that one flat direction creates baryon asymmetry of the universe, while Q balls from another direction can be the dark matter in the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking for high-scale inflation. Isocurvature fluctuations are suppressed by the fact that the Affleck–Dine field stays at around the Planck scale during inflation. We find that the dark matter Q balls can be detected in IceCube-like experiments in the future.

  7. Exotic heavy baryons at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, T.S.; Zimanyi, J.

    1993-06-01

    A heavy bottom-charm six-quark baryon is considered. A semiclassical and a Gaussian estimate show that the octet-octet bbb-ccc configuration can be favoured energetically rather than the singlet-singlet one. This result suggests that a confined bbb-ccc six-quark state may exist. Such objects may be produced in suitable amounts by heavy-ion collisions at Large Hadronic Collider energies. (R.P.) 8 refs. 1 fig

  8. Dark matter universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-06

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  9. Reconstruction and study of the multi-strange baryons in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 200 GeV, with the Star experiment at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faivre, J.

    2004-10-01

    The study of strangeness production is essential for the understanding of processes occurring in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Strangeness production is directly linked to the phase of deconfined partons that followed these collisions: the quark and gluon plasma. STAR, one of the 4 experiments at RHIC collider, is a perfect tool for studying the multi-strange Ξ and Ω particles. We have devised a Ξ and Ω reconstruction program using signals from the STAR time projection chamber. We have worked out a multi-variable selection method for extracting the signals from the combinative background: the linear discriminant analysis. We have applied it to Au-Au collisions at 200 GeV (in the center of mass frame) to improve the accuracy of previous results. The Ω and anti-Ω production rates have been obtained for 3 ranges of centrality as well as their radial flow and their kinetic uncoupling temperatures. The gain on the relative uncertainty is between 15 and 30% according to the variable. The average speed of the radial flow is 0.50 ± 0.02 and the kinetic uncoupling temperature is 132 ± 20 MeV which indicates that multi-strange baryons uncouple in hadronic medium earlier that lighter particles like pions, kaons and protons. However, uncertainty intervals remain too broad to draw strong conclusions. (A.C.)

  10. First results from the LUX Dark Matter Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of the nature of dark matter is internationally recognized as one of the greatest contemporary challenges in science, fundamental to our understanding of the Universe. The most compelling candidates for dark matter are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) that arise naturally in several models of physics beyond the Standard Model. The discovery of galactic WIMPs would therefore enlighten two of the outstanding problems of modern physics - the matter composition of the Universe and the extrapolation of the Standard Model of particle physics to GUT scales. Although no definitive signal has yet been discovered, the worldwide race towards direct detection has been dramatically accelerated by the remarkable progress and evolution of liquid xenon (LXe) time projection chambers (TPCs). They have shifted the scale of target mass by orders of magnitude whilst simultaneously reducing backgrounds to unprecedented low levels, becoming the leaders of the field and offering the most promising prospects fo...

  11. Optimisation of selection cuts for MUCH detector of CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, M.; Ahmad, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is one of the future research program scheduled at FAIR, Darmstadt Germany. The aim of the planned experiment is to explore the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram in the regions of high baryonic densities and moderate temperatures in the beam energy range of 10-45 AGeV. This approach is complementary to the studies of matter at high temperatures and low net baryon densities performed at RHIC and LHC. CBM will also search for the critical point, the first order deconfinement phase transition from the hadronic matter to the partonic matter and the study of equation-of-state of dense baryonic matter. Comprehensive scan of observables, beam energies and collision systems is realised. The observables include: low mass dilepton pairs, charmonia and open charm, collective flow of rare and bulk particles, correlations and fluctuations etc. Low yield measurements of rare probes, like charmonium and low mass vector mesons, have to be performed at very high reaction rates ∼10 MHz. These conditions demand for fast and radiation hard detectors and associated fast electronics, readout and online event reconstruction. Low material budget is required with in the detector acceptance to avoid multiple scattering which would limit high precision measurements

  12. Baryon effects on void statistics in the EAGLE simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillas, Enrique; Lagos, Claudia D. P.; Padilla, Nelson; Tissera, Patricia; Helly, John; Schaller, Matthieu

    2017-10-01

    Cosmic voids are promising tools for cosmological tests due to their sensitivity to dark energy, modified gravity and alternative cosmological scenarios. Most previous studies in the literature of void properties use cosmological N-body simulations of dark matter (DM) particles that ignore the potential effect of baryonic physics. Using a spherical underdensity finder, we analyse voids using the mass field and subhalo tracers in the Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environment (EAGLE) simulations, which follow the evolution of galaxies in a Λ cold dark matter universe with state-of-the-art subgrid models for baryonic processes in a (100 cMpc)3 volume. We study the effect of baryons on void statistics by comparing results with DM-only simulations that use the same initial conditions as EAGLE. When identifying voids in the mass field, we find that a DM-only simulation produces 24 per cent more voids than a hydrodynamical one due to the action of galaxy feedback polluting void regions with hot gas, specially for small voids with rvoid ≤ 10 Mpc. We find that the way in which galaxy tracers are selected has a strong impact on the inferred void properties. Voids identified using galaxies selected by their stellar mass are larger and have cuspier density profiles than those identified by galaxies selected by their total mass. Overall, baryons have minimal effects on void statistics, as void properties are well captured by DM-only simulations, but it is important to account for how galaxies populate DM haloes to estimate the observational effect of different cosmological models on the statistics of voids.

  13. The Heavy Baryon Physics by means LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesiak, T.

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the experimental research about the heavy baryons which were obtained in the last decade at LEP. The most important among them concern the lifetimes of beauty baryons. The methods of theoretical description of heavy hadrons together with the LEP experimental apparatus are also discussed. Heavy baryon studies are shown in a broader perspective of other LEP results: the test of the standard model and the latest measurements concerning the beauty mesons. (author)

  14. Understanding WIMP-baryon interactions with direct detection: a roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluscevic, Vera; Peter, Annika H.G.

    2014-01-01

    We study prospects of dark-matter direct-detection searches for probing non-relativistic effective theory for WIMP-baryon scattering. We simulate a large set of noisy recoil-energy spectra for different scattering scenarios (beyond the standard momentum-independent contact interaction), for Generation 2 and futuristic experiments. We analyze these simulations and quantify the probability of successfully identifying the operator governing the scattering, if a WIMP signal is observed. We find that the success rate depends on a combination of factors: the WIMP mass, the mediator mass, the type of interaction, and the experimental energy window. For example, for a 20 GeV WIMP, Generation 2 is only likely to identify the right operator if the interaction is Coulomb-like, and is unlikely to do so in any other case. For a WIMP with a mass of 200 GeV or higher, success is almost guaranteed. We also find that, regardless of the scattering model and the WIMP parameters, a single Generation 2 experiment is unlikely to successfully discern the momentum dependence of the underlying operator on its own, but prospects improve drastically when experiments with different target materials and energy windows are analyzed jointly. Furthermore, we examine the quality of parameter estimation and degeneracies in the multi-dimensional parameter space of the effective theory. We find in particular that the resulting WIMP mass estimates can be severely biased if data are analyzed assuming the standard (momentum-independent) operator while the actual operator has momentum-dependence. Finally, we evaluate the ultimate reach of direct detection, finding that the prospects for successful operator selection prior to reaching the irreducible backgrounds are excellent, if the signal is just below the current limits, but slim if Generation 2 does not report WIMP detection

  15. Magnetic moments of baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1983-06-01

    The new experimental values of hyperon magnetic moments are compared with sum rules predicted from general quark models. Three difficulties are encountered which are not easily explained by simple models. The isovector contributions of nonstrange quarks to hyperon moments are smaller than the corresponding contribution to nucleon moments, indicating either appreciable configuration mixing present in hyperon wave functions and absent in nucleons or an additional isovector contribution beyond that of valence quarks; e.g. from a pion cloud. The large magnitude of the ω - moment may indicate that the strange quark contribution to the ω moments is considerably larger than the value μ(#betta#) predicted by simple models which have otherwise been very successful. The set of controversial values from different experiments of the μ - moment include a value very close to -(1/2)μ(μ + ) which would indicate that strange quarks do not contribute at all to the μ moments. (author)

  16. Doppler effect on indirect detection of dark matter using dark matter only simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Devon; Laha, Ranjan; Ng, Kenny C. Y.; Abel, Tom

    2017-03-01

    Indirect detection of dark matter is a major avenue for discovery. However, baryonic backgrounds are diverse enough to mimic many possible signatures of dark matter. In this work, we study the newly proposed technique of dark matter velocity spectroscopy [E. G. Speckhard, K. C. Y. Ng, J. F. Beacom, and R. Laha, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 031301 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.031301]. The nonrotating dark matter halo and the Solar motion produce a distinct longitudinal dependence of the signal which is opposite in direction to that produced by baryons. Using collisionless dark matter only simulations of Milky Way like halos, we show that this new signature is robust and holds great promise. We develop mock observations by a high energy resolution x-ray spectrometer on a sounding rocket, the Micro-X experiment, to our test case, the 3.5 keV line. We show that by using six different pointings, Micro-X can exclude a constant line energy over various longitudes at ≥3 σ . The halo triaxiality is an important effect, and it will typically reduce the significance of this signal. We emphasize that this new smoking gun in motion signature of dark matter is general and is applicable to any dark matter candidate which produces a sharp photon feature in annihilation or decay.

  17. Dark matter universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  18. New Observations of beauty baryon decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Vitaly, Andreev

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the work I have done during my summer student association with the LHCb (Large Hadron Collider Beauty Experiment) collaboration at CERN from 30.06 till 26.09.2014. The project was performed in a team with two other summer students. In this report I concentrate on my contribution to the team work. In addition, one section is dedicated to the management framework called “scrum” which we used to collaborate as a team. The goal of my task was to analyze yet unobserved decays of the beauty Lambda-b-0 baryon. This is interesting since the CP violation still remains unobserved in baryons and beauty baryons are generally not well-known yet. LHCb is the first detector where these heavy baryons can be analyzed in detail. In addition these decays may play an important role in other processes and one can gain new insights into the strong interaction. The analysis presented here was performed on the full 2011-2012 LHC run data and includes several decays which are observed for the first time.

  19. Strongly baryon-dominated disk galaxies at the peak of galaxy formation ten billion years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzel, R; Schreiber, N M Förster; Übler, H; Lang, P; Naab, T; Bender, R; Tacconi, L J; Wisnioski, E; Wuyts, S; Alexander, T; Beifiori, A; Belli, S; Brammer, G; Burkert, A; Carollo, C M; Chan, J; Davies, R; Fossati, M; Galametz, A; Genel, S; Gerhard, O; Lutz, D; Mendel, J T; Momcheva, I; Nelson, E J; Renzini, A; Saglia, R; Sternberg, A; Tacchella, S; Tadaki, K; Wilman, D

    2017-03-15

    In the cold dark matter cosmology, the baryonic components of galaxies-stars and gas-are thought to be mixed with and embedded in non-baryonic and non-relativistic dark matter, which dominates the total mass of the galaxy and its dark-matter halo. In the local (low-redshift) Universe, the mass of dark matter within a galactic disk increases with disk radius, becoming appreciable and then dominant in the outer, baryonic regions of the disks of star-forming galaxies. This results in rotation velocities of the visible matter within the disk that are constant or increasing with disk radius-a hallmark of the dark-matter model. Comparisons between the dynamical mass, inferred from these velocities in rotational equilibrium, and the sum of the stellar and cold-gas mass at the peak epoch of galaxy formation ten billion years ago, inferred from ancillary data, suggest high baryon fractions in the inner, star-forming regions of the disks. Although this implied baryon fraction may be larger than in the local Universe, the systematic uncertainties (owing to the chosen stellar initial-mass function and the calibration of gas masses) render such comparisons inconclusive in terms of the mass of dark matter. Here we report rotation curves (showing rotation velocity as a function of disk radius) for the outer disks of six massive star-forming galaxies, and find that the rotation velocities are not constant, but decrease with radius. We propose that this trend arises because of a combination of two main factors: first, a large fraction of the massive high-redshift galaxy population was strongly baryon-dominated, with dark matter playing a smaller part than in the local Universe; and second, the large velocity dispersion in high-redshift disks introduces a substantial pressure term that leads to a decrease in rotation velocity with increasing radius. The effect of both factors appears to increase with redshift. Qualitatively, the observations suggest that baryons in the early (high

  20. Antiprotons are another matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynes, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    Theories of gravity abound, whereas experiments in gravity are few in number. An important experiment in gravity that has not been performed is the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Although there have been attempts to infer these properties from those of normal matter, none of these theoretical arguments are compelling. Modern theories of gravity that attempt to unify gravity with the other forces of nature predict that in principle antimatter can fall differently than normal matter in the Earth's field. Some of these supergravity theories predict that antimatter will fall faster, and that normal matter will fall with a small Baryon-number dependance in the earth's field. All of these predictions violate the Weak Equivalence Principle, a cornerstone of General Relativity, but are consistent with CPT conservation. In our approved experiment at LEAR (PS-200) we will test the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter by measuring the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons from LEAR will be lowered in energy to ∼4 Kelvin at which energy the gravitational effect will be measureable. The measurement will employ the time-of-flight technique wherein the antiprotons are released vertically in a drift tube. The spectrum of time-of-flight measurements can be used to extract the gravitational acceleration experienced by the particles. The system will be calibrated using H - ions which simulates the electromagnetic behavior of the antiproton, yet is a baryon to ∼0.1%. To extract the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton relative to the H - ion with a statistical precision of 1% will require the release of ∼10 6 to 10 7 particles

  1. Recent Results in Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Christopher Michael [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-08-01

    In this dissertation, we study the original excess of low energy events observed by the Co- GeNT collaboration and the annual modulation reported by the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration, and discuss whether these signals could both be the result of the same elastically scattering dark matter particle. We find that, without channeling but when taking into account uncertainties in the relevant quenching factors, a dark matter candidate with a mass of approximately ~7.0 GeV and a cross section with nucleons of σDM-N ~2 x 10-40 cm2 could account for both of these observations. We also compare the region of parameter space favored by DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT to the constraints from XENON 10, XENON 100, and CDMS (Si).

  2. Extreme State of Matter: Shock Experiments and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortov, Vladimir

    The behavior of matter at extremely high pressures is very interesting for understanding the structure and evolution of astrophysica objects and many modern energy technologies. Dynamic investigations of warm dense matter at extremely high pressures, based on shock loading, adiabatic release of shocked as well as quasi-isentropic compression are considered. To generate shock waves in the terapascal pressure range, the cylindrical and spherical condensed high explosives, laser and corpuscular beams, high velocity impacts, and soft X-rays were used. The high-resolved temporal diagnostics of the extreme states of plasma were carried out with VIZAR technique, fast acting electron-optical transducers, pyrometers, and high-speed spectrometers equipped with the electron-optical transmission lines. The experimental data obtained and the physical models of behavior of plasma at extremely high pressures, temperatures and strain rates are discussed.

  3. Giving pandas ROOT to chew on: experiences with the XENON1T Dark Matter experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenska, D.; Tunnell, C.; Aalbers, J.; Verhoeven, S.; Maassen, J.; Templon, J.

    2017-10-01

    In preparation for the XENON1T Dark Matter data acquisition, we have prototyped and implemented a new computing model. The XENON signal and data processing software is developed fully in Python 3, and makes extensive use of generic scientific data analysis libraries, such as the SciPy stack. A certain tension between modern “Big Data” solutions and existing HEP frameworks is typically experienced in smaller particle physics experiments. ROOT is still the “standard” data format in our field, defined by large experiments (ATLAS, CMS). To ease the transition, our computing model caters to both analysis paradigms, leaving the choice of using ROOT-specific C++ libraries, or alternatively, Python and its data analytics tools, as a front-end choice of developing physics algorithms. We present our path on harmonizing these two ecosystems, which allowed us to use off-the-shelf software libraries (e.g., NumPy, SciPy, scikit-learn, matplotlib) and lower the cost of development and maintenance. To analyse the data, our software allows researchers to easily create “mini-trees” small, tabular ROOT structures for Python analysis, which can be read directly into pandas DataFrame structures. One of our goals was making ROOT available as a cross-platform binary for an easy installation from the Anaconda Cloud (without going through the “dependency hell”). In addition to helping us discover dark matter interactions, lowering this barrier helps shift the particle physics toward non-domain-specific code.

  4. Can tonne-scale direct detection experiments discover nuclear dark matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, Alistair; Kirk, Russell; Monroe, Jocelyn; West, Stephen M., E-mail: Alistair.Butcher.2010@live.rhul.ac.uk, E-mail: Russell.Kirk.2008@live.rhul.ac.uk, E-mail: Jocelyn.Monroe@rhul.ac.uk, E-mail: Stephen.West@rhul.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-01

    Models of nuclear dark matter propose that the dark sector contains large composite states consisting of dark nucleons in analogy to Standard Model nuclei. We examine the direct detection phenomenology of a particular class of nuclear dark matter model at the current generation of tonne-scale liquid noble experiments, in particular DEAP-3600 and XENON1T. In our chosen nuclear dark matter scenario distinctive features arise in the recoil energy spectra due to the non-point-like nature of the composite dark matter state. We calculate the number of events required to distinguish these spectra from those of a standard point-like WIMP state with a decaying exponential recoil spectrum. In the most favourable regions of nuclear dark matter parameter space, we find that a few tens of events are needed to distinguish nuclear dark matter from WIMPs at the 3 σ level in a single experiment. Given the total exposure time of DEAP-3600 and XENON1T we find that at best a 2 σ distinction is possible by these experiments individually, while 3 σ sensitivity is reached for a range of parameters by the combination of the two experiments. We show that future upgrades of these experiments have potential to distinguish a large range of nuclear dark matter models from that of a WIMP at greater than 3 σ .

  5. Can tonne-scale direct detection experiments discover nuclear dark matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, Alistair; Kirk, Russell; Monroe, Jocelyn; West, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Models of nuclear dark matter propose that the dark sector contains large composite states consisting of dark nucleons in analogy to Standard Model nuclei. We examine the direct detection phenomenology of a particular class of nuclear dark matter model at the current generation of tonne-scale liquid noble experiments, in particular DEAP-3600 and XENON1T. In our chosen nuclear dark matter scenario distinctive features arise in the recoil energy spectra due to the non-point-like nature of the composite dark matter state. We calculate the number of events required to distinguish these spectra from those of a standard point-like WIMP state with a decaying exponential recoil spectrum. In the most favourable regions of nuclear dark matter parameter space, we find that a few tens of events are needed to distinguish nuclear dark matter from WIMPs at the 3 σ level in a single experiment. Given the total exposure time of DEAP-3600 and XENON1T we find that at best a 2 σ distinction is possible by these experiments individually, while 3 σ sensitivity is reached for a range of parameters by the combination of the two experiments. We show that future upgrades of these experiments have potential to distinguish a large range of nuclear dark matter models from that of a WIMP at greater than 3 σ .

  6. Beautiful baryons from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Güsken, S; Jegerlehner, F; Schilling, K; Siegert, G; Sommer, Rainer

    1994-01-01

    We perform a lattice study of heavy baryons, containing one (\\Lambda_b) or two b-quarks (\\Xi_b). Using the quenched approximation we obtain for the mass of \\Lambda_b M_{\\Lambda_b}= 5.728 \\pm 0.144 \\pm 0.018 {\\rm GeV}. The mass splitting between the \\Lambda_b and the B-meson is found to increase by about 20\\% if the light quark mass is varied from the chiral limit to the strange quark mass. ------- Figures obtained upon request from borrelli@psiclu.cern.ch.

  7. A Collective Model of Baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, Amiram

    1996-01-01

    We introduce a collective model of baryons which are interpreted as rotations and vibrations of an oblate-top shaped string. The underlying algebraic structure provides a tractable computational framework for comparing single-particle and collective forms of dynamics. We derive mass formulas as well as closed expressions for both elastic and transition form factors, and consequently for the helicity amplitudes that can be measured in electro- and photoproduction. Effects of spin-flavor symmetry breaking and of swelling of hadrons with increasing excitation energy are considered. (author)

  8. Quarks, baryons and chiral symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hosaka, Atsushi

    2001-01-01

    This book describes baryon models constructed from quarks, mesons and chiral symmetry. The role of chiral symmetry and of quark model structure with SU(6) spin-flavor symmetry are discussed in detail, starting from a pedagogic introduction. Emphasis is placed on symmetry aspects of the theories. As an application, the chiral bag model is studied for nucleon structure, where important methods of theoretical physics, mostly related to the semiclassical approach for a system of strong interactions, are demonstrated. The text is more practical than formal; tools and ideas are explained in detail w

  9. Effect of gravitational focusing on annual modulation in dark-matter direct-detection experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Samuel K; Lisanti, Mariangela; Peter, Annika H G; Safdi, Benjamin R

    2014-01-10

    The scattering rate in dark-matter direct-detection experiments should modulate annually due to Earth's orbit around the Sun. The rate is typically thought to be extremized around June 1, when the relative velocity of Earth with respect to the dark-matter wind is maximal. We point out that gravitational focusing can alter this modulation phase. Unbound dark-matter particles are focused by the Sun's gravitational potential, affecting their phase-space density in the lab frame. Gravitational focusing can result in a significant overall shift in the annual-modulation phase, which is most relevant for dark matter with low scattering speeds. The induced phase shift for light O(10)  GeV dark matter may also be significant, depending on the threshold energy of the experiment.

  10. Study of ψ(3770 decaying to baryon anti-baryon pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Gang Xia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To study the decays of ψ(3770 going to baryon anti-baryon pairs (BB¯, all available experiments of measuring the cross sections of e+e−→BB¯ at center-of-mass energy ranging from 3.0 GeV to 3.9 GeV are combined. To relate the baryon octets, a model based on the SU(3 flavor symmetry is used and the SU(3 breaking effects are also considered. Assuming the electric and magnetic form factors are equal (|GE|=|GM|, a global fit including the interference between the QED process and the resonant process is performed. The branching fraction of ψ(3770→BB¯ is determined to be (2.4±0.8±0.3×10−5, (1.7±0.6±0.1×10−5, (4.5±0.9±0.1×10−5, (4.5±0.9±0.1×10−5, (2.0±0.7±0.1×10−5, and (2.0±0.7±0.1×10−5 for B=p,Λ,Σ+,Σ0,Ξ− and Ξ0, respectively, where the first uncertainty is from the global fit and the second uncertainty is the systematic uncertainty due to the assumption |GE|=|GM|. They are at least one order of magnitude larger than a simple scaling of the branching fraction of J/ψ/ψ(3686→BB¯.

