WorldWideScience

Sample records for baryonic dark matter

  1. Non-Baryonic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Bergstrom, L.

    2001-01-01

    The need for dark matter is briefly reviewed. A wealth of observational information points to the existence of a non-baryonic component. To the theoretically favoured candidates today belong axions, supersymmetric particles, and to some extent massive neutrinos. The theoretical foundation and experimental situation for each of these is reviewed. In particular, indirect detection methods of supersymmetric dark matter are described. Present experiments are just reaching the required sensitivity...

  2. Non-Baryonic Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bergström, L

    1999-01-01

    The need for dark matter is briefly reviewed. A wealth of observational information points to the existence of a non-baryonic component. To the theoretically favoured candidates today belong axions, supersymmetric particles, and to some extent massive neutrinos. The theoretical foundation and experimental situation for each of these is reviewed. In particular, indirect detection methods of supersymmetric dark matter are described. Present experiments are just reaching the required sensitivity to discover or rule out some of these candidates, and major improvements are planned over the next few years.

  3. Non-baryonic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for dark matter is briefly reviewed. A wealth of observational information points to the existence of a non-baryonic component. To the theoretically favoured candidates today belong axions, supersymmetric particles, and to some extent massive neutrinos. The theoretical foundation and experimental situation for each of these is reviewed. In particular, indirect detection methods of supersymmetric dark matter are described. Present experiments are just reaching the required sensitivity to discover or rule out some of these candidates, and major improvements are planned over the next few years

  4. Dark Matter Assimilation into the Baryon Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    D'Eramo, Francesco; Thaler, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    Pure singlets are typically disfavored as dark matter candidates, since they generically have a thermal relic abundance larger than the observed value. In this paper, we propose a new dark matter mechanism called "assimilation", which takes advantage of the baryon asymmetry of the universe to generate the correct relic abundance of singlet dark matter. Through assimilation, dark matter itself is efficiently destroyed, but dark matter number is stored in new quasi-stable heavy states which carry the baryon asymmetry. The subsequent annihilation and late-time decay of these heavy states yields (symmetric) dark matter as well as (asymmetric) standard model baryons. We study in detail the case of pure bino dark matter by augmenting the minimal supersymmetric standard model with vector-like chiral multiplets. In the parameter range where this mechanism is effective, the LHC can discover long-lived charged particles which were responsible for assimilating dark matter.

  5. Non-Baryonic Dark Matter in Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Del Popolo, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a broad-band review of the current status of non-baryonic dark matter research. I start with a historical overview of the evidences of dark matter existence, then I discuss how dark matter is distributed from small scale to large scale, and I then verge the attention to dark matter nature: dark matter candidates and their detection. I finally discuss some of the limits of the $\\Lambda$CDM model, with particular emphasis on the small scale problems of the paradigm.

  6. Non-baryonic dark matter in cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Popolo, A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper is based on lectures given at the IX Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics. The lectures (as the paper) were a broad-band review of the current status of non-baryonic dark matter research. I start with a historical overview of the evidences of dark matter existence, then I discuss how dark matter is distributed from small scale to large scale, and I then verge the attention to dark matter nature: dark matter candidates and their detection. I finally discuss some of the limits of the ΛCDM model, with particular emphasis on the small scale problems of the paradigm.

  7. Baryon Dynamics, Dark Matter Substructure, and Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, D H; Davé, R; Katz, N; Colombi, Stephane; Dav\\'e, Romeel; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    2006-01-01

    By comparing a collisionless cosmological N-body simulation (DM) to an SPH simulation with the same initial conditions, we investigate the correspondence between the dark matter subhalos produced by collisionless dynamics and the galaxies produced by dissipative gas dynamics in a dark matter background. When galaxies in the SPH simulation become satellites in larger groups, they retain local dark matter concentrations (SPH subhalos) whose mass is typically five times their baryonic mass. The more massive subhalos of the SPH simulation have corresponding subhalos of similar mass and position in the DM simulation; at lower masses, there is fairly good correspondence, but some DM subhalos are in different spatial positions and some suffer tidal stripping or disruption. The halo occupation statistics of DM subhalos -- the mean number of subhalos, pairs, and triples as a function of host halo mass -- are very similar to those of SPH subhalos and SPH galaxies. Gravity of the dissipative baryon component amplifies t...

  8. The baryonic self similarity of dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alard, C., E-mail: alard@iap.fr [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-06-20

    The cosmological simulations indicates that dark matter halos have specific self-similar properties. However, the halo similarity is affected by the baryonic feedback. By using momentum-driven winds as a model to represent the baryon feedback, an equilibrium condition is derived which directly implies the emergence of a new type of similarity. The new self-similar solution has constant acceleration at a reference radius for both dark matter and baryons. This model receives strong support from the observations of galaxies. The new self-similar properties imply that the total acceleration at larger distances is scale-free, the transition between the dark matter and baryons dominated regime occurs at a constant acceleration, and the maximum amplitude of the velocity curve at larger distances is proportional to M {sup 1/4}. These results demonstrate that this self-similar model is consistent with the basics of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) phenomenology. In agreement with the observations, the coincidence between the self-similar model and MOND breaks at the scale of clusters of galaxies. Some numerical experiments show that the behavior of the density near the origin is closely approximated by a Einasto profile.

  9. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  10. Shedding light on baryonic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Halo dark matter, if it is baryonic, may plausibly consist of compact stellar remnants. Jeans mass clouds containing 10 to the 6th to 10 to the 8th solar masses could have efficiently formed stars in the early universe and could plausibly have generated, for a suitably top-heavy stellar initial mass function, a high abundance of neutron stars as well as a small admixture of long-lived low mass stars. Within the resulting clusters of dark remnants, which eventually are tidally disrupted when halos eventually form, captures of neutron stars by nondegenerate stars resulted in formation of close binaries. These evolve to produce, by the present epoch, an observable X-ray signal associated with dark matter aggregations in galaxy cluster cores.

  11. 'Nonbaryonic' dark matter as baryonic colour superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss a novel cold dark matter candidate which is formed from the ordinary quarks during the QCD phase transition when the axion domain wall undergoes an unchecked collapse due to the tension in the wall. If a large number of quarks is trapped inside the bulk of a closed axion domain wall, the collapse stops due to the internal Fermi pressure. In this case the system in the bulk, may reach the critical density when it undergoes a phase transition to a colour superconducting phase with the ground state being the quark condensate, similar to BCS theory. If this happens, the new state of matter representing the diquark condensate with a large baryon number B ∼ 1032 becomes a stable soliton-like configuration. Consequently, it may serve as a novel cold dark matter candidate

  12. Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    CERN Document Server

    Appelquist, Thomas; Buchoff, Michael I; Fleming, George T; Jin, Xiao-Yong; Kiskis, Joe; Kribs, Graham D; Neil, Ethan T; Osborn, James C; Rebbi, Claudio; Rinaldi, Enrico; Schaich, David; Schroeder, Chris; Syritsyn, Sergey; Vranas, Pavlos; Weinberg, Evan; Witzel, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an $SU(N_D)$ strongly-coupled theory with even $N_D \\geq 4$. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vector-like representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to $SU(4)$, and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominant...

  13. Self Interacting Dark Matter and Baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Alexander B.; Governato, Fabio; Pontzen, Andrew; Quinn, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Self Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) is a cosmologically consistent alternative theory to Cold Dark Matter (CDM). SIDM is motivated as a solution to solve problems of the CDM model on small scales including the core/cusp problem, the missing satellites, and halo triaxiality. Each of these problems has secular astrophysical solutions, however taken together and along with suggestions from dark matter (DM) particle physics it is interesting to place constraints on how strong a self interaction would have to be for us to observe it and conversely the null hypothesis of whether we can rule out SIDM. We use high resolution cosmological simulations to compare evolution of stellar populations and (DM) components of dwarf galaxies. Our advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics N-body simulations combine SIDM with baryon physics including star formation, feedback recipes, metal line cooling, UV background, and thermal diffusion that eliminates artificial surface gas tension. We find for a constant SIDM cross section of 2 cm2 g-1 that DM interactions alone are not significant enough to create cores in dwarf galaxies and for low mass (Vpeak= 25 km s-1) galaxies the introduction of SIDM fails to decrease the DM central density. Our simulations with star formation feedback are in good agreement with observational estimates of Local Group dwarfs. The lower mass (below 108 M⊙) halos have inefficient SF, late formation time, and less DM interactions thus small field halos in CDM and SIDM remain cuspy. We conclude that constant cross section SIDM of 2 cm2 g-1 would be close to unobservable in dwarf galaxies and yet at the same time this cross section is already larger than some observational constraints found in larger (higher velocity) systems. We conclude that to differentiate between SIDM and CDM in an observationally detectable and astrophysically consistent manner a velocity dependent cross section that peaks for halos with small peak velocities will be necessary.

  14. Non-baryonic dark matter: observational evidence and detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evidence for the existence of dark matter in the universe is reviewed. A general picture emerges, where both baryonic and non-baryonic dark matter is needed to explain current observations. In particular, a wealth of observational information points to the existence of a non-baryonic component, contributing between around 20 and 40% of the critical mass density needed to make the universe geometrically flat on large scales. In addition, an even larger contribution from vacuum energy (or cosmological constant) is indicated by recent observations. To the theoretically favoured particle candidates for non-baryonic dark matter belong axions, supersymmetric particles, and of less importance, massive neutrinos. The theoretical foundation and experimental situation for each of these is reviewed. Direct and indirect methods for detection of supersymmetric dark matter are described in some detail. Present experiments are just reaching the required sensitivity to discover or rule out some of these candidates, and major improvements are planned over the coming years. (author)

  15. The segregation of baryons and dark matter during halo assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Shihong; Frenk, Carlos S; Guo, Qi; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The standard galaxy formation theory assumes that baryons and dark matter are initially well-mixed before becoming segregated due to radiative cooling. We use non-radiative hydrodynamical simulations to explicitly examine this assumption and find that baryons and dark matter can also be segregated during the build-up of the halo. As a result, baryons in many haloes do not originate from the same Lagrangian region as the dark matter. When using the fraction of corresponding dark matter and gas particles in the initial conditions (the "paired fraction") as a proxy of the dark matter and gas segregation strength of a halo, on average about $25$ percent of the baryonic and dark matter of the final halo are segregated in the initial conditions. A consequence of this effect is that the baryons and dark matter of the same halo initially experience different tidal torques and thus their angular momentum vectors are often misaligned. This is at odds with the assumption of the standard galaxy formation model, and chall...

  16. Dark matter growth and baryon bias in an accelerating universe

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seokcheon

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the exact analytic solutions for the growths of the dark matter and the baryon in sub-horizon scale. The growth of the dark matter $\\delta_{\\DM}$ is related to that of the halos. Thus, the exact solution for the growth of the dark matter is important to obtain the proper properties of dark matter halos. However, the dark energy model dependence of $\\delta_{\\DM}$ is confused with the $\\delta_{\\DM}$ dependence on $\\Omega_{m}^{0}$. Thus, the careful investigation is necessary for ...

  17. Accurate initial conditions in mixed Dark Matter--Baryon simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Valkenburg, Wessel

    2016-01-01

    We quantify the error in the results of mixed baryon--dark-matter hydrodynamic simulations, stemming from outdated approximations for the generation of initial conditions. The error at redshift 0 in contemporary large simulations, is of the order of few to ten percent in the power spectra of baryons and dark matter, and their combined total-matter power spectrum. After describing how to properly assign initial displacements and peculiar velocities to multiple species, we review several approximations: (1) {using the total-matter power spectrum to compute displacements and peculiar velocities of both fluids}, (2) scaling the linear redshift-zero power spectrum back to the initial power spectrum using the Newtonian growth factor ignoring homogeneous radiation, (3) using longitudinal-gauge velocities with synchronous-gauge densities, and (4) ignoring the phase-difference in the Fourier modes for the offset baryon grid, relative to the dark-matter grid. Three of these approximations do not take into account that ...

  18. Tying dark matter to baryons with self-interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplinghat, Manoj; Keeley, Ryan E; Linden, Tim; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2014-07-11

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) models have been proposed to solve the small-scale issues with the collisionless cold dark matter paradigm. We derive equilibrium solutions in these SIDM models for the dark matter halo density profile including the gravitational potential of both baryons and dark matter. Self-interactions drive dark matter to be isothermal and this ties the core sizes and shapes of dark matter halos to the spatial distribution of the stars, a radical departure from previous expectations and from cold dark matter predictions. Compared to predictions of SIDM-only simulations, the core sizes are smaller and the core densities are higher, with the largest effects in baryon-dominated galaxies. As an example, we find a core size around 0.3 kpc for dark matter in the Milky Way, more than an order of magnitude smaller than the core size from SIDM-only simulations, which has important implications for indirect searches of SIDM candidates.

  19. On the separation between baryonic and dark matter: evidence for phantom dark matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Knebe, Alexander; Llinares, Claudio; Wu, Xufen; Zhao, HongSheng

    2009-01-01

    The recent years have seen combined measurements of X-ray and (weak) lensing contours for colliding galaxy clusters such as, for instance, the famous "Bullet" cluster. These observations have revealed offsets in the peaks of the baryonic and (dominant) gravitational matter component of order ~(100-200) kpc. Such discrepancies are difficult to explain using modified theories for gravity other than dark matter. Or are they not? Here we use the concept of "phantom dark matter" that is based upon...

  20. Constraining Dark Matter-Baryon Scattering with Linear Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorkin, Cora; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2013-01-01

    We derive constraints on elastic scattering between baryons and dark matter using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data from the Planck satellite and the Lyman-alpha forest data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Elastic scattering allows baryons and dark matter to exchange momentum, affecting the dynamics of linear density perturbations in the early Universe. We derive constraints to scattering cross sections of the form sigma \\propto v^n, allowing for a wide range of velocity dependencies with n between -4 and 2. We improve and correct previous estimates where they exist, including velocity-independent cross section as well as dark matter millicharge and electromagnetic dipole moments. Lyman-alpha forest data dominates the constraints for n>-3, where the improvement over CMB data alone can be several orders of magnitude. Dark matter-baryon scattering cannot affect the halo mass function on mass scales M>10^{12} M_{solar}. Our results imply, model-independently, that a baryon in the halo of a galaxy lik...

  1. Continuum-Mediated Dark Matter-Baryon Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Andrey; Sajjad, Aqil

    2016-01-01

    Many models of dark matter scattering with baryons may be treated either as a simple contact interaction or as the exchange of a light mediator particle. We study an alternative, in which a continuum of light mediator states may be exchanged. This could arise, for instance, from coupling to a sector which is approximately conformal at the relevant momentum transfer scale. In the non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter-baryon scattering, which is useful for parametrizing direct detection signals, the effect of such continuum mediators is to multiply the amplitude by a function of the momentum transfer q, which in the simplest case is just a power law. We develop the basic framework and study two examples: the case where the mediator is a scalar operator coupling to the Higgs portal (which turns out to be highly constrained) and the case of an antisymmetric tensor operator ${\\cal O}_{\\mu \

  2. Simultaneous Generation of WIMP Miracle-like Densities of Baryons and Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, John

    2012-09-01

    The observed density of dark matter is of the magnitude expected for a thermal relic weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP). In addition, the observed baryon density is within an order of magnitude of the dark matter density. This suggests that the baryon density is physically related to a typical thermal relic WIMP dark matter density. We present a model which simultaneously generates thermal relic WIMP-like densities for both baryons and dark matter by modifying a large initial baryon asymmetry. Production of unstable scalars carrying baryon number at the LHC would be a clear signature of the model.

  3. Generation of WIMP Miracle-like Densities of Baryons and Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, John

    2012-01-01

    The observed density of dark matter is of the magnitude expected for a thermal relic weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP). In addition, the observed baryon density is within an order of magnitude of the dark matter density. This suggests that the baryon density is physically related to a typical thermal relic WIMP dark matter density. We present a model which simultaneously generates thermal relic WIMP-like densities for both baryons and dark matter by modifying a large initial baryon asymmetry. Production of unstable scalars carrying baryon number at the LHC would be a clear signature of the model.

  4. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  5. Baryon Asymmetry and Dark Matter Through the Vector-Like Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Fileviez Perez, P.; Wise, M.

    2013-01-01

    A possible connection between the cosmological baryon asymmetry, dark matter and vector-like fermions is investigated. In this scenario an asymmetry generated through baryogenesis or leptogenesis (in the vector-like matter sector) connects the baryon asymmetry to the dark matter density. We present explicit renormalizable models where this connection occurs. These models have asymmetric dark matter and a significant invisible Higgs decay width to dark matter particles is possible. We refer to...

  6. Continuum-mediated dark matter-baryon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Andrey; Reece, Matthew; Sajjad, Aqil

    2016-06-01

    Many models of dark matter scattering with baryons may be treated either as a simple contact interaction or as the exchange of a light mediator particle. We study an alternative, in which a continuum of light mediator states may be exchanged. This could arise, for instance, from coupling to a sector which is approximately conformal at the relevant momentum transfer scale. In the non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter-baryon scattering, which is useful for parametrizing direct detection signals, the effect of such continuum mediators is to multiply the amplitude by a function of the momentum transfer q, which in the simplest case is just a power law. We develop the basic framework and study two examples: the case where the mediator is a scalar operator coupling to the Higgs portal (which turns out to be highly constrained) and the case of an antisymmetric tensor operator Oμν that mixes with the hypercharge field strength and couples to dark matter tensor currents, which has an interesting viable parameter space. We describe the effect of such mediators on the cross sections and recoil energy spectra that could be observed in direct detection.

  7. Explaining the Dark Energy, Baryon and Dark Matter Coincidence via Domain-Dependent Random Densities

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, John

    2013-01-01

    The dark energy, dark matter and baryon densities in the Universe are observed to be similar, with a factor of no more than 20 between the largest and smallest densities. We show that this coincidence can be understood via superhorizon domains of randomly varying densities when the baryon density at initial collapse of galaxy-forming perturbations is determined by anthropic selection. The baryon and dark matter densities are assumed to be dependent on random variables \\theta_{d} and \\theta_{b} according to \\rho_{dm} ~ \\theta_{d}^{\\alpha} and \\rho_{b} ~ \\theta_{b}^{\\beta}, while the effectively constant dark energy density is dependent upon a random variable \\phi_{Q} according to \\rho_{Q} ~ \\phi_{Q}^{n}. The ratio of the baryon density to the dark energy density at initial collapse, r_{Q}, and the baryon-to-dark matter ratio, r, are then determined purely statistically, with no dependence on the anthropically-preferred baryon density. We compute the probability distribution for r_{Q} and r and show that the ob...

  8. Theories relating baryon asymmetry and dark matter: a Mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eMorisi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nature of dark matter and the origin of the baryon asymmetry are two of the deepest mysteries of modern particle physics. In the absence of hints regarding a possible solution to these mysteries, many approaches have been developed to tackle them simultaneously { leading to very diverse and rich models}. We give a short review where we describe the general features of some of these models and an overview on the general problem. We also propose a diagrammatic notation to label the different models.

  9. Some Consequences of the Baryonic Dark Matter Population

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, R E

    2004-01-01

    Microlensed double-image quasars have sent a consistent message that the baryonic dark matter consists of a population of free-roaming planet mass objects, as summarized previously. These were previously predicted to have formed at the time of recombination, 300,000 years after the Big Bang, whence they collapsed on a Kelvin Helmholz time scale. Today they are glimpsed as the cometary knots in planetary nebulae. But they probably also nucleate the mysterious Lyman-alpha clouds and cause a reduction in the transparency of the universe to distant quasars and supernovae.

  10. Entropy, baryon asymmetry and dark matter from heavy neutrino decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, W.; Schmitz, K.; Vertongen, G.

    2011-04-15

    The origin of the hot phase of the early universe remains so far an unsolved puzzle. A viable option is entropy production through the decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos whose lifetimes determine the initial temperature. We show that baryogenesis and the production of dark matter are natural by-products of this mechanism. As is well known, the cosmological baryon asymmetry can be accounted for by lepto- genesis for characteristic neutrino mass parameters. We nd that thermal gravitino production then automatically yields the observed amount of dark matter, for the gravitino as the lightest superparticle and typical gluino masses. As an example, we consider the production of heavy Majorana neutrinos in the course of tachyonic preheating associated with spontaneous B-L breaking. A quantitative analysis leads to contraints on the superparticle masses in terms of neutrino masses: For a light neutrino mass of 10{sup -5} eV the gravitino mass can be as small as 200 MeV, whereas a lower neutrino mass bound of 0.01 eV implies a lower bound of 9 GeV on the gravitino mass. The measurement of a light neutrino mass of 0.1 eV would rule out heavy neutrino decays as the origin of entropy, visible and dark matter. (orig.)

  11. The joint evolution of baryons and dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Pedrosa, Susana E; Scannapieco, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the dark matter (DM) distribution in a approx 10^12 h^-1 M_sun mass halo extracted from a simulation consistent with the concordance cosmology, where the physics regulating the transformation of gas into stars was allowed to change producing galaxies with different morphologies. The presence of baryons produces the concentration of the DM halo with respect to its corresponding dissipationless run, but we found that this response does not only depend on the amount of baryons gathered in the central region but also on the way they have been assembled. DM and baryons affect each other in a complex way so the formation history of a galaxy plays an important role on its final total mass distribution. The Supernova (SN) feedback regulates the star formation and triggers galactic outflows not only in the central galaxy but also in their satellites. Our results suggest that, as the effects of SN feedback get stronger, satellites get less massive and can even be more easily disrupted by dynamical frict...

  12. Helioseismology with long-range dark matter-baryon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Ilídio [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofísica, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Panci, Paolo [CP3-Origins and DIAS, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense (Denmark); Silk, Joseph, E-mail: ilidio.lopes@tecnico.ulisboa.pt, E-mail: panci@iap.fr, E-mail: silk@astro.ox.ac.uk [Institut d' Astrophysique, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis Blvd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-11-10

    Assuming the existence of a primordial asymmetry in the dark sector, we study how long-range dark matter (DM)-baryon interactions, induced by the kinetic mixing of a new U(1) gauge boson and a photon, affect the evolution of the Sun and, in turn, the sound speed the profile obtained from helioseismology. Thanks to the explicit dependence on the exchanged momenta in the differential cross section (Rutherford-like scattering), we find that DM particles with a mass of ∼10 GeV, kinetic mixing parameter of the order of 10{sup –9}, and a mediator with a mass smaller than a few MeV improve the agreement between the best solar model and the helioseismic data without being excluded by direct detection experiments. In particular, the LUX detector will soon be able to either constrain or confirm our best-fit solar model in the presence of a dark sector with long-range interactions that reconcile helioseismology with thermal neutrino results.

  13. Entropy, Baryon Asymmetry and Dark Matter from Heavy Neutrino Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmuller, W; Vertongen, G

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the hot phase of the early universe remains so far an unsolved puzzle. A viable option is entropy production through the decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos whose lifetimes determine the initial temperature. We show that baryogenesis and the production of dark matter are natural by-products of this mechanism. As is well known, the cosmological baryon asymmetry can be accounted for by leptogenesis for characteristic neutrino mass parameters. We find that thermal gravitino production then automatically yields the observed amount of dark matter, for the gravitino as the lightest superparticle and typical gluino masses. As an example, we consider the production of heavy Majorana neutrinos in the course of tachyonic preheating associated with spontaneous B-L breaking. A quantitative analysis leads to contraints on the superparticle masses in terms of neutrino masses: For a light neutrino mass of 10^{-5} eV the gravitino mass can be as small as 200 MeV, whereas a lower neutrino mass bound of 0.01 eV im...

  14. The electroweak axion, dark energy, inflation and baryonic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous paper [1], the standard model was generalized to include an electroweak axion which carries baryon plus lepton number, B + L. It was shown that such a model naturally gives the observed value of the dark energy, if the scale of explicit baryon number violation A was chosen to be of the order of the Planck mass. In this paper, we consider the effect of the modulus of the axion field. Such a field must condense in order to generate the standard Goldstone boson associated with the phase of the axion field. This condensation breaks baryon number. We argue that this modulus might be associated with inflation. If an additional B − L violating scalar is introduced with a mass similar to that of the modulus of the axion field, we argue that decays of particles associated with this field might generate an acceptable baryon asymmetry

  15. The angular momentum of baryons and dark matter halos revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive mesh refinement, we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole....

  16. Baryon number asymmetry and dark matter in the neutrino mass model with an inert doublet

    OpenAIRE

    Kashiwase, Shoichi; Suematsu, Daijiro

    2012-01-01

    The radiative neutrino mass model with an inert doublet scalar has been considered as a promising candidate which can explain neutrino masses, dark matter abundance and baryon number asymmetry if dark matter is identified with the lightest neutral component of the inert doublet. We reexamine these properties by imposing all the data of the neutrino oscillation, which are recently suggested by the reactor experiments. We find that the sufficient baryon number asymmetry seems not to be easily g...

  17. Simultaneous Generation of WIMP Miracle-like Densities of Baryons and Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, John

    2011-01-01

    The observed density of dark matter is of the magnitude expected for a thermal relic weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP). In addition, the observed baryon density is within an order of magnitude of the dark matter density. This suggests that the baryon density is physically related to a typical thermal relic WIMP dark matter density. We present a model which simultaneously generates thermal relic WIMP-like densities for both baryons and dark matter by modifying a large initial baryon asymmetry. Dark matter is due to O(100) GeV gauge singlet scalars produced in the annihilation of the O(TeV) coloured scalars which is responsible for the final thermal WIMP-like baryon asymmetry. The requirement of no baryon washout implies that there are two gauge singlet scalars. The low temperature transfer of the asymmetry to conventional baryons can be understood if the long-lived O(TeV) coloured scalars have large hypercharge, |Y| > 4/3. Production of such scalars at the LHC would be a clear signature of the model.

  18. Composite bosonic baryon dark matter on the lattice: SU(4) baryon spectrum and the effective Higgs interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Appelquist, Thomas; Brower, Richard C; Buchoff, Michael I; Fleming, George T; Kiskis, Joe; Kribs, Graham D; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T; Osborn, James C; Rebbi, Claudio; Rinaldi, Enrico; Schaich, David; Schroeder, Chris; Syritsyn, Sergey; Voronov, Gennady; Vranas, Pavlos; Weinberg, Evan; Witzel, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    We present the spectrum of baryons in a new SU(4) gauge theory with fundamental fermion constituents. The spectrum of these bosonic baryons is of significant interest for composite dark matter theories. Here, we compare the spectrum and properties of SU(3) and SU(4) baryons, and then compute the dark-matter direct detection cross section via Higgs boson exchange for TeV-scale composite dark matter arising from a confining SU(4) gauge sector. Comparison with the latest LUX results leads to tight bounds on the fraction of the constituent-fermion mass that may arise from electroweak symmetry breaking. Lattice calculations of the dark matter mass spectrum and the Higgs-dark matter coupling are performed on quenched $16^{3} \\times 32$, $32^{3} \\times 64$, $48^{3} \\times 96$, and $64^{3} \\times128$ lattices with three different lattice spacings, using Wilson fermions with moderate to heavy pseudoscalar meson masses. Our results lay a foundation for future analytic and numerical study of composite baryonic dark matt...

  19. Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Einasto, Jaan

    2013-01-01

    I give a review of the development of the concept of dark matter. The dark matter story passed through several stages from a minor observational puzzle to a major challenge for theory of elementary particles. Modern data suggest that dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, and that it consists of some unknown non-baryonic particles. Dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, thus properties of dark matter particles determine the structure of the cosmic...

  20. Baryonic impact on the dark matter distribution in Milky Way-sized galaxies and their satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qirong; Marinacci, Federico; Maji, Moupiya; Li, Yuexing; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-05-01

    We study the impact of baryons on the distribution of dark matter in a Milky Way-sized halo by comparing a high-resolution, moving mesh cosmological simulation with its dark matter-only counterpart. We identify three main processes related to baryons - adiabatic contraction, tidal disruption, and reionization - which jointly shape the dark matter distribution in both the main halo and its subhaloes. The relative effect of each baryonic process depends strongly on the subhalo mass. For massive subhaloes with maximum circular velocity vmax > 35 km s-1, adiabatic contraction increases the dark matter concentration, making these haloes less susceptible to tidal disruption. For low-mass subhaloes with vmax abundance and internal structure of subhaloes suggests that galaxy formation and evolution models based on N-body simulations should include these physical processes as major components.

  1. Analysis of instability of systems composed by dark and baryonic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kremer, Gilberto M

    2015-01-01

    In this work the dynamics of self-gravitating systems composed by dark and baryonic matter was analyzed. Searching for a description of this dynamics, a system of Boltzmann equations for the two constituents and the Poisson equation for the gravitational field were employed. Through the solution of these equations the collapse criterion is determined from a dispersion relation. The collapse occurs in an unstable region where the solutions grow exponentially with time. Two cases were analyzed: (a) collisionless dark and baryonic matter and (b) collisionless baryons with self-interacting dark matter. For the former case it was shown that the unstable region becomes larger if the dispersion velocity of dark matter becomes larger than the one of the baryonic matter. For the later case it was shown that the unstable region becomes smaller by increasing the collision frequency of the self-interacting dark matter. The results obtained were also compared with the case where only the dark matter is present. The models...

  2. Understanding the internal dynamics of elliptical galaxies without non-baryonic dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Dabringhausen, J.; Kroupa, P.; Famaey, B.; Fellhauer, M.

    2016-01-01

    Assuming virial equilibrium and Newtonian dynamics, low-mass early-type galaxies have larger velocity dispersions than expected from the amount of baryons they contain. The conventional interpretation of this finding is that their dynamics is dominated by non-baryonic matter. However, there is also strong evidence that many low-mass early-type galaxies formed as tidal dwarf galaxies, which would contain almost no dark matter. Using an extensive catalogue of early-type galaxies, we therefore d...

  3. The impact of baryons on the direct detection of dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Chris; Savage, Christopher; Valluri, Monica; Freese, Katherine; Stinson, Gregory S.; Bailin, Jeremy

    2016-08-01

    The spatial and velocity distributions of dark matter particles in the Milky Way Halo affect the signals expected to be observed in searches for dark matter. Results from direct detection experiments are often analyzed assuming a simple isothermal distribution of dark matter, the Standard Halo Model (SHM). Yet there has been skepticism regarding the validity of this simple model due to the complicated gravitational collapse and merger history of actual galaxies. In this paper we compare the SHM to the results of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation to investigate whether or not the SHM is a good representation of the true WIMP distribution in the analysis of direct detection data. We examine two Milky Way-like galaxies from the MaGICC cosmological simulations (a) with dark matter only and (b) with baryonic physics included. The inclusion of baryons drives the shape of the DM halo to become more spherical and makes the velocity distribution of dark matter particles less anisotropic especially at large heliocentric velocities, thereby making the SHM a better fit. We also note that we do not find a significant disk-like rotating dark matter component in either of the two galaxy halos with baryons that we examine, suggesting that dark disks are not a generic prediction of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We conclude that in the Solar neighborhood, the SHM is in fact a good approximation to the true dark matter distribution in these cosmological simulations (with baryons) which are reasonable representations of the Milky Way, and hence can also be used for the purpose of dark matter direct detection calculations.

  4. The angular momentum of baryons and dark matter halos revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Kimm, Taysun; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive mesh refinement, we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r=0.1rvir. In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/rvir>0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its ...

  5. Effects of baryons on the dark matter distribution in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Matthieu

    2015-09-01

    Simulations including solely dark matter performed over the last three decades have delivered an accurate and robust description of the cosmic web and dark matter structures. With the advent of more precise cosmological probes, planned and ongoing, and dark matter detection experiments, this numerical modelling has to be improved to incorporate the complex non-linear and energetic processes taking place during galaxy formation. We use the ``Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environment'' (EAGLE) suite of cosmological simulations to investigate the effects of baryons and astrophysical processes on the underlying dark matter distribution. Many effects are expected and we investigate (i): the modification of the profile of halos from the Navarro-Frenk-White profile shape found in collisionless simulations, including the changes in the dark matter profiles themselves, (ii) the changes of the inner density profiles of rich clusters, where observations have suggested a deviation from the standard cold dark matter paradigm, (iii) the offset created by astrophysical process between the centre of galaxies and the centre of the dark matter halo in which they reside and, (iv) the changes in the shape of the dark matter profile due to baryons in the centre of Milky Way halos and the impact these changes have on the morphology of the annihilation signal that could be observed as an indirect proof of the existence of dark matter. In all cases we find that the baryons play a significant role and change the results found in collisionless simulations dramatically. This highlights the need for more simulations like EAGLE to better understand and analyse future cosmology surveys. We also conduct a thorough study of the hydrodynamics solver parameters used in these simulations, assess their impact on the simulated galaxy population and show how robust some of the EAGLE results are against such variations.

  6. Dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Einasto, J.

    2011-01-01

    I give a review of the development of the concept of dark matter. The dark matter story passed through several stages from a minor observational puzzle to a major challenge for theory of elementary particles. Modern data suggest that dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, and that it consists of some unknown non-baryonic particles. Properties of dark matter particles determine the structure of the cosmic web.

  7. Analysis of instability of systems composed by dark and baryonic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Gilberto M.; André, Raíla

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the dynamics of self-gravitating systems composed by dark and baryonic matter is analyzed. Searching for a description of this dynamics, a system of collisionless Boltzmann equations for the two constituents and the Poisson equation for the gravitational field are employed. Through the solution of these equations, the collapse criterion is determined from a dispersion relation. The collapse occurs in an unstable region where the solutions grow exponentially with time. It is shown that the unstable region becomes larger if the dispersion velocity of dark matter becomes larger than the one of the baryonic matter. The results obtained are also compared with the case where only the dark matter is present. The model of the present work has a higher limit of instability and therefore exhibited an advantage in the structure formation.

  8. Dark matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigman, Gary

    The observational evidence for dark matter in the universe is reviewed. Constraints on the baryon density from primordial nucleosynthesis are presented and compared to the dynamical estimates of the mass on various scales. Baryons can account for the observed luminous mass as well as some, perhaps most, of the 'observed' dark mass. However if, as inflation/naturalness suggest, the total density of the universe is equal to the critical density, then nonbaryonic dark matter is required. The assets and liabilities of, as well as the candidates for, hot and cold dark matter are outlined. At present, there is no completely satisfactory candidate for nonbaryonic dark matter.

  9. Impact of baryon physics on dark matter structures: a detailed simulation study of halo density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Duffy, Alan R; Kay, Scott T; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Battye, Richard A; Booth, C M

    2010-01-01

    The back-reaction of baryons on the dark matter halo density profile is of great interest, not least because it is an important systematic uncertainty when attempting to detect the dark matter. Here, we draw on a large suite of high resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, to systematically investigate this process and its dependence on the baryonic physics associated with galaxy formation. The inclusion of baryons results in significantly more concentrated density profiles if radiative cooling is efficient and feedback is weak. The dark matter halo concentration can in that case increase by as much as 30 (10) per cent on galaxy (cluster) scales. The most significant effects occur in galaxies at high redshift, where there is a strong anti-correlation between the baryon fraction in the halo centre and the inner slope of both the total and the dark matter density profiles. If feedback is weak, isothermal inner profiles form, in agreement with observations of massive, early-type galaxies. However, we ...

  10. Revisiting the gravitino dark matter and baryon asymmetry from Q-ball decay in gauge mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasuya, Shinta, E-mail: kasuya@kanagawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Kanagawa University, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, PO Box 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Kawasaki, Masahiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Yamada, Masaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2013-10-07

    We reconsider the Q-ball decay and reinvestigate the scenario that the amount of the baryons and the gravitino dark matter is naturally explained by the decay of the Q balls in the gauge-mediated SUSY breaking. We refine the decay rates into baryons, NLSPs, and gravitinos, and estimate their branching ratios based on the consideration of Pauli blocking. We obtain a smaller branching into gravitinos than the previous estimate, and the NLSPs are more produced by the Q-ball decay. However, the efficient annihilations of NLSPs occur afterward so that their abundance does not spoil the successful BBN and they only produce negligible amount of the gravitinos to the dark matter density by their decay. In this way, we find that the scenario with the direct production of the gravitino dark matter from the Q-ball decay works naturally.

  11. Understanding the internal dynamics of elliptical galaxies without non-baryonic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabringhausen, J.; Kroupa, P.; Famaey, B.; Fellhauer, M.

    2016-08-01

    Assuming virial equilibrium and Newtonian dynamics, low-mass early-type galaxies have larger velocity dispersions than expected from the amount of baryons they contain. The conventional interpretation of this finding is that their dynamics is dominated by non-baryonic matter. However, there is also strong evidence that many low-mass early-type galaxies formed as tidal dwarf galaxies, which would contain almost no dark matter. Using an extensive catalogue of early-type galaxies, we therefore discuss how the internal dynamics of early-type galaxies in general can be understood by replacing the assumption of non-baryonic dark matter with two alternative assumptions. The first assumption is that Milgromian dynamics (i.e., MOND) is valid, which changes the effective gravitational force in the weak-field limit. The second assumption is that binary stars affect the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersions. Some moderate discrepancies between observed and predicted velocity dispersions remain also when these effects are implemented. Nevertheless, the observed velocity dispersions in early-type galaxies can then easily be explained without invoking the presence of non-baryonic dark matter in them, but with already documented variations of the galaxy-wide stellar initial mass function and non-equilibrium dynamics in some of the low-mass early-type galaxies.

  12. Neutrino masses, dark matter and baryon asymmetry of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Ahriche, Amine

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we try to explain the neutrino mass and mixing data radiatively at three-loop by extending the standard model (SM) with two charged singlet scalars and three right handed (RH) neutrinos. Here, the lightest RH neutrino is a dark matter candidate that gives a relic density in agreement with the recent Planck data, the model can be consistent with the neutrino oscillation data, lepton flavor violating processes, the electroweak phase transition can be strongly first order; and the charged scalars may enhance the branching ratio $h\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$, where as $h\\rightarrow\\gamma Z$ get can get few percent suppression. We also discuss the phenomenological implications of the RH neutrinos at the collider.

  13. Baryonic impact on the dark matter distribution in Milky Way-size galaxies and their satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Qirong; Maji, Moupiya; Li, Yuexing; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of baryons on the distribution of dark matter in a Milky Way-size halo by comparing a high-resolution, moving-mesh cosmological simulation with its dark matter-only counterpart. We identify three main processes related to baryons -- adiabatic contraction, tidal disruption and reionization -- which jointly shape the dark matter distribution in both the main halo and its subhalos. The relative effect of each baryonic process depends strongly on the subhalo mass. For massive subhalos with maximum circular velocity $v_{\\rm max} > 35 km/s$, adiabatic contraction increases the dark matter concentration, making these halos less susceptible to tidal disruption. For low-mass subhalos with $v_{\\rm max} < 20 km/s$, reionization effectively reduces their mass on average by $\\approx$ 30% and $v_{\\rm max}$ by $\\approx$ 20%. For intermediate subhalos with $20 km/s < v_{\\rm max} < 35 km/s$, which share a similar mass range as the classical dwarf spheroidals, strong tidal truncation induced by the...

  14. The impact of baryons on the direct detection of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kelso, Chris; Valluri, Monica; Freese, Katherine; Stinson, Gregory S; Bailin, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    The spatial and velocity distributions of dark matter particles in the Milky Way Halo affect the signals expected to be observed in searches for dark matter. Results from direct detection experiments are often analyzed assuming a simple isothermal distribution of dark matter, the Standard Halo Model (SHM). Yet there has been skepticism regarding the validity of this simple model due to the complicated gravitational collapse and merger history of actual galaxies. In this paper we compare the SHM to the results of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation to investigate whether or not the SHM is a good representation of the true WIMP distribution in the analysis of direct detection data. We examine two Milky Way-like galaxies from the MaGICC cosmological simulations (a) with dark matter only and (b) with baryonic physics included. The inclusion of baryons drives the shape of the DM halo to become more spherical and makes the velocity distribution of dark matter particles less anisotropic espec...

  15. Dwarf galaxies in CDM and SIDM with baryons: observational probes of the nature of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Vogelsberger, Mark; Simpson, Christine; Jenkins, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    We present the first cosmological simulations of dwarf galaxies, which include dark matter self-interactions and baryons. We study two dwarf galaxies within cold dark matter, and four different elastic self-interacting scenarios with constant and velocity-dependent cross sections, motivated by a new force in the hidden dark matter sector. Our highest resolution simulation has a baryonic mass resolution of $1.8\\times 10^2\\,{\\rm M}_\\odot$ and a gravitational softening length of $34\\,{\\rm pc}$ at $z=0$. In this first study we focus on the regime of mostly isolated dwarf galaxies with halo masses $\\sim10^{10}\\,{\\rm M}_\\odot$ where dark matter dynamically dominates even at sub-kpc scales. We find that while the global properties of galaxies of this scale are minimally affected by allowed self-interactions, their internal structures change significantly if the cross section is large enough within the inner sub-kpc region. In these dark-matter-dominated systems, self-scattering ties the shape of the stellar distribu...

  16. A TeV scale model for neutrino mass, dark matter and baryon asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Seto, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a TeV scale model which would explain neutrino oscillation, dark matter, and baryon asymmetry of the Universe simultaneously by the dynamics of the extended Higgs sector and TeV-scale right-handed neutrinos with imposed an exact $Z_2$ symmetry. Tiny neutrino masses are generated at the three loop level, a singlet scalar field is a candidate of dark matter, and a strong first order phase transition is realized for successful electroweak baryogenesis. The model provides various discr...

  17. An extended Higgs sector for neutrino mass, dark matter and baryon asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Seto, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    In this talk, we discuss a TeV scale model which would explain neutrino oscillation, dark matter, and baryon asymmetry of the Universe simultaneously by the dynamics of the extended Higgs sector and TeV-scale right-handed neutrinos. By the imposed exact $Z_2$ symmetry, tiny neutrino masses are generated at the three loop level, and the stability of the dark matter candidate, an additional singlet scalar field, is guaranteed. The extra Higgs doublet is introduced not only for neutrino masses b...

  18. Cosmological phase transition, baryon asymmetry and dark matter Q-balls

    CERN Document Server

    Krylov, E; Rubakov, V

    2013-01-01

    We consider a mechanism of dark matter production in the course of first order phase transition. We assume that there is an asymmetry between X- and anti-X-particles of dark sector. In particular, it may be related to the baryon asymmetry. We also assume that the phase transition is so strongly first order, that X-particles do not permeate into the new phase. In this case, as the bubbles of old phase collapse, X-particles are packed into Q-balls with huge mass defect. These Q-balls compose the present dark matter. We find that the required present dark matter density is obtained for the energy scale of the theory in the ballpark of 1-10 TeV. As an example we consider a theory with effective potential of one-loop motivated form.

  19. Cuspy no more: how outflows affect the central dark matter and baryon distribution in Λ cold dark matter galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governato, F.; Zolotov, A.; Pontzen, A.; Christensen, C.; Oh, S. H.; Brooks, A. M.; Quinn, T.; Shen, S.; Wadsley, J.

    2012-05-01

    We examine the evolution of the inner dark matter (DM) and baryonic density profile of a new sample of simulated field galaxies using fully cosmological, Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM), high-resolution SPH+N-Body simulations. These simulations include explicit H2 and metal cooling, star formation (SF) and supernovae-driven gas outflows. Starting at high redshift, rapid, repeated gas outflows following bursty SF transfer energy to the DM component and significantly flatten the originally 'cuspy' central DM mass profile of galaxies with present-day stellar masses in the 104.5-109.8 M⊙ range. At z= 0, the central slope of the DM density profile of our galaxies (measured between 0.3 and 0.7 kpc from their centre) is well fitted by ρDM ∝ rα with α≃-0.5 + 0.35 log10(M★/108 M⊙), where M★ is the stellar mass of the galaxy and 4 < log M★ < 9.4. These values imply DM profiles flatter than those obtained in DM-only simulations and in close agreement with those inferred in galaxies from the THINGS and LITTLE THINGS surveys. Only in very small haloes, where by z= 0 SF has converted less than ˜0.03 per cent of the original baryon abundance into stars, outflows do not flatten the original cuspy DM profile out to radii resolved by our simulations. The mass (DM and baryonic) measured within the inner 500 pc of each simulated galaxy remains nearly constant over 4 orders of magnitudes in stellar mass for M★ < 109 M⊙. This finding is consistent with estimates for faint Local Group dwarfs and field galaxies. These results address one of the outstanding problems faced by the CDM model, namely the strong discrepancy between the original predictions of cuspy DM profiles and the shallower central DM distribution observed in galaxies.

