WorldWideScience

Sample records for barringer meteor crater

  1. Creation of High Resolution Terrain Models of Barringer Meteorite Crater (Meteor Crater) Using Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard B.; Navard, Andrew R.; Holland, Donald E.; McKellip, Rodney D.; Brannon, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Barringer Meteorite Crater or Meteor Crater, AZ, has been a site of high interest for lunar and Mars analog crater and terrain studies since the early days of the Apollo-Saturn program. It continues to be a site of exceptional interest to lunar, Mars, and other planetary crater and impact analog studies because of its relatively young age (est. 50 thousand years) and well-preserved structure. High resolution (2 meter to 1 decimeter) digital terrain models of Meteor Crater in whole or in part were created at NASA Stennis Space Center to support several lunar surface analog modeling activities using photogrammetric and ground based laser scanning techniques. The dataset created by this activity provides new and highly accurate 3D models of the inside slope of the crater as well as the downslope rock distribution of the western ejecta field. The data are presented to the science community for possible use in furthering studies of Meteor Crater and impact craters in general as well as its current near term lunar exploration use in providing a beneficial test model for lunar surface analog modeling and surface operation studies.

  2. Investigation of impact materials around Barringer Meteor Crater by SEMEDX and micro-PIXE techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Up to date (2008), 174 terrestrial impact craters have been explored on the Earth's surface. They were created by hitting asteroids, meteorites and/or comets. The most famous and well-preserved meteorite crater is the Barringer Meteor Crater in Arizona, USA which is approximately 50,000 years old. It was created by an iron meteorite. In recent years, much effort has been devoted to the elemental characterization of various impact materials collected in its near environment by the leadership of the late Prof. Gyula Szoeor. Especially, their Fe-rich inclusions were studied supposedly originated from the projectile of the impacted meteorite. In this report, results for some non-spherical, aggregate-like specimens are shown. The application of Scanning Electron Microscope combined with Energy Dispersive Xray Analysis (SEM-EDX) and a Scanning Nuclear Microprobe (SNM) is a powerful technique for the complex characterization of such materials. SEM provides the fine textural information and the concentration of the major elements. SNM with Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) method serves for the determination of both the major constituents and the important minor and trace elements such as the Platinum Group Elements (PGEs): Ru, Rh, Pd, etc. In this report analytical data are presented for S-Fe-Ni-Cu systems in order to feature the major characteristics of impact metamorphism of materials. A part of the work was presented in the 11th Int. Conf. on Nuclear Microprobe Technology and Applications (Hungary) and 71st Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society (Japan) conferences. Detailed results are under publication in a NIM B volume. Acknowledgements Support from the EU co-funded Economic Competitiveness Operative Programme GVOP- 3.2.1.-2004-04-0402/3.0, the Hungarian-Slovenian intergovernmental S and T cooperation program (SLO-16/2005 GVOP) as well as from the Hungarian Research Foundation (OTKA) under contract No T046579 are

  3. Two-dimensional computer simulation of hypervelocity impact cratering: some preliminary results for Meteor Crater, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computational approach used for subsurface explosion cratering was extended to hypervelocity impact cratering. Meteor (Barringer) Crater, Arizona, was selected for the first computer simulation because it is one of the most thoroughly studied craters. It is also an excellent example of a simple, bowl-shaped crater and is one of the youngest terrestrial impact craters. Initial conditions for this calculation included a meteorite impact velocity of 15 km/s, meteorite mass of 1.67 x 108 kg, with a corresponding kinetic energy of 1.88 x 1016 J (4.5 megatons). A two-dimensional Eulerian finite difference code called SOIL was used for this simulation of a cylindrical iron projectile impacting at normal incidence into a limestone target. For this initial calculation, a Tillotson equation-of-state description for iron and limestone was used with no shear strength. Results obtained for this preliminary calculation of the formation of Meteor Crater are in good agreement with field measurements. A color movie based on this calculation was produced using computer-generated graphics. 19 figures, 5 tables, 63 references

  4. Impact mechanics at Meteor Crater, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Eugene Merle

    1959-01-01

    Meteor Crator is a bowl-shaped depression encompassed by a rim composed chiefly of debris stacked in layers of different composition. Original bedrock stratigraphy is preserved, inverted, in the debris. The debris rests on older disturbed strata, which are turned up at moderate to steep angles in the wall of the crater and are locally overturned near the contact with the debris. These features of Meteor Crater correspond closely to those of a crater produced by nuclear explosion where depth of burial of the device was about 1/5 the diameter of the resultant crater. Studies of craters formed by detonation of nuclear devices show that structures of the crater rims are sensitive to the depth of explosion scaled to the yield of the device. The structure of Meteor Crater is such as would be produced by a very strong shock originating about at the level of the present crater floor, 400 feet below the original surface. At supersonic to hypersonic velocity an impacting meteorite penetrates the ground by a complex mechanism that includes compression of the target rocks and the meteorite by shock as well as hydrodynamic flow of the compressed material under high pressure and temperature. The depth of penetration of the meteorite, before it loses its integrity as a single body, is a function primarily of the velocity and shape of the meteorite and the densities and equations of state of the meteorite and target. The intensely compressed material then becomes dispersed in a large volume of breccia formed in the expanding shock wave. An impact velocity of about 15 km/sec is consonant with the geology of Meteor Crater in light of the experimental equation of state of iron and inferred compressibility of the target rocks. The kinetic energy of the meteorite is estimated by scaling to have been from 1.4 to 1.7 megatons TNT equivalent.

  5. Meteor Crater: An Analog for Using Landforms to Reconstruct Past Hydrologic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palucis, M. C.; Dietrich, W. E.; Howard, A. D.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Kring, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work suggests that debris flow activity has occurred on Mars in the last few million years during high orbital obliquities, but estimating the amount and frequency of liquid water needed to generate these types of flows is still poorly constrained. While it is relatively common to estimate water amounts needed to produce landforms on Mars, such as gullies or alluvial fans, this is something rarely done on Earth. Consequently, there is little field data on the linkage between climate (snowmelt or rainfall events) and the amount of runoff needed to produce specific volumes of sediment in a landform. Here, we present field and modeling data from Meteor Crater, which is a ~50,000 year old impact crater in northern Arizona (USA). Though it is very well preserved, it has developed gullies along its inner wall, similar in form to many gullies on Mars. Meteor Crater, similar to many Martian craters, has also gone through a change in a climate based on the ~30 m of lake sediments on its now dry floor, and what has eroded from its walls has deposited on its floor, making it a closed system. We show using LiDAR-derived topographic data and field observations that debris flows, likely generated by runoff entrainment into talus bordering bedrock cliffs of the crater walls, drove erosion and deposition processes at Meteor Crater. Cosmogenic dating of levee deposits indicates that debris flows ceased in the early Holocene, synchronous with regional drying. For a water-to-rock ratio of 0.3 at the time of transport, which is based on data from rotating drum experiments, it would have taken ~150,000 m3 of water to transport the estimated ~500,000 m3 of debris flow deposits found at the surface of the crater floor. This extensive erosion would require less than 0.4 m of total runoff over the 0.35 km2 upslope source area of the crater, or ~26 mm of runoff per debris flow event. Much more runoff did occur however, as evidenced by lake deposits on the crater floor and Holocene

  6. Scaling craters in carbonates: Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of shock damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    prehistoric shock damage. This is demonstrated by our study of shocked Kaibab limestone from the 49,000-year-old Meteor (Barringer) Crater Arizona.

  7. Geochemical and C, O, Sr, and U-series isotopic evidence for the meteoric origin of calcrete at Solitario Wash, Crater Flat, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymark, L. A.; Paces, J. B.; Marshall, B. D.; Peterman, Z. E.; Whelan, J. F.

    2005-08-01

    Calcite-rich soils (calcrete) in alluvium and colluvium at Solitario Wash, Crater Flat, Nevada, USA, contain pedogenic calcite and opaline silica similar to soils present elsewhere in the semi-arid southwestern United States. Nevertheless, a ground-water discharge origin for the Solitario Wash soil deposits was proposed in a series of publications proposing elevation-dependent variations of carbon and oxygen isotopes in calcrete samples. Discharge of ground water in the past would raise the possibility of future flooding in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of a proposed high-level nuclear waste repository. New geochemical and carbon, oxygen, strontium, and uranium-series isotopic data disprove the presence of systematic elevation-isotopic composition relations, which are the main justification given for a proposed ground-water discharge origin of the calcrete deposits at Solitario Wash. Values of δ13C (-4.1 to -7.8 per mil [‰]), δ18O (23.8-17.2‰), 87Sr/86Sr (0.71270-0.71146), and initial 234U/238U activity ratios of about 1.6 in the new calcrete samples are within ranges previously observed in pedogenic carbonate deposits at Yucca Mountain and are incompatible with a ground-water origin for the calcrete. Variations in carbon and oxygen isotopes in Solitario Wash calcrete likely are caused by pedogenic deposition from meteoric water under varying Quaternary climatic conditions over hundreds of thousands of years.

  8. Video Meteor Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  9. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17.

  10. Formation of Craters in Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun; Se-Won Jang

    2007-01-01

    The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17

  11. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17

  12. The Meteor Meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggensperger, Martin B.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the Meteor Scatter Project (MSP) in which high school students build an automated meteor observatory and learn to monitor meteor activity. Involves students in activities such as radio frequency survey, antenna design, antenna construction, manual meteor counts, and computer board configuration and installation. (YDS)

  13. Proceedings of the Geophysical Laboratory - Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Cratering Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordyke, M. D.

    1961-10-01

    The geological papers in this morning's session will deal descriptively with surficial features and end products of impact craters caused by meteorite falls. Such items as breccia, structural deformation, normal and inverse stratigraphy, glass (fused rock), and coesite will frequently be mentioned. Meteor and explosion crater data are presented.

  14. Meteors and meteorites spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.; Lenža, L.; Ferus, M.; Civiš, S.; Knížek, A.; Kubelík, P.; Kaiserová, T.; Váňa, P.

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of our meteor spectroscopy project is to better understand the physical and chemical properties of meteoroids. Astrometric and spectral observations of real meteors are obtained via spectroscopic CCD video systems. Processed meteor data are inserted to the EDMOND database (European viDeo MeteOr Network Database) together with spectral information. The fully analyzed atmospheric trajectory, orbit and also spectra of a Leonid meteor/meteoroid captured in November 2015 are presented as an example. At the same time, our target is the systematization of spectroscopic emission lines for the comparative analysis of meteor spectra. Meteoroid plasma was simulated in a laboratory by laser ablation of meteorites samples using an (ArF) excimer laser and the LIDB (Laser Induced Dielectric Breakdown) in a low pressure atmosphere and various gases. The induced plasma emissions were simultaneously observed with the Echelle Spectrograph and the same CCD video spectral camera as used for real meteor registration. Measurements and analysis results for few selected meteorite samples are presented and discussed.

  15. Optical electronics for meteor observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiev, R. I.; Mukhamednazarov, S.; Atamas, I. A.

    1987-01-01

    Spectral observations of meteors have been carried out for several years using an optical electronics facility. Interest has centered on faint meteors and their trails in the period of intensive meteor showers. Over 800 meteors were registered during the observation period, with spectrograms obtained for 170 of these. A total of 86 meteors were photographed from two sites and for 25 of these spectrograms of the meteors as well as their trails were obtained. All meteors have undergone routine processing in order to determine atmospheric characteristics. Results are discussed.

  16. A Tale of 3 Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    11 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image captures some of the complexity of the martian upper crust. Mars does not simply have an impact-cratered surface, it's upper crust is a cratered volume. Over time, older craters on Mars have been eroded, filled, buried, and in some cases exhumed and re-exposed at the martian surface. The crust of Mars is layered to depths of 10 or more kilometers, and mixed in with the layered bedrock are a variety of ancient craters with diameters ranging from a few tens of meters (a few tens of yards) to several hundred kilometers (more than one or two hundred miles). The picture shown here captures some of the essence of the layered, cratered volume of the upper crust of Mars in a very simple form. The image shows three distinct circular features. The smallest, in the lower right quarter of the image, is a meteor crater surrounded by a mound of material. This small crater formed within a layer of bedrock that once covered the entire scene, but today is found only in this small remnant adjacent to the crater. The intermediate-sized crater, west (left) of the small one, formed either in the next layer down--that is, below the layer in which the small crater formed--or it formed in some layers that are now removed, but was big enough to penetrate deeply into the rock that is near the surface today. The largest circular feature in the image, in the upper right quarter of the image, is still largely buried. It formed in layers of rock that are below the present surface. Erosion has brought traces of its rim back to the surface of Mars. This picture is located near 50.0oS, 77.8oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this October 2004 image from the upper left.

  17. Meteor signature interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Meteor signatures contain information about the constituents of space debris and present potential false alarms to early warnings systems. Better models could both extract the maximum scientific information possible and reduce their danger. Accurate predictions can be produced by models of modest complexity, which can be inverted to predict the sizes, compositions, and trajectories of object from their signatures for most objects of interest and concern.

  18. The Production of Small Primary Craters on Mars and the Moon

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Jean-Pierre; Pathare, Asmin V.; Aharonson, Oded

    2013-01-01

    We model the primary crater production of small (D < 100 m) primary craters on Mars and the Moon using the observed annual flux of terrestrial fireballs. From the size-frequency distribution (SFD) of meteor diameters, with appropriate velocity distributions for Mars and the Moon, we are able to reproduce martian and lunar crater-count chronometry systems (isochrons) in both slope and magnitude. We include an atmospheric model for Mars that accounts for the deceleration, ablation, and fragment...

  19. Meteors in Australian Aboriginal Dreamings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2010-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of Australian Aboriginal accounts of meteors. The data used were taken from anthropological and ethnographic literature describing oral traditions, ceremonies, and Dreamings of 97 Aboriginal groups representing all states of modern Australia. This revealed common themes in the way meteors were viewed between Aboriginal groups, focusing on supernatural events, death, omens, and war. The presence of such themes around Australia was probably due to the unpredictable nature of meteors in an otherwise well-ordered cosmos.

  20. The Chelyabinsk meteor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, O.; Jenniskens, P.; Shuvalov, V.; Emel'yanenko, V.; Rybnov, Y.; Kharlamov, V.; Kartashova, A.; Biryukov, E.; Khaibrakhmanov, S.

    2014-07-01

    A review is given about what was learned about the 0.5-Mt Chelyabinsk airburst of 15 February 2013 by field studies, the analysis of recovered meteorites, and numerical models of meteoroid fragmentation and airburst propagation. Previous events with comparable or larger energy in recent times include only the 0.5-Mt -sized 3 August 1963 meteor over the south Atlantic, for which only an infrasound signal was recorded, and the famous Tunguska impact of 1908. Estimates of the initial kinetic energy of the Tunguska impact range from 3 to 50 Mt, due to the lack of good observations at the time. The Chelyabinsk event is much better documented than both, and provides a unique opportunity to calibrate the different approaches used to model meteoroid entry and calculate the damaging effects of a shock wave from a large meteoroid impact. A better understanding of what happened might help future impact hazard mitigation efforts by calibrating models of what might happen under somewhat different circumstances. The initial kinetic energy is estimated from infrasonic signals and the fireball's lightcurve, as well as the extent of the glass damage on the ground. Analysis of video observations of the fireball and the shadow movements provided an impact trajectory and a record of the meteor lightcurve, which describes how that energy was deposited in the atmosphere. Ablation and fragmentation scenarios determine the success of attempts to reproduce the observed meteor lightcurve and deceleration profile by numerical modeling. There was almost no deceleration until peak brightness. Meteoroid fragmentation occurred in different forms, some part of the initial mass broke in well separated fragments, the surviving fragments falling on the ground as meteorites. The specific conditions during energy deposition determined the fraction of surviving mass. The extent of the glass damage was mapped by visiting over 50 villages in the area. A number of numerical simulations were conducted that

  1. Big Crater as Viewed by Pathfinder Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The 'Big Crater' is actually a relatively small Martian crater to the southeast of the Mars Pathfinder landing site. It is 1500 meters (4900 feet) in diameter, or about the same size as Meteor Crater in Arizona. Superimposed on the rim of Big Crater (the central part of the rim as seen here) is a smaller crater nicknamed 'Rimshot Crater.' The distance to this smaller crater, and the nearest portion of the rim of Big Crater, is 2200 meters (7200 feet). To the right of Big Crater, south from the spacecraft, almost lost in the atmospheric dust 'haze,' is the large streamlined mountain nicknamed 'Far Knob.' This mountain is over 450 meters (1480 feet) tall, and is over 30 kilometers (19 miles) from the spacecraft. Another, smaller and closer knob, nicknamed 'Southeast Knob' can be seen as a triangular peak to the left of the flanks of the Big Crater rim. This knob is 21 kilometers (13 miles) southeast from the spacecraft.The larger features visible in this scene - Big Crater, Far Knob, and Southeast Knob - were discovered on the first panoramas taken by the IMP camera on the 4th of July, 1997, and subsequently identified in Viking Orbiter images taken over 20 years ago. The scene includes rocky ridges and swales or 'hummocks' of flood debris that range from a few tens of meters away from the lander to the distance of South Twin Peak. The largest rock in the nearfield, just left of center in the foreground, nicknamed 'Otter', is about 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) long and 10 meters (33 feet) from the spacecraft.This view of Big Crater was produced by combining 6 individual 'Superpan' scenes from the left and right eyes of the IMP camera. Each frame consists of 8 individual frames (left eye) and 7 frames (right eye) taken with different color filters that were enlarged by 500% and then co-added using Adobe Photoshop to produce, in effect, a super-resolution panchromatic frame that is sharper than an individual frame would be.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery

  2. On the interaction meteor complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajchl, J.

    An approach to the problem of a meteoric complex called the interaction meteor complex (IMC) is applied and discussed, generalizing the idea of the interaction layer (Rajchl 1969). The role of an extended interaction of meteoroids is emphasized, both with planet surfaces and/or their satellites and with planet atmospheres, elastic or inelastic in form. The dissipation and related formative aspect are joined in one complex and compared with a topological compact. Examples of these types of interaction are presented.

  3. Meteor showers an annotated catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Kronk, Gary W

    2014-01-01

    Meteor showers are among the most spectacular celestial events that may be observed by the naked eye, and have been the object of fascination throughout human history. In “Meteor Showers: An Annotated Catalog,” the interested observer can access detailed research on over 100 annual and periodic meteor streams in order to capitalize on these majestic spectacles. Each meteor shower entry includes details of their discovery, important observations and orbits, and gives a full picture of duration, location in the sky, and expected hourly rates. Armed with a fuller understanding, the amateur observer can better view and appreciate the shower of their choice. The original book, published in 1988, has been updated with over 25 years of research in this new and improved edition. Almost every meteor shower study is expanded, with some original minor showers being dropped while new ones are added. The book also includes breakthroughs in the study of meteor showers, such as accurate predictions of outbursts as well ...

  4. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierinen, Juha; Chau, Jorge L.; Pfeffer, Nico; Clahsen, Matthias; Stober, Gunter

    2016-03-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products.

  5. The Production of Small Primary Craters on Mars and the Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Jean-Pierre; Aharonson, Oded

    2013-01-01

    We model the primary crater production of small (D < 100 m) primary craters on Mars and the Moon using the observed annual flux of terrestrial fireballs. From the size-frequency distribution (SFD) of meteor diameters, with appropriate velocity distributions for Mars and the Moon, we are able to reproduce martian and lunar crater-count chronometry systems (isochrons) in both slope and magnitude. We include an atmospheric model for Mars that accounts for the deceleration, ablation, and fragmentation of meteors. We find that the details of the atmosphere or the fragmentation of the meteors do not strongly influence our results. The downturn in the crater SFD from atmospheric filtering is predicted to occur at D ~ 10-20 cm, well below the downturn observed in the distribution of fresh craters detected by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) or the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX). Crater counts conducted on the ejecta blanket of Zunil crater on Mars and North Ray crate...

  6. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vierinen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs; continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after performing a measurement, as it does not depend on pulse spacing; and the low signal to noise ratio allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band without significantly interfering with each other. The latter allows the same receiver antennas to be used to receive multiple transmitters. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. This would, for example, provide higher spatio-temporal resolution for mesospheric wind field measurements.

  7. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierinen, J.; Chau, J. L.; Pfeffer, N.; Clahsen, M.; Stober, G.

    2015-07-01

    The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs); continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after performing a measurement, as it does not depend on pulse spacing; and the low signal to noise ratio allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band without significantly interfering with each other. The latter allows the same receiver antennas to be used to receive multiple transmitters. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. This would, for example, provide higher spatio-temporal resolution for mesospheric wind field measurements.

  8. Meteors And Showers A Millennium Ago

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, S H

    2003-01-01

    Meteors can be classified into either sporadic meteors or showery meteors. We compile the meteor records in the astronomical archives in the Chronicle of the Koryo dynasty (918-1392), and investigate the spatial distribution of meteor streams along the orbit of the Earth from the 10th century to the 14th century. We see that meteors from meteor streams signalize themselves over noisy sporadic meteors, and that the seasonal activity of sporadic meteors was apparently regular. We discover the presence of a few meteor streams by analysing about 700 meteors in the Koryo period. We also compile the records of meteor showers and storms in the chronicles of Korea, Japan, China, Arab, and Europe, and compare their appearance dates with those of showers obtained above, as well as with the modern observations. We confirm that the three sets of data are in agreement with each other. The representative meteor showers are the Perseids, the Leonids, and the $\\eta$-Aquarids/Orionids pair formed by Halley's comet. The other ...

  9. A fast meteor detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gural, P.

    2016-01-01

    A low latency meteor detection algorithm for use with fast steering mirrors had been previously developed to track and telescopically follow meteors in real-time (Gural, 2007). It has been rewritten as a generic clustering and tracking software module for meteor detection that meets both the demanding throughput requirements of a Raspberry Pi while also maintaining a high probability of detection. The software interface is generalized to work with various forms of front-end video pre-processing approaches and provides a rich product set of parameterized line detection metrics. Discussion will include the Maximum Temporal Pixel (MTP) compression technique as a fast thresholding option for feeding the detection module, the detection algorithm trade for maximum processing throughput, details on the clustering and tracking methodology, processing products, performance metrics, and a general interface description.

  10. New trends in meteor radio receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Recent progresses in low cost—but performing—SDR (software defined radio) technology presents a major breakthrough in the domain of meteor radio observations. Their performances are now good enough for meteor work and should therefore encourage newcomers to join the meteor radio community.

  11. Croatian Meteor Network: Ongoing work 2015 - 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šegon, D.; Vida, D.; Korlević, K.; Andreić, Ž.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing work of the Croatian Meteor Network (CMN) between the 2015 and 2016 International Meteor Conferences is presented. The current sky coverage is considered, software updates and updates of orbit catalogues are described. Furthermore, the work done on meteor shower searches, international collaborations as well as new fields of research are discussed. Finally, the educational efforts made by the CMN are described.

  12. Meteor Beliefs Project: Meteors in the Maori astronomical traditions of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Tui R.; Hamacher, Duane W.

    2014-02-01

    We review the literature for perceptions of meteors in the Maori culture of Aotearoa or New Zealand. We examine representations of meteors in religion, story, and ceremony. We find that meteors are sometimes personified as gods or children, or are seen as omens of death and destruction. The stories we found highlight the broad perception of meteors found throughout the Maori culture, and note that some early scholars conflated the terms comet and meteor.

  13. Impact craters on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles A.; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randy; Lopes, Rosaly; Mitchell, Karl; Stofan, Ellen; ,

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles.