  11. Dence Cold Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavinskiy Alexey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Possible way to create dense cold baryonic matter in the laboratory is discussed. The density of this matter is comparable or even larger than the density of neutron star core. The properties of this matter can be controlled by trigger conditions. Experimental program for the study of properties of dense cold matter for light and heavy ion collisions at initial energy range √sNN~2-3GeV is proposed..

  12. Detailed Characterization of Nuclear Recoil Pulse Shape Discrimination in the DarkSide-50 Direct Dark Matter Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edkins, Erin Elisabeth [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-05-01

    While evidence of non-baryonic dark matter has been accumulating for decades, its exact nature continues to remain a mystery. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are a well motivated candidate which appear in certain extensions of the Standard Model, independently of dark matter theory. If such particles exist, they should occasionally interact with particles of normal matter, producing a signal which may be detected. The DarkSide-50 direct dark matter experiment aims to detect the energy of recoiling argon atoms due to the elastic scattering of postulated WIMPs. In order to make such a discovery, a clear understanding of both the background and signal region is essential. This understanding requires a careful study of the detector's response to radioactive sources, which in turn requires such sources may be safely introduced into or near the detector volume and reliably removed. The CALibration Insertaion System (CALIS) was designed and built for this purpose in a j oint effort between Fermi National Laboratory and the University of Hawaii. This work describes the design and testing of CALIS, its installation and commissioning at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and the multiple calibration campaigns which have successfully employed it. As nuclear recoils produced by WIMPs are indistinguishable from those produced by neutrons, radiogenic neutrons are both the most dangerous class of background and a vital calibration source for the study of the potential WIMP signal. Prior to the calibration of DarkSide-50 with radioactive neutron sources, the acceptance region was determined by the extrapolation of nuclear recoil data from a separate, dedicated experiment, ScENE, which measured the distribution of the pulse shape discrimination parameter, $f_{90}$, for nuclear recoils of known energies. This work demonstrates the validity of the extrapolation of ScENE values to DarkSide-50, by direct comparison of the $f_{90}$ distributio n of nuclear

  13. The good, the bad, and the baryon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    We describe the incorporation of baryons into an effective theory of QCD at low energies. The baryon is not a Skyrmion, rather it consists of three valence quarks bound by effective gluon exchanges, enveloped in a meson cloud, which may possibly take the form of a chiral soliton. Some of the physical implications of these results are also discussed. (orig.)

  14. Vector baryon interaction and dynamically generated resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Gonzalez, P.; Vicente Vacas, M. J.; Ramos, A.; Vijande, J.; Sarkar, S.; Sun Baoxi

    2010-01-01

    The formalism for the interaction of vector mesons with baryons within the local hidden gauge formalism is presented and it is shown to lead to a large amount of dynamically generated baryonic resonances, many of which can be associated to known states, while others represent predictions for new resonances.

  15. Exotic dynamically generated baryons with C = -1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamermann, D.; Garcia-Recio, C.; Salcedo, L. L.; Nieves, J.; Tolos, L.

    2010-01-01

    We follow a model based on the SU(8) symmetry for the interaction of mesons with baryons. The model treats on an equal footing the pseudo-scalars and the vector mesons, as required by heavy quark symmetry. The T-matrix calculated within an unitary scheme in coupled channels has poles which are interpreted as baryonic resonances.

  16. Heavy flavor baryons in hypercentral model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Hypercentral constituent quark model; charmed and beauty baryons; hyper-Coulomb plus power potential. Abstract. Heavy flavor baryons containing single and double charm (beauty) quarks with light flavor combinations are studied using the hypercentral description of the three-body problem. The confinement ...

  17. Baryon spectroscopy and the omega minus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-12-31

    In this report, I will mainly discuss baryon resonances with emphasis on the discovery of the {Omega}{sup {minus}}. However, for completeness, I will also present some data on the meson resonances which together with the baryons led to the uncovering of the SU(3) symmetry of particles and ultimately to the concept of quarks.

  18. Structure and reactions of pentaquark baryons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. April 2006 physics pp. 625–645. Structure and reactions of pentaquark baryons. ATSUSHI HOSAKA. Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki 567-0047, Japan. E-mail: hosaka@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp. Abstract. We review the current status of the exotic pentaquark baryons. After a brief look at ...

  19. Strange baryon production in Z hadronic decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Anykeyev, V B; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barate, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brunet, J M; Brückman, P; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Buys, A; Bärring, O; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Cassio, V; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chikilev, O G; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; D'Almagne, B; Da Silva, W; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Daum, A; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Defoix, C; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dijkstra, H; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Dönszelmann, M; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Föth, H; Fürstenau, H; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gillespie, D; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Gracco, Valerio; Grard, F; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Gunnarsson, P; Guy, J; Guz, Yu; Górski, M; Günther, M; Haedinger, U; Hahn, F; Hahn, M; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Ioannou, P; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Kaiser, M; Kalmus, George Ernest; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Królikowski, J; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Kuznetsov, O; Köhne, J H; Köne, B; La Vaissière, C de; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; López, J M; López-Aguera, M A; López-Fernandez, A; Lörstad, B; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martí i García, S; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Maréchal, B; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Mönig, K; Møller, R; Müller, H; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Némécek, S; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Pennanen, J; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rídky, J; Rückstuhl, W; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stepaniak, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Stäck, H; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Sánchez, J; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tuuva, T; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van der Velde, C; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Voutilainen, M; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Wehr, A; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yu, L; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zhigunov, V P; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G; de Boer, Wim; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Åsman, B; Österberg, K; Überschär, B; Überschär, S

    1995-01-01

    A study of the production of strange octet and decuplet baryons in hadronic decays of the Z recorded by the DELPHI detector at LEP is presented. This includes the first measurement of the \\Sigma^\\pm average multiplicity. The total and differential cross sections, the event topology and the baryon-antibaryon correlations are compared with current hadronization models.

  20. Baryon spectroscopy and the omega minus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    In this report, I will mainly discuss baryon resonances with emphasis on the discovery of the Ω - . However, for completeness, I will also present some data on the meson resonances which together with the baryons led to the uncovering of the SU(3) symmetry of particles and ultimately to the concept of quarks

  1. Exactly solvable models of baryon structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijker, R. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Leviatan, A. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University. Jerusalem 91904, Israel (Israel)

    1998-12-31

    We present a qualitative analysis of the gross features of baryon spectroscopy (masses and form factors) in terms of various exactly solvable models. It is shown that a collective model, in which baryon resonances are interpreted as rotations and vibrations of an oblate symmetric top, provides a good starting point for a more detailed quantitative study. (Author)

  2. Exactly solvable models of baryon structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijker, R.; Leviatan, A.

    1998-01-01

    We present a qualitative analysis of the gross features of baryon spectroscopy (masses and form factors) in terms of various exactly solvable models. It is shown that a collective model, in which baryon resonances are interpreted as rotations and vibrations of an oblate symmetric top, provides a good starting point for a more detailed quantitative study. (Author)

  3. The Fourteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and from the Second Phase of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfathi, Bela; Aguado, D. S.; Aguilar, Gabriela; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Anguiano, Borja; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Ata, Metin; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Barger, Kathleen A.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Bastien, Fabienne; Bates, Dominic; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bender, Chad F.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Bershady, Matthew A.; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Boquien, Médéric; Borissova, Jura; Bovy, Jo; Andres Bradna Diaz, Christian; Nielsen Brandt, William; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burgasser, Adam J.; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cañas, Caleb I.; Cano-Díaz, Mariana; Cappellari, Michele; Carrera, Ricardo; Casey, Andrew R.; Cervantes Sodi, Bernardo; Chen, Yanping; Cherinka, Brian; Chiappini, Cristina; Doohyun Choi, Peter; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comerford, Julia M.; Comparat, Johan; Correa do Nascimento, Janaina; da Costa, Luiz; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Cunha, Katia; da Silva Ilha, Gabriele; Damke, Guillermo J.; Darling, Jeremy; Davidson, James W., Jr.; Dawson, Kyle; de Icaza Lizaola, Miguel Angel C.; de la Macorra, Axel; de la Torre, Sylvain; De Lee, Nathan; de Sainte Agathe, Victoria; Deconto Machado, Alice; Dell’Agli, Flavia; Delubac, Timothée; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Donor, John; José Downes, Juan; Drory, Niv; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Duckworth, Christopher J.; Dwelly, Tom; Dyer, Jamie; Ebelke, Garrett; Davis Eigenbrot, Arthur; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Michael; Erfanianfar, Ghazaleh; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Feuillet, Diane; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter; Fu, Hai; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Galbany, Lluís; García Pérez, Ana E.; Garcia-Dias, R.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Garma Oehmichen, Luis Alberto; Gaulme, Patrick; Gelfand, Joseph; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Goddard, Daniel; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul J.; Grier, Catherine J.; Gueguen, Alain; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne; Hayes, Christian R.; Hearty, Fred; Hekker, Saskia; Hernandez, Jesus; Hernandez Toledo, Hector; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Hou, Jiamin; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Hunt, Jason A. S.; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Jimenez Angel, Camilo Eduardo; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jönsson, Henrik; Jullo, Eric; Sakil Khan, Fahim; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Charles C., IV; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Law, David R.; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Lee, Young-Bae; Li, Hongyu; Li, Cheng; Lian, Jianhui; Liang, Yu; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Mackereth, J. Ted; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Geimba Maia, Marcio Antonio; Majewski, Steven; Manchado, Arturo; Maraston, Claudia; Mariappan, Vivek; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Masseron, Thomas; Masters, Karen L.; McDermid, Richard M.; McGreer, Ian D.; Melendez, Matthew; Meneses-Goytia, Sofia; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Minchev, Ivan; Minniti, Dante; Mueller, Eva-Maria; Muller-Sanchez, Francisco; Muna, Demitri; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Myers, Adam D.; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; O’Connell, Julia; Oelkers, Ryan James; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel; Aquino Ortíz, Erik; Osorio, Yeisson; Pace, Zach; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Alonso Palicio, Pedro; Pan, Hsi-An; Pan, Kaike; Parikh, Taniya; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Pisani, Alice; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Queiroz, Anna Bárbara de Andrade; Raddick, M. Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Barboza Rembold, Sandro; Richstein, Hannah; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rodríguez Torres, Sergio; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Ruggeri, Rossana; Ruiz, Jose; Salvato, Mara; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Sánchez, Sebastián F.; Sanchez Almeida, Jorge; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Santana Rojas, Felipe Antonio; Santiago, Basílio Xavier; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Schlafly, Edward; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Schuster, William J.; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serenelli, Aldo; Shen, Shiyin; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shull, Michael; Silva Aguirre, Víctor; Simon, Joshua D.; Skrutskie, Mike; Slosar, Anže; Smethurst, Rebecca; Smith, Verne; Sobeck, Jennifer; Somers, Garrett; Souter, Barbara J.; Souto, Diogo; Spindler, Ashley; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stello, Dennis; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Suárez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Szigeti, Laszlo; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Talbot, Michael S.; Tang, Baitian; Tao, Charling; Tayar, Jamie; Tembe, Mita; Teske, Johanna; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Tissera, Patricia; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy; Troup, Nicholas W.; Urry, Meg; Valenzuela, O.; van den Bosch, Remco; Vargas-González, Jaime; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Villanova, Sandro; Vogt, Nicole; Wake, David; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Weinberg, David H.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Whelan, David G.; Wilcots, Eric; Wild, Vivienne; Williams, Rob A.; Wilson, John; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Ybarra, Jason E.; Yèche, Christophe; Zakamska, Nadia; Zamora, Olga; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Cheng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Guangtun; Zinn, Joel C.; Zou, Hu

    2018-04-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) has been in operation since 2014 July. This paper describes the second data release from this phase, and the 14th from SDSS overall (making this Data Release Fourteen or DR14). This release makes the data taken by SDSS-IV in its first two years of operation (2014–2016 July) public. Like all previous SDSS releases, DR14 is cumulative, including the most recent reductions and calibrations of all data taken by SDSS since the first phase began operations in 2000. New in DR14 is the first public release of data from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey; the first data from the second phase of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-2), including stellar parameter estimates from an innovative data-driven machine-learning algorithm known as “The Cannon” and almost twice as many data cubes from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) survey as were in the previous release (N = 2812 in total). This paper describes the location and format of the publicly available data from the SDSS-IV surveys. We provide references to the important technical papers describing how these data have been taken (both targeting and observation details) and processed for scientific use. The SDSS web site (www.sdss.org) has been updated for this release and provides links to data downloads, as well as tutorials and examples of data use. SDSS-IV is planning to continue to collect astronomical data until 2020 and will be followed by SDSS-V.

  4. Baryon electromagnetic form factors at BESIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dbeyssi Alaa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic form factors are fundamental quantities which parameterize the electric and magnetic structure of hadrons. This contribution reports on the measurements of baryon electromagnetic form factors at the BESIII experiment in Beijing. The Beijing e+e− collider BEPCII is a double-ring symmetric collider running at √s between 2.0 and 4.6 GeV. Baryon electromagnetic form factors can be measured at BESIII in direct e+e−-annihilation and in initial state radiation processes. Based on the data collected by the BESIII detector at 12 center of mass energies between 2.23 and 3.67 GeV, the e+e− → p̄p cross section and the time-like proton form factor is measured. Preliminary results from the analysis of the initial state radiation process e+e− → p̄pγ using a data set of 7.408 fb−1 collected at center-of-mass energies between 3.773 and 4.6 GeV, are also presented. The cross section for e+e−→Λ¯Λ${e^ + }{e^ - } \\to \\bar \\Lambda \\Lambda $ is measured based on 40.5 pb−1 data collected at 4 energy points from the threshold up to 3.08 GeV. Preliminary results on the total cross section and the Λ effective form factor are shown. Ongoing analysis based on the high luminosity energy scan from 2015 and from radiative return at different √s are also described.

  5. SELEX: Recent Progress in the Analysis of Charm-Strange and Double-Charm Baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelfried, Jurgen

    2007-01-01

    SELEX (Fermilab Experiment 781) [1] employs beams of Σ - , π - , and protons at around 600 GeV/c to study production and decay properties of charmed baryons. It took data in the 1996/7 fixed target run and is currently analyzing those data. Here they focus on recently obtained results concerning the (Omega) c 0 lifetime and the doubly-charmed baryons Ξ cc + and Ξ cc ++

  6. Warm-hot baryons comprise 5-10 per cent of filaments in the cosmic web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-12-03

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background indicate that baryons account for 5 per cent of the Universe's total energy content. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not condensed into virialized haloes, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web (where matter density is larger than average) as a low-density plasma at temperatures of 10(5)-10(7) kelvin, known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm-hot baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars and of hot gas between interacting clusters. These observations were, however, unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm-hot baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of gas at 10(7) kelvin associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we find hot gas structures that are coherent over scales of 8 megaparsecs. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10 per cent of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster's gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. Our findings strengthen evidence for a picture of the Universe in which a large fraction of the missing baryons reside in the filaments of the cosmic web.

  7. Glueball–baryon interactions in holographic QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Wen Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Studying the Witten–Sakai–Sugimoto model with type IIA string theory, we find the glueball–baryon interaction is predicted in this model. The glueball is identified as the 11D gravitational waves or graviton described by the M5-brane supergravity solution. Employing the relation of M-theory and type IIA string theory, glueball is also 10D gravitational perturbations which are the excited modes by close strings in the bulk of this model. On the other hand, baryon is identified as a D4-brane wrapped on S4 which is named as baryon vertex, so the glueball–baryon interaction is nothing but the close string/baryon vertex interaction in this model. Since the baryon vertex could be equivalently treated as the instanton configurations on the flavor brane, we identify the glueball–baryon interaction as “graviton–instanton” interaction in order to describe it quantitatively by the quantum mechanical system for the collective modes of baryons. So the effective Hamiltonian can be obtained by considering the gravitational perturbations in the flavor brane action. With this Hamiltonian, the amplitudes and the selection rules of the glueball–baryon interaction can be analytically calculated in the strong coupling limit. We show our calculations explicitly in two characteristic situations which are “scalar and tensor glueball interacting with baryons”. Although there is a long way to go, our work provides a holographic way to understand the interactions of baryons in hadronic physics and nuclear physics by the underlying string theory.

  8. Patient experiences of inpatient hospital care : A department matter and a hospital matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, Maarten W.; De Boer, Dolf; Sixma, Herman; Van der Hoek, Lucas; Rademakers, Jany J. D. J. M.; Delnoij, Diana M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the added value of measuring and possibly presenting patient experiences at the department level, in addition to the hospital level, and to explore the possibility that patient experiences differ according to the ‘type’ of hospital department. Design Secondary analysis of data

  9. Patient experiences of inpatient hospital care: a department matter and a hospital matter.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, M.W.; Boer, D. de; Sixma, H.; Hoek, L. van der; Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.; Delnoij, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the added value of measuring and possibly presenting patient experiences at the department level, in addition to the hospital level, and to explore the possibility that patient experiences differ according to the ‘type’ of hospital department. Design: Secondary analysis of data

  10. Electromagnetic properties of light and heavy baryons in the relativistic quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicmorus Marinescu, Diana

    2007-06-14

    One of the main challenges of nowadays low-energy physics remains the description of the internal structure of hadrons, strongly connected to the electromagnetic properties of matter. In this vein, the success of the relativistic quark model in the analysis of the hadron structure constitutes a solid motivation for the study carried out throughout this work. The relativistic quark model is extended to the investigation of static electromagnetic properties of both heavy and light baryons. The bare contributions to the magnetic moments of the single-, double- and triple-heavy baryons are calculated. Moreover, the relativistic quark model allows the study of the electromagnetic properties of the light baryon octet incorporating meson cloud contributions in a perturbative manner. The long disputed values of the multipole ratios E2/M1 and C2/M1 and the electromagnetic form factors of the N{yields}{delta}{gamma} transition are successfully reproduced. The relativistic quark model can be viewed as a quantum field theory approach based on a phenomenological Lagrangian coupling light and heavy baryons to their constituent quarks. In our approach the baryon is a composite object of three constituent quarks, at least in leading order. The effective interaction Lagrangian is written in terms of baryon and constituent quark fields. The effective action preserves Lorentz covariance and gauge invariance. The main ingredients of the model are already introduced at the level of the interaction Lagrangian: the three-quark baryon currents, the Gaussian distribution of the constituent quarks inside the baryon and the compositeness condition which sets an upper limit for the baryon-quark vertex. The S-matrix elements are expressed by a set of Feynman quark-diagrams. The model contains only few parameters, namely, the cut-off parameter of the Gaussian quark distribution and the free quark propagator, which are unambiguously determined from the best fit to the data. The heavy quark limit

  11. Electromagnetic properties of light and heavy baryons in the relativistic quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicmorus Marinescu, Diana

    2007-01-01

    One of the main challenges of nowadays low-energy physics remains the description of the internal structure of hadrons, strongly connected to the electromagnetic properties of matter. In this vein, the success of the relativistic quark model in the analysis of the hadron structure constitutes a solid motivation for the study carried out throughout this work. The relativistic quark model is extended to the investigation of static electromagnetic properties of both heavy and light baryons. The bare contributions to the magnetic moments of the single-, double- and triple-heavy baryons are calculated. Moreover, the relativistic quark model allows the study of the electromagnetic properties of the light baryon octet incorporating meson cloud contributions in a perturbative manner. The long disputed values of the multipole ratios E2/M1 and C2/M1 and the electromagnetic form factors of the N→Δγ transition are successfully reproduced. The relativistic quark model can be viewed as a quantum field theory approach based on a phenomenological Lagrangian coupling light and heavy baryons to their constituent quarks. In our approach the baryon is a composite object of three constituent quarks, at least in leading order. The effective interaction Lagrangian is written in terms of baryon and constituent quark fields. The effective action preserves Lorentz covariance and gauge invariance. The main ingredients of the model are already introduced at the level of the interaction Lagrangian: the three-quark baryon currents, the Gaussian distribution of the constituent quarks inside the baryon and the compositeness condition which sets an upper limit for the baryon-quark vertex. The S-matrix elements are expressed by a set of Feynman quark-diagrams. The model contains only few parameters, namely, the cut-off parameter of the Gaussian quark distribution and the free quark propagator, which are unambiguously determined from the best fit to the data. The heavy quark limit within this

  12. The Photon-Baryon Governed Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo A. Marosi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous paper we postulated that the repulsive force responsible for the universal expansion is associated with the excitation of the empty space (quantum vacuum and the excitation energy is represented by the energy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB. In this paper, we show that the concept of the repulsive space expanding photon field (i can successfully be applied to explain the local velocity anomaly of the Milky Way Galaxy as shown by Faber and Burstein (1998 and Tully (1998, (ii offers a convincing explanation of the still disputed question of the cosmological expansion on local and intergalactic scales discussed by Cooperstock et al. (1998, and (iii explains the redshift (RS of the CMB in accordance with the law of energy conservation without the need for dark matter (DM and dark energy (DE. Probably the most remarkable result of this model (abbreviated as photon/baryon: PB model in the following discussion is that the individual voids building up the soup-bubble- (SB- like galaxy distribution are the governing dynamical components of the universal expansion. Further consequence implies that the universe is considerably older than the interpretation of the Hubble constant as expansion velocity suggests.

  13. Search for missing baryons through scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habibi, F.

    2011-06-01

    Cool molecular hydrogen H 2 may be the ultimate possible constituent to the Milky-Way missing baryon. We describe a new way to search for such transparent matter in the Galactic disc and halo, through the diffractive and refractive effects on the light of background stars. By simulating the phase delay induced by a turbulent medium, we computed the corresponding illumination pattern on the earth for an extended source and a given passband. We show that in favorable cases, the light of a background star can be subjected to stochastic fluctuations of the order of a few percent at a characteristic time scale of a few minutes. We have searched for scintillation induced by molecular gas in visible dark nebulae as well as by hypothetical halo clumpuscules of cool molecular hydrogen (H 2 -He) during two nights, using the NTT telescope and the IR SOFI detector. Amongst a few thousands of monitored stars, we found one light-curve that is compatible with a strong scintillation effect through a turbulent structure in the B68 nebula. Because no candidate were found toward the SMC (Small Magellan Cloud), we are able to establish upper limits on the contribution of gas clumpuscules to the Galactic halo mass. We show that the short time-scale monitoring of a few 10 6 star*hour in the visible band with a >4 m telescope and a fast readout camera should allow one to interestingly quantify or constrain the contribution of turbulent molecular gas to the Galactic halo. (author)

  14. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R.; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-02-01

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: The dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored but potentially interesting.