  20. The baryonic Tully-Fisher Relation predicted by cold dark matter cosmogony

    CERN Document Server

    Desmond, Harry

    2012-01-01

    The baryonic Tully-Fisher Relation (TFR) is a tight relationship observed between baryonic mass and rotational velocity in spiral galaxies. Providing a theoretical basis for the TFR in the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) paradigm has proved problematic: simple calculations suggest too low a slope and too high a scatter. This paper aims to develop a rigorous prediction for the relation in the context of CDM by accounting for all relevant TFR-independent effects observed in numerical simulations of dark matter haloes, including their expected scatter. It is demonstrated that consistent treatment of these effects goes a large way towards reconciling the CDM prediction with the data; the normalisation becomes almost perfect, athough the slope remains somewhat too low. The predicted scatter is indeed too large, but may be reduced to near that of the data by accouting for observational selection effects.

  1. Marriage à-la-MOND: Baryonic dark matter in galaxy clusters and the cooling flow puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2008-05-01

    I start with a brief introduction to MOND phenomenology and its possible roots in cosmology—a notion that may turn out to be the most far reaching aspect of MOND. Next I discuss the implications of MOND for the dark matter (DM) doctrine: MOND's successes imply that baryons determine everything. For DM this would mean that the puny tail of leftover baryons in galaxies wags the hefty DM dog. This has to occur in many intricate ways, and despite the haphazard construction history of galaxies—a very tall order. I then concentrate on galaxy clusters in light of MOND, which still requires some yet undetected cluster dark matter, presumably in some baryonic form (CBDM). This CBDM might contribute to the heating of the X-ray emitting gas and thus alleviate the cooling flow puzzle. MOND, qua theory of dynamics, does not directly enter the microphysics of the gas; however, it does force a new outlook on the role of DM in shaping the cluster gas dynamics: MOND tells us that the cluster DM is not cold dark matter, is not so abundant, and is not expected in galaxies; it is thus not subject to constraints on baryonic DM in galaxies. The mass in CBDM required in a whole cluster is, typically, similar to that in hot gas, but is rather more centrally concentrated, totally dominating the core. The CBDM contribution to the baryon budget in the universe is thus small. Its properties, deduced for isolated clusters, are consistent with the observations of the "bullet cluster". Its kinetic energy reservoir is much larger than that of the hot gas in the core, and would suffice to keep the gas hot for many cooling times. Heating can be effected in various ways depending on the exact nature of the CBDM, from very massive black holes to cool, compact gas clouds.

  2. Marriage \\`a-la-MOND: Baryonic dark matter in galaxy clusters and the cooling flow puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2007-01-01

    I start with a brief introduction to MOND phenomenology and its possible roots in cosmology--a notion that may turn out to be the most far reaching aspect of MOND. Next I discuss the implications of MOND for the dark matter (DM) doctrine: MOND's successes imply that baryons determine everything. For DM this would mean that the puny tail of leftover baryons in galaxies wags the hefty DM dog. This has to occur in many intricate ways, and despite the haphazard construction history of galaxies--a very tall order. I then concentrate on galaxy clusters in light of MOND, which still requires some yet undetected cluster dark matter, presumably in some baryonic form (CBDM). This CBDM might contribute to the heating of the x-ray emitting gas and thus alleviate the cooling-flow puzzle. MOND, qua theory of dynamics, does not directly enter the microphysics of the gas; however, it does force a new outlook on the role of DM in shaping the cluster gasdynamics: MOND tells us that the cluster DM is not cold dark matter, is no...

  3. Asymmetric Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, David E.; Luty, Markus A.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a simple class of models in which the relic density of dark matter is determined by the baryon asymmetry of the universe. In these models a $B - L$ asymmetry generated at high temperatures is transfered to the dark matter, which is charged under $B - L$. The interactions that transfer the asymmetry decouple at temperatures above the dark matter mass, freezing in a dark matter asymmetry of order the baryon asymmetry. This explains the observed relation between the baryon and dark m...

  4. Understanding the internal dynamics of elliptical galaxies without non-baryonic dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Dabringhausen, J; Famaey, B; Fellhauer, M

    2016-01-01

    Assuming virial equilibrium and Newtonian dynamics, low-mass early-type galaxies have larger velocity dispersions than expected from the amount of baryons they contain. The conventional interpretation of this finding is that their dynamics is dominated by non-baryonic matter. However, there is also strong evidence that many low-mass early-type galaxies formed as tidal dwarf galaxies, which would contain almost no dark matter. Using an extensive catalogue of early-type galaxies, we therefore discuss how the internal dynamics of early-type galaxies in general can be understood by replacing the assumption of non-baryonic dark matter with two alternative assumptions. The first assumption is that Milgromian dynamics (i.e., MOND) is valid, which changes the effective gravitational force in the weak-field limit. The second assumption is that binary stars affect the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersions. Some moderate discrepancies between observed and predicted velocity dispersions remain also when these effec...

  5. Constraints on the interactions between dark matter and baryons from the x-ray quantum calorimetry experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the rocket-based x-ray quantum calorimetry (XQC) experiment was designed for x-ray spectroscopy, the minimal shielding of its calorimeters, its low atmospheric overburden, and its low-threshold detectors make it among the most sensitive instruments for detecting or constraining strong interactions between dark matter particles and baryons. We use Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the precise limits the XQC experiment places on spin-independent interactions between dark matter and baryons, improving upon earlier analytical estimates. We find that the XQC experiment rules out a wide range of nucleon-scattering cross sections centered around 1 b for dark matter particles with masses between 0.01 and 105 GeV. Our analysis also provides new constraints on cases where only a fraction of the dark matter strongly interacts with baryons

  6. Dark matter annihilation in the milky way galaxy: effects of baryonic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, F; Klypin, A; Flix, J; Martínez, M; Simonneau, E

    2004-12-10

    If the dark matter (DM), which is considered to constitute most of the mass of galaxies, is made of supersymmetric particles, the central region of our Galaxy should emit gamma rays produced by their annihilation. We use detailed models of the Milky Way to make accurate estimates of continuum gamma-ray fluxes. We argue that the most important effect, which was previously neglected, is the compression of the dark matter due to the infall of baryons to the galactic center: it boosts the expected signal by a factor 1000. To illustrate this effect, we computed the expected gamma fluxes in the minimal supergravity scenario. Our models predict that the signal could be detected at high confidence levels by imaging atmospheric C erenkov telescopes assuming that neutralinos make up most of the DM in the Universe.

  7. Baryonic Conversion Tree: The global assembly of stars and dark matter in galaxies from the SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, R; Heavens, A; Verde, L

    2004-01-01

    Using the spectroscopic sample of the SDSS DR1 we measure how gas was transformed into stars as a function of time and stellar mass: the baryonic conversion tree (BCT). There is a clear correlation between early star formation activity and present-day stellar mass: the more massive galaxies have converted about 80% of their baryons into stars at z>1, while for the less massive ones the value is only about 20%. In other words, while the dark matter halo formation is hierarchical (small objects form first and large objects later), the formation of their stellar component is anti-hierarchical (large galaxies are older in this respect than small ones). By comparing the BCT to the dark matter merger tree, we find indications that star formation efficiency at z>1 had to be high (~30%) in galaxies with present-day stellar mass larger than 2 x 10^{11}. Therefore, the LCDM paradigm can accommodate a large number of red objects; it is the high efficiency in the conversion from gas to stars that needs to be explained. O...

  8. Sharing but not Caring: Dark Matter and the Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Bernal, Nicolás; Fonseca, Nayara

    2016-01-01

    We consider scenarios where Dark Matter (DM) particles carry baryon and/or lepton numbers, which can be defined if there exist operators connecting the dark to the visible sector. As a result, the DM fields become intimately linked to the Standard Model (SM) ones and can be maximally asymmetric just like the ordinary matter. In particular, we discuss minimal scenarios where the DM is a complex scalar or a Dirac fermion coupled to operators with nonzero baryon and/or lepton numbers, and that consist of only SM fields. We consider an initial asymmetry stored in either the SM or the DM sector; the main role of these operators is to properly $share$ the asymmetry between the two sectors, in accordance with observations. After the chemical decoupling, the DM and SM sectors do $not$ $care$ about each other as there is only an ineffective communication between them. Once the DM mass is specified, the Wilson coefficients of these operators are fixed by the requirement of the correct transfer of the asymmetry. We stud...

  9. Sharing but not caring: dark matter and the baryon asymmetry of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Nicolás; Fong, Chee Sheng; Fonseca, Nayara

    2016-09-01

    We consider scenarios where Dark Matter (DM) particles carry baryon and/or lepton numbers, which can be defined if there exist operators connecting the dark to the visible sector. As a result, the DM fields become intimately linked to the Standard Model (SM) ones and can be maximally asymmetric just like the ordinary matter. In particular, we discuss minimal scenarios where the DM is a complex scalar or a Dirac fermion coupled to operators with nonzero baryon and/or lepton numbers, and that consist of only SM fields. We consider an initial asymmetry stored in either the SM or the DM sector; the main role of these operators is to properly share the asymmetry between the two sectors, in accordance with observations. After the chemical decoupling, the DM and SM sectors do not care about each other as there is only an ineffective communication between them. Once the DM mass is specified, the Wilson coefficients of these operators are fixed by the requirement of the correct transfer of the asymmetry. We study the phenomenology of this framework at colliders, direct detection and indirect detection experiments. In particular, the LHC phenomenology is very rich and can be tested in different channels such as the two same-sign leptons with two jets, monojet and monojet with a monolepton.

  10. Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Einasto, Jaan

    2009-01-01

    A review of the development of the concept of dark matter is given. I begin the review with the description of the discovery of the mass paradox in our Galaxy and in clusters of galaxies. In mid 1970s the amount of observational data was sufficient to suggest the presence of a massive and invisible population around galaxies and in clusters of galaxies. The nature of the dark population was not clear at that time, but the hypotheses of stellar as well as of gaseous nature of the new population had serious difficulties. These difficulties disappeared when non-baryonic nature of dark matter was suggested in early 1980s. In addition to the presence of Dark Matter, recent observations suggest the presence of Dark Energy, which together with Dark Matter and ordinary baryonic matter makes the total matter/energy density of the Universe equal to the critical cosmological density. There are various hypothesis as for the nature of the dark matter particles, and generally some form of weakly interactive massive particl...

  11. Influence of baryons on the orbital structure of dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Bryan, S E; Kay, S T; Schaye, J; Vecchia, C Dalla; Booth, C M

    2011-01-01

    We explore the dynamical signatures imprinted by baryons on dark matter haloes during the formation process using the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS), a set of state-of-the-art high resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We present a detailed study of the effects of the implemented feedback prescriptions on the orbits of dark matter particles, stellar particles and subhaloes, analysing runs with no feedback, with stellar feedback and with feedback from supermassive black holes. We focus on the central regions (0.25 r_{200}) of haloes with virial masses ~ 6 x 10^{13} (~ 7 x 10^{11}) Msun/h at z = 0(2). We also investigate how the orbital content of these haloes depends on several key parameters such as their mass, redshift and dynamical state. The results of spectral analyses of the orbital content of these simulations are compared, and the change in fraction of box, tube and irregular orbits are quantified. Box orbits are found to dominate the orbital structure of dark matter haloes in co...

  12. Baryonic matter and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We summarize recent developments in identifying the ground state of dense baryonic matter and beyond. The topics include deconfinement from baryonic matter to quark matter, a diquark mixture, topological effect coupled with chirality and density, and inhomogeneous chiral condensates.

  13. Baryonic Distributions in Galaxy Dark Matter Haloes I: New Observations of Neutral and Ionized Gas Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Emily E; Barnes, K L; Staudaher, S; Dale, D A; Braun, T T; Wavle, D C; Dalcanton, J J; Bullock, J S; Chandar, R

    2016-01-01

    We present a combination of new and archival neutral hydrogen (HI) observations and new ionized gas spectroscopic observations for sixteen galaxies in the statistically representative EDGES kinematic sample. HI rotation curves are derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) as well as processed data products from the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope (WSRT). The HI rotation curves are supplemented with optical spectroscopic integral field unit (IFU) observations using SparsePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to constrain the central ionized gas kinematics in twelve galaxies. The full rotation curves of each galaxy are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6$\\mu$m images from the Spitzer Space Telescope for the stellar content, the neutral hydrogen data for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. Differences in the inferred distribution of mass are illustrated under fixe...

  14. Addressing the too big to fail problem with baryon physics and sterile neutrino dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lovell, Mark R; Bose, Sownak; Boyarsky, Alexey; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    N-body dark matter simulations of structure formation in the $\\Lambda$CDM model predict a population of subhalos within Galactic halos that have higher central densities than inferred for satellites of the Milky Way, a tension known as the `too big to fail' problem. Proposed solutions include baryonic effects, a smaller mass for the Milky Way halo, and warm dark matter. We test these three possibilities using a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation to generate luminosity functions for Milky Way halo-analogue satellite populations, the results of which are then coupled to the Jiang & van den Bosch model of subhalo stripping to predict the subhalo $V_\\mathrm{max}$ functions for the 10 brightest satellites. We find that selecting the brightest satellites (as opposed to the most massive) and modelling the expulsion of gas by supernovae at early times increases the likelihood of generating the observed Milky Way satellite $V_\\mathrm{max}$ function. The preferred halo mass is $6\\times10^{11}M_{\\odot}$, which ...

  15. Interacting photon-baryon fluid, warm dark matter, and the first acoustic peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabris, Julio C.; Velasquez-Toribio, Alan M.; Zimdahl, Winfried [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica, Vitoria, Espirito Santo (Brazil); Shapiro, Ilya L. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Departamento de Fisica-ICE, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-15

    The Reduced Relativistic Gas (RRG) model was introduced by A. Sakharov in 1965 for deriving the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum. It was recently reinvented by some of us to achieve an interpolation between the radiation and dust epochs in the evolution of the Universe. This model circumvents the complicated structure of the Boltzmann-Einstein system of equations and admits a transparent description of warm-dark-matter effects. It is extended here to include, on a phenomenological basis, an out-of-equilibrium interaction between radiation and baryons which is supposed to account for relevant aspects of pre-recombination physics in a simplified manner. Furthermore, we use the tight-coupling approximation to explore the influence of both this interaction and of the RRG warmness parameter on the anisotropy spectrum of the CMB. The predictions of the model are very similar to those of the ΛCDM model if both the interaction and the dark-matter warmness parameters are of the order of 10{sup -4} or smaller. As far as the warmness parameter is concerned, this is in good agreement with previous estimations on the basis of results from structure formation. (orig.)

  16. Interacting photon-baryon fluid, warm dark matter and the first acoustic peak

    CERN Document Server

    Fabris, Julio C; Zimdahl, Winfried; Shapiro, Ilya L

    2013-01-01

    The Reduced Relativistic Gas (RRG) model was introduced by A. Sakharov in 1965 for deriving the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum. It was recently reinvented by some of us to achieve an interpolation between the radiation and dust epochs in the evolution of the Universe. This model circumvents the complicated structure of the Boltzmann-Einstein system of equations and admits a transparent description of warm-dark-matter effects. It is extended here to include, on a phenomenological basis, an out-of-equilibrium interaction between radiation and baryons which is supposed to account for relevant aspects of pre-recombination physics in a simplified manner. Furthermore, we use the tight-coupling approximation to explore the influence of both this interaction and of the RRG warmness parameter on the anisotropy spectrum of the CMB. The predictions of the model are very similar to those of the {\\Lambda}CDM model if both the interaction and the dark-matter warmness parameters are of the order of $10^{-4}$ or ...

  17. CFHTLenS: The relation between galaxy dark matter haloes and baryons from weak gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Velander, Malin; Hoekstra, Henk; Coupon, Jean; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Kitching, Thomas D; Mellier, Yannick; Miller, Lance; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Bonnett, Christopher; Fu, Liping; Giodini, Stefania; Hudson, Michael J; Kuijken, Konrad; Rowe, Barnaby; Schrabback, Tim; Semboloni, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the relation between dark matter halo mass and the baryonic content of host galaxies, quantified through luminosity and stellar mass. Our investigation uses 154 deg2 of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) lensing and photometric data, obtained from the CFHT Legacy Survey. We employ a galaxy-galaxy lensing halo model which allows us to constrain the halo mass and the satellite fraction, and our analysis is limited to lenses at redshifts between 0.2 and 0.4. We express the relationship between halo mass and baryonic observable as a power law. For the luminosity-halo mass relation we find a slope of 1.56+0.04-0.06 and a normalisation of 1.26+0.07-0.06x10^13 h70^-1 Msun for red galaxies, while for blue galaxies the best-fit slope is 0.73+0.09-0.08 and the normalisation is 0.16+/-0.03x10^13 h70^-1 Msun. Similarly, we find a best-fit slope of 1.49+0.06-0.04 and a normalisation of 1.30+0.05-0.09x10^13 h70^-1 Msun for the stellar mass-halo mass relation of red galaxies, whil...

  18. Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Zacek, Viktor

    2007-01-01

    The nature of the main constituents of the mass of the universe is one of the outstanding riddles of cosmology and astro-particle physics. Current models explaining the evolution of the universe, and measurements of the various components of its mass, all have in common that an appreciable contribution to that mass is non-luminous and non-baryonic, and that a large fraction of this so-called dark matter must be in the form of non-relativistic massive particles (Cold Dark Matter: CDM). In the ...

  19. Astrophysical constraints on dark-matter Q-balls in the presence of baryon-violating operators

    CERN Document Server

    Cotner, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model predict the existence of non-topological solitons, Q-balls. Assuming the standard cosmological history preceded by inflation, Q-balls can form in the early universe and can make up the dark matter. The relatively large masses of such dark-matter particles imply a low number density, making direct detection very challenging. The strongest limits come from the existence of neutron stars because, if a baryonic Q-ball is captured by a neutron star, the Q-ball can absorb the baryon number releasing energy and eventually destroying a neutron star. However, in the presence of baryon number violating higher-dimension operators, the growth of a Q-ball inside a neutron star is hampered once the Q-ball reaches a certain size. We re-examine the limits and identify some classes of higher-dimensional operators for which supersymmetric Q-balls can account for dark matter. The present limits leave a wide range of parameters available for dark matter in the form of supersymmetri...

  20. Tully-Fisher relation, key to dark matter companion of baryonic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Sobouti, Y; Haghi, H

    2009-01-01

    Rotation curves of spiral galaxies \\emph{i}) fall off much less steeply than the Keplerian curves do, and \\emph{ii}) have far-distance asymptotic speeds (almost) proportional to the fourth root of the mass of the galaxy, the Tully-Fisher relation. These features alone are sufficient to assign a dark companion to the galaxy in an unambiguous way. In regions exterior to a spherical system, we design a spherically symmetric spacetime to accommodate the idiosyncracy just quoted. In the weak field regime, an excess gravitation over what the observable matter can produce, emerges. We attribute it to a hypothetical dark perfect fluid companion to the galaxy, and resort to the Tully-Fisher relation to deduce its density and pressure. The dark density turns out to be proportional to the square root of the mass of the galaxy, and to fall off as $r^{-(2+\\alpha)}, ~\\alpha\\ll 1$. The dark equation of state is barrotropic. For the interior of the configuration, we require the continuity of the total force field at the boun...

  1. Neutrino mass, dark matter, and Baryon asymmetry via TeV-scale physics without fine-tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Seto, Osamu

    2009-02-01

    We propose an extended version of the standard model, in which neutrino oscillation, dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe can be simultaneously explained by the TeV-scale physics without assuming a large hierarchy among the mass scales. Tiny neutrino masses are generated at the three-loop level due to the exact Z2 symmetry, by which the stability of the dark matter candidate is guaranteed. The extra Higgs doublet is required not only for the tiny neutrino masses but also for successful electroweak baryogenesis. The model provides discriminative predictions especially in Higgs phenomenology, so that it is testable at current and future collider experiments. PMID:19257506

  2. Neutrino mass, Dark Matter and Baryon Asymmetry via TeV-Scale Physics without Fine-Tuning

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Seto, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    We propose an extended version of the standard model, in which neutrino oscillation, dark matter, and baryon asymmetry of the Universe can be simultaneously explained by the TeV-scale physics without assuming unnatural hierarchy among the mass scales. Tiny neutrino masses are generated at the three loop level due to the exact $Z_2$ symmetry, by which stability of the dark matter candidate is guaranteed. The extra Higgs doublet is required not only for the tiny neutrino masses but also for suc...

  3. ILC phenomenology in a TeV scale radiative seesaw model for neutrino mass, dark matter and baryon asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Seto, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    We discuss phenomenology in a new TeV scale model which would explain neutrino oscillation, dark matter, and baryon asymmetry of the Universe simultaneously by the dynamics of the extended Higgs sector and TeV-scale right-handed neutrinos. Tiny neutrino masses are generated at the three-loop level due to the exact $Z_2$ symmetry, by which the stability of the dark matter candidate is guaranteed. The model provides various discriminative predictions in Higgs phenomenology, which can be tested ...

  4. Neutrino mass, dark matter, and Baryon asymmetry via TeV-scale physics without fine-tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Seto, Osamu

    2009-02-01

    We propose an extended version of the standard model, in which neutrino oscillation, dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe can be simultaneously explained by the TeV-scale physics without assuming a large hierarchy among the mass scales. Tiny neutrino masses are generated at the three-loop level due to the exact Z2 symmetry, by which the stability of the dark matter candidate is guaranteed. The extra Higgs doublet is required not only for the tiny neutrino masses but also for successful electroweak baryogenesis. The model provides discriminative predictions especially in Higgs phenomenology, so that it is testable at current and future collider experiments.

  5. Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Zacek, Viktor

    2007-01-01

    The nature of the main constituents of the mass of the universe is one of the outstanding riddles of cosmology and astro-particle physics. Current models explaining the evolution of the universe, and measurements of the various components of its mass, all have in common that an appreciable contribution to that mass is non-luminous and non-baryonic, and that a large fraction of this so-called dark matter must be in the form of non-relativistic massive particles (Cold Dark Matter: CDM). In the spirit of the Lake Louise Winter Institute Lectures we take a look at the latest astronomical discoveries and report on the status of direct and indirect Dark Matter searches.

  6. Effects of baryons on the dark matter distribution in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Schaller, Matthieu; Frenk, Carlos S.; Bower, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Simulations including solely dark matter performed over the last three decades have delivered an accurate and robust description of the cosmic web and dark matter structures. With the advent of more precise cosmological probes, planned and ongoing, and dark matter detection experiments, this numerical modelling has to be improved to incorporate the complex non-linear and energetic processes taking place during galaxy formation. We use the ``Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environ...

  7. Baryonic distributions in galaxy dark matter haloes - I. New observations of neutral and ionized gas kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Emily E.; van Zee, L.; Barnes, K. L.; Staudaher, S.; Dale, D. A.; Braun, T. T.; Wavle, D. C.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; Chandar, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present a combination of new and archival neutral hydrogen (H I) observations and new ionized gas spectroscopic observations for 16 galaxies in the statistically representative Extended Disk Galaxy Explore Science kinematic sample. H I rotation curves are derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) as well as processed data products from the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope (WSRT). The H I rotation curves are supplemented with optical spectroscopic integral field unit (IFU) observations using SparsePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to constrain the central ionized gas kinematics in 12 galaxies. The full rotation curves of each galaxy are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6μm images from the Spitzer Space Telescope for the stellar content, the neutral hydrogen data for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. Differences in the inferred distribution of mass are illustrated under fixed stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and maximum disc/bulge assumptions in the rotation curve decomposition.

  8. Disentangling Baryons and Dark Matter in the Spiral Gravitational Lens B1933+503

    CERN Document Server

    Suyu, S H; McKean, J P; Fassnacht, C D; Treu, T; Halkola, A; Norbury, M; Jackson, N; Schneider, P; Thompson, D; Auger, M W; Koopmans, L V E; Matthews, K

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the relative mass contributions of luminous and dark matter in spiral galaxies is important for understanding their formation and evolution. The combination of a galaxy rotation curve and strong lensing is a powerful way to break the disk-halo degeneracy that is inherent in each of the methods individually. We present an analysis of the 10-image radio spiral lens B1933+503 at z_l=0.755, incorporating (1) new global VLBI observations, (2) new adaptive-optics assisted K-band imaging, (3) new spectroscopic observations for the lens galaxy rotation curve and the source redshift. We construct a three-dimensionally axisymmetric mass distribution with 3 components: an exponential profile for the disk, a point mass for the bulge, and an NFW profile for the halo. The mass model is simultaneously fitted to the kinematics and the lensing data. The NFW halo needs to be oblate with a flattening of a/c=0.33^{+0.07}_{-0.05} to be consistent with the radio data. This suggests that baryons are effective at making th...

  9. Structure of Dark Matter and Baryons in AMIBA SZE Galaxy Clusters (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Paul

    2010-01-01

    We propose deep BR_cz' imaging with Suprime-Cam of several hot X-ray (> 8 keV) clusters of galaxies for which Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) observations are underway at 3mm with the Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) and superb resolution HST/ACS strong lensing (SL) data are readily available. Joint weak lensing (WL), SL, multicolor imaging, and SZE observations, combined with archival X-ray data, will probe in a model-independent manner the structure of dark matter, member galaxies, and the hot cluster gas in rich cluster environments. Our targets are composed of a class of the most massive clusters at moderate redshifts (0.2 <~ z <~ 0.7), allowing us to derive reliable WL shape measurements and thus accurate mass profiles out to the cluster virial radius. Our proposal aims to (1) map out the mass distribution in clusters via WL techniques, and compare with the distributions of hot and cold baryonic components, (2) make an accurate determination of the cluster mass profile from a joint WL+SL analysis, (3) derive cluster gas-mass fraction profiles free from the hydrostatic equilibrium assumption, and (4) examine directly the cluster mass vs. SZE observable relation, which will provide an important basis for cosmological tests with upcoming blind SZE surveys.

  10. Dense Baryonic Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at SIS energies address fundamental aspects of modern nuclear physics: the determination of the nuclear equation-of-state at high baryon densities and the properties of hadrons in dense nuclear matter. Experimental data and theoretical results will be reviewed. Future experiments at the FAIR accelerator aim at the exploration of the QCD phase diagram at highest baryon densities. The proposal for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will be presented. (author)

  11. Antibaryonic dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbunov, D

    2013-01-01

    Assuming existence of (very) heavy fourth generation of quarks and antiquarks we argue that antibaryon composed of the three heavy antiquarks can be light, stable and invisible, hence a good candidate for the Dark matter particle. Such opportunity allows to keep the baryon number conservation for the generation of the visible baryon asymmetry. The dark matter particles traveling through the ordinary matter will annihilate with nucleons inducing proton(neutron)-decay-like events with ~5GeV energy release in outcoming particles.

  12. Cosmological perturbation theory for baryons and dark matter I. One-loop corrections in the RPT framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somogyi, Gabor [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Smith, Robert E. [Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2009-10-15

    We generalize the ''renormalized'' perturbation theory (RPT) formalism of M. Crocce and R. Scoccimarro (2006) to deal with multiple fluids in the Universe and here we present the complete calculations up to the one-loop level in the RPT. We apply this approach to the problem of following the nonlinear evolution of baryon and cold dark matter (CDM) perturbations, evolving from the distinct sets of initial conditions, from the high redshift post-recombination Universe right through to the present day. In current theoretical and numerical models of structure formation, it is standard practice to treat baryons and CDM as an effective single matter fluid - the so called dark matter only modeling. In this approximation, one uses a weighed sum of late time baryon and CDM transfer functions to set initial mass fluctuations. In this paper we explore whether this approach can be employed for high precision modeling of structure formation. We show that, even if we only follow the linear evolution, there is a large-scale scale-dependent bias between baryons and CDM for the currently favored WMAP5 {lambda}CDM model. This time evolving bias is significant (> 1%) until the present day, when it is driven towards unity through gravitational relaxation processes. Using the RPT formalism we test this approximation in the non-linear regime. We show that the non-linear CDM power spectrum in the 2-component fluid differs from that obtained from an effective mean-mass 1-component fluid by {proportional_to} 3% on scales of order k {proportional_to} 0.05 h Mpc{sup -1} at z = 10, and by {proportional_to} 0.5% at z = 0. However, for the case of the non-linear evolution of the baryons the situation is worse and we find that the power spectrum is suppressed, relative to the total matter, by {proportional_to} 15% on scales k {proportional_to} 0.05 hMpc{sup -1} at z = 10, and by {proportional_to} 3 - 5% at z = 0. Importantly, besides the suppression of the spectrum, the

  13. Baryons do trace dark matter 380,000 years after the big bang: Search for compensated isocurvature perturbations with WMAP 9-year data

    CERN Document Server

    Grin, Daniel; Holder, Gilbert; Doré, Olivier; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Primordial isocurvature fluctuations between photons and either neutrinos or non-relativistic species such as baryons or dark matter are known to be sub-dominant to adiabatic fluctuations. Perturbations in the relative densities of baryons and dark matter (known as compensated isocurvature perturbations, or CIPs), however, are surprisingly poorly constrained. CIPs leave no imprint in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on observable scales, at least at linear order in their amplitude and zeroth order in the amplitude of adiabatic perturbations. It is thus not yet empirically known if baryons trace dark matter at the surface of last scattering. If CIPs exist, they would spatially modulate the Silk damping scale and acoustic horizon, causing distinct fluctuations in the CMB temperature/polarization power spectra across the sky: this effect is first order in both the CIP and adiabatic mode amplitudes. Here, temperature data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) are used to conduct the first CMB-...

  14. Dark galactic halos without dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Nesbet, R. K.

    2011-01-01

    Using standard Einstein theory, baryonic mass cannot account for observed galactic rotation velocities and gravitational lensing, attributed to galactic dark matter halos. In contrast, theory constrained by Weyl conformal scaling symmetry explains observed galactic rotation in the halo region without invoking dark matter. An explanation of dark halos, gravitational lensing, and structural stabilization, without dark matter and consistent with conformal theory, is proposed here. Condensation o...

  15. Quirky composite dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kribs, Graham D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Terning, John; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2010-05-01

    We propose a new dark matter candidate, “quirky dark matter,” that is a scalar baryonic bound state of a new non-Abelian force that becomes strong below the electroweak scale. The bound state is made of chiral quirks: new fermions that transform under both the new strong force as well as in a chiral representation of the electroweak group, acquiring mass from the Higgs mechanism. Electric charge neutrality of the lightest baryon requires approximately degenerate quirk masses which also causes the charge radius of the bound state to be negligible. The abundance is determined by an asymmetry that is linked to the baryon and lepton numbers of the universe through electroweak sphalerons. Dark matter elastic scattering with nuclei proceeds through Higgs exchange as well as an electromagnetic polarizability operator which is just now being tested in direct detection experiments. A novel method to search for quirky dark matter is to look for a gamma-ray “dark line” spectroscopic feature in galaxy clusters that result from the quirky Lyman-alpha or quirky hyperfine transitions. Colliders are expected to dominantly produce quirky mesons, not quirky baryons, consequently large missing energy is not the primary collider signal of the physics associated with quirky dark matter.

  16. A Testable Conspiracy: Simulating Baryonic Effects on Self-Interacting Dark Matter Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Elbert, Oliver D; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Graus, Andrew S; Rocha, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the response of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) halos to the growth of galaxy potentials using idealized simulations, each run in tandem with standard collisionless Cold Dark Matter (CDM). We find a greater diversity in the SIDM halo profiles compared to the CDM halo profiles. If the stellar gravitational potential strongly dominates in the central parts of a galaxy, then SIDM halos can be as dense as CDM halos on observable scales. For extreme cases with highly compact disks core collapse can occur, leading to SIDM halos that are denser and cuspier than their CDM counterparts. If the stellar potential is not dominant, then SIDM halos retain constant density cores with densities far below CDM predictions. When a disk potential is present, the inner SIDM halo becomes \\em{more flattened} in the disk plane than the CDM halo. These results are in excellent quantitative agreement with the predictions of Kaplinghat et al. (2014). We also simulated a galaxy cluster halo with a central stellar dist...

  17. The Entire Virial Radius of the Fossil Cluster RXJ1159+5531: II. Dark Matter and Baryon Fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Buote, David A; Gastaldello, Fabio; Brighenti, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    In this second paper on the entire virial region of the relaxed fossil cluster RXJ1159+5531, we present a hydrostatic analysis of the hot intracluster medium (ICM). For a model consisting of ICM, stellar mass from the central galaxy (BCG), and an NFW dark matter (DM) halo, we obtain good descriptions of the projected radial profiles of ICM emissivity and temperature. The BCG stellar mass is clearly detected with M_star/L_K = 0.61 +/- 0.11 solar, consistent with stellar population synthesis models for a Milky-Way IMF. We obtain a halo concentration, c_200 =8.4 +/- 1.0, and virial mass, M_200 = 7.9 +/- 0.6 x 10^13 M_sun. For its mass, the inferred concentration is larger than most relaxed halos produced in cosmological simulations with Planck parameters, consistent with RXJ1159+5531 forming earlier than the general halo population. The baryon fraction at r_200, f_b,200 = 0.134 +/- 0.007, is slightly below the Planck value (0.155) for the universe. When we account for the stellar baryons associated with non-cent...

  18. Dark Matter with Variable Masses

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan

    1992-01-01

    String effective theories contain a dilaton scalar field which couples to gravity, matter and radiation. In general, particle masses will have different dilaton couplings. We can always choose a conformal frame in which baryons have constant masses while (non--baryonic) dark matter have variable masses, in the context of a scalar--tensor gravity theory. We are interested in the phenomenology of this scenario. Dark matter with variable masses could have a measurable effect on the dynamical mot...

  19. Dissecting Galaxy Formation: I. Comparison Between Pure Dark Matter and Baryonic Models

    CERN Document Server

    Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Heller, Clayton; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2009-01-01

    We compare assembly of DM halos with and without baryons, within the context of cosmological evolution in the LCDM WMAP3 Universe (baryons+DM, BDM model, and pure DM, PDM model). In representative PDM and BDM models we find that baryons contribute decisively to the evolution of the central region, leading to an isothermal DM cusp, and to a flat DM density core -- the result of heating by dynamical friction of the substructure during a quiescent evolution epoch. This process ablates the cold gas from an embedded disk, cutting the star formation rate by ~10, and heats up the spheroidal gas and stellar components, triggering their expansion. The substructure is more resilient in the presence of baryons. The disk which formed from inside-out as gas dominated, is transformed into an intermediate Hubble type by z ~ 2 and to an early type by z ~ 0.5, based on its gas contents and spheroidal-to-disk stellar mass ratio. Only a relatively small ~20% fraction of DM particles in PDM and BDM models are bound within the ra...

  20. Constraining the Baryon-Dark Matter Relative Velocity with the Large-Scale 3-Point Correlation Function of the SDSS BOSS DR12 CMASS Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Slepian, Zachary; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Blazek, Jonathan A.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; McEwen, Joseph E.; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We search for a galaxy clustering bias due to a modulation of galaxy number with the baryon-dark matter relative velocity resulting from recombination-era physics. We find no detected signal and place the constraint $b_v < 0.01$ on the relative velocity bias for the CMASS galaxies. This bias is an important potential systematic of Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) method measurements of the cosmic distance scale using the 2-point clustering. Our limit on the relative velocity bias indicates a...

  1. Familon model of dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdyuzha, V.; Lalakulich, O.; Ponomarev, Yu.; Vereshkov, G.

    2004-05-01

    If the next fundamental level of matter occurs (preons), then dark matter must consist of familons containing a 'hot' component from massless particles and a 'cold' component from massive particles. During the evolution of the Universe this dark matter occurred up to late-time relativistic phase transitions the temperatures of which were different. Fluctuations created by these phase transitions had a fractal character. As a result the structuration of dark matter (and therefore the baryon subsystem) occurred, and in the Universe some characteristic scales which have caused this phenomenon arise naturally. Familons are collective excitations of non-perturbative preon condensates that could be produced during an earlier relativistic phase transition. For structuration of dark matter (and the baryon component), three generations of particles are necessary. The first generation of particles produced the observed baryon world. The second and third generations produced dark matter from particles that appeared when symmetry between the generations was spontaneously broken.

  2. Familon Model of Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Burdyuzha, V; Ponomarev, Yu; Vereshkov, G

    2008-01-01

    If the next fundamental level of matter occurs (preons) then dark matter must consist of familons containing a "hot" component from massless particles and a "cold" component from massive particles. During evolution of the Universe this dark matter was undergone to late-time relativistic phase transitions temperatures of which were different. Fluctuations created by these phase transitions have had a fractal character. In the result the structurization of dark matter (and therefore the baryon subsystem) has taken place and in the Universe some characteristic scales which have printed this phenomenon arise naturally. Familons are collective excitations of nonperturbative preon condensates which could be produced during more early relativistic phase transition. For structurization of dark matter (and baryon component) three generations of particles are necessary. The first generation of particles has produced the observed baryon world. The second and third generations have produced dark matter from particles whi...

  3. A search for non-baryonic dark matter using an ionisation bolometer in the edelweiss experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EDELWEISS experiment is an underground direct-detection search for hypothetical supersymmetric WIMPs that might solve the problem of dark matter. We have employed a cryogenic 70 g germanium ionisation bolometer, in which a WIMP would scatter elastically off a nucleus, creating both a heat and an ionisation signal. To offset the various electronic noises present in our necessarily small signals, we have s applied an optimal filtering technique in the frequency domain. This allows us to reach resolutions of 1.2 keV FWHM at 122 keV on north channels. It also provides good separation right down to low energies between the expected signal of nuclear recoils, and the photonic background of electron recoils which ionize more for a given energy. Calibration data show that we are able to reject 99.7 % of this background, while keeping 95% of the signal. However, our 1.17 kg.days of data searching for WIMPs show a third population encroaching on the expected signal. This is probably due to low energy photons or electrons interacting in the outer layers of the crystal, where charges are incompletely collected. Nevertheless, by trading off half of the conserved signal, we still manage to reject 98.5 % of the background. Thus the raw rate of 40 evts/d/kg/keV yields a conservative 90 % upper limit on the signal of 0.6 evts/d/kg/keV. This represents nearly a three orders of magnitude improvement for EDELWEISS, and puts the predicted supersymmetric phase space within two orders of magnitude. (author)

  4. Separating baryons and dark matter in cluster cores: a full 2-D lensing and dynamic analysis of Abell 383 and MS2137-23

    CERN Document Server

    Sand, D J; Ellis, Richard S; Smith, G P; Kneib, J-P

    2007-01-01

    (abridged) We utilize existing imaging and spectroscopic data for the galaxy clusters MS2137-23 and Abell 383 to present improved measures of the distribution of dark and baryonic material in the clusters' central regions. Our method, based on the combination of gravitational lensing and dynamical data, is uniquely capable of separating the distribution of dark and baryonic components at scales below 100 kpc. We find a variety of strong lensing models fit the available data, including some with dark matter profiles as steep as expected from recent simulations. However, when combined with stellar velocity dispersion data for the brightest member, shallower inner slopes than predicted by numerical simulations are preferred. For Abell 383, the preferred shallow inner slopes are statistically a good fit only when the multiple image position uncertainties associated with our lens model are assumed to be 0\\farcs5, to account for unknown substructure. No statistically satisfactory fit was obtained matching both the ...

  5. The Entire Virial Radius of the Fossil Cluster RXJ 1159 + 5531. II. Dark Matter and Baryon Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buote, David A.; Su, Yuanyuan; Gastaldello, Fabio; Brighenti, Fabrizio

    2016-08-01

    In this second paper on the entire virial region of the relaxed fossil cluster RXJ 1159+5531, we present a hydrostatic analysis of the azimuthally averaged hot intracluster medium (ICM) using the results of Su et al. For a model consisting of ICM, stellar mass from the central galaxy (BCG), and an NFW dark matter (DM) halo, we obtain a good description of the projected radial profiles of ICM emissivity and temperature that yield precise constraints on the total mass profile. The BCG stellar mass component is clearly detected with a K-band stellar mass-to-light ratio, {M}\\star /{L}K=0.61+/- 0.11 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ , consistent with stellar population synthesis models for a Milky Way initial mass function. We obtain a halo concentration, {c}200=8.4+/- 1.0, and virial mass, {M}200=(7.9+/- 0.6)× {10}13 {M}ȯ . For its mass, the inferred concentration is larger than most relaxed halos produced in cosmological simulations with Planck parameters, consistent with RXJ 1159+5531 forming earlier than the general halo population. The baryon fraction at r 200, {f}{{b,200}}=0.134+/- 0.007, is slightly below the Planck value (0.155) for the universe. However, when we take into account the additional stellar baryons associated with non-central galaxies and the uncertain intracluster light (ICL), {f}{{b,200}} increases by ≈ 0.015, consistent with the cosmic value and therefore no significant baryon loss from the system. The total mass profile is nearly a power law over a large radial range (∼0.2–10 R e ), where the corresponding density slope α obeys the α -{R}e scaling relation for massive early-type galaxies. Performing our analysis in the context of MOND still requires a large DM fraction (85.0 % +/- 2.5 % at r = 100 kpc) similar to that obtained using the standard Newtonian approach. The detection of a plausible stellar BCG mass component distinct from the NFW DM halo in the total gravitational potential suggests that ∼ {10}14 {M}ȯ represents the mass scale above which

  6. The Impact of Baryonic Physics on the Structure of Dark Matter Halos: the View from the FIRE Cosmological Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keung Chan, Tsang; Keres, Dusan; Oñorbe, Jose; Hopkins, Philip F.; Muratov, Alexander; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-06-01

    We study the distribution of cold dark matter (CDM) in cosmological simulations from the FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments) project, which incorporates explicit stellar feedback in the multi-phase ISM, with energetics from stellar population models. We find that stellar feedback, without ``fine-tuned'' parameters, greatly alleviates small-scale problems in CDM. Feedback causes bursts of star formation and outflows, altering the DM distribution. As a result, the inner slope of the DM halo profile (α) shows a strong mass dependence: profiles are shallow at Mh ∼ 1010-1011 M⊙ and steepen at higher/lower masses. The resulting core sizes and slopes are consistent with observations. Because the star formation efficiency, Ms/Mh is strongly halo mass dependent, a rapid change in α occurs around Mh ∼1010M⊙, (Ms∼106-107M⊙) as sufficient feedback energy becomes available to perturb the DM. Large cores are not established during the period of rapid growth of halos because of ongoing DM mass accumulation. Instead, cores require several bursts of star formation after the rapid buildup has completed. Stellar feedback dramatically reduces circular velocities in the inner kpc of massive dwarfs; this could be sufficient to explain the ``Too Big To Fail'' problem without invoking non-standard DM. Finally, feedback and baryonic contraction in Milky Way-mass halos produce DM profiles slightly shallower than the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, consistent with the normalization of the observed Tully-Fisher relation.

  7. How Density Environment Changes the Influence of the Dark Matter-Baryon Streaming Velocity on the Cosmological Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamical effect of relative velocities between dark matter and baryonic fluids, which remained supersonic after the epoch of recombination. The impact of this supersonic motion on the formation of cosmological structures was first formulated by Tseliakhovich & Hirata (2010), in terms of the linear theory of small-scale fluctuations coupled to large-scale, relative velocities in mean-density regions. In their formalism, they limited the large-scale density environment to be those of the global mean density. We improve on their formulation by allowing variation in the density environment as well as the relative velocities. This leads to a new type of coupling between large-scale and small-scale modes. We find that the small-scale fluctuation grows in a biased way: faster in the overdense environment and slower in the underdense environment. We also find that the net effect on the global power spectrum of the density fluctuation is to boost its overall amplitude from the prediction by Tseliakho...

  8. Compressed Baryonic Matter: from Nuclei to Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    Our world is wonderful because of the negligible baryonic part although unknown dark matter and dark energy dominate the Universe. Those nuclei in the daily life are forbidden to fuse by compression due to the Coulomb repulse, nevertheless, it is usually unexpected in extraterrestrial extreme-environments: the gravity in a core of massive evolved star is so strong that all the other forces (including the Coulomb one) could be neglected. Compressed baryonic matter is then produced after supernova, manifesting itself as pulsar-like stars observed. The study of this compressed baryonic matter can not only be meaningful in fundamental physics (e.g., the elementary color interaction at low-energy scale, testing gravity theories, detecting nano-Hertz background gravitational waves), but has also profound implications in engineering applications (including time standard and navigation), and additionally, is focused by Chinese advanced telescopes, either terrestrial or in space. Historically, in 1930s, L. Landau spec...