  14. The Role of Nonlocal Sediment Transport in Shaping Impact Crater Walls on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, A. M.; Furbish, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    With increasing interest in the concept of ';nonlocal' sediment transport on steep, regolith covered hillslopes, clearer connections between theoretical formulations of nonlocal transport and natural landforms are needed. Scree slopes that form within impact craters provide useful, interesting study sites, due in part to their reasonably well-known initial morphologies. Recent research also suggests that the surface of Mars may be more erosionally active than previously thought. By using elevations derived from LiDAR data for Earth and HiRISE images for Mars together with a probabilistic description of nonlocal transport that includes entrainment and disentrainment rates, comparisons are made between Barringer Meteorite Crater in Arizona and Martian craters of various ages. This enables commentary on whether nonlocal transport produces similar slopes, despite the differing transport processes and acceleration due to gravity for the two planets. Physical insight is obtained through laboratory experiments where gravel particles are dropped on a loose granular slope composed of similar sized gravel inclined at different slopes, including the angle of repose and a flat layer of gravel. Total travel distances were obtained for approximately 500 particles dropped from three different heights for each slope angle. The resulting distributions of travel distances are exponential-like, but for steeper slopes these distributions may decay less rapidly than an exponential function, indicating a decreasing likelihood of disentrainment with increasing travel distance. These approximately dynamically scaled experiments will help clarify the relationship between drop height, slope, surface roughness, and mean travel distance. A description of the disentrainment rate based partly on these findings will to be incorporated in a numerical model that simulates impact crater erosion for Earth and Mars. This will test the theoretical similarity of two locations that are physically very

  15. Big data era in meteor science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinković, D.; Gritsevich, M.; Srećković, V.; Pečnik, B.; Szabó, G.; Debattista, V.; Škoda, P.; Mahabal, A.; Peltoniemi, J.; Mönkölä, S.; Mickaelian, A.; Turunen, E.; Kákona, J.; Koskinen, J.; Grokhovsky, V.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last couple of decades technological advancements in observational techniques in meteor science have yielded drastic improvements in the quality, quantity and diversity of meteor data, while even more ambitious instruments are about to become operational. This empowers meteor science to boost its experimental and theoretical horizons and seek more advanced science goals. We review some of the developments that push meteor science into the big data era that requires more complex methodological approaches through interdisciplinary collaborations with other branches of physics and computer science. We argue that meteor science should become an integral part of large surveys in astronomy, aeronomy and space physics, and tackle the complexity of micro-physics of meteor plasma and its interaction with the atmosphere.

  16. Experimental impact crater morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, A.; Poelchau, M. H.; Hoerth, T.; Schaefer, F.; Thoma, K.; Deutsch, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    The research group MEMIN (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Impact Modelling Research Network) is conducting impact experiments into porous sandstones, examining, among other parameters, the influence of target pore-space saturation with water, and projectile velocity, density and mass, on the cratering process. The high-velocity (2.5-7.8 km/s) impact experiments were carried out at the two-stage light-gas gun facilities of the Fraunhofer Institute EMI (Germany) using steel, iron meteorite (Campo del Cielo IAB), and aluminium projectiles with Seeberg Sandstone as targets. The primary objectives of this study within MEMIN are to provide detailed morphometric data of the experimental craters, and to identify trends and characteristics specific to a given impact parameter. Generally, all craters, regardless of impact conditions, have an inner depression within a highly fragile, white-coloured centre, an outer spallation (i.e. tensile failure) zone, and areas of arrested spallation (i.e. spall fragments that were not completely dislodged from the target) at the crater rim. Within this general morphological framework, distinct trends and differences in crater dimensions and morphological characteristics are identified. With increasing impact velocity, the volume of craters in dry targets increases by a factor of ~4 when doubling velocity. At identical impact conditions (steel projectiles, ~5km/s), craters in dry and wet sandstone targets differ significantly in that "wet" craters are up to 76% larger in volume, have depth-diameter ratios generally below 0.19 (whereas dry craters are almost consistently above this value) at significantly larger diameters, and their spallation zone morphologies show very different characteristics. In dry craters, the spall zone surfaces dip evenly at 10-20° towards the crater centre. In wet craters, on the other hand, they consist of slightly convex slopes of 10-35° adjacent to the inner depression, and of sub-horizontal tensile

  17. The 25th International Meteor Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggemans, Paul

    2006-08-01

    Since the founding of the International Meteor Organization, the International Meteor Conferences guaranteed the vital personal contacts between its members. In recent years IMCs were sometimes assumed to have started with IMO. However, the IMCs grew out of a much older initiative, the Meteor Seminars that started in 1979, later also called International Meteor Weekends. These events played a crucial role in the making of the IMO. The 2006 IMC in Roden, the Netherlands later this year is in fact a jubilee edition as it is the 25th edition since the very beginning in 1979!

  18. Impact and cratering rates onto Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Gladman, Brett; McKinnon, William B.

    2015-09-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft fly-through of the Pluto system in July 2015 will provide humanity's first data for the crater populations on Pluto and its binary companion, Charon. In principle, these surfaces could be dated in an absolute sense, using the observed surface crater density (# craters/km2 larger than some threshold crater diameter D). Success, however, requires an understanding of both the cratering physics and absolute impactor flux. The Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS) L7 synthetic model of classical and resonant Kuiper belt populations (Petit, J.M. et al. [2011]. Astron. J. 142, 131-155; Gladman, B. et al. [2012]. Astron. J. 144, 23-47) and the scattering object model of Kaib et al. (Kaib, N., Roškar, R., Quinn, T. [2011]. Icarus 215, 491-507) calibrated by Shankman et al. (Shankman, C. et al. [2013]. Astrophys. J. 764, L2-L5) provide such impact fluxes and thus current primary cratering rates for each dynamical sub-population. We find that four sub-populations (the q 100km) connects to smaller projectiles, we compute cratering rates using five model impactor size distributions: a single power-law, a power-law with a knee, a power-law with a divot, as well as the "wavy" size distributions described in Minton et al. (Minton, D.A. et al. [2012]. Asteroids Comets Meteors Conf. 1667, 6348) and Schlichting et al. (Schlichting, H.E., Fuentes, C.I., Trilling, D.E. [2013]. Astron. J. 146, 36-42). We find that there is only a small chance that Pluto has been hit in the past 4 Gyr by even one impactor with a diameter larger than the known break in the projectile size distribution (d ≈ 100km) which would create a basin on Pluto (D ⩾ 400km in diameter). We show that due to present uncertainties in the impactor size distribution between d = 1-100km , computing absolute ages for the surface of Pluto is entirely dependent on the extrapolation to small sizes and thus fraught with uncertainty. We show, however, what the ages would be for several cases

  19. Lunar Regolith Maturity Controlled By Ilmenite Content And Micro-Meteor Flux Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, H. H.

    2013-12-01

    Synthesis of Is/FeO maturity indexes for Apollo 17 regolith samples in the valley of Taurus-Littrow on the Moon indicate that high levels of ilmenite in the samples significantly reduces the level of this indicator of space exposure. The analysis, along with consideration of regolith glass characteristics, also discloses that micro-meteor fluxes vary over geologic time, presumably in response to significant impact events in the Asteroid Belt. Surface samples of ilmenite-poor, silicate-rich regolith have about 80-90% higher maturity indexes than surface samples of ilmenite-rich, basaltic regolith of comparable exposure. For comparison of the history of various regolith exposures to the space environment, Taurus-Littrow's light mantle avalanche deposit, the youngest large area stratigraphic unit, provides a specific time horizon. For at least the last ~110 million years, the currently estimated age of the light mantle avalanche, most near surface (upper 1-5cm) regolith has had approximately the same exposure to micro-meteors. The surface of the largely ilmenite-rich basalt fill in the valley has been exposed to space at least as long or possibly 30 million years longer than the light mantle, based on exposure ages for large boulder ejecta in the Camelot cluster of craters. High apparent maturity (Is/FeO >80), however, exists only on three types of regolith surfaces: (1) the North Massif apron (e.g., 77431), (2) the light mantle avalanche deposit (e.g., 72161), and (3) low ilmenite basalt (e.g., 72150). Only intermediate to low maturity (Is/FeO orange ash, has exceptionally low maturity (8% agglutinates and Is/FeO = 5) but an unusually high amount of "ropy" glass (14-18%). (Ropy glass normally constitutes less than on percent of new Taurus-Littrow regolith. It forms within fresh impact craters as a result of macro-meteor impacts, but the current flux of micro-meteors disaggregates such glass within a million years or less.) The light mantle avalanche deposit protected

  20. Sporadic E-Layers and Meteor Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimov, Obid

    2016-07-01

    In average width it is difficult to explain variety of particularities of the behavior sporadic layer Es ionospheres without attraction long-lived metallic ion of the meteoric origin. Mass spectrometric measurements of ion composition using rockets indicate the presence of metal ions Fe+, Mg+, Si+, Na+, Ca+, K+, Al+ and others in the E-region of the ionosphere. The most common are the ions Fe+, Mg+, Si+, which are primarily concentrated in the narrow sporadic layers of the ionosphere at altitudes of 90-130 km. The entry of meteoric matter into the Earth's atmosphere is a source of meteor atoms (M) and ions (M +) that later, together with wind shear, produce midlatitude sporadic Es layer of the ionosphere. To establish the link between sporadic Es layer and meteoroid streams, we proceeded from the dependence of the ionization coefficient of meteors b on the velocity of meteor particles in different meteoroid streams. We investigated the dependence of the critical frequency f0Es of sporadic E on the particle velocity V of meteor streams and associations. It was established that the average values of f0Es are directly proportional to the velocity V of meteor streams and associations, with the correlation coefficient of 0.53 ions M+ of meteoric origin.

  1. 10Be content in clasts from fallout suevitic breccia in drill cores from the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana: Clues to preimpact target distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, Anna; Wild, Eva Maria; Michlmayr, Leonard; Koeberl, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Rocks from drill cores LB-07A (crater fill) and LB-08A (central uplift) into the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana, were analyzed for the presence of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which target rocks of various depths were mixed during the formation of the crater-filling breccia, and also to detect meteoric water infiltration within the impactite layer. 10Be abundances above background were found in two (out of 24) samples from the LB-07A core, and in none of five samples from the LB-08A core. After excluding other possible explanations for an elevated 10Be signal, we conclude that it is most probably due to a preimpact origin of those clasts from target rocks close to the surface. Our results suggest that in-crater breccias were well mixed during the impact cratering process. In addition, the lack of a 10Be signal within the rocks located very close to the lake sediment-impactite boundary suggests that infiltration of meteoric water below the postimpact crater floor was limited. This may suggest that the infiltration of the meteoric water within the crater takes place not through the aerial pore-space, but rather through a localized system of fractures.

  2. Venus Crater Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This web page leads to a database of images and information about the 900 or so impact craters on the surface of Venus by diameter, latitude, and name.

  3. Meteor heights during the recent solar minimum

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobi, Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Average meteor heights have been continuously observed using a SKiYMET VHF radar at Collm (51.3° N, 13.0° E) since late summer of 2004. Initially, the daily mean meteor height was about 89.4 km. Since that time, average meteor heights have decreased. This is consistent with earlier results on middle atmosphere temperature change from the literature and from earlier results of low-frequency reflection height changes measured at Kühlungsborn and Collm. During the recent solar ...

  4. Radio Meteors Observations Techniques at RI NAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovk, Vasyl; Kaliuzhnyi, Mykola

    2016-07-01

    The Solar system is inhabited with large number of celestial bodies. Some of them are well studied, such as planets and vast majority of big asteroids and comets. There is one group of objects which has received little attention. That is meteoroids with related to them meteors. Nowadays enough low-technology high-efficiency radio-technical solutions are appeared which allow to observe meteors daily. At RI NAO three methodologies for meteor observation are developed: single-station method using FM-receiver, correlation method using FM-receiver and Internet resources, and single-station method using low-cost SDR-receiver.

  5. Tritium concentrations in the active Pu'u O'o crater, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii: implications for cold fusion in the Earth's interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, J.E.; Hinkley, T.K.; Reimer, G.M.; Hedge, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    The assertion that deuterium-deuterium fusion may occur at low temperature suggests a potential new source of geothermal heat. If a cold-fusion-like process occurs within the Earth, then a test for its existence would be a search for anomalous tritium in volcanic emissions. The Pu'u O'o crater is the first point at which large amounts of water are degassed from the magma that feeds the Kilauea system. The magma is probably not contaminated by meteoric-source ground water prior to degassing at Pu'u O'o, although mixing of meteoric and magmatic H2O occurs within the crater. Tritium contents of samples from within the crater are lower than in samples taken simultaneously from the nearby upwind crater rim. These results provide no evidence in support of a cold-fusion-like process in the Earth's interior. ?? 1991.

  6. Dynamics and mass balance of El Chichón crater lake, Mexico.

    OpenAIRE

    Rouwet, D.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia; Taran, Y.; Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. 04510; Inguaggiato, D.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia; Varley, N.; Universidad de Colima, Colima, México

    2004-01-01

    The mass balance of El Chichón crater lake is controlled by precipitations, evaporation and seepage through the lake bottom. The main non-meteoric source of water and Cl for the lake is a boiling spring (Soap Pool) discharging saline and neutral water with a variable flow rate from 0 to 30 kg/s inside the El Chichón crater. Variations in lake volume over time were approximately determined from digitized photographic views of the lake using an empirical relationship between depth of t...

  7. Dynamics and mass balance of El Chichón crater lake, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitri Rouwet; Yuri A. Taran; Nicholas R. Varley

    2004-01-01

    The mass balance of El Chichón crater lake is controlled by precipitations, evaporation and seepage through the lake bottom. The main non-meteoric source of water and Cl for the lake is a boiling spring (Soap Pool) discharging saline and neutral water with a variable flow rate from 0 to 30 kg/s inside the El Chichón crater. Variations in lake volume over time were approximately determined from digitized photographic views of the lake using an empirical relationship between depth of the lake a...

  8. The KUT meteor radar: An educational low cost meteor observation system by radio forward scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkour, W.; Yamamoto, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Kochi University of Technology (KUT) meteor radar is an educational low cost observation system built at Kochi, Japan by successive graduate students since 2004. The system takes advantage of the continuous VHF- band beacon signal emitted from Fukui National College of Technology (FNCT) for scientific usage all over Japan by receiving the forward scattered signals. The system uses the classical forward scattering setup similar to the setup described by the international meteor organization (IMO), gradually developed from the most basic single antenna setup to the multi-site meteor path determination setup. The primary objective is to automate the observation of the meteor parameters continuously to provide amounts of data sufficient for statistical analysis. The developed software system automates the observation of the astronomical meteor parameters such as meteor direction, velocity and trajectory. Also, automated counting of meteor echoes and their durations are used to observe mesospheric ozone concentration by analyzing the duration distribution of different meteor showers. The meteor parameters observed and the methodology used for each are briefly summarized.

  9. Monte Carlo modeling and meteor showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prediction of short lived increases in the cosmic dust influx, the concentration in lower thermosphere of atoms and ions of meteor origin and the determination of the frequency of micrometeor impacts on spacecraft are all of scientific and practical interest and all require adequate models of meteor showers at an early stage of their existence. A Monte Carlo model of meteor matter ejection from a parent body at any point of space was worked out by other researchers. This scheme is described. According to the scheme, the formation of ten well known meteor streams was simulated and the possibility of genetic affinity of each of them with the most probable parent comet was analyzed. Some of the results are presented

  10. Monte Carlo modeling and meteor showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, N. V.

    1987-08-01

    Prediction of short lived increases in the cosmic dust influx, the concentration in lower thermosphere of atoms and ions of meteor origin and the determination of the frequency of micrometeor impacts on spacecraft are all of scientific and practical interest and all require adequate models of meteor showers at an early stage of their existence. A Monte Carlo model of meteor matter ejection from a parent body at any point of space was worked out by other researchers. This scheme is described. According to the scheme, the formation of ten well known meteor streams was simulated and the possibility of genetic affinity of each of them with the most probable parent comet was analyzed. Some of the results are presented.

  11. Meteors in the Maori Astronomical Traditions of New Zealand

    CERN Document Server

    Britton, Tui R

    2013-01-01

    We review the literature for perceptions of meteors in the Maori cultures of New Zealand. We examine representations of meteors in religion, story, and ceremony. We find that meteors are sometimes personified as gods or children, or are seen as omens of death and destruction. The stories we found highlight the broad perception of meteors found throughout the Maori culture and demonstrate that some early scholars conflated the terms comet and meteor.

  12. Analysis of ALTAIR 1998 Meteor Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, J.; Close, S.; Colestock, P. L.; MacDonell, A.; Loveland, R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new analysis of a set of 32 UHF meteor radar traces recorded with the 422 MHz ALTAIR radar facility in November 1998. Emphasis is on the velocity measurements, and on inferences that can be drawn from them regarding the meteor masses and mass densities. We find that the velocity vs altitude data can be fitted as quadratic functions of the path integrals of the atmospheric densities vs distance, and deceleration rates derived from those fits all show the expected behavior of increasing with decreasing altitude. We also describe a computer model of the coupled processes of collisional heating, radiative cooling, evaporative cooling and ablation, and deceleration - for meteors composed of defined mixtures of mineral constituents. For each of the cases in the data set we ran the model starting with the measured initial velocity and trajectory inclination, and with various trial values of the quantity mPs 2 (the initial mass times the mass density squared), and then compared the computed deceleration vs altitude curves vs the measured ones. In this way we arrived at the best-fit values of the mPs 2 for each of the measured meteor traces. Then further, assuming various trial values of the density Ps, we compared the computed mass vs altitude curves with similar curves for the same set of meteors determined previously from the measured radar cross sections and an electrostatic scattering model. In this way we arrived at estimates of the best-fit mass densities Ps for each of the cases. Keywords meteor ALTAIR radar analysis 1 Introduction This paper describes a new analysis of a set of 422 MHz meteor scatter radar data recorded with the ALTAIR High-Power-Large-Aperture radar facility at Kwajalein Atoll on 18 November 1998. The exceptional accuracy/precision of the ALTAIR tracking data allow us to determine quite accurate meteor trajectories, velocities and deceleration rates. The measurements and velocity/deceleration data analysis are described in Sections

  13. METEOR v1.0 - User's Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This script is a User's Guide for the software package METEOR for statistical analysis of meteorological data series. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph.D. Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIMASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds the graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written in spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v1.0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  14. The Southern Argentine Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, Diego

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) is a new generation system deployed in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53 S) in May 2008. SAAMER transmits 10 times more power than regular meteor radars, and uses a newly developed transmitting array, which focuses power upward instead of the traditional single-antenna-all-sky configuration. The system is configured such that the transmitter array can also be utilized as a receiver. The new design greatly increases the sensitivity of the radar enabling the detection of large number of particles at low zenith angles. The more concentrated transmitted power enables additional meteor studies besides those typical of these systems based on the detection of specular reflections, such as routine detections of head echoes and non-specular trails, previously only possible with High Power and Large Aperture radars. In August 2010, SAAMER was upgraded to a system capable to determine meteoroid orbital parameters. This was achieved by adding two remote receiving stations approximately 10 km away from the main site in near perpendicular directions. The upgrade significantly expands the science that is achieved with this new radar enabling us to study the orbital properties of the interplanetary dust environment. Because of the unique geographical location, SAAMER allows for additional inter-hemispheric comparison with measurements from Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which is geographically conjugate. Initial surveys show, for example, that SAAMER observes a very strong contribution of the South Toroidal Sporadic meteor source, of which limited observational data is available. In addition, SAAMER offers similar unique capabilities for meteor showers and streams studies given the range of ecliptic latitudes that the system enables detailed study of showers at high southern latitudes (e.g July Phoenicids or Puppids complex). Finally, SAAMER is ideal for the deployment of complementary instrumentation in both, permanent

  15. Field experiment for blasting crater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Tu-qiang

    2008-01-01

    A series of single hole blasting crater experiments and a variable distance multi-hole simultaneous blasting experiment was carded in the Yunfu Troilite Mine, according to the Livingston blasting crater theory. We introduce in detail, our methodology of data collection and processing from our experiments. Based on the burying depth of the explosives, the blasting crater volume was fitted by the method of least squares and the characteristic curve of the blasting crater was obtained using the MATLAB software. From this third degree polynomial, we have derived the optimal burying depth, the critical burying depth and the optimal explosive specific charge of the blasting crater.

  16. IAU Meteor Data Center | the shower database: a status report

    CERN Document Server

    Jopek, Tadeusz Jan

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the meteor shower part of Meteor Data Center database includes: 112 established showers, 563 in the working list, among them 36 have pro tempore status and 23 will be removed from the list. The list of shower complexes contains 25 groups, 3 have established status and 1 has pro tempore status. In the past three years, new meteor showers submitted to the MDC database were detected amongst meteors observed by CAMS stations (Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance), meteors included in the EDMOND (European viDeo MeteOr Network Database), meteors collected by Japanese SonotaCo Network, meteors recorded in IMO (International Meteor Organization) database, amongst meteors observed by Croatian Meteor Network and meteors observed on the Southern Hemisphere by the SAAMER radar. During the XXIXth General Assembly of the IAU in Honolulu, Hawaii in 2015, the names of 18 showers were o?cially accepted and moved to the list of established showers. Also, one shower already o?cially named (3/SIA the Southern iota A...

  17. Observation of meteors by MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William; Kingsley, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The observation of meteor trails by a vertical mesosphere - stratosphere - troposphere (MST) radar beam has the advantage of good height resolution and an approximate knowledge of the zenith angle since the trails are horizontal or near-horizontal. An extension of the ablation theory of meteors was developed for near horizontal trails which takes into account the curvature of the earth. Observations of the Geminid meteor shower by MST radar reveal the 'diffusion heights' to be in fair agreement with the true height, but with some discrepancies that can amount to 4 km. The true heights are almost entirely confined to the range 87-91 km, although the upper limit is attributed to the coherent integration time of the existing MST radar processing.

  18. Advances in Meteoroid and Meteor Science

    CERN Document Server

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M; Llorca, J; Janches, D

    2008-01-01

    This volume is a compilation of articles that summarize the most recent results in meteor, meteoroid and related fields presented at the Meteoroids 2007 conference held at the impressive CosmoCaixa Science Museum in Barcelona, Spain. The conference took place between the 11th and the 15th of June and was organized by the Institute of Space Sciences (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC) and the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC). Researchers in meteor science and supporting fields representing more than 20 countries participated at this international conference. The papers contained in this volume underwent the rigorous refereeing process, and they are good examples of the continuous progress being made in this research field. Technological advances in meteor and metoroid detection, the ever-increasing sophistication of computer modeling, and the proliferation of autonomous monitoring stations continue to create new niches for exciting research on meteoroids and their parent bo...

  19. Big Crater as Viewed by Pathfinder Lander - Anaglyph

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The 'Big Crater' is actually a relatively small Martian crater to the southeast of the Mars Pathfinder landing site. It is 1500 meters (4900 feet) in diameter, or about the same size as Meteor Crater in Arizona. Superimposed on the rim of Big Crater (the central part of the rim as seen here) is a smaller crater nicknamed 'Rimshot Crater.' The distance to this smaller crater, and the nearest portion of the rim of Big Crater, is 2200 meters (7200 feet). To the right of Big Crater, south from the spacecraft, almost lost in the atmospheric dust 'haze,' is the large streamlined mountain nicknamed 'Far Knob.' This mountain is over 450 meters (1480 feet) tall, and is over 30 kilometers (19 miles) from the spacecraft. Another, smaller and closer knob, nicknamed 'Southeast Knob' can be seen as a triangular peak to the left of the flanks of the Big Crater rim. This knob is 21 kilometers (13 miles) southeast from the spacecraft.The larger features visible in this scene - Big Crater, Far Knob, and Southeast Knob - were discovered on the first panoramas taken by the IMP camera on the 4th of July, 1997, and subsequently identified in Viking Orbiter images taken over 20 years ago. The scene includes rocky ridges and swales or 'hummocks' of flood debris that range from a few tens of meters away from the lander to the distance of South Twin Peak. The largest rock in the nearfield, just left of center in the foreground, nicknamed 'Otter', is about 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) long and 10 meters (33 feet) from the spacecraft.This view of Big Crater was produced by combining 6 individual 'Superpan' scenes from the left and right eyes of the IMP camera. Each frame consists of 8 individual frames (left eye) and 7 frames (right eye) taken with different color filters that were enlarged by 500% and then co-added using Adobe Photoshop to produce, in effect, a super-resolution panchromatic frame that is sharper than an individual frame would be.The anaglyph view of Big Crater was produced by

  20. Modern Meteor Science An Interdisciplinary View

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Robert; Brown, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This volume represents a blend of leading edge research and authoritative reviews in meteor science. It provides a comprehensive view of meteoroid research including the dynamics, sources and distribution of these bodies, and their chemistry and physical processes in the interplanetary medium and the Earth’s atmosphere. Techniques for investigation of meteor phenomena in the book include conventional and large aperture radar systems, spacecraft detection, optical systems, spectral measurements, and laboratory based interplanetary dust particle studies. The book will be of interest to researchers and students in astronomy, astrophysics, cosmochemistry, space engineering and space science. Cover photograph was taken by Masayuki Toda.

  1. The Radio Meteor Zoo: a citizen science project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calders, S.; Verbeeck, C.; Lamy, H.; Martínez Picar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Scientists from the BRAMS radio meteor network have started a citizen science project called Radio Meteor Zoo in collaboration with Zooniverse in order to identify meteor reflections in BRAMS spectrograms. First, a small-scale version of the Radio Meteor Zoo was carried out with a sample of meteor identifications in 12 spectrograms by 35 volunteers. Results are presented here and allowed us to define a method that reliably detects meteor reflections based on the identifications by the volunteers. It turns out that, if each spectrogram is inspected by 10 volunteers, hit and false detection percentages of 95% respectively 6% are expected. The Radio Meteor Zoo is online at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/radio-meteor-zoo. Citizen scientists are kindly invited to inspect spectrograms.