  15. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-02-02

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: The dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored but potentially interesting.

  16. The Baryon Number Two System in the Chiral Soliton Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantovani-Sarti, V.; Drago, A.; Vento, V.; Park, B.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    We study the interaction between two B = 1 states in a chiral soliton model where baryons are described as non-topological solitons. By using the hedgehog solution for the B = 1 states we construct three possible B = 2 configurations to analyze the role of the relative orientation of the hedgehog quills in the dynamics. The strong dependence of the inter soliton interaction on these relative orientations reveals that studies of dense hadronic matter using this model should take into account their implications. (author)

  17. Insights on Dark Matter from Hydrogen during Cosmic Dawn

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, Julian B.; Loeb, Abraham

    2018-01-01

    The origin and composition of the cosmological dark matter remain a mystery. However, upcoming 21-cm measurements during cosmic dawn, the period of the first stellar formation, can provide new clues on the nature of dark matter. During this era, the baryon-dark matter fluid is the slowest it will ever be, making it ideal to search for dark matter elastically scattering with baryons through massless mediators, such as the photon. Here we explore whether dark-matter particles with an electric "...

  18. Asymmetric Higgsino dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kfir; Efrati, Aielet; Grossman, Yuval; Nir, Yosef; Riotto, Antonio

    2012-08-03

    In the supersymmetric framework, prior to the electroweak phase transition, the existence of a baryon asymmetry implies the existence of a Higgsino asymmetry. We investigate whether the Higgsino could be a viable asymmetric dark matter candidate. We find that this is indeed possible. Thus, supersymmetry can provide the observed dark matter abundance and, furthermore, relate it with the baryon asymmetry, in which case the puzzle of why the baryonic and dark matter mass densities are similar would be explained. To accomplish this task, two conditions are required. First, the gauginos, squarks, and sleptons must all be very heavy, such that the only electroweak-scale superpartners are the Higgsinos. With this spectrum, supersymmetry does not solve the fine-tuning problem. Second, the temperature of the electroweak phase transition must be low, in the (1-10) GeV range. This condition requires an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  19. QCD Matter Physics at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, P.; CBM Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will be one of the major scientific pillars of the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. The goal of the CBM research program is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities using high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes the study of the equation-of-state of nuclear matter at neutron star core densities, and the search for the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions. The CBM detector is designed to measure rare diagnostic probes such as hadrons including multi-strange (anti-) hyperons, lepton pairs, and charmed particles with unprecedented precision and statistics. Most of these particles will be studied for the first time in the FAIR energy range. In order to achieve the required precision, the measurements will be performed at very high reaction rates of 1 to 10 MHz. This requires very fast and radiation-hard detectors, a novel data read-out and analysis concept based on free streaming front-end electronics, and a high-performance computing cluster for online event selection. The status of FAIR and the physics program of the proposed CBM experiment will be discussed.

  20. arXiv Search for baryon-number-violating $\\Xi_b^0$ oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Alfonso Albero, Alejandro; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Beliy, Nikita; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Berninghoff, Daniel; Bertholet, Emilie; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørn, Mikkel; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brundu, Davide; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Byczynski, Wiktor; Cadeddu, Sandro; Cai, Hao; Calabrese, Roberto; Calladine, Ryan; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu Faye; Chitic, Stefan-Gabriel; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Ciambrone, Paolo; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Colombo, Tommaso; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; 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Federici, Luca; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Declara, Placido; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gabriel, Emmy; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Grabowski, Jascha Peter; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruber, Lukas; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hancock, Thomas Henry; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hasse, Christoph; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Hecker, Malte; Heinicke, Kevin; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; 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Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Pei-Rong; Li, Tenglin; Li, Yiming; Li, Zhuoming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Lisovskyi, Vitalii; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Loi, Angelo; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Macko, Vladimir; Mackowiak, Patrick; Maddrell-Mander, Samuel; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Maisuzenko, Dmitrii; Majewski, Maciej Witold; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Marangotto, Daniele; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; 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Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Pullen, Hannah Louise; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Quintana, Boris; Rachwal, Bartlomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Ravonel Salzgeber, Melody; Reboud, Meril; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Robert, Arnaud; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Ruiz Vidal, Joan; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarpis, Gediminas; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepulveda, Eduardo Enrique; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stepanova, Margarita; Stevens, Holger; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Jiayin; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Toriello, Francis; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Usachov, Andrii; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagner, Alexander; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zonneveld, Jennifer Brigitta; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-11-03

    A search for baryon-number-violating $\\Xi_b^0$ oscillations is performed with a sample of $pp$ collision data recorded by the LHCb experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$. The baryon number at the moment of production is identified by requiring that the $\\Xi_b^0$ come from the decay of a resonance $\\Xi_b^{*-} \\to \\Xi_b^0 \\pi^-$ or $\\Xi_b^{\\prime-} \\to \\Xi_b^0 \\pi^-$, and the baryon number at the moment of decay is identified from the final state using the decays $\\Xi_b^0 \\to \\Xi_c^+ \\pi^-, ~ \\Xi_c^+ \\to p K^- \\pi^+$. No evidence of baryon number violation is found, and an upper limit is set on the oscillation rate of $\\omega < 0.08$ ps$^{-1}$, where $\\omega$ is the associated angular frequency.

  1. Search for Baryon-Number Violating Ξb0 Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alfonso Albero, A.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Beliy, N.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Berninghoff, D.; Bertholet, E.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørn, M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brundu, D.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Byczynski, W.; Cadeddu, S.; Cai, H.; Calabrese, R.; Calladine, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chitic, S.-G.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Colombo, T.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H.-P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Douglas, L.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fazzini, D.; Federici, L.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Fernandez Declara, P.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gabriel, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Grabowski, J. P.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greim, R.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruber, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hancock, T. H.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hasse, C.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Hecker, M.; Heinicke, K.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P. H.; Huard, Z. C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Ibis, P.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kazeev, N.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Kopecna, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, P.-R.; Li, T.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Lionetto, F.; Lisovskyi, V.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Loi, A.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Macko, V.; Mackowiak, P.; Maddrell-Mander, S.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Maisuzenko, D.; Majewski, M. W.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Marangotto, D.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Mead, J. V.; Meadows, B.; Meaux, C.; Meier, F.; Meinert, N.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Millard, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Minzoni, L.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Mombacher, T.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Ossowska, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poli Lener, M.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Ponce, S.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Pullen, H.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Quintana, B.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Ravonel Salzgeber, M.; Reboud, M.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Ruiz Vidal, J.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarpis, G.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schreiner, H. F.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepulveda, E. S.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Soares Lavra, l.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stepanova, M.; Stevens, H.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, J.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; Szymanski, M.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Toriello, F.; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R.; Tournefier, E.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Usachov, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagner, A.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Verlage, T. A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Winn, M.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zonneveld, J. B.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    A search for baryon-number violating Ξb0 oscillations is performed with a sample of p p collision data recorded by the LHCb experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 . The baryon number at the moment of production is identified by requiring that the Ξb0 come from the decay of a resonance Ξb*-→Ξb0π- or Ξb'-→Ξb0π-, and the baryon number at the moment of decay is identified from the final state using the decays Ξb0→Ξc+π-,Ξc+→p K-π+. No evidence of baryon-number violation is found, and an upper limit at the 95% confidence level is set on the oscillation rate of ω <0.08 ps-1, where ω is the associated angular frequency.

  2. Search for Baryon-Number Violating Ξ_{b}^{0} Oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alfonso Albero, A; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Baranov, A; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baryshnikov, F; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Beiter, A; Bel, L J; Beliy, N; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Beranek, S; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Berninghoff, D; Bertholet, E; Bertolin, A; Betancourt, C; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Bjørn, M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Bordyuzhin, I; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brundu, D; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Byczynski, W; Cadeddu, S; Cai, H; Calabrese, R; Calladine, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Chamont, D; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chitic, S-G; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Chubykin, A; Ciambrone, P; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Colombo, T; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C T; Decamp, D; Del Buono, L; Dembinski, H-P; Demmer, M; Dendek, A; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Nezza, P; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Douglas, L; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziewiecki, M; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fazzini, D; Federici, L; Ferguson, D; Fernandez, G; Fernandez Declara, P; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Funk, W; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gabriel, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Govorkova, E; Grabowski, J P; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greim, R; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruber, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hancock, T H; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hasse, C; Hatch, M; He, J; Hecker, M; Heinicke, K; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P H; Huard, Z C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hutchcroft, D; Ibis, P; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kazeev, N; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Klimkovich, T; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Kopecna, R; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kotriakhova, S; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, P-R; Li, T; Li, Y; Li, Z; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Lionetto, F; Lisovskyi, V; Liu, X; Loh, D; Loi, A; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Macko, V; Mackowiak, P; Maddrell-Mander, S; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Maisuzenko, D; Majewski, M W; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Marangotto, D; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marinangeli, M; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurice, E; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Mead, J V; Meadows, B; Meaux, C; Meier, F; Meinert, N; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Millard, E; Minard, M-N; Minzoni, L; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Mombacher, T; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morello, M J; Morgunova, O; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nogay, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Ossowska, A; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Placinta, V; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poli Lener, M; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Ponce, S; Popov, A; Popov, D; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Pullen, H; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Quintana, B; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Ratnikov, F; Raven, G; Ravonel Salzgeber, M; Reboud, M; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Robert, A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Ruiz Vidal, J; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarpis, G; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schreiner, H F; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepulveda, E S; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Soares Lavra, L; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stepanova, M; Stevens, H; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Stramaglia, M E; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, J; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; Szymanski, M; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Toriello, F; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R; Tournefier, E; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Usachov, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagner, A; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Verlage, T A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Viemann, H; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vitti, M; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Winn, M; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yang, Z; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zonneveld, J B; Zucchelli, S

    2017-11-03

    A search for baryon-number violating Ξ_{b}^{0} oscillations is performed with a sample of pp collision data recorded by the LHCb experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3  fb^{-1}. The baryon number at the moment of production is identified by requiring that the Ξ_{b}^{0} come from the decay of a resonance Ξ_{b}^{*-}→Ξ_{b}^{0}π^{-} or Ξ_{b}^{'-}→Ξ_{b}^{0}π^{-}, and the baryon number at the moment of decay is identified from the final state using the decays Ξ_{b}^{0}→Ξ_{c}^{+}π^{-},Ξ_{c}^{+}→pK^{-}π^{+}. No evidence of baryon-number violation is found, and an upper limit at the 95% confidence level is set on the oscillation rate of ω<0.08  ps^{-1}, where ω is the associated angular frequency.

  3. Fluid dynamic propagation of initial baryon number perturbations on a Bjorken flow background

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Baryon number density perturbations offer a possible route to experimentally measure baryon number susceptibilities and heat conductivity of the quark gluon plasma. We study the fluid dynamical evolution of local and event-by-event fluctuations of baryon number density, flow velocity and energy density on top of a (generalized) Bjorken expansion. To that end we use a background-fluctuation splitting and a Bessel-Fourier decomposition for the fluctuating part of the fluid dynamical fields with respect to the azimuthal angle, the radius in the transverse plane and rapidity. We examine how the time evolution of linear perturbations depends on the equation of state as well as on shear viscosity, bulk viscosity and heat conductivity for modes with different azimuthal, radial and rapidity wave numbers. Finally we discuss how this information is accessible to experiments in terms of the transverse and rapidity dependence of correlation functions for baryonic particles in high energy nuclear collisions.

  4. Status of the ROSEBUD dark matter experiment in 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebrian, S.; Coron, N.; Dambier, G.; Marcillac, P. de; Garcia, E.; Gonzalez, D.; Irastorza, I.G.; Leblanc, J.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solorzano, A.; Peruzzi, A.; Puimedon, J.; Sarsa, M.L.; Scopel, S.; Villar, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The ROSEBUD (Rare Objects SEarch with Bolometers UndergrounD) experiment consists of three small sapphire bolometers with NTD-Ge sensors operating at 20 mK in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory in an attempt to directly detect low mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) through their scattering off Al and O nuclei. We report in this paper the results of three runs (about 10 days each) performed along 1999 and the progressive background reduction obtained essentially from modifications in the cryostat. A new run is in progress to complete the first phase of the experiment

  5. Status of the ROSEBUD Dark Matter search experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebrian, S.; Coron, N.; Dambier, G.; Garcia, E.; Gonzalez, D.; Irastorza, I.G.; Leblanc, J.; Marcillac, P. de; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solorzano, A.; Peruzzi, A.; Puimedon, J.; Sarsa, M.L.; Scopel, S.; Villar, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The Rare Objects SEarch with Bolometers UndergrounD (ROSEBUD) experiment consists of three small sapphire bolometers with NTD-Ge sensors operating at 20 mK and attempts to directly detect low mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) through their scattering off Al and O nuclei. It has been recently installed in an ultralow background environment in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (at 2450 m.w.e.) and the testing period is underway. The status and preliminary results of the experiment are reported in this paper

  6. Dark matter searches with NaI scintillators in the Canfranc underground laboratory: ANAIS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amare, J; Beltran, B; Carmona, J M; Cebrian, S; GarcIa, E; Gomez, H; Irastorza, I G; Luzon, G; Martinez, M; Morales, J; Solorzano, A Ortiz de; Pobes, C; Puimedon, J; RodrIguez, A; Ruz, J; Sarsa, M L; Torres, L; Villar, J A

    2006-01-01

    A large mass dark matter search experiment with NaI scintillators at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory is underway. A 10.7 kg prototype with improved light collection efficiency and special low-background improvements has been tested and started taking data underground in summer 2005. Preliminary results and prospects for the experiment are presented

  7. Dark matter searches with NaI scintillators in the Canfranc underground laboratory: ANAIS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amare, J; Beltran, B; Carmona, J M; Cebrian, S; GarcIa, E; Gomez, H; Irastorza, I G; Luzon, G; Martinez, M; Morales, J; Solorzano, A Ortiz de; Pobes, C; Puimedon, J; RodrIguez, A; Ruz, J; Sarsa, M L; Torres, L; Villar, J A [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2006-05-15

    A large mass dark matter search experiment with NaI scintillators at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory is underway. A 10.7 kg prototype with improved light collection efficiency and special low-background improvements has been tested and started taking data underground in summer 2005. Preliminary results and prospects for the experiment are presented.

  8. Dense detector for baryon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, H.; Heller, K.; Marshak, M.L.; Peterson, E.A.; Ruddick, K.; Shupe, M.

    1981-01-01

    Our studies indicate that the dense detector represents a potentially powerful means to search for baryon decay and to study this process, if it occurs. The detector has good angular resolution and particle identification properties for both showering and non-showering events. Its energy resolution is particularly good for muons, but pion, electron and photon energies can also be measured with resolutions of at least 25 percent (standard deviation). The dense detector has strong logistical advantages over other proposed schemes. These advantages imply not only a lower cost but also faster construction and higher reliability. A particular advantage is that the dense detector can be prototyped in order to optimize its characteristics prior to the construction of a large module. Subsequent modules can also be added easily, while the initial detector continues operation

  9. (X-ray diffraction experiments with condenser matter)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppens, P.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the following topics: high-{Tc} superconductors; The response of crystal to an applied electric field; quasicrystals; surface structure and kinetics of surface layer formation; EXAFS studies of superconductors and heterostructures; effect of iron on the crystal structure of perovskite; x-ray detector development; and SAXS experiments. (LSP)

  10. Perrault's experiments, a matter of soil hydrology and epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barontini, Stefano; Berta, Andrea; Settura, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    The studies conducted in the second half of the Sixteenth Century were crucial both for the hydrological knowledge and for the modern epistemology. In fact thanks to the new experiment-based scientific approach the Sun was about to be fully recognized as the engine of the hydrological cycle instead of an endogenous engine placed in the depths of the Earth, and the original Aristotelic approach to the description of the nature, based on the the four qualities (hot and cold, dry and moist), was got over. At the same time, the questions posed on the hydrological cycle and on the soil hydrology, which are hardly reproducible by means of a controlled laboratory model, severely tested the modern scientific approach at its beginning, and contributed to the development of modern epistemology. Perrault's classical book De l'origine des fontaines (On the origin of springs, 1674) is deeply rooted in these debates. In this book he performed experiments and collected many observations both to assess the water balance at the basin scale and to understand the water movement in the upper soil layers. Particularly he performed four experiments to understand whether the water could spontaneously rise within the soil from the water table and originate springs (1st and 2nd experiment), how deep the rainfall could percolate through the soil and recharge the groundwater table (3rd one), and whether salty water remained salty when rising into the soil by capillary action (4th one). In order to do so he filled with different soils a leaden pipe, 65cm long, and observed their performances against capillary rise, infiltration, percolation and water-content redistribution. The great detail of the experimental report allowed us to quantitatively re-experience the first three ones in the laboratory, with comparable results to Perrault's ones. Moreover it allowed us to recognize both the omitted data which would be needed for a complete repeatability, and the observations which leaded Perrault

  11. Search for (exotic) strange matter in the Star and Alice experiments with the ultra-relativistic heavy ion colliders RHIC and LHC; Recherche de matiere etrange (exotique) dans les experiences STAR et ALICE aupres des collisionneurs d'ions lourds ultra-relativistes RHIC et LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernet, R

    2006-02-15

    Ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions offer the possibility to create conditions of temperature and density that could lead nuclear matter to a state of deconfined partons, the quark-gluon plasma. Strange baryon production is one of the essential observables to understand the mechanisms involved in the medium. Furthermore, theories predict a possible production of strange dibaryons, still hypothetical particles, from which one could draw important inferences in nuclear physics and astrophysics. The experiments STAR at RHIC, and, soon, ALICE at LHC, allow one to search for strange baryons and dibaryons. The STAR sensitivity to the metastable dibaryon H{sup 0} in the {lambda}p{pi}{sup -} decay mode was calculated thanks to a dedicated simulation. The search for the H{sup 0}, and for the {xi}{sup -}p resonance as well, was performed in the STAR Au+Au data at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 62.4 and 200 GeV energies. Within the framework of the preparation of ALICE to the first Pb+Pb data, the detector ability to identify strange baryons {lambda}, {xi} and {omega}, was estimated via several simulations. So as to favour the reconstruction efficiency in a large range of transverse momentum while keeping a reasonable S/B ratio, the influence of the geometrical selections and the size of the reconstruction zone was emphasized. The ALICE sensitivities to the metastable strange dibaryons H{sup 0} and ({xi}{sup 0}p){sub b} and to the {lambda}{lambda} resonance were calculated as well. (author)

  12. CP violation in the baryon sector

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Eluned Anne

    2017-01-01

    The study of CP violation in the baryon sector is still a relatively new field and offers the possibility to make many CP measurements which could complement those performed in the meson sector. This is especially true of late given the large number of baryons currently being produced at the LHC. Such measurements could help further over-constrain the CKM unitary triangle, as well as furthering our understand of baryongenesis. These proceedings will give an overview of the current state of the search for CP violation in the baryon sector.

  13. Do Qualification, Experience and Age Matter for Principals Leadership Styles?

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Javed Sawati; Saeed Anwar; Muhammad Iqbal Majoka

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of present study was to find out the prevalent leadership styles of principals in government schools of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and to find relationship of leadership styles with qualifications, age and experience of the principals. On the basis of analyzed data, four major leadership styles of the principals were identified as Eclectic, Democratic, Autocratic, and Free-rein. However, a small proportion of the principal had no dominant leadership style. This study shows that princip...

  14. Calculation of baryon sum rules and SU(4) mass formulae for mesons and baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongardt, K.

    1976-01-01

    Light cone coordinates and field-field anticommutators for the free quark model on the light cone are introduced and light cone charges and light cone currents for the free quark model as well as sum rules for the meson and quark states are derived. The derivation of sum rules for the baryons is attempted. It is seen that it is possible formally to derive the same sum rules for the baryons and for the quarks. The baryon sums were derived through the symmetry properties of the baryon fields. Explicit assumptions about the spatial distribution of the three quarks in the baryons were not utilized. The meson-baryon Σ-terms, Zweig's rules in the SU (4) and a number of properties of the M-matrix are discussed. (BJ) [de

  15. Prospects of detecting baryon and quark superfluidity from cooling neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page; Prakash; Lattimer; Steiner

    2000-09-04

    Baryon and quark superfluidity in the cooling of neutron stars are investigated. Future observations will allow us to constrain combinations of the neutron or Lambda-hyperon pairing gaps and the star's mass. However, in a hybrid star with a mixed phase of hadrons and quarks, quark gaps larger than a few tenths of an MeV render quark matter virtually invisible for cooling. If the quark gap is smaller, quark superfluidity could be important, but its effects will be nearly impossible to distinguish from those of other baryonic constituents.