  9. Quirky Composite Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kribs, Graham D; Terning, John; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new dark matter candidate, quirky dark matter, that is a scalar baryonic bound state of a new non-Abelian force that becomes strong below the electroweak scale. The bound state is made of chiral quirks: new fermions that transform under both the new strong force as well as in a chiral representation of the electroweak group, acquiring mass from the Higgs mechanism. Electric charge neutrality of the lightest baryon requires approximately degenerate quirk masses which also causes the charge radius of the bound state to be negligible. The abundance is determined by an asymmetry that is linked to the baryon and lepton numbers of the universe through electroweak sphalerons. Dark matter elastic scattering with nuclei proceeds through Higgs exchange as well as an electromagnetic polarizability operator which is just now being tested in direct detection experiments. A novel method to search for quirky dark matter is to look for a gamma-ray dark line spectroscopic feature in galaxy clusters that result fr...

  10. Dark world and baryon asymmetry from a common source

    CERN Document Server

    Suematsu, D

    2006-01-01

    We study generation of baryon number asymmetry and both abundance of dark matter and dark energy on the basis of global symmetry and its associating flat directions in a supersymmetric model. We assume the existence of a model independent axion which is generally expected in the effective theory of superstring. If we consider a combined field of the model independent axion and a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson coming from spontaneous breaking of the global symmetry, its potential can be sufficiently flat and then it may present a candidate of the dark energy as a quintessential axion. Both the baryon asymmetry and the dark matter are supposed to be produced nonthermally as the asymmetry of another global charge through the Affleck-Dine mechanism along the relevant flat direction. Its decay to the observable and hidden sectors explains the baryon number asymmetry and the dark matter abundance, respectively.

  11. Modified Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Y Jack; Farrah, Duncan; Minic, Djordje; Takeuchi, Tatsu; Ho, Chiu Man

    2016-01-01

    Modified dark matter (MDM, formerly known as MoNDian dark matter) is a phenomenological model of dark matter, inspired by quantum gravity. We review the construction of MDM by generalizing entropic gravity to de-Sitter space as is appropriate for an accelerating universe (in accordance with the Lambda-CDM model). Unlike cold dark matter models, the MDM mass profile depends on the baryonic mass. We successfully fit the rotation curves to a sample of 30 local spiral galaxies with a single free parameter (viz., the mass-to-light ratio for each galaxy). We show that dynamical and observed masses agree in a sample of 93 galactic clusters. We also comment on strong gravitational lensing in the context of MDM.

  12. The Relationship Between Baryons and Dark Matter in Extended Galaxy Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Putman, M E; Stocke, J T; McEntaffer, R

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between gas-rich galaxies and Ly-alpha absorbers is addressed in this paper in the context of the baryonic content of galaxy halos. Deep Arecibo HI observations are presented of two gas-rich spiral galaxies within 125 kpc projected distance of a Ly-alpha absorber at a similar velocity. The galaxies investigated are close to edge-on and the absorbers lie almost along their major axes, allowing for a comparison of the Ly-alpha absorber velocities with galactic rotation. This comparison is used to examine whether the absorbers are diffuse gas rotating with the galaxies' halos, outflow material from the galaxies, or intergalactic gas in the low redshift cosmic web. The results indicate that if the gas resides in the galaxies' halos it is not rotating with the system and possibly counter-rotating. In addition, simple geometry indicates the gas was not ejected from the galaxies and there are no gas-rich satellites detected down to 3.6 - 7.5 x 10^6 Msun, or remnants of satellites to 5-6 x 10^{18} cm...

  13. The impact of baryonic physics on the structure of dark matter haloes: the view from the FIRE cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, T. K.; Kereš, D.; Oñorbe, J.; Hopkins, P. F.; Muratov, A. L.; Faucher-Giguère, C.-A.; Quataert, E.

    2015-12-01

    We study the distribution of cold dark matter (CDM) in cosmological simulations from the FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments) project, for M* ˜ 104-11 M⊙ galaxies in Mh ˜ 109-12 M⊙ haloes. FIRE incorporates explicit stellar feedback in the multiphase interstellar medium, with energetics from stellar population models. We find that stellar feedback, without `fine-tuned' parameters, greatly alleviates small-scale problems in CDM. Feedback causes bursts of star formation and outflows, altering the DM distribution. As a result, the inner slope of the DM halo profile (α) shows a strong mass dependence: profiles are shallow at Mh ˜ 1010-1011 M⊙ and steepen at higher/lower masses. The resulting core sizes and slopes are consistent with observations. This is broadly consistent with previous work using simpler feedback schemes, but we find steeper mass dependence of α, and relatively late growth of cores. Because the star formation efficiency M*/Mh is strongly halo mass dependent, a rapid change in α occurs around Mh ˜ 1010 M⊙ (M* ˜ 106-107 M⊙), as sufficient feedback energy becomes available to perturb the DM. Large cores are not established during the period of rapid growth of haloes because of ongoing DM mass accumulation. Instead, cores require several bursts of star formation after the rapid build-up has completed. Stellar feedback dramatically reduces circular velocities in the inner kpc of massive dwarfs; this could be sufficient to explain the `Too Big To Fail' problem without invoking non-standard DM. Finally, feedback and baryonic contraction in Milky Way-mass haloes produce DM profiles slightly shallower than the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, consistent with the normalization of the observed Tully-Fisher relation.

  14. Baryonic matter perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marttens, R.F. vom; Zimdahl, W. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Av. Fernando Ferrari, 514, Campus de Goiabeiras, CEP 29075-910, Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil); Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S., E-mail: rodrigovonmarttens@gmail.com, E-mail: wiliam.ricaldi@ufes.br, E-mail: winfried.zimdahl@pq.cnpq.br [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, CEUNES, Rodovia BR 101 Norte, km. 60, CEP 29932-540, São Mateus, Espírito Santo (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    We consider the perturbation dynamics for the cosmic baryon fluid and determine the corresponding power spectrum for a Λ(t)CDM model in which a cosmological term decays into dark matter linearly with the Hubble rate. The model is tested by a joint analysis of data from supernovae of type Ia (SNIa) (Constitution and Union 2.1), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), the position of the first peak of the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale-structure (LSS) data (SDSS DR7). While the homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics is only marginally influenced by the baryons, there are modifications on the perturbative level if a separately conserved baryon fluid is included. Considering the present baryon fraction as a free parameter, we reproduce the observed abundance of the order of 5% independently of the dark-matter abundance which is of the order of 32% for this model. Generally, the concordance between background and perturbation dynamics is improved if baryons are explicitly taken into account.

  15. Reconciliation of MOND and Dark Matter theory

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Man Ho

    2013-01-01

    I show that Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) is equivalent to assuming an isothermal dark matter density profile, with its density related to the enclosed total baryonic mass. This density profile can be deduced by physical laws if a dark matter core exists and if the baryonic component is spherically-symmetric, isotropic and isothermal. All the usual predictions of MOND, as well as the universal constant $a_0$, can be derived in this model. Since the effects of baryonic matter are larger i...

  16. Dark matter universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  17. Constraining the Baryon-Dark Matter Relative Velocity with the Large-Scale 3-Point Correlation Function of the SDSS BOSS DR12 CMASS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Slepian, Zachary; Blazek, Jonathan A; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; McEwen, Joseph E; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Rossi, Graziano; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We search for a galaxy clustering bias due to a modulation of galaxy number with the baryon-dark matter relative velocity resulting from recombination-era physics. We find no detected signal and place the constraint $b_v < 0.01$ on the relative velocity bias for the CMASS galaxies. This bias is an important potential systematic of Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) method measurements of the cosmic distance scale using the 2-point clustering. Our limit on the relative velocity bias indicates a systematic shift of no more than $0.3\\%$ rms in the distance scale inferred from the BAO feature in the BOSS 2-point clustering, well below the $1\\%$ statistical error of this measurement. This constraint is the most stringent currently available and has important implications for the ability of upcoming large-scale structure surveys such as DESI to self-protect against the relative velocity as a possible systematic.

  18. Dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, P James E

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again. PMID:24794526

  19. The origin of dark matter, matter-anti-matter asymmetry, and inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Mazumdar, Anupam

    2011-01-01

    A rapid phase of accelerated expansion in the early universe, known as inflation, dilutes all matter except the vacuum induced quantum fluctuations. These are responsible for seeding the initial perturbations in the baryonic matter, the non-baryonic dark matter and the observed temperature anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. To explain the universe observed today, the end of inflation must also excite a thermal bath filled with baryons, an amount of baryon asymmetry, and dark matter. We review the current understanding of inflation, dark matter, mechanisms for generating matter-anti-matter asymmetry, and the prospects for testing them at ground and space based experiments.

  20. Interactions between dark energy and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated interacting dark energy cosmologies both concerning their impact on the background evolution of the Universe and their effects on cosmological structure growth. For the former aspect, we have developed a cosmological model featuring a matter species consisting of particles with a mass that increases with time. In such model the appearance of a Growing Matter component, which is negligible in early cosmology, dramatically slows down the evolution of the dark energy scalar field at a redshift around six, and triggers the onset of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, therefore addressing the Coincidence Problem. We propose to identify this Growing Matter component with cosmic neutrinos, in which case the present dark energy density can be related to the measured average mass of neutrinos. For the latter aspect, we have implemented the new physical features of interacting dark energy models into the cosmological N-body code GADGET-2, and we present the results of a series of high-resolution simulations for a simple realization of dark energy interaction. As a consequence of the new physics, cold dark matter and baryon distributions evolve differently both in the linear and in the non-linear regime of structure formation. Already on large scales, a linear bias develops between these two components, which is further enhanced by the non-linear evolution. We also find, in contrast with previous work, that the density profiles of cold dark matter halos are less concentrated in coupled dark energy cosmologies compared with ΛCDM. Also, the baryon fraction in halos in the coupled models is significantly reduced below the universal baryon fraction. These features alleviate tensions between observations and the ΛCDM model on small scales. Our methodology is ideally suited to explore the predictions of coupled dark energy models in the fully non-linear regime, which can provide powerful constraints for the viable parameter space of such scenarios

  1. Interactions between dark energy and dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldi, Marco

    2009-03-20

    We have investigated interacting dark energy cosmologies both concerning their impact on the background evolution of the Universe and their effects on cosmological structure growth. For the former aspect, we have developed a cosmological model featuring a matter species consisting of particles with a mass that increases with time. In such model the appearance of a Growing Matter component, which is negligible in early cosmology, dramatically slows down the evolution of the dark energy scalar field at a redshift around six, and triggers the onset of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, therefore addressing the Coincidence Problem. We propose to identify this Growing Matter component with cosmic neutrinos, in which case the present dark energy density can be related to the measured average mass of neutrinos. For the latter aspect, we have implemented the new physical features of interacting dark energy models into the cosmological N-body code GADGET-2, and we present the results of a series of high-resolution simulations for a simple realization of dark energy interaction. As a consequence of the new physics, cold dark matter and baryon distributions evolve differently both in the linear and in the non-linear regime of structure formation. Already on large scales, a linear bias develops between these two components, which is further enhanced by the non-linear evolution. We also find, in contrast with previous work, that the density profiles of cold dark matter halos are less concentrated in coupled dark energy cosmologies compared with {lambda}{sub CDM}. Also, the baryon fraction in halos in the coupled models is significantly reduced below the universal baryon fraction. These features alleviate tensions between observations and the {lambda}{sub CDM} model on small scales. Our methodology is ideally suited to explore the predictions of coupled dark energy models in the fully non-linear regime, which can provide powerful constraints for the viable parameter

  2. Dark matter and cosmological nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1986-01-01

    Existing dark matter problems, i.e., dynamics, galaxy formation and inflation, are considered, along with a model which proposes dark baryons as the bulk of missing matter in a fractal universe. It is shown that no combination of dark, nonbaryonic matter can either provide a cosmological density parameter value near unity or, as in the case of high energy neutrinos, allow formation of condensed matter at epochs when quasars already existed. The possibility that correlations among galactic clusters are scale-free is discussed. Such a distribution of matter would yield a fractal of 1.2, close to a one-dimensional universe. Biasing, cosmic superstrings, and percolated explosions and hot dark matter are theoretical approaches that would satisfy the D = 1.2 fractal model of the large-scale structure of the universe and which would also allow sufficient dark matter in halos to close the universe.

  3. Dilatons in Dense Baryonic Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyun Kyu

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the role of dilaton, which is supposed to be representing a special feature of scale symmetry of QCD, trace anomaly, in dense baryonic matter. The idea that the scale symmetry breaking of QCD is responsible for the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry is presented along the similar spirit of Freund-Nambu model. The incorporation of dilaton field in the hidden local symmetric parity doublet model is briefly sketched with the possible role of dilaton at high density baryonic matter, the emergence of linear sigma model in dilaton limit.

  4. LSP as a Candidate for Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Lahanas, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    The most recent observations by the WMAP satellite provided us with data of unprecedented accuracy regarding the parameters describing the Standard Cosmological Model. The current matter-energy density of the Universe is close to its critical value of which 73% is attributed to Dark Energy, 23% to Cold Dark Matter and only 4% is ordinary matter of baryonic nature. The origins of the Dark Energy (DE) and Dark Matter (DM) constitute the biggest challenge of Modern Astroparticle Physics. Particl...

  5. A Dark Matter Superfluid

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Justin

    2015-01-01

    In this talk we present a novel framework that unifies the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the LambdaCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity. The dark matter and MOND components have a common origin, representing different phases of a single underlying substance. In galaxies, dark matter thermalizes and condenses to form a superfluid phase. The superfluid phonons couple to baryonic matter particles and mediate a MOND-like force. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures, which we briefly discuss. Remarkably the critical temperature and equation of state of the dark matter superfluid are similar to those of known cold at...

  6. Dark Matter Superfluidity

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Justin

    2016-01-01

    In this talk I summarize a novel framework that unifies the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the $\\Lambda$CDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity. The dark matter and MOND components have a common origin, representing different phases of a single underlying substance. In galaxies, dark matter thermalizes and condenses to form a superfluid phase. The superfluid phonons couple to baryonic matter particles and mediate a MOND-like force. This framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures, which we briefly discuss. Remarkably the critical temperature and equation of state of the dark matter superfluid are similar to those of known co...

  7. Dark matter and dark energy

    CERN Multimedia

    Caldwell, Robert

    2009-01-01

    "Observations continue to indicate that the Universe is dominated by invisible components - dark matter and dark energy. Shedding light on this cosmic darkness is a priority for astronomers and physicists" (3 pages)

  8. Lectures on Dark Matter Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lisanti, Mariangela

    2016-01-01

    Rotation curve measurements from the 1970s provided the first strong indication that a significant fraction of matter in the Universe is non-baryonic. In the intervening years, a tremendous amount of progress has been made on both the theoretical and experimental fronts in the search for this missing matter, which we now know constitutes nearly 85% of the Universe's matter density. These series of lectures, first given at the TASI 2015 summer school, provide an introduction to the basics of dark matter physics. They are geared for the advanced undergraduate or graduate student interested in pursuing research in high-energy physics. The primary goal is to build an understanding of how observations constrain the assumptions that can be made about the astro- and particle physics properties of dark matter. The lectures begin by delineating the basic assumptions that can be inferred about dark matter from rotation curves. A detailed discussion of thermal dark matter follows, motivating Weakly Interacting Massive P...

  9. Dark matter: an overview of direct searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper, intended for physicists 'in collision', is to give a flavour of the experimental challenges raised by the detection of Dark Matter. It summarizes the detection methods of the MACHO's, celestial bodies candidate for the baryonic Dark Matter and of the WIMP's, particles candidate for the non-baryonic Dark Matter. Current status and hopes are given. Two side aspects not directly related to the experimental search will be evoked to illustrate that the Dark Matter puzzle is indeed at the common frontier of various fields of physics. (author)

  10. Reconciling MOND and dark matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of galaxies suggest a one-to-one analytic relation between the inferred gravity of dark matter at any radius and the enclosed baryonic mass, a relation summarized by Milgrom's law of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). However, present-day covariant versions of MOND usually require some additional fields contributing to the geometry, as well as an additional hot dark matter component to explain cluster dynamics and cosmology. Here, we envisage a slightly more mundane explanation, suggesting that dark matter does exist but is the source of MOND-like phenomenology in galaxies. We assume a canonical action for dark matter, but also add an interaction term between baryonic matter, gravity, and dark matter, such that standard matter effectively obeys the MOND field equation in galaxies. We show that even the simplest realization of the framework leads to a model which reproduces some phenomenological predictions of cold dark matter (CDM) and MOND at those scales where these are most successful. We also devise a more general form of the interaction term, introducing the medium density as a new order parameter. This allows for new physical effects which should be amenable to observational tests in the near future. Hence, this very general framework, which can be furthermore related to a generalized scalar-tensor theory, opens the way to a possible unification of the successes of CDM and MOND at different scales

  11. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  12. Galilean Equivalence for Galactic Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kesden, M; Kesden, Michael; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way experience a tidal disruption as they orbit in the Milky Way's dark halo. While the bound core of the satellite remains dominated by dark matter, the tidally disrupted stars behave like purely baryonic tracers of the Milky Way's potential well. If dark matter experiences a stronger self attraction than visible matter, stars will preferentially gain rather than lose energy during tidal disruption. This leads to a relative enhancement in the trailing as compared to the leading tidal stream. We show that the absence of a strong asymmetry in the surface brightness of the leading and trailing tidal streams already constrains the equivalence of acceleration of dark matter and baryons in a gravitational field to less than ten percent--thus ruling out a recently proposed mechanism to clear dwarf galaxies from voids. Future observations should be sensitive at the percent level to departures from the equivalence of dark matter and baryons.

  13. Dark Matter Annihilation at the Galactic Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Timothy Ryan [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Observations by the WMAP and PLANCK satellites have provided extraordinarily accurate observations on the densities of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy in the universe. These observations indicate that our universe is composed of approximately ve times as much dark matter as baryonic matter. However, e orts to detect a particle responsible for the energy density of dark matter have been unsuccessful. Theoretical models have indicated that a leading candidate for the dark matter is the lightest supersymmetric particle, which may be stable due to a conserved R-parity. This dark matter particle would still be capable of interacting with baryons via weak-force interactions in the early universe, a process which was found to naturally explain the observed relic abundance of dark matter today. These residual annihilations can persist, albeit at a much lower rate, in the present universe, providing a detectable signal from dark matter annihilation events which occur throughout the universe. Simulations calculating the distribution of dark matter in our galaxy almost universally predict the galactic center of the Milky Way Galaxy (GC) to provide the brightest signal from dark matter annihilation due to its relative proximity and large simulated dark matter density. Recent advances in telescope technology have allowed for the rst multiwavelength analysis of the GC, with suitable e ective exposure, angular resolution, and energy resolution in order to detect dark matter particles with properties similar to those predicted by the WIMP miracle. In this work, I describe ongoing e orts which have successfully detected an excess in -ray emission from the region immediately surrounding the GC, which is di cult to describe in terms of standard di use emission predicted in the GC region. While the jury is still out on any dark matter interpretation of this excess, I describe several related observations which may indicate a dark matter origin. Finally, I discuss the

  14. Light asymmetric dark matter from new strong dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Sarkar, Subir; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai

    2011-01-01

    A ~5 GeV `dark baryon' with a cosmic asymmetry similar to that of baryons is a natural candidate for the dark matter. We study the possibility of generating such a state through dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking, and show that it can share the relic baryon asymmetry via sphaleron interactions...

  15. The temperature of hot gas in galaxies and clusters: baryons dancing to the tune of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Steen H; Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Hoffman, Yehuda; Brüggen, Marcus; Scannapieco, Evan; Stinson, Greg S

    2010-01-01

    The temperature profile of hot gas in galaxies and galaxy clusters is largely determined by the depth of the total gravitational potential and thereby by the dark matter (DM) distribution. We use high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation to derive a surprisingly simple relation between the gas temperature and DM properties. We show that this relation holds not just for galaxy clusters but also for equilibrated and relaxed galaxies at radii beyond the central stellar-dominated region of typically a few kpc. It is then clarified how a measurement of the temperature and density of the hot gas component can lead to an indirect measurement of the DM velocity anisotropy in galaxies. We also study the temperature relation for galaxy clusters in the presence of self-regulated, recurrent active galactic nuclei (AGN), and demonstrate that this temperature relation even holds outside the inner region of 30 kpc in clusters with an active AGN.

  16. THE TEMPERATURE OF HOT GAS IN GALAXIES AND CLUSTERS: BARYONS DANCING TO THE TUNE OF DARK MATTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature profile of hot gas in galaxies and galaxy clusters is largely determined by the depth of the total gravitational potential and thereby by the dark matter (DM) distribution. We use high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation to derive a surprisingly simple relation between the gas temperature and DM properties. We show that this relation holds not just for galaxy clusters but also for equilibrated and relaxed galaxies at radii beyond the central stellar-dominated region of typically a few kpc. It is then clarified how a measurement of the temperature and density of the hot gas component can lead to an indirect measurement of the DM velocity anisotropy in galaxies. We also study the temperature relation for galaxy clusters in the presence of self-regulated, recurrent active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and demonstrate that this temperature relation even holds outside the inner region of ∼30 kpc in clusters with an active AGN.

  17. Dark matter: Models and detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for dark matter is briefly reviewed. A wealth of observational information points to the existence of a non-baryonic component. To the theoretically favoured candidates today belong axions, supersymmetric particles, and in a smaller quantity, massive neutrinos. The theoretical foundation and experimental situation for each of these is reviewed. In particular, indirect detection methods of supersymmetric dark matter are described. Aspects of the density structure of dark matter halos, important for estimating the chances of detection, are discussed

  18. Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    It's a dark, dark universe out there, and I don't mean because the night sky is black. After all, once you leave the shadow of the Earth and get out into space, you're surrounded by countless lights glittering everywhere you look. But for all of Sagan's billions and billions of stars and galaxies, it's a jaw-dropping fact that the ordinary kind of…

  19. The Impact of Baryonic Physics on the Structure of Dark Matter Halos: the View from the FIRE Cosmological Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, T K; Oñorbe, J; Hopkins, P F; Muratov, A L; Faucher-Giguère, C -A; Quataert, E

    2015-01-01

    We study the distribution of cold dark matter (CDM) in cosmological zoom-in simulations from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project, for a range of halo mass (10^9-10^12 Msun) and stellar mass (10^4-10^11 Msun). The FIRE simulations incorporate explicit stellar feedback within the multi-phase ISM. We find that stellar feedback, without any "fine-tuned" parameters, can greatly alleviate small-scale problems in CDM. Feedback causes bursts of star formation and outflows, altering the DM distribution. As a result, the inner slope of the DM halo profile "alpha" shows a strong mass dependence: profiles are shallow at M_h ~ 10^10-10^11 Msun and steepen at higher/lower masses. The resulting core sizes and slopes are consistent with observations. This is broadly consistent with previous work using simpler feedback schemes, but we find steeper mass dependence of "alpha," and relatively late growth of cores. Because the star formation efficiency is strongly halo mass dependent, a rapid change in the centr...

  20. The formation of massive black holes in z~30 dark matter haloes with large baryonic streaming velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Takamitsu L

    2013-01-01

    The origins of the ~10^9 Msol quasar supermassive black holes (BHs) at redshifts z>6 remain a theoretical puzzle. One possibility is that they grew from ~10^5 Msol BHs formed in the `direct collapse' of atomic-cooling (>~8000 K) gas of nearly primordial composition. For such an event to occur, the H2 fraction must be kept extremely low as gas accumulates inside a dark matter halo with virial temperature Tvir>8000 K. A strong UV background, such as produced by a nearby star-forming galaxy or quasar, could photodissociate H2 and lead to direct collapse as early as z=16. Alternatively, dense, pristine atomic-cooling (PAC) gas can suppress the H2 fraction through collisional dissociation, in the absence of a UV background. A key obstacle to direct collapse is metal enrichment; a single pair-instability supernova may raise the gas metallicity to levels where direct collapse could not occur. Therefore, the gas must be kept pristine from when Tvir~1000 K, when star formation typically begins, until Tvir~8000 K---a g...

  1. Twin Higgs Asymmetric Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García, Isabel; Lasenby, Robert; March-Russell, John

    2015-09-18

    We study asymmetric dark matter (ADM) in the context of the minimal (fraternal) twin Higgs solution to the little hierarchy problem, with a twin sector with gauged SU(3)^{'}×SU(2)^{'}, a twin Higgs doublet, and only third-generation twin fermions. Naturalness requires the QCD^{'} scale Λ_{QCD}^{'}≃0.5-20  GeV, and that t^{'} is heavy. We focus on the light b^{'} quark regime, m_{b^{'}}≲Λ_{QCD}^{'}, where QCD^{'} is characterized by a single scale Λ_{QCD}^{'} with no light pions. A twin baryon number asymmetry leads to a successful dark matter (DM) candidate: the spin-3/2 twin baryon, Δ^{'}∼b^{'}b^{'}b^{'}, with a dynamically determined mass (∼5Λ_{QCD}^{'}) in the preferred range for the DM-to-baryon ratio Ω_{DM}/Ω_{baryon}≃5. Gauging the U(1)^{'} group leads to twin atoms (Δ^{'}-τ^{'}[over ¯] bound states) that are successful ADM candidates in significant regions of parameter space, sometimes with observable changes to DM halo properties. Direct detection signatures satisfy current bounds, at times modified by dark form factors.

  2. Twin Higgs Asymmetric Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García, Isabel; Lasenby, Robert; March-Russell, John

    2015-09-18

    We study asymmetric dark matter (ADM) in the context of the minimal (fraternal) twin Higgs solution to the little hierarchy problem, with a twin sector with gauged SU(3)^{'}×SU(2)^{'}, a twin Higgs doublet, and only third-generation twin fermions. Naturalness requires the QCD^{'} scale Λ_{QCD}^{'}≃0.5-20  GeV, and that t^{'} is heavy. We focus on the light b^{'} quark regime, m_{b^{'}}≲Λ_{QCD}^{'}, where QCD^{'} is characterized by a single scale Λ_{QCD}^{'} with no light pions. A twin baryon number asymmetry leads to a successful dark matter (DM) candidate: the spin-3/2 twin baryon, Δ^{'}∼b^{'}b^{'}b^{'}, with a dynamically determined mass (∼5Λ_{QCD}^{'}) in the preferred range for the DM-to-baryon ratio Ω_{DM}/Ω_{baryon}≃5. Gauging the U(1)^{'} group leads to twin atoms (Δ^{'}-τ^{'}[over ¯] bound states) that are successful ADM candidates in significant regions of parameter space, sometimes with observable changes to DM halo properties. Direct detection signatures satisfy current bounds, at times modified by dark form factors. PMID:26430985

  3. Direct searches for non-baryonic dark matter; Experiences de detection directe de la matiere sombre non baryonique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Stefano, Philippe E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: distefano@mppmu.mpg.de

    2001-10-01

    Since the mid-1980s, non-accelerator particle physics experiments have been searching for weakly interacting massive particles which could solve the dark matter enigma first pointed out some 70 years ago. The low event rate and energies expected pose a formidable experimental challenge. The first detectors were ionization devices, soon followed by scintillation detectors able to reject a small portion of the photon and electron radioactive backgrounds. The performance of these early generations of detectors has now been matched by new cryogenic detectors in which a simultaneous reading of phonons and charge allows a very efficient rejection of the background. These devices, along with recently developed simultaneous phonon and scintillation techniques could provide cryogenic devices with a decisive advantage. (author) [French] La question astrophysique de la matiere sombre, posee dans les annees trente, attire depuis une quinzaine d'annees des experiences de physique des particules hors accelerateur tentant d'y repondre par la mise en evidence de particules lourdes et interagissant faiblement. Le faible taux et la basse energie des evenements attendus rendent la tache ardue. Les premiers detecteurs employes furent a ionisation, puis a scintillation, ceux-ci disposant d'une methode rudimentaire pour rejeter le fond electromagnetique. Ces deux premieres generations d'experiences massives sont aujourd'hui rattrapees par des nouveaux detecteurs cryogeniques associant une mesure de l'ionisation a un signal phonons, qui permettent de rejeter le fond electromagnetique tres efficacement. Ces dispositifs, et de recents developpements de mesure simultanee de scintillation et de phonons, pourraient donner l'avantage aux detecteurs cryogeniques. (author)

  4. Diffuse baryonic matter beyond 2020

    CERN Document Server

    Markevitch, M; Nulsen, P; Rasia, E; Vikhlinin, A; Kravtsov, A; Forman, W; Brunetti, G; Sarazin, C; Elvis, M; Fabbiano, G; Hornschemeier, A; Brissenden, R

    2009-01-01

    The hot, diffuse gas that fills the largest overdense structures in the Universe -- clusters of galaxies and a web of giant filaments connecting them -- provides us with tools to address a wide array of fundamental astrophysical and cosmological questions via observations in the X-ray band. Clusters are sensitive cosmological probes. To utilize their full potential for precision cosmology in the following decades, we must precisely understand their physics -- from their cool cores stirred by jets produced by the central supermassive black hole (itself fed by inflow of intracluster gas), to their outskirts, where the infall of intergalactic medium (IGM) drives shocks and accelerates cosmic rays. Beyond the cluster confines lies the virtually unexplored warm IGM, believed to contain most of the baryonic matter in the present-day Universe. As a depository of all the matter ever ejected from galaxies, it carries unique information on the history of energy and metal production in the Universe. Currently planned ma...

  5. Secretly Asymmetric Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Prateek; Kilic, Can; Swaminathan, Sivaramakrishnan; Trendafilova, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    We study a mechanism where the dark matter number density today arises from asymmetries generated in the dark sector in the early universe, even though total dark matter number remains zero throughout the history of the universe. The dark matter population today can be completely symmetric, with annihilation rates above those expected from thermal WIMPs. We give a simple example of this mechanism using a benchmark model of flavored dark matter. We discuss the experimental signatures of this s...

  6. Constraints on Dark Matter interactions from structure formation: Damping lengths

    OpenAIRE

    Boehm, Celine; Schaeffer, Richard

    2004-01-01

    (Shortened) Weakly Interacting Massive Particles are often said to be the best Dark Matter candidates. Studies have shown however that rather large Dark Matter-photon or Dark Matter-baryon interactions could be allowed by cosmology. Here we address the question of the role of the Dark Matter interactions in more detail to determine at which extent Dark Matter has to be necessarily weakly interacting. To this purpose, we compute the collisional damping (and free-streaming) lengths of generic i...

  7. The Effect of Central Baryonic Cores in Dark Halos on the Evaluation of Strong Lensing Probabilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Wang

    2004-01-01

    We present an estimate of the strong lensing probability by dark halos, with emphasis on the role of the baryonic matter arising purely from radiative cooling. We treat the contribution of the cooled baryons optimistically with all the cooled baryons confined within a central core, and including no feedback process from stellar evolution. Our two-component model provides a strong lensing probability that is in good agreement with the observed distribution of multiple images of quasars, provided that the cooled baryons are deposited within a spherical region of radius of 0.1 times the virial radius and follow an isothermal profile. It is pointed out that strong lensing may be used as an additional probe of baryon physics in dark halos though this may meanwhile complicate the test of the inner density profiles of dark matter in halos using the observed strong lensing probability.

  8. Secretly Asymmetric Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Prateek; Swaminathan, Sivaramakrishnan; Trendafilova, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    We study a mechanism where the dark matter number density today arises from asymmetries generated in the dark sector in the early universe, even though total dark matter number remains zero throughout the history of the universe. The dark matter population today can be completely symmetric, with annihilation rates above those expected from thermal WIMPs. We give a simple example of this mechanism using a benchmark model of flavored dark matter. We discuss the experimental signatures of this setup, which arise mainly from the sector that annihilates the symmetric component of dark matter.

  9. Heavy spin-2 Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Babichev, Eugeny; Raidal, Martti; Schmidt-May, Angnis; Urban, Federico; Veermäe, Hardi; von Strauss, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    We provide further details on a recent proposal addressing the nature of the dark sectors in cosmology and demonstrate that all current observations related to Dark Matter can be explained by the presence of a heavy spin-2 particle. Massive spin-2 fields and their gravitational interactions are uniquely described by ghost-free bimetric theory, which is a minimal and natural extension of General Relativity. In this setup, the largeness of the physical Planck mass is naturally related to extremely weak couplings of the heavy spin-2 field to baryonic matter and therefore explains the absence of signals in experiments dedicated to Dark Matter searches. It also ensures the phenomenological viability of our model as we confirm by comparing it with cosmological and local tests of gravity. At the same time, the spin-2 field possesses standard gravitational interactions and it decays universally into all Standard Model fields but not into massless gravitons. Matching the measured DM abundance together with the require...

  10. Dark Matter Effective Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We organize the effective (self)interaction terms for complex scalar dark matter candidates which are either an isosinglet, isodoublet or an isotriplet with respect to the weak interactions. The classification has been performed ordering the operators in inverse powers of the dark matter cutoff s...... scale. We assume Lorentz invariance, color and charge neutrality. We also introduce potentially interesting dark matter induced flavor-changing operators. Our general framework allows for model independent investigations of dark matter properties....

  11. Cannibal Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Pappadopulo, Duccio; Trevisan, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    A thermally decoupled hidden sector of particles, with a mass gap, generically enters a phase of cannibalism in the early Universe. The Standard Model sector becomes exponentially colder than the hidden sector. We propose the Cannibal Dark Matter framework, where dark matter resides in a cannibalizing sector with a relic density set by 2-to-2 annihilations. Observable signals of Cannibal Dark Matter include a boosted rate for indirect detection, new relativistic degrees of freedom, and warm dark matter.

  12. Impeded Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Xue, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We consider a new class of thermal dark matter models, dubbed "Impeded Dark Matter", in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. We demonstrate that either case can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonst...

  13. Dark matter direct detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are now enough pieces of (gravitational or cosmological) evidence for the existence of dark matter in the universe. The dark matter is an unknown matter that do not emit any electromagnetic radiation and perhaps have very feeble interaction with other particles. It is now established from the study of anisotropies in apparently smooth cosmic microwave background radiation that about 26.5% of the content of the universe is made up of dark matter as compared to only a paltry amount of about 4.5% of known matter. Although the evidence of dark matter is so far gravitational by and large, there are now worldwide endeavours to detect the dark matter directly in the laboratories. The direct detection of dark matter is based on measuring the recoil energy of the nucleus that scatters off a possible dark matter particle that may happen to interact with a nucleus of the detecting material

  14. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may he elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should ma be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  15. Impeded Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kopp, Joachim; Slatyer, Tracy R; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Xue, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We consider a new class of thermal dark matter models, dubbed "Impeded Dark Matter", in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. We demonstrate that either case can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may even be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. For positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppress...

  16. Dark energy and extended dark matter halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2012-03-01

    The cosmological mean matter (dark and baryonic) density measured in the units of the critical density is Ωm = 0.27. Independently, the local mean density is estimated to be Ωloc = 0.08-0.23 from recent data on galaxy groups at redshifts up to z = 0.01-0.03 (as published by Crook et al. 2007, ApJ, 655, 790 and Makarov & Karachentsev 2011, MNRAS, 412, 2498). If the lower values of Ωloc are reliable, as Makarov & Karachentsev and some other observers prefer, does this mean that the Local Universe of 100-300 Mpc across is an underdensity in the cosmic matter distribution? Or could it nevertheless be representative of the mean cosmic density or even be an overdensity due to the Local Supercluster therein. We focus on dark matter halos of groups of galaxies and check how much dark mass the invisible outer layers of the halos are able to host. The outer layers are usually devoid of bright galaxies and cannot be seen at large distances. The key factor which bounds the size of an isolated halo is the local antigravity produced by the omnipresent background of dark energy. A gravitationally bound halo does not extend beyond the zero-gravity surface where the gravity of matter and the antigravity of dark energy balance, thus defining a natural upper size of a system. We use our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy to estimate the maximal sizes and masses of the extended dark halos. Using data from three recent catalogs of galaxy groups, we show that the calculated mass bounds conform with the assumption that a significant amount of dark matter is located in the invisible outer parts of the extended halos, sufficient to fill the gap between the observed and expected local matter density. Nearby groups of galaxies and the Virgo cluster have dark halos which seem to extend up to their zero-gravity surfaces. If the extended halo is a common feature of gravitationally bound systems on scales of galaxy groups and clusters, the Local Universe could be typical or even

  17. Atomic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, David E.; Krnjaic, Gordan Z.; Rehermann, Keith R.; Wells, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    We propose that dark matter is dominantly comprised of atomic bound states. We build a simple model and map the parameter space that results in the early universe formation of hydrogen-like dark atoms. We find that atomic dark matter has interesting implications for cosmology as well as direct detection: Protohalo formation can be suppressed below $M_{proto} \\sim 10^3 - 10^6 M_{\\odot}$ for weak scale dark matter due to Ion-Radiation interactions in the dark sector. Moreover, weak-scale dark a...

  18. Axino LSP baryogenesis and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss a new mechanism for baryogenesis, in which the baryon asymmetry is generated by the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) decay via baryonic R-parity-violating interactions. As a specific example, we use a supersymmetric axion model with an axino LSP. This scenario predicts large R-parity violation for the stop, and an upper limit on the squark masses between 15 and 130 TeV, for different choices of the Peccei-Quinn scale and the soft Xt terms. We discuss the implications for the nature of dark matter in light of the axino baryogenesis mechanism, and find that both the axion and a metastable gravitino can provide the correct dark matter density. In the axion dark matter scenario, the initial misalignment angle is restricted to be O(1). On the other hand, the reheating temperature is linked to the PQ scale and should be higher than 104–105 GeV in the gravitino dark matter scenario

  19. Baryons and baryonic matter in four-fermion interaction models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urlichs, K.

    2007-02-23

    In this work we discuss baryons and baryonic matter in simple four-fermion interaction theories, the Gross-Neveu model and the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in 1+1 and 2+1 space-time dimensions. These models are designed as toy models for dynamical symmetry breaking in strong interaction physics. Pointlike interactions (''four-fermion'' interactions) between quarks replace the full gluon mediated interaction of quantum chromodynamics. We consider the limit of a large number of fermion flavors, where a mean field approach becomes exact. This method is formulated in the language of relativistic many particle theory and is equivalent to the Hartree-Fock approximation. In 1+1 dimensions, we generalize known results on the ground state to the case where chiral symmetry is broken explicitly by a bare mass term. For the Gross-Neveu model, we derive an exact self-consistent solution for the finite density ground state, consisting of a one-dimensional array of equally spaced potential wells, a baryon crystal. For the Nambu- Jona-Lasinio model we apply the derivative expansion technique to calculate the total energy in powers of derivatives of the mean field. In a picture akin to the Skyrme model of nuclear physics, the baryon emerges as a topological soliton. The solution for both the single baryon and dense baryonic matter is given in a systematic expansion in powers of the pion mass. The solution of the Hartree-Fock problem is more complicated in 2+1 dimensions. In the massless Gross-Neveu model we derive an exact self-consistent solution by extending the baryon crystal of the 1+1 dimensional model, maintaining translational invariance in one spatial direction. This one-dimensional configuration is energetically degenerate to the translationally invariant solution, a hint in favor of a possible translational symmetry breakdown by more general geometrical structures. In the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, topological soliton configurations induce a finite baryon

  20. Asymmetric dark matter and the Sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Sarkar, Subir

    2010-01-01

    Cold dark matter particles with an intrinsic matter-antimatter asymmetry do not annihilate after gravitational capture by the Sun and can affect its interior structure. The rate of capture is exponentially enhanced when such particles have self-interactions of the right order to explain structure...... formation on galactic scales. A `dark baryon' of mass 5 GeV is a natural candidate and has the required relic abundance if its asymmetry is similar to that of ordinary baryons. We show that such particles can solve the `solar composition problem'. The predicted small decrease in the low energy neutrino...

  1. Dark matter and IceCube neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Biondi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    We show that the excess of high energy neutrinos observed by the IceCube collaboration at energies above 100 TeV might originate from baryon number violating decays of heavy shadow baryons from mirror sector, which in turn constitute Dark Matter. Due to tiny mixing between mirror and ordinary neutrinos, it is possible to explain the specific features of the IceCube events spectrum.

  2. Dissipative dark matter explains rotation curves

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, R

    2015-01-01

    Dissipative dark matter, where dark matter particles interact with a massless (or very light) boson, is studied. Such dark matter can arise in simple hidden sector gauge models, including those featuring an unbroken $U(1)'$ gauge symmetry, leading to a dark photon. Previous work has shown that such models can not only explain the LSS and CMB, but potentially also dark matter phenomena on small scales, such as the inferred cored structure of dark matter halos. In this picture, dark matter halos of disk galaxies not only cool via dissipative interactions but are also heated via ordinary supernovae (facilitated by an assumed photon - dark photon kinetic mixing interaction). This interaction between the dark matter halo and ordinary baryons, a very special feature of these types of models, plays a critical role in governing the physical properties of the dark matter halo. Here, we further study the implications of this type of dissipative dark matter for disk galaxies. Building on earlier work, we develop a simpl...

  3. Neutrinos and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutrinos could be key particles to unravel the nature of the dark matter of the Universe. On the one hand, sterile neutrinos in minimal extensions of the Standard Model are excellent dark matter candidates, producing potentially observable signals in the form of a line in the X-ray sky. On the other hand, the annihilation or the decay of dark matter particles produces, in many plausible dark matter scenarios, a neutrino flux that could be detected at neutrino telescopes, thus providing non-gravitational evidence for dark matter. More conservatively, the non-observation of a significant excess in the neutrino fluxes with respect to the expected astrophysical backgrounds can be used to constrain dark matter properties, such as the self-annihilation cross section, the scattering cross section with nucleons and the lifetime

  4. Neutrinos and dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarra, Alejandro [Physik-Department T30d, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Neutrinos could be key particles to unravel the nature of the dark matter of the Universe. On the one hand, sterile neutrinos in minimal extensions of the Standard Model are excellent dark matter candidates, producing potentially observable signals in the form of a line in the X-ray sky. On the other hand, the annihilation or the decay of dark matter particles produces, in many plausible dark matter scenarios, a neutrino flux that could be detected at neutrino telescopes, thus providing non-gravitational evidence for dark matter. More conservatively, the non-observation of a significant excess in the neutrino fluxes with respect to the expected astrophysical backgrounds can be used to constrain dark matter properties, such as the self-annihilation cross section, the scattering cross section with nucleons and the lifetime.

  5. Nonthermal production of dark radiation and dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Matthew; Roxlo, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Dark matter may be coupled to dark radiation: light degrees of freedom that mediate forces between dark sector particles. Cosmological constraints favor dark radiation that is colder than Standard Model radiation. In models with fixed couplings between dark matter and the Standard Model, these constraints can be difficult to satisfy if thermal equilibrium is assumed in the early universe. We construct a model of asymmetric reheating of the visible and dark sectors from late decays of a long-lived particle (for instance, a modulus). We show, as a proof of principle, that such a model can populate a sufficiently cold dark sector while also generating baryon and dark matter asymmetries through the out-of-equilibrium decay. We frame much of our discussion in terms of the scenario of dissipative dark matter, as in the Double-Disk Dark Matter scenario. However, our results may also be of interest for other scenarios like the Twin Higgs model that are in danger of overproducing dark radiation due to nonnegligible dark-visible couplings.

  6. Axions and Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Qiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter particles constitute $23\\%$ of the total energy density of our universe and their exact properties are still unclear besides that they must be very cold and weakly interacting with the standard model particles. Many beyond standard model theories provide proper candidates to serve as the dark matter. The axions were introduced to solve the strong CP problem and later turned out to be a very attractive dark matter candidate. In this paper, we briefly review the physics of axions an...

  7. Clumpy cold dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  8. Originally Asymmetric Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, Nobuchika

    2012-01-01

    We propose a scenario with a fermion dark matter, where the dark matter particle used to be the Dirac fermion, but it takes the form of the Majorana fermion at a late time. The relic number density of the dark matter is determined by the dark matter asymmetry generated through the same mechanism as leptogenesis when the dark matter was the Dirac fermion. After efficient dark matter annihilation processes have frozen out, a phase transition of a scalar field takes place and generates Majorana mass terms to turn the dark matter particle into the Majorana fermion. In order to address this scenario in detail, we propose two simple models. The first one is based on the Standard Model (SM) gauge group and the dark matter originates the $SU(2)_L$ doublet Dirac fermion, analogous to the Higgsino-like neutralino in supersymmetric models. We estimate the spin-independent/dependent elastic scattering cross sections of this late-time Majorana dark matter with a proton and find the possibility to discover it by the direct...

  9. Dark Matter from new Technicolor Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarke Gudnason, Sven; Kouvaris, Christoforos; Sannino, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    We investigate dark matter candidates emerging in recently proposed technicolor theories. We determine the relic density of the lightest, neutral, stable technibaryon having imposed weak thermal equilibrium conditions and overall electric neutrality of the Universe. In addition we consider...... sphaleron processes that violate baryon, lepton and technibaryon number. Our analysis is performed in the case of a first order electroweak phase transition as well as a second order one. We argue that, in both cases, the new technibaryon contributes to the dark matter in the Universe. Finally we examine...... the problem of the constraints on these types of dark matter components from earth based experiments....