  2. Are There Meteors Originated from Near Earth Asteroid (25143) Itokawa?

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsuka, K; Abe, M; Yano, H; Watanabe, J

    2008-01-01

    As a result of a survey of Itokawid meteors (i.e., meteors originated from Near Earth Asteroid (25143) Itokawa = 1998SF36), from among the multi-station optical meteor orbit data of ~15000 orbits, and applying the D-criteria, we could find five Itokawid meteor candidates. We also analyzed corresponding mineral materials of the Itokawid candidates through their trajectory and atmospheric data. We conclude, on the basis of our investigation, that the fireball, MORP172, is the strongest Itokawid candidate.

  3. Meteor Search by Spirit, Sol 668

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Meteor Search by Spirit, Sol 668 The panoramic cameras on NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers are about as sensitive as the human eye at night. The cameras can see the same bright stars that we can see from Earth, and the same patterns of constellations dot the night sky. Scientists on the rover team have been taking images of some of these bright stars as part of several different projects. One project is designed to try to capture 'shooting stars,' or meteors, in the martian night sky. 'Meteoroids' are small pieces of comets and asteroids that travel through space and eventually run into a planet. On Earth, we can sometimes see meteoroids become brilliant, long 'meteors' streaking across the night sky as they burn up from the friction in our atmosphere. Some of these meteors survive their fiery flight and land on the surface (or in the ocean) where, if found, they are called 'meteorites.' The same thing happens in the martian atmosphere, and Spirit even accidentally discovered a meteor while attempting to obtain images of Earth in the pre-dawn sky back in March, 2004 (see http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20040311a.html, and Selsis et al. (2005) Nature, vol 435, p. 581). On Earth, some meteors come in 'storms' or 'showers' at predictable times of the year, like the famous Perseid meteor shower in August or the Leonid meteor shower in November. These 'storms' happen when Earth passes through the same parts of space where comets sometimes pass. The meteors we see at these times are from leftover debris that was shed off of these comets. The same kind of thing is predicted for Mars, as well. Inspired by calculations about Martian meteor storms by meteor scientists from the University of Western Ontario in Canada and the Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique de Lyon in France, and also aided by other meteor research colleagues from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, scientists on the rover team

  4. Impact Cratering Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the von Mises and Mohr-Coulomb strength models with and without damage effects and developed a model for dilatancy. The models and results are given in O'Keefe et al. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting with the bolide in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements. These features included a central uplift, an inner ring, circular terracing and faulting. This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths of approximately 0.1 GPa and at depth strengths of approximately 1.0 GPa. We modeled the damage in geologic materials using a phenomenological approach, which coupled the Johnson-Cook damage model with the CTH code geologic strength model. The objective here was not to determine the distribution of fragment sizes, but rather to determine the effect of brecciated and comminuted material on the crater evolution, fault production, ejecta distribution, and final crater morphology.

  5. Impacts into Sandstone: Crater Morphology, Crater Scaling and the Effects of Porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Dufresne, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2011-03-01

    Crater morphology results from impact cratering experiments in sandstone within the MEMIN program are presented and compared to other brittle materials. The effects of porosity on crater shape, volume and cratering efficiency are analyzed.

  6. Meteor Shower Activity Derived from "Meteor Watching Public-Campaign" in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.; Watanabe, J.

    2011-01-01

    We tried to analyze activities of meteor showers from accumulated data collected by public campaigns for meteor showers which were performed as outreach programs. The analyzed campaigns are Geminids (in 2007 and 2009), Perseids (in 2008 and 2009), Quadrantids (in 2009) and Orionids (in 2009). Thanks to the huge number of reports, the derived time variations of the activities of meteor showers is very similar to those obtained by skilled visual observers. The values of hourly rates are about one-fifth (Geminids 2007) or about one-fourth (Perseids 2008) compared with the data of skilled observers, mainly due to poor observational sites such as large cities and urban areas, together with the immature skill of participants in the campaign. It was shown to be highly possible to estimate time variation in the meteor shower activity from our campaign.

  7. Oblique View of Eros' Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This image, showing an oblique view of Eros' large central crater, was taken at a resolution of about 20 meters (65 feet) per pixel. The brightness or albedo patterns on the walls of this crater are clearly visible, with the brighter materials near the tops of the walls and darker materials on the lower walls. Boulders are seen inside this crater and the smaller nearby craters. The higher density of craters to the left of the large crater implies that this region is older than the smoother area seen associated with the saddle region on the opposite side of the asteroid.Built and managed by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, NEAR was the first spacecraft launched in NASA's Discovery Program of low-cost, small-scale planetary missions. See the NEAR web page at http://near.jhuapl.edu for more details.

  8. Automated Meteor Fluxes with a Wide-Field Meteor Camera Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaauw, R. C.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Cooke, W.; Weryk, R. J.; Gill, J.; Musci, R.

    2013-01-01

    Within NASA, the Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) is charged to monitor the meteoroid environment in near ]earth space for the protection of satellites and spacecraft. The MEO has recently established a two ]station system to calculate automated meteor fluxes in the millimeter ]size ]range. The cameras each consist of a 17 mm focal length Schneider lens on a Watec 902H2 Ultimate CCD video camera, producing a 21.7 x 16.3 degree field of view. This configuration has a red ]sensitive limiting meteor magnitude of about +5. The stations are located in the South Eastern USA, 31.8 kilometers apart, and are aimed at a location 90 km above a point 50 km equidistant from each station, which optimizes the common volume. Both single station and double station fluxes are found, each having benefits; more meteors will be detected in a single camera than will be seen in both cameras, producing a better determined flux, but double station detections allow for non ]ambiguous shower associations and permit speed/orbit determinations. Video from the cameras are fed into Linux computers running the ASGARD (All Sky and Guided Automatic Real ]time Detection) software, created by Rob Weryk of the University of Western Ontario Meteor Physics Group. ASGARD performs the meteor detection/photometry, and invokes the MILIG and MORB codes to determine the trajectory, speed, and orbit of the meteor. A subroutine in ASGARD allows for the approximate shower identification in single station meteors. The ASGARD output is used in routines to calculate the flux in units of #/sq km/hour. The flux algorithm employed here differs from others currently in use in that it does not assume a single height for all meteors observed in the common camera volume. In the MEO system, the volume is broken up into a set of height intervals, with the collecting areas determined by the radiant of active shower or sporadic source. The flux per height interval is summed to obtain the total meteor flux. As ASGARD also

  9. CONTENUTO DI URANIO E TORIO NELLE METEORITI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SANTANGELO

    1955-06-01

    Full Text Available Molti ricercatori in questi ultimi anni si sono interessati al problema
    della composizione delle meteoriti; dai risultati sperimentali si
    è cercato trarre elementi circa la genesi di questi materiali, questione
    ancora aperta, ed avere informazioni sui processi chimici e termodinamici
    cui le meteoriti furono soggette prima della loro caduta sulla
    terra.
    Uno degli aspetti del problema è quello dell'abbondanza percentuale
    degli elementi chimici e della loro composizione isotopica nella
    materia meteorica dei diversi tipi : ciò perché esso è connesso con
    quello piii generale dell'origine e distribuzione degli elementi nel cosmo
    e nella terra, nonché con quello dell'età delle meteoriti (l .
    In un recente lavoro Urey e collaboratori (-, esaminando un gran
    numero di analisi chimiche effettuate su questi materiali, sono pervenuti
    alla formulazione di alcuni criteri di classificazione in base alla
    percentuale dei componenti più abbondanti ed alla presenza o meno
    di disomogeneità strutturali nella massa fondamentale. Fra gli elementi
    meno abbondanti presentano particolare interesse quelli delle due famiglie
    radioattive naturali Torio e Uranio; le loro concentrazioni sono
    state determinate per alcune meteoriti siliciche (stonv ineteorites e
    per qualcuna ferrica (iron meteorites

  10. Crater Count Ages of Young Martian Ray Craters: a Successful Test of the Crater Chronometry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William K.; Quantin, C.; Werner, S. C.; Popova, O.

    2008-09-01

    McEwen et al. (2005) developed a useful test of crater-count chronometry systems [1]. They argued that fresh-looking, Zunil-style Martian ray craters are the youngest or near-youngest craters in their size ranges. The "McEwen et al. test" is that crater-count ages from small craters (D 10-25 m), superimposed on these "Zunils," should be comparable to the expected formation intervals of these host Zunil-style primaries themselves, typically 1 to a few My. McEwen et al., however, found few or no small superposed craters in MOC frames, and concluded that crater chronometry systems are in error by factors of 700 to 2000. Since then, Malin et al. discovered that 10-25m craters form at essentially the rate we used in our isochron system [2,3,4]. Thus, 10-25m craters should be usable for dating these "Zunils." We re-evaluate the "McEwen et al. test" with HiRise images, studying three young craters they discussed, and five others. In every case we found small-crater populations, giving approximately the expected ages. We conclude that the alleged large errors are incorrect. The semi-independent crater count systems of Neukum and of Hartmann agree with the Malin cratering rate, are internally consistent, and appear to give valid age information within about a factor 2 to 4. We thank the International Space Science Institute (ISSI), Bern, for hosting our working group. [1] McEwen et al. 2005 Icarus,176, 351-381. [2] Malin, M. et al. 2006 Science 314, 1573-1557. [3] Hartmann, W.K. 2007 Icarus, 189, 274-278. [4] Kreslavsky, M.A. 2007 7th Internatl. Conf. on Mars, Abstract 3325.

  11. Analysis of historical meteor and meteor shower records: Korea, China, and Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, H J; Park, M G; Yang, Hong-Jin; Park, Changbom; Park, Myeong-Gu

    2005-01-01

    We have compiled and analyzed historical Korean meteor and meteor shower records in three Korean official history books, Samguksagi which covers the three Kingdoms period (57 B.C -- A.D. 935), Goryeosa of Goryeo dynasty (A.D. 918 -- 1392), and Joseonwangjosillok of Joseon dynasty (A.D. 1392 -- 1910). We have found 3861 meteor and 31 meteor shower records. We have confirmed the peaks of Perseids and an excess due to the mixture of Orionids, north-Taurids, or Leonids through the Monte-Carlo test. The peaks persist from the period of Goryeo dynasty to that of Joseon dynasty, for almost one thousand years. Korean records show a decrease of Perseids activity and an increase of Orionids/north-Taurids/Leonids activity. We have also analyzed seasonal variation of sporadic meteors from Korean records. We confirm the seasonal variation of sporadic meteors from the records of Joseon dynasty with the maximum number of events being roughly 1.7 times the minimum. The Korean records are compared with Chinese and Japanese re...

  12. Identification of craters on Moon using Crater Density Parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandana, Vandana

    2016-07-01

    Lunar craters are the most noticeable features on the face of the moon. They take up 40.96% of the lunar surface and, their accumulated area is approximately three times as much as the lunar surface area. There are many myths about the moon. Some says moon is made of cheese. The moon and the sun chase each other across the sky etc. but scientifically the moon are closest and are only natural satellite of earth. The orbit plane of the moon is tilted by 5° and orbit period around the earth is 27-3 days. There are two eclipse i.e. lunar eclipse and solar eclipse which always comes in pair. Moon surface has 3 parts i.e. highland, Maria, and crater. For crater diagnostic crater density parameter is one of the means for measuring distance can be easily identity the density between two craters. Crater size frequency distribution (CSFD) is being computed for lunar surface using TMC and MiniSAR image data and hence, also the age for the selected test sites of mars is also determined. The GIS-based program uses the density and orientation of individual craters within LCCs (as vector points) to identify potential source craters through a series of cluster identification and ejection modeling analyses. JMars software is also recommended and operated only the time when connected with server but work can be done in Arc GIS with the help of Arc Objects and Model Builder. The study plays a vital role to determine the lunar surface based on crater (shape, size and density) and exploring affected craters on the basis of height, weight and velocity. Keywords: Moon; Crater; MiniSAR.

  13. Interferometric Meteor Head Echo Observations using the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, D.; Hocking, W.; Pifko, S.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Fritts, D. C.; Brunini, C; Michell, R.; Samara, M.

    2013-01-01

    A radar meteor echo is the radar scattering signature from the free-electrons in a plasma trail generated by entry of extraterrestrial particles into the atmosphere. Three categories of scattering mechanisms exist: specular, nonspecular trails, and head-echoes. Generally, there are two types of radars utilized to detect meteors. Traditional VHF meteor radars (often called all-sky1radars) primarily detect the specular reflection of meteor trails traveling perpendicular to the line of sight of the scattering trail, while High Power and Large Aperture (HPLA) radars efficiently detect meteor head-echoes and, in some cases, non-specular trails. The fact that head-echo measurements can be performed only with HPLA radars limits these studies in several ways. HPLA radars are very sensitive instruments constraining the studies to the lower masses, and these observations cannot be performed continuously because they take place at national observatories with limited allocated observing time. These drawbacks can be addressed by developing head echo observing techniques with modified all-sky meteor radars. In addition, the fact that the simultaneous detection of all different scattering mechanisms can be made with the same instrument, rather than requiring assorted different classes of radars, can help clarify observed differences between the different methodologies. In this study, we demonstrate that such concurrent observations are now possible, enabled by the enhanced design of the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) deployed at the Estacion Astronomica Rio Grande (EARG) in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. The results presented here are derived from observations performed over a period of 12 days in August 2011, and include meteoroid dynamical parameter distributions, radiants and estimated masses. Overall, the SAAMER's head echo detections appear to be produced by larger particles than those which have been studied thus far using this technique.

  14. The Swedish Allsky Meteor Network: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempels, E.; Kero, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Swedish Allsky Meteor Network started operations with two cameras in early 2014 and has since grown steadily. Currently, seven stations are active and several more will come online in the near future. The network to a large degree relies on low-cost stations run by private individuals or small societies of amateur astronomers. Originally based on the Danish meteor network Stjerneskud, the central node of Uppsala University provides the network with the necessary infrastructure, such as a continually updated software distribution and automatic processing of data from all stations. Although covering a very large land mass with relatively low resources is challenging, there have up to now been several well-observed events, often in collaboration with observations from neighboring countries. We give a short overview of the network's current status, chosen technical solutions, and some results.

  15. Meteor detection on ST (MST) radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    The ability to detect radar echoes from backscatter due to turbulent irregularities of the radio refractive index in the clear atmosphere has lead to an increasing number of established mesosphere - stratosphere - troposphere (MST or ST) radars. Humidity and temperature variations are responsible for the echo in the troposphere and stratosphere and turbulence acting on electron density gradients provides the echo in the mesosphere. The MST radar and its smaller version, the ST radar, are pulsed Doppler radars operating in the VHF - UHF frequency range. These echoes can be used to determine upper atmosphere winds at little extra cost to the ST radar configuration. In addition, the meteor echoes can supplement mesospheric data from an MST radar. The detection techniques required on the ST radar for delineating meteor echo returns are described.

  16. A Global Atmospheric Model of Meteoric Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wuhu; Marsh, Daniel R.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Janches, Diego; Hoffner, Josef; Yi, Fan; Plane, John M. C.

    2013-01-01

    The first global model of meteoric iron in the atmosphere (WACCM-Fe) has been developed by combining three components: the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), a description of the neutral and ion-molecule chemistry of iron in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), and a treatment of the injection of meteoric constituents into the atmosphere. The iron chemistry treats seven neutral and four ionized iron containing species with 30 neutral and ion-molecule reactions. The meteoric input function (MIF), which describes the injection of Fe as a function of height, latitude, and day, is precalculated from an astronomical model coupled to a chemical meteoric ablation model (CABMOD). This newly developed WACCM-Fe model has been evaluated against a number of available ground-based lidar observations and performs well in simulating the mesospheric atomic Fe layer. The model reproduces the strong positive correlation of temperature and Fe density around the Fe layer peak and the large anticorrelation around 100 km. The diurnal tide has a significant effect in the middle of the layer, and the model also captures well the observed seasonal variations. However, the model overestimates the peak Fe+ concentration compared with the limited rocket-borne mass spectrometer data available, although good agreement on the ion layer underside can be obtained by adjusting the rate coefficients for dissociative recombination of Fe-molecular ions with electrons. Sensitivity experiments with the same chemistry in a 1-D model are used to highlight significant remaining uncertainties in reaction rate coefficients, and to explore the dependence of the total Fe abundance on the MIF and rate of vertical transport.

  17. An agar degrading diazotrophic actinobacteria from hyperalkaline meteoric lonar crater lake - a primary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash A. Raut

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There are very few reports on agarases being produced by actinobacteria, Streptomyces coelicolor being the only one known since decades for its agar degrading property. Here we report an agar degrading diazotrophic actinobacterium other than Streptomyces coelicolor, isolated from the littoral soil of Lonar Lake situated in Buldhana district of Maharashtra, India, a lake characterised by high alkalinity, carbonates, bicarbonates, and algal blooms. The lake has a mean diameter of 1800 meters. The Gram-positive filamentous rod grew in a simple medium of pH 10.5 containing agar as a sole source of carbon. The agar degrading property was detected by the appearance of depressions around each colony after 48 h of growth. The enzyme responsible for this degradation, agarase was also detected and estimated. The isolate also grew on Ashby’s Nitrogen free Mannitol Medium aerobically and fixed nitrogen. Morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics of the isolate are presented in this paper.

  18. The Unexpected 2012 Draconid Meteor Storm

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Quanzhi; Brown, Peter G; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D; Weryk, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    An unexpected intense outburst of the Draconid meteor shower was detected by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) on October 8, 2012. The peak flux occurred at ~16:40 UT on October 8 with a maximum of 2.4 +/- 0.3 hr-1 km-2 (appropriate to meteoroid mass larger than 10-7 kg), equivalent to a ZHRmax = 9000 +/- 1000 using 5-minute intervals, using a mass distribution index of s = 1.88 +/- 0.01 as determined from the amplitude distribution of underdense Draconid echoes. This makes the out- burst among the strongest Draconid returns since 1946 and the highest flux shower since the 1966 Leonid meteor storm, assuming a constant power-law distribution holds from radar to visual meteoroid sizes. The weighted mean geocentric radiant in the time interval of 15-19h UT, Oct 8, 2012 was {\\alpha}g = 262.4 +/- 0.1 deg, {\\delta}g = 55.7 +/- 0.1 deg (epoch J2000.0). Visual observers also reported increased activity around the peak time, but with a much lower rate (ZHR 200), suggesting that the magnitude-cumulative num- ber r...

  19. Interferometric meteor head echo observations using the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, D.; Hocking, W.; Pifko, S.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Fritts, D. C.; Brunini, C.; Michell, R.; Samara, M.

    2014-03-01

    A radar meteor echo is the radar scattering signature from the free electrons generated by the entry of extraterrestrial particles into the atmosphere. Three categories of scattering mechanisms exist: specular, nonspecular trails, and head echoes. Generally, there are two types of radars utilized to detect meteors. Traditional VHF all-sky meteor radars primarily detect the specular trails, while high-power, large-aperture (HPLA) radars efficiently detect meteor head echoes and, in some cases, nonspecular trails. The fact that head echo measurements can be performed only with HPLA radars limits these studies in several ways. HPLA radars are sensitive instruments constraining the studies to the lower masses, and these observations cannot be performed continuously because they take place at national observatories with limited allocated observing time. These drawbacks can be addressed by developing head echo observing techniques with modified all-sky meteor radars. Such systems would also permit simultaneous detection of all different scattering mechanisms using the same instrument, rather than requiring assorted different classes of radars, which can help clarify observed differences between the different methodologies. In this study, we demonstrate that such concurrent observations are now possible, enabled by the enhanced design of the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER). The results presented here are derived from observations performed over a period of 12 days in August 2011 and include meteoroid dynamical parameter distributions, radiants, and estimated masses. Overall, the SAAMER's head echo detections appear to be produced by larger particles than those which have been studied thus far using this technique.

  20. Mesospheric observations by a forward scattering meteor radar basic setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkour, Waleed; Yamamoto, Masa-yuki

    2016-08-01

    The durations of radio echo signals scattered from meteor ionized trails might not show a consistent increase corresponding to higher density trails due to the rapid removal of meteor ions at certain heights. Several studies have concluded the dominant role of the secondary ozone layer over diffusion in the removal of the meteor trails below 95 km through chemical oxidization of the meteor ions. Using a basic setup configuration of a forward scattering receiver, a trial to observe the mesospheric ozone concentration was performed by analyzing the meteor echo duration distributions. The forward scattered meteor echoes have the advantage of long durations that can enable observing the transition from the diffusion-removal regime to the chemistry-removal regime. The cumulative meteor echo duration distribution of two meteor showers, the Perseids and the Geminids, were analyzed over 10 years and the chemistry-removal regime in each shower was observed. The knee duration position at which a drop in the number of long overdense meteor echoes starts differed by around 30 seconds between the two showers. As the secondary ozone concentration is inversely related to the solar activity level, the Geminids 2011 corresponding to a high solar activity level showed a significant higher counts of long duration echoes compared to the Geminids 2006 during a low activity level, with the knee position shifted to longer duration. The knee positions obtained during the two distinct meteor showers and the two half solar cycle points are generally in agreement with the mesospheric ozone conditions expected in each case. However, continuous data record is required for the other meteor showers and the sporadic meteors at different heights to observe the mesospheric ozone concentration vertically and the full 11-years solar cycle.

  1. SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE SYSTEMS FOR SOUNDING METEOR TRAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebedeva, A.A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the basic physical principles of meteor radio. A block diagram of hardware and software for sensing meteor trails. The principles of software-defined radio system lies at the heart of the complex. The paper presents a functional diagram of a digital oscillator, as well as software description with an example of the received data. This complex allows eliminating a number of shortcomings meteor radio, as well as increasing its range and security.

  2. Survivability of meteor burst communication under adverse operating conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis is a study of the survivability and reliability issues associated with operating meteor burst communication systems under adverse conditions. Meteor burst communication relies on the phenomenon of reflecting radio waves off the ionized trails left by meteors as they enter the atmosphere and disintegrate. The system's rapid deployment capability, mobility, and operating characteristics make it ideal for disast...

  3. Treating Bony craters by osseous resection in periodontics: Crater therapy

    OpenAIRE

    V. Selahi Moghadam

    1989-01-01

    Treating bony craters by surgical method needs elimination or reduction of bony lesions as well as providing sufficient bone by minimum osteotomy in order to preserve supporting bone. Furcation preservation is very important. Most mandibular molars are overtreated from buccal aspect that leads to inverted morphology and affects buccal forcation. Identifying anatomical structures and their relation to lesions is essential. In crater therapy, furcation and tooth trunk are two ...

  4. Reconstructing the orbit of the Chelyabinsk meteor using satellite observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proud, Simon Richard

    2013-01-01

    The large number of objects in a range of orbits around the Sun means that some will inevitably intersect the Earth, becoming a meteor. These objects are commonly comet fragments or asteroids. To determine the type of a particular meteor requires knowledge of its trajectory and orbital path...... useful in areas where ground-based observations are sparse. Key Points Global satellite coverage allows rapid analysis of meteors Cloud/trail altitude can be determined by satellite Remote sensing data can be used to reconstruct meteor orbital elements ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights...

  5. The Daytime Craterids, a radar-detected meteor shower outburst from hyperbolic comet C/2007 W1 (Boattini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, P. A.; Brown, P. G.; Weryk, R. J.; Wong, D. K.

    2011-06-01

    We report a new daytime meteor shower detected with the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR). This shower has a radiant in the southern constellation Crater. The Daytime Craterid shower was observed in 2003 and 2008 but not in any of the other years in the 2002-09 interval. The strength of this shower in the years observed is equivalent to a daily averaged zenithal hourly rate (ZHR) over 30, with a peak ZHR likely much higher at the time of the outburst. The orbital elements of the shower closely match those of Comet C/2007 W1 (Boattini), which passed perihelion in 2007. The orbit of C/2007 W1 is nominally hyperbolic orbit making this the first meteor shower detected from a clearly unbound comet. The 2003 outburst of the Daytime Craterid shower indicates that this comet must have recently been transferred to an unbound orbit from a bound one, likely through a close encounter with a giant planet. As a result we conclude that this shower provides us with one of the few examples of showers originating from the population of nearly isotropic comets. The stream is difficult to model owing to its proximity to the orbits of Jupiter, Saturn and the Earth. However, the intermittent nature of the shower can be largely understood from numerical simulations. No outbursts of similar strength are expected in the next decade, with the possible exception of 2015.

  6. A Global Model of Meteoric Sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Daniel R.; Janches, Diego; Feng, Wuhu; Plane, John M. C.