  16. Direct couplings of mimetic dark matter and their cosmological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liuyuan; Mou, Yicen; Zheng, Yunlong; Li, Mingzhe

    2018-01-01

    The original mimetic model was proposed to take the role of dark matter. In this paper we consider possible direct interactions of mimetic dark matter with other matter in the universe, especially standard model particles such as baryons and photons. By imposing shift symmetry, the mimetic dark matter field can only have derivative couplings. We discuss the possibilities of generating baryon number asymmetry and cosmic birefringence in the universe based on the derivative couplings of mimetic dark matter to baryons and photons. Supported by NSFC (11422543, 11653002)

  17. Long-term care insurance: Does experience matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Norma B; Skira, Meghan M; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold

    2015-03-01

    We examine whether long-term care (LTC) experience helps explain the low demand for long-term care insurance (LTCI). We test if expectations about future informal care receipt, expectations about inheritance receipt, and LTCI purchase decisions vary between individuals whose parents or in-laws have used LTC versus those who have not. We find parental use of a nursing home decreases expectations that one's children will provide informal care, consistent with the demonstration effect. Nursing home use by in-laws does not have the same impact, suggesting that individuals are responding to information gained about their own aging trajectory. Nursing home use by either a parent or in-law increases LTCI purchase probability by 0.8 percentage points, with no significant difference in response between parents' and in-laws' use. The estimated increase in purchase probability from experience with LTC is about half the previously estimated increase from tax policy-induced price decreases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-Term Care Insurance: Does Experience Matter?*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Norma B.; Skira, Meghan M.; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold

    2015-01-01

    We examine whether long-term care (LTC) experience helps explain the low demand for long-term care insurance (LTCI). We test if expectations about future informal care receipt, expectations about inheritance receipt, and LTCI purchase decisions vary between individuals whose parents or in-laws have used LTC versus those who have not. We find parental use of a nursing home decreases expectations that one’s children will provide informal care, consistent with the demonstration effect. Nursing home use by in-laws does not have the same impact, suggesting that individuals are responding to information gained about their own aging trajectory. Nursing home use by either a parent or in-law increases LTCI purchase probability by 0.8 percentage points, with no significant difference in response between parents’ and in-laws’ use. The estimated increase in purchase probability from experience with LTC is about half the previously estimated increase from tax policy-induced price decreases. PMID:25647006

  19. Analog Experiments on Tensile Strength of Dusty and Cometary Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiolik, Grzegorz; de Beule, Caroline; Wurm, Gerhard

    2017-11-01

    The tensile strength of small dusty bodies in the solar system is determined by the interaction between the composing grains. In the transition regime between small and sticky dust (μm) and non cohesive large grains (mm), particles still stick to each other but are easily separated. In laboratory experiments we find that thermal creep gas flow at low ambient pressure generates an overpressure sufficient to overcome the tensile strength. For the first time it allows a direct measurement of the tensile strength of individual, very small (sub)-mm aggregates which consist of only tens of grains in the (sub)-mm size range. We traced the disintegration of aggregates by optical imaging in ground based as well as microgravity experiments and present first results for basalt, palagonite and vitreous carbon samples with up to a few hundred Pa. These measurements show that low tensile strength can be the result of building loose aggregates with compact (sub)-mm units. This is in favour of a combined cometary formation scenario by aggregation to compact aggreates and gravitational instability of these units.

  20. DS Mesons in Asymmetric Hot and Dense Hadronic Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakar Pathak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The in-medium properties of DS mesons are investigated within the framework of an effective hadronic model, which is a generalization of a chiral SU(3 model, to SU(4, in order to study the interactions of the charmed hadrons. In the present work, the DS mesons are observed to experience net attractive interactions in a dense hadronic medium, hence reducing the masses of the DS+ and DS- mesons from the vacuum values. While this conclusion holds in both nuclear and hyperonic media, the magnitude of the mass drop is observed to intensify with the inclusion of strangeness in the medium. Additionally, in hyperonic medium, the mass degeneracy of the DS mesons is observed to be broken, due to opposite signs of the Weinberg-Tomozawa interaction term in the Lagrangian density. Along with the magnitude of the mass drops, the mass splitting between DS+ and DS- mesons is also observed to grow with an increase in baryonic density and strangeness content of the medium. However, all medium effects analyzed are found to be weakly dependent on isospin asymmetry and temperature. We discuss the possible implications emanating from this analysis, which are all expected to make a significant difference to observables in heavy ion collision experiments, especially the upcoming Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR, GSI, where matter at high baryonic densities is planned to be produced.

  1. Beauty matters, family matters :: the experience of growing up an African-American girl

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Carolina Campos de Carvalho

    2006-01-01

    The present work focuses on the experience of the African-American girl as she grows up in Toni Morrisons "The Bluest Eye" and Maya Angelous "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings". The books, both published in 1970, portray the lives of young girls as they learn what it is to be black under a solid racist regime that dictates white western society as the norm. The norm includes, necessarily, physical traits that are established as the standards for beauty. African-American girls need to deal with ...

  2. Unified Chiral models of mesons and baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez-Galain, R.; Ripka, G.

    1990-01-01

    Unified Chiral models of mesons and baryons are presented. Emphasis is placed on the underlying quark structure of hadrons including the Skyrmion. The Nambu Jona-Lasinio model with vector mesons is discussed

  3. Current algebra, baryons and quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witten, E.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that ordinary baryons can be understood as solitons in current algebra effective lagrangiangs. The formation of color flux tubes can also be seen in current algebra, under certain conditions. (orig.)

  4. Openness to experience and creativity: When does global citizenship matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidikis, Viktoria; Dunbar, Nora D

    2017-10-04

    The relationship between the openness to experience trait (OTE) and creativity has been well documented in previous research. Likewise, the global citizenship construct has theoretical overlap with both OTE and creativity. We hypothesised global citizenship would make a unique contribution to explaining variance in five types of creativity (self/everyday, scholarly, performance, mechanical/scientific and artistic), above and beyond the contribution of OTE. Participants were predominantly female, European American, traditionally aged college students (N = 407). Global citizenship prosocial outcomes explained unique variance in self/everyday (sr 2  = .10), scholarly (sr 2  = .03) and mechanical/scientific (sr 2  = .03) creativity. Results are discussed in terms of dual processes theories of cognition. © 2017 International Union of Psychological Science.

  5. Hidden photons in beam dump experiments and in connection with dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Sarah

    2012-12-15

    Hidden sectors with light extra U(1) gauge bosons, so-called hidden photons, recently received much interest as natural feature of beyond standard model scenarios like string theory and SUSY and because of their possible connection to dark matter. This paper presents limits on hidden photons from past electron beam dump experiments including two new limits from experiments at KEK and Orsay. Additionally, various hidden sector models containing both a hidden photon and a dark matter candidate are discussed with respect to their viability and potential signatures in direct detection.

  6. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment: Measuring Matter Antimatter Asymmetries at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Parkes, Chris; Gutierrez, J

    2015-01-01

    This document is the student manual for a third year undergraduate laboratory experiment at the University of Manchester. This project aims to measure a fundamental difference between the behaviour of matter and antimatter through the analysis of data collected by the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The three-body dmecays $B^\\pm \\rightarrow h^\\pm h^+ h^-$, where $h^\\pm$ is a $\\pi^\\pm$ or $K^\\pm$ are studied. The inclusive matter antimatter asymmetry is calculated, and larger asymmetries are searched for in localized regions of the phase-space.

  7. Shear viscosity of pionic and nucleonic components from their different possible mesonic and baryonic thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi, E-mail: sabyaphy@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Teorica

    2015-12-15

    Owing to the Kubo relation, the shear viscosities of pionic and nucleonic components have been evaluated from their corresponding retarded correlators of viscous stress tensor in the static limit, which become non-divergent only for the non-zero thermal widths of the constituent particles. In the real-time thermal field theory, the pion and nucleon thermal widths have respectively been obtained from the pion self-energy for different meson, baryon loops, and the nucleon self-energy for different pion-baryon loops. We have found non-monotonic momentum distributions of pion and nucleon thermal widths, which have been integrated out by their respective Bose-enhanced and Pauli-blocked phase space factors during evaluation of their shear viscosities. The viscosity to entropy density ratio for this mixed gas of pion-nucleon system decreases and approaches its lower bound as the temperature and baryon chemical potential increase within the relevant domain of hadronic matter. (author)

  8. Baryon number transfer in hadronic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakelyan, G.H.; Capella, A.; Kaidalov, A.B.; Shabelski, Yu.M.

    2002-01-01

    The process of baryon number transfer due to string junction propagation in rapidity space is analyzed. It has a significant effect on the net baryon production in pp collisions at mid-rapidities and an even larger effect in the forward hemisphere in the cases of πp and γp interactions. The results of numerical calculations in the framework of the quark-gluon string model are in reasonable agreement with the data. (orig.)

  9. Meson and baryon spectroscopy on the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Richards

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress at understanding the excited state spectrum of mesons and baryons is described. I begin by outlining the application of the variational method to compute the spectrum, and the program of anisotropic clover lattice generation designed for hadron spectroscopy. I present results for the excited meson spectrum, with continuum quantum numbers of the states clearly delineated. I conclude with recent results for the low lying baryon spectrum, and the prospects for future calculations.

  10. Physics reach of the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.; Brown, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Bauermeister, B. [Institut für Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F. D.; Balan, C. [Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Arazi, L.; Breskin, A.; Budnik, R. [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Arneodo, F. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L. [Physik-Institut, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Berger, T.; Brown, E. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Bruenner, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G., E-mail: cyril.grignon@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: marco.selvi@bo.infn.it [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Münster (Germany); and others

    2016-04-01

    The XENON1T experiment is currently in the commissioning phase at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy. In this article we study the experiment's expected sensitivity to the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section, based on Monte Carlo predictions of the electronic and nuclear recoil backgrounds. The total electronic recoil background in 1 tonne fiducial volume and (1, 12) keV electronic recoil equivalent energy region, before applying any selection to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils, is (1.80 ± 0.15) · 10{sup −4} (kg·day·keV){sup −1}, mainly due to the decay of {sup 222}Rn daughters inside the xenon target. The nuclear recoil background in the corresponding nuclear recoil equivalent energy region (4, 50) keV, is composed of (0.6 ± 0.1) (t·y){sup −1} from radiogenic neutrons, (1.8 ± 0.3) · 10{sup −2} (t·y){sup −1} from coherent scattering of neutrinos, and less than 0.01 (t·y){sup −1} from muon-induced neutrons. The sensitivity of XENON1T is calculated with the Profile Likelihood Ratio method, after converting the deposited energy of electronic and nuclear recoils into the scintillation and ionization signals seen in the detector. We take into account the systematic uncertainties on the photon and electron emission model, and on the estimation of the backgrounds, treated as nuisance parameters. The main contribution comes from the relative scintillation efficiency L{sub eff}, which affects both the signal from WIMPs and the nuclear recoil backgrounds. After a 2 y measurement in 1 t fiducial volume, the sensitivity reaches a minimum cross section of 1.6 · 10{sup −47} cm{sup 2} at m{sub χ} = 50 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  11. Mattering in the Later Years: Older Adults' Experiences of Mattering to Others, Purpose in Life, Depression, and Wellness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrea L.

    2007-01-01

    The relationships among mattering, purpose in life, depression, and wellness among older adults were explored. Mattering, purpose in life, and depression accounted for 78% of the wellness variance. Older adults perceived that they mattered most to their children and friends. The importance of mattering when counseling older adults is discussed.…

  12. Baryon Budget of the Hot Circumgalactic Medium of Massive Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Bregman, Joel N.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Crain, Robert A.; Anderson, Michael E.

    2018-03-01

    The baryon content around local galaxies is observed to be much less than is needed in Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Simulations indicate that a significant fraction of these “missing baryons” may be stored in a hot tenuous circumgalactic medium (CGM) around massive galaxies extending to or even beyond the virial radius of their dark matter halos. Previous observations in X-ray and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (SZ) signals claimed that ∼(1–50)% of the expected baryons are stored in a hot CGM within the virial radius. The large scatter is mainly caused by the very uncertain extrapolation of the hot gas density profile based on the detection in a small radial range (typically within 10%–20% of the virial radius). Here, we report stacking X-ray observations of six local isolated massive spiral galaxies from the CGM-MASS sample. We find that the mean density profile can be characterized by a single power law out to a galactocentric radius of ≈200 kpc (or ≈130 kpc above the 1σ background uncertainty), about half the virial radius of the dark matter halo. We can now estimate that the hot CGM within the virial radius accounts for (8 ± 4)% of the baryonic mass expected for the halos. Including the stars, the baryon fraction is (27 ± 16)%, or (39 ± 20)% by assuming a flattened density profile at r ≳ 130 kpc. We conclude that the hot baryons within the virial radius of massive galaxy halos are insufficient to explain the “missing baryons.”

  13. Interplay and Characterization of Dark Matter Searches at Colliders and in Direct Detection Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Malik, Sarah A.; Araujo, Henrique; Belyaev, A.; Bœhm, Céline; Brooke, Jim; Buchmueller, Oliver; Davies, Gavin; De Roeck, Albert; de Vries, Kees; Dolan, Matthew J.; Ellis, John; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Flaecher, Henning; Gouskos, Loukas; Khoze, Valentin V.; Landsberg, Greg; Newbold, Dave; Papucci, Michele; Sumner, Timothy; Thomas, Marc; Worm, Steven

    2015-01-01

    In this White Paper we present and discuss a concrete proposal for the consistent interpretation of Dark Matter searches at colliders and in direct detection experiments. Based on a specific implementation of simplified models of vector and axial-vector mediator exchanges, this proposal demonstrates how the two search strategies can be compared on an equal footing.

  14. The Impact of Vocational Teachers on Student Learning in Developing Countries: Does Enterprise Experience Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jamie; Loyalka, Prashant; Chu, James; Song, Yingquan; Yi, Hongmei; Huang, Xiaoting

    2016-01-01

    Although a large number of students around the world attend vocational schools, there is little evidence about what factors matter for learning in these schools. Using data on approximately 1,400 vocational students in one eastern province in China, we employ a student fixed-effects model to identify whether teacher enterprise experience, direct…

  15. Lowering the radioactivity of the photomultiplier tubes for the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Tiseni, A.; Tunnell, C.

    2015-01-01

    The low-background, VUV-sensitive 3-inch diameter photomultiplier tube R11410 has been developed by Hamamatsu for dark matter direct detection experiments using liquid xenon as the target material. We present the results from the joint effort between the XENON collaboration and the Hamamatsu company

  16. Search for doubly charmed baryons and study of charmed strange baryons at Belle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Y.; Iijima, T.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Ban, Y.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Jaegle, I.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. -J.; Lee, S. -H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Niiyama, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Peng, T.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shiu, J. -G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Sohn, Y. -S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. -Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-03-17

    We report results of a study of doubly charmed baryons and charmed strange baryons. The analysis is performed using a 980 fb-1 data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  17. High baryon and energy densities achievable in heavy-ion collisions at √{sN N}=39 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yu. B.; Soldatov, A. A.

    2018-02-01

    Baryon and energy densities, which are reached in central Au+Au collisions at collision energy of √{sN N}= 39 GeV, are estimated within the model of three-fluid dynamics. It is shown that the initial thermalized mean proper baryon and energy densities in a sizable central region approximately are nB/n0≈ 10 and ɛ ≈ 40 GeV/fm3, respectively. The study indicates that the deconfinement transition at the stage of interpenetration of colliding nuclei makes the system quite opaque. The final fragmentation regions in these collisions are formed not only by primordial fragmentation fireballs, i.e., the baryon-rich matter passed through the interaction region (containing approximately 30% of the total baryon charge), but also by the baryon-rich regions of the central fireball pushed out to peripheral rapidities by the subsequent almost one-dimensional expansion of the central fireball along the beam direction.

  18. The PANDA experiment: physics goals and experimental setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boca Gianluigi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available PANDA (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt is an experiment that will run at the GSI laboratory, Darmstadt, Germany, in 2019. A high intensity antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c will collide on a fixed proton target (pellet target or jet target. A wide range of physics topics will be investigated: char- monium states and open charm states above the DD¯$D\\overline D $ threshold; exotic states like glueballs, oddballs, hybrids, multiquarks, molecules; the spectroscopy of the excited states of strange and charm baryons; non-perturbative QCD dynamics in the pp¯$p\\overline p $ production cross section of charm and strange baryons and their spin correlations; the behaviour of hadrons in nuclear matter; hypernuclear physics; electromagnetic proton form factors in the timelike region; the CP violation in the charm sector, rare and forbidden decays of charm baryons and mesons.

  19. The PANDA experiment: physics goals and experimental setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Gianluigi

    2014-05-01

    PANDA (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt) is an experiment that will run at the GSI laboratory, Darmstadt, Germany, in 2019. A high intensity antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c will collide on a fixed proton target (pellet target or jet target). A wide range of physics topics will be investigated: char- monium states and open charm states above the Doverline D threshold; exotic states like glueballs, oddballs, hybrids, multiquarks, molecules; the spectroscopy of the excited states of strange and charm baryons; non-perturbative QCD dynamics in the poverline p production cross section of charm and strange baryons and their spin correlations; the behaviour of hadrons in nuclear matter; hypernuclear physics; electromagnetic proton form factors in the timelike region; the CP violation in the charm sector, rare and forbidden decays of charm baryons and mesons.

  20. Experience-dependent plasticity in white matter microstructure: Reasoning training alters structural connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson P Mackey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI techniques have made it possible to investigate white matter plasticity in humans. Changes in DTI measures, principally increases in fractional anisotropy (FA, have been observed following training programs as diverse as juggling, meditation, and working memory. Here, we sought to test whether three months of reasoning training could alter white matter microstructure. We recruited participants (n=23 who were enrolled in a course to prepare for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT, a test that places strong demands on reasoning skills, as well as age- and IQ-matched controls planning to take the LSAT in the future (n=22. DTI data were collected at two scan sessions scheduled three months apart. In trained participants but not controls, we observed decreases in radial diffusivity (RD in white matter connecting frontal cortices, and in mean diffusivity (MD within frontal and parietal lobe white matter. Further, participants exhibiting larger gains on the LSAT exhibited greater decreases in MD in the right internal capsule. In summary, reasoning training altered multiple measures of white matter structure in young adults. While the cellular underpinnings are unknown, these results provide evidence of experience-dependent white matter changes that may not be limited to myelination.

  1. Dance Experience and Associations with Cortical Gray Matter Thickness in the Aging Population

    OpenAIRE

    Porat, Shai; Goukasian, Naira; Hwang, Kristy S.; Zanto, Theodore; Do, Triet; Pierce, Jonathan; Joshi, Shantanu; Woo, Ellen; Apostolova, Liana G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated the effect dance experience may have on cortical gray matter thickness and cognitive performance in elderly participants with and without mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: 39 cognitively normal and 48 MCI elderly participants completed a questionnaire regarding their lifetime experience with music, dance, and song. Participants identified themselves as either dancers or nondancers. All participants received structural 1.5-tesla MRI scans and detailed clin...

  2. Comments on the SU(4) dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Shuryak, Edward

    2018-01-01

    We discuss possible scale of $SU(4)$ dark matter, in form of neutral baryons. We argue that it is very likely that those would have time to cluster into large "nuclear drops" in which they are Bose-condensed.

  3. Asymmetric dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, David E.; Luty, Markus A.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a simple class of models in which the relic density of dark matter is determined by the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. In these models a B-L asymmetry generated at high temperatures is transferred to the dark matter, which is charged under B-L. The interactions that transfer the asymmetry decouple at temperatures above the dark matter mass, freezing in a dark matter asymmetry of order the baryon asymmetry. This explains the observed relation between the baryon and dark matter densities for the dark matter mass in the range 5-15 GeV. The symmetric component of the dark matter can annihilate efficiently to light pseudoscalar Higgs particles a or via t-channel exchange of new scalar doublets. The first possibility allows for h 0 →aa decays, while the second predicts a light charged Higgs-like scalar decaying to τν. Direct detection can arise from Higgs exchange in the first model or a nonzero magnetic moment in the second. In supersymmetric models, the would-be lightest supersymmetric partner can decay into pairs of dark matter particles plus standard model particles, possibly with displaced vertices.

  4. Subhalo demographics in the Illustris simulation: effects of baryons and halo-to-halo variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Kun Ting Eddie; Pillepich, Annalisa; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Vogelsberger, Mark; Bird, Simeon; Hernquist, Lars

    2017-12-01

    We study the abundance of subhaloes in the hydrodynamical cosmological simulation Illustris, which includes both baryons and dark matter in a cold dark matter volume 106.5 Mpc a side. We compare Illustris to its dark-matter only (DMO) analogue, Illustris-Dark and quantify the effects of baryonic processes on the demographics of subhaloes in the host mass range 1011-3 × 1014 M⊙. We focus on both the evolved (z = 0) subhalo cumulative mass functions (SHMF) and the statistics of subhaloes ever accreted, i.e. infall SHMF. We quantify the variance in subhalo abundance at fixed host mass and investigate the physical reasons responsible for such scatter. We find that in Illustris, baryonic physics impacts both the infall and z = 0 subhalo abundance by tilting the DMO function and suppressing the abundance of low-mass subhaloes. The breaking of self-similarity in the subhalo abundance at z = 0 is enhanced by the inclusion of baryonic physics. The non-monotonic alteration of the evolved subhalo abundances can be explained by the modification of the concentration-mass relation of Illustris hosts compared to Illustris-Dark. Interestingly, the baryonic implementation in Illustris does not lead to an increase in the halo-to-halo variation compared to Illustris-Dark. In both cases, the normalized intrinsic scatter today is larger for Milky Way-like haloes than for cluster-sized objects. For Milky Way-like haloes, it increases from about eight per cent at infall to about 25 per cent at the current epoch. In both runs, haloes of fixed mass formed later host more subhaloes than early formers.

  5. 21-cm Fluctuations from Charged Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, Julian B.; Dvorkin, Cora; Loeb, Abraham

    2018-01-01

    The epoch of the formation of the first stars, known as the cosmic dawn, has emerged as a new arena in the search for dark matter. In particular, the first claimed 21-cm detection exhibits a deeper global absorption feature than expected, which could be caused by a low baryonic temperature. This has been interpreted as a sign for electromagnetic interactions between baryons and dark matter. However, in order to remain consistent with the rest of cosmological observations, only part of the dar...

  6. Gas-Rich Mergers in LCDM: Disk Survivability and the Baryonic Assembly of Galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, K.

    2009-01-01

    We use N-body simulations and observationally-normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z ∼ 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M > 0.3) experienced by Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshift. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed late-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M DM ∼ 10 11 - 10 13 M · . These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Secondly, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is substantial. Approximately 30% of the cold baryonic material in M star ∼ 10 10 M · (M DM ∼ 10 11.5 M · ) galaxies is accreted as cold gas in major mergers. For more massive galaxies with M star ∼ 10 11 M · (M DM ∼ 10 13 M · the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers is even higher, ∼ 50%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass deposition is almost unavoidable, and provides a limit on the fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons that can originate in cold flows or from hot halo cooling

  7. Gas-Rich Mergers in LCDM: Disk Survivability and the Baryonic Assembly of Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Maller, Ariyeh H.; /New York City Coll. Tech.