  10. Course 6. dark matter: direct detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determining the precise nature of dark matter is one of the main open questions of contemporary physics. The search for non-baryonic dark matter is strongly motivated by present data and 3 particle candidates: wimps (weakly interactive massive particles), axions and massive neutrinos are actively searched by several experiments (GENIUS, HDMS, CDMS, EDELWEISS, LLNL, CARRACK, SOLAX, DAMA,...). In this course the author reviews and summarizes the experimental situation and analyzes the main detection strategies developed to identify the dark matter candidates. (A.C.)

  11. Dipolar Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchet, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because the two types of dark matter interact through the vector field, a ghostly degree of fre...

  12. A Dark Matter Candidate with New Strong Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, T.; Mason, J. D.; O'Neil, D.

    2005-01-01

    We study the possibility that dark matter is a baryon of a new strongly interacting gauge theory, which was introduced in the low energy theory of Cosmological SUSY Breaking (CSB). This particle can fit the observed dark matter density if an appropriate cosmological asymmetry is generated. The same mechanism can also explain the dark/baryonic matter ratio in the universe. The mass of the dark matter particle is in the multiple TeV range, and could be as high as 20 TeV.

  13. Singlet fermion dark matter within left-right model

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhanwa Patra; Soumya Rao

    2016-01-01

    We discuss singlet fermion dark matter within a left-right symmetric model promoting baryon and lepton numbers as separate gauge symmetries. We add a simple Dirac fermionic dark matter singlet under SU(2)L,R with nonzero and equal baryon and lepton number which ensures electric charge neutrality. Such a dark matter candidate interacts with SM particles through the extra ZB,ℓ gauge bosons. This can give rise to a dark matter particle of a few hundred GeV that couples to ∼TeV scale gauge bosons...

  14. Twin Higgs Asymmetric Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    García, Isabel García; March-Russell, John

    2015-01-01

    We study Asymmetric Dark Matter (ADM) in the context of the minimal (Fraternal) Twin Higgs solution to the little hierarchy problem, with a twin sector with gauged $SU(3)' \\times SU(2)'$, a twin Higgs, and only third generation twin fermions. Naturalness requires the QCD$^\\prime$ scale $\\Lambda'_{\\rm QCD} \\simeq 0.5 - 20 \\ {\\rm GeV}$, and $t'$ to be heavy. We focus on the light $b'$ quark regime, $m_{b'} \\lesssim \\Lambda'_{\\rm QCD}$, where QCD$^\\prime$ is characterised by a single scale $\\Lambda'_{\\rm QCD}$ with no light pions. A twin baryon number asymmetry leads to a successful DM candidate: the spin-3/2 twin baryon, $\\Delta' \\sim b'b'b'$, with a dynamically determined mass ($\\sim 5 \\Lambda'_{\\rm QCD}$) in the preferred range for the DM-to-baryon ratio $\\Omega_{\\rm DM}/\\Omega_{\\rm baryon} \\simeq 5$. Gauging the $U(1)'$ group leads to twin atoms ($\\Delta'$ - $\\bar {\\tau'}$ bound states) that are successful ADM candidates in significant regions of parameter space, sometimes with observable changes to DM halo ...

  15. Dark Matter Detection in Space

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Jonathan L.

    2004-01-01

    I review prospects for detecting dark matter in space-based experiments, with an emphasis on recent developments. I propose the ``Martha Stewart criterion'' for identifying dark matter candidates that are particularly worth investigation and focus on three that satisfy it: neutralino dark matter, Kaluza-Klein dark matter, and superWIMP gravitino dark matter.

  16. Analysis of dark matter and dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-05-01

    As the law of unity of opposites of the Philosophy tells us, the bright material exists, the dark matter also exists. Dark matter and dark energy should allow the law of unity of opposites. The Common attributes of the matter is radiation, then common attributes of dark matter must be absorb radiation. Only the rotation speed is lower than the speed of light radiation, can the matter radiate, since the speed of the matter is lower than the speed of light, so the matter is radiate; The rotate speed of the dark matter is faster than the light , so the dark matter doesn't radiate, it absorbs radiation. The energy that the dark matter absorb radiation produced (affect the measurement of time and space distribution of variations) is dark energy, so the dark matter produce dark energy only when it absorbs radiation. Dark matter does not radiate, two dark matters does not exist inevitably forces, and also no dark energy. Called the space-time ripples, the gravitational wave is bent radiation, radiation particles should be graviton, graviton is mainly refers to the radiation particles whose wavelength is small. Dark matter, dark energy also confirms the existence of the law of symmetry.

  17. Asymptotically Safe Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for dark matter (DM) interactions in which the interaction strength is asymptotically safe. In models of this type, the coupling strength is small at low energies but increases at higher energies, and asymptotically approaches a finite constant value. The resulting...... searches are the primary ways to constrain or discover asymptotically safe dark matter....

  18. Dark matter response to galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Tissera, Patricia B; Pedrosa, Susana; Scannapieco, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    We have resimulated the six galaxy-sized haloes of the Aquarius Project including metal-dependent cooling, star formation and supernova feedback. This allows us to study not only how dark matter haloes respond to galaxy formation, but also how this response is affected by details of halo assembly history. In agreement with previous work, we find baryon condensation to lead to increased dark matter concentration. Dark matter density profiles differ substantially in shape from halo to halo when baryons are included, but in all cases the velocity dispersion decreases monotonically with radius. Some haloes show an approximately constant dark matter velocity anisotropy with $ \\beta \\approx 0.1-02$, while others retain the anisotropy structure of their baryon-free versions. Most of our haloes become approximately oblate in their inner regions, although a few retain the shape of their dissipationless counterparts. Pseudo-phase-space densities are described by a power law in radius of altered slope when baryons are i...

  19. Hidden Charged Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Jonathan L; Tu, Huitzu; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2009-01-01

    We examine the possibility that dark matter is hidden, that is, neutral under all standard model gauge interactions, but charged under an exact U(1) gauge symmetry of the hidden sector. Such candidates are predicted in simple WIMPless models, supersymmetric models in which hidden dark matter has the desired thermal relic density for a wide range of masses. Hidden charged dark matter has many potentially disastrous implications for astrophysics: (1) bound state formation and Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation after chemical freeze out may destroy its relic density, (2) similar effects greatly enhance dark matter annihilation in protohalos at redshifts of z ~ 30, (3) Compton scattering off hidden photons delays kinetic decoupling, suppressing small scale structure, and (4) Rutherford scattering makes such dark matter self-interacting and collisional, potentially violating constraints from the Bullet Cluster and the observed morphology of galactic halos. We show that all of these constraints are satisfied and are ...

  20. Missing dark matter in dwarf galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Kyle A.; Navarro, Julio F.; Sales, Laura V.; Fattahi, Azadeh; Frenk, Carlos S.; Sawala, Till; Schaller, Matthieu; White, Simon D. M.

    2016-08-01

    We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the APOSTLE project to examine the fraction of baryons in $\\Lambda$CDM haloes that collect into galaxies. This `galaxy formation efficiency' correlates strongly and with little scatter with halo mass, dropping steadily towards dwarf galaxies. The baryonic mass of a galaxy may thus be used to place a lower limit on total halo mass and, consequently, on its asymptotic maximum circular velocity. A number of dwarfs seem to violate this constraint, having baryonic masses up to ten times higher than expected from their rotation speeds, or, alternatively, rotating at only half the speed expected for their mass. Taking the data at face value, either these systems have formed galaxies with extraordinary efficiency - highly unlikely given their shallow potential wells - or they inhabit haloes with extreme deficits in their dark matter content. This `missing dark matter' is reminiscent of the inner mass deficits of galaxies with slowly-rising rotation curves, but extends to regions larger than the luminous galaxies themselves, disfavouring explanations based on star formation-induced `cores' in the dark matter. An alternative could be that galaxy inclination errors have been underestimated, and that these are just systems where inferred mass profiles have been compromised by systematic uncertainties in interpreting the velocity field. This should be investigated further, since it might provide a simple explanation not only for missing-dark-matter galaxies but also for other challenges to our understanding of the inner structure of cold dark matter haloes.

  1. GUTzilla Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Lin, Tongyan; Lou, Hou Keong

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by gauge coupling unification and dark matter, we present an extension to the Standard Model where both are achieved by adding an extra new matter multiplet. Such considerations lead to a Grand Unified Theory with very heavy WIMPzilla dark matter, which has mass greater than ~10^7 GeV and must be produced before reheating ends. Naturally, we refer to this scenario as GUTzilla dark matter. Here we present a minimal GUTzilla model, adding a vector-like quark multiplet to the Standard ...

  2. Composite Millicharged Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kouvaris, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We study a composite millicharged dark matter model. The dark matter is in the form of pion-like objects emerging from a higher scale QCD-like theory. We present two distinct possibilities with interesting phenomenological consequences based on the choice of the parameters. In the first one, the dark matter is produced non-thermally and it could potentially account for the 130 GeV Fermi photon line via decays of the "dark pions". We estimate the self-interaction cross section which might play an important role both in changing the dark matter halo profile at the center of the galaxy and in making the dark matter warmer. In the second version the dark matter is produced via the freeze-in mechanism. Finally we impose all possible astrophysical, cosmological and experimental constraints. We study in detail generic constraints on millicharged dark matter that can arise from anomalous isotope searches of different elements and we show why constraints based on direct searches from underground detectors are not gene...

  3. Composite millicharged dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouvaris, Chris

    2013-07-01

    We study a composite millicharged dark matter model. The dark matter is in the form of pionlike objects emerging from a higher scale QCD-like theory. We present two distinct possibilities with interesting phenomenological consequences based on the choice of the parameters. In the first one, the dark matter is produced nonthermally, and it could potentially account for the 130 GeV Fermi photon line via decays of the “dark pions.” We estimate the self-interaction cross section, which might play an important role both in changing the dark matter halo profile at the center of the galaxy and in making the dark matter warmer. In the second version the dark matter is produced via the freeze-in mechanism. Finally we impose all possible astrophysical, cosmological and experimental constraints. We study in detail generic constraints on millicharged dark matter that can arise from anomalous isotope searches of different elements and we show why constraints based on direct searches from underground detectors are not generally valid.

  4. Constraints on the Coupling between Dark Energy and Dark Matter from CMB data

    OpenAIRE

    Murgia, Riccardo; Gariazzo, Stefano; Fornengo, Nicolao

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a phenomenological non-gravitational coupling between dark energy and dark matter, where the interaction in the dark sector is parameterized as an energy transfer either from dark matter to dark energy or the opposite. The models are constrained by a whole host of updated cosmological data: cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies and polarization, high-redshift supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, redshift space distortions and gravitational lensing. Both mode...

  5. Exothermic Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Peter W; Rajendran, Surjeet; Saraswat, Prashant

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel mechanism for dark matter to explain the observed annual modulation signal at DAMA/LIBRA which avoids existing constraints from every other dark matter direct detection experiment including CRESST, CDMS, and XENON10. The dark matter consists of at least two light states with mass ~few GeV and splittings ~5 keV. It is natural for the heavier states to be cosmologically long-lived and to make up an O(1) fraction of the dark matter. Direct detection rates are dominated by the exothermic reactions in which an excited dark matter state down-scatters off of a nucleus, becoming a lower energy state. In contrast to (endothermic) inelastic dark matter, the most sensitive experiments for exothermic dark matter are those with light nuclei and low threshold energies. Interestingly, this model can also naturally account for the observed low-energy events at CoGeNT. The only significant constraint on the model arises from the DAMA/LIBRA unmodulated spectrum but it can be tested in the near future by a lo...

  6. Dissipative dark matter and the rotation curves of dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, R

    2015-01-01

    There is ample evidence from rotation curves that dark matter halo's around disk galaxies have nontrivial dynamics. Of particular significance are: a) the cored dark matter profile of disk galaxies, b) correlations of the shape of rotation curves with baryonic properties, and c) the Tully-Fisher relation. Dark matter halo's around disk galaxies may have nontrivial dynamics if dark matter is strongly self interacting and dissipative. Multicomponent hidden sector dark matter featuring a massless `dark photon' (from an unbroken dark $U(1)$ gauge interaction) which kinetically mixes with the ordinary photon provides a concrete example of such dark matter. The kinetic mixing interaction facilitates halo heating by enabling ordinary supernovae to be a source of these `dark photons'. Dark matter halo's can expand and contract in response to the heating and cooling processes, but for a sufficiently isolated halo should have evolved to a steady state or `equilibrium' configuration where heating and cooling rates local...

  7. Bosonic-Seesaw Portal Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Ishida, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of Higgs-portal dark matter-production mechanism, called bosonic-seesaw portal scenario. Bosonic seesaw provides the dynamical origin of the electroweak symmetry breaking, triggered by mixing between the elementary Higgs and a composite Higgs generated by a new-color strong dynamics (hypercolor) which dynamically breaks the classical-scale invariance of the model. The composite hypercolor-baryonic matter can then be a dark matter candidate, which significantly couples to the standard-model Higgs via the bosonic seesaw, and can be produced from the thermal plasma below the decoupling temperature around the new strong coupling scale, to account for the observed relic abundance of the dark matter: the dark matter can closely be related to the mechanism of the electroweak symmetry breaking.

  8. The dark matter distribution of M87 and NGC 1399

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Recent X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies indicate that, outside the innermost about 100 kpc region, the ratio of dark matter density to baryonic matter density declines with radius. We show that this result is consistent with a cold dark matter simulation, suggesting the presence of dissipationless dark matter in the observed clusters. This is contrary to previous suggestions that dissipational baryonic dark matter is required to explain the decline in the density ratio. The simulation further shows that, in the inner 100 kpc region, the density ratio should rise with radius. We confirm this property in M87 and NGC 1399, which are close enough to allow the determination of the density ratio in the required inner region. X-ray mappings of the dark matter distribution in clusters of galaxies are therefore consistent with the presence of dissipationless dark matter.

  9. Dark Matter in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Resconi, Silvia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An overview of Dark Matter searches with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is shown. Results of Mono-X analyses requiring large missing transverse momentum and a recoiling detectable physics object (X) are reported. The data were collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The observed data are in agreement with the expected Standard Model backgrounds for all analyses described. Exclusion limits are presented for Dark Matter models including pair production of Dark Matter candidates.

  10. Dark Matter in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Resconi, Silvia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Results of Dark Matter searches in mono-X analysis with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider are reported. The data were collected in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1. A description of the main characteristics of each analysis and how the main backgrounds are estimated is shown. The observed data are in agreement with the expected Standard Model backgrounds for all analysis described. Exclusion limits are presented for Dark Matter models including pair production of dark matter candidates.

  11. Dark Matter 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Schumann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This article gives an overview on the status of experimental searches for dark matter at the end of 2014. The main focus is on direct searches for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) using underground-based low-background detectors, especially on the new results published in 2014. WIMPs are excellent dark matter candidates, predicted by many theories beyond the standard model of particle physics, and are expected to interact with the target nuclei either via spin-independent (scalar) or spin-dependent (axial-vector) couplings. Non-WIMP dark matter candidates, especially axions and axion-like particles are also briefly discussed.

  12. Shallowed cusp slope of dark matter in disc galaxy formation through clump clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Shigeki; Saitoh, Takayuki R.

    2011-01-01

    Cusp-core problem is a controversial problem on galactic dark matter haloes. Cosmological N-body simulations has demonstrated that galactic dark matter haloes have a cuspy density profile at the centre. However, baryonic physics may affect the dark matter density profile. For example, it was suggested that adiabatic contraction of baryonic gas makes the dark matter cusp steeper. However, it is still an open question if the gas falls into the galactic centre in smooth adiabatic manner. Recent ...

  13. Cold Dark Matter from Dark Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Aharon; Karasik, David; Lederer, Yoav

    2001-01-01

    Dark energy/matter unification is first demonstrated within the framework of a simplified model. Geodetic evolution of a cosmological constant dominated bubble Universe, free of genuine matter, is translated into a specific FRW cosmology whose effectively induced dark component highly resembles the cold dark matter ansatz. The realistic extension constitutes a dark soliton which bridges past (radiation and/or matter dominated) and future (cosmological constant dominated) Einstein regimes; its...

  14. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Min Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1D. After the U(1D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3→2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  15. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-07-01

    We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1)D. After the U(1)D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3 → 2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  16. GUTzilla dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Lin, Tongyan; Lou, Hou Keong

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by gauge coupling unification and dark matter, we present an extension to the Standard Model where both are achieved by adding an extra new matter multiplet. Such considerations lead to a Grand Unified Theory with very heavy WIMPzilla dark matter, which has mass greater than ˜ 107 GeV and must be produced before reheating ends. Naturally, we refer to this scenario as GUTzilla dark matter. Here we present a minimal GUTzilla model, adding a vector-like quark multiplet to the Standard Model. Proton decay constraints require the new multiplet to be both color and electroweak charged, which prompts us to include a new confining SU(3) gauge group that binds the multiplet into a neutral composite dark matter candidate. Current direct detection constraints are evaded due to the large dark matter mass; meanwhile, next-generation direct detection and proton decay experiments will probe much of the parameter space. The relic abundance is strongly dependent on the dynamics of the hidden confining sector, and we show that dark matter production during the epoch of reheating can give the right abundance.

  17. Dark Matter Gravitational Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, R W

    1998-01-01

    We argue that the conjectured dark mater in the Universe may be endowed with a new kind of gravitational charge that couples to a short range gravitational interaction mediated by a massive vector field. A model is constructed that assimilates this concept into ideas of current inflationary cosmology. The model is also consistent with the observed behaviour of galactic rotation curves according to Newtonian dynamics. The essential idea is that stars composed of ordinary (as opposed to dark matter) experience Newtonian forces due to the presence of an all pervading background of massive gravitationally charged cold dark matter. The novel gravitational interactions are predicted to have a significant influence on pre-inflationary cosmology. The precise details depend on the nature of a gravitational Proca interaction and the description of matter. A gravitational Proca field configuration that gives rise to attractive forces between dark matter charges of like polarity exhibits homogeneous isotropic eternal cos...

  18. Inflatable Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D

    2016-01-22

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed "inflatable dark matter," in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early Universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many, otherwise, well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context. Thermal relics that would, otherwise, be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the nonthermal abundance of grand unified theory or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. A period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ∼MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the standard model.

  19. Cleaning up dark matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Bignami, Giovanni Fabrizio

    2006-01-01

    "An experiment in Italy has found tantalizing but puzzling evidence for axions, one if the leading candidates for dark matter. The authors explain how a pair of spinning neutron stars should settle the issue once and for all." (3 pages)

  20. Xenophobic Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Jonathan L; Sanford, David

    2013-01-01

    We consider models of xenophobic dark matter, in which isospin-violating dark matter-nucleon interactions significantly degrade the response of xenon direct detection experiments. For models of near-maximal xenophobia, with neutron-to-proton coupling ratio $f_n / f_p \\approx -0.64$, and dark matter mass near 8 GeV, the regions of interest for CoGeNT and CDMS-Si and the region of interest identified by Collar and Fields in CDMS-Ge data can be brought into agreement. This model may be tested in future direct, indirect, and collider searches. Interestingly, because the natural isotope abundance of xenon implies that xenophobia has its limits, we find that this xenophobic model may be probed in the near future by xenon experiments. Near-future data from the LHC and Fermi-LAT may also provide interesting alternative probes of xenophobic dark matter.

  1. Xenophobic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Kumar, Jason; Sanford, David

    2013-07-01

    We consider models of xenophobic dark matter, in which isospin-violating dark matter-nucleon interactions significantly degrade the response of xenon direct detection experiments. For models of near-maximal xenophobia, with neutron-to-proton coupling ratio fn/fp≈-0.64, and dark matter mass near 8 GeV, the regions of interest for CoGeNT and CDMS-Si and the region of interest identified by Collar and Fields in CDMS-Ge data can be brought into agreement. This model may be tested in future direct, indirect, and collider searches. Interestingly, because the natural isotope abundance of xenon implies that xenophobia has its limits, we find that this xenophobic model may be probed in the near future by xenon experiments. Near-future data from the LHC and Fermi-LAT may also provide interesting alternative probes of xenophobic dark matter.

  2. Direct Detection of Stealth Dark Matter through Electromagnetic Polarizability

    CERN Document Server

    Appelquist, Thomas; Brower, Richard C; Buchoff, Michael I; Fleming, George T; Jin, Xiao-Yong; Kiskis, Joe; Kribs, Graham D; Neil, Ethan T; Osborn, James C; Rebbi, Claudio; Rinaldi, Enrico; Schaich, David; Schroeder, Chris; Syritsyn, Sergey; Vranas, Pavlos; Weinberg, Evan; Witzel, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the spin-independent scattering cross section for direct detection that results from the electromagnetic polarizability of a composite scalar baryon dark matter candidate -- "Stealth Dark Matter", that is based on a dark SU(4) confining gauge theory. In the nonrelativistic limit, electromagnetic polarizability proceeds through a dimension-7 interaction leading to a very small scattering cross section for dark matter with weak scale masses. This represents a lower bound on the scattering cross section for composite dark matter theories with electromagnetically charged constituents. We carry out lattice calculations of the polarizability for the lightest baryons in SU(3) and SU(4) gauge theories using the background field method on quenched configurations. We find the polarizabilities of SU(3) and SU(4) to be comparable (within about 50%) normalized to the baryon mass, which is suggestive for extensions to larger SU(N) groups. The resulting scattering cross sections with a xenon target are shown to...

  3. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range.

  4. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kuflik, Eric; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an Elastically Decoupling Relic (ELDER), which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross-section of its elastic scattering on Standard Model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross-section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the $10^{-3}-1$ fb range.

  5. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range. PMID:27314712

  6. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10[sup [minus]6] eV--10[sup [minus]4] eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  7. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ``new physics.`` The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10{sup {minus}6} eV--10{sup {minus}4} eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  8. The dark matter of gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan

    2010-01-01

    We review progress in understanding dark matter by astrophysics, and particularly via the effect of gravitational lensing. Evidence from many different directions now implies that five sixths of the material content of the universe is in this mysterious form, separate from and beyond the ordinary "baryonic" particles in the standard model of particle physics. Dark matter appears not to interact via the electromagnetic force, and therefore neither emits nor reflects light. However, it definitely does interact via gravity, and has played the most important role in shaping the Universe on large scales. The most successful technique with which to investigate it has so far been gravitational lensing. The curvature of space-time near any gravitating mass (including dark matter) deflects passing rays of light - observably shifting, distorting and magnifying the images of background galaxies. Measurements of such effects currently provide constraints on the mean density of dark matter, and its density relative to bar...

  9. Fundamental plane: dark matter and dissipation contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, Andre L B

    2010-01-01

    Stellar and galactic systems are objects in dynamical equilibrium that are composed of ordinary baryonic matter hypothetically embedded in extended dominant dark matter halos. Our aim is to investigate the scaling relations and dissipational features of these objects over a wide range of their properties, taking the dynamical influence of the dark matter component into account. We study the physical properties of these self-gravitating systems using the two-component virial theorem in conjunction with data that embrace a wide range of astrophysical systems. We find that the scaling relations defined by the properties of these objects admit a dark-to-luminous density ratio parameter as a natural requirement in this framework. We also probe dissipational effects on the fundamental surface defined by the two-component virial theorem and discuss their relations with respect to the region devoid of objects in the data distribution. Our results indicate complementary contributions of dissipation and dark matter to ...

  10. Light Dark Matter and Dark Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Heo, Jae Ho

    2015-01-01

    The light dark matter particles freeze out after neutrino decoupling. If the dark matter particle couples to neutrino or electromagnetic plasma, the late time entropy production by dark matter annihilations can change the neutrino-to-photon temperature ratio, and equally effective number of neutrinos. We study the effect of dark matter annihilations in the thermal equilibrium approximation and non-equilibrium method (freeze-out mechanism), and constrain both results with Planck observations. We demonstrate that the bound of dark matter mass and the possibility of the existence of extra radiation particles are more tightly constrained in the non-equilibrium method.

  11. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Soo-Min Choi; Hyun Min Lee

    2016-01-01

    We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1)D. After the U(1)D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3→2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic...

  12. Dark Matter Annihilations in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Gondolo, P.

    1993-01-01

    The flat rotation curve obtained for the outer star clusters of the Large Magellanic Cloud is suggestive of an LMC dark matter halo. From the composite HI and star cluster rotation curve, I estimate the parameters of an isothermal dark matter halo added to a `maximum disk.' I then examine the possibility of detecting high energy gamma-rays from non-baryonic dark matter annihilations in the central region of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  13. Matter and Dark Matter from False Vacuum Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmuller, W; Vertongen, G

    2010-01-01

    We study tachyonic preheating associated with the spontaneous breaking of B-L, the difference of baryon and lepton number. Reheating occurs through the decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos which are produced during preheating and in decays of the Higgs particles of B-L breaking. Baryogenesis is an interplay of nonthermal and thermal leptogenesis, accompanied by thermally produced gravitino dark matter. The proposed mechanism simultaneously explains the generation of matter and dark matter, thereby relating the absolute neutrino mass scale to the gravitino mass.

  14. Radion as a possible dark matter candidate

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Sumanta

    2015-01-01

    The discrepancy between observed virial and baryonic mass in galaxy clusters have lead to the missing mass problem. To resolve this, a new, non-baryonic matter field, known as dark matter has been invoked. However, till date no possible constituents of the dark matter components are known. This has led to various models, by modifying gravity at large distances to explain the missing mass problem. The modification to gravity appears very naturally when effective field theory on a lower dimensional manifold, embedded in a higher dimensional spacetime is considered. It has been shown that in a scenario with two lower dimensional manifolds separated by a finite distance is capable to address the missing mass problem, which in turn determines the kinematics of the brane separation.

  15. Collider limits on dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Dark matter pair production at high energy colliders may leave observable signatures in the energy and momentum spectra of the objects recoiling against the dark matter. We discuss signatures of Dark Matter in the jets + missing energy and photon + missing energy channels at the Tevatron and at LEP. Working in a largely model-independent effective theory framework, we can convert the collider bounds into constraints on the dark matter-nucleon scattering cross section and on the dark matter an...

  16. GUTzilla Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Lou, Hou Keong

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by gauge coupling unification and dark matter, we present an extension to the Standard Model where both are achieved by adding an extra new matter multiplet. Such considerations lead to a Grand Unified Theory with very heavy WIMPzilla dark matter, which has mass greater than ~10^7 GeV and must be produced before reheating ends. Naturally, we refer to this scenario as GUTzilla dark matter. Here we present a minimal GUTzilla model, adding a vector-like quark multiplet to the Standard Model. Proton decay constraints require the new multiplet to be both color and electroweak charged, which prompts us to include a new confining SU(3) gauge group that binds the multiplet into a neutral composite dark matter candidate. Current direct detection constraints are evaded due to the large dark matter mass; meanwhile, next-generation direct detection and proton decay experiments will probe much of the parameter space. The relic abundance is strongly dependent on the dynamics of the hidden confining sector, and we...

  17. Thermal Relic Dark Matter Beyond the Unitarity Limit

    OpenAIRE

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Ibe, Masahiro; Kaneta, Kunio; Nakano, Wakutaka; Suzuki, Motoo

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a simple model of thermal relic dark matter whose mass can be much larger than the so-called unitarity limit on the mass of point-like particle dark matter. The model consists of new strong dynamics with one flavor of fermions in the fundamental representation which is much heavier than the dynamical scale of the new strong dynamics. Dark matter is identified with the lightest baryonic hadron of the new dynamics. The baryonic hadrons annihilate into the mesonic hadrons of the new s...

  18. Influence of baryons on spatial distribution of matter: higher order correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xiaojun

    2012-01-01

    Baryonic physical processes could leave non-negligible imprint on cosmic matter distribution pattern. Series of high precision simulation data sets with identical initial condition are employed for count-in-cell (CIC) analysis, including one N-body dark matter run, one with adiabatic gas only and one with dissipative processes. Variances and higher order correlation functions of dark matter and gas are estimated. It is found that baryon physical processes mainly affected dark matter distribution at scales less than $1h^{-1}$Mpc. In comparison with the pure dark matter run, adiabatic process alone strengthens variance of dark matter by \\sim 10% at scale $0.1h^{-1}$Mpc, while $S_n$s of dark matter deviate from pure dark matter case only mildly at a few percentages. Dissipative gas run does not differ much to the adiabatic run in dark matter variance, but renders significantly different $S_n$ parameters of dark matter, bringing about more than 10% enhancement to $S_3$ at $0.1h^{-1}$Mpc and $z=0$. Distribution pa...

  19. Dark matter in the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-11-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the Universe This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the Universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the Universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the Universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand: Most of the material in the Universe does not give off detectable radiation, i.e., is dark;'' the dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10% and 30% of the critical density (by comparison luminous matter contributes less than 1%); baryonic matter contributes between 1.1% and 12% of critical. The case for the spatially-flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments--structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation--and by some observational data. If {Omega} is indeed unity--or even just significantly greater than 0.1--then there is a strong case for a Universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark-matter candidates: an axion of mass 10{sup {minus}6} eV to 10{sup {minus}4} eV; a neutralino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either being planned or are underway. 63 refs.

  20. Dark matter in the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1991-03-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the universe This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand: most of the material in the universe does not give off detectable radiation, i.e., is dark;'' the dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10% and 30% of the critical density (by comparison luminous matter contributes less than 1%); baryonic matter contributes between 1.1% and 12% of critical. The case for the spatially-flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments -- structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation -- and by some observational data. If {Omega} is indeed unity--or even just significantly greater than 0.1--then there is a strong case for a universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark-matter candidates: an axion of mass 10{sup {minus}6} eV to 10{sup {minus}4} eV; a neutralino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either being planned or are underway. 71 refs., 6 figs.

  1. THE DETECTION OF ULTRA-FAINT LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS DWARF GALAXIES IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER: A PROBE OF DARK MATTER AND BARYONIC PHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Fassbender, R.; Fontana, A.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    We have discovered 11 ultra-faint (r ≲ 22.1) low surface brightness (LSB, central surface brightness 23 ≲ μ{sub r} ≲ 26) dwarf galaxy candidates in one deep Virgo field of just 576 arcmin{sup 2} obtained by the Large Binocular Camera at the Large Binocular Telescope. Their association with the Virgo cluster is supported by their distinct position in the central surface brightness—total magnitude plane with respect to the background galaxies of similar total magnitude. They have typical absolute magnitudes and scale sizes, if at the distance of Virgo, in the range −13 ≲ M{sub r} ≲ −9 and 250 ≲ r{sub s} ≲ 850 pc, respectively. Their colors are consistent with a gradually declining star formation history with a specific star formation rate of the order of 10{sup −11} yr{sup −1}, i.e., 10 times lower than that of main sequence star-forming galaxies. They are older than the cluster formation age and appear to be regular in morphology. They represent the faintest extremes of the population of low luminosity LSB dwarfs that has recently been detected in wider surveys of the Virgo cluster. Thanks to the depth of our observations, we are able to extend the Virgo luminosity function down to M{sub r} ∼ −9.3 (corresponding to total masses M ∼ 10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙}), finding an average faint-end slope α ≃ −1.4. This relatively steep slope puts interesting constraints on the nature of the dark matter and, in particular, on warm dark matter (WDM) often invoked to solve the overprediction of the dwarf number density by the standard cold dark matter scenario. We derive a lower limit on the WDM particle mass >1.5 keV.

  2. The Detection of Ultra-faint Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster: A Probe of Dark Matter and Baryonic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Fassbender, R.; Fontana, A.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.

    2015-11-01

    We have discovered 11 ultra-faint (r ≲ 22.1) low surface brightness (LSB, central surface brightness 23 ≲ μr ≲ 26) dwarf galaxy candidates in one deep Virgo field of just 576 arcmin2 obtained by the Large Binocular Camera at the Large Binocular Telescope. Their association with the Virgo cluster is supported by their distinct position in the central surface brightness—total magnitude plane with respect to the background galaxies of similar total magnitude. They have typical absolute magnitudes and scale sizes, if at the distance of Virgo, in the range -13 ≲ Mr ≲ -9 and 250 ≲ rs ≲ 850 pc, respectively. Their colors are consistent with a gradually declining star formation history with a specific star formation rate of the order of 10-11 yr-1, i.e., 10 times lower than that of main sequence star-forming galaxies. They are older than the cluster formation age and appear to be regular in morphology. They represent the faintest extremes of the population of low luminosity LSB dwarfs that has recently been detected in wider surveys of the Virgo cluster. Thanks to the depth of our observations, we are able to extend the Virgo luminosity function down to Mr ˜ -9.3 (corresponding to total masses M ˜ 107 M⊙), finding an average faint-end slope α ≃ -1.4. This relatively steep slope puts interesting constraints on the nature of the dark matter and, in particular, on warm dark matter (WDM) often invoked to solve the overprediction of the dwarf number density by the standard cold dark matter scenario. We derive a lower limit on the WDM particle mass >1.5 keV.

  3. WISPy cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Paola [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Cadamuro, Davide; Redondo, Javier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches - exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques - can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future. (orig.)

  4. Axion Dark Matter Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, I

    2014-01-01

    Nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a $\\mu$eV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 $\\mu$eV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axions at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.

  5. Does Dark Matter Exist?

    CERN Document Server

    Sellwood, J A

    2000-01-01

    The success of the Lambda-CDM model on large scales does not extend down to galaxy scales. We list a dozen problems of the dark matter hypothesis, some of which arise in specific models for the formation of structure in the universe, while others are generic and require fine tuning in any dark matter theory. Modifications to the theory, such as adding properties to the DM particles beyond gravitational interactions, or simply a better understanding of the physics of galaxy formation, may resolve some problems, but a number of conspiracies and correlations are unlikely to yield to this approach. The alternative is that mass discrepancies result from of a non-Newtonian law of gravity, a hypothesis which avoids many of the more intractable problems of dark matter. A modified law of gravity is not without formidable difficulties of its own, but it is no longer obvious that they are any more daunting than those facing DM.

  6. Co-Decaying Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Kuflik, Eric; Ng, Wee Hao

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism for thermal dark matter freezeout, termed Co-Decaying Dark Matter. Multi-component dark sectors with degenerate particles and out-of-equilibrium decays can co-decay to obtain the observed relic density. The dark matter density is exponentially depleted through the decay of nearly degenerate particles, rather than from Boltzmann suppression. The relic abundance is set by the dark matter annihilation cross-section, which is predicted to be boosted, and the decay rate ...

  7. Dark matter in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the Universe? This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the Universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the Universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the Universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand. Most of the radiation in the Universe does not give off detectable radiation; it is dark. The dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10 and 30 percent of the critical density; baryonic matter contributes between 1.1 and 12 percent of the critical. The case for the spatially flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments - structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation - and by some observational data. If Omega is indeed unity, or even just significantly greater than 0.1, then there is a strong case for a Universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark matter candidates: an axion of mass 10 (exp -6) eV to 10 (exp -4) eV; a neutrino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either planned or are underway.

  8. Dark Matter and MOOCs

    CERN Document Server

    Salucci, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    To teach the topic of Dark Matter in Galaxies to undergraduate and PhD students is not easy, one reason being that the scientific community has not converged yet to a generally shared knowledge. We argue that the teaching of this topic and its subsequent scientific progress may benefit by Massive Online and Open Courses. The reader of this paper can express his/her opinion on this by means of a confidence vote at: https://moocfellowship.org/submissions/dark-matter-in-galaxies-the-last-mystery

  9. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  10. Weak lensing: Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Dark Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Heavens, Alan

    2009-01-01

    In this non-specialist review I look at how weak lensing can provide information on the dark sector of the Universe. The review concentrates on what can be learned about Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Dark Gravity, and why. On Dark Matter, results on the confrontation of theoretical profiles with observation are reviewed, and measurements of neutrino masses discussed. On Dark Energy, the interest is whether this could be Einstein's cosmological constant, and prospects for high-precision studies...

  11. Spherical Cows in Dark Matter Indirect Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Bernal, Nicolás; Necib, Lina; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter (DM) halos have long been known to be triaxial, but in studies of possible annihilation and decay signals they are often treated as approximately spherical. In this work, we examine the asymmetry of potential indirect detection signals of DM annihilation and decay, exploiting the large statistics of the hydrodynamic simulation Illustris. We carefully investigate the effects of the baryons on the sphericity of annihilation and decay signals for both the case where the observer is a...

  12. Very Cold Gas and Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Combes, F.; Pfenniger, D.

    1996-01-01

    We have recently proposed a new candidate for baryonic dark matter: very cold molecular gas, in near-isothermal equilibrium with the cosmic background radiation at 2.73 K. The cold gas, of quasi-primordial abundances, is condensed in a fractal structure, resembling the hierarchical structure of the detected interstellar medium. We present some perspectives of detecting this very cold gas, either directly or indirectly. The H$_2$ molecule has an "ultrafine" structure, due to the interaction be...

  13. Dark Matter searches with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a non-baryonic Dark Matter (DM) component in the Universe is inferred from the observation of its gravitational interaction. If DM interacts non-gravitationally with the Standard Model, it could be produced at the LHC, escaping the detector and leaving missing transverse momentum (MET) as a signature. Recent results from the ATLAS detector will be presented, based on events with large MET accompanied by a variety of other objects.

  14. Light Dark Matter and Dark Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Heo, Jae Ho; Kim, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Light dark-matter ($M\\leq20$ MeV) particles freeze out after neutrino decoupling. If the dark-matter particle couples to a neutrino or an electromagnetic plasma, the late time entropy production from dark-matter annihilation can change the neutrino-to-photon temperature ratio, and equally the effective number of neutrinos $N_{eff}$. We study the non-equilibrium effects of dark-matter annihilation on the $N_{eff}$ and the effects by using a thermal equilibrium approximation. Both results are c...

  15. Dark matter detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudis, Laura

    2016-08-01

    More than 80 years after its first postulation in modern form, the existence and distribution of dark matter in our Universe is well established. Dark matter is the gravitational glue that holds together galaxies, galaxy clusters and structures on the largest cosmological scales, and an essential component to explain the observed fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background. Yet its existence is inferred indirectly, through its gravitational influence on luminous matter, and its nature is not known. A viable hypothesis is that dark matter is made of new, elementary particles, with allowed masses and interaction strengths spanning a wide range. Two well-motivated classes of candidates are axions and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), and experimental efforts have now reached sensitivities that allow them to test this hypothesis. Axions, produced non-thermally in the early Universe, can be detected by exploiting their predicted couplings to photons and electrons. WIMPs can be detected directly by looking for their collisions with atomic nuclei ultra-low background detectors, or indirectly, through the observation of their annihilation products such as neutrinos, gamma rays, positrons and antiprotons over the astrophysical background. A complementary method is the production of dark matter particles at colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, where they could be observed indirectly via missing transverse energy, or via associated particle production. I will review the main experimental efforts to search for dark matter particles, and the existing constraints on the interaction cross sections. I will also discuss future experiments, their complementarity and their ability to measure the properties of these particles.

  16. The Dark Matter Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Tyson, J A; Angel, J R P; Wittman, David

    2001-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing enables direct reconstruction of dark matter maps over cosmologically significant volumes. This research is currently telescope-limited. The Dark Matter Telescope (DMT) is a proposed 8.4 m telescope with a 3 degree field of view, with an etendue of 260 $(m. degree)^2$, ten times greater than any other current or planned telescope. With its large etendue and dedicated observational mode, the DMT fills a nearly unexplored region of parameter space and enables projects that would take decades on current facilities. The DMT will be able to reach 10-sigma limiting magnitudes of 27-28 magnitude in the wavelength range .3 - 1 um over a 7 square degree field in 3 nights of dark time. Here we review its unique weak lensing cosmology capabilities and the design that enables those capabilities.

  17. Template Composite Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drach, Vincent; Hietanen, Ari; Pica, Claudio;

    2015-01-01

    We present a non perturbative study of SU(2) gauge theory with two fundamental Dirac flavours. We discuss how the model can be used as a template for composite Dark Matter (DM). We estimate one particular interaction of the DM candidate with the Standard Model : the interaction through photon...

  18. Dark matter on top

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a simplified model of fermionic dark matter which couples exclusively to the right-handed top quark via a renormalizable interaction with a color-charged scalar. We first compute the relic abundance of this type of dark matter and investigate constraints placed on the model parameter space by the latest direct detection data. We also perform a detailed analysis for the production of dark matter at the LHC for this model. We find several kinematic variables that allow for a clean signal extraction and we show that the parameter space of this model will be well probed during LHC Run-II. Finally, we investigate the possibility of detecting this type of dark matter via its annihilations into gamma rays. We compute the continuum and the line emission (which includes a possible ''Higgs in Space!'' line) and its possible discovery by future gamma-ray telescopes. We find that the annihilation spectrum has distinctive features which may distinguish it from other models

  19. Inflatable Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; McDermott, Samuel D

    2016-01-01

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed "Inflatable Dark Matter", in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many otherwise well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context, without the need to tune underlying parameters or to appeal to anthropic considerations. Thermal relics that would otherwise be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the non-thermal abundance of GUT or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels, without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. A period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ~ MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the...

  20. DARK MATTER AND DARK ENERGY OF THE UNIVERSE INRIA-SACLAYS Version

    OpenAIRE

    Delort, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we propose a new model of dark matter. According to this new model, dark matter is a substance, that is a new physical element not constituted of classical particles, called dark substance and filling the Universe. Assuming some very simple physical properties to this dark substance, we theoretically justify the flat rotation curve of galaxies and the baryonic Tully-Fisher's law. Then using the new model of dark matter we are naturally led to propose a new geometrical model o...

  1. Dark Matter Halos from the Inside Out

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, James E

    2010-01-01

    The balance of evidence indicates that individual galaxies and groups or clusters of galaxies are embedded in enormous distributions of cold, weakly interacting dark matter. These dark matter 'halos' provide the scaffolding for all luminous structure in the universe, and their properties comprise an essential part of the current cosmological model. I review the internal properties of dark matter halos, focussing on the simple, universal trends predicted by numerical simulations of structure formation. Simulations indicate that halos should all have roughly the same spherically-averaged density profile and kinematic structure, and predict simple distributions of shape, formation history and substructure in density and kinematics, over an enormous range of halo mass and for all common variants of the concordance cosmology. I describe observational progress towards testing these predictions by measuring masses, shapes, profiles and substructure in real halos, using baryonic tracers or gravitational lensing. An i...

  2. Phase transitions and dark matter problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible relationships between phase transitions in the early universe and dark matter problems are discussed. It is shown that there are at least 3 distinct cosmological dark matter problems 1) halos; 2) galaxy formation and clustering; and 3) Ω = 1, each emphasizing different attributes for the dark matter. At least some of the dark matter must by baryonic but if problems 2 and 3 are real they seem to also require non-baryonic material. However, if seeds are generated at the quark-hadron-chiral symmetry transition then alternatives to the standard scenarios may occur. At present no simple simultaneous solution (neither ''hot'', ''warm'', nor ''cold'') exists for all 3 problems, but non-standard solutions with strings, decaying particles or light not tracing to mass may work. An alternative interpretation of the relationship of the cluster-cluster and galaxy-galaxy correlation functions using renormalized scaling is mentioned. In this interpretation galaxies are more strongly correlated and the cluster-cluster function is not expected to go negative until > or approx. 200 Mpc. Possible phase transition origins for the cluster-cluster renormalized scale are presented as ways to obtain a dimension 1.2 fractal. (orig.)

  3. Dark matter, neutrinos, and our solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Nirmala

    2013-01-01

    Dark Matter, Neutrinos, and Our Solar System is a unique enterprise that should be viewed as an important contribution to our understanding of dark matter, neutrinos and the solar system. It describes these issues in terms of links, between cosmology, particle and nuclear physics, as well as between cosmology, atmospheric and terrestrial physics. It studies the constituents of dark matter (classified as hot warm and cold) first in terms of their individual structures (baryonic and non-baryonic, massive and non-massive, interacting and non-interacting) and second, in terms of facilities available to detect these structures (large and small). Neutrinos (an important component of dark matter) are treated as a separate entity. A detailed study of these elusive (sub-atomic) particles is done, from the year 1913 when they were found as byproducts of beta decay -- until the discovery in 2007 which confirmed that neutrino flavors were not more than three (as speculated by some). The last chapter of the book details t...