    2013-01-01

    A global model of sodium in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere has been developed within the framework of the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The standard fully interactive WACCM chemistry module has been augmented with a chemistry scheme that includes nine neutral and ionized sodium species. Meteoric ablation provides the source of sodium in the model and is represented as a combination of a meteoroid input function (MIF) and a parameterized ablation model. The MIF provides the seasonally and latitudinally varying meteoric flux which is modeled taking into consideration the astronomical origins of sporadic meteors and considers variations in particle entry angle, velocity, mass, and the differential ablation of the chemical constituents. WACCM simulations show large variations in the sodium constituents over time scales from days to months. Seasonality of sodium constituents is strongly affected by variations in the MIF and transport via the mean meridional wind. In particular, the summer to winter hemisphere flow leads to the highest sodium species concentrations and loss rates occurring over the winter pole. In the Northern Hemisphere, this winter maximum can be dramatically affected by stratospheric sudden warmings. Simulations of the January 2009 major warming event show that it caused a short-term decrease in the sodium column over the polar cap that was followed by a factor of 3 increase in the following weeks. Overall, the modeled distribution of atomic sodium in WACCM agrees well with both ground-based and satellite observations. Given the strong sensitivity of the sodium layer to dynamical motions, reproducing its variability provides a stringent test of global models and should help to constrain key atmospheric variables in this poorly sampled region of the atmosphere.

  7. A new method of discovering new meteor showers from the IMO single-station video meteor database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It has been found that unknown meteor showers could be efficiently discovered from the single station video meteor database of the International Meteor Organization(IMO) by assuming the geocentric velocity and adjusting it within the dynamically permitted range. The mean geocentric velocities of new meteor showers can be obtained,as well as the coordinates of the radiants. The activity period and maximum time can also be obtained if there are sufficient shower meteors. All single station video meteor observations between February 13 and 17(from 2000 to 2005) in IMO’s database are processed with this method. As a result,two new meteor showers,one near RA=245.10°,Dec=41.82° in Hercules and the other near RA=233.03°,Dec=17.04° in Serpenids,are discovered. Some dynamical characteristics of the new meteor showers are also determined. Considering the random nature on the selection of period in this work,it is expected that there are some more potential new meteor showers in IMO’s video database.

  8. Geology of Lofn Crater, Callisto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald; Heiner, Sarah; Klemaszewski, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Lofn crater is a 180-km-diameter impact structure in the southern cratered plains of Callisto and is among the youngest features seen on the surface. The Lofn area was imaged by the Galileo spacecraft at regional-scale resolutions (875 m/pixel), which enable the general geology to be investigated. The morphology of Lofn crater suggests that (1) it is a class of impact structure intermediate between complex craters and palimpsests or (2) it formed by the impact of a projectile which fragmented before reaching the surface, resulting in a shallow crater (even for Callisto). The asymmetric pattern of the rim and ejecta deposits suggests that the impactor entered at a low angle from the northwest. The albedo and other characteristics of the ejecta deposits from Lofn also provide insight into the properties of the icy lithosphere and subsurface configuration at the time of impact. The "target" for the Lofn impact is inferred to have included layered materials associated with the Adlinda multiring structure northwest of Loh and ejecta deposits from the Heimdall crater area to the southeast. The Lofn impact might have penetrated through these materials into a viscous substrate of ductile ice or possibly liquid water. This interpretation is consistent with models of the current interior of Callisto based on geophysical information obtained from the Galileo spacecraft.

  9. Aging comets and their meteor showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi

    2016-10-01

    Comets are thought to be responsible for the terrestrial accretion of water and organic materials. The aging of comets is one of the most critical yet poorly understood problems in planetary astronomy. Here we attack this problem by examining different parts of the cometary aging spectrum of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs), a group of comets that dominates the cometary influx in the near-Earth space, using both telescopic and meteor observations.We examine two representative JFCs and the population of dormant comets. At the younger end of the aging spectrum, we examine a moderately active JFC, 15P/Finlay, and review the puzzle of the non-detection of the associated Finlayid meteor shower. We find that, although having been behaved like a dying comet in the past several 102 years, 15P/Finlay does possess ability for energetic outbursts without a clear reason. Towards the more aged end of the spectrum, we examine a weakly active JFC, 209P/LINEAR. By bridging telescopic observations at visible and infrared wavelength, meteor observations and dynamical investigations, we find that 209P/LINEAR is indeed likely an aged yet long-lived comet. At the other end of the spectrum, we examine the population of dormant near-Earth comets, by conducting a comprehensive meteor-based survey looking for dormant comets that have recently been active. We find the lower limit of the dormant comet fraction in the near-Earth object (NEO) population to be 2.0 ± 1.7%. This number is at the lower end of the numbers found using dynamical and telescopic techniques, which may imply that a significant fraction of comets in the true JFC population are weakly active and are not yet detected.These results have revealed interesting diversities in dying or dead comets, both in their behaviors as well as their natures. An immediate quest in the understanding of cometary aging would be to examine a large number of dying or dead comets and understand their general characteristics.

  10. Distant Secondary Craters from Lyot Crater, Mars, and Implications for Ages of Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, S. J.; Hynek, B. M.

    2011-03-01

    We identified thousands of secondary craters in distinct clusters up to 5200 km from their primary crater, Lyot, on Mars. Their properties, relation to Lyot, and broader implications to secondary cratering and planetary ages will be discussed.

  11. The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER): Platform for comprehensive meteor radar observations and studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, D.; Hormaechea, J.; Pifko, S.; Hocking, W.; Fritts, D.; Brunini, C.; Close, S.; Michell, R.; Samara, M.

    2014-07-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) is a new generation system deployed in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53^oS) in May 2008 (Janches et al., 2013,2014). SAAMER transmits 10 times more power than regular meteor radars, and uses a newly developed transmitting array, which focuses power upward instead of the traditional single-antenna-all-sky configuration. The system is configured such that the transmitter array can also be utilized as a receiver. The new design greatly increases the sensitivity of the radar enabling the detection of large numbers of particles at low zenith angles. The more concentrated transmitted power enables additional meteor studies besides those typical of these systems based on the detection of specular reflections, such as routine detections of head echoes and non-specular trails, previously only possible with High Power and Large Aperture radars (Janches et al., 2014). In August 2010, SAAMER was upgraded to a system capable to determine meteoroid orbital parameters. This was achieved by adding two remote receiving stations approximately 10 km away from the main site in near perpendicular directions (Pifko et al., 2014). The upgrade significantly expands the science that is achieved with this new radar enabling us to study the orbital properties of the interplanetary dust environment. Because of the unique geographical location, the SAAMER allows for additional inter-hemispheric comparison with measurements from Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which is geographically conjugate. Initial surveys show, for example, that SAAMER observes a very strong contribution of the South Toroidal Sporadic meteor source (Pifko et al., 2014), of which limited observational data is available. In addition, SAAMER offers similar unique capabilities for meteor showers and streams studies given the range of ecliptic latitudes that the system enables to survey (Janches et al., 2013). It can effectively observe radiants from the ecliptic south

  12. The Taurid complex meteor showers and asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Porubčan, V; Williams, I P

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the Taurid meteor complex based on photographic orbits available in the IAU Meteor database is studied. We have searched for potential sub-streams or filaments to be associated with the complex utilizing the Southworth-Hawkins D-criterion. Applying a strict limiting value for D=0.10, fifteen sub-streams or filaments, consisting of more than three members, could be separated out from the general complex. To confirm their mutual consistence as filaments, rather than fortuitous clumping at the present time, the orbital evolution over 5000 years of each member is studied. Utilizing the D-criterion we also searched for NEOs that might be associated with the streams and filaments of the complex and investigated the orbital evolution of potential members. Possible associations between 7 Taurid filaments and 9 NEOs were found. The most probable are for S Psc(b) -- 2003QC10, N Tau(a) -- 2004TG10, o Ori -- 2003UL3 and N Tau(b) -- 2002XM35. Some of the potential parent objects could be either dormant co...

  13. Comets and meteors in the beliefs of ancient mayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yershova, G. G.

    2001-12-01

    Data concerning the Mayan approach to comets and meteors have till now been available mostly from ethnographical and folklore sources which dealt, as a rule, with various beliefs and tokens. The studies of hieroglyphic texts of the Classic Period (AD 600-900) have proved that comets and meteors were undoubtedly known in this culture through astronomical observations and their periodicity.

  14. Investigation of meteor shower parent bodies using various metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, B. A.; Birlan, M.; Nedelcu, A.; Popescu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The present knowledge of meteor showers identifies the small bodies of our Solar System as supply sources for meteor streams. Both comets and asteroids are considered as the origin of meteor showers. The new paradigm of "active asteroids" opens up a large field of investigation regarding the relationships between asteroids and meteors. Processes like ejection and disaggregation at impacts, rotational instabilities, electrostatic repulsion, radiation pressure, dehydration stress followed by thermal fractures, sublimation of ices are sources of matter loss from asteroids. Our objective is to find genetic relationships between asteroids and meteor showers using metrics based on orbital elements. For this objective we selected three metrics (Southworth and Hawkins, 1963; Asher et al. 1993, and Jopek, 1993, respectively), the recent MPC database and the more recent IAU meteor shower database. From our analysis, 41 of the meteor showers have probabilities of being produced (or to be fueled) by asteroids. Our sample of asteroids contains more than 1000 objects, all of them belonging to the Near-Earth Asteroid population. The systematic approach performed, based on the physical properties of our sample, reinforced the link between asteroids and their associated meteor shower.

  15. On the interaction of radio waves with meteoric plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Foschini, Luigi

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, a meteoric plasma is analyzed from a physical viewpoint, with particular emphasis on its interaction with radio waves. The attention is drawn to some macroscopic characteristics of a meteoric plasma and it is shown that the electron-ion collision frequency is not negligible, as commonly thought.

  16. Meteor trails observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikota, A.; Bektešević, D.; Cikota, S.; Weaver, B.; Jevremović, D.; Vinković, D.

    2014-07-01

    Scientific observation of meteors is not simple because they have large angular size and random appearance in time and position on the sky. Bright meteors can be easily observed by naked eye or by video cameras in low resolution, but the luminosity distribution of meteors at their fainter end, the actual column diameter of the radiating zone, meteor fragmentation and the microstructure of lightcurves (especially when a meteor is detected through several color filters, as it happened in SDSS) is not well investigated. However, wide-field surveys, such as SDSS or the future LSST, with long time coverage over a significant fraction of sky might be helpful in collecting a scientifically relevant sample of low-brightness meteors. We used a custom designed Python script to detect linear features in SDSS images. The detection is performed in two steps: 1) we detect stars with Source Extractor [1] and blend them out; 2) we define a threshold so as to analyze 10000 points over the threshold; 3) we apply RANSAC [2] to detect points forming a line. We detected trails in over 15000 calibrated and sky-subtracted ''frame'' images in two filters so far. The drift scan in imaging survey mode of SDSS enables simple distinction between "apparently fast" meteors and other "slow" linear features caused by satellites and space debris, so that around 4000 frames could be eliminated as obvious satellites. Here we discuss the detection method, show some interesting preliminary results of the analysis of detected meteors, and discuss implications for other surveys.

  17. Goals, technique and equipment of meteor study in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartashova, A.; Bagrov, A. V.; Bolgova, G. T.; Kruchkov, S. V.; Leonov, V. A.; Mazurov, V. A.

    2013-09-01

    Institute of Astronomy RAS is one of the science institutes in the Russian Federation providing systematic optical meteor observations and supervises several meteor groups in our country. The main tasks of our investigations are dedicated to study meteoroid nature as well as meteoroid streams and meteoroid population in the Solar System. In the XXI century we in Russia carry out the reconstruction of our meteor astronomy due to possibilities of new meteor observation equipment (more powerful than were used before as visual and photographic methods) had made possible to select more interesting goals. First of our task is investigation of meteoroid streams crossing the Earth's orbit, and character of meteoroid distributions along of them. The multi stations meteor monitoring from located in the both hemispheres of the Earth can help in this study. According to the analysis of the evolution of meteor orbits, the compact and long lived meteoroid streams consist mainly from large particles. The observation equipment (cheap TV-cameras) with low limiting magnitude we use for gathering observational data. On the other hand, the observations of weak meteors are needed for new meteor shower indication (or confirmation of known meteor shower). The more effective way to do it is comparison of individual meteor orbits parameters (then calculation of radiants of meteor showers). The observations of space debris (as the meteors with low velocity - less 11.2 km/s) can be taking up within this task. The combination of high sensitive TV-cameras WATEC and super-fast lenses COMPUTAR are widely used for meteor TV-monitoring. The TVsystems for round-year meteor observations are fixed and are permanently oriented to the zenith area (the patrol camera - PatrolCa). The mobile TV-cameras (MobileCa) are used for double station observations (if it is possible) and located not far from main cameras PatrolCa (20-30 km). The mobile TVcameras observe 90% of main PatrolCa cameras FOV at altitudes

  18. 'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater. The main body of the crater appears in the upper right of this stereo panorama, with the far side of the crater lying about 800 meters (half a mile) away. Bracketing that part of the view are two promontories on the crater's rim at either side of Duck Bay. They are 'Cape Verde,' about 6 meters (20 feet) tall, on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' about 15 meters (50 feet) tall, on the right. The rest of the image, other than sky and portions of the rover, is ground within Duck Bay. Opportunity's targets of study during the last quarter of 2007 were rock layers within a band exposed around the interior of the crater, about 6 meters (20 feet) from the rim. Bright rocks within the band are visible in the foreground of the panorama. The rover science team assigned informal names to three subdivisions of the band: 'Steno,' 'Smith,' and 'Lyell.' This view combines many images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) from the 1,332nd through 1,379th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (Oct. 23 to Dec. 11, 2007). Images taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers were mixed to produce an approximately true-color panorama. Some visible patterns in dark and light tones are the result of combining frames that were affected by dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera. Opportunity landed on Jan. 25, 2004, Universal Time, (Jan. 24, Pacific Time) inside a much smaller crater about 6 kilometers (4 miles) north of Victoria Crater, to begin a surface mission designed to last 3 months and drive about 600 meters (0.4 mile).

  19. First results on video meteors from Crete, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maravelias, G.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the first systematic video meteor observations from a, forthcoming permanent, station in Crete, Greece, operating as the first official node within the International Meteor Organization's Video Network. It consists of a Watec 902 H2 Ultimate camera equipped with a Panasonic WV-LA1208 (focal length 12mm, f/0.8) lens running MetRec. The system operated for 42 nights during 2011 (August 19-December 30, 2011) recording 1905 meteors. It is significantly more performant than a previous system used by the author during the Perseids 2010 (DMK camera 21AF04.AS by The Imaging Source, CCTV lens of focal length 2.8 mm, UFO Capture v2.22), which operated for 17 nights (August 4-22, 2010) recording 32 meteors. Differences - according to the author's experience - between the two softwares (MetRec, UFO Capture) are discussed along with a small guide to video meteor hardware.

  20. The Updated IAU MDC Catalogue of Photographic Meteor Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porubcan, V.; Svoren, J.; Neslusan, L.; Schunova, E.

    2011-01-01

    The database of photographic meteor orbits of the IAU Meteor Data Center at the Astronomical Institute SAS has gradually been updated. To the 2003 version of 4581 photographic orbits compiled from 17 different stations and obtained in the period 1936-1996, additional new 211 orbits compiled from 7 sources have been added. Thus, the updated version of the catalogue contains 4792 photographic orbits (equinox J2000.0) available either in two separate orbital and geophysical data files or a file with the merged data. All the updated files with relevant documentation are available at the web of the IAU Meteor Data Center. Keywords astronomical databases photographic meteor orbits 1 Introduction Meteoroid orbits are a basic tool for investigation of distribution and spatial structure of the meteoroid population in the close surroundings of the Earth s orbit. However, information about them is usually widely scattered in literature and often in publications with limited circulation. Therefore, the IAU Comm. 22 during the 1976 IAU General Assembly proposed to establish a meteor data center for collection of meteor orbits recorded by photographic and radio techniques. The decision was confirmed by the next IAU GA in 1982 and the data center was established (Lindblad, 1987). The purpose of the data center was to acquire, format, check and disseminate information on precise meteoroid orbits obtained by multi-station techniques and the database gradually extended as documented in previous reports on the activity of the Meteor Data Center by Lindblad (1987, 1995, 1999 and 2001) or Lindblad and Steel (1993). Up to present, the database consists of 4581 photographic meteor orbits (Lindblad et al., 2005), 63.330 radar determined orbit: Harvard Meteor Project (1961-1965, 1968-1969), Adelaide (1960-1961, 1968-1969), Kharkov (1975), Obninsk (1967-1968), Mogadish (1969-1970) and 1425 video-recordings (Lindblad, 1999) to which additional 817 video meteors orbits published by Koten el

  1. How old is Autolycus crater?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Pasckert, Jan Henrik; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.; Robinson, Mark S.

    2016-04-01

    Accurately determining the lunar cratering chronology is prerequisite for deriving absolute model ages (AMAs) across the lunar surface and throughout the Solar System [e.g., 1]. However, the lunar chronology is only constrained by a few data points over the last 1 Ga and there are no calibration data available between 1 and 3 Ga and beyond 3.9 Ga [2]. Rays from Autolycus and Aristillus cross the Apollo 15 landing site and presumably transported material to this location [3]. [4] proposed that at the Apollo 15 landing site about 32% of any exotic material would come from Autolycus crater and 25% would come from Aristillus crater. [5,6] proposed that the 39Ar-40Ar age of 2.1 Ga derived from three petrologically distinct, shocked Apollo 15 KREEP basalt samples, date Autolycus crater. Grier et al. [7] reported that the optical maturity (OMAT) characteristics of these craters are indistinguishable from the background values despite the fact that both craters exhibit rays that were used to infer relatively young, i.e., Copernican ages [8,9]. Thus, both OMAT characteristics and radiometric ages of 2.1 Ga and 1.29 Ga for Autolycus and Aristillus, respectively, suggest that these two craters are not Copernican in age. [10] interpreted newer U-Pb ages of 1.4 and 1.9 Ga from sample 15405 as the formation ages of Aristillus and Autolycus. If Autolycus is indeed the source of the dated exotic material collected at the Apollo 15 landing site, than performing crater size frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements for Autolycus offers the possibility to add a new calibration point to the lunar chronology, particularly in an age range that was previously unconstrained. We used calibrated and map-projected LRO NAC images to perform CSFD measurements within ArcGIS, using CraterTools [11]. CSFDs were then plotted with CraterStats [12], using the production and chronology functions of [13]. We determined ages of 3.72 and 3.85 Ga for the interior (Ai1) and ejecta area Ae3, which we

  2. Venus - Lavinia Region Impact Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Three large meteorite impact craters, with diameters that range from 37 to 50 kilometers (23 to 31 miles), are seen in this image of the Lavinia region of Venus. The image is centered at 27 degrees south latitude and 339 degrees east longitude (longitude on Venus is measured from 0 degrees to 360 degrees east), and covers an area 550 kilometers (342 miles) wide by about 500 kilometers (311 miles) long. Situated in a region of fractured plains, the craters show many features typical of meteorite impact craters, including rough (bright) material around the rim, terraced inner walls and central peaks. Numerous domes, probably caused by volcanic activity, are seen in the southeastern corner of the mosaic. The domes range in diameter from 1 to 12 kilometers (0.6 to 7 miles). Some of the domes have central pits that are typical of some types of volcanoes. North is at the top of the image.

  3. STRAWBERRY CRATER ROADLESS AREAS, ARIZONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Light, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona, indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources in the area. The area contains deposits of cinder, useful for the production of aggregate block, and for deposits of decorative stone; however, similar deposits occur in great abundance throughout the San Francisco volcanic field outside the roadless areas. There is a possibility that the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas may overlie part of a crustal magma chamber or still warm pluton related to the San Francisco Mountain stratovolcano or to basaltic vents of late Pleistocene or Holocene age. Such a magma chamber or pluton beneath the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas might be an energy source from which a hot-, dry-rock geothermal energy system could be developed, and a probable geothermal resource potential is therefore assigned to these areas. 9 refs.

  4. Asteroids in the Eccentrids meteor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentjeva, A. K.; Barabanov, S. I.

    2016-09-01

    Among 11 673 of near-Earth objects (NEOs), 52 asteroids are identified, which, together with the Eccentrids meteor system, comprise a single population of small bodies of the Solar System with the smallest orbits of high eccentricity. Some features of this unique system of bodies are discussed in this paper. The distribution of perihelion longitudes is studied for the given group of asteroids and compared to that of the Aten asteroids, which are the most similar to the Eccentrids. The dependence is obtained of the character of perihelion longitude distribution on the eccentricities of the NEO orbits. Eight asteroid stream of the Eccentrids are found. The Eccentrids asteroids approaching the Earth's orbit along its whole length in their aphelia can pose a certain hazard for the Earth.

  5. Multilayer detection and classification of specular and nonspecular meteor trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Siming; Urbina, Julio; Dyrud, Lars; Seal, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    Meteor radar data are continuously collected by different radar systems that operate throughout the year. Analyzing this fast growing, large data set requires efficient and reliable detection routines. Currently most meteor echo routines search for underdense meteor trails, often discarding overdense and nonspecular meteor trails. This is because their main purpose is the study of mesospheric winds. But the study of meteor flux requires the unique identification of each type of meteor reflections. In this paper, a multilayer radar detection and classification algorithm is proposed to correctly identify multiple types of meteor trail reflections. The process consists of two steps. The first step is based on the time-frequency waveform detector. In this step, we start by selecting low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values in order to detect all types of radar echoes; however, a high probability offalse alarm is often produced. In the second step, several features from the detected echoes in step one are extracted and a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is constructed to further classify these echoes. The algorithm was tested using data collected from a 50-MHz radar stationed near Salinas, Puerto Rico, on April 5, 1998. A total of 270 detected echoes were labeled as underdense, overdense, nonspecular, other ionospheric echoes, and noise. We used 50% of the labeled echoes as training samples and divided the rest 50% testing samples as 10 subsets for testing. This technique successfully classified about 85% of the testing samples. Details concerning implementation, feature extraction, and data visualization are presented and discussed.

  6. Meteor stream survey in the southern hemisphere using SAAMER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, D.; da Silva, D.; Pifko, S.; Hormaechea, J.; Hocking, W.; Brunini, C.; Close, S.; Fritts, D.

    2014-07-01

    We present in this manuscript two meteor shower surveys in the Southern Hemisphere utilizing the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER). SAAMER, which operates at the southern most region of South America, is a new generation SKiYMET system designed with significant differences from typical meteor radars including high transmitted power and an 8-antenna transmitting array enabling large detected rates at low zenith angles. For the first survey, we applied the statistical methodology developed by Jones and Jones (2006) to the data collected each day during 4 years and compiled the results into 1 composite representative year at 1-degree resolution in Solar Longitude. We then search for enhancements in the activity, which last for at least 3 days and evolve temporally as is expected for a meteor shower. Using this methodology, we have identified in our data 32 shower radiants, two of which were not part of the IAU commission 22 meteor shower working list (Janches et al., 2014). Recently, SAAMER's capabilities were enhanced by adding two remote stations to receive meteor forward scatter signals from meteor trails and thus enable the determination of meteoroid orbital parameters. SAAMER started recording orbits in January 2012. We also present a 1-year survey using a wavelet-transform approach (Galligan and Baggaley, 2002ab; Brown et al., 2008) of this new orbital dataset to isolate enhancements in radiant density in geocentric coordinates resulting in not only radiant information but shower orbital properties.

  7. METEOR v1.0 - A usage example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This script describes a detailed example of the use of the software package METEOR for statistical analysis of meteorological data series. A real spanish meteorological data set is chosen to show the capabilities of METEOR. Output files and resultant plots provided of their interpretations are compiled in three appendixes. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph. D.Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds the graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written is spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v1 .0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  8. Diurnal variation of non-specular meteor trails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hinrichs

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We present results of simulated radar observations of meteor trails in an effort to show how non-specular meteor trails are expected to vary as a function of a number of key atmospheric, ionospheric and meteoroid parameters. This paper identifies which geophysical sources effect the variability in non-specular trail radar observations, and provides an approach that uses some of these parameter dependencies to determine meteoroid and atmospheric properties based upon the radar meteor observations. The numerical model used follows meteor evolution from ablation and ionization to head echo plasma generation and through formation of field aligned irregularities (FAI. Our main finding is that non-specular meteor trail duration is highly sensitive to the presence of lower thermospheric winds or electric fields and the background ionospheric electron density. In an effort to make key predictions we present the first results of how the same meteoroid is expected to produce dramatically different meteor trails as a function of location and local time. For example, we show that mid-latitude trail durations are often shorter lasting than equatorial trail observations because of the difference in mid-latitude wind speed and equatorial drift speed. The simulated trails also account for observations showing that equatorial nighttime non-specular meteor trails last significantly longer and are observed more often than daytime trails.