    2009-08-03

    We use N-body simulations and observationally-normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M > 0.3) experienced by Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshift. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed late-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Secondly, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is substantial. Approximately 30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas in major mergers. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers is even higher, {approx} 50%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass deposition is almost unavoidable, and provides a

  8. Direct dark matter search with the CRESST-III experiment - status and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willers, M.; Angloher, G.; Bento, A.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Defay, X.; Erb, A.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Ferreiro Iachellini, N.; Gütlein, A.; Gorla, P.; Hauff, D.; Jochum, J.; Kiefer, M.; Kluck, H.; Kraus, H.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Loebell, J.; Mancuso, M.; Münster, A.; Pagliarone, C.; Petricca, F.; Potzel, W.; Pröbst, F.; Puig, R.; Reindl, F.; Schäffner, K.; Schieck, J.; Schönert, S.; Seidel, W.; Stahlberg, M.; Stodolsky, L.; Strandhagen, C.; Strauss, R.; Tanzke, A.; Trinh Thi, H. H.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Uffinger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Usherov, I.; Wawoczny, S.; Wüstrich, M.; Zöller, A.

    2017-09-01

    The CRESST-III experiment, located in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS, Italy), aims at the direct detection of dark matter (DM) particles. Scintillating CaWO4 crystals operated as cryogenic detectors are used as target material for DM-nucleus scattering. The simultaneous measurement of the phonon signal from the CaWO4 crystal and of the emitted scintillation light in a separate cryogenic light detector is used to discriminate backgrounds from a possible dark matter signal. The experiment aims to significantly improve the sensitivity for low-mass (≲ 5-10 GeV/c2) DM particles by using optimized detector modules with a nuclear recoil-energy threshold ≲ 100 eV. The current status of the experiment as well as projections of the sensitivity for spin-independent DM-nucleon scattering will be presented.

  9. Superconducting dipole magnet for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurilkin P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific goal of the CBM (Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR (Darmstadt is to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest baryon densities. The physics program of the CBM experiment is complimentary to the programs to be realized at MPD and BMN facilities at NICA and will start with beam derived by the SIS100 synchrotron. The 5.15 MJ superconducting dipole magnet will be used in the silicon tracking system of the CBM detector. The magnet will provide a magnetic field integral of 1 Tm which is required to obtain a momentum resolution of 1% for the track reconstruction. The results of the development of dipole magnet of the CBM experiment are presented.

  10. Action Video Game Experience Related to Altered Large-Scale White Matter Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Diankun; Ma, Weiyi; Gong, Jinnan; He, Hui; Dong, Li; Zhang, Dan; Li, Jianfu; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-01-01

    With action video games (AVGs) becoming increasingly popular worldwide, the cognitive benefits of AVG experience have attracted continuous research attention over the past two decades. Research has repeatedly shown that AVG experience can causally enhance cognitive ability and is related to neural plasticity in gray matter and functional networks in the brain. However, the relation between AVG experience and the plasticity of white matter (WM) network still remains unclear. WM network modulates the distribution of action potentials, coordinating the communication between brain regions and acting as the framework of neural networks. And various types of cognitive deficits are usually accompanied by impairments of WM networks. Thus, understanding this relation is essential in assessing the influence of AVG experience on neural plasticity and using AVG experience as an interventional tool for impairments of WM networks. Using graph theory, this study analyzed WM networks in AVG experts and amateurs. Results showed that AVG experience is related to altered WM networks in prefrontal networks, limbic system, and sensorimotor networks, which are related to cognitive control and sensorimotor functions. These results shed new light on the influence of AVG experience on the plasticity of WM networks and suggested the clinical applicability of AVG experience.

  11. Action Video Game Experience Related to Altered Large-Scale White Matter Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diankun Gong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With action video games (AVGs becoming increasingly popular worldwide, the cognitive benefits of AVG experience have attracted continuous research attention over the past two decades. Research has repeatedly shown that AVG experience can causally enhance cognitive ability and is related to neural plasticity in gray matter and functional networks in the brain. However, the relation between AVG experience and the plasticity of white matter (WM network still remains unclear. WM network modulates the distribution of action potentials, coordinating the communication between brain regions and acting as the framework of neural networks. And various types of cognitive deficits are usually accompanied by impairments of WM networks. Thus, understanding this relation is essential in assessing the influence of AVG experience on neural plasticity and using AVG experience as an interventional tool for impairments of WM networks. Using graph theory, this study analyzed WM networks in AVG experts and amateurs. Results showed that AVG experience is related to altered WM networks in prefrontal networks, limbic system, and sensorimotor networks, which are related to cognitive control and sensorimotor functions. These results shed new light on the influence of AVG experience on the plasticity of WM networks and suggested the clinical applicability of AVG experience.

  12. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  13. Phenomenological aspects of theories for baryon and lepton number violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerr, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The renormalizable couplings of the Standard Model are invariant under two accidental global symmetries, which correspond to conserved baryon and lepton numbers. In this thesis, we discuss possible roles of these symmetries in extension of the Standard Model. Two approaches are considered: explicit violation of lepton number by two units in the renormalizable couplings of the Lagrangian, and promotion of the global symmetries to local gauge symmetries that are spontaneously broken. The former approach directly leads to Majorana neutrino masses and neutrinoless double beta decay. We discuss the interplay of the contributions to this decay in a one-loop neutrino mass model, the colored seesaw mechanism. We find that, depending on the parameters of the model, both the light Majorana neutrino exchange and the contribution of the new colored particles may be dominant. Additionally, an experimental test is presented, which allows for a discrimination of neutrinoless double beta decay from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope. In the latter approach, fascinating implications originate from the attempt to write down an anomaly-free and spontaneously broken gauge theory for baryon and lepton numbers, such as an automatically stable dark matter candidate. When gauging the symmetries in a left-right symmetric setup, the same fields that allow for an anomaly-free theory generate neutrino masses via the type III seesaw mechanism.

  14. THE BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF SDSS-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, Kyle S.; Ahn, Christopher P.; Bolton, Adam S.; Schlegel, David J.; Bailey, Stephen; Anderson, Scott F.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Borde, Arnaud; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, W. N.

    2013-01-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) is designed to measure the scale of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the clustering of matter over a larger volume than the combined efforts of all previous spectroscopic surveys of large-scale structure. BOSS uses 1.5 million luminous galaxies as faint as i = 19.9 over 10,000 deg 2 to measure BAO to redshifts z A to an accuracy of 1.0% at redshifts z = 0.3 and z = 0.57 and measurements of H(z) to 1.8% and 1.7% at the same redshifts. Forecasts for Lyα forest constraints predict a measurement of an overall dilation factor that scales the highly degenerate D A (z) and H –1 (z) parameters to an accuracy of 1.9% at z ∼ 2.5 when the survey is complete. Here, we provide an overview of the selection of spectroscopic targets, planning of observations, and analysis of data and data quality of BOSS.

  15. Influence of baryonic physics in simulations of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halle, A.

    2013-01-01

    The modelling of baryonic physics in numerical simulations of disc galaxies allows us to study the evolution of the different components, the physical state of the gas and the star formation. The present work aims at investigating in particular the role of the cold and dense molecular phase, which could play a role of gas reservoir in the outer galaxy discs, with low star formation efficiency. After a presentation of galaxies with a focus on spiral galaxies, their interstellar medium and dynamical evolution, we review the current state of hydrodynamical numerical simulations and the implementation of baryonic physics. We then present the simulations we performed. These include the cooling to low temperatures, and a molecular hydrogen component. The cooling functions we use include cooling by metals, for temperatures as low as 100 K, and cooling by H 2 due to collisions with H, He and other H 2 molecules. We use a TreeSPH type code that considers the stellar and gaseous components and black matter as particles. We especially test the impact of the presence of molecular hydrogen in simulations with several feedback efficiencies, and find that the molecular hydrogen allows in all cases some slow stellar formation to occur in the outer disc, with an effect on the vertical structure of the disc that is sensitive to the feedback efficiency. Molecular hydrogen is therefore able to play the role of gas reservoir in external parts of spiral galaxies, which accrete gas from cosmic filaments all along their lives

  16. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, Jonathan A.; McEwen, Joseph E.; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2016-03-01

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ˜5 ) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  17. Getting the astrophysics and particle physics of dark matter out of next-generation direct detection experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, Annika H. G.

    2010-01-01

    The next decade will bring massive new data sets from experiments of the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter. Mapping the data sets to the particle-physics properties of dark matter is complicated not only by the considerable uncertainties in the dark-matter model, but by its poorly constrained local distribution function (the 'astrophysics' of dark matter). I propose a shift in how to think about direct-detection data analysis. I show that by treating the astrophysical and particle-physics uncertainties of dark matter on equal footing, and by incorporating a combination of data sets into the analysis, one may recover both the particle physics and astrophysics of dark matter. Not only does such an approach yield more accurate estimates of dark-matter properties, but it may illuminate how dark matter coevolves with galaxies.

  18. Baryons in the relativistic jets of the stellar-mass black-hole candidate 4U 1630-47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, María Díaz; Miller-Jones, James C A; Migliari, Simone; Broderick, Jess W; Tzioumis, Tasso

    2013-12-12

    Accreting black holes are known to power relativistic jets, both in stellar-mass binary systems and at the centres of galaxies. The power carried away by the jets, and, hence, the feedback they provide to their surroundings, depends strongly on their composition. Jets containing a baryonic component should carry significantly more energy than electron-positron jets. Energetic considerations and circular-polarization measurements have provided conflicting circumstantial evidence for the presence or absence of baryons in jets, and the only system in which they have been unequivocally detected is the peculiar X-ray binary SS 433 (refs 4, 5). Here we report the detection of Doppler-shifted X-ray emission lines from a more typical black-hole candidate X-ray binary, 4U 1630-47, coincident with the reappearance of radio emission from the jets of the source. We argue that these lines arise from baryonic matter in a jet travelling at approximately two-thirds the speed of light, thereby establishing the presence of baryons in the jet. Such baryonic jets are more likely to be powered by the accretion disk than by the spin of the black hole, and if the baryons can be accelerated to relativistic speeds, the jets should be strong sources of γ-rays and neutrino emission.

  19. Novel baryon resonances in the Skyrme model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, F.; Sri Ram, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    We predict a novel family of baryons with or without the charm quantum number by quantizing the ''maximal solitons'' in the SU(4) Skyrme model. The baryon number B of these solitons can take any integer value. The low-lying states with B = 1 belong to 4( with spin (3/2), 20( with spin (1/2), (3/2), (5/2), or (7/2), and 20('' with spin (3/2), (5/2), or (9/2). The charm-zero states among them could correspond to some of the observed resonances in meson-baryon scattering between 1.5--2 GeV. The lowest among the dibaryon states is an SU(3) singlet contained in the 10( of SU(4) with spin 1, with mass in the range 2.5--3 GeV

  20. Weak form factors of beauty baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, M.A.; Lyubovitskij, V.E.

    1992-01-01

    Full analysis of semileptonic decays of beauty baryons with J p =1/2 2 and J p =3/2 2 into charmed ones within the Quark Confinement Model is reported. Weak form factors and decay rates are calculated. Also the heavy quark limit m Q →∞ (Isgur-Wise symmetry) is examined. The weak heavy-baryon form factors in the Isgur-Wise limit and 1/m Q -corrections to them are computered. The Ademollo-Gatto theorem is spin-flavour symmetry of heavy quarks is checked. 33 refs.; 1 fig.; 9 tabs

  1. Baryon symmetric big-bang cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stecker, F.W.

    1978-04-01

    The framework of baryon-symmetric big-bang cosmology offers the greatest potential for deducing the evolution of the universe as a consequence of physical laws and processes with the minimum number of arbitrary assumptions as to initial conditions in the big-bang. In addition, it offers the possibility of explaining the photon-baryon ratio in the universe and how galaxies and galaxy clusters are formed, and also provides the only acceptable explanation at present for the origin of the cosmic gamma ray background radiation.

  2. Baryon symmetric big-bang cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecker, F.W.

    1978-04-01

    The framework of baryon-symmetric big-bang cosmology offers the greatest potential for deducing the evolution of the universe as a consequence of physical laws and processes with the minimum number of arbitrary assumptions as to initial conditions in the big-bang. In addition, it offers the possibility of explaining the photon-baryon ratio in the universe and how galaxies and galaxy clusters are formed, and also provides the only acceptable explanation at present for the origin of the cosmic gamma ray background radiation

  3. Preliminary Evidence for the Impact of Combat Experiences on Gray Matter Volume of the Posterior Insula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley N. Clausen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Combat-exposed veteran populations are at an increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and insula have been implicated in both autonomic arousal to emotional stressors and homeostatic processes, which may contribute to cardiovascular dysfunction in combat veteran populations. The aim of the present study was to explore the intersecting relationships of combat experiences, rostral ACC and posterior insula volume, and cardiovascular health in a sample of combat veterans.Method: Twenty-four male combat veterans completed clinical assessment of combat experiences and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Subjects completed a magnetic resonance imaging scan and autosegmentation using FreeSurfer was used to estimate regional gray matter volume (controlling for total gray matter volume of the rostral ACC and posterior insula. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD was conducted to assess cardiovascular health. Theil-sen robust regressions and Welch's analysis of variance were used to examine relationships of combat experiences and PTSD symptomology with (1 FMD and (2 regional gray matter volume.Results: Increased combat experiences, deployment duration, and multiple deployments were related to smaller posterior insula volume. Combat experiences were marginally associated with poorer cardiovascular health. However, cardiovascular health was not related to rostral ACC or posterior insula volume.Conclusion: The present study provides initial evidence for the relationships of combat experiences, deployment duration, and multiple deployments with smaller posterior insula volume. Results may suggest that veterans with increased combat experiences may exhibit more dysfunction regulating the autonomic nervous system, a key function of the posterior insula. However, the relationship between combat and cardiovascular health was not mediated by regional brain volume. Future research is warranted to further clarify the

  4. Strange and non-strange baryon and antibaryon production in sulphur-tungsten and sulphur-sulphur interactions at 200 A Gev/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holme, A.K.

    1995-11-01

    The author has studied production of strange and multistrange baryons and antibaryons in central sulphur-tungsten, sulphur-sulphur, and lead-lead interactions at relativistic energies. The spectra of strange baryons and antibaryons provide information about the dynamics of hadronic matter under the extreme conditions realised in these collisions. The particle ratios allow the degree and the nature of the flavour equilibrium to be studied, while the transverse mass distributions provide independent information of the temperatures achieved. 143 refs.

  5. Strange and non-strange baryon and antibaryon production in sulphur-tungsten and sulphur-sulphur interactions at 200 A Gev/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holme, A.K.

    1995-11-01

    The author has studied production of strange and multistrange baryons and antibaryons in central sulphur-tungsten, sulphur-sulphur, and lead-lead interactions at relativistic energies. The spectra of strange baryons and antibaryons provide information about the dynamics of hadronic matter under the extreme conditions realised in these collisions. The particle ratios allow the degree and the nature of the flavour equilibrium to be studied, while the transverse mass distributions provide independent information of the temperatures achieved. 143 refs

  6. Time-Sliced Perturbation Theory II: Baryon Acoustic Oscillations and Infrared Resummation

    CERN Document Server

    Blas, Diego; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We use time-sliced perturbation theory (TSPT) to give an accurate description of the infrared non-linear effects affecting the baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) present in the distribution of matter at very large scales. In TSPT this can be done via a systematic resummation that has a simple diagrammatic representation and does not involve uncontrollable approximations. We discuss the power counting rules and derive explicit expressions for the resummed matter power spectrum up to next-to leading order and the bispectrum at the leading order. The two-point correlation function agrees well with N-body data at BAO scales. The systematic approach also allows to reliably assess the shift of the baryon acoustic peak due to non-linear effects.

  7. Heavy baryon transitions in a relativistic three-quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, M.A.; Lyubovitskij, V.E.; Koerner, J.G.; Kroll, P.

    1997-01-01

    Exclusive semileptonic decays of bottom and charm baryons are considered within a relativistic three-quark model with a Gaussian shape for the baryon-three-quark vertex and standard quark propagators. We calculate the baryonic Isgur-Wise functions, decay rates, and asymmetry parameters. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  8. Semileptonic heavy-to-light decays of baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, G.V.; Ivanov, M.A.; Lyubovitskij, V.E.

    1992-01-01

    The results about semileptonic decays of baryons with only heavy quark into light baryons are reported. These processes are considered in the framework of the quark confinement model. Weak form factors, decay rates and differential distributions of semileptonic heavy-to-light baryon decays are calculated. The limit m Q →∞ is examined. 23 refs.; 14 figs.; 1 tab

  9. Search for GeV-Scale Sterile Neutrinos Responsible for Active Neutrino Oscillations and Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Gninenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard Model fails to explain neutrino oscillations, dark matter, and baryon asymmetry of the Universe. All these problems can be solved with three sterile neutrinos added to SM. Quite remarkably, if sterile neutrino masses are well below the electroweak scale, this modification—Neutrino Minimal Standard Model (νMSM—can be tested experimentally. We discuss a new experiment on search for decays of GeV-scale sterile neutrinos, which are responsible for the matter-antimatter asymmetry generation and for the active neutrino masses. If lighter than 2 GeV, these particles can be produced in decays of charm mesons generated by high energy protons in a target, and subsequently decay into SM particles. To fully explore this sector of νMSM, the new experiment requires data obtained with at least 1020 incident protons on target (achievable at CERN SPS in future and a big volume detector constructed from a large amount of identical single modules, with a total sterile neutrino decay length of few kilometers. The preliminary feasibility study for the proposed experiment shows that it has sensitivity which may either lead to the discovery of new particles below the Fermi scale—right-handed partners of neutrinos—or rule out seesaw sterile neutrinos with masses below 2 GeV.

  10. The DarkSide-50 Experiment: a Liquid Argon Target for Dark Matter Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnes, P.; et al.

    2017-01-01

    The DarkSide-50 experiment, located at the “Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (INFN)”, is based on low-radioactivity argon double phase time projection chamber, surrounded by an active liquid scintillator veto, designed for the zero background achievement. The liquid argon features sufficient self shielding and easy scalability to multi-tons scale. The impressive reduction of the 39Ar isotope (compared to the atmospheric argon), along with the excellent pulse shape discrimination, make this technology a possible candidate for the forthcoming generation of multi-ton Dark Matter experiments.

  11. Another baryon miracle? Testing solutions to the `missing dwarfs' problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Schneider, Aurel; Papastergis, Emmanouil; Reed, Darren S.; Lake, George

    2018-04-01

    The dearth of dwarf galaxies in the local Universe is hard to reconcile with the large number of low-mass haloes expected within the concordance Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) paradigm. In this paper, we perform a systematic evaluation of the uncertainties affecting the measurement of dark matter halo abundance using galaxy kinematics. Using a large sample of dwarf galaxies with spatially resolved kinematics, we derive a correction to obtain the abundance of galaxies as a function of maximum circular velocity - a direct probe of halo mass - from the line-of-sight velocity function in the Local Volume. This method provides a direct means of comparing the predictions of theoretical models and simulations (including non-standard cosmologies and novel galaxy formation physics) to the observational constraints. The new `galactic Vmax' function is steeper than the line-of-sight velocity function but still shallower than the theoretical CDM expectation, implying that unaccounted baryonic physics may be necessary to reduce the predicted abundance of galaxies. Using the galactic Vmax function, we investigate the theoretical effects of feedback-powered outflows and photoevaporation of gas due to reionization. At the 3σ confidence level, we find that feedback and reionization are not effective enough to reconcile the disagreement. In the case of maximum baryonic effects, the theoretical prediction still deviates significantly from the observations for Vmax < 60 km s-1. CDM predicts at least 1.8 times more galaxies with Vmax = 50 km s-1 and 2.5 times more than observed at 30 km s-1. Recent hydrodynamic simulations seem to resolve the discrepancy but disagree with the properties of observed galaxies with spatially resolved kinematics. This abundance problem might point to the need to modify cosmological predictions at small scales.

  12. Heavy flavor baryons in hypercentral model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Heavy flavor baryons containing single and double charm (beauty) quarks with light flavor combinations are studied using the hypercentral description of the three- body problem. The confinement potential is assumed as hypercentral Coulomb plus power potential with power index ν. The ground state masses of ...

  13. Electromagnetic baryon form factors from holographic QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keun-Young; Zahed, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    In the holographic model of QCD suggested by Sakai and Sugimoto, baryons are chiral solitons sourced by D4 instantons in bulk of size 1/(λ) 1/2 with λ = g 2 N c . We quantize the D4 instanton semiclassically using h-bar = 1/(N c λ) and non-rigid constraints on the vector mesons. The holographic baryon is a small chiral bag in the holographic direction with a Cheshire cat smile. The vector-baryon interactions occur at the core boundary of the instanton in D4. They are strong and of order 1/( h-bar ) 1/2 . To order h-bar 0 the electromagnetic current is entirely encoded on the core boundary and vector-meson dominated. To this order, the electromagnetic charge radius is of order λ 0 . The meson contribution to the baryon magnetic moments sums identically to the core contribution. The proton and neutron magnetic moment are tied by a model independent relation similar to the one observed in the Skyrme model.

  14. Baryons as non-topological chiral solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Chr. V.; Blotz, A.; Kim, H.-C.; Pobylitsa, P.; Watabe, T.; Meissner, Th.; Ruiz Arriola, E.; Goeke, K.

    The present review gives a survey of recent developments and applications of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with Nf = 2 and Nf = 3 quark flavors for the structure of baryons. The model is an effective chiral quark theory which incorporates the SU(N f) L⊗SU(N f) R⊗U(1) V approximate symmetry of Quantum chromodynamics. The approach describes the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and dynamical quark mass generation. Mesons appear as quark-antiquark excitations and baryons arise as non-topological solitons with three valence quarks and a polarized Dirac sea. For the evaluation of the baryon properties the present review concentrates on the non-linear Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with quark and Goldstone degrees of freedom which is identical to the Chiral quark soliton model obtained from the instanton liquid model of the QCD vacuum. In this non-linear model, a wide variety of observables of baryons of the octet and decuplet is considered. These include, in particular, electromagnetic, axial, pseudoscalar and pion nucleon form factors and the related static properties like magnetic moments, radii and coupling constants of the nucleon as well as the mass splittings and electromagnetic form factors of hyperons. Predictions are given for the strange form factors, the scalar form factor and the tensor charge of the nucleon.