  4. Dark matter from unification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kainulainen, Kimmo; Tuominen, Kimmo; Virkajärvi, Jussi Tuomas

    2013-01-01

    We consider a minimal extension of the Standard Model (SM), which leads to unification of the SM coupling constants, breaks electroweak symmetry dynamically by a new strongly coupled sector and leads to novel dark matter candidates. In this model, the coupling constant unification requires...... eigenstates of this sector and determine the resulting relic density. The results are constrained by available data from colliders and direct and indirect dark matter experiments. We find the model viable and outline briefly future research directions....... the existence of electroweak triplet and doublet fermions singlet under QCD and new strong dynamics underlying the Higgs sector. Among these new matter fields and a new right handed neutrino, we consider the mass and mixing patterns of the neutral states. We argue for a symmetry stabilizing the lightest mass...

  5. Levitating dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra `antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < -1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger `Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  6. Levitating dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaloper, Nemanja [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Padilla, Antonio, E-mail: kaloper@physics.ucdavis.edu, E-mail: antonio.padilla@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra 'antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < −1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger 'Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  7. Inflatable Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hooper, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); McDermott, Samuel D. [C.N. Yang Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2015-07-30

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed “Inflatable Dark Matter”, in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many otherwise well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context, without the need to tune underlying parameters or to appeal to anthropic considerations. Thermal relics that would otherwise be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the non-thermal abundance of GUT or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels, without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. Additionally, a period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ~ MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the Standard Model.

  8. Tunguska Dark Matter Ball

    CERN Document Server

    Froggatt, C D

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that the Tunguska event in June 1908 cm-large was due to a cm-large ball of a condensate of bound states of 6 top and 6 anti-top quarks containing highly compressed ordinary matter. Such balls are supposed to make up the dark matter as we earlier proposed. The expected rate of impact of this kind of dark matter ball with the earth seems to crudely match a time scale of 200 years between the impacts. The main explosion of the Tunguska event is explained in our picture as material coming out from deep within the earth, where it has been heated and compressed by the ball penetrating to a depth of several thousand km. Thus the effect has some similarity with volcanic activity as suggested by Kundt. We discuss the possible identification of kimberlite pipes with earlier Tunguska-like events. A discussion of how the dark matter balls may have formed in the early universe is also given.

  9. Interacting dark energy collapse with matter components separation

    CERN Document Server

    Delliou, Morgan Le

    2012-01-01

    We use the spherical collapse model of structure formation to investigate the separation in the collapse of uncoupled matter (including dark matter and baryons) and coupled dark matter in an interacting dark energy scenario. Following the usual assumption of a single radius of collapse for all species, we show that we only need to evolve the uncoupled matter sector to obtain the evolution for all matter components. This gives us more information on the collapse with a simplified set of evolution equations compared with the usual approaches. We then apply these results to five quintessence potentials and show how we can discriminate between different quintessence models.

  10. How clustering dark energy affects matter perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi, A.; Basilakos, S.; Pace, F.

    2015-09-01

    The rate of structure formation in the Universe is different in homogeneous and clustered dark energy models. The degree of dark energy clustering depends on the magnitude of its effective sound speed c2_eff and for c2_eff=0 dark energy clusters in a similar fashion to dark matter while for c2_eff=1 it stays (approximately) homogeneous. In this paper we consider two distinct equations of state for the dark energy component, wd = const and w_d=w_0+w_1(z/1+z) with c2_eff as a free parameter and we try to constrain the dark energy effective sound speed using current available data including Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillation, cosmic microwave background shift parameter (Planck and WMAP), Hubble parameter, big bang nucleosynthesis and the growth rate of structures fσ8(z). At first we derive the most general form of the equations governing dark matter and dark energy clustering under the assumption that c2_eff=const. Finally, performing an overall likelihood analysis we find that the likelihood function peaks at c2_eff=0; however, the dark energy sound speed is degenerate with respect to the cosmological parameters, namely Ωm and wd.

  11. Colloquium: Annual modulation of dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Katherine; Lisanti, Mariangela; Savage, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Direct detection experiments, which are designed to detect the scattering of dark matter off nuclei in detectors, are a critical component in the search for the Universe’s missing matter. This Colloquium begins with a review of the physics of direct detection of dark matter, discussing the roles of both the particle physics and astrophysics in the expected signals. The count rate in these experiments should experience an annual modulation due to the relative motion of the Earth around the Sun. This modulation, not present for most known background sources, is critical for solidifying the origin of a potential signal as dark matter. The focus is on the physics of annual modulation, discussing the practical formulas needed to interpret a modulating signal. The dependence of the modulation spectrum on the particle and astrophysics models for the dark matter is illustrated. For standard assumptions, the count rate has a cosine dependence with time, with a maximum in June and a minimum in December. Well-motivated generalizations of these models, however, can affect both the phase and amplitude of the modulation. Shown is how a measurement of an annually modulating signal could teach us about the presence of substructure in the galactic halo or about the interactions between dark and baryonic matter. Although primarily a theoretical review, the current experimental situation for annual modulation and future experimental directions is briefly discussed.

  12. Beyond vanilla dark matter: New channels in the multifaceted search for dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaylali, David E.

    Though we are extremely confident that non-baryonic dark matter exists in our universe, very little is known about its fundamental nature or its relationship with the Standard Model. Guided by theoretical motivations, a desire for generality in our experimental strategies, and a certain amount of hopeful optimism, we have established a basic framework and set of assumptions about the dark sector which we are now actively testing. After years of probing the parameter spaces of these vanilla dark-matter scenarios, through a variety of different search channels, a conclusive direct (non-gravitational) discovery of dark matter eludes us. This very well may suggest that our first-order expectations of the dark sector are too simplistic. This work describes two ways in which we can expand the experimental reach of vanilla dark-matter scenarios while maintaining the model-independent generality which is at this point still warranted. One way in which this is done is to consider coupling structures between the SM and the dark sector other than the two canonical types --- scalar and axial-vector --- leading to spin dependent and independent interactions at direct-detection experiments. The second way we generalize the vanilla scenarios is to consider multi-component dark sectors. We find that both of these generalizations lead to new and interesting phenomenology, and provide a richer complementarity structure between the different experimental probes we are using to search for dark matter.

  13. Fluid Mechanics Explains Cosmology, Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and Life

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H

    2012-01-01

    Observations of the interstellar medium by the Herschel, Planck etc. infrared satellites throw doubt on standard {\\Lambda}CDMHC cosmological processes to form gravitational structures. According to the Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics (HGD) cosmology of Gibson (1996), and the quasar microlensing observations of Schild (1996), the dark matter of galaxies consists of Proto-Globular-star-Cluster (PGC) clumps of Earth-mass primordial gas planets in metastable equilibrium since PGCs began star production at 0.3 Myr by planet mergers. Dark energy and the accelerating expansion of the universe inferred from SuperNovae Ia are systematic dimming errors produced as frozen gas dark matter planets evaporate to form stars. Collisionless cold dark matter that clumps and hierarchically clusters does not exist. Clumps of PGCs began diffusion from the Milky Way Proto-Galaxy upon freezing at 14 Myr to give the Magellanic Clouds and the faint dwarf galaxies of the 10^22 m diameter baryonic dark matter Galaxy halo. The first stars p...

  14. Monodromy Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Witkowski, Lukas T

    2016-01-01

    Light pseudo-Goldstone bosons such as, e.g. axion-like particles, that are non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism are promising dark matter candidates. An important feature of pseudo-Goldstone bosons is their periodic potential, whose scale of periodicity controls all their couplings. As a consequence of the periodicity the maximal potential energy is limited and, hence, producing the observed dark matter density poses significant constraints on the allowed masses and couplings. In the presence of a monodromy, the field range as well as the range of the potential can be significantly extended. As we argue in this paper this has important phenomenological consequences. The constraints on the masses and couplings are ameliorated and couplings to Standard Model particles could be significantly stronger, thereby opening up considerable experimental opportunities. Yet, monodromy models can also give rise to new and qualitatively different features. As a remnant of the periodicity the potential can f...

  15. Dilaton-assisted dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph

    2009-12-31

    A dilaton could be the dominant messenger between standard model fields and dark matter. The measured dark matter relic abundance relates the dark matter mass and spin to the conformal breaking scale. The dark matter-nucleon spin-independent cross section is predicted in terms of the dilaton mass. We compute the current constraints on the dilaton from LEP and Tevatron experiments, and the gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilation to dilatons that could be observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  16. Levitating Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark $U(1)'$ charge equal to its mass, such as the BPS states in string theory. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra `antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic $w<-1$. They can also lead to a {\\it local} variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, ...

  17. An elusive vector dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Ren Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Even though the sensitivity of direct dark matter search experiments reaches the level of about 10−45 cm2, no confident signal of dark matter has been observed. We point out that, if dark matter is a vector boson, the null result in direct dark matter search experiments may be due to the destructive effects in dark-matter–nucleon elastic scattering. We illustrate the scenario using a modified Higgs portal model that includes exotic quarks. The significant cancellation can occur for a certain mass gap between new heavy quark and dark matter. As a result, the spin-independent dark-matter–nucleon elastic scattering is so suppressed that the future direct search experiments will hardly observe the signal of dark matter.

  18. Co-Decaying Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Ng, Wee Hao

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism for thermal dark matter freezeout, termed Co-Decaying Dark Matter. Multi-component dark sectors with degenerate particles and out-of-equilibrium decays can co-decay to obtain the observed relic density. The dark matter density is exponentially depleted through the decay of nearly degenerate particles, rather than from Boltzmann suppression. The relic abundance is set by the dark matter annihilation cross-section, which is predicted to be boosted, and the decay rate of the dark sector particles. The mechanism is viable in a broad range of dark matter parameter space, with a robust prediction of an enhanced indirect detection signal. Finally, we present a simple model that realizes co-decaying dark matter.

  19. Observational constraints on variable equation of state parameters of dark matter and dark energy after Planck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we study a cosmological model in general relativity within the framework of spatially flat Friedmann–Robertson–Walker space–time filled with ordinary matter (baryonic), radiation, dark matter and dark energy, where the latter two components are described by Chevallier–Polarski–Linder equation of state parameters. We utilize the observational data sets from SNLS3, BAO and Planck + WMAP9 + WiggleZ measurements of matter power spectrum to constrain the model parameters. We find that the current observational data offer tight constraints on the equation of state parameter of dark matter. We consider the perturbations and study the behavior of dark matter by observing its effects on CMB and matter power spectra. We find that the current observational data favor the cold dark matter scenario with the cosmological constant type dark energy at the present epoch

  20. Observational constraints on variable equation of state parameters of dark matter and dark energy after Planck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Suresh, E-mail: sukuyd@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, BITS Pilani, Pilani Campus, Rajasthan, 333031 (India); Xu, Lixin, E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2014-10-07

    In this paper, we study a cosmological model in general relativity within the framework of spatially flat Friedmann–Robertson–Walker space–time filled with ordinary matter (baryonic), radiation, dark matter and dark energy, where the latter two components are described by Chevallier–Polarski–Linder equation of state parameters. We utilize the observational data sets from SNLS3, BAO and Planck + WMAP9 + WiggleZ measurements of matter power spectrum to constrain the model parameters. We find that the current observational data offer tight constraints on the equation of state parameter of dark matter. We consider the perturbations and study the behavior of dark matter by observing its effects on CMB and matter power spectra. We find that the current observational data favor the cold dark matter scenario with the cosmological constant type dark energy at the present epoch.

  1. Weak lensing: Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Dark Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Heavens, Alan

    2009-01-01

    In this non-specialist review I look at how weak lensing can provide information on the dark sector of the Universe. The review concentrates on what can be learned about Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Dark Gravity, and why. On Dark Matter, results on the confrontation of theoretical profiles with observation are reviewed, and measurements of neutrino masses discussed. On Dark Energy, the interest is whether this could be Einstein's cosmological constant, and prospects for high-precision studies of the equation of state are considered. On Dark Gravity, we consider the exciting prospects for future weak lensing surveys to distinguish General Relativity from extra-dimensional or other gravity theories.

  2. Luminous Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Feldstein, Brian; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2010-01-01

    We propose a dark matter model in which the signal in direct detection experiments arises from electromagnetic, not nuclear, energy deposition. This can provide a novel explanation for DAMA while avoiding many direct detection constraints. The dark matter state is taken nearly degenerate with another state. These states are naturally connected by a dipole moment operator, which can give both the dominant scattering and decay modes between the two states. The signal at DAMA then arises from dark matter scattering in the Earth into the excited state and decaying back to the ground state through emission of a single photon in the detector. This model has unique signatures in direct detection experiments. The density and chemical composition of the detector is irrelevant, only the total volume affects the event rate. In addition, the spectrum is a monoenergetic line, which can fit the DAMA signal well. This model is readily testable at experiments such as CDMS and XENON100 if they analyze their low-energy, electr...

  3. Coupling dark energy to dark matter perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Marra, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    This Letter proposes that dark energy in the form of a scalar field could effectively couple to dark matter perturbations. The idea is that dark matter particles could annihilate/interact inside dense clumps and transfer energy to the scalar field, which would then enter an accelerated regime. This hypothesis is interesting as it provides a natural trigger for the onset of the acceleration of the universe, since dark energy starts driving the expansion of the universe when matter perturbations become sufficiently dense. Here we study a possible realization of this general idea by coupling dark energy to dark matter via the linear growth function of matter perturbations. The numerical results show that it is indeed possible to obtain a viable cosmology with the expected series of radiation, matter and dark-energy dominated eras. Moreover, the current density of dark energy is given by the value of the coupling parameters rather than by very special initial conditions for the scalar field. In other words, this ...

  4. Signals of Supersymmetric Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, A

    2000-01-01

    The Lightest Supersymmetric Particle predicted in most of the supersymmetric scenarios is an ideal candidate for the dark matter of cosmology. Their detection is of extreme significance today. Recently there have been intriguing signals of a 59 Gev neutralino dark matter at DAMA in Gran Sasso. We look at other possible signatures of dark matter in astrophysical and geological frameworks. The passage of the earth through dense clumps of dark matter would produce large quantities of heat in the interior of this planet through the capture and subsequent annihilation of dark matter particles. This heat would lead to large-scale volcanism which could in turn have caused mass extinctions. The periodicity of such volcanic outbursts agrees with the frequency of palaeontological mass extinctions as well as the observed periodicity in the occurrence of the largest flood basalt provinces on the globe. Binary character of these extinctions is another unique aspect of this signature of dark matter. In addition dark matter...

  5. Cold dark matter as compact composite objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2006-08-01

    Dark matter (DM) being the vital ingredient in the cosmos, still remains a mystery. The standard assumption is that the collisionless cold dark matter (CCDM) particles are represented by some weakly interacting fundamental fields which cannot be associated with any standard quarks or leptons. However, recent analyses of structure on galactic and subgalactic scales have suggested discrepancies and stimulated numerous alternative proposals including, e.g. self-interacting dark matter, self-annihilating dark matter, decaying dark matter, to name just a few. We propose the alternative to the standard assumption about the nature of DM particles (which are typically assumed to be weakly interacting fundamental pointlike particles, yet to be discovered). Our proposal is based on the idea that DM particles are strongly interacting composite macroscopically large objects which made of well-known light quarks (or even antiquarks). The required weakness of the DM particle interactions is guaranteed by a small geometrical factor γ˜(area)/(volume)˜B-1/3≪1 of the composite objects with a large baryon charge B≫1, rather than by a weak coupling constant of a new field. We argue that the interaction between hadronic matter and composite dark objects does not spoil the desired properties of the latter as cold matter. We also argue that such a scenario does not contradict to the current observational data. Rather, it has natural explanations of many observed data, such as ΩDM/ΩB˜1 or 511 KeV line from the bulge of our galaxy. We also suggest that composite dark matter may modify the dynamics of structure formation in the central overdense regions of galaxies. We also present a number of other cosmological/astrophysical observations which indirectly support the novel concept of DM nature.

  6. Conformal Gravity: Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Nesbet, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    This short review examines recent progress in understanding dark matter, dark energy, and galactic halos using theory that departs minimally from standard particle physics and cosmology. Postulated strict conformal symmetry (local Weyl scaling covariance) for all elementary massless fields retains standard theory for fermions and gauge bosons but modifies Einstein-Hilbert general relativity and the Higgs scalar field model, introducing no new physical fields. Subgalactic phenomenology is retained. Without invoking dark matter, conformal gravity and a conformal Higgs model fit empirical data on galactic rotational velocities, galactic halos, and Hubble expansion including dark energy.

  7. Conformal Gravity: Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Nesbet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This short review examines recent progress in understanding dark matter, dark energy, and galactic halos using theory that departs minimally from standard particle physics and cosmology. Strict conformal symmetry (local Weyl scaling covariance, postulated for all elementary massless fields, retains standard fermion and gauge boson theory but modifies Einstein–Hilbert general relativity and the Higgs scalar field model, with no new physical fields. Subgalactic phenomenology is retained. Without invoking dark matter, conformal gravity and a conformal Higgs model fit empirical data on galactic rotational velocities, galactic halos, and Hubble expansion including dark energy.

  8. Dark Matter Accretion into Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Peirani, Sébastien

    2008-01-01

    The relativistic accretion rate of dark matter by a black hole is revisited. Under the assumption that the phase space density indicator, $Q=\\rho_{\\infty}/\\sigma^3_{\\infty}$, remains constant during the inflow, the derived accretion rate can be higher up to five orders of magnitude than the classical accretion formula, valid for non-relativistic and non-interacting particles, when typical dark halo conditions are considered. For these typical conditions, the critical point of the flow is located at distances of about 30-150 times the horizon radius. Application of our results to black hole seeds hosted by halos issued from cosmological simulations indicate that dark matter contributes to no more than ~10% of the total accreted mass, confirming that the bolometric quasar luminosity is related to the baryonic accretion history of the black hole.

  9. Twin Higgs WIMP Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    García, Isabel García; March-Russell, John

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter (DM) without a matter asymmetry is studied in the context of Twin Higgs (TH) theories in which the LHC naturalness problem is addressed. These possess a twin sector related to the Standard Model (SM) by a (broken) $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetry, and interacting with the SM via a specific Higgs portal. We focus on the minimal realisation of the TH mechanism, the Fraternal Twin Higgs, with only a single generation of twin quarks and leptons, and $SU(3)'\\times SU(2)'$ gauge group. We show that a variety of natural twin-WIMP DM candidates are present (directly linked to the weak scale by naturalness), the simplest and most attractive being the $\\tau^\\prime$ lepton with a mass $m_{\\tau^\\prime} > m_{\\rm Higgs}/2$, although spin-1 $W^{\\prime\\pm}$ DM and multicomponent DM are also possible (twin baryons are strongly disfavoured by tuning). We consider in detail the dynamics of the possibly (meta)stable glueballs in the twin sector, the nature of the twin QCD phase transition, and possible new contributions to th...

  10. Dark energy interacting with neutrinos and dark matter: a phenomenological theory

    OpenAIRE

    Kremer, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    A model for a flat homogeneous and isotropic Universe composed of dark energy, dark matter, neutrinos, radiation and baryons is analyzed. The fields of dark matter and neutrinos are supposed to interact with the dark energy. The dark energy is considered to obey either the van der Waals or the Chaplygin equations of state. The ratio between the pressure and the energy density of the neutrinos varies with the red-shift simulating massive and non-relativistic neutrinos at small red-shifts and n...

  11. Skew-Flavored Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Prateek; Chacko, Zackaria; Fortes, Elaine C. F. S.; Kilic, Can

    2015-01-01

    We explore a novel flavor structure in the interactions of dark matter with the Standard Model. We consider theories in which both the dark matter candidate, and the particles that mediate its interactions with the Standard Model fields, carry flavor quantum numbers. The interactions are skewed in flavor space, so that a dark matter particle does not directly couple to the Standard Model matter fields of the same flavor, but only to the other two flavors. This framework respects Minimal Flavo...

  12. Direct search for dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Dark matter is hypothetical matter which does not interact with electromagnetic radiation. The existence of dark matter is only inferred from gravitational effects of astrophysical observations to explain the missing mass component of the Universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles are currently the most popular candidate to explain the missing mass component. I review the current status of experimental searches of dark matter through direct detection using terrestrial detectors.

  13. Singlet fermion dark matter within left-right model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Sudhanwa; Rao, Soumya

    2016-08-01

    We discuss singlet fermion dark matter within a left-right symmetric model promoting baryon and lepton numbers as separate gauge symmetries. We add a simple Dirac fermionic dark matter singlet under SU(2) L , R with nonzero and equal baryon and lepton number which ensures electric charge neutrality. Such a dark matter candidate interacts with SM particles through the extra ZB,ℓ gauge bosons. This can give rise to a dark matter particle of a few hundred GeV that couples to ∼TeV scale gauge bosons to give the correct relic density. This model thus accommodates TeV scale ZB,ℓ gauge bosons and other low scale BSM particles, which can be easily probed at LHC.

  14. Power spectrum for the Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velten, Hermano, E-mail: velten@physik.uni-bielefeld.de [Departamento de Fisica, UFES, Vitoria, 29075-910 Espirito Santo (Brazil); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, Postfach 100131, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Wamba, Etienne [Laboratory of Mechanics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, P.O. Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2012-03-13

    We assume that dark matter is composed of scalar particles that form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) at some point during the cosmic evolution. Afterwards, cold dark matter is in the form of a condensate and behaves slightly different from the standard dark matter component. We study the large scale perturbative dynamics of the BEC dark matter in a model where this component coexists with baryonic matter and cosmological constant. The perturbative dynamics is studied using neo-Newtonian cosmology (where the pressure is dynamically relevant for the homogeneous and isotropic background) which is assumed to be correct for small values of the sound speed. We show that BEC dark matter effects can be seen in the matter power spectrum if the mass of the condensate particle lies in the range 15 MeV

  15. Baryon acoustic oscillation intensity mapping of dark energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B; McDonald, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    The expansion of the Universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious antigravity agent of this acceleration has been called "dark energy." To measure the dynamics of dark energy, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as 10(9) individual galaxies, by observing the 21 cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three-dimensional intensity mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy. PMID:18352692

  16. Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Intensity Mapping of Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Peterson, Jeffrey B; McDonald, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The expansion of the universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious anti-gravity agent of this acceleration has been called ``dark energy''. To measure the dynamics of dark energy, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as 10^9 individual galaxies, by observing the 21cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three dimensional brightness mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy.

  17. Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Intensity Mapping of Dark Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; McDonald, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    The expansion of the Universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious antigravity agent of this acceleration has been called “dark energy.” To measure the dynamics of dark energy, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as 109 individual galaxies, by observing the 21 cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three-dimensional intensity mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy.

  18. Baryogenesis and Dark Matter in $U(1)$ Extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Wan-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    A brief review is given of some recent works where baryogenesis and dark matter have a common origin within the $U(1)$ extensions of the standard model and of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. The models considered generate the desired baryon asymmetry and the dark matter to baryon ratio. In one model all of the fundamental interactions do not violate lepton number, and the total $B-L$ in the Universe vanishes. In addition, one may also generate a normal hierarchy of neutrino masses and mixings in conformity with the current data. Specifically one can accommodate $\\theta_{13}\\sim 9^{\\circ}$ consistent with the data from Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment.

  19. Neutrino Masses, Leptogenesis and Decaying Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Zhuridov, Dmitry V

    2009-01-01

    We study a simple extension of the standard model to simultaneously explain neutrino masses, dark matter and the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. In our model, the baryon asymmetry is achieved by the leptogenesis mechanism, while the decaying dark matter with the lifetime of O(10^26 s) provides a natural solution to the electron and positron excesses in Fermi and PAMELA satellite experiments. In particular, we emphasize that our model is sensitive to the structure at the endpoint around 1 TeV of the Fermi data. In addition, some of new particles proposed in the model are within the reach at the near future colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider.

  20. Neutrino masses, leptogenesis and decaying dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chuan-Hung [Department of Physics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Geng, Chao-Qiang; Zhuridov, Dmitry V., E-mail: physchen@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: zhuridov@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2009-10-01

    We study a simple extension of the standard model to simultaneously explain neutrino masses, dark matter and the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. In our model, the baryon asymmetry is achieved by the leptogenesis mechanism, while the decaying dark matter with the lifetime of O(10{sup 26} s) provides a natural solution to the electron and positron excesses in Fermi and PAMELA satellite experiments. In particular, we emphasize that our model is sensitive to the structure at the endpoint around 1 TeV of the Fermi data. In addition, some of new particles proposed in the model are within the reach at the near future colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider.

  1. Dark Matter from QCD-balls

    CERN Document Server

    Zhitnitsky, A R

    2003-01-01

    We discuss a novel cold dark matter candidate which is formed from the ordinary quarks during the QCD phase transition when the axion domain wall undergoes an unchecked collapse due to the tension in the wall. If a large number of quarks is trapped inside the bulk of a closed axion domain wall, the collapse stops due to the internal Fermi pressure. In this case the system in the bulk, may reach the critical density when it undergoes a phase transition to a color superconducting phase with the ground state being the quark condensate, similar to BCS theory. If this happens, the new state of matter representing the diquark condensate with a large baryon number B > 10^{20} becomes a stable soliton-like configuration. Consequently, it may serve as a novel cold dark matter candidate. We also discuss a possibility that baryogenesis happens exactly at the same instant during the QCD phase transition.

  2. Dark Matter Superfluidity and Galactic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhiani, Lasha

    2015-01-01

    We propose a unified framework that reconciles the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the LambdaCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the physics of superfluidity. Dark matter consists of self-interacting axion-like particles that thermalize and condense to form a superfluid in galaxies, with ~mK critical temperature. The superfluid phonons mediate a MOND acceleration on baryonic matter. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures.

  3. Dark matter superfluidity and galactic dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasha Berezhiani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a unified framework that reconciles the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the ΛCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the physics of superfluidity. Dark matter consists of self-interacting axion-like particles that thermalize and condense to form a superfluid in galaxies, with ∼mK critical temperature. The superfluid phonons mediate a MOND acceleration on baryonic matter. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not: dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures.

  4. Asymmetric Dark Matter Models and the LHC Diphoton Excess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of dark matter (DM) and the origin of the baryon asymmetry are persistent indications that the SM is incomplete. More recently, the ATLAS and CMS experiments have observed an excess of diphoton events with invariant mass of about 750 GeV. One interpretation of this excess is decays...... have for models of asymmetric DM that attempt to account for the similarity of the dark and visible matter abundances....

  5. The Hubble Web: The Dark Matter Problem and Cosmic Strings

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Stephon

    2007-01-01

    I propose a reinterpretation of cosmic dark matter in which a rigid network of cosmic strings formed at the end of inflation. The cosmic strings fulfill three functions: At recombination they provide an accretion mechanism for virializing baryonic and warm dark matter into disks. These cosmic strings survive as configurations which thread spiral and elliptical galaxies leading to the observed flatness of rotation curves and the Tully-Fisher relation. We find a relationship between the rotatio...

  6. Dark Energy, Dark Matter and Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Bertolami, Orfeu

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the motivation for high accuracy relativistic gravitational experiments in the Solar System and complementary cosmological tests. We focus our attention on the issue of distinguishing a generic scalar-theory of gravity as the underlying physical theory from the usual general relativistic picture, where one expects the presence of fundamental scalar fields associated, for instance, to inflation, dark matter and dark energy.

  7. Dark Matter remains obscure

    CERN Multimedia

    Fabio Capello

    2011-01-01

    It is one of the hidden secrets that literally surround the Universe. Experiments have shown no result so far because trying to capture particles that do not seem to interact with ordinary matter is no trivial exercise. The OSQAR experiment at CERN is dedicated to the search for axions, one of the candidates for Dark Matter. For its difficult challenge, OSQAR counts on one of the world’s most powerful magnets borrowed from the LHC. In a recent publication, the OSQAR collaboration was able to confirm that no axion signal appears out of the background. In other words: the quest is still on.   The OSQAR experiment installed in the SM18 hall. (Photo by F. Capello) The OSQAR “Light Shining Through a Wall” experiment was officially launched in 2007 with the aim of detecting axions, that is, particles that might be the main components of Dark Matter. OSQAR uses the powerful LHC dipole magnet to intensify the predicted photon-axion conversions in the presence of strong m...

  8. Coupling dark energy to dark matter inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Valerio

    2016-09-01

    We propose that dark energy in the form of a scalar field could effectively couple to dark matter inhomogeneities. Through this coupling energy could be transferred to/from the scalar field, which could possibly enter an accelerated regime. Though phenomenological, this scenario is interesting as it provides a natural trigger for the onset of the acceleration of the universe, since dark energy starts driving the expansion of the universe when matter inhomogeneities become sufficiently strong. Here we study a possible realization of this idea by coupling dark energy to dark matter via the linear growth function of matter perturbations. The numerical results show that it is indeed possible to obtain a viable cosmology with the expected series of radiation, matter and dark-energy dominated eras. In particular, the current density of dark energy is given by the value of the coupling parameters rather than by very special initial conditions for the scalar field. In other words, this model-unlike standard models of cosmic late acceleration-does not suffer from the so-called "coincidence problem" and its related fine tuning of initial conditions.

  9. Baryogenesis from dark matter in an inflationary universe

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Wan-Zhe; Nath, Pran

    2013-01-01

    We consider the possibility that in an inflationary universe, the inflaton field decays purely into the dark sector creating asymmetric dark matter at the end of inflation. This asymmetry is subsequently transmuted into leptons and baryons. We consider this possibility in the framework of a generic inflation model, and compute the amount of asymmetric dark matter created from the out of equilibrium decays of the inflaton with CP violating Yukawa couplings. The dark matter asymmetry is then transferred to the visible sector by the asymmetry transfer equation and generates an excess of $B-L$. Baryogenesis occurs via sphaleron processes which conserve $B-L$ but violate $B+L$. A mechanism for the annihilation of the symmetric component of dark matter is also discussed. The model leads to multi-component dark matter consisting of both bosonic and fermionic components.

  10. Plasma dark matter direct detection

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Jackson D

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter in spiral galaxies like the Milky Way may take the form of a dark plasma. Hidden sector dark matter charged under an unbroken $U(1)'$ gauge interaction provides a simple and well defined particle physics model realising this possibility. The assumed $U(1)'$ neutrality of the Universe then implies (at least) two oppositely charged dark matter components with self-interactions mediated via a massless "dark photon" (the $U(1)'$ gauge boson). In addition to nuclear recoils such dark matter can give rise to keV electron recoils in direct detection experiments. In this context, the detailed physical properties of the dark matter plasma interacting with the Earth is required. This is a complex system, which is here modelled as a fluid governed by the magnetohydrodynamic equations. These equations are numerically solved for some illustrative examples, and implications for direct detection experiments discussed. In particular, the analysis presented here leaves open the intriguing possibility that the DAMA...

  11. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Speckhard, Eric G; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce line-like spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming and proposed experiments will make significant improvements. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  12. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  13. DARK MATTER SEARCH AT LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kanaya, N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The existence of significant amount of dark matter in the Universe is one of strongest motivations to expect new physics beyond the Standard Model. The observation of dark matter at the LHC is a grand challenge next to the discovery of the Higgs boson. Following sections present latest LHC results on the search for dark matter in various final states with large missing transverse energy using data collected in 2011 and 2012.

  14. Dark matter searches with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Jeitler, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The existence of dark matter, indicated by astronomical observations, is one of the main proofs of physics beyond the standard model. Despite its abundance, dark matter has not been directly observed yet. This talk presents several searches for dark matter production in proton-proton collisions at 7, 8, and 13 TeV at the LHC, performed by the CMS collaboration. They are interpreted in terms of simplified models with different structures and mediators, as well as generic effective theory terms.

  15. Dark matter, shared asymmetries, and galactic gamma ray signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Nayara; Necib, Lina; Thaler, Jesse

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a novel dark matter scenario where the visible sector and the dark sector share a common asymmetry. The two sectors are connected through an unstable mediator with baryon number one, allowing the standard model baryon asymmetry to be shared with dark matter via semi-annihilation. The present-day abundance of dark matter is then set by thermal freeze-out of this semi-annihilation process, yielding an asymmetric version of the WIMP miracle as well as promising signals for indirect detection experiments. As a proof of concept, we find a viable region of parameter space consistent with the observed Fermi excess of GeV gamma rays from the galactic center.

  16. Dark Matter, Shared Asymmetries, and Galactic Gamma Ray Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, Nayara; Thaler, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel dark matter scenario where the visible sector and the dark sector share a common asymmetry. The two sectors are connected through an unstable mediator with baryon number one, allowing the standard model baryon asymmetry to be shared with dark matter via semi-annihilation. The present-day abundance of dark matter is then set by thermal freeze-out of this semi-annihilation process, yielding an asymmetric version of the WIMP miracle as well as promising signals for indirect detection experiments. As a proof of concept, we find a viable region of parameter space consistent with the observed Fermi excess of GeV gamma rays from the galactic center.

  17. (Mainly) axion dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The strong CP problem of QCD is at heart a problem of naturalness: why is the FF ˜ term highly suppressed in the QCD Lagrangian when it seems necessary to explain why there are three and not four light pions? The most elegant solution posits a spontaneously broken Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry which requires the existence of the axion field a. The axion field settles to the minimum of its potential thus removing the offensive term but giving rise to the physical axion whose coherent oscillations can make up the cold dark matter. Only now are experiments such as ADMX beginning to explore QCD axion parameter space. Since a bonafide scalar particle- the Higgs boson- has been discovered, one might expect its mass to reside at the axion scale fa ˜ 1011 GeV. The Higgs mass is elegantly stabilized by supersymmetry: in this case the axion is accompanied by its axino and saxion superpartners. Requiring naturalness also in the electroweak sector implies higgsino-like WIMPs so then we expect mixed axion-WIMP dark matter. Ultimately we would expect detection of both an axion and a WIMP while signals for light higgsinos may show up at LHC and must show up at ILC.

  18. Dark matter. A light move

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Javier [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Doebrich, Babette [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    This proceedings contribution reports from the workshop Dark Matter - a light move, held at DESY in Hamburg in June 2013. Dark Matter particle candidates span a huge parameter range. In particular, well motivated candidates exist also in the sub-eV mass region, for example the axion. Whilst a plethora of searches for rather heavy Dark Matter particles exists, there are only very few experiments aimed at direct detection of sub-eV Dark Matter to this date. The aim of our workshop was to discuss if and how this could be changed in the near future.

  19. Matter-antimatter asymmetry and dark matter from torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popławski, Nikodem J.

    2011-04-01

    We propose a simple scenario which explains the observed matter-antimatter imbalance and the origin of dark matter in the Universe. We use the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory of gravity which naturally extends general relativity to include the intrinsic spin of matter. Spacetime torsion produced by spin generates, in the classical Dirac equation, the Hehl-Datta term which is cubic in spinor fields. We show that under a charge-conjugation transformation this term changes sign relative to the mass term. A classical Dirac spinor and its charge conjugate therefore satisfy different field equations. Fermions in the presence of torsion have higher energy levels than antifermions, which leads to their decay asymmetry. Such a difference is significant only at extremely high densities that existed in the very early Universe. We propose that this difference caused a mechanism, according to which heavy fermions existing in such a Universe and carrying the baryon number decayed mostly to normal matter, whereas their antiparticles decayed mostly to hidden antimatter which forms dark matter. The conserved total baryon number of the Universe remained zero.

  20. Lectures on Dark Matter Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Lisanti, Mariangela

    2016-01-01

    Rotation curve measurements from the 1970s provided the first strong indication that a significant fraction of matter in the Universe is non-baryonic. In the intervening years, a tremendous amount of progress has been made on both the theoretical and experimental fronts in the search for this missing matter, which we now know constitutes nearly 85% of the Universe's matter density. These series of lectures, first given at the TASI 2015 summer school, provide an introduction to the basics of d...

  1. Grand unified hidden-sector dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Stephen J.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2014-10-01

    We explore G×G unified theories with the visible and the hidden or dark sectors paired under a Z2 symmetry. Developing a system of "asymmetric symmetry breaking" we motivate such models on the basis of their ability to generate dark baryons that are confined with a mass scale just above that of the proton, as motivated by asymmetric dark matter. This difference is achieved from the distinct but related confinement scales that develop in unified theories that have the two factors of G spontaneously breaking in an asymmetric manner. We show how Higgs potentials that admit different gauge group breaking chains in each sector can be constructed, and demonstrate the capacity for generating different fermion mass scales. Lastly we discuss supersymmetric extensions of such schemes.

  2. Make Dark Matter Charged Again

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Prateek; Randall, Lisa; Scholtz, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    We revisit constraints on dark matter that is charged under a $U(1)$ gauge group in the dark sector, decoupled from Standard Model forces. We find that the strongest constraints in the literature are subject to a number of mitigating factors. For instance, the naive dark matter thermalization timescale in halos is corrected by saturation effects that slow down isotropization for modest ellipticities. The weakened bounds uncover interesting parameter space, making models with weak-scale charged dark matter viable, even with electromagnetic strength interaction. This also leads to the intriguing possibility that dark matter self-interactions within small dwarf galaxies are extremely large, a relatively unexplored regime in current simulations. Such strong interactions suppress heat transfer over scales larger than the dark matter mean free path, inducing a dynamical cutoff length scale above which the system appears to have only feeble interactions. These effects must be taken into account to assess the viabili...

  3. Detecting Stealth Dark Matter Directly through Electromagnetic Polarizability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelquist, T; Berkowitz, E; Brower, R C; Buchoff, M I; Fleming, G T; Jin, X-Y; Kiskis, J; Kribs, G D; Neil, E T; Osborn, J C; Rebbi, C; Rinaldi, E; Schaich, D; Schroeder, C; Syritsyn, S; Vranas, P; Weinberg, E; Witzel, O

    2015-10-23

    We calculate the spin-independent scattering cross section for direct detection that results from the electromagnetic polarizability of a composite scalar "stealth baryon" dark matter candidate, arising from a dark SU(4) confining gauge theory-"stealth dark matter." In the nonrelativistic limit, electromagnetic polarizability proceeds through a dimension-7 interaction leading to a very small scattering cross section for dark matter with weak-scale masses. This represents a lower bound on the scattering cross section for composite dark matter theories with electromagnetically charged constituents. We carry out lattice calculations of the polarizability for the lightest "baryon" states in SU(3) and SU(4) gauge theories using the background field method on quenched configurations. We find the polarizabilities of SU(3) and SU(4) to be comparable (within about 50%) normalized to the stealth baryon mass, which is suggestive for extensions to larger SU(N) groups. The resulting scattering cross sections with a xenon target are shown to be potentially detectable in the dark matter mass range of about 200-700 GeV, where the lower bound is from the existing LUX constraint while the upper bound is the coherent neutrino background. Significant uncertainties in the cross section remain due to the more complicated interaction of the polarizablity operator with nuclear structure; however, the steep dependence on the dark matter mass, 1/m(B)(6), suggests the observable dark matter mass range is not appreciably modified. We briefly highlight collider searches for the mesons in the theory as well as the indirect astrophysical effects that may also provide excellent probes of stealth dark matter.

  4. Interacting Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Farrar, G R; Farrar, Glennys R.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss models for the cosmological dark sector in which the energy density of a scalar field approximates Einstein's cosmological constant and the scalar field value determines the dark matter particle mass by a Yukawa coupling. A model with one dark matter family can be adjusted so the observational constraints on the cosmological parameters are close to but different from what is predicted by the Lambda CDM model. This may be a useful aid to judging how tightly the cosmological parameters are constrained by the new generation of cosmological tests that depend on the theory of structure formation. In a model with two families of dark matter particles the scalar field may be locked to near zero mass for one family. This can suppress the long-range scalar force in the dark sector and eliminate evolution of the effective cosmological constant and the mass of the nonrelativistic dark matter particles, making the model close to Lambda CDM, until the particle number density becomes low enough to allow the scal...

  5. On the dark matter distribution in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iocco, Fabio; Pato, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    The distribution of dark matter in the Milky Way is a crucial input for ongoing studies in cosmology, astrophysics and particle physics. This motivates the effort over the next years to improve our mapping of dark matter, which has indeed become a top priority in the field. We report briefly on the state of the art regarding the dark matter distribution in our Galaxy, with a special emphasis in the inner part of the Galaxy where baryons start to give an important dynamical contribute to the total gravitational potential. After introducing the kinematic data used to trace the rotation curve and the photometric data used to model the different baryonic components, we combine kinematics and photometry to single out the dark matter content. The procedure is then used to assess the evidence for dark matter and to constrain the underlying dark matter distribution with two conceptually distinct approaches, which we dub profile fitting and profile reconstruction. Finally, in view of the swarm of astronomical data soon to become available, we shortly address the expected progress in pinpointing dark matter across the Galaxy.

  6. Split neutrinos - leptogenesis, dark matter and inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Mazumdar, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    We propose a simple framework to split neutrinos with a slight departure from tribimaximal mixing - where two of the neutrinos are Majorana type which provide thermal leptogenesis. The Dirac neutrino with a tiny Yukawa coupling explains primordial inflation and the cosmic microwave background radiation, where the inflaton is the gauge invariant flat direction. The observed baryon asymmetry, and the scale of inflation are intimately tied to the observed reactor angle, which can be further constrained by the LHC and the neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. The model also provides the lightest right handed sneutrino as a part of the inflaton to be the dark matter candidate.

  7. Gravitational Origin of Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Babichev, Eugeny; Raidal, Martti; Schmidt-May, Angnis; Urban, Federico; Veermäe, Hardi; von Strauss, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Observational evidence for the existence of Dark Matter is limited to its gravitational effects. The extensive program for dedicated searches has yielded null results so far, challenging the most popular models. Here we propose that this is the case because the very existence of cold Dark Matter is a manifestation of gravity itself. The consistent bimetric theory of gravity, the only known ghost-free extension of General Relativity involving a massless and a massive spin-2 field, automatically contains a perfect Dark Matter candidate. We demonstrate that the massive spin-2 particle can be heavy, stable on cosmological scales, and that it interacts with matter only through a gravitational type of coupling. Remarkably, these features persist in the same region of parameter space where bimetric theory satisfies the current gravity tests. We show that the observed Dark Matter abundance can be generated via freeze-in and suggest possible particle physics and gravitational signatures of our bimetric Dark Matter mod...

  8. Skew-Flavored Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Prateek; Fortes, Elaine C F S; Kilic, Can

    2015-01-01

    We explore a novel flavor structure in the interactions of dark matter with the Standard Model. We consider theories in which both the dark matter candidate, and the particles that mediate its interactions with the Standard Model fields, carry flavor quantum numbers. The interactions are skewed in flavor space, so that a dark matter particle does not directly couple to the Standard Model matter fields of the same flavor, but only to the other two flavors. This framework respects Minimal Flavor Violation, and is therefore naturally consistent with flavor constraints. We study the phenomenology of a benchmark model in which dark matter couples to right-handed charged leptons. In large regions of parameter space the dark matter can emerge as a thermal relic, while remaining consistent with the constraints from direct and indirect detection. The collider signatures of this scenario include events with multiple leptons and missing energy. These events exhibit a characteristic flavor pattern that may allow this cla...

  9. Shallowed cusp slope of dark matter in disc galaxy formation through clump clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    Cusp-core problem is a controversial problem on galactic dark matter haloes. Cosmological N-body simulations has demonstrated that galactic dark matter haloes have a cuspy density profile at the centre. However, baryonic physics may affect the dark matter density profile. For example, it was suggested that adiabatic contraction of baryonic gas makes the dark matter cusp steeper. However, it is still an open question if the gas falls into the galactic centre in smooth adiabatic manner. Recent numerical studies suggested that disc galaxies might experience clumpy phase in their early stage of the disc formation, which could also explain clump clusters and chain galaxies observed in high redshift Universe. In this letter, using numerical simulations with an isolated model, we study how the dark matter halo responds to these clumpy nature of baryon component in disc galaxy formation through the clump cluster phase. Our simulation demonstrates that such clumpy phase leads to a shallower density profile of the dark...

  10. Distinguishing interacting dark energy from wCDM with CMB, lensing, and baryon acoustic oscillation data

    CERN Document Server

    Valiviita, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    We employ the Planck 2013 CMB temperature anisotropy and lensing data, and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data to constrain a phenomenological $w$CDM model, where dark matter and dark energy interact. We assume time-dependent equation of state parameter for dark energy, and treat dark matter and dark energy as fluids whose energy-exchange rate is proportional to the dark-matter density. The CMB data alone leave a strong degeneracy between the interaction rate and the physical CDM density parameter today, $\\omega_c$, allowing a large interaction rate $|\\Gamma| \\sim H_0$. However, as has been known for a while, the BAO data break this degeneracy. Moreover, we exploit the CMB lensing potential likelihood, which probes the matter perturbations at redshift $z \\sim 2$ and is very sensitive to the growth of structure, and hence one of the tools for discerning between the $\\Lambda$CDM model and its alternatives. However, we find that in the non-phantom models ($w_{\\mathrm{de}}>-1$), the constraints remain unchange...