  9. eMeteorNews: website and PDF journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggemans, P.; Kacerek, R.; Koukal, J.; Miskotte, K.; Piffl, R.

    2016-01-01

    Amateur meteor workers have always been interested to exchange information and experience. In the past this was only possible via personal contacts by letter or by specialized journals. With internet a much faster medium became available and plenty of websites, mailing lists, Facebook groups, etc., have been created in order to communicate about meteors. Today there is a wealth of meteor data circulating on internet, but the information is very scattered and not directly available to everyone. The authors have been considering how to organize an easy access to the many different meteor related publications. The best solution for the current needs of amateur meteor observers proved to be a dedicated website combined with a PDF journal, both being free available without any subscription fee or registration requirement. The authors decided to start with this project and in March 2016 the website meteornews.org has been created. A first issue of eMeteorNews was prepared in April 2016. The year 2016 will be a test period for this project. The mission statement of this project is: "Minimizing overhead and editorial constraints to assure a swift exchange of information dedicated to all fields of active amateur meteor work."

  10. Moon - 'Ghost' craters formed during Mare filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Hartmann, W. K.; Wood, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper discusses formation of 'pathological' cases of crater morphology due to interaction of craters with molten lavas. Terrestrial observations of such a process are discussed. In lunar maria, a number of small impact craters (D less than 10 km) may have been covered by thin layers of fluid lavas, or formed in molten lava. Some specific lunar examples are discussed, including unusual shallow rings resembling experimental craters deformed by isostatic filling.

  11. The self-secondary crater population of the Hokusai crater on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyong; Prieur, Nils C.; Werner, Stephanie C.

    2016-07-01

    Whether or not self-secondaries dominate small crater populations on continuous ejecta deposits and floors of fresh impact craters has long been a controversy. This issue potentially affects the age determination technique using crater statistics. Here the self-secondary crater population on the continuous ejecta deposits of the Hokusai crater on Mercury is unambiguously recognized. Superposition relationships show that this population was emplaced after both the ballistic sedimentation of excavation flows and the subsequent veneering of impact melt, but it predated the settlement and solidification of melt pools on the crater floor. Fragments that formed self-secondaries were launched via impact spallation with large angles. Complex craters on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars probably all have formed self-secondaries populations. Dating young craters using crater statistics on their continuous ejecta deposits can be misleading. Impact melt pools are less affected by self-secondaries. Overprint by subsequent crater populations with time reduces the predominance of self-secondaries.

  12. Double station observation of faint meteors in Nikolaev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulichenko, Mykola; Shulga, Alexandr; Sybiryakova, Yevgeniya

    2016-07-01

    Meteor research using TV CCD unintensified techniques was started in 2011 in Nikolaev astronomical observatory (RI NAO). The method of meteor registration is based on combined observation method developed at RI NAO. The main accent of the research is made on precise astrometry and meteoroid orbits calculation. In 2013 first double station meteors with low baseline were observed. The accuracy of visible radiant estimation is 0.7" with baseline 5 km, and less 0.5" with baseline 11.8 km. The accuracy of velocity and height estimation is 0.5 km/s and 1-2 km.

  13. Particle-based ablation model for faint meteors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M.

    2014-07-01

    Modeling the ablation of meteoroids as they enter the atmosphere is a way of determining their physical structure and elemental composition. This can provide insight into the structure of parent bodies when combined with an orbit computed from observations. The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO) is a source of new, high-resolution observations of faint meteors [1]. These faint objects tend to have pre-atmospheric masses around 10^{-5} kg, corresponding to a radius of 1 mm. A wide-field camera with a 28° field of view provides guidance to a high-resolution camera that tracks meteors in flight with 1.5° field of view. Meteors are recorded with a scale of 4 m per pixel at a range of 135 km, at 110 frames per second, allowing us to investigate detailed meteor morphology. This serves as an important new constraint for ablation models, in addition to meteor brightness (lightcurves) and meteoroid deceleration. High-resolution observations of faint meteors have revealed that contemporary ablation models are not able to predict meteor morphology, even while matching the observed lightcurve and meteoroid deceleration [2]. This implies that other physical processes, in addition to fragmentation, must be considered for faint meteor ablation. We present a new, particle-based approach to modeling the ablation of small meteoroids. In this model, we simulate the collisions between atmospheric particles and the meteoroid to determine the rate of evaporation and deceleration. Subsequent collisions simulated between evaporated meteoroid particles and ambient atmospheric particles then produce light that would be observed by high-resolution cameras. Preliminary results show simultaneous agreement with meteor morphology, lightcurves, and decelerations recorded with CAMO. A sample comparison of simulated and observed meteor morphology is given in the attached figure. Several meteoroids are well-represented as solid, stony bodies, but some require modeling as a dustball [3

  14. Characteristics of Polygonal Craters on (1) Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Katharina A.; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Buczkowski, Debra L.; von der Gathen, Isabel; Kersten, Elke; Mest, Scott C.; Naß, Andrea; Neesemann, Adrian; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; Schröder, Stefan E.; Schulzeck, Fanziska; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland; Williams, David A.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Chistopher T.

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn spacecraft arrived at Ceres in March 2015. There, the on-board Framing Camera (FC) collects image data with a resolution of up to 35 m/pixel, which reveal a large variety of impact crater morphologies including polygonal craters. Polygonal craters show straight rim sections aligned to form an angular shape. They are commonly associated with fractures in the target material, which may be preserved as linear structures on Ceres [3, 4]. On Ceres, we find polygonal craters with a size ranging between 5 km and 280 km in diameter. However, the majority of polygonal craters have diameters ranging between 10 km and 50 km diameter. A preferential hexagonal shape is observed and some polygonal craters exhibit central peaks or relaxed crater floors. On average there are eight to ten polygonal craters per 100,000 km², however the northern latitudes have a slightly higher and the southern latitudes a slightly lower polygonal crater density. This may hint at an older and younger age of the northern (> 60° N) and southern regions (> 60° S) compared to the mid latitudes, respectively. Alternatively, the relaxation of craters may be advanced in the mid latitudes which are generally warmer than the poles and thus support the relaxation of depressions. Also, the southern region harbors relatively large craters which may have altered or destroyed preexisting structures in the crust which are necessary for the formation of polygonal craters. Most polygonal craters have six or seven straight rim sections; however, there is a tendency for fewer edges with decreasing crater size. Although this observation may be biased due to the map resolution, it is also possible that the impactor creating a relatively small polygonal crater embeds less energy and thus forms the straight rim sections during the excavation stage. This may result in fewer straight rim sections compared to more energetic impactors which form their polygonal shape during the modification stage. Straight rim

  15. Radio and Meteor Science Outcomes From Comparisons of Meteor Radar Observations at AMISR Poker Flat, Sondrestrom, and Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, J. D.; Briczinski, S. J.; Meisel, D. D.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2008-06-01

    Radio science and meteor physics issues regarding meteor “head-echo” observations with high power, large aperture (HPLA) radars, include the frequency and latitude dependency of the observed meteor altitude, speed, and deceleration distributions. We address these issues via the first ever use and analysis of meteor observations from the Poker Flat AMISR (PFISR: 449.3 MHz), Sondrestrom (SRF: 1,290 MHz), and Arecibo (AO: 430 MHz) radars. The PFISR and SRF radars are located near the Arctic Circle while AO is in the tropics. The meteors observed at each radar were detected and analyzed using the same automated FFT periodic micrometeor searching algorithm. Meteor parameters (event altitude, velocity, and deceleration distributions) from all three facilities are compared revealing a clearly defined altitude “ceiling effect” in the 1,290 MHz results relative to the 430/449.3 MHz results. This effect is even more striking in that the Arecibo and PFISR distributions are similar even though the two radars are over 2,000 times different in sensitivity and at very different latitudes, thus providing the first statistical evidence that HPLA meteor radar observations are dominated by the incident wavelength, regardless of the other radar parameters. We also offer insights into the meteoroid fragmentation and “terminal” process.

  16. METEOR v1.0 - A usage example; METEOR v1.0 - Un ejemplo de uso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, E.

    1994-07-01

    This script describes a detailed example of the use of the software package METEOR for statistical analysis of meteorological data series. A real spanish meteorological data set is chosen to show the capabilities of METEOR. Output files and resultant plots provided of their interpretations are compiled in three appendixes. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph. D.Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds the graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written is spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v1 .0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  17. Stratigraphy of the crater Copernicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, R.

    1984-01-01

    The stratigraphy of copernicus based on its olivine absorption bands is presented. Earth based spectral data are used to develop models that also employ cratering mechanics to devise theories for Copernican geomorphology. General geologic information, spectral information, upper and lower stratigraphic units and a chart for model comparison are included in the stratigraphic analysis.

  18. Small crater populations on Vesta

    CERN Document Server

    Marchi, S; O'Brien, D P; Schenk, P; Mottola, S; De Sanctis, M C; Kring, D A; Williams, D A; Raymond, C A; Russell, C T

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Dawn mission has extensively examined the surface of asteroid Vesta, the second most massive body in the main belt. The high quality of the gathered data provides us with an unique opportunity to determine the surface and internal properties of one of the most important and intriguing main belt asteroids (MBAs). In this paper, we focus on the size frequency distributions (SFDs) of sub-kilometer impact craters observed at high spatial resolution on several selected young terrains on Vesta. These small crater populations offer an excellent opportunity to determine the nature of their asteroidal precursors (namely MBAs) at sizes that are not directly observable from ground-based telescopes (i.e., below ~100 m diameter). Moreover, unlike many other MBA surfaces observed by spacecraft thus far, the young terrains examined had crater spatial densities that were far from empirical saturation. Overall, we find that the cumulative power-law index (slope) of small crater SFDs on Vesta is fairly consistent with...

  19. A passive FPAA based RF scatter meteor detector

    CERN Document Server

    Popowicz, Adam; Bernacki, Krzysztof; Fietkiewicz, Karol

    2015-01-01

    In the article we present a hardware meteor detector. The detection principle is based on the electromagnetic wave reflection from the ionized meteor trail in the atmosphere. The detector uses the ANADIGM field programmable analogue array (FPAA), which is an attractive alternative for a typically used detecting equipment - a PC computer with dedicated software. We implement an analog signal path using most of available FPAA resources to obtain precise audio signal detection. Our new detector was verified in collaboration with the Polish Fireball Network - the organization which monitors meteor activity in Poland. When compared with currently used signal processing PC software employing real radio meteor scatter signals, our low-cost detector proved to be more precise and reliable. Due to its cost and efficiency superiority over the current solution, the presented module is going to be implemented in the planned distributed detectors system.

  20. Improving Photometric Calibration of Meteor Video Camera Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Steven; Kingery, Aaron; Cooke, William

    2016-01-01

    Current optical observations of meteors are commonly limited by systematic uncertainties in photometric calibration at the level of approximately 0.5 mag or higher. Future improvements to meteor ablation models, luminous efficiency models, or emission spectra will hinge on new camera systems and techniques that significantly reduce calibration uncertainties and can reliably perform absolute photometric measurements of meteors. In this talk we discuss the algorithms and tests that NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has developed to better calibrate photometric measurements for the existing All-Sky and Wide-Field video camera networks as well as for a newly deployed four-camera system for measuring meteor colors in Johnson-Cousins BV RI filters. In particular we will emphasize how the MEO has been able to address two long-standing concerns with the traditional procedure, discussed in more detail below.

  1. Meteor radar observation of circulation near mesopause over Wuhan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Jiangang; WAN Weixin; NING Baiqi; LIU Libo

    2003-01-01

    The Wuhan meteor radar is the first all-sky meteor radar in China. The circulation near the mesopause from February to September 2002 is studied based on the data obtained by the Wuhan meteor radar. The zonal wind is usually eastward in winter from 80 to 100 km. The mean zonal wind become westward from March to early of May, when the winter circulation reverses to the summer circulation. But at the meteor heights, the zonal circulation usually becomes eastward after the middle of May. The meridional circulation is always equatorward. The peaks of the meridional wind move downward with the height, and the peak value reaches its maximum of 21 ms-1 in July. Having made a comparison between monthly mean wind and HWM93 model wind, the value of southward wind, the maximal value of eastward wind as well as the reversal height of zonal wind are found to be quite different from each other.

  2. Confirmation and characterization of IAU temporary meteor showers in EDMOND database

    OpenAIRE

    Kornoš, L.; Matlovič, P.; Rudawska, R.; Tóth, J.; Hajduková, M.; Koukal, J.; Piffl, R.

    2014-01-01

    The European viDeo MeteOr Network Database (EDMOND) is a database of video meteor orbits resulting from cooperation and data sharing among several European national networks and the International Meteor Organization Video Meteor Network, IMO VMN. At present, the 4th version of the EDMOND database, which contains 83 369 video meteor orbits, has been released. The first results of the database analysis, in which we studied minor streams, are presented. Using the radiant-geocentric velocity meth...

  3. A chemical model of meteoric ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Vondrak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the extraterrestrial dust entering the Earth's atmosphere ablates to produce metal vapours, which have significant effects on the aeronomy of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. A new Chemical Ablation Model (CAMOD is described which treats the physics and chemistry of ablation, by including the following processes: sputtering by inelastic collisions with air molecules before the meteoroid melts; evaporation of atoms and oxides from the molten particle; diffusion-controlled migration of the volatile constituents (Na and K through the molten particle; and impact ionization of the ablated fragments by hyperthermal collisions with air molecules. Evaporation is based on thermodynamic equilibrium in the molten meteoroid (treated as a melt of metal oxides, and between the particle and surrounding vapour phase. The loss rate of each element is then determined assuming Langmuir evaporation. CAMOD successfully predicts the meteor head echo appearance heights, observed from incoherent scatter radars, over a wide range of meteoroid velocities. The model also confirms that differential ablation explains common-volume lidar observations of K, Ca and Ca+ in fresh meteor trails. CAMOD is then used to calculate the injection rates into the atmosphere of a variety of elements as a function of altitude, integrated over the meteoroid mass and velocity distributions. The most abundant elements (Fe, Mg and Si have peak injection rates around 85 km, with Na and K about 8 km higher. The more refractory element Ca ablates around 82 km with a Na:Ca ratio of 4:1, which does therefore not explain the depletion of atomic Ca to Na, by more than 2 orders of magnitude, in the upper mesosphere. Diffusion of the most volatile elements (Na and K does not appear to be rate-limiting except in the fastest meteoroids. Non-thermal sputtering causes ~35% mass loss from the fastest (~60–70 km s−1 and smallest (10−17–10

  4. A chemical model of meteoric ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Vondrak

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of the extraterrestrial dust entering the Earth's atmosphere ablates to produce metal vapours, which have significant effects on the aeronomy of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. A new Chemical Ablation Model (CAMOD is described which treats the physics and chemistry of ablation, by including the following processes: sputtering by inelastic collisions with air molecules before the meteoroid melts; evaporation of atoms and oxides from the molten particle; diffusion-controlled migration of the volatile constituents (Na and K through the molten particle; and impact ionization of the ablated fragments by hyperthermal collisions with air molecules. Evaporation is based on thermodynamic equilibrium in the molten meteoroid (treated as a melt of metal oxides, and between the particle and surrounding vapour phase. The loss rate of each element is then determined assuming Langmuir evaporation. CAMOD successfully predicts the meteor head echo appearance heights, observed from incoherent scatter radars, over a wide range of meteoroid velocities. The model also confirms that differential ablation explains common-volume lidar observations of K, Ca and Ca+ in fresh meteor trails. CAMOD is then used to calculate the injection rates into the atmosphere of a variety of elements as a function of altitude, integrated over the meteoroid mass and velocity distributions. The most abundant elements (Fe, Mg and Si have peak injection rates around 85 km, with Na and K about 8 km higher. The more refractory element Ca ablates around 82 km with a Na:Ca ratio of 4:1, which does therefore not explain the depletion of atomic Ca to Na, by more than 2 orders of magnitude, in the upper mesosphere. Diffusion of the most volatile elements (Na and K does not appear to be rate-limiting except in the fastest meteoroids. Non-thermal sputtering causes ~35% mass loss from the fastest (~60–70 km s−1 and smallest (10−17–10

  5. Low-emissivity impact craters on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, C. M.; Elachi, C.; Moore, H. J.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Ivanov, B. A.; Schaber, G. G.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of 144 impact craters on Venus has shown that 11 of these have floors with average emissivities lower than 0.8. The remaining craters have emissivities between 0.8 and 0.9, independent of the specific backscatter cross section of the crater floors. These 144 impact craters were chosen from a possible 164 craters with diameters greater than 30 km as identified by researchers for 89 percent of the surface of Venus. We have only looked at craters below 6053.5 km altitude because a mineralogical change causes high reflectivity/low emissivity above the altitude. We have also excluded all craters with diameters smaller than 30 km because the emissivity footprint at periapsis is 16 x 24 km and becomes larger at the poles.

  6. Results of the IMO Video Meteor Network - January 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molau, S.; Crivello, S.; Goncalves, R.; Saraiva, C.; Stomeo, E.; Kac, J.

    2016-06-01

    The January 2016 report of IMO Video Meteor Network observations is presented, based on more than 9 000 hours of observations with almost 28 000 meteors recorded. The flux density profile is presented for the 2016 Quadrantids and compared to the profiles from the years 2011-2015. The flux density profile is also presented for the 2016 gamma-Ursae Minorids. Development of a new algorithm for the calculation of the limiting magnitude is presented.

  7. PyCraters: A Python framework for crater function analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a Python framework designed to automate the most common tasks associated with the extraction and upscaling of the statistics of single-impact crater functions to inform coefficients of continuum equations describing surface morphology evolution. Designed with ease-of-use in mind, the framework allows users to extract meaningful statistical estimates with very short Python programs. Wrappers to interface with specific simulation packages, routines for statistical extraction of output, and fitting and differentiation libraries are all hidden behind simple, high-level user-facing functions. In addition, the framework is extensible, allowing advanced users to specify the collection of specialized statistics or the creation of customized plots. The framework is hosted on the BitBucket service under an open-source license, with the aim of helping non-specialists easily extract preliminary estimates of relevant crater function results associated with a particular experimental system.

  8. PyCraters: A Python framework for crater function analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a Python framework designed to automate the most common tasks associated with the extraction and upscaling of the statistics of single-impact crater functions to inform coefficients of continuum equations describing surface morphology evolution. Designed with ease-of-use in mind, the framework allows users to extract meaningful statistical estimates with very short Python programs. Wrappers to interface with specific simulation packages, routines for statistical extraction of out...

  9. Automated UHF radar observations of meteors with aeronomic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briczinski, Stanley J., Jr.

    The micrometeor observations performed using the 430 MHz Arecibo Observatory radar have been crucial for the understanding of meteoric effects on the aeronomy of the upper atmosphere. Previous techniques using the Arecibo radar required manual confirmation of each event, followed by direct measurements of the parameters (i.e. altitudes, velocities and decelerations). A new periodic FFT searching algorithm, the meteor return signal detector (MRSD) has been developed and implemented, replacing previous (labor-intensive) visual verification. The MRSD shows an improvement over traditional searching routines by increasing the event detection rate by as much as 30% as well as significantly reducing the required analysis time. The new technique used to detect meteors as well as the measured parameters obtained from this method are presented. The meteor parameters obtained from the MRSD are presented. Mass distributions are obtained from momentum considerations. Previous mass distributions have assumed a constant meteoroid mass density of 3 gm/cm3. Using statistical interpretations of the parameters obtained from the MRSD, the meteoroid mass density has been revised to a constant mass density of 1 gm/cm 3. This new mass result represents the first analysis and revision of the meteoroid mass since large aperture radars began observing meteors in the early 1990s. In some cases meteors are observed that appear to catastrophically destruct within the beam. These meteors appear to undergo minor ablation of their volatile components before annihilation---the terminal event---that occurs in under 1 ms. As with essentially all observed meteoroids, the meteoroids that disappear in a terminal event appear to experience linear decelerations before their abrupt disappearance. This non-ablative mass deposition process may play an important role in the composition of the upper atmosphere as it apparently produces sub-micron-sized particles. The first statistical analyses of the terminal

  10. SPA Meteor Section Results: November -- December 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeath, A.

    2000-10-01

    Results and reports submitted to the SPA Meteor Section for November and December, 1999, are summarized, except for the Leonid details already discussed [1-3]. The Taurids received some useful coverage in early November, without anything unusual being detected. A brilliant fireball accurred around 22h10m UT on November 28 over southeast Ireland, after which about 271 g of L6 chondritic meteorites were recovered near Leighlinbridge, County Carlow, Ireland, the first recovered meteorite fall in the British Isles since 1991. Two other bright fireballs accurred on November 27-28 and 29-30 over Europe as well. December 13-14 saw the highest Geminid ZHRs, 100 +- 10, during a well-observed Geminid epoch. Radio data showed strong echo counts on both December 13 and 14, with the latter date (lambda approx 263 deg, eq. J2000.0) producing the highest counts generally, but with no specific clear maximum time. The Ursid peak was detected by radio only, giving a very weak showing in most data sets especially around lambda = 269-270 deg.

  11. Wildfires Caused by Formation of Small Impact Craters: A Kaali Crater Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, Anna; Belcher, Claire; Hudspith, Victoria; Zhu, Menghua; Bronikowska, Malgorzata; Jõeleht, Argo; Plado, Juri

    2016-04-01

    Formation of ~200-km Chicxulub 65 Ma ago was associated with release of significant amount of thermal energy [1,2,3] which was sufficient to start wildfires that had either regional [4] or global [5] range. The evidence for wildfires caused by impacts smaller than Chicxulub is inconclusive. On one hand, no signs of fires are associated with the formation of 24-km Ries crater [6]. On the other hand, the Tunguska site was burned after the impact and the numerical models of the bolide-produced thermal radiation suggest that the Tunguska-like event would produce a thermal flux to the surface that is sufficient to ignite pine needles [7]. However, in case of Tunguska the only proof for the bolide starting the fire comes from an eyewitness description collected many years after the event. Some authors [8] suggest that this fire might have been caused "normaly" later during the same year, induced on dead trees killed by the Tunguska fall. More recently it was observed that the Chelyabinsk meteor [9] - smaller than Tunguska event - did not produced a fire. In order to explore this apparent relationship in more detail, we have studied the proximal ejecta from a 100-m in diameter, ~3500 years old [10] Kaali crater (Estonia) within which we find pieces of charred organic material. Those pieces appear to have been produced during the impact, according to their stratigraphic location and following 14C analysis [19] as opposed to pre- or post-impact forest fires. In order to determine the most probable formation mechanism of the charred organic material found within Kaali proximal ejecta blanket, we: 1) Analyzed charcoal under SEM to identify the charred plants and determine properties of the charcoal related to the temperature of its formation [11]. Detected homogenization of cell walls suggests that at least some pieces of charcoal were formed at >300 °C [11]. 2) Analyzed the reflectance properties of the charred particles in order to determine the intensity with which

  12. Response to Tim Barringer, A White Atlantic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Flint

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In my response to Tim Barringer’s piece, I emphasize the importance of extending one’s frame of reference when discussing transatlantic artistic connections to the consideration of as many different art forms as possible – including photography, and magazine and book illustrations – in order to get as full a picture as possible of the two-way flow in transatlantic artistic influences.This fuller picture notably extends the degree to which images of non-white subjects are seen to be in circulation. I also draw attention to the ways in which American and English artistic circles intersected outside as well as within these two countries, a point reinforced by looking at American women sculptors in Rome in the 1860s, paying particular attention to the work of the part African-American, part Native American sculptor, Edmonia Lewis. In her work can be seen a complex set of attitudes towards her subject matter that remind one forcefully of the many racial and cultural strands coming together in new American art.