  15. CP asymmetries in Strange Baryon Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, I. I.; Kang, Xian-Wei; Li, Hai-Bo

    2018-01-01

    While indirect and direct CP violation (CPV) has been established in the decays of strange and beauty mesons, no CPV has yet been found for baryons. There are different paths to finding CP asymmetry in the decays of strange baryons; they are all highly non-trivial. The HyperCP Collaboration has probed CPV in the decays of single Ξ and Λ [1]. We discuss future lessons from {{{e}}}+{{{e}}}- collisions at BESIII/BEPCII: probing decays of pairs of strange baryons, namely Λ, Σ and Ξ. Realistic goals are to learn about non-perturbative QCD. One can hope to find CPV in the decays of strange baryons; one can also dream of finding the impact of New Dynamics. We point out that an important new era will start with the BESIII/BEPCII data accumulated by the end of 2018. This also supports new ideas to trigger {{J}}/{{\\psi }}\\to \\bar{{{Λ }}}{{Λ }} at the LHCb collaboration. Supported by National Science Foundation (PHY-1520966), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11335009, 11125525), Joint Large-Scale Scientific Facility Funds of the NSFC and CAS (U1532257), the National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences, CAS, (QYZDJ-SSW-SLH003), XWK’s work is also supported by MOST (Taiwan) (104-2112-M-001-022)

  16. Heavy flavor baryons in hypercentral model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heavy flavor baryons containing single and double charm (beauty) quarks with light flavor combinations are studied using the hypercentral description of the three-body problem. The confinement potential is assumed as hypercentral Coulomb plus power potential with power index . The ground state masses of the heavy ...

  17. Heavy flavor baryons in hypercentral model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    predicted masses are found to attain a saturated value in each case of quark combinations beyond the power index ν = 1.0. Keywords. Hypercentral constituent quark model; charmed and beauty baryons; hyper-. Coulomb plus power potential. PACS Nos 12.39.Jh; 12.39.pn; 14.20.kp. 1. Introduction. Recent experimental ...

  18. Baryons in the unquenched quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijker, R.; Díaz-Gómez, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-543, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico); Lopez-Ruiz, M. A. [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Santopinto, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Italy (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    In this contribution, we present the unquenched quark model as an extension of the constituent quark model that includes the effects of sea quarks via a {sup 3}P{sub 0} quark-antiquark pair-creation mechanism. Particular attention is paid to the spin and flavor content of the proton, magnetic moments and β decays of octet baryons.

  19. Large N baryons, strong coupling theory, quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakita, B.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that in QCD the large N limit is the same as the static strong coupling limit. By using the static strong coupling techniques some of the results of large N baryons are derived. The results are consistent with the large N SU(6) static quark model. (author)

  20. Multi-strange baryon production in Pb-Pb and pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV with the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Colella, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    The production of $\\Xi^{-}$ and $\\Omega^{-}$ baryons and their anti-particles in Pb-Pb and pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV has been measured by the ALICE collaboration. The transverse momentum spectra at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.5) in pp and Pb-Pb collisions for five centrality intervals have been compared with model predictions. Hyperon yields and spectra in Pb-Pb collisions, normalized to the corresponding measurements in pp at the same centre-of-mass energy, allow the study of the strangeness enhancement and the nuclear modification factor as a function of the transverse momentum ($p_{T}$) and collision centrality.

  1. Semileptonic *DELTA*S=1 decays of baryons with boosted bags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eeg, J.O.; Lie-Svendsen, Oe.

    1984-03-01

    Recoil effects for strangeness-changing semileptonic decays of baryons by means of boosted quark mode solutions of the MIT bag model is calculated. Both the quark and the psevdoscalar part of the axial current is considered. It is shown that the induced scalar form factor f*sb3* and the ''weak electric'' form factor g*sb2* are proportional to the mass difference of the final and initial baryon. Moreover, it is shown that the quark wave function mismatch, which decreases the conventional vector form factor f*sb1*, can be compensated by recoil effects. Thus a better agreement with experiment seems to be achieved. (Auth.)

  2. $\\Sigma$-antihyperon correlations in $Z^{0}$ decay and investigation of the baryon production mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, R J; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, S; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, M; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, K; Dienes, B; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, J; Gruwé, M; Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenesa, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Krämer, T; Krasznahorkay, A Jr; Krieger, P; von Krogh, J; Kuhl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lu, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycién, M; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan, E K G; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spano, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vértesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, J; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2009-01-01

    Data collected around sqrt{s}=91 GeV by the OPAL experiment at the LEP e+e- collider are used to study the mechanism of baryon formation. As the signature, the fraction of Sigma-hyperons whose baryon number is compensated by the production of a Sigma-, Lambda or Xi- antihyperon is determined. The method relies entirely on quantum number correlations of the baryons, and not rapidity correlations, making it more model independent than previous studies. The diquark fragmentation model without the popcorn mechanism is strongly disfavored with a significance of 3.8 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. It is shown that previous studies of the popcorn mechanism are not conclusive if parameter uncertainties are considered.

  3. Status of the CBM experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuser Johann M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experiment at the Facility for Anti-Proton and Ion Research (FAIR will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest net baryon densities and moderate temperatures. The CBM physics program will be started with beams delivered by the SIS 100 synchrotron, providing energies from 2 to 11 GeV/nucleon for heavy nuclei, up to 14 GeV/nucleon for light nuclei, and 29 GeV for protons. The highest net baryon densities will be explored with ion beams up to 45 GeV/nucleon energy delivered by SIS 300 in the next stage of FAIR. Collision rates up to 107 per second are required to produce very rare probes with unprecedented statistics in this energy range. Their signatures are complex. These conditions call for detector systems designed to meet the extreme requirements in terms of rate capability, momentum and spatial resolution, and a novel DAQ and trigger concept which is not limited by latency but by throughput. The article discusses the development status of the CBM sub-systems for charged particle tracking, vertex detection, electron/muon identification, hadron/time-of-flight measurement, electromagnetic and zero-degree calorimetry, in terms of prototypes and expected physics performance. The concept and development status of CBM’s central detector, the Silicon Tracking System STS are presented in somewhat more detail.

  4. Current Status of the dark matter experiment DarkSide-50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, L.; Pagani, Ioanna; Agnes, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Arisaka, K.; Back, Henning O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; D' Angelo, D.; D' Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Deo, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, Giuseppe; Edkins, E.; Empl, Anton; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M. Y.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B.; Herner, K.; Humble, Paul H.; Hungerford, Edward; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C.; Kidner, S.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kurlej, A.; Li, P. X.; Lombardi, P.; Love, C.; Ludhova, L.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y. Q.; Machulin, I.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meroni, E.; Meyers, P. D.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B.; Muratova, V.; Musico, P.; Nelson, A.; Odrowski, S.; Okounkova, M.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, Marco; Pantic, E.; Papp, L.; Parmeggiano, S.; Parsells, R.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D.; Shields, E.; Skorokhvatov, Mikhail; Smirnov, Oleg; Sotnikov, Albert; Stanford, Chris; Suvorov, Yura; Tartaglia, Roberto; Tatarowicz, John; Testera, Gemma; Tonazzo, Alessandra; Unzhakov, Eugenii; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wada, Masayuki; Walker, Susan E.; Wang, H.; Wang, Yanan; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Xiang, Xin; Xu, Jingke; Yang, C. G.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zec, Adam; Zhu, Chengliang; Zuzel, G.

    2016-07-12

    DarkSide-50 is a dark matter direct search experiment at LNGS, searching for rare nuclear recoils possibly induced by WIMPs. It has two nested vetoes and a dual phase liquid argon TPC as dark matter detector. Key features of this experiment are the use of underground argon as radio-pure target and of muon and neutron active vetoes to suppress the background. The first data-taking campaign was running from November 2013 to April 2015 with an atmospheric argon target and a reduced efficiency neutron veto due to internal contamination. However, an upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon cross section of 6.1×10−44 cm2 at 90% CL was obtained for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2 and an exposure of (1422 ± 67) kg·d. At present DarkSide-50 started a 3 years run, intended to be background-free because the neutron veto was successfully recovered and underground argon replaced the atmospheric one. Additionally calibration campaigns for both the TPC and the neutron veto were completed. Thanks to the good performance of the background rejection, the results obtained so far suggest the scalability of DarkSide-50 to a ton-scale detector, which will play a key role into the dark matter search scenario.

  5. Proposal for an Experiment to Search for Light Dark Matter at the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Gninenko, Sergei

    2013-01-01

    Several models of dark matter suggest the existence of dark sectors consisting of $SU(3)_C \\times SU(2)_L \\times U(1)_Y$ singlet fields. These sectors of particles do not interact with the ordinary matter directly but could couple to it via gravity. In addition to gravity, there might be another very weak interaction between the ordinary and dark matter mediated by $U'(1)$ gauge bosons $A'$ (dark photons) mixing with our photons. In a class of models the corresponding dark gauge bosons could be light and have the $\\g - A'$ coupling strength laying in the experimentally accessible and theoretically interesting region. If such $A'$ mediators exist, their di-electron decays $\\aee$ could be searched for in a light-shining-through-a-wall experiment looking for an excess of events with the two-shower signature generated by a single high energy electron in the detector. A proposal to perform such an experiment aiming to probe the still unexplored area of the mixing strength $10^{-5}\\lesssim \\epsilon \\les...

  6. Baryon Number Transfer Could Delay Quark–Hadron Transition in Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio A. Bonometto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the early Universe, strongly interacting matter was a quark–gluon plasma. Both lattice computations and heavy ion collision experiments, however, tell us that, in the absence of chemical potentials, no plasma survives at T < ∼ 150 MeV. The cosmological Quark–Hadron transition, however, seems to have been a crossover; cosmological consequences envisaged when it was believed to be a phase transition no longer hold. In this paper, we discuss whether even a crossover transition can leave an imprint that cosmological observations can seek or, vice versa, if there are questions cosmology should address to QCD specialists. In particular, we argue that it is still unclear how baryons (not hadrons could form at the cosmological transition. A critical role should be played by diquark states, whose abundance in the early plasma needs to be accurately evaluated. We estimate that, if the number of quarks belonging to a diquark state, at the beginning of the cosmological transition, is < ∼ 1 : 10 6 , its dynamics could be modified by the process of B-transfer from plasma to hadrons. In turn, by assuming B-transfer to cause just mild perturbations and, in particular, no entropy input, we study the deviations from the tracking regime, in the frame of SCDEW models. We find that, in some cases, residual deviations could propagate down to primeval nuclesynthesis.

  7. Quark matter or new particles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

  8. Black Holes as Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Frampton, Paul H.

    2009-01-01

    While the energy of the universe has been established to be about 0.04 baryons, 0.24 dark matter and 0.72 dark energy, the cosmological entropy is almost entirely, about $(1 - 10^{-15})$, from black holes and only $10^{-15}$ from everything else. This identification of all dark matter as black holes is natural in statistical mechanics. Cosmological history of dark matter is discussed.

  9. Results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Using a Chi Squared Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sander, Joel [UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-12-01

    Most of the mass-energy density of the universe remains undetected and is only understood through its affects on visible, baryonic matter. The visible, baryonic matter accounts for only about half of a percent of the universe's total mass-energy budget, while the remainder of the mass-energy of the universe remains dark or undetected. About a quarter of the dark mass-energy density of the universe is comprised of massive particles that do not interact via the strong or electromagnetic forces. If these particles interact via the weak force, they are termed weakly interacting massive particles or WIMPs, and their interactions with baryonic matter could be detectable. The CDMS II experiment attempts to detect WIMP interactions in the Soudan Underground Laboratory using germanium detectors and silicon detectors. A WIMP can interact a with detector nuclei causing the nuclei to recoil. A nuclear recoil is distinguished from background electron recoils by comparing the deposited ionization and phonon energies. Electron recoils occurring near detector surfaces are more difficult to reject. This thesis describes the results of a χ2 analysis designed to reject events occurring near detector surfaces. Because no WIMP signal was observed, separate limits using the germanium and silicon detectors are set on the WIMP cross section under standard astrophysical assumptions.

  10. Dark matter candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    One of the simplest, yet most profound, questions we can ask about the Universe is, how much stuff is in it, and further what is that stuff composed of? Needless to say, the answer to this question has very important implications for the evolution of the Universe, determining both the ultimate fate and the course of structure formation. Remarkably, at this late date in the history of the Universe we still do not have a definitive answer to this simplest of questions---although we have some very intriguing clues. It is known with certainty that most of the material in the Universe is dark, and we have the strong suspicion that the dominant component of material in the Cosmos is not baryons, but rather is exotic relic elementary particles left over from the earliest, very hot epoch of the Universe. If true, the Dark Matter question is a most fundamental one facing both particle physics and cosmology. The leading particle dark matter candidates are: the axion, the neutralino, and a light neutrino species. All three candidates are accessible to experimental tests, and experiments are now in progress. In addition, there are several dark horse, long shot, candidates, including the superheavy magnetic monopole and soliton stars. 13 refs

  11. van der Waals Interactions in Hadron Resonance Gas: From Nuclear Matter to Lattice QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovchenko, Volodymyr; Gorenstein, Mark I; Stoecker, Horst

    2017-05-05

    An extension of the ideal hadron resonance gas (HRG) model is constructed which includes the attractive and repulsive van der Waals (VDW) interactions between baryons. This VDW-HRG model yields the nuclear liquid-gas transition at low temperatures and high baryon densities. The VDW parameters a and b are fixed by the ground state properties of nuclear matter, and the temperature dependence of various thermodynamic observables at zero chemical potential are calculated within the VDW-HRG model. Compared to the ideal HRG model, the inclusion of VDW interactions between baryons leads to a qualitatively different behavior of second and higher moments of fluctuations of conserved charges, in particular in the so-called crossover region T∼140-190  MeV. For many observables this behavior resembles closely the results obtained from lattice QCD simulations. This hadronic model also predicts nontrivial behavior of net-baryon fluctuations in the region of phase diagram probed by heavy-ion collision experiments. These results imply that VDW interactions play a crucial role in the thermodynamics of hadron gas. Thus, the commonly performed comparisons of the ideal HRG model with the lattice and heavy-ion data may lead to misconceptions and misleading conclusions.

  12. General experiments concerning particle-matter interactions; Experiences interdisciplinaires d'interaction particule-matiere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauvergne, D

    2006-07-15

    The author gathers in this document several papers he has already published in order to shed light on different aspects concerning ion-crystal interactions. This document is divided into 3 chapters. In the first chapter the author presents results obtained from experiments dedicated to charge exchanges and energy released by heavy ions in channeling conditions. Different processes involved in ion-electron interactions are considered: The tri-electronic recombination, the electron capture through nuclear excitation (NEEC), resonant transfer and excitation (RTE), resonant transfer and double excitation (RTDE) and electron impact ionization (EII). The second chapter deals with the measurement of nuclear fission times through crystal blocking experiments. The crystal blocking technique allows the measurement in a model-independent way of the recoil distance covered by the excited nucleus during the whole fission process (starting from the initial collision and ending at the scission point). The last chapter is dedicated to the photon impact ionization through the conversion of a high-energy photon into an electron-positron pair.

  13. Charmed and strange baryon production in 29-GeV electron positron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    Baryon production is one of the least understood areas of hadron production in electron positron collisions. Early models of hadronization predicted that very few baryons should be produced. However, experiments have shown a very substantial rate of baryon production, and many different models have been proposed to explain this. One way to test these models, and to further probe the hadronization process is to measure the production rates of different types of baryons. This dissertation presents measurements of the production rates of baryons with different strangeness and spin. The analyses presented here use data taken with the Mark II detector at the PEP storage ring, operating at a center of mass energy of 29 GeV. The Ξ - production rate is measured to be 0.017 ± 0.004 ± 0.004 per hadronic event, Ω - production is measured to be 0.014 ± 0.006 ± 0.004 per hadronic event, and Ξ *0 production is less than 0.006 per hadronic event at a 90% confidence level. These measurements place strong constraints on models of baryon production. In particular, the unexpectedly high rate of Ω - production is difficult to explain in any disquark based model. Semileptonic Λ c + decays have also been observed, with σ(e + e - → Λ c X) * Br(Λ c → eΛX) = 0.0031 ± 0.0012 ± 0.0010 per hadronic event, and σ(e + e - → Λ c X) * Br(Λ c → μΛX) = 0.0024 ± 0.0024 ± 0.0007 per hadronic event. Because neither the branching ratios nor the production rate are well known, it is difficult to interpret these results

  14. Observational constraints of stellar collapse: Diagnostic probes of nature's extreme matter experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Fryer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Supernovae are Nature's high-energy, high density laboratory experiments, reaching densities in excess of nuclear densities and temperatures above 10 MeV. Astronomers have built up a suite of diagnostics to study these supernovae. If we can utilize these diagnostics, and tie them together with a theoretical understanding of supernova physics, we can use these cosmic explosions to study the nature of matter at these extreme densities and temperatures. Capitalizing on these diagnostics will require understanding a wide range of additional physics. Here we review the diagnostics and the physics neeeded to use them to learn about the supernova engine, and ultimate nuclear physics.

  15. CALIS—A CALibration Insertion System for the DarkSide-50 dark matter search experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnes, P.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Asner, D. M.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bocci, V.; Bonfini, G.; Bonivento, W.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Caravati, M.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cicalò, C.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; D' Angelo, D.; D' Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; Cecco, S. De; Deo, M. De; Vincenzi, M. De; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Eusanio, F. Di; Pietro, G. Di; Dionisi, C.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giagu, S.; Giganti, C.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K.; Hughes, D.; Humble, P.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; James, I.; Johnson, T. N.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Longo, G.; Ma, Y.; Machado, A. A.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Milincic, R.; Miller, J. D.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Agasson, A. Navrer; Odrowski, S.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeti, M.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Rescigno, M.; Riffard, Q.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Savarese, C.; Schlitzer, B.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Shields, E.; Singh, P. N.; Skorokhvatov, M. D.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Verducci, M.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, Xi.; Xiao, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, commissioning and use of a CALibration source Insertion System (CALIS) in the DarkSide-50 direct dark matter search experiment. CALIS deploys radioactive sources into the liquid scintillator veto to characterize the detector response and detection efficiency of the DarkSide-50 Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber, and the surrounding 30 t organic liquid scintillator neutron veto. It was commissioned in September 2014 and has been used successfully in several gamma and neutron source campaigns since then. A description of the hardware and an excerpt of calibration analysis results are given below.

  16. Observation of the Doubly Charmed Baryon Ξcc ++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alfonso Albero, A.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Beliy, N.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Berninghoff, D.; Bertholet, E.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjoern, M. B.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Borysova, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brundu, D.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Byczynski, W.; Cadeddu, S.; Cai, H.; Calabrese, R.; Calladine, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chitic, S.-G.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Colombo, T.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H.-P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Douglas, L.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Federici, L.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Fernandez Declara, P.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gabriel, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Grabowski, J. P.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greim, R.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruber, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hancock, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hasse, C.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Hecker, M.; Heinicke, K.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P. H.; Huard, Z.-C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Ibis, P.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kazeev, N.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Kopecna, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Kozeiha, M.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, P.-R.; Li, T.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Lionetto, F.; Lisovskyi, V.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Loi, A.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Macko, V.; Mackowiak, P.; Maddock, B.; Maddrell-Mander, S.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Maisuzenko, D.; Majewski, M. W.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Marangotto, D.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Mead, J. V.; Meadows, B.; Meaux, C.; Meier, F.; Meinert, N.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Millard, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Minzoni, L.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Mombacher, T.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Ossowska, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poli Lener, M.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Ponce, S.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Pullen, H.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Quintana, B.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Ravonel Salzgeber, M.; Reboud, M.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Ruiz Vidal, J.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Gonzalo, D.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarpis, G.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schreiner, H. F.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Soares Lavra, l.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stepanova, M.; Stevens, H.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; Szymanski, M.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Toriello, F.; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R.; Tournefier, E.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Usachov, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagner, A.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Verlage, T. A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Winn, M. A.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zonneveld, J. B.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    A highly significant structure is observed in the Λc+K-π+π+ mass spectrum, where the Λc+ baryon is reconstructed in the decay mode p K-π+. The structure is consistent with originating from a weakly decaying particle, identified as the doubly charmed baryon Ξcc ++. The difference between the masses of the Ξcc ++ and Λc+ states is measured to be 1334.94 ±0.72 (stat.) ±0.27 (syst. ) MeV /c2 , and the Ξcc ++ mass is then determined to be 3621.40 ±0.72 (stat.) ±0.27 (syst. ) ±0.14 (Λc+) MeV /c2 , where the last uncertainty is due to the limited knowledge of the Λc+ mass. The state is observed in a sample of proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.7 fb-1, and confirmed in an additional sample of data collected at 8 TeV.