  11. Lattice calculation of composite dark matter form factors

    CERN Document Server

    Appelquist, T; Buchoff, M I; Cheng, M; Cohen, S D; Fleming, G T; Kiskis, J; Lin, M F; Neil, E T; Osborn, J C; Rebbi, C; Schaich, D; Schroeder, C; Syritsyn, S N; Voronov, G; Vranas, P; Wasem, J

    2013-01-01

    Composite dark matter candidates, which can arise from new strongly-coupled sectors, are well-motivated and phenomenologically interesting, particularly in the context of asymmetric generation of the relic density. In this work, we employ lattice calculations to study the electromagnetic form factors of electroweak-neutral dark-matter baryons for a three-color, QCD-like theory with Nf = 2 and 6 degenerate fermions in the fundamental representation. We calculate the (connected) charge radius and anomalous magnetic moment, both of which can play a significant role for direct detection of composite dark matter. We find minimal Nf dependence in these quantities. We generate mass-dependent cross-sections for dark matter-nucleon interactions and use them in conjunction with experimental results from XENON100, excluding dark matter candidates of this type with masses below 10 TeV.

  12. Search for pseudoscalar cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Bibber, K.; Stoeffl, W.; LLNL Collaborators

    1992-05-29

    AH dynamical evidence points to the conclusion that the predominant form of matter in the universe is in a non-luminous form. Furthermore, large scale deviations from uniform Hubble flow, and the recent COBE reports of inhomogeneities in the cosmic microwave background strongly suggest that we live in an exactly closed universe. If this is true, then ordinary baryonic matter could only be a minority component (10% at most) of the missing mass, and that what constitutes the majority of the dark matter must involve new physics. The axion is one of very few well motivated candidates which may comprise the dark matter. Additionally it is a `cold` dark-matter candidate which is preferred by the COBE data. We propose to construct and operate an experiment to search for axions which may constitute the dark matter of our own galaxy. As proposed by Sikivie, dark-matter axions may be detected by their stimulated conversion into monochromatic microwave photons in a tunable high-Q cavity inside a strong magnetic field. Our ability to mount an experiment quickly and take data within one year is due to a confluence of three factors. The first is the availability of a compact high field superconducting magnet and a local industrial partner, Wang NMR, who can make a very thermally efficient and economical cryostat for it. The second is an ongoing joint venture with the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences to do R&D on metalized precision-formed ceramic microwave cavities for the axion search, and INR has commited to providing all the microwave cavity arrays for this experiment, should this proposal be approved. The third is a commitment of very substantial startup capital monies from MIT for all of the state-of-the-art ultra-low noise microwave electronics, to one of our outstanding young collaborators who is joining their faculty.

  13. Finite Volume Effect of Baryons in Strange Hadronic Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Bao-Xi; LI Lei; NING Ping-Zhi; ZHAO En-Guang

    2001-01-01

    The finite volume effect of baryons in strange hadronic matter (SHM) is studied within the framework of relativistic mean-field theory. As this effect is concerned, the saturation density of SHM turns lower, and the binding energy per baryon decreases. Its influence to the compression modulus of SHM is also discussed.

  14. Baryons Matter: Why Luminous Satellite Galaxies Have Reduced Central Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Zolotov, Adi; Willman, Beth; Governato, Fabio; Pontzen, Andrew; Christensen, Charlotte; Dekel, Avishai; Quinn, Tom; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2012-01-01

    Using high resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of Milky Way-massed disk galaxies, we demonstrate that supernovae feedback and tidal stripping lower the central masses of bright (-14 10^9 Msun, Mstar > 10^7 Msun) compared to DM-only simulations. The progenitors of the lower mass satellites are unable to maintain bursty star formation histories, due to both heating at reionization and gas loss from initial star forming events, preserving the steep inner density profile predicted by DM-only simulations. After infall, tidal stripping acts to further reduce the central densities of the luminous satellites, particularly those that enter with cored dark matter halos, increasing the discrepancy in the central masses predicted by baryon+DM and DM-only simulations. We show that DM-only simulations, which neglect the baryonic effects described in this work, produce denser satellites with larger central velocities. We provide a simple correction to the central DM mass predicted for satellites by DM-only s...

  15. Repulsive Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, J

    2000-01-01

    It seems necessary to suppress, at least partially, the formation ofstructure on subgalactic scales. As an alternative to warm or collisional darkmatter, I postulate a condensate of massive bosons interacting via a repulsiveinterparticle potential, plus gravity. This leads to a minimum lengthscale forbound objects, and to superfluidity. Galactic dynamics may differ significantlyfrom that of more generic dark matter in not unwelcome ways, especially in thecore. Such particles can be realized as quanta of a relativistic massive scalarfield with a quartic self-interaction. At high densities, the equation of statehas the same form as that of an ideal relativistic gas despite theinteractions. If the nonrelativistic lengthscale is of order a kiloparsec, thenthe energy density in these particles was comparable to that of photons atearly times, but small enough to avoid conflict with primordialnucleosynthesis.

  16. Ultralight particle dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringwald, A.

    2013-10-15

    We review the physics case for very weakly coupled ultralight particles beyond the Standard Model, in particular for axions and axion-like particles (ALPs): (i) the axionic solution of the strong CP problem and its embedding in well motivated extensions of the Standard Model; (ii) the possibility that the cold dark matter in the Universe is comprised of axions and ALPs; (iii) the ALP explanation of the anomalous transparency of the Universe for TeV photons; and (iv) the axion or ALP explanation of the anomalous energy loss of white dwarfs. Moreover, we present an overview of ongoing and near-future laboratory experiments searching for axions and ALPs: haloscopes, helioscopes, and light-shining-through-a-wall experiments.

  17. Antideuterons from supersymmetric dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Donato, F; Maurin, D

    2007-01-01

    We calculate the antideuteron flux expected from dark matter annihilation in the galactic halo. The propagation is treated in a full 2-D propagation model consistent with the results obtained from the propagation of B/C and other galactic species. We discuss the potentials of this indirect dark matter detection means, with special emphasis on the possible sources of uncertainties affecting future measurements

  18. Quantum Gravity and Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Chiu Man; Ng, Y Jack

    2011-01-01

    We propose a connection between global physics and local galactic dynamics via quantum gravity. The salient features of cold dark matter (CDM) and modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) are combined into a unified scheme by introducing the concept of MONDian dark matter which behaves like CDM at cluster and cosmological scales but emulates MOND at the galactic scale.

  19. ℤ2 SIMP dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dark matter with strong self-interactions provides a compelling solution to several small-scale structure puzzles. Under the assumption that the coupling between dark matter and the Standard Model particles is suppressed, such strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) allow for a successful thermal freeze-out through N-to-N′ processes, where N dark matter particles annihilate to N′ of them. In the most common scenarios, where dark matter stability is guaranteed by a ℤ2 symmetry, the seemingly leading annihilating channel, i.e. 3-to-2 process, is forbidden, so the 4-to-2 one dominate the production of the dark matter relic density. Moreover, cosmological observations require that the dark matter sector is colder than the thermal bath of Standard Model particles, a condition that can be dynamically generated via a small portal between dark matter and Standard Model particles, à la freeze-in. This scenario is exemplified in the context of the Singlet Scalar dark matter model

  20. Dark matter searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Gramling, Johanna; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Compelling astrophysical evidence for dark matter makes it important and interesting to look for signatures of missing energies at the LHC. This talk presents the different searches carried out with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, and there results and interpretations in the context of dark matter production.

  1. $Z_2$ SIMP Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bernal, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter with strong self-interactions provides a compelling solution to several small-scale structure puzzles. Under the assumption that the coupling between dark matter and the Standard Model particles is suppressed, such strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) allow for a successful thermal freeze-out through N-to-N' processes, where N dark matter particles annihilate to N' of them. In the most common scenarios, where dark matter stability is guaranteed by a $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetry, the seemingly leading annihilating channel, i.e. 3-to-2 process, is forbidden, so the 4-to-2 one dominate the production of the dark matter relic density. Moreover, cosmological observations require that the dark matter sector is colder than the thermal bath of Standard Model particles, a condition that can be dynamically generated via a small portal between dark matter and Standard Model particles, \\`a la freeze-in. This scenario is exemplified in the context of the Singlet Scalar dark matter model.

  2. Conformal Gravity: Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Nesbet, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    This short review examines recent progress in understanding dark matter, dark energy, and galactic halos using theory that departs minimally from standard particle physics and cosmology. Strict conformal symmetry (local Weyl scaling covariance), postulated for all elementary massless fields, retains standard fermion and gauge boson theory but modifies Einstein–Hilbert general relativity and the Higgs scalar field model, with no new physical fields. Subgalactic phenomenology is retai...

  3. Investigation of dark matter-dark energy interaction cosmological model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J S

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we test the dark matter-dark energy interacting cosmological model with a dynamic equation of state $w_{DE}(z)=w_{0}+w_{1}z/(1+z)$, using type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), Hubble parameter data, baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) observation. This interacting cosmological model has not been studied before. The best-fitted parameters with $1 \\sigma$ uncertainties are $\\delta=-0.022 \\pm 0.006$, $\\Omega_{DM}^{0}=0.213 \\pm 0.008$, $w_0 =-1.210 \\pm 0.033$ and $w_1=0.872 \\pm 0.072$ with $\\chi^2_{min}/dof = 0.990$. At the $1 \\sigma$ confidence level, we find $\\delta<0$, which means that the energy transfer prefers from dark matter to dark energy. We also find that the SNe Ia are in tension with the combination of CMB, BAO and Hubble parameter data. The evolution of $\\rho_{DM}/\\rho_{DE}$ indicates that this interacting model is a good approach to solve the coincidence problem, because the $\\rho_{DE}$ decrease with scale factor $a$. The transition r...

  4. Cold Dark Matter and Preon Model with Preonic Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, H.

    1988-06-01

    In our model a weakly-interacting massive stable particle l_{S}(e) exists. It is examined whether l_{S}(e) can be a candidate of the cold dark matter in the universe. Proton decay and the baryon asymmetry in the universe are also discussed.

  5. Pangenesis: a common origin for visible and dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Volkas, Raymond R.

    2012-01-01

    The similar mass densities observed for visible and dark matter in the present-day universe suggest a common origin for both. A scheme called "pangenesis" for realising this using the Affleck-Dine mechanism in a baryon-symmetric universe is presented in this talk.

  6. In search of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, Kenneth C

    2006-01-01

    The dark matter problem is one of the most fundamental and profoundly difficult to solve problems in the history of science. Not knowing what makes up most of the known universe goes to the heart of our understanding of the Universe and our place in it. In Search of Dark Matter is the story of the emergence of the dark matter problem, from the initial erroneous ‘discovery’ of dark matter by Jan Oort to contemporary explanations for the nature of dark matter and its role in the origin and evolution of the Universe. Written for the educated non-scientist and scientist alike, it spans a variety of scientific disciplines, from observational astronomy to particle physics. Concepts that the reader will encounter along the way are at the cutting edge of scientific research. However the themes are explained in such a way that no prior understanding of science beyond a high school education is necessary.

  7. Phases of Cannibal Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Farina, Marco; Ruderman, Joshua T; Trevisan, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    A hidden sector with a mass gap undergoes an epoch of cannibalism if number changing interactions are active when the temperature drops below the mass of the lightest hidden particle. During cannibalism, the hidden sector temperature decreases only logarithmically with the scale factor. We consider the possibility that dark matter resides in a hidden sector that underwent cannibalism, and has relic density set by the freeze-out of two-to-two annihilations. We identify three novel phases, depending on the behavior of the hidden sector when dark matter freezes out. During the cannibal phase, dark matter annihilations decouple while the hidden sector is cannibalizing. During the chemical phase, only two-to-two interactions are active and the total number of hidden particles is conserved. During the one way phase, the dark matter annihilation products decay out of equilibrium, suppressing the production of dark matter from inverse annihilations. We map out the distinct phenomenology of each phase, which includes ...

  8. Bimetric gravity and dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Laura; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    We review some recent proposals for relativistic models of dark matter in the context of bimetric gravity. The aim is to solve the problems of cold dark matter (CDM) at galactic scales, and to reproduce the phenomenology of the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND), while still being in agreement with the standard cosmological model $\\Lambda$-CDM at large scales. In this context a promising alternative is dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter particles are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. The phenomenology of MOND then results from a mechanism of gravitational polarization. Probably the best formulation of the model is within the framework of recently developed massive bigravity theories. Then the gravitational sector of the model is safe by construction, but a ghostly degree of freedom in the decoupling limit is still present in the dark matter sector. Future work should analyse the cosmological solutions of...

  9. Constraints on the coupling between dark energy and dark matter from CMB data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, R.; Gariazzo, S.; Fornengo, N.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a phenomenological non-gravitational coupling between dark energy and dark matter, where the interaction in the dark sector is parameterized as an energy transfer either from dark matter to dark energy or the opposite. The models are constrained by a whole host of updated cosmological data: cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies and polarization, high-redshift supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, redshift space distortions and gravitational lensing. Both models are found to be compatible with all cosmological observables, but in the case where dark matter decays into dark energy, the tension with the independent determinations of H0 and σ8, already present for standard cosmology, increases: this model in fact predicts lower H0 and higher σ8, mostly as a consequence of the higher amount of dark matter at early times, leading to a stronger clustering during the evolution. Instead, when dark matter is fed by dark energy, the reconstructed values of H0 and σ8 nicely agree with their local determinations, with a full reconciliation between high- and low-redshift observations. A non-zero coupling between dark energy and dark matter, with an energy flow from the former to the latter, appears therefore to be in better agreement with cosmological data.

  10. DIOS (Diffuse Intergalactic Oxygen Surveyor): the Dark Baryon Exploring Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawara, Yuzuru; Ohashi, Takaya; Yamasaki, Noriko; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2015-08-01

    More than half of the baryons are unidentified in the local Universe, and majority of them are thought to reside along the large-scale structure in the form of Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). The 3-dimensional structure of WHIM will be probed by observing redshifted oxygen emission lines with high resolution X-ray spectrometers. DIOS (Diffuse Intergalactic Oxygen Surveyor) has been developed aiming for a launch by JAXA’s Epsilon Launch Vehicle around 2020. The payload consists of a 4-reflection X-ray telescope and a TES calorimeter array cooled by mechanical coolers. With a large grasp (area times f.o.v.) over 100 cm2 deg2, DIOS will identify 30-40% of dark baryons and will show us gas dynamics of cosmic plasmas from Earth’s megnetosphere to cluster outskirts. We describe the design and outstanding issues of DIOS.

  11. Dark matter, dark energy and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, B. A.

    2015-02-01

    Within the framework of the Generation Model (GM) of particle physics, gravity is identified with the very weak, universal and attractive residual color interactions acting between the colorless particles of ordinary matter (electrons, neutrons and protons), which are composite structures. This gravitational interaction is mediated by massless vector bosons (hypergluons), which self-interact so that the interaction has two additional features not present in Newtonian gravitation: (i) asymptotic freedom and (ii) color confinement. These two additional properties of the gravitational interaction negate the need for the notions of both dark matter and dark energy.

  12. Dark matter, dark energy and gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the Generation Model (GM) of particle physics, gravity is identified with the very weak, universal and attractive residual color interactions acting between the colorless particles of ordinary matter (electrons, neutrons and protons), which are composite structures. This gravitational interaction is mediated by massless vector bosons (hypergluons), which self-interact so that the interaction has two additional features not present in Newtonian gravitation: (i) asymptotic freedom and (ii) color confinement. These two additional properties of the gravitational interaction negate the need for the notions of both dark matter and dark energy. (author)

  13. Unravelling the Dark Matter - Dark Energy Paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill, Reginald T.

    2009-01-01

    The standard LambdaCDM model of cosmology is usually understood to arise from demanding that the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric satisfy the General Relativity dynamics for spacetime metrics. The FLRW data-based dominant parameter values, Omega_Lambda=0.73 and Omega_m=0.27 for the dark energy and dark matter+matter, respectively, are then determined by fitting the supernova red-shift data. However in the pressure-less flat-space case the LambdaCDM model is most easily derive...

  14. Vector Mesons and Baryon Resonances in Nuclear Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Post, M.; Mosel, U.

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the effect of many-body interactions in nuclear matter on the spectral function of $\\rho$ and $\\omega$ meson. In particular, we focus on the role played by baryon resonances in this context.

  15. Dark Matter and Baryons in the Most X-ray Luminous and Merging Galaxy Cluster RX J1347.5-1145

    CERN Document Server

    Bradac, Marusa; Erben, Thomas; McCourt, Michael; Million, Evan; Mantz, Adam; Allen, Steve; Blandford, Roger; Halkola, Aleksi; Hildebrand, Hendrik; Lombardi, Marco; Marshall, Phil; Schneider, Peter; Treu, Tommaso; Kneib, Jean-Paul

    2007-01-01

    The galaxy cluster RX J1347-1145 is one of the most X-ray luminous and most massive clusters known. Its extreme mass makes it a prime target for studying issues addressing cluster formation and cosmology. In this paper we present new high-resolution HST/ACS and Chandra X-ray data. The high resolution and sensitivity of ACS enabled us to detect and quantify several new multiply imaged sources, we now use a total of eight for the strong lensing analysis. Combining this information with shape measurements of weak lensing sources in the central regions of the cluster, we derive a high-resolution, absolutely-calibrated mass map. This map provides the best available quantification of the total mass of the central part of the cluster to date. We compare the reconstructed mass with that inferred from the new Chandra X-ray data, and conclude that both mass estimates agree extremely well in the observed region, namely within 400 / h_70 kpc of the cluster center. In addition we study the major baryonic components (gas a...

  16. Comparative testing of dark matter models with 9 HSB and 9 LSB galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kun, E; Keresztes, Z; Gergely, L Á

    2016-01-01

    We ensemble a database of 9 high-surface brightness (HSB) and 9 low-surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, for which both surface brightness density and spectroscopic rotation curve data are available in the literature, and are representative for the various morphologies. We use this dataset for a comparative testing of the Navarro-Frenk-White, the Einasto, and the pseudo-isothermal sphere dark matter models. We investigate the compatibility of the pure baryonic model and baryonic plus one of the three dark matter models with observations on the assembled galaxy database. When dark matter component is necessary to explain the spectroscopic rotational curves, we rank the models according to the goodness of fitting to the datasets. We construct the spatial luminosity density of the baryonic component based on the surface brightness profile of the galaxies. An axissymetric, baryonic mass model with variable axis ratios and three dark matter models are employed to fit the theoretical rotational velocity curves to the...

  17. Common Origin of Neutrino Mass, Dark Matter and Dirac Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Borah, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    We study the possibility of generating tiny Dirac neutrino masses at one loop level through the \\textit{scotogenic} mechanism such that one of the particles going inside the loop can be a stable cold dark matter (DM) candidate. Majorana mass terms of singlet fermions as well as tree level Dirac neutrino masses are prevented by incorporating the presence of additional discrete symmetries in a minimal fashion, which also guarantee the stability of the dark matter candidate. Due to the absence of total lepton number violation, the observed baryon asymmetry of the Universe is generated through the mechanism of Dirac leptogenesis where an equal and opposite amount of leptonic asymmetry is generated in the left and right handed sectors which are prevented from equilibration due to tiny Dirac Yukawa couplings. Dark matter relic abundance is generated through its usual freeze-out at a temperature much below the scale of leptogenesis. We constrain the relevant parameter space from neutrino mass, baryon asymmetry, Plan...

  18. Dark matter powered stars: Constraints from the extragalactic background light

    CERN Document Server

    Maurer, A; Kneiske, T; Elsässer, D; Hauschildt, P H; Horns, D

    2012-01-01

    The existence of predominantly cold non-baryonic dark matter is unambiguously demonstrated by several observations (e.g., structure formation, big bang nucleosynthesis, gravitational lensing, and rotational curves of spiral galaxies). A candidate well motivated by particle physics is a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP). Self-annihilating WIMPs would affect the stellar evolution especially in the early universe. Stars powered by self-annihilating WIMP dark matter should possess different properties compared with standard stars. While a direct detection of such dark matter powered stars seems very challenging, their cumulative emission might leave an imprint in the diffuse metagalactic radiation fields, in particular in the mid-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this work the possible contributions of dark matter powered stars (dark stars; DSs) to the extragalactic background light (EBL) are calculated. It is shown that existing data and limits of the EBL intensity can already be used to...

  19. Nonlocal gravity simulates dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehl, Friedrich W. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Cologne, 50923 Koeln (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)], E-mail: hehl@thp.uni-koeln.de; Mashhoon, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)], E-mail: mashhoonb@missouri.edu

    2009-03-30

    A nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation is constructed within the framework of the translational gauge theory of gravity. In the linear approximation, the nonlocal theory can be interpreted as linearized general relativity but in the presence of 'dark matter' that can be simply expressed as an integral transform of matter. It is shown that this approach can accommodate the Tohline-Kuhn treatment of the astrophysical evidence for dark matter.

  20. NASA's Dark Matter and Dark Energy Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an overview of selected high value scientific results and prospects for future advances from NASA's “Dark” missions, i.e., those covering dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE). This includes current missions HST, Chandra, Swift, GALEX, Suzaku, Fermi, and future missions JWST and WFIRST. These missions and earlier ones, such as WMAP, have brought about a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental properties of the universe – its age, rate of expansion, deceleration history, and composition (i.e., relative mix of luminous matter, dark matter, and dark energy). The next chapters in this story will be written by JWST and WFIRST. JWST was the highest priority of the 2000 Decadal Survey. It will observe in the near and medium infrared, and revolutionize our understanding of the high redshift universe. WFIRST is the highest ranked large space mission of the 2010 Decadal Survey. It is a NASA observatory designed to perform wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopic surveys of the NIR sky (0.7 – 2.5μ). WFIRST will: (i) measure the expansion history of the universe, and thereby constrain dark energy, (ii) find Earth-like planets around other stars using microlensing, and (iii) perform surveys that are ∼100 times more sensitive than current NIR surveys

  1. Flavoured Dark Matter Beyond MFV

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Monika

    2014-01-01

    We review a model of quark flavoured dark matter with new flavour violating interactions. This simplified model describes Dirac fermionic dark matter that is charged under a new U(3) flavour symmetry and couples to right-handed down quarks via a scalar mediator. The corresponding coupling matrix is assumed to be the only new source of flavour violation, which we refer to as the Dark Minimal Flavour Violation (DMFV) hypothesis. This ansatz ensures the stability of dark matter. We discuss the phenomenology of the simplest DMFV model in flavour violating observables, LHC searches, and direct dark matter detection experiments. Especially interesting is the non-trivial interplay between the constraints from the different sectors.

  2. The Local Dark Matter Density

    CERN Document Server

    Read, J I

    2014-01-01

    I review current efforts to measure the mean density of dark matter near the Sun. This encodes valuable dynamical information about our Galaxy and is also of great importance for 'direct detection' dark matter experiments. I discuss theoretical expectations in our current cosmology; the theory behind mass modelling of the Galaxy; and I show how combining local and global measures probes the shape of the Milky Way dark matter halo and the possible presence of a 'dark disc'. I stress the strengths and weaknesses of different methodologies and highlight the continuing need for detailed tests on mock data - particularly in the light of recently discovered evidence for disequilibria in the Milky Way disc. I highlight several recent measurements in order of increasing data complexity and prior, and, correspondingly, decreasing formal error bars. Comparing these measurements with spherical extrapolations from the Milky Way's rotation curve, I show that the Milky Way is consistent with having a spherical dark matter ...

  3. Detectors calibration and research of luminescent materials for non baryonic dark matter detection; Calibration de detecteurs et recherche de materiaux luminescents pour la detection de la matiere noire non baryonique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messous, M.Y.

    1995-03-01

    This work is dedicated to the characterization of luminescent materials in order to build bolometers for the simultaneous detection of heat an light in the search for WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles) candidates for non baryonic dark matter. These double bolometers should enable the identification and measurement of recoil ions after collision between a WIMPs and material nucleus. In our search for highly luminescent materials, we have studied the emission spectra, the time response and the spectra response resulting from laser excitation or ionizing particles bombardment of some crystals such as CaF{sub 2}(Eu), CaF{sub 2}, CeF{sub 3}(Ce) and In{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}. These studies were conducted down to liquid Helium temperature (4 K). After showing the good performance of CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator, we have measured the quenching effect resulting from {sup 19}F and Ca ions recoil in CaF{sub 2}(Eu). This was done at the 14 MeV Tandem accelerator of Bruyeres-Le-Chatel with a pulsed neutron beam, simulating the WIMPs. The data obtained allowed the exploitation of the results of the BPRS (Beijing - Rome - Paris - Saclay) experiments carried out at Gran-Sasso. This results showed a gain of up to an order of magnitude in the exclusion graph of axially coupled WIMPs compared to NaI. With the apparatus developed at IPN Lyon (Nuclear Physical Institute of Lyon), we have also measured the ionization induced by Ge ion recoils in Germanium detector, which is one of the most promising crystals for WIMPs detection in the energy range of 2.8 keV-37.8 keV. An ionization efficiency of 24% to 29% was obtained. (author). refs., figs., tabs.

  4. Physics Beyond the Standard Model and Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2007-01-01

    In this lecture note, I discuss why many of us are expecting rich physics at the TeV scale, drawing analogies from the history of physics in the last century. Then I review some of the possible candidates of new physics at this energy scale. I also discuss why we believe much of the matter in the universe is not atoms (baryons) or compact astronomical objects, and hence requires physics beyond the standard model. Finally I discuss some of the candidates for the non-baryonic dark matter.

  5. The dark side of cosmology: dark matter and dark energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spergel, David N

    2015-03-01

    A simple model with only six parameters (the age of the universe, the density of atoms, the density of matter, the amplitude of the initial fluctuations, the scale dependence of this amplitude, and the epoch of first star formation) fits all of our cosmological data . Although simple, this standard model is strange. The model implies that most of the matter in our Galaxy is in the form of "dark matter," a new type of particle not yet detected in the laboratory, and most of the energy in the universe is in the form of "dark energy," energy associated with empty space. Both dark matter and dark energy require extensions to our current understanding of particle physics or point toward a breakdown of general relativity on cosmological scales.

  6. Layers of deformed instantons in holographic baryonic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Preis, Florian

    2016-01-01

    We discuss homogeneous baryonic matter in the decompactified limit of the Sakai-Sugimoto model, improving existing approximations based on flat-space instantons. We allow for an anisotropic deformation of the instantons in the holographic and spatial directions and for a density-dependent distribution of arbitrarily many instanton layers in the bulk. Within our approximation, the baryon onset turns out to be a second-order phase transition, at odds with nature, and there is no transition to quark matter at high densities, at odds with expectations from QCD. This changes when we impose certain constraints on the shape of single instantons, motivated by known features of holographic baryons in the vacuum. Then, a first-order baryon onset and chiral restoration at high density are possible, and at sufficiently large densities two instanton layers are formed dynamically. Our results are a further step towards describing realistic, strongly interacting matter over a large density regime within a single model, desi...

  7. Indirect detection of dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is an experimental review of the status and prospects of indirect searches for dark matter. Experiments observe secondary particles such as positrons, antiprotons, antideuterons, gamma-rays and neutrinos which could originate from annihilations of dark matter particles in various locations in the galaxy. Data exist from some experiments which have been interpreted as hints of evidence for dark matter. These data and their interpretations are reviewed together with the new experiments which are planned to resolve the puzzles and make new measurements which could give unambiguous results

  8. Mixed dark matter from technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belyaev, Alexander; T. Frandsen, Mads; Sannino, Francesco;

    2011-01-01

    We study natural composite cold dark matter candidates which are pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons (pNGB) in models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. Some of these can have a significant thermal relic abundance, while others must be mainly asymmetric dark matter. By considering the thermal...... abundance alone we find a lower bound of MW on the pNGB mass when the (composite) Higgs is heavier than 115 GeV. Being pNGBs, the dark matter candidates are in general light enough to be produced at the LHC....

  9. Capturing prokaryotic dark matter genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasc, Cyrielle; Ribière, Céline; Parisot, Nicolas; Beugnot, Réjane; Defois, Clémence; Petit-Biderre, Corinne; Boucher, Delphine; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Prokaryotes are the most diverse and abundant cellular life forms on Earth. Most of them, identified by indirect molecular approaches, belong to microbial dark matter. The advent of metagenomic and single-cell genomic approaches has highlighted the metabolic capabilities of numerous members of this dark matter through genome reconstruction. Thus, linking functions back to the species has revolutionized our understanding of how ecosystem function is sustained by the microbial world. This review will present discoveries acquired through the illumination of prokaryotic dark matter genomes by these innovative approaches.

  10. Dark matter searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Gustavino, Giuliano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Although the existence of Dark Matter is a well-established hypothesis to explain a range of astrophysical and cosmological measurements, its nature and particle properties still remain one of the greatest unsolved puzzles of particle and astro-particle physics. The collider experiments have developed a comprehensive search program in this sector looking at a wide spectrum of channels in which a Dark Matter evidence can be traced. In this context the last results using the data sample collected at LHC at the new centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV will be presented giving an outlook of the Dark Matter search status in the ATLAS experiment.

  11. Capturing prokaryotic dark matter genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasc, Cyrielle; Ribière, Céline; Parisot, Nicolas; Beugnot, Réjane; Defois, Clémence; Petit-Biderre, Corinne; Boucher, Delphine; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Prokaryotes are the most diverse and abundant cellular life forms on Earth. Most of them, identified by indirect molecular approaches, belong to microbial dark matter. The advent of metagenomic and single-cell genomic approaches has highlighted the metabolic capabilities of numerous members of this dark matter through genome reconstruction. Thus, linking functions back to the species has revolutionized our understanding of how ecosystem function is sustained by the microbial world. This review will present discoveries acquired through the illumination of prokaryotic dark matter genomes by these innovative approaches. PMID:26100932

  12. "Dark Matter searches at ATLAS"

    CERN Document Server

    Gustavino, Giuliano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Although the existence of Dark Matter is a well-established hypothesis to explain a range of astrophysical and cosmological measurements, its nature and particle properties still remain one of the greatest unsolved puzzles of particle and astro-particle physics. The collider experiments have developed a comprehensive search program in this sector looking at a wide spectrum of channels in which a Dark Matter evidence can be traced. In this context the last results using the data sample collected at LHC at the new centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV will be presented giving an outlook of the Dark Matter search status in the ATLAS experiment.

  13. (Mainly) axion dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The strong CP problem of QCD is at heart a problem of naturalness: why is the F\\tilde{F} term highly suppressed in the QCD Lagrangian when it seems necessary to explain why there are three and not four light pions? The most elegant solution posits a spontaneously broken Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry which requires the existence of the axion field a. The axion field settles to the minimum of its potential thus removing the offensive term but giving rise to the physical axion whose coherent oscillations can make up the cold dark matter. Only now are experiments such as ADMX beginning to explore QCD axion parameter space. Since a bonafide scalar particle-- the Higgs boson-- has been discovered, one might expect its mass to reside at the axion scale f_a~ 10^{11} GeV. The Higgs mass is elegantly stabilized by supersymmetry: in this case the axion is accompanied by its axino and saxion superpartners. Requiring naturalness also in the electroweak sector implies higgsino-like WIMPs so then we expect mixed axion-WIMP dar...

  14. Novel frameworks for Dark Matter and neutrino masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Daniel

    2013-12-18

    The established light neutrino masses and the Dark Matter of the Universe both require physics beyond the Standard Model for their theoretical explanation. Models that provide a common framework for these two issues are very attractive. In particular, radiative mechanisms naturally yield light neutrino masses due to loop suppression factors. These corrections can comprise a link to the physics of Dark Matter. In most considerations, the Dark Matter relic density is produced by freeze-out. This thesis contributes to the fields of radiative neutrino masses and frozen-out Dark Matter. In detail, it is shown that in the Ma-model, right-handed neutrino Dark Matter can be directly detected by photon exchange at one-loop level. The Zee-Babu-model is extended such that it enjoys a global symmetry based on baryon and lepton number. This symmetry generates light neutrino masses and a mass for a stable Dark Matter particle by its spontaneous breaking. Moreover, this thesis provides a new production mechanism for keV sterile neutrino Dark Matter, which is based on the freeze-in scenario. In particular, keV sterile neutrino Dark Matter produced by the decay of a frozen-in scalar is investigated.

  15. Baryogenesis and dark matter through a Higgs asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Géraldine; Tulin, Sean

    2013-10-11

    In addition to explaining the masses of elementary particles, the Higgs boson may have far-reaching implications for the generation of the matter content in the Universe. For instance, the Higgs boson plays a key role in two main theories of baryogenesis, namely, electroweak baryogenesis and leptogenesis. In this Letter, we propose a new cosmological scenario where the Higgs chemical potential mediates asymmetries between visible and dark matter sectors, either generating a baryon asymmetry from a dark matter asymmetry or vice versa. We illustrate this mechanism with a simple model with two new fermions coupled to the Higgs boson and discuss the associated signatures. PMID:24160589

  16. Milli-interacting Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Wallemacq, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    We present a dark matter model reproducing well the results from DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT and having no contradiction with the negative results from XENON100 and CDMS-II/Ge. Two new species of fermions F and G form hydrogen-like atoms with standard atomic size through a dark U(1) gauge interaction carried out by a dark massless photon. A Yukawa coupling between the nuclei F and neutral scalar particles S induces an attractive shorter-range interaction. This dark sector interacts with our standard particles because of the presence of two mixings, a kinetic photon-dark photon mixing, and a mass {\\sigma}-S mixing. The dark atoms from the halo diffuse elastically in terrestrial matter until they thermalize and then reach underground detectors with thermal energies, where they form bound states with nuclei by radiative capture. This causes the emission of photons that produce the signals observed by direct-search experiments.

  17. Milli-interacting dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallemacq, Quentin

    2013-09-01

    We present a dark matter model reproducing well the results from DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT and having no contradiction with the negative results from XENON100 and CDMS-II/Ge. Two new species of fermions F and G form hydrogenlike atoms with standard atomic size through a dark U(1) gauge interaction carried out by a dark massless photon. A Yukawa coupling between the nuclei F and neutral scalar particles S induces an attractive shorter-range interaction. This dark sector interacts with our standard particles because of the presence of two mixings, a kinetic photon-dark photon mixing, and a mass σ-S mixing. The dark atoms from the halo diffuse elastically in terrestrial matter until they thermalize and then reach underground detectors with thermal energies, where they form bound states with nuclei by radiative capture. This causes the emission of photons that produce the signals observed by direct-search experiments.

  18. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, David H; Bullock, James S; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H G

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years.

  19. A New Cosmological Paradigm the Cosmological Constant and Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Krauss, L M

    1998-01-01

    The Standard Cosmological Model of the 1980's is no more. I describe the definitive evidence that the density of matter is insufficient to result in a flat universe, as well as the mounting evidence that the cosmological constant is not zero. I finally discuss the implications of these results for particle physics and direct searches for non-baryonic dark matter, and demonstrate that the new news is good news.

  20. Unified Description of Dark Energy and Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Petry, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Dark energy in the universe is assumed to be vacuum energy. The energy-momentum of vacuum is described by a scale-dependent cosmological constant. The equations of motion imply for the density of matter (dust) the sum of the usual matter density (luminous matter) and an additional matter density (dark matter) similar to the dark energy. The scale-dependent cosmological constant is given up to an exponent which is approximated by the experimentally decided density parameters of dark matter and...

  1. The search for decaying Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Herder, J W den; Ruchayskiy, O; Abazajian, K; Frenk, C; Hansen, S; Jonker, P; Kouveliotou, C; Lesgourgues, J; Neronov, A; Ohashi, T; Paerels, F; Paltani, S; Piro, L; Pohl, M; Shaposhnikov, M; Silk, J; Valle, J

    2009-01-01

    We propose an X-ray mission called Xenia to search for decaying superweakly interacting Dark Matter particles (super-WIMP) with a mass in the keV range. The mission and its observation plan are capable of providing a major break through in our understanding of the nature of Dark Matter (DM). It will confirm, or reject, predictions of a number of particle physics models by increasing the sensitivity of the search for decaying DM by about two orders of magnitude through a wide-field imaging X-ray spectrometer in combination with a dedicated observation program. The proposed mission will provide unique limits on the mixing angle and mass of neutral leptons, right handed partners of neutrinos, which are important Dark Matter candidates. The existence of these particles is strongly motivated by observed neutrino flavor oscillations and the problem of baryon asymmetry of the Universe. In super-WIMP models, the details of the formation of the cosmic web are different from those of LambdaCDM. The proposed mission wil...

  2. The Dark Matter of Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    The inside of the cell is full of important, yet invisible species of molecules and proteins that interact weakly but couple together to have huge and important effects in many biological processes. Such "dark matter" inside cells remains mostly hidden, because our tools were developed to investigate strongly interacting species and folded proteins. Example dark-matter species include intrinsically disordered proteins, posttranslational states, ion species, and rare, transient, and weak interactions undetectable by biochemical assays. The dark matter of biology is likely to have multiple, vital roles to regulate signaling, rates of reactions, water structure and viscosity, crowding, and other cellular activities. We need to create new tools to image, detect, and understand these dark-matter species if we are to truly understand fundamental physical principles of biology.

  3. The Dark Matter of Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    The inside of the cell is full of important, yet invisible species of molecules and proteins that interact weakly but couple together to have huge and important effects in many biological processes. Such "dark matter" inside cells remains mostly hidden, because our tools were developed to investigate strongly interacting species and folded proteins. Example dark-matter species include intrinsically disordered proteins, posttranslational states, ion species, and rare, transient, and weak interactions undetectable by biochemical assays. The dark matter of biology is likely to have multiple, vital roles to regulate signaling, rates of reactions, water structure and viscosity, crowding, and other cellular activities. We need to create new tools to image, detect, and understand these dark-matter species if we are to truly understand fundamental physical principles of biology. PMID:27602719

  4. The LZ dark matter experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinsey, D. N.; LZ Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The LUX and ZEPLIN collaborations have merged to construct a 7 tonne two-phase Xe dark matter detector, known as LUX-ZEPLIN or LZ. Chosen as one of the Generation 2 suite of dark matter direct detection experiments, LZ will probe spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections down to 2 × 10-48 cm2 at 50 GeV/c2 within 3 years of operation, covering a substantial range of theoretically-motivated dark matter candidates. Along with dark matter interactions with Xe nuclei, LZ will also be sensitive to solar neutrinos emitted by the pp fusion process in the sun, neutrinos emitted by a nearby supernova and detected by coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, certain classes of axions and axion-like particles, and neutrinoless double-beta decay of 136Xe. The design of LZ is presented, along with its expected backgrounds and projected sensitivity.

  5. Dark Matter search at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Pazzini, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    The results of recent searches for dark matter at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN are reported.The searches for dark matter performed with the first data collected during the LHC Run-2 by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations, corresponding to 2.1~\\fb and 3.2~\\fb of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\TeV$ respectively, are presented and categorized according to the event topology characteristics.No excesses are found above the standard model expectations and the results are interpreted in terms of upper limits in the production of dark matter using simplified theory models.The results are also translated into limits on the dark matter-nucleon spin-dependent and spin-independent cross section to compare with the results of direct detection experiments.

  6. Electroweak interactions and dark baryons in the sextet BSM model with a composite Higgs particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Zoltan; Holland, Kieran; Kuti, Julius; Mondal, Santanu; Nogradi, Daniel; Wong, Chik Him

    2016-07-01

    The electroweak interactions of a strongly coupled gauge theory are discussed with an outlook beyond the Standard Model (BSM) under global and gauge anomaly constraints. The theory is built on a minimal massless fermion doublet of the SU(2) BSM flavor group (bsm-flavor) with a confining gauge force at the TeV scale in the two-index symmetric (sextet) representation of the BSM SU(3) color gauge group (bsm-color). The intriguing possibility of near-conformal sextet gauge dynamics could lead to the minimal realization of the composite Higgs mechanism with a light 0++ scalar, far separated from strongly coupled resonances of the confining gauge force in the 2-3 TeV range, distinct from Higgsless technicolor. In previous publications we have presented results for the meson spectrum of the theory, including the light composite scalar, which is perhaps the emergent Higgs impostor. Here we discuss the critically important role of the baryon spectrum in the sextet model investigating its compatibility with what we know about thermal evolution of the early Universe including its galactic and terrestrial relics. For an important application, we report the first numerical results on the baryon spectrum of this theory from nonperturbative lattice simulations with baryon correlators in the staggered fermion implementation of the strongly coupled gauge sector. The quantum numbers of composite baryons and their spectroscopy from lattice simulations are required inputs for exploring dark matter contributions of the sextet BSM model, as outlined for future work.

  7. A Theory of Dark Matter Superfluidity

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhiani, Lasha

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel theory of dark matter (DM) superfluidity that matches the successes of the LambdaCDM model on cosmological scales while simultaneously reproducing the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) phenomenology on galactic scales. The DM and MOND components have a common origin, representing different phases of a single underlying substance. DM consists of axion-like particles with mass of order eV and strong self-interactions. The condensate has a polytropic equation of state P~rho^3 giving rise to a superfluid core within galaxies. Instead of behaving as individual collisionless particles, the DM superfluid is more aptly described as collective excitations. Superfluid phonons, in particular, are assumed to be governed by a MOND-like effective action and mediate a MONDian acceleration between baryonic matter particles. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): due to the higher velocity dispersion in clusters, and corres...

  8. A History of Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Although dark matter is a central element of modern cosmology, the history of how it became accepted as part of the dominant paradigm is often ignored or condensed into a brief anecdotical account focused around the work of a few pioneering scientists. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with a broader historical perspective on the observational discoveries and the theoretical arguments that led the scientific community to adopt dark matter as an essential part of the standard cosmological model.

  9. The Galaxy Dark Matter Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch, Frank C. van den; Yang, Xiaohu; Mo, H. J.

    2004-01-01

    What galaxy lives in what halo? The answer to this simple question holds important information regarding galaxy formation and evolution. We describe a new statistical technique to link galaxies to their dark matter haloes, or light to mass, using the clustering properties of galaxies as function of their luminosity. The galaxy-dark matter connection thus established, and parameterized through the conditional luminosity function, indicates the presence of two characteristic scales in galaxy fo...

  10. A History of Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertone, Gianfranco [U. Amsterdam, GRAPPA; Hooper, Dan [Fermilab

    2016-05-16

    Although dark matter is a central element of modern cosmology, the history of how it became accepted as part of the dominant paradigm is often ignored or condensed into a brief anecdotical account focused around the work of a few pioneering scientists. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with a broader historical perspective on the observational discoveries and the theoretical arguments that led the scientific community to adopt dark matter as an essential part of the standard cosmological model.

  11. Dark Matter searches at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    This talk describes searches for directly produced Dark Matter particles in CMS. The searches are performed using the datasets recorded with the CMS detector in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV. Final states with a monojet, monophoton, and monolepton signature are among the final states considered, as well as dark-matter particles produced in association with bottom and top quarks.

  12. Tachyonic models of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Nikitin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We consider a spherically symmetric stationary problem in General Relativity, including a black hole, inflow of normal and tachyonic matter and outflow of tachyonic matter. Computations in a weak field limit show that the resulting concentration of matter around the black hole leads to gravitational effects equivalent to those associated with dark matter halo. In particular, the model reproduces asymptotically constant galactic rotation curves, if the tachyonic flows of the central supermassive black hole in the galaxy are considered as a main contribution.

  13. Asymmetric dark matter from spontaneous cogenesis in the supersymmetric standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, Kohei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Yamaguchi, Masahide [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2012-01-15

    The observational relation between the density of baryon and dark matter in the Universe, {omega}{sub DM}/{omega}{sub B}{approx_equal}5, is one of the most difficult problems to solve in modern cosmology. We discuss a scenario that explains this relation by combining the asymmetric dark matter scenario and the spontaneous baryogenesis associated with the flat direction in the supersymmetric standard model. A part of baryon asymmetry is transferred to charge asymmetry D that dark matter carries, if a symmetry violating interaction that works at high temperature breaks not only B-L but also D symmetries simultaneously. In this case, the present number density of baryon and dark matter can be same order if the symmetric part of dark matter annihilates sufficiently. Moreover, the baryon number density can be enhanced as compared to that of dark matter if another B-L violating interaction is still in thermal equilibrium after the spontaneous genesis of dark matter, which accommodates a TeV scale asymmetric dark matter model. (orig.)

  14. Dark halo baryons not in ancient halo white dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Crézé, M.; Mohan, V; Robin, A.C.; Reylé, C.; Mc Cracken, H.,; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mellier, Y

    2004-01-01

    accepted in Astronomy and Astrophysics (19-05-2004) Having ruled out the possibility that stellar objects are the main contributor of the dark matter embedding galaxies, microlensing experiments cannot exclude the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the Milky Way dark halo might be made of MACHOs with masses in the range $0.5-0.8 \\msun$. Ancient white dwarfs are generally considered the most plausible candidates for such MACHOs. We report the results of a search for such white dwarfs...