  13. METEOR v1.0 - User's Guide; METEOR v1.0 - Guia de Usuarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, E.

    1994-07-01

    This script is a User's Guide for the software package METEOR for statistical analysis of meteorological data series. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph.D. Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIMASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds the graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written in spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v1.0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  14. Hydrochemical dynamics of the “lake spring” system in the crater of El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouwet, D.; Taran, Y.; Inguaggiato, S.; Varley, N.; Santiago Santiago, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) erupted violently in March-April 1982, breaching through the former volcano-hydrothermal system. Since then, the 1982 crater has hosted a shallow (1-3.3 m, acidic (pH ˜ 2.2) and warm (˜ 30 °C) crater lake with a strongly varying chemistry (Cl/SO 4 = 0-79 molar ratio). The changes in crater lake chemistry and volume are not systematically related to the seasonal variation of rainfall, but rather to the activity of near-neutral geyser-like springs in the crater (Soap Pool). These Soap Pool springs are the only sources of Cl for the lake. Their geyser-like behaviour with a long-term (months to years) periodicity is due to a specific geometry of the shallow boiling aquifer beneath the lake, which is the remnant of the 1983 Cl-rich (24,000 mg/l) crater lake water. The Soap Pool springs decreased in Cl content over time. The zero-time extrapolation (1982, year of the eruption) approaches the Cl content in the initial crater lake, meanwhile the extrapolation towards the future indicates a zero-Cl content by 2009 ± 1. This particular situation offers the opportunity to calculate mass balance and Cl budget to quantify the lake-spring system in the El Chichón crater. These calculations show that the water balance without the input of SP springs is negative, implying that the lake should disappear during the dry season. The isotopic composition of lake waters (δD and δ 18O) coincide with this crater lake-SP dynamics, reflecting evaporation processes and mixing with SP geyser and meteoric water. Future dome growth, not observed yet in the post-1982 El Chichón crater, may be anticipated by changes in lake chemistry and dynamics.

  15. Autumn Afternoon in Hale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The seasons on Mars and Earth are anti-correlated at present: days are getting shorter and shadows are getting longer as autumn end sand the beginning of winter draws nearer in the martian southern hemisphere, just as the same is occurring in Earth's northern hemisphere. Long shadows are especially prominent in this high resolution view of mountains forming part of the central peaks of Hale Crater (left), a 136 kilometer-(85 mile)-diameter impact crater at 36oS, 37oW. The two pictures were taken simultaneously by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera on November 10, 2000. The sun illuminates the scene from the northwest (upper left)about 22o above the horizon. Knowing the sun angle and the length of the longest shadow (1.6 km; 1.0 mi), the height of the largest peak in the high resolution view (right) is about 630 meters (2,070 ft) above the crater floor. Sand dunes blanket the middle portion of the high resolution view, and small gullies--possibly carved by water--can be seen on the slopes of some of the peaks at the upper left. Winter in the southern hemisphere will begin in mid-December 2000. The high resolution view covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide at a full-resolution scale of 3 meters (9.8 ft) per pixel.

  16. Evidence for coeval Late Triassic terrestrial impacts from the Rochechouart (France) meteorite crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilder, S. A.; Carporzen, L.

    2006-12-01

    High temperature impact melt breccias from the Rochechouart (France) meteorite crater record a magnetization component with antipodal, normal and reverse polarities. The corresponding paleomagnetic pole for this component lies between the 220 Ma and 210 Ma reference poles on the Eurasian apparent polar wander path, consistent with the 214 ± 8 Ma ^{40} Ar/ ^{39} Ar age of the crater [Kelley and Spray, 1997]. Late Triassic tectonic reconstructions of the Eurasian and North American plates place this pole within 95 % confidence limits of the paleomagnetic pole from the Manicouagan (Canada) meteorite impact crater, which is dated at 214 ± 1 Ma [Hodych and Dunning, 1992]. Together, these observations reinforce the hypothesis of Spray et al. [1998] for a Late Triassic, multiple meteorite impact event on Earth. References: Hodych, J. P., and G. R. Dunning (1992), Did the Manicouagan impact trigger end-of-Triassic mass extinction?, Geology, 20, 51-54. Kelley, S. P., and J. G. Spray (1997), A late Triassic age for the Rochechouart impact structure, France, Meteor., 32, 629-636. Spray, J. G., S. P. Kelley, and D. B. Rowley (1998), Evidence for a late Triassic multiple impact event on Earth, Nature, 392, 171-173.

  17. Dynamical model for the toroidal sporadic meteors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokorný, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Nesvorný, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Brown, Peter, E-mail: petr.pokorny@volny.cz, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: margaret.campbell@uwo.ca, E-mail: pbrown@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade of radar operations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar have allowed both young and moderately old streams to be distinguished from the dispersed sporadic background component. The latter has been categorized according to broad radiant regions visible to Earth-based observers into three broad classes: the helion and anti-helion source, the north and south apex sources, and the north and south toroidal sources (and a related arc structure). The first two are populated mainly by dust released from Jupiter-family comets and new comets. Proper modeling of the toroidal sources has not to date been accomplished. Here, we develop a steady-state model for the toroidal source of the sporadic meteoroid complex, compare our model with the available radar measurements, and investigate a contribution of dust particles from our model to the whole population of sporadic meteoroids. We find that the long-term stable part of the toroidal particles is mainly fed by dust released by Halley type (long period) comets (HTCs). Our synthetic model reproduces most of the observed features of the toroidal particles, including the most troublesome low-eccentricity component, which is due to a combination of two effects: particles' ability to decouple from Jupiter and circularize by the Poynting-Robertson effect, and large collision probability for orbits similar to that of the Earth. Our calibrated model also allows us to estimate the total mass of the HTC-released dust in space and check the flux necessary to maintain the cloud in a steady state.

  18. The Cratering History of Asteroid (21) Lutetia

    CERN Document Server

    Marchi, S; Vincent, J -B; Morbidelli, A; Mottola, S; Marzari, F; Kueppers, M; Besse, S; Thomas, N; Barbieri, C; Naletto, G; Sierks, H

    2011-01-01

    The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft passed by the main belt asteroid (21) Lutetia the 10th July 2010. With its ~100km size, Lutetia is one of the largest asteroids ever imaged by a spacecraft. During the flyby, the on-board OSIRIS imaging system acquired spectacular images of Lutetia's northern hemisphere revealing a complex surface scarred by numerous impact craters, reaching the maximum dimension of about 55km. In this paper, we assess the cratering history of the asteroid. For this purpose, we apply current models describing the formation and evolution of main belt asteroids, that provide the rate and velocity distributions of impactors. These models, coupled with appropriate crater scaling laws, allow us to interpret the observed crater size-frequency distribution (SFD) and constrain the cratering history. Thanks to this approach, we derive the crater retention age of several regions on Lutetia, namely the time lapsed since their formation or global surface reset. We also investigate the influe...

  19. American Meteor Society Fireball reporting system and mobile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, M.

    2014-07-01

    The American Meteor Society (AMS) founded in 1911 pioneered the visual study of meteors and has collected data relating to meteor observations and bright fireballs for over 100 years. In December 2010, the online fireball reporting system was upgraded to an interactive application that utilizes Google Maps and other programmatic methods to pinpoint the observer's location, azimuth and elevation values with a high degree of precision. The AMS has collected 10s of 1000s of witness reports relating to 100s of events each year since the new application was released. Three dimensional triangulation methods that average the data collected from witnesses have been developed that can determine the start and end points of the meteor with an accuracy of mobile application, the AMS is able to collect more precise elevation angles than through the web application. Users can file a new report directly on the phone or update the values submitted through a web report. After web users complete their fireball report online, they are prompted to download the app and update their observation with the more precise data provided by the sensors in the mobile device. The mobile app also provides an accurate means for the witness to report the elapsed time of the fireball. To log this value, the user drags the device across the sky where they saw the fireball. This process is designed to require no button click or user interaction to start and stop the time recording. A count down initiates the process and once the user's phone crosses the plane of azimuth for the end point of the fireball the velocity timer automatically stops. Users are asked to log the recording three times in an effort to minimize error. The three values are then averaged into a final score. Once enough witnesses have filed reports, elapsed time data collected from the mobile phone can be used to determine the velocity of the fireball. With the velocity, trajectory solution and RA/DEC the AMS can plot orbital

  20. A meteorite crater on Mt. Ararat?

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G

    2010-01-01

    We briefly report on a crater on the western slope of Mt.Ararat . It is located in an area closed to foreigners at an altitude around 2100m with geographic coordinates 39\\deg 47' 30"N, 44\\deg 14' 40"E. The diameter of the crater is around 60-70m, the depth is up to 15m. The origin of the crater, either of meteorite impact or volcanic, including the evaluation of its age, will need detailed studies.

  1. The Explorer's Guide to Impact Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierazzo, E.; Osinski, G.; Chuang, F.

    2004-12-01

    Impact cratering is a fundamental geologic process of our solar system. It competes with other processes, such as plate tectonics, volcanism, or fluvial, glacial and eolian activity, in shaping the surfaces of planetary bodies. In some cases, like the Moon and Mercury, impact craters are the dominant landform. On other planetary bodies impact craters are being continuously erased by the action of other geological processes, like volcanism on Io, erosion and plate tectonics on the Earth, tectonic and volcanic resurfacing on Venus, or ancient erosion periods on Mars. The study of crater populations is one of the principal tools for understanding the geologic history of a planetary surface. Among the general public, impact cratering has drawn wide attention through its portrayal in several Hollywood movies. Questions that are raised after watching these movies include: ``How do scientists learn about impact cratering?'', and ``What information do impact craters provide in understanding the evolution of a planetary surface?'' Fundamental approaches used by scientists to learn about impact cratering include field work at known terrestrial craters, remote sensing studies of craters on various solid surfaces of solar system bodies, and theoretical and laboratory studies using the known physics of impact cratering. We will provide students, science teachers, and the general public an opportunity to experience the scientific endeavor of understanding and exploring impact craters through a multi-level approach including images, videos, and rock samples. This type of interactive learning can also be made available to the general public in the form of a website, which can be addressed worldwide at any time.

  2. Division F Commission 22: Meteors, Meteorites, and Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Borovička, Jiří; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Jopek, Tadeusz; Abe, Shinsuke; Consolmagno, Guy J.; Ishiguro, Masateru; Janches, Diego; Ryabova, Galina O.; Vaubaillon, Jérémie; Zhu, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Commission 22 (Meteors, Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust) was established at the first IAU General Assembly held in Rome in 1922, with William Frederick Denning as its first President. Denning was an accountant by profession, but as an amateur astronomer he contributed extensively to meteor science. Commission 22 thus established a pattern that has continued to this day that non-professional astronomers were welcomed and valued and could play a significant role in its affairs. The field of meteors, meteorites and interplanetary dust has played a disproportional role in the astronomical perception of the general public through the majestic displays of our annual meteor showers. Those in the field deployed many techniques uncommon in other fields of astronomy, studying the ``vermin of space'', the small solid bodies that pervade interplanetary space and impact Earth's atmosphere, the surface of the Moon, and that of our satellites in orbit. Over time, the field has tackled a wide array of problems, from predicting the encounter with meteoroid streams, to the origin of our meteorites and the nature of the zodiacal cloud. Commission 22 has played an important role in organizing the field through dedicated meetings, a data centre, and working groups that developed professional-amateur relationships and that organized the nomenclature of meteor showers. The contribution of Commission 22 to the field is perhaps most readily seen in the work of the presidents that followed in the footsteps of Denning.

  3. SuprimeCam Observation of Sporadic Meteors during Perseids 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Iye, M; Yanagisawa, M; Ebizuka, N; Ohnishi, K; Hirose, C; Asami, N; Komiyama, Yu; Furusawa, H

    2007-01-01

    We report the serendipitous findings of 13 faint meteors and 44 artificial space objects by Subaru SuprimeCam imaging observations during 11-16 August 2004. The meteors, at about 100km altitude, and artificial satellites/debris in orbit, at 500km altitude or higher, were clearly discriminated by their apparent defocused image sizes. CCD photometry of the 13 meteors, including 1 Perseid, 1 Aquarid, and 11 sporadic meteors, was performed. We defined a peak video-rate magnitude by comparing the integrated photon counts from the brightest portion of the track traversed within 33ms to those from a 0-mag star during the same time duration. This definition gives magnitudes in the range 4.0< V_{vr} <6.4 and 4.1< I_{vr}<5.9 for these 13 meteors. The corresponding magnitude for virtual naked-eye observers could be somewhat fainter especially for the V-band observation, in which the [OI] 5577 line lasting about 1 sec as an afterglow could contribute to the integrated flux of the present 5-10 min CCD exposure...

  4. A New Analysis of the IMO Video Meteor Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molau, Sirko

    2010-08-01

    Starting in 1999, a database of meteor records was created from automated single station video observations (Molau, 1991) of the IMO network. At the 2006 IMC, a first full analysis of the IMO Video Meteor Database based on roughly 190,000 meteors was presented. In the optical domain it was the first time, that a list of meteor showers was obtained automated, based on fully objective criteria only. For each shower, the activity interval, radiant position and drift, and an activity profile was obtained. A number of hitherto unknown showers were found as well. The corresponding analysis procedure was derived and explained in detail in Molau (2006). However, beside the successful application of the analysis procedure, also a number of weak points were detected. As of 2008, the database had almost doubled, which made it worthwhile to repeat the analysis. However, these weak points were to be addressed first. This paper describes the problems in detail and presents solutions for them. In addition, a new meter shower list derived from the new full analysis of the IMO Video Meteor Database is given.

  5. Meteoric 10Be in soil profiles - A global meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, Joseph A.; Bierman, Paul R.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess current understanding of meteoric 10Be dynamics and distribution in terrestrial soils, we assembled a database of all published meteoric 10Be soil depth profiles, including 104 profiles from 27 studies in globally diverse locations, collectively containing 679 individual measurements. This allows for the systematic comparison of meteoric 10Be concentration to other soil characteristics and the comparison of profile depth distributions between geologic settings. Percent clay, 9Be, and dithionite-citrate extracted Al positively correlate to meteoric 10Be in more than half of the soils where they were measured, but the lack of significant correlation in other soils suggests that no one soil factor controls meteoric 10Be distribution with depth. Dithionite-citrate extracted Fe and cation exchange capacity are only weakly correlated to meteoric 10Be. Percent organic carbon and pH are not significantly related to meteoric 10Be concentration when all data are complied.The compilation shows that meteoric 10Be concentration is seldom uniform with depth in a soil profile. In young or rapidly eroding soils, maximum meteoric 10Be concentrations are typically found in the uppermost 20 cm. In older, more slowly eroding soils, the highest meteoric 10Be concentrations are found at depth, usually between 50 and 200 cm. We find that the highest measured meteoric 10Be concentration in a soil profile is an important metric, as both the value and the depth of the maximum meteoric 10Be concentration correlate with the total measured meteoric 10Be inventory of the soil profile.In order to refine the use of meteoric 10Be as an estimator of soil erosion rate, we compare near-surface meteoric 10Be concentrations to total meteoric 10Be soil inventories. These trends are used to calibrate models of meteoric 10Be loss by soil erosion. Erosion rates calculated using this method vary based on the assumed depth and timing of erosional events and on the reference data selected.

  6. Meteoric 10Be in soil profiles - A global meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, Joseph A.; Bierman, Paul R.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to assess current understanding of meteoric 10Be dynamics and distribution in terrestrial soils, we assembled a database of all published meteoric 10Be soil depth profiles, including 104 profiles from 27 studies in globally diverse locations, collectively containing 679 individual measurements. This allows for the systematic comparison of meteoric 10Be concentration to other soil characteristics and the comparison of profile depth distributions between geologic settings. Percent clay, 9Be, and dithionite-citrate extracted Al positively correlate to meteoric 10Be in more than half of the soils where they were measured, but the lack of significant correlation in other soils suggests that no one soil factor controls meteoric 10Be distribution with depth. Dithionite-citrate extracted Fe and cation exchange capacity are only weakly correlated to meteoric 10Be. Percent organic carbon and pH are not significantly related to meteoric 10Be concentration when all data are complied. The compilation shows that meteoric 10Be concentration is seldom uniform with depth in a soil profile. In young or rapidly eroding soils, maximum meteoric 10Be concentrations are typically found in the uppermost 20 cm. In older, more slowly eroding soils, the highest meteoric 10Be concentrations are found at depth, usually between 50 and 200 cm. We find that the highest measured meteoric 10Be concentration in a soil profile is an important metric, as both the value and the depth of the maximum meteoric 10Be concentration correlate with the total measured meteoric 10Be inventory of the soil profile. In order to refine the use of meteoric 10Be as an estimator of soil erosion rate, we compare near-surface meteoric 10Be concentrations to total meteoric 10Be soil inventories. These trends are used to calibrate models of meteoric 10Be loss by soil erosion. Erosion rates calculated using this method vary based on the assumed depth and timing of erosional events and on the reference data selected.

  7. French Meteor Network for High Precision Orbits of Meteoroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, P.; Vaubaillon, J.; Colas, F.; Bouley, S.; Gaillard, B.; Sauli, I.; Kwon, M. K.

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of precise meteoroids orbit from video observations as most of the meteor stations use off-the-shelf CCD cameras. Few meteoroids orbit with precise semi-major axis are available using film photographic method. Precise orbits are necessary to compute the dust flux in the Earth s vicinity, and to estimate the ejection time of the meteoroids accurately by comparing them with the theoretical evolution model. We investigate the use of large CCD sensors to observe multi-station meteors and to compute precise orbit of these meteoroids. An ideal spatial and temporal resolution to get an accuracy to those similar of photographic plates are discussed. Various problems faced due to the use of large CCD, such as increasing the spatial and the temporal resolution at the same time and computational problems in finding the meteor position are illustrated.

  8. Meteoric sphaerosiderite lines and their use for paleohydrology and paleoclimatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigson, Greg A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Metzger, R.A.; Witzke, B.J.; Brenner, Richard L.; Murillo, A.P.; White, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    Sphaerosiderite, a morphologically distinct millimeter-scale spherulitic siderite (FeCO3), forms predominantly in wetland soils and sediments, and is common in the geologic record. Ancient sphaerosiderites are found in paleosol horizons within coal-bearing stratigraphic intervals and, like their modern counterparts, are interpreted as having formed in water-saturated environments. Here we report on sphaerosiderites from four different stratigraphic units, each of which has highly variable 13C and relatively stable 18O compositions. The unique isotopic trends are analogous to well-documented meteoric calcite lines, which we define here as meteoric sphaerosiderite lines. Meteoric sphaerosiderite lines provide a new means of constraining ground-water ??18O and thus allow evaluation of paleohydrology and paleoclimate in humid continental settings.

  9. Meteoroids and Meteors - Observations and Connection to Parent Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Shinsuke

    2009-05-01

    Meteoroid are a small rocky bodies traveling through interplanetary space. Meteors are phenomena caused by the interaction of meteoroids with the Earth's upper atmosphere. In this chapter the author, will briefly discuss observational methods and then concentrate on optical observations of meteors. First, the basic properties of meteor phenomenon in the atmosphere and classification of meteoroids are introduced and then coincidental phenomena, e.g., wake, jets, and train, are mentioned. Scientific observations (imaging and spectroscopy) carried out using various observational techniques allow measuring characteristics of meteoroids, e.g., orbits, density, strength, compositions. All information are potentially useful for investigating parent bodies of meteoroids, such as comets and asteroids. Searching for organics-related CHON and water in meteoroids is of particular interest for astrobiology.

  10. Altitudinal dependence of meteor radio afterglows measured via optical counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Obenberger, K S; Dowell, J D; Schinzel, F K; Stovall, K; Sutton, E K; Taylor, G B

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the all-sky imaging capabilities of the LWA1 radio telescope along with a host of all-sky optical cameras, we have now observed 44 optical meteor counterparts to radio afterglows. Combining these observations we have determined the geographic positions of all 44 afterglows. Comparing the number of radio detections as a function of altitude above sea level to the number of expected bright meteors we find a strong altitudinal dependence characterized by a cutoff below $\\sim$ 90 km, below which no radio emission occurs, despite the fact that many of the observed optical meteors penetrated well below this altitude. This cutoff suggests that wave damping from electron collisions is an important factor for the evolution of radio afterglows, which agrees with the hypothesis that the emission is the result of electron plasma wave emission.

  11. The Third Peak of the 1998 Leonid Meteor Shower

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Leonid meteor shower in November 1998 was observed widely by astronomers. The first peak, rich in bright meteors, appeared about 16 hours before the predicted maximum of the main shower. The main shower was also observed by both optical and radio methods during 19:00-21:00UT on Nov. 17, and the ra-dio peak was over 2500h-1. About 18 hours after the main shower, an abnormal phenomenon in the ionosphere was detected by two separate ionosphere observing stations. And the very high abnormal phenomenon maintained over one hour. The phenomenon showed that the ionosphere was injected with a large amount of small dust particles that could not be observed in optical and radio. The observational results show that the Leonid meteor shower in 1998 had three peaks.

  12. Long-time observation of meteor induced layers with ionosonde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, Kamil; Akchurin, Adel

    2016-07-01

    It is considered that the main theory explaining appearance of sporadic E is the theory of wind shear, which means (includes) the presence and movement of nodes converging tidal wind through the height region of the most frequent occurrence Es (120-140km) [Mathew et. all, 1998]. However, the appearance of intense layers, following its name, are sporadic, and such variability cannot to explain by the influence of tidal waves only. Another indication inconsistency theory of wind shear is the appearance of so-called transient Es layers [Maruiama, 2003]. The distinctive feature of this trace is the high critical frequency (> 5 MHz), a constant height, weak amplitude, all trace semitransparent and short lifetime [Maruiama et. all, 2003 and 2008 and references there]. Because of duration, such layer is opposite to the traditional persistent Es layer, which we do not consider in this paper. Various researchers have used different terms for such spontaneous Es, it is meteor echo, meteor induced Es, spontaneously formed sporadic Es patches resulting of the Fresnel scattering from a region of enhanced plasma density along the meteor trail, transitory Es and transient Es. Since the term transient Es is unstable, to avoid confusion, we will stick to this term. Since meteor echo is not fully satisfy this term by some parameter, we will describe the properties of transient Es based on the ionogram properties and not from physics of its origin. We used data from our ionosonde with one-minute ionogram repetition rate for 2010-2014 years. For processing performed a method are using to select beatings and the ionosphere reflectivity of the layers by means A-, H-and AΣ-map [Akchurin, 2011; Yusupov, 2014]. This maps allow to collect transient Es appearance over a long-time. Such statistics comparison with meteor showers activity showed good agreement. It shows the presence of the transient Es formation mechanism, which coupling with meteors.

  13. CAMS newly detected meteor showers and the sporadic background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, P.; Nénon, Q.; Gural, P. S.; Albers, J.; Haberman, B.; Johnson, B.; Morales, R.; Grigsby, B. J.; Samuels, D.; Johannink, C.

    2016-03-01

    The Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) video-based meteoroid orbit survey adds 60 newly identified showers to the IAU Working List of Meteor Showers (numbers 427, 445-446, 506-507, and part of 643-750). 28 of these are also detected in the independent SonotaCo survey. In total, 230 meteor showers and shower components are identified in CAMS data, 177 of which are detected in at least two independent surveys. From the power-law size frequency distribution of detected showers, we extrapolate that 36% of all CAMS-observed meteors originated from ∼700 showers above the N = 1 per 110,000 shower limit. 71% of mass falling to Earth from streams arrives on Jupiter-family type orbits. The transient Geminids account for another 15%. All meteoroids not assigned to streams form a sporadic background with highest detected numbers from the apex source, but with 98% of mass falling in from the antihelion source. Even at large ∼7-mm sizes, a Poynting-Robertson drag evolved population is detected, which implies that the Grün et al. collisional lifetimes at these sizes are underestimated by about a factor of 10. While these large grains survive collisions, many fade on a 104-y timescale, possibly because they disintegrate into smaller particles by processes other than collisions, leaving a more resilient population to evolve. The meteors assigned to the various showers are identified in the CAMS Meteoroid Orbit Database 2.0 submitted to the IAU Meteor Data Center, and can be accessed also at

  14. About comparative models of meteor orbital data for different radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomiyets, Svitlana

    2016-07-01

    There is an electronic data base (~ 250, 000 orbits of faint radar meteors till +12^M) in the Kashcheyev LAB of KhNURE (Kharkiv, Ukraine). It is important if this data base will become open. Two scientific teams (from New Zealand and from Canada) are the principal expert on similar radar dataset (~500,000 and more than 3 million, respectively). The Kharkiv team will prepare the data for implementation in the IAU Meteor Data Centre and the virtual Observatory. We will develop a standard model for comparison of data from different radars.