  17. Observation of the Doubly Charmed Baryon Ξ_{cc}^{++}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alfonso Albero, A; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Baranov, A; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baryshnikov, F; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Beiter, A; Bel, L J; Beliy, N; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Beranek, S; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Berninghoff, D; Bertholet, E; Bertolin, A; Betancourt, C; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Bjoern, M B; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Bordyuzhin, I; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Borysova, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brundu, D; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Byczynski, W; Cadeddu, S; Cai, H; Calabrese, R; Calladine, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Chamont, D; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chitic, S-G; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Chubykin, A; Ciambrone, P; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Colombo, T; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C T; Decamp, D; Del Buono, L; Dembinski, H-P; Demmer, M; Dendek, A; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Nezza, P; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Douglas, L; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziewiecki, M; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Federici, L; Ferguson, D; Fernandez, G; Fernandez Declara, P; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Funk, W; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gabriel, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Govorkova, E; Grabowski, J P; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greim, R; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruber, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hancock, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hasse, C; Hatch, M; He, J; Hecker, M; Heinicke, K; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P H; Huard, Z-C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hutchcroft, D; Ibis, P; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kazeev, N; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Klimkovich, T; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Kopecna, R; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kotriakhova, S; Kozeiha, M; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, P-R; Li, T; Li, Y; Li, Z; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Lionetto, F; Lisovskyi, V; Liu, X; Loh, D; Loi, A; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Macko, V; Mackowiak, P; Maddock, B; Maddrell-Mander, S; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Maisuzenko, D; Majewski, M W; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Marangotto, D; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marinangeli, M; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurice, E; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Mead, J V; Meadows, B; Meaux, C; Meier, F; Meinert, N; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Millard, E; Minard, M-N; Minzoni, L; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Mombacher, T; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morello, M J; Morgunova, O; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nogay, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Ossowska, A; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Placinta, V; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poli Lener, M; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Ponce, S; Popov, A; Popov, D; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Pullen, H; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Quintana, B; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Ratnikov, F; Raven, G; Ravonel Salzgeber, M; Reboud, M; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Robert, A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Ruiz Vidal, J; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Gonzalo, D; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarpis, G; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schreiner, H F; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Soares Lavra, L; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stepanova, M; Stevens, H; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Stramaglia, M E; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; Szymanski, M; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Toriello, F; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R; Tournefier, E; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Usachov, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagner, A; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Verlage, T A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Viemann, H; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vitti, M; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Winn, M A; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yang, Z; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zonneveld, J B; Zucchelli, S

    2017-09-15

    A highly significant structure is observed in the Λ_{c}^{+}K^{-}π^{+}π^{+} mass spectrum, where the Λ_{c}^{+} baryon is reconstructed in the decay mode pK^{-}π^{+}. The structure is consistent with originating from a weakly decaying particle, identified as the doubly charmed baryon Ξ_{cc}^{++}. The difference between the masses of the Ξ_{cc}^{++} and Λ_{c}^{+} states is measured to be 1334.94±0.72(stat.)±0.27(syst.)  MeV/c^{2}, and the Ξ_{cc}^{++} mass is then determined to be 3621.40±0.72(stat.)±0.27(syst.)±0.14(Λ_{c}^{+})  MeV/c^{2}, where the last uncertainty is due to the limited knowledge of the Λ_{c}^{+} mass. The state is observed in a sample of proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.7  fb^{-1}, and confirmed in an additional sample of data collected at 8 TeV.

  18. Investigation of Avalanche Photodiodes Radiation Hardness for Baryonic Matter Studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kushpil, Vasilij; Mikhaylov, Vasily; Ladygin, V.; Kugler, Andrej; Kushpil, Svetlana; Svoboda, Ondřej; Tlustý, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2016), s. 120-126 ISSN 1547-4771 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG12007; GA MŠk LG14004; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : APDs * detectors * neutrons Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  19. Studying hadron properties in baryonic matter with HADES

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kugler, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 855, č. 1 (2011), s. 261-264 ISSN 0375-9474. [4th International Conference on Hard and Electromagnetic Probes of High Energy Nuclear Collisions. Eilat, 10.10.2010-15.10.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100480803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : HEAVY-ION COLLISIONS * QCD SUM-RULES * DIELECTRON PRODUCTION Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.540, year: 2011

  20. A Low-Threshold Analysis of Data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunker, Raymond [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Although dark matter appears to constitute over 80% of the matter in the Universe, its composition is a mystery. Astrophysical observations suggest that the luminous portions of the Galaxy are embedded in a halo of darkmatter particles. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are the most studied class of dark-matter candidates and arise naturally within the context of many weak-scale supersymmetric theories. Direct-detection experiments like the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) strive to discern the kinetic energy of recoiling nuclei resulting from WIMP interactions with terrestrial matter. This is a considerable challenge in which the low (expected) rate of WIMP interactions must be distinguished from an overwhelming rate due to known types of radiation. An incontrovertible positive detection has remained elusive. However, a few experiments have recorded data that appear consistent with a low-mass WIMP. This thesis describes an attempt to probe the favored parameter space. To increase sensitivity to low-mass WIMPs, a low-threshold technique with improved sensitivity to small energy depositions is applied to CDMS shallowsite data. Four germanium and two silicon detectors were operated between December 2001 and June 2002, yielding 118 days of exposure. By sacrificing some of the CDMS detectors’ ability to discriminate signal from background, energy thresholds of ~1 and ~2 keV were achieved for three of the germanium and both silicon detectors, respectively. A large number of WIMP candidate events are observed, most of which can be accounted for by misidentification of background sources. No conclusive evidence for a low-mass WIMP signal is found. The observed event rates are used to set upper limits on the WIMPnucleon scattering cross section as a function of WIMP mass. Interesting parameter space is excluded for WIMPs with masses below ~9GeV/c2. Under standard assumptions, the parameter space favored by interpretations of other experiments

  1. Locating the QCD critical end point through peaked baryon number susceptibilities along the freeze-out line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhibin; Chen, Yidian; Li, Danning; Huang, Mei

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the baryon number susceptibilities up to fourth order along different freeze-out lines in a holographic QCD model with a critical end point (CEP), and we propose that the peaked baryon number susceptibilities along the freeze-out line can be used as a clean signature to locate the CEP in the QCD phase diagram. On the temperature and baryon chemical potential plane, the cumulant ratio of the baryon number susceptibilities (up to fourth order) forms a ridge along the phase boundary, and develops a sword-shaped “mountain” standing upright around the CEP in a narrow and oblate region. The measurement of baryon number susceptibilities from heavy-ion collision experiments is along the freeze-out line. If the freeze-out line crosses the foot of the CEP mountain, then one can observe the peaked baryon number susceptibilities along the freeze-out line, and the kurtosis of the baryon number distributions has the highest magnitude. The data from the first phase of the beam energy scan program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider indicates that there should be a peak of the kurtosis of the baryon number distribution at a collision energy of around 5 GeV, which suggests that the freeze-out line crosses the foot of the CEP mountain and the summit of the CEP should be located nearby, around a collision energy of 3–7 GeV. Supported by NSFC (11275213, and 11261130311) (CRC 110 by DFG and NSFC), CAS key project KJCX2-EW-N01, and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of CAS

  2. Search for narrow four-baryon states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badelek, B.

    1981-01-01

    Highly excited (4.10 2 ) four-baryon resonances have been searched for in the missing-mass spectrum of the reaction π - + 4 He → π - + X at 5 GeV/c in the region of small four-momentum transfer (0.005 2 ), where one of the decay products of the X is either proton or deuteron or triton. No resonance signal is seen in the mass spectrum of X. Within our limited acceptance, the cross section for the production of a narrow (GAMMA approx. 20 MeV/c 2 ) four-baryon state with mass 4.9 GeV/c 2 is estimated to be smaller than approx. 100 nb. (orig.)

  3. Conformal Symmetry Patterns in Baryon Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchbach, Mariana; Compean, Cliffor B

    2011-01-01

    Attention is drawn to the fact that the spectra of the baryons of the lightest flavors, the nucleon and the Δ, carry quantum numbers characteristic for an unitary representation of the conformal group. We show that the above phenomenon is well explained for baryons whose internal structure is dominated by a quark-diquark configuration that resides in a conformally compactified Minkowski space time, R 1 x S 3 , and is described by means of the conformal scale equation there. The R 1 x S 3 space-time represents the boundary of the conformally compactified AdS 5 , on which one expects to encounter a conformal theory in accord with the gauge-gravity duality. Within this context, our model is congruent with AdS 5 /CFT 4 .

  4. Baryon magnetic moments: Symmetries and relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parreno, Assumpta [University of Barcelona; Savage, Martin [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Tiburzi, Brian [City College of New York, NY (United States); City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States); Wilhelm, Jonas [Justus-Liebig-Universitat Giessen, Giessen, Germany; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chang, Emmanuel [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Detmold, William [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Orginos, Kostas [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic moments of the octet baryons are computed using lattice QCD in background magnetic fields, including the first treatment of the magnetically coupled Σ0- Λ system. Although the computations are performed for relatively large values of the up and down quark masses, we gain new insight into the symmetries and relations between magnetic moments by working at a three-flavor mass-symmetric point. While the spinflavor symmetry in the large Nc limit of QCD is shared by the naïve constituent quark model, we find instances where quark model predictions are considerably favored over those emerging in the large Nc limit. We suggest further calculations that would shed light on the curious patterns of baryon magnetic moments.

  5. Heavy baryon spectroscopy with relativistic kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcarce, A.; Garcilazo, H.; Vijande, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comparative Faddeev study of heavy baryon spectroscopy with nonrelativistic and relativistic kinematics. We show results for different standard hyperfine interactions with both kinematics in an attempt to learn about the light quark dynamics. We highlight the properties of particular states accessible in nowadays laboratories that would help in discriminating between different dynamical models. The advance in the knowledge of light quark dynamics is a key tool for the understanding of the existence of exotic hadrons.

  6. Baryon spectroscopy with polarization observables from CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Steffen [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Meson photoproduction is an important tool in the study of baryon resonances. The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of polarization observables. The N* program at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) includes experimental studies with linearly and circularly polarized tagged photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized nucleon targets, and recoil polarizations. An overview of these experimental studies and recent results will be given.

  7. Strong decays of nonstrange q3 baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijker, R.; Iachello, F.; Leviatan, A.

    1997-01-01

    We study strong decays of nonstrange baryons by making use of the algebraic approach to hadron structure. Within this framework we derive closed expressions for decay widths in an elementary-meson emission model and use these to analyze the experimental data for N * →N+π, N * →Δ+π, N * →N+η, Δ * →N+π, Δ * →Δ+π, and Δ * →Δ+η decays. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  8. An algebraic model of baryon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijker, R.; Leviatan, A.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss recent calculations of the mass spectrum, electromagnetic and strong couplings of baryon resonances. The calculations are done in a collective constituent model for the nucleon, in which the resonances are interpreted as rotations and vibrations of a symmetric top with a prescribed distribution of the charge and magnetization. We analyze recent data on eta-photo- and eta- electroproduction, and the tensor analyzing power in deuteron scattering. (author)

  9. Understanding the baryon and meson spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, Michael R. [JLAB

    2013-10-01

    A brief overview is given of what we know of the baryon and meson spectra, with a focus on what are the key internal degrees of freedom and how these relate to strong coupling QCD. The challenges, experimental, theoretical and phenomenological, for the future are outlined, with particular reference to a program at Jefferson Lab to extract hadronic states in which glue unambiguously contributes to their quantum numbers.

  10. Baryon Distribution in Galaxy Clusters as a Result of Sedimentation of Helium Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin; Wu

    2000-01-20

    Heavy particles in galaxy clusters tend to be more centrally concentrated than light ones according to the Boltzmann distribution. An estimate of the drift velocity suggests that it is possible that the helium nuclei may have entirely or partially sedimented into the cluster core within the Hubble time. We demonstrate this scenario using the Navarro-Frenk-White profile as the dark matter distribution of clusters and assuming that the intracluster gas is isothermal and in hydrostatic equilibrium. We find that a greater fraction of baryonic matter is distributed at small radii than at large radii, which challenges the prevailing claim that the baryon fraction increases monotonically with cluster radius. It shows that the conventional mass estimate using X-ray measurements of intracluster gas along with a constant mean molecular weight may have underestimated the total cluster mass by approximately 20%, which in turn leads to an overestimate of the total baryon fraction by the same percentage. Additionally, it is pointed out that the sedimentation of helium nuclei toward cluster cores may at least partially account for the sharp peaks in the central X-ray emissions observed in some clusters.

  11. The cosmic history of the baryon budget in a hierarchical universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasera, Yann

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of the hierarchical model of galaxy formation, small primordial density fluctuations observed on the cosmological microwave background are amplified by gravitational instability leading to the formation of larger and larger halos. The gas collapses and cools in these dark matter potential wells and forms cold centrifugally supported gas discs. These discs are converted into stellar discs that is to say galaxies. The problem in this scenario is the so-called 'overcooling problem': the resulting amount of stars is greater than the observed one by a factor of four. I have therefore studied the evolution of baryons (hydrogen and helium gas) in the Universe using high resolution hydrodynamic simulations. Based on these results, I have developed a simple analytical model for computing the baryons mass fraction in each of the following phases: stars, cold gas in galactic discs, hot gas in clusters and diffuse gas in the intergalactic medium. The comparison of model results to observations shows us that cosmology controls the cosmic history of star formation. The important cosmological role of galactic winds is also shed to light. They eject the cold gas from discs to hot halos, overcoming the overcooling problem. Finally, I have studied the implication of baryon physics onto the diffuse gamma-ray background from light dark matter particles. (author) [fr

  12. The different baryonic Tully-Fisher relations at low masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Chris B; Santos-Santos, Isabel; Stinson, Greg

    2016-06-11

    We compare the Baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR) of simulations and observations of galaxies ranging from dwarfs to spirals, using various measures of rotational velocity V rot . We explore the BTFR when measuring V rot at the flat part of the rotation curve, V flat , at the extent of H i gas, V last , and using 20 per cent ( W 20 ) and 50 per cent ( W 50 ) of the width of H i line profiles. We also compare with the maximum circular velocity of the parent halo, [Formula: see text], within dark matter only simulations. The different BTFRs increasingly diverge as galaxy mass decreases. Using V last  one obtains a power law over four orders of magnitude in baryonic mass, with slope similar to the observed BTFR. Measuring V flat gives similar results as V last when galaxies with rising rotation curves are excluded. However, higher rotation velocities would be found for low-mass galaxies if the cold gas extended far enough for V rot to reach a maximum. W 20 gives a similar slope as V last but with slightly lower values of V rot for low-mass galaxies, although this may depend on the extent of the gas in your galaxy sample. W 50 bends away from these other relations towards low velocities at low masses. By contrast, [Formula: see text] bends towards high velocities for low-mass galaxies, as cold gas does not extend out to the radius at which haloes reach [Formula: see text]. Our study highlights the need for careful comparisons between observations and models: one needs to be consistent about the particular method of measuring V rot , and precise about the radius at which velocities are measured.

  13. Efficient construction of mock catalogs for baryon acoustic oscillation surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunayama, Tomomi; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Rangel, Esteban

    2016-05-01

    Precision measurements of the large scale structure of the Universe require large numbers of high fidelity mock catalogs to accurately assess, and account for, the presence of systematic effects. We introduce and test a scheme for generating mock catalogs rapidly using suitably derated N-body simulations. Our aim is to reproduce the large scale structure and the gross properties of dark matter halos with high accuracy, while sacrificing the details of the halo's internal structure. By adjusting global and local time-steps in an N-body code, we demonstrate that we recover halo masses to better than 0.5% and the power spectrum to better than 1% both in real and redshift space for k=1hMpc-1, while requiring a factor of 4 less CPU time. We also calibrate the redshift spacing of outputs required to generate simulated light cones. We find that outputs separated by Δ z=0.05 allow us to interpolate particle positions and velocities to reproduce the real and redshift space power spectra to better than 1% (out to k=1hMpc-1). We apply these ideas to generate a suite of simulations spanning a range of cosmologies, motivated by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) but broadly applicable to future large scale structure surveys including eBOSS and DESI. As an initial demonstration of the utility of such simulations, we calibrate the shift in the baryonic acoustic oscillation peak position as a function of galaxy bias with higher precision than has been possible so far. This paper also serves to document the simulations, which we make publicly available.

  14. Investigation of water-soluble organic matter extracted from shales during leaching experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaling; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilke, Franziska D. H.; Horsfield, Brian

    2017-04-01

    The huge volumes and unknown composition of flowback and produced waters cause major public concerns about the environmental and social compatibility of hydraulic fracturing and the exploitation of gas from unconventional reservoirs. Flowback and produced waters contain not only residues of fracking additives but also chemical species that are dissolved from the shales themselves during fluid-rock interaction. Knowledge of the composition, size and structure of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as well as the main controls on the release of DOC are a prerequisite for a better understanding of these interactions and its effects on composition of flowback and produced water. Black shales from four different geological settings and covering a maturity range Ro = 0.3-2.6% were extracted with deionized water. The DOC yields were found to decrease rapidly with increasing diagenesis and remain low throughout catagenesis. Four DOC fractions have been qualitatively and quantitatively characterized using size-exclusion chromatography. The concentrations of individual low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) decrease with increasing maturity of the samples except for acetate extracted from the overmature Posidonia shale, which was influenced by hydrothermal brines. The oxygen content of the shale organic matter also shows a significant influence on the release of organic acids, which is indicated by the positive trend between oxygen index (OI) and the concentrations of formate and acetate. Based on our experiments, both the properties of the organic matter source and the thermal maturation progress of the shale organic matter significantly influence the amount and quality of extracted organic compounds during the leaching experiments.

  15. PandaX: a liquid xenon dark matter experiment at CJPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, XiGuang; Chen, Xun; Chen, YunHua; Cui, XiangYi; Fang, DeQing; Fu, ChangBo; Giboni, Karl L.; Gong, HaoWei; Guo, GuoDong; He, Ming; Hu, Jie; Huang, XingTao; Ji, XiangDong; Ju, YongLin; Li, ShaoLi; Lin, Qing; Liu, HuaXuan; Liu, JiangLai; Liu, Xiang; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Ma, YuGang; Mao, YaJun; Ni, KaiXuan; Pushkin, Kirill; Ren, XiangXiang; Schubnell, Michael; Shen, ManBing; Shi, YuJie; Stephenson, Scott; Tan, AnDi; Tarlé, Greg; Wang, HongWei; Wang, JiMing; Wang, Meng; Wang, XuMing; Wang, Zhou; Wei, YueHuan; Wu, ShiYong; Xiao, MengJiao; Xiao, Xiang; Xie, PengWei; Ye, Tao; You, YingHui; Zen, XiongHui; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, HaiYing; Zhao, Li; Zhou, XiaoPeng; Zhu, ZhongHua

    2014-08-01

    PandaX is a large liquid-xenon detector experiment usable for direct dark-matter detection and 136Xe double-beta decay search. The central vessel was designed to accommodate a staged target volume increase from initially 120 kg (stage I) to 0.5 t (stage II) and eventually to a multi-ton scale. The experiment is located in the Jinping Deep-Underground Laboratory in Sichuan, China. The detector operates in dual-phase mode, allowing detection of both prompt scintillation, and ionization charge through proportional scintillation. In this paper a detailed description of the stage I detector design and performance as well as results established during the commissioning phase are presented.

  16. Material radioassay and selection for the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, LIBPhys, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Sivers, M. von [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics; Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Molinario, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Nisi, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Miguez, B.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Scotto Lavina, L. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-12-15

    The XENON1T dark matter experiment aims to detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) through low-energy interactions with xenon atoms. To detect such a rare event necessitates the use of radiopure materials to minimize the number of background events within the expected WIMP signal region. In this paper we report the results of an extensive material radioassay campaign for the XENON1T experiment. Using gamma-ray spectroscopy and mass spectrometry techniques, systematic measurements of trace radioactive impurities in over one hundred samples within a wide range of materials were performed. The measured activities allowed for stringent selection and placement of materials during the detector construction phase and provided the input for XENON1T detection sensitivity estimates through Monte Carlo simulations. (orig.)

  17. Data acquisition and readout system for the LUX dark matter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerib, D.S.; Bai, X.; Bedikian, S.; Bernard, E.; Bernstein, A.; Bradley, A.; Cahn, S.B.; Carmona-Benitez, M.C.; Carr, D.; Chapman, J.J.; Clark, K.; Classen, T.; Coffey, T.; Curioni, A.; Dazeley, S.; Viveiros, L. de; Dragowsky, M.; Druszkiewicz, E.

    2012-01-01

    LUX is a two-phase (liquid/gas) xenon time projection chamber designed to detect nuclear recoils from interactions with dark matter particles. Signals from the LUX detector are processed by custom-built analog electronics which provide properly shaped signals for the trigger and data acquisition (DAQ) systems. The DAQ is composed of commercial digitizers with firmware customized for the LUX experiment. Data acquisition systems in rare-event searches must accommodate high rate and large dynamic range during precision calibrations involving radioactive sources, while also delivering low threshold for maximum sensitivity. The LUX DAQ meets these challenges using real-time baseline suppression that allows for a maximum event acquisition rate in excess of 1.5 kHz with virtually no deadtime. This paper describes the LUX DAQ and the novel acquisition techniques employed in the LUX experiment.

  18. Characterising dark matter searches at colliders and direct detection experiments: Vector mediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, Oliver; Dolan, Matthew J.; Malik, Sarah A.; McCabe, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a Minimal Simplified Dark Matter (MSDM) framework to quantitatively characterise dark matter (DM) searches at the LHC. We study two MSDM models where the DM is a Dirac fermion which interacts with a vector and axial-vector mediator. The models are characterised by four parameters: m DM , M med, g DM and g q , the DM and mediator masses, and the mediator couplings to DM and quarks respectively. The MSDM models accurately capture the full event kinematics, and the dependence on all masses and couplings can be systematically studied. The interpretation of mono-jet searches in this framework can be used to establish an equal-footing comparison with direct detection experiments. For theories with a vector mediator, LHC mono-jet searches possess better sensitivity than direct detection searches for light DM masses (≲5 GeV). For axial-vector mediators, LHC and direct detection searches generally probe orthogonal directions in the parameter space. We explore the projected limits of these searches from the ultimate reach of the LHC and multi-ton xenon direct detection experiments, and find that the complementarity of the searches remains. In conclusion, we provide a comparison of limits in the MSDM and effective field theory (EFT) frameworks to highlight the deficiencies of the EFT framework, particularly when exploring the complementarity of mono-jet and direct detection searches

  19. First Results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment at the Deep Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandic, Vuk [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-06-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to search for dark matter in the form of the Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). For this purpose, CDMS uses detectors based on crystals of Ge and Si, operated at the temperature of 20 mK, and providing a two-fold signature of an interaction: the ionization and the athermal phonon signals. The two signals, along with the passive and active shielding of the experimental setup, and with the underground experimental sites, allow very effective suppression and rejection of different types of backgrounds. This dissertation presents the commissioning and the results of the first WIMP-search run performed by the CDMS collaboration at the deep underground site at the Soudan mine in Minnesota. We develop different methods of suppressing the dominant background due to the electron-recoil events taking place at the detector surface and we apply these algorithms to the data set. These results place the world's most sensitive limits on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent elastic-scattering cross-section. Finally, they examine the compatibility of the supersymmetric WIMP-models with the direct-detection experiments (such as CDMS) and discuss the implications of the new CDMS result on these models.