  15. Light Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassé, M.; Fayet, P.

    The SPI spectrometer aboard of the INTEGRAL satellite has released a map of the e^+e- annihilation emission line of unprecedented quality, showing that most of the photons arise from a region coinciding with the stellar bulge of the Milky Way. The impressive intensity (≃ 10-3 photon cm-2 s-1) and morphology (round and wide) of the emission is begging an explanation. Different classes of astrophysical objects could inject positrons in the interstellar medium of the bulge, but the only acceptable ones should inject them at energies low enough to avoid excessive bremsstrahlung emission in the soft gamma ray regime. Among the ~ MeV injectors, none seems generous enough to sustain the high level of annihilation observed. Even the most profuse candidate, namely the β+ radioactivity of 56Co nuclei created and expelled in the interstellar medium by explosive nucleosynthesis of type Ia supernovae, falls short explaining the phenomenon due to the small fraction of positrons leaking out from the ejecta (≈ 3%), together with the low SNIa rate in the bulge (≈ 0.03 per century). It is therefore worth exploring alternative solutions, as for instance, the idea that the source of the positrons is the annihilation of light dark matter (LDM) particles of the kind recently proposed, totally independently, by Bœhm and Fayet. Assuming that LDM is the culprit, crucial constraints on the characteristics (mass and annihilation cross-section) of the associated particle may be discussed, combining direct gamma ray observations and models of the early Universe. In particular, the mass of the LDM particles should be significantly less than 100 MeV, so that the e+ and e- resulting from their annihilations do not radiate exceedingly through bremsstrahlung in the interstellar gas of the galactic bulge.

  16. Dark matter and global symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mambrini, Yann; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2016-09-01

    General considerations in general relativity and quantum mechanics are known to potentially rule out continuous global symmetries in the context of any consistent theory of quantum gravity. Assuming the validity of such considerations, we derive stringent bounds from gamma-ray, X-ray, cosmic-ray, neutrino, and CMB data on models that invoke global symmetries to stabilize the dark matter particle. We compute up-to-date, robust model-independent limits on the dark matter lifetime for a variety of Planck-scale suppressed dimension-five effective operators. We then specialize our analysis and apply our bounds to specific models including the Two-Higgs-Doublet, Left-Right, Singlet Fermionic, Zee-Babu, 3-3-1 and Radiative See-Saw models. Assuming that (i) global symmetries are broken at the Planck scale, that (ii) the non-renormalizable operators mediating dark matter decay have O (1) couplings, that (iii) the dark matter is a singlet field, and that (iv) the dark matter density distribution is well described by a NFW profile, we are able to rule out fermionic, vector, and scalar dark matter candidates across a broad mass range (keV-TeV), including the WIMP regime.

  17. Reionization and dark matter decay

    CERN Document Server

    Oldengott, Isabel M; Schwarz, Dominik J

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic reionization and dark matter decay can impact observations of the cosmic microwave sky in a similar way. A simultaneous study of both effects is required to constrain unstable dark matter from cosmic microwave background observations. We compare two reionization models with and without dark matter decay. We find that a reionization model that fits also data from quasars and star forming galaxies results in tighter constraints on the reionization optical depth $\\tau_{\\text{reio}}$, but weaker constraints on the spectral index $n_{\\text{s}}$ than the conventional parametrization. We use the Planck 2015 data to constrain the effective decay rate of dark matter to $\\Gamma_{\\rm eff} < 2.9 \\times 10^{-25}/$s at $95$\\% C.L. This limit is robust and model independent. It holds for any type of decaying dark matter and it depends only weakly on the chosen parametrization of astrophysical reionization. For light dark matter particles that decay exclusively into electromagnetic components this implies a limit o...

  18. Dark matter beams at LBNF

    CERN Document Server

    Coloma, Pilar; Frugiuele, Claudia; Harnik, Roni

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity neutrino beam facilities may produce a beam of light dark matter when protons strike the target. Searches for such a dark matter beam using its scattering in a nearby detector must overcome the large neutrino background. We characterize the spatial and energy distributions of the dark matter and neutrino beams, focusing on their differences to enhance the sensitivity to dark matter. We find that a dark matter beam produced by a $Z'$ boson in the GeV mass range is both broader and more energetic than the neutrino beam. The reach for dark matter is maximized for a detector sensitive to hard neutral-current scatterings, placed at a sizable angle off the neutrino beam axis. In the case of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), a detector placed at roughly 6 degrees off axis and at a distance of about 200 m from the target would be sensitive to $Z'$ couplings as low as 0.05. This search can proceed symbiotically with neutrino measurements. We also show that the MiniBooNE and MicroBooNE detector...

  19. Sterile neutrinos as dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Widrow, L.M. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics]|[Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Canadian Inst. for Theoretical Astrophysics

    1993-03-01

    The simplest model that can accommodate a viable nonbaryonic dark matter candidate is the standard electroweak theory with the addition of right-handed or sterile neutrinos. This model has been studied extensively in the context of the hot dark matter scenario. We reexamine this model and find that hot, warm, and cold dark matter are all possibilities. We focus on the case where sterile neutrinos are the dark matter. Since their only direct coupling is to left-handed or active neutrinos, the most efficient production mechanism is via neutrino oscillations. If the production rate is always less than the expansion rate, then these neutrinos will never be in thermal equilibrium. However, they may still play a significant role in the dynamics of the Universe and possibly provide the missing mass necessary for closure. We consider a single generation of neutrino fields ({nu}{sub L}, {nu}{sub R}) with a Dirac mass, {mu}, and a Majorana mass for the right-handed components only, M. For M {much_gt} {mu} we show that the number density of sterile neutrinos is proportional to {mu}{sup 2}/M so that the energy density today is independent of M. However M is crucial in determining the large scale structure of the Universe. In particular, M {approx_equal} 0.1--1.0 key leads to warm dark matter and a structure formation scenario that may have some advantages over both the standard hot and cold dark matter scenarios.

  20. Antideuterons from dark matter decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observations of a large excess of cosmic-ray positrons at high energies have raised a lot of interest in leptonic decay modes of dark matter particles. Nevertheless, dark matter particles in the Milky Way halo could also decay hadronically, producing not only a flux of antiprotons but also a flux of antideuterons. We show that for certain choices of parameters the antideuteron flux from dark matter decay can be much larger than the purely secondary flux from spallation of cosmic rays on the interstellar medium, while the total antiproton flux remains consistent with present observations. We show that if the dark matter particle is sufficiently light, the antideuteron flux from dark matter decay could even be within the reach of planned experiments such as AMS-02 or GAPS. Furthermore, we discuss the prospects to observe the antideuteron flux in the near future if the steep rise in the positron fraction reported by the PAMELA collaboration is interpreted in terms of the decay of dark matter particles

  1. Does Bulk Viscosity Create a Viable Unified Dark Matter Model?

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Baojiu

    2009-01-01

    We investigate in detail the possibility that a single imperfect fluid with bulk viscosity can replace the need for separate dark matter and dark energy in cosmological models. With suitable choices of model parameters, we show that the background cosmology in this model can mimic that of a LCDM Universe to high precision. However, as the cosmic expansion goes through the decelerating-accelerating transition, the density perturbations in this fluid are rapidly damped out. We show that,although this does not significantly affect structure formation in baryonic matter, it makes the gravitational potential decay rapidly at late times, leading to modifications in predictions of cosmological observables such as the CMB power spectrum and weak lensing. This model of unified dark matter is thus difficult to reconcile with astronomical observations. We also clarify the differences with respect to other unified dark matter models where the fluid is barotropic, i.e., p=p(rho), such as the (generalized) Chaplygin gas mo...

  2. Modified Gravity Explains Dark Matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Katsuragawa, Taishi

    2016-01-01

    We explore a new horizon of modified gravity from the viewpoint of the particle physics. As a concrete example, we take the $F(R)$ gravity to raise a question: can a scalar particle ("scalaron") derived from the $F(R)$ gravity be a dark matter candidate? We place the limit on the form of function $F(R)$ from the constraint on the scalaron as a dark matter. The role of the screening mechanism and compatibility with the dark energy problem are addressed.

  3. Dark matter as the Bose-Einstein condensation in loop quantum cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Atazadeh, K.; Darabi, F.; M. Mousavi

    2016-01-01

    We consider the FLRW universe in a loop quantum cosmological model filled with the radiation, baryonic matter (with negligible pressure), dark energy and dark matter. The dark matter sector is supposed to be of Bose-Einstein condensate type. The Bose-Einstein condensation process in a cosmological context by supposing it as an approximate first order phase transition, has been already studied in the literature. Here, we study the evolution of the physical quantities related to the early unive...

  4. Cold dark matter heats up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzen, Andrew; Governato, Fabio

    2014-02-13

    A principal discovery in modern cosmology is that standard model particles comprise only 5 per cent of the mass-energy budget of the Universe. In the ΛCDM paradigm, the remaining 95 per cent consists of dark energy (Λ) and cold dark matter. ΛCDM is being challenged by its apparent inability to explain the low-density 'cores' of dark matter measured at the centre of galaxies, where centrally concentrated high-density 'cusps' were predicted. But before drawing conclusions, it is necessary to include the effect of gas and stars, historically seen as passive components of galaxies. We now understand that these can inject heat energy into the cold dark matter through a coupling based on rapid gravitational potential fluctuations, explaining the observed low central densities.

  5. 暗物质晕和重子物质的自旋、速度剪切场及涡量的相关性分析∗%Correlation Analysis between Spin, Velocity Shear, and Vorticity of Baryonic and Dark Matter Halos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘利利

    2016-01-01

    Using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the align-ments between velocity shear, vorticity, and the spin of dark matter halos, and study the correlation between baryonic and dark matter. We find that (1) mis-alignment between vorticity of baryonic and dark matter would develop on scales<0.2h−1 Mpc;(2) the vorticity of baryonic matter exhibits stronger alignment/anti-alignment with the eigenvectors of velocity shear than that of dark matter; (3) small/massive halos spinning parallel/perpendicular to the host filaments are sensitive to the identification of cosmic web, simulation box size, and resolution. These factors might complicate the connection between the spins of dark matter halos and galaxies, and affect the correlation signal of the alignments of galaxy spin with nearby large-scale structures.%在宇宙学流体力学模拟的基础上,通过对速度剪切场、涡量与暗物质晕自旋方向的相关性,以及重子与暗物质之间关系的研究,发现:(1)在小于0.2h−1 Mpc的尺度上,重子物质涡量与暗物质涡量的差异比较明显;(2)重子物质的涡量与速度剪切张量的相关性比暗物质要强;(3)小质量暗物质晕的自旋方向平行于其所在的纤维结构的方向,而大质量暗物质晕的自旋方向垂直于纤维结构的方向,并且这种相关性的强弱依赖于模拟盒子大小以及模拟精度.这些因素会使暗物质晕自旋与星系自旋之间的关系复杂化,也会对星系自旋方向与大尺度环境的相关性产生影响.

  6. Nonlocal Gravity Simulates Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hehl, Friedrich W

    2008-01-01

    A nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation is constructed within the framework of the translational gauge theory of gravity. In the linear approximation, the nonlocal theory can be interpreted as linearized general relativity but in the presence of "dark matter" that can be simply expressed as an integral transform of matter.

  7. Baryonic dark clusters in galactic halos and their observable consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Ira; Salpeter, Edwin E.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the possibility that approximately 10% of the mass of a typical galaxy halo is in the form of massive (approximately 10(exp 7) solar masses), compact (escape speeds approximately 100 km/s) baryonic clusters made of neutron stars (approximately 10% by mass), black holes (less than or approximately equal to 1%) and brown dwarfs, asteroids, and other low-mass debris (approximately 90%). These general properties are consistent with several different observational and phenomenological constraints on cluster properties subject to the condition that neutron stars comprise approximately 1% of the total halo mass. Such compact, dark clusters could be the sites of a variety of collisional phenomena involving neutron stars. We find that integrated out to the Hubble distance approximately one neutron star-neutron star or neutron star-black hole collision occurs daily. Of order 0.1-1 asteroid-neutron star collisions may also happen daily in the halo of the Milky Way if there is roughly equal cluster mass per logarithmic particle mass interval between asteroids and brown dwarfs. These event rates are comparable to the frequency of gamma-ray burst detections by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Observatory, implying that if dark halo clusters are the sites of most gamma-ray bursts, perhaps approximately 90% of all bursts are extragalactic, but approximately 10% are galactic. It is possible that dark clusters of the kind discussed here could be detected directly by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) or Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). If the clusters considered in this paper exist, they should produce spatially correlated gravitational microlensing of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). If 10% of the halo is in the form of dark baryonic clusters, and the remaining 90% is in brown dwarfs and other dark objects which are either unclustered or collected into low-mass clusters, then we expect that two events within

  8. Dynamical Dark Matter: II. An Explicit Model

    OpenAIRE

    Dienes, Keith R.; Thomas, Brooks

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper (arXiv:1106.4546), we introduced "dynamical dark matter," a new framework for dark-matter physics, and outlined its underlying theoretical principles and phenomenological possibilities. Unlike most traditional approaches to the dark-matter problem which hypothesize the existence of one or more stable dark-matter particles, our dynamical dark-matter framework is characterized by the fact that the requirement of stability is replaced by a delicate balancing between cosmologica...

  9. Dark-matter 'paparazzi' exposed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Margaret

    2008-10-01

    After waiting almost two years for data that may shed light on the mysterious substance that makes up almost a quarter of the universe, some physicists thought a new result on dark matter was just too exciting to keep quiet. So when a member of the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) team recently gave a conference talk, a few audience members could not resist taking photos of the slides. By incorporating their snapshots into papers posted on the arXiv preprint server, these "paparazzi" physicists sparked a debate on both dark matter and datasharing etiquette in a digital world.

  10. From Dark Energy and Dark Matter to Dark Metric

    OpenAIRE

    Capozziello, S.; De Laurentis, M.; Francaviglia, M.; Mercadante, S

    2008-01-01

    It is nowadays clear that General Relativity cannot be the definitive theory of Gravitation due to several shortcomings that come out both from theoretical and experimental viewpoints. At large scales (astrophysical and cosmological) the attempts to match it with the latest observational data lead to invoke Dark Energy and Dark Matter as the bulk components of the cosmic fluid. Since no final evidence, at fundamental level, exists for such ingredients, it is clear that General Relativity pres...

  11. Dark Matter and Leptogenesis Linked by Classical Scale Invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Khoze, Valentin V

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study a classically scale invariant extension of the Standard Model that can explain simultaneously dark matter and the baryon asymmetry in the universe. In our set-up we introduce a dark sector, namely a non-Abelian SU(2) hidden sector coupled to the SM via the Higgs portal, and a singlet sector responsible for generating Majorana masses for three right-handed sterile neutrinos. The gauge bosons of the dark sector are mass-degenerate and stable, and this makes them suitable as dark matter candidates. Our model also accounts for the matter-anti-matter asymmetry. The lepton flavour asymmetry is produced during CP-violating oscillations of the GeV-scale right-handed neutrinos, and converted to the baryon asymmetry by the electroweak sphalerons. All the characteristic scales in the model: the electro-weak, dark matter and the leptogenesis/neutrino mass scales, are generated radiatively, have a common origin and related to each other via scalar field couplings in perturbation theory.

  12. Influence of baryons on the spatial distribution of matter: higher order correlation functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Jun Zhu; Jun Pan

    2012-01-01

    Physical processes involving baryons could leave a non-negligible imprint on the distribution of cosmic matter.A series of simulated data sets at high resolution with identical initial conditions are employed for count-in-cell analysis,including one N-body pure dark matter run,one with only adiabatic gas and one with dissipative processes.Variances and higher order cumulants Sn of dark matter and gas are estimated.It is found that physical processes with baryons mainly affect distributions of dark matter at scales less than 1 h-1 Mpc.In comparison with the pure dark matter run,adiabatic processes alone strengthen the variance of dark matter by ~ 10% at a scale of 0.1 h-1 Mpc,while the Sn parameters of dark matter only mildly deviate by a few percent.The dissipative gas run does not differ much from the adiabatic run in terms of variance for dark matter,but renders significantly different Sn parameters describing the dark matter,bringing about a more than 10% enhancement to S3 at 0.1 h-1 Mpc and z = 0 and being even larger at a higher redshift.Distribution patterns of gas in two hydrodynamical simulations are quite different.Variance of gas at z = 0 decreases by ~ 30% in the adiabatic simulation but by ~ 60% in the nonadiabatic simulation at 0.1 h-1 Mpc.The attenuation is weaker at larger scales but is still obvious at ~ 10 h-1 Mpc.Sn parameters of gas are biased upward at scales <~ 4 h-1 Mpc,and dissipative processes show an ~ 84% promotion at z = 0 to S3 at 0.1 h-1 Mpc in contrast with the ~ 7% change in the adiabatic run.The segregation in clustering between gas and dark matter could have dramatic implications on modeling distributions of galaxies and relevant cosmological applications demanding fine details of matter distribution in a strongly nonlinear regime.

  13. The Hubble Web: The Dark Matter Problem and Cosmic Strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I propose a reinterpretation of cosmic dark matter in which a rigid network of cosmic strings formed at the end of inflation. The cosmic strings fulfill three functions: At recombination they provide an accretion mechanism for virializing baryonic and warm dark matter into disks. These cosmic strings survive as configurations which thread spiral and elliptical galaxies leading to the observed flatness of rotation curves and the Tully-Fisher relation. We find a relationship between the rotational velocity of the galaxy and the string tension and discuss the testability of this model.

  14. The dark matter density problem in massive disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Weiner, B J

    2003-01-01

    I discuss measurements of disk mass from non-circular streaming motions of gas in the barred galaxies NGC 3095 and NGC 4123. In these galaxies with strong shocks and non-circular motions, the inner regions must be disk-dominated to reproduce the shocks. This requires dark matter halos of low central density and low concentration, compared to LCDM halo predictions. In addition, the baryonic collapse to a disk should have compressed the halo and increased the dark matter density, which sharpens the disagreement. One possible resolution is a substantial amount of angular momentum transfer from disk to halo, but this is not particularly attractive nor elegant.

  15. NJL model approach to diquarks and baryons in quark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Blaschke, D.; Dubinin, A.; Zablocki, D.

    2015-01-01

    We describe baryons as quark-diquark bound states at finite temperature and density within the NJL model for chiral symmetry breaking and restoration in quark matter. Based on a generalized Beth-Uhlenbeck approach to mesons and diquarks we present in a first step the thermodynamics of quark-diquark matter which includes the Mott dissociation of diquarks at finite temperature. In a second step we solve the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the baryon as a quark-diquark bound state in quark-diquark m...

  16. Studying dark matter haloes with weak lensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velander, Malin Barbro Margareta

    2012-01-01

    Our Universe is comprised not only of normal matter but also of unknown components: dark matter and dark energy. This Thesis recounts studies of dark matter haloes, using a technique known as weak gravitational lensing, in order to learn more about the nature of these dark components. The haloes ana

  17. Heavy spin-2 Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Babichev, Eugeny; Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti; Schmidt-May, Angnis; Urban, Federico; Veermäe, Hardi; von Strauss, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    We provide further details on a recent proposal addressing the nature of the dark sectors in cosmology and demonstrate that all current observations related to Dark Matter can be explained by the presence of a heavy spin-2 particle. Massive spin-2 fields and their gravitational interactions are uniquely described by ghost-free bimetric theory, which is a minimal and natural extension of General Relativity. In this setup, the largeness of the physical Planck mass is naturally related to extrem...

  18. Scalar graviton as dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirogov, Yu. F., E-mail: pirogov@ihep.ru [NRC “Kurchatov Institute”, Theory Division, Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-15

    The basics of the theory of unimodular bimode gravity built on the principles of unimodular gauge invariance/relativity and general covariance are exposed. Besides the massless tensor graviton of General Relativity, the theory includes an (almost) massless scalar graviton treated as the gravitational dark matter. A spherically symmetric vacuum solution describing the coherent scalar-graviton field for the soft-core dark halos, with the asymptotically flat rotation curves, is demonstrated as an example.

  19. Caustics in dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Mohayaee, R; Mohayaee, Roya; Colombi, Stephane; Fort, Bernard; Gavazzi, Raphael; Shandarin, Sergei; Touma, Jihad

    2005-01-01

    Cold dark matter haloes are populated by high-density structures with sharply-peaked profiles known as caustics which have not yet been resolved by 3-dimensional numerical simulations. Here, we derive semi-analytic expressions for the density profiles near caustics in haloes which form by self-similar accretions of dark matter with infinitesimal velocity dispersion. A simple rescaling shows that these profiles are universal: they are valid for all caustics and irrespective of physical parameters of the halo. We derive the maximum density of the caustics and show that it depends on the velocity dispersion and the caustic location. Finally, we demonstrate that there can be a significant contribution to the emission measure from dark matter particle annihilation in the caustics.

  20. Dark Matter in 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Daniele S.M.; Hedri, Sonia El; Wacker, Jay G.

    2012-04-01

    We discuss the relevance of directional detection experiments in the post-discovery era and propose a method to extract the local dark matter phase space distribution from directional data. The first feature of this method is a parameterization of the dark matter distribution function in terms of integrals of motion, which can be analytically extended to infer properties of the global distribution if certain equilibrium conditions hold. The second feature of our method is a decomposition of the distribution function in moments of a model independent basis, with minimal reliance on the ansatz for its functional form. We illustrate our method using the Via Lactea II N-body simulation as well as an analytical model for the dark matter halo. We conclude that O(1000) events are necessary to measure deviations from the Standard Halo Model and constrain or measure the presence of anisotropies.

  1. The DAMIC Dark Matter Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Mello Neto, J. R.T. [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). et al

    2015-10-07

    The DAMIC (DArk Matter In CCDs) experiment uses high-resistivity, scientific-grade CCDs to search for dark matter. The CCD’s low electronic noise allows an unprecedently low energy threshold of a few tens of eV; this characteristic makes it possible to detect silicon recoils resulting from interactions of low-mass WIMPs. In addition, the CCD’s high spatial resolution and the excellent energy response results in very effective background identification techniques. The experiment has a unique sensitivity to dark matter particles with masses below 10 GeV/c2. Previous results have motivated the construction of DAMIC100, a 100 grams silicon target detector currently being installed at SNOLAB. The mode of operation and unique imaging capabilities of the CCDs, and how they may be exploited to characterize and suppress backgrounds are discussed, as well as physics results after one year of data taking.

  2. Dark Matter and Global Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Mambrini, Yann; Queiroz, Farinaldo S

    2015-01-01

    General considerations in general relativity and quantum mechanics rule out global symmetries in the context of any consistent theory of quantum gravity. Motivated by this, we derive stringent and robust bounds from gamma-ray, X-ray, cosmic ray, neutrino and CMB data on models that invoke global symmetries to stabilize the dark matter particle. Under realistic assumptions we are able to rule out fermionic, vector, and scalar dark matter candidates across a broad mass range (keV-TeV), including the WIMP regime. We then specialize our analysis and apply our bounds to specific models such as the Two-Higgs-Doublet, Left-Right, Singlet Fermionic, Zee-Babu, 3-3-1 and Radiative See-Saw models. In the supplemental material we derive robust, updated model-independent limits on the dark matter lifetime.

  3. Dark matter via massive bigravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-05-01

    In this work we investigate the existence of relativistic models for dark matter in the context of bimetric gravity, used here to reproduce the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) at galactic scales. For this purpose we consider two different species of dark matter particles that separately couple to the two metrics of bigravity. These two sectors are linked together via an internal U (1 ) vector field, and some effective composite metric built out of the two metrics. Among possible models only certain classes of kinetic and interaction terms are allowed without invoking ghost degrees of freedom. Along these lines we explore the number of allowed kinetic terms in the theory and point out the presence of ghosts in a previous model. Finally, we propose a promising class of ghost-free candidate theories that could provide the MOND phenomenology at galactic scales while reproducing the standard cold dark matter model at cosmological scales.

  4. Dark Matter searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    If Dark Matter interacts weakly with the Standard Model it can be produced at the LHC. It can be identified via initial state radiation (ISR) of the incoming partons, leaving a signature in the detector of the ISR particle (jet, photon, Z or W) recoiling off of the invisible Dark Matter particles, resulting in a large momentum imbalance. Many signatures of large missing transverse momentum recoiling against jets, photons, heavy-flavor quarks, weak gauge bosons or Higgs bosons provide an interesting channel for Dark Matter searches. These LHC searches complement those from (in)direct detection experiments. Results of these searches with the ATLAS experiment, in both effective field theory and simplified models with pair WIMP production are discussed. Both 8TeV and 13TeV pp collision data has been used in these results.

  5. Dipolar Dark Matter and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchet, Luc; Tiec, Alexandre Le; Marsat, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenology of the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) can be recovered from a mechanism of "gravitational polarization" of some dipolar medium playing the role of dark matter. We review a relativistic model of dipolar dark matter (DDM) within standard general relativity to describe, at some effective level, a fluid polarizable in a gravitational field. At first order in cosmological perturbation theory, this model is equivalent to the concordance cosmological scenario, or Lambda-cold dark matter (CDM) model. At second order, however, the internal energy of DDM modifies the curvature perturbation generated by CDM. This correction, which depends quadratically on the dipole, induces a new type of non-Gaussianity in the bispectrum of the curvature perturbation with respect to standard CDM. Recent observations by the Planck satellite impose stringent constraints on the primordial value of the dipole field.

  6. The DAMIC dark matter experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Bertou, X; Bole, D; Butner, M; Cancelo, G; Vázquez, A Castañeda; Chavarria, A E; Neto, J R T de Mello; Dixon, S; D'Olivo, J C; Estrada, J; Moroni, G Fernandez; Torres, K P Hernández; Izraelevitch, F; Kavner, A; Kilminster, B; Lawson, I; Liao, J; López, M; Molina, J; Moreno-Granados, G; Pena, J; Privitera, P; Sarkis, Y; Scarpine, V; Schwarz, T; Haro, M Sofo; Tiffenberg, J; Machado, D Torres; Trillaud, F; You, X; Zhou, J

    2015-01-01

    The DAMIC (Dark Matter in CCDs) experiment uses high resistivity, scientific grade CCDs to search for dark matter. The CCD's low electronic noise allows an unprecedently low energy threshold of a few tens of eV that make it possible to detect silicon recoils resulting from interactions of low mass WIMPs. In addition the CCD's high spatial resolution and the excellent energy response results in very effective background identification techniques. The experiment has a unique sensitivity to dark matter particles with masses below 10 GeV/c$^2$. Previous results have demonstrated the potential of this technology, motivating the construction of DAMIC100, a 100 grams silicon target detector currently being installed at SNOLAB. In this contribution, the mode of operation and unique imaging capabilities of the CCDs, and how they may be exploited to characterize and suppress backgrounds will be discussed, as well as physics results after one year of data taking.

  7. Clustering GCG: a viable option for unified dark matter-dark energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the clustering Generalized Chaplygin Gas (GCG) as a possible candidate for dark matter-dark energy unification. The vanishing speed of sound 0cs2 = ) for the GCG fluid can be obtained by incorporating higher derivative operator in the original K-essence Lagrangian. The evolution of the density fluctuations in the GCG+Baryon fluid is studied in the linear regime. The observational constraints on the model are obtained using latest data from SNIa, H(z), BAO and also for the fσ8 measurements. The matter power spectra for the allowed parameter values are well behaved without any unphysical features

  8. Evidence for dark matter in the inner Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Iocco, Fabio; Bertone, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of dark matter in the universe is today a central tenet in modern cosmology and astrophysics. Ranging from the smallest galaxies to the observable universe, the evidence for dark matter is compelling in dwarfs, spiral galaxies, galaxy clusters as well as at cosmological scales. However, it has been historically difficult to pin down the dark matter contribution to the total mass density in the Milky Way, particularly in the innermost regions of the Galaxy and in the solar neighbourhood. Here we present an up-to-date compilation of Milky Way rotation curve measurements, and compare it with state-of-the-art baryonic mass distribution models. We show that current data strongly disfavour baryons as the sole contribution to the galactic mass budget, even inside the solar circle. Our findings demonstrate the existence of dark matter in the inner Galaxy while making no assumptions on its distribution. We anticipate that this result will compel new model-independent constraints on the dark mat...

  9. Preons, Dark Matter and the Production of Early Cosmological Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Burdyuzha, V; Ponomarev, Yu; Vereshkov, G M; Ponomarev, Yu.

    1999-01-01

    If the preon structure of quarks, leptons and gauge bosons will be proved then in the Universe during relativistic phase transition the production of nonperturbative preon condensates has been occured collective excitations of which are perceived as pseudogoldstone bosons. Dark matter consisting of pseudogoldstone bosons of familon type contains a "hot" component from massless particles and a "cold" (nonrelativistic) component from massive particles. It is shown that such dark matter was undergone to two relativistic phase transitions temperatures of which were different. In the result of these phase transitions the structurization of dark matter and therefore the baryon subsystem has taken place. Besides, the role of particle generations in the Universe become more evident. For the possibility of structurization of matter as minimum three generations of particles are necessary.

  10. Cosmological dark matter and ensoulment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kemal Irmak

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Allocortical structures such as hippocampal formation and amygdala are involved in the emotions and memory, and regarded as the seat of personhood. Human body is a composite of a biological organism and an intellective soul. It was suggested that cerebral allocortex is the main region harboring the soul and the beginning of a human person as an individual living organism is at the 13th week of development when an adult type allocortex is already formed. No experimental data can be sufficient to bring us to the recognition of a soul, but there must be a substance as the basis of personal identity, for without space-occupying substance, there would be no way to account for the soul’s ability to interact with the body. It was suggested that the soul substance consists of cosmological dark matter. The dark matter constitutes most of the mass in our universe, but its nature remains unknown. The soul is likely to work into man’s physical body directly via that dark matter. We thought that while the soul has a material component as dark matter, there must be an open window to the brain for the entrance of the soul with dark matter. In this respect, vomeronasal organ which is found in the nasal cavity and which has connections with the brain only between the 12th and 14th weeks of human development - a period including the time of ensoulment at 13th week - seems to be the most appropriate window through which the soul and dark matter can enter the brain. [J Exp Integr Med 2013; 3(4.000: 343-346

  11. Invisible Higgs and Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikinheimo, Matti; Tuominen, Kimmo; Virkajärvi, Jussi Tuomas

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that a massive weakly interacting fermion simultaneously provides for a dominant component of the dark matter relic density and an invisible decay width of the Higgs boson at the LHC. As a concrete model realizing such dynamics we consider the minimal walking...... technicolor, although our results apply more generally. Taking into account the constraints from the electroweak precision measurements and current direct searches for dark matter particles, we find that such scenario is heavily constrained, and large portions of the parameter space are excluded....

  12. Dark Matter Searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The astrophysical evidence of dark matter provides some of the most compelling clues to the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. From these clues, ATLAS has developed a broad and systematic search program for dark matter production in LHC collisions. These searches are now entering their prime, with the LHC now colliding protons at the increased 13 TeV centre-of-mass energy and set to deliver much larger datasets than ever before. The results of these searches on the first 13 TeV data, their interpretation, and the design and possible evolution of the search program will be presented.

  13. Dark Matter Searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mehlhase, Sascha; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The large excess of Dark Matter observed in the Universe and its particle nature is one of the key problems yet to be solved in particle physics. Despite the extensive success of the Standard Model, it is not able to explain this excess, which instead might be due to yet unknown particles, such as Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, that could be produced at the Large Hadron Collider. This contribution will give an overview of different approaches to finding evidence for Dark Matter with the ATLAS experiment in $\\sqrt{s}=8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ Run-1 data.

  14. Indirect searches for dark matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Marco Cirelli

    2012-11-01

    The current status of indirect searches for dark matter has been reviewed in a schematic way here. The main relevant experimental results of the recent years have been listed and the excitements and disappointments that their phenomenological interpretations in terms of almost-standard annihilating dark matter have brought along have been discussed. The main sources of uncertainties that affect this kind of searches are also listed. [Report number: Saclay T11/206, CERN-PH-TH/2011-257, extended version in arXiv:1202.1454], [Prepared for the Proceedings of Lepton–Photon 2011, Mumbai, India, 22–27 Aug. 2011].

  15. The difficulty of measuring the local dark matter density

    CERN Document Server

    Hessman, Frederic V

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the vertical velocity dispersion of disc stars is the most direct astronomical means of estimating the local dark matter density, $\\rho_{DM}$. Current estimates based on the mid-plane dynamic density use a local baryonic correction that ignores the non-local effects of spiral structure and significantly underestimates the amount of dynamically relevant gas; the additional gas plus the remaining uncertainties make it practically impossible to measure $\\rho_{DM}$ from mid-plane kinematics alone. The sampling of inhomogeneous tracer populations with different scale-heights and scale-lengths results in a systematic increase in the observed dispersion gradients and changes in the nominal density distributions that, if not properly considered, can be misinterpreted as a sign of more dark matter. If the disc gravity is modelled using an infinite disc, the local variation in the vertical gravity due to the globally exponential disc components results in an underestimation of the baryonic contribution ...

  16. Asymmetric Dark Matter Models and the LHC Diphoton Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Frandsen, Mads T

    2016-01-01

    The existence of dark matter (DM) and the origin of the baryon asymmetry are persistent indications that the SM is incomplete. More recently, the ATLAS and CMS experiments have observed an excess of diphoton events with invariant mass of about 750 GeV. One interpretation of this excess is decays of a new spin-0 particle with a sizable diphoton partial width, e.g. induced by new heavy weakly charged particles. These are also key ingredients in models cogenerating asymmetric DM and baryons via sphaleron interactions and an initial particle asymmetry. We explore what consequences the new scalar may have for models of asymmetric DM that attempt to account for the similarity of the dark and visible matter abundances.

  17. Baryon and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Properties of MareNostrum and MultiDark Simulated Clusters (MUSIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembolini, F.; Yepes, G.; De Petris, M.

    2012-07-01

    We report the first results of the MUSIC project. It consists of two data sets of resimulates clusters extracted from two large dark matter only simulations: Marenostrum Universe and Multidark. In total, the MUSIC contains more than 400 clusters resimulated with high resolution both with radiative and non-radiative physics included. Here we present the first results on the properties of the baryon content and the Sunyaev Zeldovich scaling relations.

  18. DARK MATTER IN DARK UNIVERSE:RECENT PROGRESS%暗宇宙之暗物质研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢瑜; 孟晓磊; 张同杰

    2014-01-01

    对暗物质研究进行了系统性的综述。从标准宇宙学模型出发,讨论了暗物质研究的历史、暗物质的分类、暗物质的候选者(包括重子暗物质与非重子暗物质候选者)、暗物质的理论模型、暗物质的探测方法和暗物质对宇宙演化的影响。最后,我们对暗物质研究做了总结和展望。%Research of dark matter is reviewed in this article.Standard cosmology model was introduced, history of dark matter research,classification of dark matter,candidates for dark matter (including baryonic and non baryonic dark matter),theoretical model of dark matter,observational method for dark matter and effect that dark matter may have on evolution of the universe are discussed.

  19. 暗宇宙之暗物质研究进展%DARK MATTER IN DARK UNIVERSE:RECENT PROGRESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢瑜; 孟晓磊; 张同杰

    2014-01-01

    对暗物质研究进行了系统性的综述。从标准宇宙学模型出发,讨论了暗物质研究的历史、暗物质的分类、暗物质的候选者(包括重子暗物质与非重子暗物质候选者)、暗物质的理论模型、暗物质的探测方法和暗物质对宇宙演化的影响。最后,我们对暗物质研究做了总结和展望。%Research of dark matter is reviewed in this article.Standard cosmology model was introduced, history of dark matter research,classification of dark matter,candidates for dark matter (including baryonic and non baryonic dark matter),theoretical model of dark matter,observational method for dark matter and effect that dark matter may have on evolution of the universe are discussed.

  20. Did LIGO Detect Dark Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Simeon; Cholis, Ilias; Muñoz, Julian B; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D; Raccanelli, Alvise; Riess, Adam G

    2016-05-20

    We consider the possibility that the black-hole (BH) binary detected by LIGO may be a signature of dark matter. Interestingly enough, there remains a window for masses 20M_{⊙}≲M_{bh}≲100M_{⊙} where primordial black holes (PBHs) may constitute the dark matter. If two BHs in a galactic halo pass sufficiently close, they radiate enough energy in gravitational waves to become gravitationally bound. The bound BHs will rapidly spiral inward due to the emission of gravitational radiation and ultimately will merge. Uncertainties in the rate for such events arise from our imprecise knowledge of the phase-space structure of galactic halos on the smallest scales. Still, reasonable estimates span a range that overlaps the 2-53  Gpc^{-3} yr^{-1} rate estimated from GW150914, thus raising the possibility that LIGO has detected PBH dark matter. PBH mergers are likely to be distributed spatially more like dark matter than luminous matter and have neither optical nor neutrino counterparts. They may be distinguished from mergers of BHs from more traditional astrophysical sources through the observed mass spectrum, their high ellipticities, or their stochastic gravitational wave background. Next-generation experiments will be invaluable in performing these tests.

  1. Did LIGO Detect Dark Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Simeon; Cholis, Ilias; Muñoz, Julian B.; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D.; Raccanelli, Alvise; Riess, Adam G.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the possibility that the black-hole (BH) binary detected by LIGO may be a signature of dark matter. Interestingly enough, there remains a window for masses 20 M⊙≲Mbh≲100 M⊙ where primordial black holes (PBHs) may constitute the dark matter. If two BHs in a galactic halo pass sufficiently close, they radiate enough energy in gravitational waves to become gravitationally bound. The bound BHs will rapidly spiral inward due to the emission of gravitational radiation and ultimately will merge. Uncertainties in the rate for such events arise from our imprecise knowledge of the phase-space structure of galactic halos on the smallest scales. Still, reasonable estimates span a range that overlaps the 2 - 53 Gpc-3 yr-1 rate estimated from GW150914, thus raising the possibility that LIGO has detected PBH dark matter. PBH mergers are likely to be distributed spatially more like dark matter than luminous matter and have neither optical nor neutrino counterparts. They may be distinguished from mergers of BHs from more traditional astrophysical sources through the observed mass spectrum, their high ellipticities, or their stochastic gravitational wave background. Next-generation experiments will be invaluable in performing these tests.

  2. Did LIGO detect dark matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Simeon; Muñoz, Julian B; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D; Raccanelli, Alvise; Riess, Adam G

    2016-01-01

    We consider the possibility that the black-hole (BH) binary detected by LIGO may be a signature of dark matter. Interestingly enough, there remains a window for masses $10\\,M_\\odot \\lesssim M_{\\rm bh} \\lesssim 100\\, M_\\odot$ where primordial black holes (PBHs) may constitute the dark matter. If two BHs in a galactic halo pass sufficiently close, they can radiate enough energy in gravitational waves to become gravitationally bound. The bound BHs will then rapidly spiral inward due to emission of gravitational radiation and ultimately merge. Uncertainties in the rate for such events arise from our imprecise knowledge of the phase-space structure of galactic halos on the smallest scales. Still, reasonable estimates span a range that overlaps the $2-53$ Gpc$^{-3}$ yr$^{-1}$ rate estimated from GW150914, thus raising the possibility that LIGO has detected PBH dark matter. PBH mergers are likely to be distributed spatially more like dark matter than luminous matter and have no optical nor neutrino counterparts. The...

  3. Did LIGO Detect Dark Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Simeon; Cholis, Ilias; Muñoz, Julian B; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D; Raccanelli, Alvise; Riess, Adam G

    2016-05-20

    We consider the possibility that the black-hole (BH) binary detected by LIGO may be a signature of dark matter. Interestingly enough, there remains a window for masses 20M_{⊙}≲M_{bh}≲100M_{⊙} where primordial black holes (PBHs) may constitute the dark matter. If two BHs in a galactic halo pass sufficiently close, they radiate enough energy in gravitational waves to become gravitationally bound. The bound BHs will rapidly spiral inward due to the emission of gravitational radiation and ultimately will merge. Uncertainties in the rate for such events arise from our imprecise knowledge of the phase-space structure of galactic halos on the smallest scales. Still, reasonable estimates span a range that overlaps the 2-53  Gpc^{-3} yr^{-1} rate estimated from GW150914, thus raising the possibility that LIGO has detected PBH dark matter. PBH mergers are likely to be distributed spatially more like dark matter than luminous matter and have neither optical nor neutrino counterparts. They may be distinguished from mergers of BHs from more traditional astrophysical sources through the observed mass spectrum, their high ellipticities, or their stochastic gravitational wave background. Next-generation experiments will be invaluable in performing these tests. PMID:27258861

  4. Local thermal equilibrium of dense baryonic matter at CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR/GSI laboratory is being designed to perform heavy-ion collisions in fixed target mode at beam energies of 5-45 GeV per nucleon. The major scientific issues addressed in the experiment are the properties of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) at high baryon density and moderate temperature and the order of quark-hadron phase transition at large baryo-chemical potential. However an important question arises whether the dense baryonic matter created in such collisions may achieve a local thermal equilibrium or not. We have investigated the conditions of local thermal equilibrium of baryons and mesons in a small element of volume within the rapidity range |y| <1.0 for central Au+Au collisions at Elab = 10, 20, 30, 40 GeV per nucleon. For this purpose we used the microscopic transport model UrQMD-3.3 in default cascade mode. We calculated the longitudinal-to-transverse pressure anisotropy (PL/PT) and the inverse slope parameter of energy spectra of baryons and mesons inside the cell at different times (t)= 1-15 fm/c measured in center of mass frame. The quantities are averaged over 60 K events at every time step

  5. Dark Matter Searches with Astroparticle Data

    CERN Document Server

    Porter, Troy A; Graham, Peter W

    2011-01-01

    The existence of dark matter (DM) was first noticed by Zwicky in the 1930s, but its nature remains one of the great unsolved problems of physics. A variety of observations indicate that it is non-baryonic and non-relativistic. One of the preferred candidates for non-baryonic DM is a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) that in most models is stable. WIMP self-annihilation can produce cosmic rays, gamma rays, and other particles with signatures that may be detectable. Hints of anomalous cosmic-ray spectra found by recent experiments, such as PAMELA, have motivated interesting interpretations in terms of DM annihilation and/or decay. However, these signatures also have standard astrophysical interpretations, so additional evidence is needed in order to make a case for detection of DM annihilation or decay. Searches by the Fermi Large Area Telescope for gamma-ray signals from clumps, nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and galaxy clusters have also been performed, along with measurements of the diffuse Galac...

  6. MSSM Dark Matter Without Prejudice

    CERN Document Server

    Gainer, James S

    2009-01-01

    Recently we examined a large number of points in a 19-dimensional parameter subspace of the CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation. We determined whether each of these points satisfied existing theoretical, experimental, and observational constraints. Here we discuss the properties of the parameter space points allowed by existing data that are relevant for dark matter searches.

  7. MSSM Dark Matter Without Prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, James S.

    2010-02-01

    Recently we examined a large number of points in a 19-dimensional parameter subspace of the CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation. We determined whether each of these points satisfied existing theoretical, experimental, and observational constraints. Here we discuss the properties of the parameter space points allowed by existing data that are relevant for dark matter searches.

  8. Dark Matter searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Numerous independent astrophysical experiments have observed and measured the influence of the phenomenon named Dark Matter, but its nature is still unknown. If the assumption that Dark Matter is a particle which has a weak coupling to the Standard Model is valid, then collider searches have the ability to search for the production of this new Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP). Any Dark Matter particles produced in collisions would escape the detector without being observed. Signatures which include an initial-state radiated particle balancing a large amount of Missing Transverse Momentum, known as mono-X topologies, provide a generic means of conducting Dark Matter searches. ATLAS has conducted several mono-X searches, including recoiling jets, photons, W/Z bosons which decay hadronically, and Z bosons which decay leptonically. Searches were carried out with centre of mass energies of both 7 and 8 TeV, and with up to 20/fb of data. No evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model is observed, and t...

  9. Diphoton resonance confronts dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-07-01

    As an interpretation of the 750 GeV diphoton excesses recently reported by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we consider a simple extension of the Standard Model with a Dirac fermion dark matter where a singlet complex scalar field mediates between dark matter and SM particles via effective couplings to SM gauge bosons and/or Higgs-portal. In this model, we can accommodate the diphoton events through the direct and/or cascade decays of pseudo-scalar and real scalar partners of the complex scalar field. We show that mono-jet searches and gamma-ray observations are complementary in constraining the region where the width of the diphoton resonance can be enhanced due to the couplings of the resonance to dark matter and the correct relic density is obtained. In the case of cascade decay of the resonance, the effective couplings of singlet scalars can be smaller, but the model is still testable by the future discrimination between single photon and photon-jet at the LHC as well as the gamma-ray searches for the cascade annihilation of dark matter.