  15. The daytime Taurid complex meteor streams: activity and mass distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity and mass distribution of the summer daytime Taurid meteor complex stream Zeta Perseids and Beta Taurids in 1997-2004 is analysed and discussed. The results are based on radio observations obtained by the BLM forward-scatter system (Italy-Slovakia) and by the Ondrejov backscatter meteor radar (Czech Republic). The observed positions of maxima of the streams are in a general agreement with previous analysis. The observations indicate a filamentary structure of the streams, the existence of which is supported also by the mass exponent values

  16. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kang; Jaffe, Richard L.; Palmer, Grant E.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; Tauber, Michael E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup.Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood.On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heatshields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is 13 kms (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kW/sq cm. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to 20 kms; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses. With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current simulation tools to

  17. Software tools for the analysis of video meteors emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiedo, J. M.; Toscano, F. M.; Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    One of the goals of the SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN) is related to the study of the chemical composition of meteoroids by analyzing the emission spectra resulting from the ablation of these particles of interplanetary matter in the atmosphere. With this aim, some of the CCD video devices we employ to observe the nigh sky are endowed with holographic diffraction gratings, and a continuous monitoring of meteor activity is performed. We have recently developed a new software to analyze these spectra. A description of this computer program is given, and some of the results obtained so far are presented here.

  18. An Automatic Video Meteor Observation Using UFO Capture at the Showa Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Ejiri, M.; Suzuki, H.

    2012-05-01

    The goal of our study is to clarify meteor activities in the southern hemi-sphere by continuous optical observations with video cameras with automatic meteor detection and recording at Syowa station, Antarctica.

  19. Moon-Mercury: Relative preservation states of secondary craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Geologic mapping of the Kuiper quadrangle of Mercury and other geologic studies of the planet indicate that secondary craters are much better preserved than those on the moon around primary craters of similar size and morphology. Among the oldest recognized secondary craters on the moon associated with craters 100 km across or less are those of Posidonius, Atlas and Plato; these craters have been dated as middle to late Imbrian in age. Many craters on Mercury with dimensions, morphologies and superposed crater densities similar to these lunar craters have fields and clusters of fresher appearing secondary craters. The apparent differences between secondary-crater morphology and parent crater may be due in part to: (1) rapid isostatic adjustment of the parent crater; (2) different impact fluxes between the two planets; and (or) (3) to the greater concentration of Mercurian secondaries around impact areas, thereby accentuating crater forms. Another factor which may contribute to the better state of preservation of Mercurian secondaries relative to the moon is the difference in crater ejecta velocities on both bodies. These velocities have been calculated for fields of secondary craters at about equal ranges from lunar and Mercurian parent craters. Results show that ejection velocities of material producing most of the secondary craters are rather low (<1 km/s) but velocities on Mercury are about 50% greater than those on the moon for equivalent ranges. Higher velocities may produce morphologically enhanced secondary craters which may account for their better preservation with time. ?? 1977.

  20. Surface expression of the Chicxulub crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kevin O.; Ocampo, Adriana C.; Kinsland, Gary L.; Smith, Randy

    1996-06-01

    Analyses of geomorphic, soil, and topographic data from the northern Yucatán Peninsula, México, confirm that the buried Chicxulub impact crater has a distinct surface expression and that carbonate sedimentation throughout the Cenozoic has been influenced by the crater. Late Tertiary sedimentation was mostly restricted to the region within the buried crater, and a semicircular moat existed until at least Pliocene time. The topographic expression of the crater is a series of features concentric with the crater. The most prominent is an ˜ 83-km-radius trough or moat containing sinkholes (the Cenote ring). Early Tertiary surfaces rise abruptly outside the moat and form a stepped topography with an outer trough and ridge crest at radii of ˜103 and ˜ 129 km, respectively. Two discontinuous troughs lie within the moat at radii of ˜ 41 and ˜ 62 km. The low ridge between the inner troughs corresponds to the buried peak ring. The moat corresponds to the outer edge of the crater floor demarcated by a major ring fault. The outer trough and the ˜ 62-km-radius inner trough also mark buried ring faults. The ridge crest corresponds to the topographic rim of the crater as modified by postimpact processes. These interpretations support previous findings that the principal impact basin has a diameter of ˜ 180 km, but concentric, low-relief slumping extends well beyond this diameter and the eroded crater rim may extend to a diameter of ˜ 260 km.

  1. Processes Modifying Cratered Terrains on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The July encounter with Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft permitted imaging of its cratered terrains with scales as high as approximately 100 m/pixel, and in stereo. In the initial download of images, acquired at 2.2 km/pixel, widely distributed impact craters up to 260 km diameter are seen in the near-encounter hemisphere. Many of the craters appear to be significantly degraded or infilled. Some craters appear partially destroyed, perhaps by erosion such as associated with the retreat of scarps. Bright ice-rich deposits highlight some crater rims and/or floors. While the cratered terrains identified in the initial downloaded images are generally seen on high-to-intermediate albedo surfaces, the dark equatorial terrain informally known as Cthulhu Regio is also densely cratered. We will explore the range of possible processes that might have operated (or still be operating) to modify the landscape from that of an ancient pristinely cratered state to the present terrains revealed in New Horizons images. The sequence, intensity, and type of processes that have modified ancient landscapes are, among other things, the record of climate and volatile evolution throughout much of the Pluto's existence. The deciphering of this record will be discussed. This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  2. Cratering Rates in the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K.; Levison, H.; Dones, L.; Schenk, P.

    1999-09-01

    We use numerical simulations of the orbital evolution of stray Kuiper Belt objects to relate the number of comets striking the planets to the number of Jupiter-family comets observed in the inner solar system. Cratering rates are obtained by accounting for gravitational focusing, cratering efficiency, and an intuitive average of the various available calibrations of cometary mass. The most telling craters are those of Triton, a retrograde moon in a prograde system. It is well-known that much of Triton's surface is relatively young. Less well-known is that Triton features the most startling hemispheric cratering asymmetry in the solar system: fresh impact craters are almost exclusively limited to the leading hemisphere. It would seem that Triton has been colliding almost exclusively with planetocentric debris. If so, then we conclude that Triton's trailing hemisphere is less than 10 million years old. Recent too must be the event that cratered the leading hemisphere. Once admitted we must consider planetocentric cratering of other, prograde satellites. In particular, the lack of a strong apex-antapex asymmetry on Ganymede is not as good an argument for nonsynchronous rotation as we once thought. Rather, many or most of Ganymede's craters might prove to be secondaries, most likely made by ejecta launched into orbit about Jupiter, only to return not too much later, like the insatiable shards of Texas in Armageddon II: The New Millenium.

  3. The variability of crater identification among expert and community crater analysts

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Stuart J; Kirchoff, Michelle R; Chapman, Clark R; Fassett, Caleb I; Herrick, Robert R; Singer, Kelsi; Zanetti, Michael; Lehan, Cory; Huang, Di; Gay, Pamela L

    2014-01-01

    The identification of impact craters on planetary surfaces provides important information about their geological history. Most studies have relied on individual analysts who map and identify craters and interpret crater statistics. However, little work has been done to determine how the counts vary as a function of technique, terrain, or between researchers. Furthermore, several novel internet-based projects ask volunteers with little to no training to identify craters, and it was unclear how their results compare against the typical professional researcher. To better understand the variation among experts and to compare with volunteers, eight professional researchers have identified impact features in two separate regions of the moon. Small craters (diameters ranging from 10 m to 500 m) were measured on a lunar mare region and larger craters (100s m to a few km in diameter) were measured on both lunar highlands and maria. Volunteer data were collected for the small craters on the mare. Our comparison shows t...

  4. Optical Observations of Meteors Generating Infrasound - I: Acoustic Signal Identification and Phenomenology

    OpenAIRE

    Silber, Elizabeth A.; Brown, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze infrasound signals from 71 bright meteors simultaneously detected by video to investigate the phenomenology and characteristics of meteor-generated near-field infrasound and shock production. A taxonomy for meteor generated infrasound signal classification has been developed using the time-pressure signal of the infrasound arrivals. Based on the location along the meteor trail where the infrasound signal originates, we find most signals are associated with cylindrical shocks, with ...

  5. The missing large impact craters on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, S.; Ermakov, A. I.; Raymond, C. A.; Fu, R. R.; O'Brien, D. P.; Bland, M. T.; Ammannito, E.; de Sanctis, M. C.; Bowling, T.; Schenk, P.; Scully, J. E. C.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Williams, D. A.; Hiesinger, H.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-07-01

    Asteroids provide fundamental clues to the formation and evolution of planetesimals. Collisional models based on the depletion of the primordial main belt of asteroids predict 10-15 craters >400 km should have formed on Ceres, the largest object between Mars and Jupiter, over the last 4.55 Gyr. Likewise, an extrapolation from the asteroid Vesta would require at least 6-7 such basins. However, Ceres' surface appears devoid of impact craters >~280 km. Here, we show a significant depletion of cerean craters down to 100-150 km in diameter. The overall scarcity of recognizable large craters is incompatible with collisional models, even in the case of a late implantation of Ceres in the main belt, a possibility raised by the presence of ammoniated phyllosilicates. Our results indicate that a significant population of large craters has been obliterated, implying that long-wavelength topography viscously relaxed or that Ceres experienced protracted widespread resurfacing.

  6. Compilation of a Global GIS Crater Database for the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Nadine G.; Mest, S. C.; Gibbs, V. B.; Kinser, R. M.

    2012-10-01

    We are using primarily Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) information to compile a new global database of lunar impact craters 5 km in diameter and larger. Each crater’s information includes coordinates of the crater center (ULCN 2005), crater diameter (major and minor diameters if crater is elliptical), azimuthal angle of orientation if crater is elliptical, ejecta and interior morphologies if present, crater preservation state, geologic unit, floor depth, average rim height, central peak height and basal diameter if present, and elevation and elemental/mineralogy data of surroundings. LROC WAC images are used in ArcGIS to obtain crater diameters and central coordinates and LROC WAC and NAC images are used to classify interior and ejecta morphologies. Gridded and individual spot data from LOLA are used to obtain crater depths, rim heights, and central peak height and basal diameter. Crater preservational state is based on crater freshness as determined by the presence/absence of specific interior and ejecta morphologies and elevated crater rim together with the ratio of current crater depth to depth expected for fresh crater of identical size. The crater database currently contains data on over 15,000 craters covering 80% of the nearside and 15% of the farside. We also include information allowing cross-correlation of craters in our database with those in existing crater catalogs, including the ground-based “System of Lunar Craters” by Arthur et al. (1963-1966), the Lunar Orbiter/Apollo-based crater catalog compiled by Andersson and Whitaker (1982), and the Apollo-based morphometric crater database by Pike (1980). We find significant differences in crater diameter and classification between these earlier crater catalogs and our new compilation. Utilizing the capability of GIS to overlay different datasets, we will report on how specific crater features such as central peaks, wall terraces, and impact melt deposits correlate with parameters such as elevation

  7. Determination of the velocity of meteors based on sinodial modulation and frequency analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettonvil, F.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    In meteor photography the velocity of meteors is generally obtained from a chopper which blocks periodically the incident light beam in front of the camera lens. In this paper I examine modulation of the meteor trail instead with a sinodial function and use frequency analysis to compute accurately t

  8. International Assistance in Naming Craters on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, H. M.; Edmonds, J.; Hallau, K.; Hirshon, B.; Goldstein, J.; Hamel, J.; Hamel, S.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's robotic MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft made history in March 2011 by becoming the first to orbit Mercury. During the mission, MESSENGER acquired more than 250,000 images and made many other kinds of measurements. Names are often given to surface features that are of special scientific interest, such as craters. To draw international attention to the achievements of the spacecraft and engineers and scientists who made the MESSENGER mission a success, the MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team initiated a Name a Crater on Mercury Competition.Five craters of particular geological interest were chosen by the science team. In accordance with International Astronomical Union (IAU) rules for Mercury, impact craters are named in honor of those who have made outstanding or fundamental contributions to the arts and humanities. He or she must have been recognized as a historically significant figure in the arts for at least 50 years and deceased for the last three years. We were particularly interested in entries honoring people from nations and cultural groups underrepresented in the current list of crater names. From more than 3600 entries received from around the world, the EPO team was able to reduce the number of entries to about 1200 names of 583 different artists who met the contest eligibility criteria. Next, the proposed individuals were divided into five artistic field groups and distributed to experts in that respective field. Each expert reviewed approximately100 artists with their biographical information. They narrowed down their list to a top ten, then to a top five by applying a rubric. The final selection was based on the reviewer lists and scores, with at least three finalist names selected from each artistic field. Of the 17 finalists provided to the IAU, the following names were selected: Carolan crater, Enheduanna crater, Karsh crater, Kulthum crater, and Rivera crater. For more

  9. Anomalous meteors from the observations with super-isocon TV systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, P.; Watanabe, J.; Sato, M.

    2014-07-01

    There is a range of both optical and radar observations of meteors the behavior of which essentially differs from the behavior of most meteors. In some cases such meteors cannot be explained in the frame of the classic physical theory of meteors, in other cases the meteors are just of rare type. First of all these are the meteors with true hyperbolic velocities. In spite of the fact that most of hyperbolic orbits are the results of calculation errors, the meteors with extremely high velocities appreciably exceeding the hyperbolic limit of 73 km/s exist and can be of interstellar origin [1--3]. Another very rare phenomenon describes the possible cluster structure of meteor streams, which could be connected with the ejection of the substance from the cometary nucleus shortly before collision of the particles with the Earth [4]. Among anomalies connected with the meteor motion in the atmosphere one can note, first of all, the ultra-high altitudes of meteor beginnings exceeding 130--140 km [5--7]. Some other observations point to the beginning heights of bright meteors from Leonid shower on altitudes near 200 km [8]. The classic physical theory of meteors cannot explain their radiation on such high altitudes because of low air density [9]. Recently the results of TV observations of meteors with diffusive and cloudy structure appeared [9,10]. The results of observations in which, according to author's opinion, the meteors have a few kilometers transverse jets [9--11] were presented as well. There are video frames with bright meteor obtained with high temporal resolution, where authors declared the radiation, which could be an effect of a spread directly of the shock wave [12]. During many years' double-station observations of meteors which have been carrying out at Astronomical Observatory of Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University the ultra-sensitive TV transmitting tubes of super-isocon type were used [7]. Given type of the tube is one of the most sensitive in the

  10. Building single-page web apps with meteor

    CERN Document Server

    Vogelsteller, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    If you are a web developer with basic knowledge of JavaScript and want to take on Web 2.0, build real-time applications, or simply want to write a complete application using only JavaScript and HTML/CSS, this is the book for you.This book is based on Meteor 1.0.

  11. Improving Photometric Calibration of Meteor Video Camera Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Steven; Kingery, Aaron; Suggs, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of new calibration tests performed by the NASA Meteoroid Environment Oce (MEO) designed to help quantify and minimize systematic uncertainties in meteor photometry from video camera observations. These systematic uncertainties can be categorized by two main sources: an imperfect understanding of the linearity correction for the MEO's Watec 902H2 Ultimate video cameras and uncertainties in meteor magnitudes arising from transformations between the Watec camera's Sony EX-View HAD bandpass and the bandpasses used to determine reference star magnitudes. To address the rst point, we have measured the linearity response of the MEO's standard meteor video cameras using two independent laboratory tests on eight cameras. Our empirically determined linearity correction is critical for performing accurate photometry at low camera intensity levels. With regards to the second point, we have calculated synthetic magnitudes in the EX bandpass for reference stars. These synthetic magnitudes enable direct calculations of the meteor's photometric ux within the camera band-pass without requiring any assumptions of its spectral energy distribution. Systematic uncertainties in the synthetic magnitudes of individual reference stars are estimated at 0:20 mag, and are limited by the available spectral information in the reference catalogs. These two improvements allow for zero-points accurate to 0:05 ?? 0:10 mag in both ltered and un ltered camera observations with no evidence for lingering systematics.

  12. Panoramic camera systems for meteor tracking and meteorite recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosch, N.; Nemiroff, R.; Shamir, L.

    2006-08-01

    Since 1969, the Antarctic became the most fertile part of the Earth to yield meteorites. The recovered meteorites have been concentrated in specific locations by the actions of wind and snow. It is difficult, therefore to derive their history prior to their arrival onto the Antarctic ice except for an estimate of their space residence. We propose to deploy a system of two or more panoramic cameras in the Antarctic designed to observe meteors and measure their space trajectories. The cameras are patterned after the successful CONCAM systems with the specific difference that each would be equipped with a high-precision light chopper. The CCD images collected by the continuously-operating cameras will yield the angular speed of each detected meteor. Using two or more cameras spaced by a few km or tens of km it will be possible, using triangulation, to derive the space trajectories of these meteors. In case of meteorite-dropping meteors, the trajectory analysis will allow the determination of the approximate ground impact. This would allow recovery of the meteorite(s) in the subsequent Antarctic spring season with the full knowledge of the space history and with a very small chance of weathering.

  13. Impact cratering experiments in brittle targets with variable thickness: Implications for deep pit craters on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikami, T.; Hagermann, A.; Miyamoto, H.; Miura, S.; Haruyama, J.; Lykawka, P. S.

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution images reveal that numerous pit craters exist on the surface of Mars. For some pit craters, the depth-to-diameter ratios are much greater than for ordinary craters. Such deep pit craters are generally considered to be the results of material drainage into a subsurface void space, which might be formed by a lava tube, dike injection, extensional fracturing, and dilational normal faulting. Morphological studies indicate that the formation of a pit crater might be triggered by the impact event, and followed by collapse of the ceiling. To test this hypothesis, we carried out laboratory experiments of impact cratering into brittle targets with variable roof thickness. In particular, the effect of the target thickness on the crater formation is studied to understand the penetration process by an impact. For this purpose, we produced mortar targets with roof thickness of 1-6 cm, and a bulk density of 1550 kg/m3 by using a mixture of cement, water and sand (0.2 mm) in the ratio of 1:1:10, by weight. The compressive strength of the resulting targets is 3.2±0.9 MPa. A spherical nylon projectile (diameter 7 mm) is shot perpendicularly into the target surface at the nominal velocity of 1.2 km/s, using a two-stage light-gas gun. Craters are formed on the opposite side of the impact even when no target penetration occurs. Penetration of the target is achieved when craters on the opposite sides of the target connect with each other. In this case, the cross section of crater somehow attains a flat hourglass-like shape. We also find that the crater diameter on the opposite side is larger than that on the impact side, and more fragments are ejected from the crater on the opposite side than from the crater on the impact side. This result gives a qualitative explanation for the observation that the Martian deep pit craters lack a raised rim and have the ejecta deposit on their floor instead. Craters are formed on the opposite impact side even when no penetration

  14. Processing Images of Craters for Spacecraft Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yang; Johnson, Andrew E.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    A crater-detection algorithm has been conceived to enable automation of what, heretofore, have been manual processes for utilizing images of craters on a celestial body as landmarks for navigating a spacecraft flying near or landing on that body. The images are acquired by an electronic camera aboard the spacecraft, then digitized, then processed by the algorithm, which consists mainly of the following steps: 1. Edges in an image detected and placed in a database. 2. Crater rim edges are selected from the edge database. 3. Edges that belong to the same crater are grouped together. 4. An ellipse is fitted to each group of crater edges. 5. Ellipses are refined directly in the image domain to reduce errors introduced in the detection of edges and fitting of ellipses. 6. The quality of each detected crater is evaluated. It is planned to utilize this algorithm as the basis of a computer program for automated, real-time, onboard processing of crater-image data. Experimental studies have led to the conclusion that this algorithm is capable of a detection rate >93 percent, a false-alarm rate <5 percent, a geometric error <0.5 pixel, and a position error <0.3 pixel.

  15. Anomalous photometrical displays in faint meteors from TV observations in Kyiv

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, P. M.

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of a large range of results of modern TV meteor observations for searching presence their of the meteors with highly displayed anomalies in kinematic and photometrical characteristics has been carried out. In parallel, the results of Kyiv meteor group observations obtained with the help of observational systems equipped by high sensitive transmitting TV tubes of superisocon type, which have a range of highly displayed anomalies in a meteor development are presented. Comparative qualitative analysis of the observational data containing anomalous displays in meteor photometrical parameters, in part in their light curves is carried out, and the conclusions about physical reality of technical artifacts of the selected anomalies are done.

  16. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  17. Why Landers Should Explore Fresh, Small Craters on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, L. E.; Herr, K. C.; Adams, P. M.

    2008-03-01

    Small, fresh craters at the Nevada Test Site are unique, high quality test beds to develop exploration techniques for new craters spotted on Mars by Malin et al. The NTS craters provide data to determine the optimum crater size for exploration.

  18. Cratering statistics on asteroids: Methods and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C.

    2014-07-01

    Crater size-frequency distributions (SFDs) on the surfaces of solid-surfaced bodies in the solar system have provided valuable insights about planetary surface processes and about impactor populations since the first spacecraft images were obtained in the 1960s. They can be used to determine relative age differences between surficial units, to obtain absolute model ages if the impactor flux and scaling laws are understood, to assess various endogenic planetary or asteroidal processes that degrade craters or resurface units, as well as assess changes in impactor populations across the solar system and/or with time. The first asteroid SFDs were measured from Galileo images of Gaspra and Ida (cf., Chapman 2002). Despite the superficial simplicity of these studies, they are fraught with many difficulties, including confusion by secondary and/or endogenic cratering and poorly understood aspects of varying target properties (including regoliths, ejecta blankets, and nearly-zero-g rubble piles), widely varying attributes of impactors, and a host of methodological problems including recognizability of degraded craters, which is affected by illumination angle and by the ''personal equations'' of analysts. Indeed, controlled studies (Robbins et al. 2014) demonstrate crater-density differences of a factor of two or more between experienced crater counters. These inherent difficulties have been especially apparent in divergent results for Vesta from different members of the Dawn Science Team (cf. Russell et al. 2013). Indeed, they have been exacerbated by misuse of a widely available tool (Craterstats: hrscview.fu- berlin.de/craterstats.html), which incorrectly computes error bars for proper interpretation of cumulative SFDs, resulting in derived model ages specified to three significant figures and interpretations of statistically insignificant kinks. They are further exacerbated, and for other small-body crater SFDs analyzed by the Berlin group, by stubbornly adopting

  19. Cratering on Ceres: Implications for its crust and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesinger, H.; Marchi, S.; Schmedemann, N.; Schenk, P.; Pasckert, J. H.; Neesemann, A.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kneissl, T.; Ermakov, A. I.; Fu, R. R.; Bland, M. T.; Nathues, A.; Platz, T.; Williams, D. A.; Jaumann, R.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Ruesch, O.; Schmidt, B.; Park, R. S.; Preusker, F.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2016-09-01

    Thermochemical models have predicted that Ceres, is to some extent, differentiated and should have an icy crust with few or no impact craters. We present observations by the Dawn spacecraft that reveal a heavily cratered surface, a heterogeneous crater distribution, and an apparent absence of large craters. The morphology of some impact craters is consistent with ice in the subsurface, which might have favored relaxation, yet large unrelaxed craters are also present. Numerous craters exhibit polygonal shapes, terraces, flowlike features, slumping, smooth deposits, and bright spots. Crater morphology and simple-to-complex crater transition diameters indicate that the crust of Ceres is neither purely icy nor rocky. By dating a smooth region associated with the Kerwan crater, we determined absolute model ages (AMAs) of 550 million and 720 million years, depending on the applied chronology model.

  20. Method for evaluation of laboratory craters using crater detection algorithm for digital topography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamunićcar, Goran; Vinković, Dejan; Lončarić, Sven; Vučina, Damir; Pehnec, Igor; Vojković, Marin; Gomerčić, Mladen; Hercigonja, Tomislav

    In our previous work the following has been done: (1) the crater detection algorithm (CDA) based on digital elevation model (DEM) has been developed and the GT-115225 catalog has been assembled [GRS, 48 (5), in press, doi:10.1109/TGRS.2009.2037750]; and (2) the results of comparison between explosion-induced laboratory craters in stone powder surfaces and GT-115225 have been presented using depth/diameter measurements [41stLPSC, Abstract #1428]. The next step achievable using the available technology is to create 3D scans of such labo-ratory craters, in order to compare different properties with simple Martian craters. In this work, we propose a formal method for evaluation of laboratory craters, in order to provide objective, measurable and reproducible estimation of the level of achieved similarity between these laboratory and real impact craters. In the first step, the section of MOLA data for Mars (or SELENE LALT for Moon) is replaced with one or several 3D-scans of laboratory craters. Once embedment was done, the CDA can be used to find out whether this laboratory crater is similar enough to real craters, as to be recognized as a crater by the CDA. The CDA evaluation using ROC' curve represents how true detection rate (TDR=TP/(TP+FN)=TP/GT) depends on the false detection rate (FDR=FP/(TP+FP)). Using this curve, it is now possible to define the measure of similarity between laboratory and real impact craters, as TDR or FDR value, or as a distance from the bottom-right origin of the ROC' curve. With such an approach, the reproducible (formally described) method for evaluation of laboratory craters is provided.

  1. Towards a New Catalog of Lobed Martian Craters Compared with a New Global Crater Database, Complete to 1.5 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, S. J.; Hynek, B. M.