  20. "What matters most:" a cultural mechanism moderating structural vulnerability and moral experience of mental illness stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lawrence H; Chen, Fang-pei; Sia, Kathleen Janel; Lam, Jonathan; Lam, Katherine; Ngo, Hong; Lee, Sing; Kleinman, Arthur; Good, Byron

    2014-02-01

    To understand Chinese immigrants' experiences with mental illness stigma and mental health disparities, we integrate frameworks of 'structural vulnerability' and 'moral experience' to identify how interaction between structural discrimination and cultural engagements might shape stigma. Fifty Chinese immigrants, including 64% Fuzhounese immigrants who experienced particularly harsh socio-economical deprivation, from two Chinese bilingual psychiatric inpatient units in New York City were interviewed from 2006 to 2010 about their experiences of mental illness stigma. Interview questions were derived from 4 stigma measures, covering various life domains. Participants were asked to elaborate their rating of measure items, and thus provided open-ended, narrative data. Analysis of the narrative data followed a deductive approach, guided by frameworks of structural discrimination and "what matters most" - a cultural mechanism signifying meaningful participation in the community. After identifying initial coding classifications, analysis focused on the interface between the two main concepts. Results indicated that experiences with mental illness stigma were contingent on the degree to which immigrants were able to participate in work to achieve "what mattered most" in their cultural context, i.e., accumulation of financial resources. Structural vulnerability - being situated in an inferior position when facing structural discrimination - made access to affordable mental health services challenging. As such, structural discrimination increased healthcare spending and interfered with financial accumulation, often resulting in future treatment nonadherence and enforcing mental health disparities. Study participants' internalizing their structurally-vulnerable position further led to a depreciated sense of self, resulting in a reduced capacity to advocate for healthcare system changes. Paradoxically, the multi-layered structural marginalization experienced by Chinese

  1. Modeling baryonic interactions with the Clausius-type equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovchenko, Volodymyr; Gorenstein, Mark I.; Stoecker, Horst

    2018-02-01

    The quantum-statistical Clausius-based equation of state is used to describe a system of interacting nucleons. The interaction parameters a, b, and c of the model are fixed by the empirically known nuclear ground-state properties and nuclear incompressibility modulus. The model is generalized to describe the baryon-baryon interactions in the hadron resonance gas (HRG). The predictions of such a Clausius-HRG model are confronted with the lattice QCD data at zero and at small chemical potentials, and are also contrasted with the standard van der Waals approach. It is found that the behavior of the lattice QCD observables in a high-temperature hadron gas is sensitive to the nuclear matter properties. An improved description of the nuclear incompressibility factor correlates with an improved description of the lattice QCD data in the crossover transition region.

  2. Massive black holes and light-element nucleosynthesis in a baryonic universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Rees, Martin J.

    1995-01-01

    We reexamine the model proposed by Gnedin & Ostriker (1992) in which Jeans mass black holes (M(sub BH) approximately = 10(exp 6) solar mass) form shortly after decoupling. There is no nonbaryonic dark matter in this model, but we examine the possibility that Omega(sub b) is considerably larger than given by normal nucleosynthesis. Here we allow for the fact that much of the high baryon-to-photon ratio material will collapse leaving the universe of remaining material with light-element abundances more in accord with the residual baryonic density (approximately = 10(exp -2)) than with Omega(sub 0) and the initial baryonic density (approximately = 10(exp -1)). We find that no reasonable model can be made with random-phase density fluctuations, if the power on scales smaller than 10(exp 6) solar mass is as large as expected. However, phase-correlated models of the type that might occur in connection with topological singularities can be made with Omega(sub b) h(exp 2) = 0.013 +/- 0.001, 0.15 approximately less than Omega(sub 0) approximately less than 0.4, which are either flat (Omega(sub lambda) = 1 - Omega(sub 0)) or open (Omega(sub lambda) = 0) and which satisfy all the observational constraints which we apply, including the large baryon-to-total mass ratio found in the X-ray clusters. The remnant baryon density is thus close to that obtained in the standard picture (Omega(sub b) h(exp 2) = 0.0125 +/- 0.0025; Walker et al. 1991). The spectral index implied for fluctuations in the baryonic isocurvature scenario, -1 less than m less than 0, is in the range expected by other arguments based on large-scale structure and microwave fluctuation constraints. The dark matter in this picture is in the form of massive black holes. Accretion onto them at early epochs releases high-energy photons which significantly heat and reionize the universe. But photodissociation does not materially change light-element abundances. A typical model gives bar-y approximately = 1 x 10(exp -5

  3. Lifetime and production rate of beauty baryons from Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Buys, A; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Daum, A; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fürstenau, H; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gillespie, D; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Haedinger, U; Hahn, F; Hahn, M; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Ioannou, P; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kalmus, George Ernest; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köhne, J H; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Królikowski, J; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Fernandez, A; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, M; McNulty, M; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Ostankov, A P; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Squarcia, S; Stäck, H; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stepaniak, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Torassa, E; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Überschär, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Wehr, A; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1995-01-01

    The production and decay of beauty baryons (b-baryons) have been studied using 1.7 \\times 10^6 Z hadronic decays collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP. Three different techniques were used to identify the b-baryons. The first method used pairs of a \\Lambda and a lepton to tag the b-baryon decay. The second method associated fully reconstructed \\Lambda_c baryons with leptons. The third analysis reconstructed the b-baryon decay points by forming secondary vertices from identified protons and muons of opposite sign. Using these methods the following production rates were measured: \\begin{eqnarray*} f(\\qb \\ra \\Bb) \\times \\BR(\\Bb \\ra \\mLs \\ell\\bar{\

  4. Dynamics of the baryonic component in hierarchical clustering universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Julio

    1993-01-01

    I present self-consistent 3-D simulations of the formation of virialized systems containing both gas and dark matter in a flat universe. A fully Lagrangian code based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics technique and a tree data structure has been used to evolve regions of comoving radius 2-3 Mpc. Tidal effects are included by coarse-sampling the density of the outer regions up to a radius approx. 20 Mpc. Initial conditions are set at high redshift (z greater than 7) using a standard Cold Dark Matter perturbation spectrum and a baryon mass fraction of 10 percent (omega(sub b) = 0.1). Simulations in which the gas evolves either adiabatically or radiates energy at a rate determined locally by its cooling function were performed. This allows us to investigate with the same set of simulations the importance of radiative losses in the formation of galaxies and the equilibrium structure of virialized systems where cooling is very inefficient. In the absence of radiative losses, the simulations can be rescaled to the density and radius typical of galaxy clusters. A summary of the main results is presented.

  5. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLerran, L.

    2008-01-01

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition. At high baryon density and low temperature, large N c arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma

  6. Dark Matter Search in a Beam-Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglieri, M.

    2016-01-01

    MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. This proposal presents the MeV-GeV DM discovery potential for a ∼ 1 m$^3$ segmented CsI(Tl) scintillator detector placed downstream of the Hall A beam-dump at Jefferson Lab, receiving up to 10 22 electrons-on-target (EOT) in 285 days. This experiment (Beam-Dump eXperiment or BDX) would be sensitive to elastic DM-electron and to inelastic DM scattering at the level of 10 counts per year, reaching the limit of the neutrino irreducible background. The distinct signature of a DM interaction will be an electromagnetic shower of few hundreds of MeV, together with a reduced activity in the surrounding active veto counters. A detailed description of the DM particle χ production in the dump and subsequent interaction in the detector has been performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Different approaches have been used to evaluate the expected backgrounds: the cosmogenic background has been extrapolated from the results obtained with a prototype detector running at INFN-LNS (Italy), while the beam-related background has been evaluated by GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. The proposed experiment will be sensitive to large regions of DM parameter space, exceeding the discovery potential of existing and planned experiments in the MeV-GeV DM mass range by up to two orders of magnitude.

  7. Dark Matter Search in a Beam-Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglieri, M. [Univ. of Genova (Italy). National Institute for Nuclear Physics. et al

    2016-07-05

    MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. This proposal presents the MeV-GeV DM discovery potential for a $\\sim$1 m$^3$ segmented CsI(Tl) scintillator detector placed downstream of the Hall A beam-dump at Jefferson Lab, receiving up to 10$^{22}$ electrons-on-target (EOT) in 285 days. This experiment (Beam-Dump eXperiment or BDX) would be sensitive to elastic DM-electron and to inelastic DM scattering at the level of 10 counts per year, reaching the limit of the neutrino irreducible background. The distinct signature of a DM interaction will be an electromagnetic shower of few hundreds of MeV, together with a reduced activity in the surrounding active veto counters. A detailed description of the DM particle $\\chi$ production in the dump and subsequent interaction in the detector has been performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Different approaches have been used to evaluate the expected backgrounds: the cosmogenic background has been extrapolated from the results obtained with a prototype detector running at INFN-LNS (Italy), while the beam-related background has been evaluated by GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. The proposed experiment will be sensitive to large regions of DM parameter space, exceeding the discovery potential of existing and planned experiments in the MeV-GeV DM mass range by up to two orders of magnitude.

  8. Gauge theory for baryon and lepton numbers with leptoquarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, Michael; Fileviez Pérez, Pavel; Wise, Mark B

    2013-06-07

    Models where the baryon (B) and lepton (L) numbers are local gauge symmetries that are spontaneously broken at a low scale are revisited. We find new extensions of the standard model which predict the existence of fermions that carry both baryon and lepton numbers (i.e., leptoquarks). The local baryonic and leptonic symmetries can be broken at a scale close to the electroweak scale and we do not need to postulate the existence of a large desert to satisfy the experimental constraints on baryon number violating processes like proton decay.

  9. Search for CP violation in baryon decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of CP violation has been observed in the K- and B-meson systems, but not yet with any baryonic particle. We report on searches for CP violation in baryon decays at LHCb using Run I data. We find evidence for CP violation in Lambda0b -> p pi- pi+ pi- decays with a statistical significance corresponding to 3.3 standard deviations, including systematic uncertainties. This represents the first evidence of CP violation in the baryon sector. An overview of other recent results of baryon decays will be presented, along with some highlights of the charmless B-decay programme.

  10. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search and Background Rejection with Event Position Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gensheng [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2005-01-01

    Evidence from observational cosmology and astrophysics indicates that about one third of the universe is matter, but that the known baryonic matter only contributes to the universe at 4%. A large fraction of the universe is cold and non-baryonic matter, which has important role in the universe structure formation and its evolution. The leading candidate for the non-baryonic dark matter is Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), which naturally occurs in the supersymmetry theory in particle physics. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is searching for evidence of a WIMP interaction off an atomic nucleus in crystals of Ge and Si by measuring simultaneously the phonon energy and ionization energy of the interaction in the CDMS detectors. The WIMP interaction energy is from a few keV to tens of keV with a rate less than 0.1 events/kg/day. To reach the goal of WIMP detection, the CDMS experiment has been conducted in the Soudan mine with an active muon veto and multistage passive background shields. The CDMS detectors have a low energy threshold and background rejection capabilities based on ionization yield. However, betas from contamination and other radioactive sources produce surface interactions, which have low ionization yield, comparable to that of bulk nuclear interactions. The low-ionization surface electron recoils must be removed in the WIMP search data analysis. An emphasis of this thesis is on developing the method of the surface-interaction rejection using location information of the interactions, phonon energy distributions and phonon timing parameters. The result of the CDMS Soudan run118 92.3 live day WIMP search data analysis is presented, and represents the most sensitive search yet performed.

  11. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search and Background Rejection with Event Position Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Gen-sheng

    2005-01-01

    Evidence from observational cosmology and astrophysics indicates that about one third of the universe is matter, but that the known baryonic matter only contributes to the universe at 4%. A large fraction of the universe is cold and non-baryonic matter, which has important role in the universe structure formation and its evolution. The leading candidate for the non-baryonic dark matter is Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), which naturally occurs in the supersymmetry theory in particle physics. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is searching for evidence of a WIMP interaction off an atomic nucleus in crystals of Ge and Si by measuring simultaneously the phonon energy and ionization energy of the interaction in the CDMS detectors. The WIMP interaction energy is from a few keV to tens of keV with a rate less than 0.1 events/kg/day. To reach the goal of WIMP detection, the CDMS experiment has been conducted in the Soudan mine with an active muon veto and multistage passive background shields. The CDMS detectors have a low energy threshold and background rejection capabilities based on ionization yield. However, betas from contamination and other radioactive sources produce surface interactions, which have low ionization yield, comparable to that of bulk nuclear interactions. The low-ionization surface electron recoils must be removed in the WIMP search data analysis. An emphasis of this thesis is on developing the method of the surface-interaction rejection using location information of the interactions, phonon energy distributions and phonon timing parameters. The result of the CDMS Soudan run118 92.3 live day WIMP search data analysis is presented, and represents the most sensitive search yet performed

  12. The HIBEAM Experiment at the ESS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) offers an opportunity for a fundamental physics program with a unique reach which is complementary to that at other facilities. In this talk, the HIBEAM project is described. The HIBEAM collaboration has proposed a suite of searches and measurements which would use the Large ESS Beam Port with a high cold neutron flux. The program includes searches for conversions of free neutrons to antineutrons and to mirror neutrons with regeneration, as well as precision measurements of parity violation in nucleon-nucleon interactions. The high cold neutron intensity at HIBEAM would provide a higher sensitivity for the searches and measurements than was achieved at earlier experiments. The physics program addresses some of the central unresolved questions in particle physics and cosmology such as the energy scale and mechanism for baryon number violation, the origin of the baryon-antibaryon asymmetry of the universe, the composition of dark matter, and the mechanism for neutrino mass...

  13. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  14. Observing Primeval Galaxies and Dark Matter with LAIRTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-05

    in the form of black holes. Previously, we had argued that the dark matter in the halo of spiral galaxies is not baryonic . Now we have extended those...consider each type of barvonic matter and show the contradictions that would exist if the dark matter were made up of each form of baryonic matter . A topic...Classification) Observing Primeval Galaxies and Dark Matter with LAIRTS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year

  15. The Quest for Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments have brought for the first time under a strong experimental basis that the total density of the Universe is Wo = 1.02 ± 0.02. We have for the first time a cosmic agreement, namely matter density WM = 0.27 ± 0.04 and dark energy density WL = 0.73 ± 0.04 add up precisely to Wo ! WM + WL. On the other hand ordinary hadronic matter (quarks and leptons) determined by the Big Bang Nucleo-synthesis (BBN) is also firmly set to WBBN = 0.044 ± 0.004. About 100 years after Einstein's birth we know experimentally the identity of less than 5% of what the Universe is made of, the remaining > 95% escaping to us completely. An enormous effort is being made at LHC in order to discover SUSY particles. SUSY is an “almost necessity” of elementary particle physics. The fact that such particles may also account for the observed non baryonic dark matter is either a big coincidence or a big hint. If such SUSY particles indeed exist, they must have been...

  16. Identification of radiopure titanium for the LZ dark matter experiment and future rare event searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Akerlof, C. W.; Akimov, D. Yu.; Alsum, S. K.; Araújo, H. M.; Arnquist, I. J.; Arthurs, M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Balashov, S.; Barry, M. J.; Belle, J.; Beltrame, P.; Benson, T.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boast, K. E.; Bolozdynya, A.; Boxer, B.; Bramante, R.; Brás, P.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. V.; Bunker, R.; Burdin, S.; Busenitz, J. K.; Carels, C.; Carlsmith, D. L.; Carlson, B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Cottle, A.; Coughlen, R.; Craddock, W. W.; Currie, A.; Dahl, C. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edberg, T. K.; Edwards, W. R.; Emmet, W. T.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Fruth, T.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gantos, N. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Gerhard, R. M.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Gomber, B.; Hall, C. R.; Hans, S.; Hanzel, K.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hillbrand, S.; Hjemfelt, C.; Hoff, M. D.; Holbrook, B.; Holtom, E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hor, J. Y.-K.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Hurteau, T. W.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kaboth, A.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Khazov, A.; Khromov, A. V.; Konovalov, A. M.; Korolkova, E. V.; Koyuncu, M.; Kraus, H.; Krebs, H. J.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Kumpan, A. V.; Kyre, S.; Lee, C.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J.; Leonard, D. S.; Leonard, R.; Lesko, K. T.; Levy, C.; Liao, F.-T.; Lin, J.; Lindote, A.; Linehan, R. E.; Lippincott, W. H.; Liu, X.; Lopes, M. I.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lorenzon, W.; Luitz, S.; Majewski, P.; Manalaysay, A.; Manenti, L.; Mannino, R. L.; Markley, D. J.; Martin, T. J.; Marzioni, M. F.; McConnell, C. T.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Meng, Y.; Miller, E. H.; Mizrachi, E.; Mock, J.; Monzani, M. E.; Morad, J. A.; Mount, B. J.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; Nikkel, J. A.; O'Dell, J.; O'Sullivan, K.; Olcina, I.; Olevitch, M. A.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Piepke, A.; Powell, S.; Preece, R. M.; Pushkin, K.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C. A.; Richards, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rose, H. J.; Rosero, R.; Rossiter, P.; Saba, J. S.; Sarychev, M.; Schnee, R. W.; Schubnell, M.; Scovell, P. R.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Skarpaas, K.; Skulski, W.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Stancu, I.; Stark, M. R.; Stephenson, S.; Stiegler, T. M.; Stifter, K.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Temples, D.; Terman, P. A.; Thomas, K. J.; Thomson, J. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; Timalsina, M.; To, W. H.; Tomás, A.; Tope, T. E.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Va'Vra, J.; Vacheret, A.; van der Grinten, M. G. D.; Verbus, J. R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Waldron, W. L.; Wang, R.; Watson, R.; Webb, R. C.; Wei, W.-Z.; While, M.; White, D. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Woodward, D.; Worm, S.; Xu, J.; Yeh, M.; Yin, J.; Zhang, C.; Lux-Zeplin (LZ) Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment will search for dark matter particle interactions with a detector containing a total of 10 tonnes of liquid xenon within a double-vessel cryostat. The large mass and proximity of the cryostat to the active detector volume demand the use of material with extremely low intrinsic radioactivity. We report on the radioassay campaign conducted to identify suitable metals, the determination of factors limiting radiopure production, and the selection of titanium for construction of the LZ cryostat and other detector components. This titanium has been measured with activities of 238Ue < 1.6 mBq/kg, 238Ul < 0.09 mBq/kg, 232The = 0.28 ± 0.03 mBq/kg, 232Thl = 0.25 ± 0.02 mBq/kg, 40K < 0.54 mBq/kg, and 60Co < 0.02 mBq/kg (68% CL). Such low intrinsic activities, which are some of the lowest ever reported for titanium, enable its use for future dark matter and other rare event searches. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to assess the expected background contribution from the LZ cryostat with this radioactivity. In 1,000 days of WIMP search exposure of a 5.6-tonne fiducial mass, the cryostat will contribute only a mean background of 0.160 ± 0.001(stat) ± 0.030(sys) counts.

  17. Microbial control on stability of soil organic matter in drought manipulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, E.; Schrumpf, M.; Weber, E.; Wutzler, T.; Gleixner, G.; Reichstein, M.; Trumbore, S.

    2012-04-01

    Extending drought periods as a consequence of global warming affect both the amount and the activity of heterotrophic microorganisms in soil. The studies of drought effect on the decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) which is microbially mediated still show controversial results mainly due to separated research approaches which do not consider the soil - plant system as a whole. We would like to discuss the results obtained within the QuaSOM experiment (Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry Jena, Germany) where continues 13C- CO2-labeling was applied during vegetation of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) under deficit and optimal moisture regimes. The partitioning of plant-originated and SOM-originated carbon in heterotrophic respiration and in microbial biomass will be related to the changes in the microbial growth parameters and enzymes kinetics. The drought effect on temperature sensitivity of the enzymes responsible for the decomposition of SOM-compounds of different availability will be compared in the rhizosphere of peppermint versus bulk soil. The effect of vegetation on cycling of organic matter in soil will be considered for the contrasting moisture regimes. The changes in carbon sequestration potential due to priming effects caused by repeated drying - rewetting events will be evaluated for the short term time scale.

  18. Proton acceleration experiments and warm dense matter research using high power lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, M; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Harres, K [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Bagnoud, V [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brown, C R D [Plasma Physics Group, Imperial College London, SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Clarke, R; Heathcote, R; Li, B [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Chilton, Didcot, OX14 OQX (United Kingdom); Daido, H [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, Kizugawa-City, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Fernandez, J; Flippo, K; Gaillard, S; Gauthier, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Geissel, M [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Glenzer, S; Kritcher, A; Kugland, N; LePape, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Gregori, G, E-mail: markus.roth@physik.tu-darmstadt.d [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    The acceleration of intense proton and ion beams by ultra-intense lasers has matured to a point where applications in basic research and technology are being developed. Crucial for harvesting the unmatched beam parameters driven by the relativistic electron sheath is the precise control of the beam. In this paper we report on recent experiments using the PHELIX laser at GSI, the VULCAN laser at RAL and the TRIDENT laser at LANL to control and use laser accelerated proton beams for applications in high energy density research. We demonstrate efficient collimation of the proton beam using high field pulsed solenoid magnets, a prerequisite to capture and transport the beam for applications. Furthermore, we report on two campaigns to use intense, short proton bunches to isochorically heat solid targets up to the warm dense matter state. The temporal profile of the proton beam allows for rapid heating of the target, much faster than the hydrodynamic response time thereby creating a strongly coupled plasma at solid density. The target parameters are then probed by x-ray Thomson scattering to reveal the density and temperature of the heated volume. This combination of two powerful techniques developed during the past few years allows for the generation and investigation of macroscopic samples of matter in states present in giant planets or the interior of the earth.

  19. Optimisation of beam-pipe shielding for MUCH detector of CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.; Farooq, M.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is one of the major scientific pillars of FAIR. The main goal of the experiment is to explore the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram in the regions of high baryonic densities and moderate temperatures in the beam energy range of 10-45 AGeV. This includes also the search for the critical point, the first order deconfinement phase transition from the hadronic matter to the partonic matter and the study of equation-of-state of dense baryonic matter. The CBM research program comprises a comprehensive scan of observables, beam energies and collision systems. The observables includes low-mass dilepton pairs, charmonia and open charm, but also collective flow of rare and bulk particles, correlations and fluctuations. Some of the particles under study have low cross-sections (like charm) or small branching ratios (like low-mass vector mesons). Therefore, in order to compensate for the low yield the measurements have to be performed at very high reaction rates of up to about 10 MHz. These conditions demand for fast and radiation hard detectors and associated fast electronics, readout and online event reconstruction. Low material budget is required with in the detector acceptance to avoid multiple scattering which would limit high-precision measurements

  20. First Observation of a Baryonic Bs0 Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H.-P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gabriel, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graz