  10. Dark matter in NGC 4472

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An attempt is made to constrain the total mass distribution of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4472 by constructing simultaneous equilibrium models for the gas and stars. Emphasis is given to reconciling the value of the emission-weighted average value of kT derived from the Ginga spectrum with the amount of dark matter needed to account for velocity dispersion observations.

  11. Scalar Field (Wave) Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Matos, T

    2016-01-01

    Recent high-quality observations of dwarf and low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies have shown that their dark matter (DM) halos prefer flat central density profiles. On the other hand the standard cold dark matter model simulations predict a more cuspy behavior. Feedback from star formation has been widely used to reconcile simulations with observations, this might be successful in field dwarf galaxies but its success in low mass galaxies remains uncertain. One model that have received much attention is the scalar field dark matter model. Here the dark matter is a self-interacting ultra light scalar field that forms a cosmological Bose-Einstein condensate, a mass of $10^{-22}$eV/c$^2$ is consistent with flat density profiles in the centers of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, reduces the abundance of small halos, might account for the rotation curves even to large radii in spiral galaxies and has an early galaxy formation. The next generation of telescopes will provide better constraints to the model that will help...

  12. Black Component of Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Grobov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism of primordial black hole formation with specific mass spectrum is discussed. It is shown that these black holes could contribute to the energy density of dark matter. Our approach is elaborated in the framework of universal extra dimensions.

  13. The anomaly of dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Sidharth, Burra G.; Das, A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations by Riess and coworkers have indicated that the universe is expanding some seven percent faster than the currently accepted cosmological model described. In this paper we argue that this discrepancy can be eliminated by considering a universe consisting only of matter and dark energy.

  14. Wino dark matter under siege

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fermion triplet of SU(2)L — a wino — is a well-motivated dark matter candidate. This work shows that present-day wino annihilations are constrained by indirect detection experiments, with the strongest limits coming from H.E.S.S. and Fermi. The bounds on wino dark matter are presented as a function of mass for two scenarios: thermal (winos constitute a subdominant component of the dark matter for masses less than 3.1 TeV) and non-thermal (winos comprise all the dark matter). Assuming the NFW halo model, the H.E.S.S. search for gamma-ray lines excludes the 3.1 TeV thermal wino; the combined H.E.S.S. and Fermi results completely exclude the non-thermal scenario. Uncertainties in the exclusions are explored. Indirect detection may provide the only probe for models of anomaly plus gravity mediation where the wino is the lightest superpartner and scalars reside at the 100 TeV scale

  15. Modified Gravity or Dark Matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Moffat, J W

    2011-01-01

    Modified Gravity (MOG) has been used successfully to explain the rotation curves of galaxies, the motion of galaxy clusters, the Bullet Cluster, and cosmological observations without the use of dark matter or Einstein's cosmological constant. We review the main theoretical ideas and applications of the theory to astrophysical and cosmological data.

  16. Late Forming Dark Matter in Theories of Neutrino Dark Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Subinoy; Weiner, Neal

    2006-01-01

    We study the possibility of Late Forming Dark Matter (LFDM), where a scalar field, previously trapped in a metastable state by thermal or finite density effects, begins to oscillate near the era matter-radiation equality about its true minimum. Such a theory is motivated generally if the dark energy is of a similar form, but has not yet made the transition to dark matter, and, in particular, arises automatically in recently considered theories of neutrino dark energy. If such a field comprise...

  17. Clumps and streams in the local dark matter distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemand, J; Kuhlen, M; Madau, P; Zemp, M; Moore, B; Potter, D; Stadel, J

    2008-08-01

    In cold dark matter cosmological models, structures form and grow through the merging of smaller units. Numerical simulations have shown that such merging is incomplete; the inner cores of haloes survive and orbit as 'subhaloes' within their hosts. Here we report a simulation that resolves such substructure even in the very inner regions of the Galactic halo. We find hundreds of very concentrated dark matter clumps surviving near the solar circle, as well as numerous cold streams. The simulation also reveals the fractal nature of dark matter clustering: isolated haloes and subhaloes contain the same relative amount of substructure and both have cusped inner density profiles. The inner mass and phase-space densities of subhaloes match those of recently discovered faint, dark-matter-dominated dwarf satellite galaxies, and the overall amount of substructure can explain the anomalous flux ratios seen in strong gravitational lenses. Subhaloes boost gamma-ray production from dark matter annihilation by factors of 4 to 15 relative to smooth galactic models. Local cosmic ray production is also enhanced, typically by a factor of 1.4 but by a factor of more than 10 in one per cent of locations lying sufficiently close to a large subhalo. (These estimates assume that the gravitational effects of baryons on dark matter substructure are small.).

  18. Properties of hadron matter. II - Dense baryon matter and neutron stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Y. C.; Wang, C. G.

    1971-01-01

    In this article we have provided certain details of a nuclear-matter computation, based on the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone theory of nuclear reaction, which leads to an equation of state for matter in the density region of 10 to 500 trillion g/cu cm. We also explore the possibilities that at very high baryon densities or for very short baryon separations, the net baryon-baryon interaction may be negligible so that the results of dynamical models, like the statistical bootstrap model and the dual-resonance model, may be applicable to the study of dense baryon matter. Several plausible equations of state are constructed, and their effect on the limiting mass of the neutron star is examined.

  19. Baryogenesis and asymmetric dark matter from the left–right mirror symmetric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper suggests a left–right mirror symmetric model to account for the baryogenesis and asymmetric dark matter. The model can simultaneously accommodate the standard model, neutrino physics, matter–antimatter asymmetry and dark matter. In particular, it naturally and elegantly explains the origin of the baryon and dark matter asymmetries, and clearly gives the close interrelations of them. In addition, the model predicts a number of interesting results, e.g. that the cold dark matter neutrino mass is 3.1 times the proton mass. It is also feasible and promising to test the model in future experiments

  20. Unified Dark Matter Scalar Field Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Bertacca

    2010-01-01

    of a single scalar field accounts for a unified description of the Dark Matter and Dark Energy sectors, dubbed Unified Dark Matter (UDM models. In this framework, we consider the general Lagrangian of -essence, which allows to find solutions around which the scalar field describes the desired mixture of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. We also discuss static and spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein's equations for a scalar field with noncanonical kinetic term, in connection with galactic halo rotation curves.

  1. Isospin violating dark matter being asymmetric

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, Nobuchika

    2013-01-01

    The isospin violating dark matter (IVDM) scenario offers an interesting possibility to reconcile conflicting results among direct dark matter search experiments for a mass range around 10 GeV. We consider two simple renormalizable IVDM models with a complex scalar dark matter and a Dirac fermion dark matter, respectively, whose stability is ensured by the conservation of "dark matter number". Although both models successfully work as the IVDM scenario with destructive interference between effective couplings to proton and neutron, the dark matter annihilation cross section is found to exceed the cosmological/astrophysical upper bounds. Then, we propose a simple scenario to reconcile the IVDM scenario with the cosmological/astrophysical bounds, namely, the IVDM being asymmetric. Assuming a suitable amount of dark matter asymmetry has been generated in the early Universe, the annihilation cross section beyond the cosmological/astrophysical upper bound nicely works to dramatically reduce the anti-dark matter rel...

  2. Wave Dark Matter and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Parry, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    We explore a model of dark matter called wave dark matter (also known as scalar field dark matter and boson stars) which has recently been motivated by a new geometric perspective by Bray. Wave dark matter describes dark matter as a scalar field which satisfies the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. These equations rely on a fundamental constant $\\Upsilon$ (also known as the "mass term" of the Klein-Gordon equation). Specifically, in this dissertation, we study spherically symmetric wave dark matter and compare these results with observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies as a first attempt to compare the implications of the theory of wave dark matter with actual observations of dark matter. This includes finding a first estimate of the fundamental constant $\\Upsilon$. The majority of this thesis has also been presented by the author in three separate shorter papers with arXiv reference codes [arXiv:1210.5269 [gr-qc

  3. Chiral Effective Theory of Dark Matter Direct Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Bishara, Fady; Grinstein, Benjamin; Zupan, Jure

    2016-01-01

    We present the effective field theory for dark matter interactions with the visible sector that is valid at scales of O(1 GeV). Starting with an effective theory describing the interactions of fermionic and scalar dark matter with quarks, gluons and photons via higher dimension operators that would arise from dimension-five and dimension-six operators above electroweak scale, we perform a nonperturbative matching onto a heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory that describes dark matter interactions with light mesons and nucleons. This is then used to obtain the coefficients of the nuclear response functions using a chiral effective theory description of nuclear forces. Our results consistently keep the leading contributions in chiral counting for each of the initial Wilson coefficients.

  4. Layers of deformed instantons in holographic baryonic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, Florian; Schmitt, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We discuss homogeneous baryonic matter in the decompactified limit of the Sakai-Sugimoto model, improving existing approximations based on flat-space instantons. We allow for an anisotropic deformation of the instantons in the holographic and spatial directions and for a density-dependent distribution of arbitrarily many instanton layers in the bulk. Within our approximation, the baryon onset turns out to be a second-order phase transition, at odds with nature, and there is no transition to quark matter at high densities, at odds with expectations from QCD. This changes when we impose certain constraints on the shape of single instantons, motivated by known features of holographic baryons in the vacuum. Then, a first-order baryon onset and chiral restoration at high density are possible, and at sufficiently large densities two instanton layers are formed dynamically. Our results are a further step towards describing realistic, strongly interacting matter over a large density regime within a single model, desirable for studies of compact stars.

  5. NJL model approach to diquarks and baryons in quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Blaschke, D; Zablocki, D

    2015-01-01

    We describe baryons as quark-diquark bound states at finite temperature and density within the NJL model for chiral symmetry breaking and restoration in quark matter. Based on a generalized Beth-Uhlenbeck approach to mesons and diquarks we present in a first step the thermodynamics of quark-diquark matter which includes the Mott dissociation of diquarks at finite temperature. In a second step we solve the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the baryon as a quark-diquark bound state in quark-diquark matter. We obtain a stable, bound baryon even beyond the Mott temperature for diquark dissociation since the phase space occupation effect (Pauli blocking for quarks and Bose enhancement for diquarks) in the Bethe-Salpeter kernel for the nucleon approximately cancel so that the nucleon mass follows the in-medium behaviour of the quark and diquark masses towards chiral restoration. In this situation the baryon is obtained as a "borromean" three-quark state in medium because the two-particle state (diquark) is unbound while ...

  6. Gravitino Dark Matter and low-scale Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Nardecchia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A very simple way to obtain comparable baryon and DM densities in the early Universe is through their contemporary production from the out-of-equilibrium decay of a mother particle, if both populations are suppressed by comparably small numbers, i.e. the CP violation in the decay and the branching fraction respectively. We present a detailed study of this kind of scenario in the context of a R-parity violating realization of the MSSM in which the baryon asymmetry and the gravitino Dark Matter are produced by the decay of a Bino. The implementation of this simple picture in a realistic particle framework results, however, quite involving, due to the non trivial determination of the abundance of the decaying Bino, as well as due to the impact of wash-out processes and of additional sources both for the baryon asymmetry and the DM relic density. In order to achieve a quantitative determination of the baryon and Dark Matter abundances, we have implemented and solved a system of coupled Boltzmann equations for the...

  7. Astrophysical dark matter: candidates from particle physics and detection possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this talk, I will discuss the arguments that 50% to 90% of the matter in galaxies, including our own, is made of an unknown type of dark matter. I will review the reason why cosmologists believe Ω = 1 and illustrate the contrast with the limits on the amount of baryonic matter from element abundances in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. Other arguments for nonbaryonic dark matter will also be discussed. Candidates for the dark matter from particle physics will be presented. I will focus on cold dark matter candidates known as WIMPs, weakly interacting massive (O(GeV)) particles. I will try to illustrate why these particles are interesting for astrophysics and outline ideas for cornering them. Detection possibilities for these particles include indirect detection, which takes advantage of the annihilation products of these particles in the galactic halo, the sun, or the earth. Direct detection via newly proposed cryogenic detectors must be sensitive to <∼ keV energy deposits. Annual modulation of the dark matter signal can be used as a signature for these halo particles. I hope to motivate the interest in these particles and discuss ideas for finding them

  8. Sterile Neutrino portal to Dark Matter II: Exact Dark symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Escudero, Miguel; Sanz, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    We analyze a simple extension of the Standard Model (SM) with a dark sector composed of a scalar and a fermion, both singlets under the SM gauge group but charged under a dark sector symmetry group. Sterile neutrinos, which are singlets under both groups, mediate the interactions between the dark sector and the SM particles, and generate masses for the active neutrinos via the seesaw mechanism. We explore the parameter space region where the observed Dark Matter relic abundance is determined by the annihilation into sterile neutrinos, both for fermion and scalar Dark Matter particles. The scalar Dark Matter case provides an interesting alternative to the usual Higgs portal scenario. We also study the constraints from direct Dark Matter searches and the prospects for indirect detection via sterile neutrino decays to leptons, which may be able to rule out Dark Matter masses below and around 100 GeV.

  9. Wanted! Nuclear Data for Dark Matter Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Gondolo, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Astronomical observations from small galaxies to the largest scales in the universe can be consistently explained by the simple idea of dark matter. The nature of dark matter is however still unknown. Empirically it cannot be any of the known particles, and many theories postulate it as a new elementary particle. Searches for dark matter particles are under way: production at high-energy accelerators, direct detection through dark matter-nucleus scattering, indirect detection through cosmic r...

  10. LEP Shines Light on Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Patrick J.; Harnik, Roni(Theoretical Physics Department, Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL, 60510, U.S.A.); Kopp, Joachim; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2011-01-01

    Dark matter pair production at high energy colliders may leave observable signatures in the energy and momentum spectra of the objects recoiling against the dark matter. We use LEP data on mono-photon events with large missing energy to constrain the coupling of dark matter to electrons. Within a large class of models, our limits are complementary to and competitive with limits on dark matter annihilation and on WIMP-nucleon scattering from indirect and direct searches. Our limits, however, d...

  11. New Spectral Features from Bound Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catena, Riccardo; Kouvaris, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that dark matter particles gravitationally bound to the Earth can induce a characteristic nuclear recoil signal at low energies in direct detection experiments. The new spectral feature we predict can provide the ultimate smoking gun for dark matter discovery for experiments...... with positive signal but unclear background. The new feature is universal, in that the ratio of bound over halo dark matter event rates at detectors is independent of the dark matter-nucleon cross section....

  12. New spectral features from bound dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catena, Riccardo; Kouvaris, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that dark matter particles gravitationally bound to the Earth can induce a characteristic nuclear recoil signal at low energies in direct detection experiments. The new spectral feature that we predict can provide a complementary verification of dark matter discovery at experiments with positive signal but unclear background. The effect is generically expected, in that the ratio of bound over halo dark matter event rates at detectors is independent of the dark matter-nucleon cross section.

  13. New Spectral Features from Bound Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Catena, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that dark matter particles gravitationally bound to the Earth can induce a characteristic nuclear recoil signal at low energies in direct detection experiments. The new spectral feature we predict can provide the ultimate smoking gun for dark matter discovery for experiments with positive signal but unclear background. The new feature is universal, in that the ratio of bound over halo dark matter event rates at detectors is independent of the dark matter-nucleon cross section.

  14. TeV Scale Singlet Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Randall, Lisa; Pontón, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that stable weak scale particles are viable dark matter candidates since the annihilation cross section is naturally about the right magnitude to leave the correct thermal residual abundance. Many dark matter searches have focused on relatively light dark matter consistent with weak couplings to the Standard Model. However, in a strongly coupled theory, or even if the coupling is just a few times bigger than the Standard Model couplings, dark matter can have TeV-scale mass wi...

  15. QHD, Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2014-01-01

    In QHD the weak bosons, quarks and leptons are bound states of fundamental constituents, denoted as haplons. The confinement scale of the associated gauge group SU(2)_h is of the order of $\\Lambda_h\\simeq 0.3$ TeV. One scalar state has zero haplon number and is the resonance observed at the LHC. In addition, there exist new bound states of haplons with no counterpart in the SM, having a mass of the order of 0.5 TeV up to a few TeV. In particular, a neutral scalar state with haplon number 4 is stable and can provide the dark matter in the universe. The QHD, QCD and QED couplings can unify at the Planck scale. If this scale changes slowly with cosmic time, all of the fundamental couplings, the masses of the nucleons and of the DM particles, including the cosmological term (or vacuum energy density), will evolve with time. This could explain the dark energy of the universe.

  16. Quantum Haplodynamics, Dark Matter, and Dark Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In quantum haplodynamics (QHD) the weak bosons, quarks, and leptons are bound states of fundamental constituents, denoted as haplons. The confinement scale of the associated gauge group SU(2)h is of the order of Λh≃0.3 TeV. One scalar state has zero haplon number and is the resonance observed at the LHC. In addition, there exist new bound states of haplons with no counterpart in the SM, having a mass of the order of 0.5 TeV up to a few TeV. In particular, a neutral scalar state with haplon number 4 is stable and can provide the dark matter in the universe. The QHD, QCD, and QED couplings can unify at the Planck scale. If this scale changes slowly with cosmic time, all of the fundamental couplings, the masses of the nucleons and of the DM particles, including the cosmological term (or vacuum energy density), will evolve with time. This could explain the dark energy of the universe

  17. The nature of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, B

    1994-01-01

    Collisionless particles, such as cold dark matter, interact only by gravity and do not have any associated length scale, therefore the dark halos of galaxies should have negligible core radii. This expectation has been supported by numerical experiments of collisionless particles within scale free and cold dark matter cosmologies. Most dwarf spiral galaxies are almost completely dark matter dominated, allowing a unique insight into their mass - density profiles which can be approximated by isothermal spheres with core radii of order 3 - 7 kpc. We can therefore make a direct comparison between these galaxies, and halos which form within the numerical simulations. This yields a severe discrepancy in that the simulations predict the density to fall as rho(r) \\propto r^{-1} on the scales where the data show that rho(r) = const: e.g. the models overestimate the mass within the central few kpc of the halos by a factor of four. The formation of the luminous component of galaxies exacerbates this disparity between th...

  18. The Distribution of Dark Matter Over 3 Decades in Radius in the Lensing Cluster Abell 611

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, A B; Ellis, Richard S; Sand, D J; Richard, J; Marshall, P J; Capak, P; Miyazaki, S

    2009-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the baryonic and dark matter distribution in the lensing cluster Abell 611 (z=0.288), with the goal of determining the dark matter profile over an unprecedented range of cluster-centric distance. By combining three complementary probes of the mass distribution, weak lensing from deep multi-color imaging, strong lensing constraints based on the identification of multiply-imaged sources, and resolved stellar velocity dispersion measures for the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), we extend the methodology for separating the dark and baryonic mass components introduced by Sand et al. (2008). Our resulting dark matter profile samples the cluster from ~3 kpc to 3.25 Mpc, thereby providing an excellent basis for comparisons with recent numerical models. We demonstrate that only by combining our three observational techniques can degeneracies in constraining the form of the dark matter profile be broken on scales crucial for detailed comparisons with numerical simulations. Our analysis ...

  19. Indirect search for dark matter with AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarises the potential of AMS in the indirect search for Dark Matter. Observations and cosmology indicate that the Universe may include a large amount of Dark Matter of unknown nature. A good candidate is the Ligthest Supersymmetric Particle in R-Parity conserving models. AMS offers a unique opportunity to study Dark Matter indirect signature in three spectra: gamma, antiprotons and positrons

  20. Non-minimally flavour violating dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Flavour symmetries provide an appealing mechanism to stabilize the dark matter particle. I present a simple model of quark flavoured dark matter that goes beyond the framework of minimal flavour violation. I discuss the phenomenological implications for direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments, high energy collider searches as well as flavour violating precision data.

  1. Dark matter in elliptical galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carollo, C. M.; Zeeuw, P. T. DE; Marel, R. P. Van Der; Danziger, I. J.; Qian, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present measurements of the shape of the stellar line-of-sight velocity distribution out to two effective radii along the major axes of the four elliptical galaxies NGC 2434, 2663, 3706, and 5018. The velocity dispersion profiles are flat or decline gently with radius. We compare the data to the predictions of f = f(E, L(sub z)) axisymmetric models with and without dark matter. Strong tangential anisotropy is ruled out at large radii. We conclude from our measurements that massive dark halos must be present in three of the four galaxies, while for the fourth galaxy (NGC 2663) the case is inconclusive.

  2. Matter-antimatter asymmetry and dark matter from torsion

    CERN Document Server

    Poplawski, Nikodem J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple scenario which explains the observed matter-antimatter imbalance and the origin of dark matter in the Universe. We use the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory of gravity which naturally extends general relativity to include the intrinsic spin of matter. The torsion of spacetime generates in the Dirac equation the Hehl-Datta term which is cubic in spinor fields. We show that under the charge-conjugation transformation this term changes sign relative to the mass term. A Dirac spinor and its charge-conjugate therefore satisfy different field equations. Fermions in the presence of torsion have higher energy levels than antifermions, which leads to their decay asymmetry. Such a difference is significant only at extremely high densities that existed in the very early Universe. We propose that this difference caused a mechanism, according to which heavy fermions existing in such a Universe and carrying the baryon number decayed mostly to normal matter, whereas their antiparticles decayed mostly ...

  3. Quantum Field Theory of Interacting Dark Matter/Dark Energy: Dark Monodromies

    OpenAIRE

    D'Amico, Guido; Hamill, Teresa; Kaloper, Nemanja

    2016-01-01

    We discuss how to formulate a quantum field theory of dark energy interacting with dark matter. We show that the proposals based on the assumption that dark matter is made up of heavy particles with masses which are very sensitive to the value of dark energy are strongly constrained. Quintessence-generated long range forces and radiative stability of the quintessence potential require that such dark matter and dark energy are completely decoupled. However, if dark energy and a fraction of dar...

  4. Indirect Searches of Dark Matter in Spacc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Jin; FAN Yizhong

    2011-01-01

    Dark matter (DM) is a form of matter necessary to account for gravitational effects observed in very large scale structures such as anomalies in the rotation of galaxies and the gravitational lensing of light by galaxy clusters that cannot be accounted for by the quantity of observed matter (Bertone et al. 2005). In the standard cosmology model, dark matter, dark energy and normal matter constitute about 23%, 72% and 5% of the energy density of the universe,

  5. Dark Matter, Dark Energy and the Chaplygin Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Bilic, Neven; Tupper, Gary B.; Viollier, Raoul D

    2002-01-01

    We formulate a Zel'dovich-like approximation for the Chaplygin gas equation of state P = -A/rho, and sketch how this model unifies dark matter with dark energy in a geometric setting reminiscent of M-theory.

  6. Superstring dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is argued that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) emerging from the superstring theory is a mixture of neutral gauginos and matter fermions. Their mixing matrix is calculated in a plausible minimal low-energy model abstracted from the superstring and the composition of the LSP chi is exhibited. Its relic cosmological density is computed and it is found that it lies within a factor 2 of the critical density required for closure, over a wide range of possible input parameters. The flux of neutrinos from LSP annihilation in the Sun is computed and it is found that it straddles the upper bound from proton decay detectors. Acceptable fluxes are obtained if m chi is less than m/sub t/, in which case the superstring relic can have the critical density for a present Hubble expansion rate H0 greater than or approximately equal to 50 km/s/Mpc only if m/sub t/ is greater than or approximately 40 GeV. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  7. Mapping dark matter in the Milky Way, a synopsis

    CERN Document Server

    Pato, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the dark matter distribution across our Galaxy represents a central challenge for the near future as a new generation of space-borne and ground-based astronomical surveys swiftly comes online. Here we present a synopsis of the present status of the field, reviewing briefly the baryonic content and the kinematics of the Milky Way and outlining the methods used to infer the dark matter component. The discussion then proceeds with some of the latest developments based on our own work. In particular, we present a new compilation of kinematic measurements tracing the rotation curve of the Galaxy and an exhaustive array of observation-based baryonic models setting the contribution of stellar bulge, stellar disc and gas to the total gravitational potential. The discrepancy between these two components is then quantified to derive the latest constraints on the dark matter distribution and on modified Newtonian dynamics. We shall end with an overview of future directions to improve our mapping of the dark matt...

  8. Review of strongly-coupled composite dark matter models and lattice simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kribs, Graham D

    2016-01-01

    We review models of new physics in which dark matter arises as a composite bound state from a confining strongly-coupled non-Abelian gauge theory. We discuss several qualitatively distinct classes of composite candidates, including dark mesons, dark baryons, and dark glueballs. We highlight some of the promising strategies for direct detection, especially through dark moments, using the symmetries and properties of the composite description to identify the operators that dominate the interactions of dark matter with matter, as well as dark matter self-interactions. We briefly discuss the implications of these theories at colliders, especially the (potentially novel) phenomenology of dark mesons in various regimes of the models. Throughout the review, we highlight the use of lattice calculations in the study of these strongly-coupled theories, to obtain precise quantitative predictions and new insights into the dynamics.

  9. Modified gravity and dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cembranos, Jose A R

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental nature of Dark Matter (DM) has not been established. Indeed, beyond its gravitational effects, DM remains undetected by present experiments. In this situation, it is reasonable to wonder if other alternatives can effectively explain the observations usually associated with the existence of DM. The modification of the gravitational interaction has been studied in this context from many different approaches. However, the large amount of different astrophysical evidences makes difficult to think that modified gravity can account for all these observations. On the other hand, if such a modification introduces new degrees of freedom, they may work as DM candidates. We will summarize the phenomenology of these gravitational dark matter candidates by analyzing minimal models.

  10. Dark Matter in Axion Landscape

    CERN Document Server

    Daido, Ryuji; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    If there are a plethora of axions in nature, they may have a complicated potential and create an axion landscape. We study a possibility that one of the axions is so light that it is cosmologically stable, explaining the observed dark matter density. In particular we focus on a case in which two (or more) shift-symmetry breaking terms conspire to make the axion sufficiently light at the potential minimum. In this case the axion has a flat-bottomed potential. In contrast to the case in which a single cosine term dominates the potential, the axion abundance as well as its isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed. This allows an axion with a rather large mass to serve as dark matter without fine-tuning of the initial misalignment, and further makes higher-scale inflation to be consistent with the scenario.

  11. Superconducting Detectors for Superlight Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Zhao, Yue; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study a new class of superconducting detectors that are sensitive to O(meV) electron recoils from dark matter-electron scattering. Such devices could detect dark matter as light as the warm dark-matter limit, m(X)≳1  keV. We compute the rate of dark-matter scattering off of free electrons in a (superconducting) metal, including the relevant Pauli blocking factors. We demonstrate that classes of dark matter consistent with terrestrial and cosmological or astrophysical constraints could be detected by such detectors with a moderate size exposure.

  12. Superconducting Detectors for Super Light Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hochberg, Yonit; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study a new class of of superconducting detectors which are sensitive to O(meV) electron recoils from dark matter-electron scattering. Such devices could detect dark matter as light as the warm dark matter limit, mX > keV. We compute the rate of dark matter scattering off free electrons in a (superconducting) metal, including the relevant Pauli blocking factors. We demonstrate that classes of dark matter consistent with all astrophysical and terrestrial constraints could be detected by such detectors with a moderate size exposure.

  13. Cold dark matter with MOND scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We provide a holographic dual description of Milgrom's scaling associated with galactic rotation curves. Our argument is partly based on the recent entropic reinterpretation of Newton's laws of motion. We propose a duality between cold dark matter and modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). We introduce the concept of MONDian dark matter, and discuss some of its phenomenological implications. At cluster as well as cosmological scales, the MONDian dark matter would behave as cold dark matter, but at the galactic scale, the MONDian dark matter would act as MOND.

  14. Scalar dark matter with type II seesaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the possibility of generating tiny neutrino mass through a combination of type I and type II seesaw mechanism within the framework of an abelian extension of standard model. The model also provides a naturally stable dark matter candidate in terms of the lightest neutral component of a scalar doublet. We compute the relic abundance of such a dark matter candidate and also point out how the strength of type II seesaw term can affect the relic abundance of dark matter. Such a model which connects neutrino mass and dark matter abundance has the potential of being verified or ruled out in the ongoing neutrino, dark matter, as well as accelerator experiments

  15. Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Vaishali; Upadhyaya, G. K.

    2015-07-01

    Coloured relics servived after hadronization might have given birth to dark matter and dark energy. Theoretical ideas to solve mystery of cosmic acceleration, its origin and its status with reference to recent past are of much interest and are being proposed by many workers. In the present paper, we present a critical review of work done to understand the earliest appearance of dark matter and dark energy in the scenario of primordial quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase after Big Bang.

  16. Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, Vaishali, E-mail: vaidvavaishali24@gmail.com; Upadhyaya, G. K., E-mail: gopalujiain@yahoo.co.in [School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University Ujjain (India)

    2015-07-31

    Coloured relics servived after hadronization might have given birth to dark matter and dark energy. Theoretical ideas to solve mystery of cosmic acceleration, its origin and its status with reference to recent past are of much interest and are being proposed by many workers. In the present paper, we present a critical review of work done to understand the earliest appearance of dark matter and dark energy in the scenario of primordial quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase after Big Bang.

  17. Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coloured relics servived after hadronization might have given birth to dark matter and dark energy. Theoretical ideas to solve mystery of cosmic acceleration, its origin and its status with reference to recent past are of much interest and are being proposed by many workers. In the present paper, we present a critical review of work done to understand the earliest appearance of dark matter and dark energy in the scenario of primordial quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase after Big Bang

  18. Dark energy and dark matter as curvature effects

    OpenAIRE

    Capozziello, S.; Cardone, V F; Troisi, A.

    2006-01-01

    Astrophysical observations are pointing out huge amounts of dark matter and dark energy needed to explain the observed large scale structures and cosmic accelerating expansion. Up to now, no experimental evidence has been found, at fundamental level, to explain such mysterious components. The problem could be completely reversed considering dark matter and dark energy as shortcomings of General Relativity and claiming for the correct theory of gravity as that derived by matching the largest n...

  19. Dark Matter and Higgs Sector

    CERN Document Server

    Cembranos, Jose A R; Prado, Lilian

    2010-01-01

    The inert doublet model is an extension of the Standard Model of Elementary Particles that is defined by the only addition of a second Higgs doublet without couplings to quarks or leptons. This minimal framework has been studied for many reasons. In particular, it has been suggested that the new degrees of freedom contained in this doublet can account for the Dark Matter of the Universe.

  20. Particle Emission from Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When some kinds of symmetry breaking occur at the cosmological phase transition, the production of topological and/or non-topological defects can be expected. Here we consider the interaction of the defects within which the condensation of various fields may be realized at the core with dark matter particles, for example, axions or neutralinos. The astrophysical limits on the particle physics model are discussed

  1. Strongly Interacting Light Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Bruggisser, Sebastian; Riva, Francesco; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM) can appear weakly coupled at small energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their...

  2. Phases of Cannibal Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Farina, Marco,; Pappadopulo, Duccio; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Trevisan, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    A hidden sector with a mass gap undergoes an epoch of cannibalism if number changing interactions are active when the temperature drops below the mass of the lightest hidden particle. During cannibalism, the hidden sector temperature decreases only logarithmically with the scale factor. We consider the possibility that dark matter resides in a hidden sector that underwent cannibalism, and has relic density set by the freeze-out of two-to-two annihilations. We identify three novel phases, depe...

  3. Very Degenerate Higgsino Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Eung Jin; Jung, Sunghoon; Park, Jong-Chul

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the Very Degenerate Higgsino Dark Matter (DM), whose mass splitting between the lightest neutral and charged components is ${\\cal O}$(1) MeV, much smaller than radiative splitting of 355 MeV. The scenario is realized in the minimal supersymmetric standard model by small gaugino mixing. In contrast to the pure Higgsino DM with the radiative splitting only, various observable signatures with distinct features are induced. First of all, the very small mass splitting makes (...

  4. The DRIFT Dark Matter Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Daw, E; Fox, J R; Gauvreau, J -L; Ghag, C; Harmon, L J; Harton, J L; Gold, M; Lee, E R; Loomba, D; Miller, E H; Murphy, A St J; Paling, S M; Landers, J M; Phan, N; Pipe, M; Pushkin, K; Robinson, M; Sadler, S W; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Walker, D; Warner, D

    2011-01-01

    The current status of the DRIFT (Directional Recoil Identification From Tracks) experiment at Boulby Mine is presented, including the latest limits on the WIMP spin-dependent cross-section from 1.5 kg days of running with a mixture of CS2 and CF4. Planned upgrades to DRIFT IId are detailed, along with ongoing work towards DRIFT III, which aims to be the world's first 10 m3-scale directional Dark Matter detector.

  5. Does Physics Need 'Dark Matter'?

    OpenAIRE

    Dunning-Davies, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    To fully understand the present position concerning so-called dark matter, it is necessary to examine the historical background since, only by following this approach, do all the pieces of the puzzle fall into place. Here an attempt is made to do this briefly and it is found that an interesting and important question is raised. This question relates to the position of electromagnetism in astronomical considerations since history indicates that, in the years following the beginning of the 20th...

  6. Dark Radiation and Decaying Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Niro, V.; Salvado, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Recent cosmological measurements favour additional relativistic energy density beyond the one provided by the three active neutrinos and photons of the Standard Model (SM). This is often referred to as "dark radiation", suggesting the need of new light states in the theory beyond those of the SM. In this paper, we study and numerically explore the alternative possibility that this increase comes from the decay of some new form of heavy matter into the SM neutrinos. We study the constraints on...

  7. Dark Atoms and Puzzles of Dark Matter Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Khlopov, M Yu

    2014-01-01

    The nonbaryonic dark matter of the Universe is assumed to consist of new stable forms of matter. Their stability reflects symmetry of micro world and particle candidates for cosmological dark matter are the lightest particles that bear new conserved quantum numbers. Dark matter candidates can appear in the new families of quarks and leptons and the existence of new stable charged leptons and quarks is possible, if they are hidden in elusive "dark atoms". Such possibility, strongly restricted by the constraints on anomalous isotopes of light elements, is not excluded in scenarios that predict stable double charged particles. The excessive -2 charged particles are bound in these scenarios with primordial helium in O-helium "atoms", maintaining specific nuclear-interacting form of the dark matter, which may provide an interesting solution for the puzzles of the direct dark matter searches.

  8. On local dark matter density

    CERN Document Server

    Bidin, C Moni; Carraro, G; Mendez, R A; Moyano, M

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, we applied a three-dimensional formulation to kinematic measurements of the Galactic thick disk and derived a surprisingly low dark matter density at the solar position. This result was challenged by Bovy & Tremaine (2012, ApJ, 756, 89), who claimed that the observational data are consistent with the expected dark matter density if a one-dimensional approach is adopted. We analyze the assumption at the bases of their formulation and their claim that this returns a lower limit for the local dark matter density, which is accurate within 20%. We find that the validity of their formulation depends on the underlying mass distribution. We therefore analyze the predictions that their hypothesis casts on the radial gradient of the azimuthal velocity dV/dR and compare it with observational data as a testbed for the validity of their formulation. We find that their hypothesis requires too steep a profile of dV(Z)/dR, which is inconsistent with the observational data both in the Milky Way and in external ga...

  9. Diphoton resonance confronts dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Soo-Min; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-01-01

    As an interpretation of the 750 GeV diphoton excesses recently reported by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we consider a simple extension of the Standard Model with a Dirac fermion dark matter where a singlet complex scalar field mediates between dark matter and SM particles via effective couplings to SM gauge bosons and/or Higgs-portal. In this model, we can accommodate the diphoton events through the direct and/or cascade decays of pseudo-scalar and real scalar partners of the complex scalar field. We show that mono-jet searches and gamma-ray observations are complementary in constraining the region where the width of the diphoton resonance can be enhanced due to the couplings of the resonance to dark matter and the correct relic density is obtained. In the case of cascade decay of the resonance, the effective couplings of singlet scalars can be smaller, but the model is still testable by the future discrimination between single photon and photon-jet at the LHC as well as the gamma-ray searches for the c...

  10. Astronomical Signatures of Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Gorenstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several independent astronomical observations in different wavelength bands reveal the existence of much larger quantities of matter than what we would deduce from assuming a solar mass to light ratio. They are very high velocities of individual galaxies within clusters of galaxies, higher than expected rotation rates of stars in the outer regions of galaxies, 21 cm line studies indicative of increasing mass to light ratios with radius in the halos of spiral galaxies, hot gaseous X-ray emitting halos around many elliptical galaxies, and clusters of galaxies requiring a much larger component of unseen mass for the hot gas to be bound. The level of gravitational attraction needed for the spatial distribution of galaxies to evolve from the small perturbations implied by the very slightly anisotropic cosmic microwave background radiation to its current web-like configuration requires much more mass than is observed across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Distorted shapes of galaxies and other features created by gravitational lensing in the images of many astronomical objects require an amount of dark matter consistent with other estimates. The unambiguous detection of dark matter and more recently evidence for dark energy has positioned astronomy at the frontier of fundamental physics as it was in the 17th century.

  11. Unified Dark Energy-Dark Matter model with Inverse Quintessence

    OpenAIRE

    Ansoldi, Stefano; Guendelman, Eduardo I.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a model where both dark energy and dark matter originate from the coupling of a scalar field with a non-conventional kinetic term to, both, a metric measure and a non-metric measure. An interacting dark energy/dark matter scenario can be obtained by introducing an additional scalar that can produce non constant vacuum energy and associated variations in dark matter. The phenomenology is most interesting when the kinetic term of the additional scalar field is ghost-type, since in t...

  12. Dipolar Dark Matter with Massive Bigravity

    OpenAIRE

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alt...

  13. Ultra Minimal Technicolor and its Dark Matter TIMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryttov, Thomas; Sannino, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    particles are SM singlets. One of these Technicolor Interacting Massive Particles (TIMP)s is a natural cold dark matter (DM) candidate. We estimate the fraction of the mass in the universe constituted by our DM candidate over the baryon one. We show that the new TIMP, differently from earlier models, can be......We introduce an explicit model with technifermion matter transforming according to multiple representations of the underlying technicolor gauge group. The model features simultaneously the smallest possible value of the naive S parameter and the smallest possible number of technifermions. The...

  14. Dark Matter and Color Octets Beyond the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krnjaic, Gordan Zdenko [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Although the Standard Model (SM) of particles and interactions has survived forty years of experimental tests, it does not provide a complete description of nature. From cosmological and astrophysical observations, it is now clear that the majority of matter in the universe is not baryonic and interacts very weakly (if at all) via non-gravitational forces. The SM does not provide a dark matter candidate, so new particles must be introduced. Furthermore, recent Tevatron results suggest that SM predictions for benchmark collider observables are in tension with experimental observations. In this thesis, we will propose extensions to the SM that address each of these issues.

  15. Continuous Flavor Symmetries and the Stability of Asymmetric Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bishara, Fady

    2014-01-01

    Generically, the asymmetric interactions in asymmetric dark matter (ADM) models lead to decaying DM. We show that, for ADM that carries nonzero baryon number, the continuous flavor symmetries that generate the flavor structure in the quark sector also imply a looser lower bound on the mass scale of the asymmetric mediators between the dark and visible sectors. The mediators for $B=2$ ADM that can produce a signal in the future indirect dark matter searches can thus also be searched for at the LHC. For two examples of the mediator models, with either the MFV or Froggatt-Nielsen flavor breaking pattern, we derive the FCNC constraints and discuss the search strategies at the LHC.

  16. Seesaw theories at LHC and warm dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue

    2014-06-01

    Explaining the origin of neutrino masses clearly requires new physics beyond the Standard Model. I focus on the Seesaw paradigm and discuss a few simplest extensions of the SM that give Majorana masses to the active neutrinos. If realized at TeV scale, seesaw theories could manifest themselves in lepton number violating signatures at both low-energy processes and high-energy collider experiments. I summarize the constraints on the seesaw scales using the current LHC data. The left-right symmetric model connects the seesaw mechanism with the origin of parity symmetry breaking, and provides a unified framework for the simplest seesaw types. With new right-handed charged-current interactions, a TeV such model offers a plethora of new particles and exotic signatures at the LHC, and also accommodates a dark matter candidate, the lightest right-handed neutrino. A challenging question is the dark matter relic density which is typically over-produced in the early universe. The late decays of two heavier right-handed neutrinos can produce entropy and dilute the dark matter number. The key observation for this picture to work is the interplay between the freeze temperature of TeV right-handed gauge interaction and the QCD phase transition. The resulting dark matter mass is predicted to be around keV which makes the left-right model also a theory of warm dark matter. I will also comment on the fate of cosmic baryon asymmetry in this scenario.

  17. Warmth elevating the depths: shallower voids with warm dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin F.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Falck, Bridget; Silk, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Warm dark matter (WDM) has been proposed as an alternative to cold dark matter (CDM), to resolve issues such as the apparent lack of satellites around the Milky Way. Even if WDM is not the answer to observational issues, it is essential to constrain the nature of the dark matter. The effect of WDM on haloes has been extensively studied, but the small-scale initial smoothing in WDM also affects the present-day cosmic web and voids. It suppresses the cosmic `sub-web' inside voids, and the formation of both void haloes and subvoids. In N-body simulations run with different assumed WDM masses, we identify voids with the ZOBOV algorithm, and cosmic-web components with the ORIGAMI algorithm. As dark-matter warmth increases (i.e. particle mass decreases), void density minima grow shallower, while void edges change little. Also, the number of subvoids decreases. The density field in voids is particularly insensitive to baryonic physics, so if void density profiles and minima could be measured observationally, they would offer a valuable probe of the nature of dark matter. Furthermore, filaments and walls become cleaner, as the substructures in between have been smoothed out; this leads to a clear, mid-range peak in the density PDF.

  18. Flavored dark matter beyond Minimal Flavor Violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the interplay of flavor and dark matter phenomenology for models of flavored dark matter interacting with quarks. We allow an arbitrary flavor structure in the coupling of dark matter with quarks. This coupling is assumed to be the only new source of violation of the Standard Model flavor symmetry extended by a U(3) χ associated with the dark matter. We call this ansatz Dark Minimal Flavor Violation (DMFV) and highlight its various implications, including an unbroken discrete symmetry that can stabilize the dark matter. As an illustration we study a Dirac fermionic dark matter χ which transforms as triplet under U(3) χ , and is a singlet under the Standard Model. The dark matter couples to right-handed down-type quarks via a colored scalar mediator with a coupling. We identify a number of ''flavor-safe'' scenarios for the structure of which are beyond Minimal Flavor Violation. Also, for dark matter and collider phenomenology we focus on the well-motivated case of b-flavored dark matter. Furthermore, the combined flavor and dark matter constraints on the parameter space of turn out to be interesting intersections of the individual ones. LHC constraints on simplified models of squarks and sbottoms can be adapted to our case, and monojet searches can be relevant if the spectrum is compressed

  19. Dark Energy Coupled with Dark Matter in the Accelerating Universe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yang

    2004-01-01

    @@ To model the observed Universe containing both dark energy and dark matter, we study the effective Yang-Mills condensate model of dark energy and add a non-relativistic matter component as the dark matter, which is generated out of the decaying dark energy at a constant rate Г, a parameter of our model. For the Universe driven by these two components, the dynamic evolution still has asymptotic behaviour: the expansion of the Universe is accelerating with an asymptotically constant rate H, and the densities of both components approach to finite constant values. Moreover, ΩA≈ 0.7 for dark energy and Ωm ≈ 0.3 for dark matter are achieved if the decay rate Г is chosen such that Г/H~ 1.

  20. A Direct Empirical Proof of the Existence of Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clowe, Douglas; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Bradac, Marusa; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; /Florida U.; Markevitch, Maxim; /Harvard-Smithsonian; Randall, Scott W.; Jones, Christine; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Zaritsky, Dennis; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

    2006-09-27

    We present new weak lensing observations of 1E0657-558 (z = 0.296), a unique cluster merger, that enable a direct detection of dark matter, independent of assumptions regarding the nature of the gravitational force law. Due to the collision of two clusters, the dissipationless stellar component and the fluid-like X-ray emitting plasma are spatially segregated. By using both wide-field ground based images and HST/ACS images of the cluster cores, we create gravitational lensing maps which show that the gravitational potential does not trace the plasma distribution, the dominant baryonic mass component, but rather approximately traces the distribution of galaxies. An 8{sigma} significance spatial offset of the center of the total mass from the center of the baryonic mass peaks cannot be explained with an alteration of the gravitational force law, and thus proves that the majority of the matter in the system is unseen.