    2009-03-01

    Presenting preliminary results of a new crater database, focusing on lobed crater characteristics. Database is complete to at least 1.5 km-diameter craters and contains more characteristics of each crater than previous catalogs.

  2. Determining proportions of lunar crater populations by fitting crater size distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    We determine the proportions of two mixed crater populations distinguishable by size distributions on the Moon. A "multiple power-law" model is built to formulate crater size distribution $N(D) \\propto D^{-\\alpha}$ whose slope $\\alpha$ varies with crater diameter $D$. Fitted size distribution of lunar highland craters characterized by $\\alpha = 1.17 \\pm 0.04$, $1.88 \\pm 0.07$, $3.17 \\pm 0.10$ and $1.40 \\pm 0.15$ for consecutive $D$ intervals divided by 49, 120 and 251 km and that of lunar Class 1 craters with a single slope $\\alpha = 1.96 \\pm 0.14$, are taken as Population 1 and 2 crater size distribution respectively, whose sum is then fitted to the size distribution of global lunar craters with $D$ between 10 and 100 km. Estimated crater densities of Population 1 and 2 are $44 \\times 10^{-5}$ and $5 \\times 10^{-5}$ km$^{-2}$ respectively, leading to the proportion of the latter $10 \\%$. The results underlines the need for considering the Population 1 craters and the relevant impactors, the primordial main-b...

  3. A Buried Precambrian Impact Crater in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    Field evidence indicates that the source of the Stac Fada impact deposit (Mesoproterozoic) in NW Scotland was to the east, and that the now buried crater is represented by the 40+ km diameter Lairg Gravity Low.

  4. Impact craters: An ice study on Rhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Mastrapa, Rachel M. E.; Lewis, Emma; White, Oliver L.

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this project is to study the properties of H2O ice in the environment of the Saturn satellites and in particular to measure the relative amounts of crystalline and amorphous H2O ice in and around two craters on Rhea. The craters are remnants of cataclysmic events that, by raising the local temperature, melted the ice, which subsequently crystallized. Based on laboratory experiments it is expected that, when exposed to ion bombardment at the temperatures typical of the Saturn satellites, the crystalline structure of the ice will be broken, resulting in the disordered, amorphous phase. We therefore expect the ice in and around the craters to be partially crystalline and partially amorphous. We have designed a technique that estimates the relative amounts of crystalline and amorphous H2O ice based on measurements of the distortion of the 2-μm spectral absorption band. The technique is best suited for planetary surfaces that are predominantly icy, but works also for surfaces slightly contaminated with other ices and non-ice components. We apply the tool to two areas around the Inktomi and the Obatala craters. The first is a young impact crater on the leading hemisphere of Rhea, the second is an older one on the trailing hemisphere. For each crater we obtain maps of the fraction of crystalline ice, which were overlain onto Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images of the satellite searching for correlations between crystallinity and geography. For both craters the largest fractions of crystalline ice are in the center, as would be intuitively expected since the 'ground zero' areas should be most affected by the effects of the impact. The overall distribution of the crystalline ice fraction maps the shape of the crater and, in the case of Inktomi, of the rays. The Inktomi crater ranges between a maximum fraction of 67% crystalline ice to a minimum of 39%. The Obatala crater varies between a maximum of 51% and a minimum of 33%. Based on simplifying assumptions

  5. The size-frequency distribution of elliptical impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, G. S.; Elbeshausen, D.; Davison, T. M.; Robbins, S. J.; Hynek, B. M.

    2011-10-01

    Impact craters are elliptical in planform if the impactor's trajectory is below a threshold angle of incidence. Laboratory experiments and 3D numerical simulations demonstrate that this threshold angle decreases as the ratio of crater size to impactor size increases. According to impact cratering scaling laws, this implies that elliptical craters occur at steeper impact angles as crater size or target strength increases. Using a standard size-frequency distribution for asteroids impacting the terrestrial planets we estimate the fraction of elliptical craters as a function of crater size on the Moon, Mars, Earth, Venus and Mercury. In general, the expected fraction of elliptical craters is ~ 2-4% for craters between 5 and 100-km in diameter, consistent with the observed population of elliptical craters on Mars. At larger crater sizes both our model and observations suggest a dramatic increase in the fraction of elliptical craters with increasing crater diameter. The observed fraction of elliptical craters larger than 100-km diameter is significantly greater than our model predictions, which may suggest that there is an additional source of large elliptical craters other than oblique impact.

  6. Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsell, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

  7. At Bright Band Inside Victoria Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A layer of light-toned rock exposed inside Victoria Crater in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars appears to mark where the surface was at the time, many millions of years ago, when an impact excavated the crater. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove to this bright band as the science team's first destination for the rover during investigations inside the crater. Opportunity's left front hazard-identification camera took this image just after the rover finished a drive of 2.25 meters (7 feet, 5 inches) during the rover's 1,305th Martian day, or sol, (Sept. 25, 2007). The rocks beneath the rover and its extended robotic arm are part of the bright band. Victoria Crater has a scalloped shape of alternating alcoves and promontories around the crater's circumference. Opportunity descended into the crater two weeks earlier, within an alcove called 'Duck Bay.' Counterclockwise around the rim, just to the right of the arm in this image, is a promontory called 'Cabo Frio.'

  8. 10Be Content in Suevite Breccia from the Bosumtwi Impact Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, Anna; Wild, Eva Maria; Michlmayr, Leonard; Koeberl, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Introduction: According to the current understanding of meteorite impact processes, surface target material is transported from a crater in the form of ejecta or is vaporized/melted (e.g., [1]). The formation model of tektites from the surface of the target rocks has been established using the 10Be content of tektites (e.g., [2]), and chemical comparison with the possible target surface material (e.g., [3]); it was also reproduced by computer modeling (e.g., [4]). On the other hand, some observations ([5, 6]) suggest that part of the surface material may be incorporated into the crater-fill. The aim of this study is to check if surface-derived material is present in suevitic breccias to better understand formation mechanisms of fallback breccias. Also, 10Be can be used to trace contamination of rocks in the top layer of the suevitic layer by meteoric (lake) water. This abstract is an update (based on more data now available) of the previous report presented during the Metsoc75 conference. Samples: The Bosumtwi crater was chosen as study site because of its relatively large size (10.5 km in diameter), young age of 1.07 Ma [7], good state of preservation, and availability of core samples. Clasts from suevitic breccia selected for this study come from the LB-07A and LB-08A cores that are located within the crater and represent fallback breccia (e.g., [7]). Of 41 analyzed samples (22 single clasts and 21 matrix samples - 11 of those being monomictic breccia), 36 came from core LB-07A (in the zone outside the central uplift) and represent depths of 333.7 - 407.9 m and 5 are from core LB-08A (on the flank of the central uplift) from depths 239.5 - 264.9 m. Methods: For each sample, 0.8 g of finely grounded material from clasts containing in situ produced and meteoric 10Be was dissolved in a mixture of HF and HNO3 by microwave digestion. A 9Be carrier (1 mg or 0.6 mg, 10Be/9Be ratio: 2.82±0.31*10-15 [2? uncertainty]) was added to the sample, and then Be was chemically

  9. Do young martian ray craters have ages consistent with the crater count system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William K.; Quantin, Cathy; Werner, Stephanie C.; Popova, Olga

    2010-08-01

    McEwen et al. (McEwen, A.S., Preblich, B.S., Turtle, E.P., Artemieva, N.A., Golombek, M.P., Hurst, M., Kirk, R.L., Burr, D.M., Christensen, P. [2005]. Icarus 176, 351-381) developed a useful test for the internal consistency of crater-count chronometry systems. They argued that certain multi-kilometer, fresh-looking martian craters with prominent rays should be the youngest or near-youngest craters in their size range. The "McEwen et al. test" is that the ages determined from crater densities of the smallest superimposed craters (typically diameter D ˜ 5-20 m) should thus be comparable to the expected formation intervals of the host primary. McEwen et al. concluded from MOC data that crater chronometry failed this test by factors of 700-2000. We apply HiRISE and other imagery to eight different young craters in order to re-evaluate their arguments. We use existing crater chronology systems as well as the reported observed production rate of 16 m craters (Malin, M.C., Edgett, K., Posiolova, L., McColley, S., Noe Dobrea, E. [2006]. Science 314, 1573-1557; Hartmann, W.K., Quantin, C., Mangold, N. [2007]. Icarus 186, 11-23; Kreslavsky [2007]. Seventh International Conference on Mars, 3325). Every case passes the McEwen et al. test. We conclude that the huge inconsistencies suggested by McEwen et al. are spurious. Many of these craters show evidence of impact into ice-rich material, and appear to have ice-flow features and sublimation pits on their floors. As production rate data improve, decameter-scale craters will provide a valuable way of dating these young martian geological formations and the processes that modify them.

  10. Advanced Meteor radar at Tirupati: System details and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Sundararaman, Sathishkumar; Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Eethamakula, Kosalendra; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.

    An advanced meteor radar viz., Enhanced Meteor Detection Radar (EMDR) operating at 35.25 MHz is installed at Sri Venkateswara University (SVU), Tirupati (13.63oN, 79.4oE), India, in the month of August 2013. Present communication describes the need for the meteor radar at present location, system description, its measurement techniques, its variables and comparison of measured mean winds with contemporary radars over the Indian region. The present radar site is selected to fill the blind region of Gadanki (13.5oN, 79.2oE) MST radar, which covers mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region (70-110 km). By modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements, this radar is capable of providing accurate wind information between 70 and 110 km unlike other similar radars. Height covering region is extended by increasing the meteor counting capacity by modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements and hence its wind estimation limits extended below and above of 80 and 100 km, respectively. In the present study, we also made comparison of horizontal winds in the MLT region with those measured by similar and different (MST and MF radars) techniques over the Indian region including the model (HWM 07) data sets. The comparison showed a very good agreement between the overlapping altitudes (82-98 km) of different radars. Zonal winds compared very well as that of meridional winds. The observed discrepancies and limitations in the wind measurement are discussed. This new radar is expected to play important role in understanding the vertical and lateral coupling by forming a unique local network.

  11. VLF observation during Leonid Meteor Shower-2002 from Kolkata

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, S K; Acharyya, K; Mandal, S; Chakrabarti, S; Khan, R; Bose, B; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2002-01-01

    Using a Gyrator-II Loop antenna tuned at 19.0Khz, we monitored the meteor shower during 17-24th November, 2002. We observe the primary peak at 3h58m (UT) on the 19th of November, 2002. We distinctly observed several `beadlike' and `exponentially dropping' signals. The `beadlike' signals were more in abundance on the 18th of November, 2002, one day prior to the actual encounter.

  12. A low cost meteor observation system using radio forward scattering and the interferometry technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkour, Waleed; Yamamoto, Masa-yuki; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Mizumoto, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    We present a low cost meteor observation system based on the radio forward scattering and interferometry technique at Kochi University of Technology (KUT). The system can be a suitable model for low budget educational institutes that target practical learning of astronomical objects and upper atmospheric characteristics. The system methodology for the automatic counting of meteor echoes, filtering noise and detecting meteor echo directions is described. Detection of the meteor echo directions, which is the basic element for determining the meteor trajectories and the orbital parameters of parent comets, is based on a software system developed for analysis of phase differences detected by interferometry. Randomly selected observation samples measured by the radio interferometer are compared to simultaneous optical observations by video cameras to verify the system accuracy. Preliminary error analysis revealed that the system accuracy is directly related to the duration of observed meteor echoes. Eighty percent of meteor echo samples with durations longer than 3 s showed agreement in azimuth and elevation angles measurements to within a 10° error range, while meteor echo samples with shorter durations showed lower agreement levels probably due to the low system sampling resolution of 0.1 s. The reasonable agreement level of meteor echoes with duration longer than 3 s demonstrated the applicability of the system methodology. Accurate observation of shorter duration meteor echoes could possibly be achieved by improving the system resolution.

  13. Development of the mesospheric Na layer at 69° N during the Geminids meteor shower 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dunker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ECOMA sounding rocket campaign in 2010 was performed to investigate the charge state and number density of meteoric smoke particles during the Geminids meteor shower in December 2010. The ALOMAR Na lidar contributed to the campaign with measurements of sodium number density, temperature and line-of-sight wind between 80 and 110 km altitude over Andøya in northern Norway. This paper investigates a possible connection between the Geminids meteor shower and the mesospheric sodium layer. We compare with data from a meteor radar and from a rocket-borne in situ particle instrument on three days. Our main result is that the sodium column density is smaller during the Geminids meteor shower than the winter average at the same latitude. Moreover, during two of the three years considered, the sodium column density decreased steadily during these three weeks of the year. Both the observed decrease of Na column density by 30% and of meteoric smoke particle column density correlate well with a corresponding decrease of sporadic meteor echoes. We found no correlation between Geminids meteor flux rates and sodium column density, nor between sporadic meteors and Na column density (R = 0.25. In general, we found the Na column density to be at very low values for winter, between 1.8 and 2.6 × 1013 m−2. We detected two meteor trails containing sodium, on 13 December 2010 at 87.1 km and on 19 December 2010 at 84 km. From these meteor trails, we estimate a global meteoric Na flux of 121 kg d−1 and a global total meteoric influx of 20.2 t d−1.

  14. The prediction of meteor showers from all potential parent comets

    CERN Document Server

    Neslusan, Lubos; Tomko, Dusan; Kanuchova, Zuzana; Jakubik, Marian

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to predict new meteor showers associated with as many as possible known periodic comets and to find a generic relationship of some already known showers with these comets. For a potential parent comet, we model a theoretical stream at the moment of its perihelion passage in a far past, and follow its dynamical evolution until the present. Subsequently, we analyze the orbital characteristics of the parts of the stream that approach the Earth's orbit. Modelled orbits of the stream particles are compared with the orbits of actual photographic, video, and radar meteors from several catalogues. The whole procedure is repeated for several past perihelion passages of the parent comet. To keep our description compact but detailed, we usually present only either a single or a few parent comets with their associated showers in one paper. Here, an overview of the results from the modelling of the meteor-shower complexes of more than ten parent bodies will be presented. This enables the...

  15. A Persistent Meteoric Ion Layer in the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crismani, Matteo; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Jain, Sonal Kumar; Plane, John; Deigo Carrillo Sanchez, Juan; Deighan, Justin; Stevens, Michael H.; Evans, Scott; Chaffin, Michael S.; Jacosky, Bruce; IUVS Team

    2016-10-01

    We report on a persistent metal ion layer at Mars produced by meteoric ablation in the upper atmosphere, observed by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on MAVEN. The response of the Martian atmosphere to meteoroid influx constrains cometary activity, dust dynamics, ionospheric production at Mars and meteoric smoke may represent a site of nucleation for high altitude clouds. Using observations that span more than an Earth year, we find this layer is global and steady state, contrary to previous observations, but in accordance with predictions. IUVS observations cover a range of observation conditions, which allows us to determine the variability of the Mg+ layer seasonally and geographically. Mars has passed through several predicted meteor showers, though the fluences of these events have hitherto been unconstrained. Analysis of these events will determine whether Mars' atmosphere responds to such events dramatically, as was the case with comet Siding Spring, or more similarly to Earth. Mg is also detected, but the ratio of Mg to Mg+ is less than predicted, indicative of undetermined chemical processes in the Martian atmosphere.

  16. Meteor Showers in the Ancient Maya Hieroglyphic Codices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsman, J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Researchers of the ancient Maya culture have long been fascinated with the Maya obsession concerning cyclical calendars and precise visual observations of astronomical bodies and phenomena, in particular the Sun, Moon, visible planets, and solar and lunar eclipses. Although considered possible, heretofore no record of specific sightings of comets or meteor showers in the Maya inscriptions has been firmly established by scholars. Besides difficulties with decipherment of the hieroglyphic script, investigators have had to grapple with an ancient Maya calendar that has not been accurately correlated to the European calendar. Recent examination by this researcher has found that it may be possible to recognize written accounts of meteor showers embedded in the hieroglyphic corpus, especially the codices, the screen-fold books that were the tools of the astronomer-priests of that day. By proposing an alternative decipherment of an astronomical sign and using the accompanying hieroglyphic texts and illustrations with appropriate dates, this researcher believes it is possible to demonstrate that the Maya may have recorded meteor showers occurring in the seventh through the tenth centuries AD.

  17. Rates, Flux Densities, and Spectral Indices of Meteor Radio Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Obenberger, K S; Hancock, P J; Holmes, J M; Pedersen, T R; Schinzel, F K; Taylor, G B

    2016-01-01

    Using the narrowband all-sky imager mode of the LWA1 we have now detected 30 transients at 25.6 MHz, 1 at 34 MHz, and 93 at 38.0 MHz. While we have only optically confirmed that 37 of these events are radio afterglows from meteors, evidence suggests that most, if not all, are. Using the beam-forming mode of the LWA1 we have also captured the broadband spectra between 22.0 and 55.0 MHz of four events. We compare the smooth, spectral components of these four events and fit the frequency dependent flux density to a power law, and find that the spectral index is time variable, with the spectrum steepening over time for each meteor afterglow. Using these spectral indices along with the narrow band flux density measurements of the 123 events at 25.6 and 38 MHz, we predict the expected flux densities and rates for meteor afterglows potentially observable by other low frequency radio telescopes.

  18. The Degradational History of Endeavour Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J. A.; Parker, T. J.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wilson, S. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Endeavour crater (2.28 deg S, 354.77 deg E) is a Noachian-aged 22 km-diameter impact structure of complex morphology in Meridiani Planum. The degradation state of the crater has been studied using Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Opportunity rover data. Exposed rim segments rise approximately 10 m to approximately 100 m above the level of the embaying Burns Formation and the crater is 200-500 m deep with the southern interior wall exposing over approximately 300 m relief. Both pre-impact rocks (Matijevic Formation) and Endeavour impact ejecta (Shoemaker Formation) are present at Cape York, but only the Shoemaker crops out (up to approximately 140 m) along the rim segment from Murray Ridge to Cape Tribulation. Study of pristine complex craters Bopolu and Tooting, and morphometry of other martian complex craters, enables us to approximate Endeavour's pristine form. The original rim likely averaged 410 m (+/-)200 m in elevation and a 250-275 m section of ejecta ((+/-)50-60 m) would have composed a significant fraction of the rim height. The original crater depth was likely between 1.5 km and 2.2 km. Comparison between the predicted original and current form of Endeavour suggests approximately 100-200 m rim lowering that removed most ejecta in some locales (e.g., Cape York) while thick sections remain elsewhere (e.g., Cape Tribulation). Almost complete removal of ejecta at Cape York and minimal observable offset across fractures indicates current differences in rim relief are not solely due to original rim relief. Rim segments are embayed by approximately 100-200 m thickness of plains rocks outside the crater, but thicker deposits lie inside the crater. Ventifact textures confirm ongoing eolian erosion with the overall extent difficult to estimate. Analogy with degraded Noachian-aged craters south of Endeavour, however, suggests fluvial erosion dominated rim degradation in the Noachian and was likely followed by approximately 10s of meters modification by alternate

  19. Isotope hydrology of El Chichón volcano-hydrothermal system; a coupled system of crater lake and hot springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, L.; Taran, Y.; Rouwet, D.

    2010-12-01

    The catastrophic 1982 eruption of El Chichón (>1.5 km3 of erupted material) opened the upper hundred meters of the existing volcano-hydrothermal system. In the new formed 200m-deep crater a large shallow crater lake and numerous hot springs were formed. The lake existence and its salinity depend on the precipitation (~4000 mm/y) as well as a group of geyser-like neutral saline springs (source of Cl and SO4) and hydrothermal steam vents discharging into the lake (source of SO4). The chemistry of these “Soap Pool” (SP) springs evolved from >13,000 ppm of Cl in 1995 to ~2000-3000 ppm of Cl in 2006. Since 2006, this Cl-concentration in SP waters is constant. Similar concentrations of Cl are observed in most flank hot springs located at altitudes of ~ 600 m asl, 2-3 km from the crater. Therefore, it can be suggested that the flank springs, crater lake and crater hot springs are manifestations of the upper, relatively shallow volcano-hydrothermal system developed beneath the crater in the volcano edifice. Water isotopic composition of all types of thermal and fresh waters including fumarolic steam condensates (>100 samples collected in 1995-2010) allow to classify and distinguish different processes of shallow mixing, boiling, evaporation and water-rock isotope exchange. All spring waters from the upper system have meteoric origin, with the isotopic composition plotting close to the meteoric water line. Crater waters are strongly evolved due to shallow boiling and loss of steam. Isotopic composition of water from the lower, deep hydrothermal system is characterized by a significant positive oxygen isotopic shift and a strong Cl-d18O linear correlation. Waters from numerous cold springs that drain pyroclastic deposits demonstrate a clear negative oxygen shift. Some problems related to water isotopic composition are still remain unresolved: (1) we cannot find any traces of the infiltrated isotopically heavy lake waters, i.e., the seepage from the lake at the volcano

  20. The 2013 Chelyabinsk meteor ionospheric impact studied using GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Ming; Komjathy, Attila; Langley, Richard B.; Vergados, Panagiotis; Butala, Mark D.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2014-05-01

    On 15 February 2013, the Chelyabinsk meteor event (the largest in size since 1908) provided a unique opportunity to observe ionospheric perturbations associated with the ablation and ionospheric impact of the meteor using GPS measurements. The hypersonic bolide generated powerful shock waves while acoustic perturbations in the atmosphere led to the upward propagation of acoustic and gravity waves into the ionosphere. In our research, we applied two different techniques to detect ionospheric disturbances in dual-frequency global positioning system (GPS) measurements during the meteor impact event. The data were collected from near-field GPS networks in Russia, GPS Earth Observation Network (GEONET) in Japan, and Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) stations in the coterminous U.S. Using a novel wavelet coherence detection technique, we were able to identify three different wave trains in the measurements collected from the nearest GPS station to the meteor impact site, with frequencies of approximately 4.0-7.8 mHz, 1.0 -2.5 mHz, and 2.7-11 mHz at 03:30 UTC. We estimated the speed and direction of arrival of the total electron content (TEC) disturbances by cross-correlating TEC time series for every pair of stations in several areas of the GEONET and PBO networks. The results may be characterized as three different types of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). First, the higher-frequency (4.0-7.8 mHz) disturbances were observed around the station ARTU in Arti, Russia (56.43°N, 58.56°E), with an estimated mean propagation speed of about 862 ± 65 m/s (with 95% confidence interval). Another type of TID disturbance related to the wave trains was identified in the lower frequency band (1.0-2.5 mHz), propagating with a mean speed of 362 ± 23 m/s. The lower frequency ionospheric perturbations were observed at distances of 300-1500 km away from Chelyabinsk. The third type of TID wave train was identified using the PBO stations in the relative short-period range of 1

  1. 'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater (Stereo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater. The main body of the crater appears in the upper right of this stereo panorama, with the far side of the crater lying about 800 meters (half a mile) away. Bracketing that part of the view are two promontories on the crater's rim at either side of Duck Bay. They are 'Cape Verde,' about 6 meters (20 feet) tall, on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' about 15 meters (50 feet) tall, on the right. The rest of the image, other than sky and portions of the rover, is ground within Duck Bay. Opportunity's targets of study during the last quarter of 2007 were rock layers within a band exposed around the interior of the crater, about 6 meters (20 feet) from the rim. Bright rocks within the band are visible in the foreground of the panorama. The rover science team assigned informal names to three subdivisions of the band: 'Steno,' 'Smith,' and 'Lyell.' This view incorporates many images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) from the 1,332nd through 1,379th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (Oct. 23 to Dec. 11, 2007). It combines a stereo pair so that it appears three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses. Some visible patterns in dark and light tones are the result of combining frames that were affected by dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera. Opportunity landed on Jan. 25, 2004, Universal Time, (Jan. 24, Pacific Time) inside a much smaller crater about 6 kilometers (4 miles) north of Victoria Crater, to begin a surface mission designed to last 3 months and drive about 600 meters (0.4 mile).

  2. Instrument for the detection of meteors in the infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedhem, H.; Koschny, D.; Ter Haar, J.

    2014-07-01

    The flux of interplanetary particles in the size range 2 mm to 20 m is poorly constrained due to insufficient data --- the larger bodies may be observed remotely by ground-based or space-based telescopes and the smaller particles are measured by in-situ impact detectors in space or by meteor cameras from ground. An infrared video rate imager in Earth orbit would enable a systematic characterization for an extended period, day and night, of the flux in this range by monitoring the bright meteor/fireball generated during atmospheric entry. Due to the low flux of meteoroids in this range a very large detector is required. With this method a large portion of the Earth atmosphere is in fact used as a huge detector. Such an instrument has never flown in Earth orbit. The only sensors of a similar kind fly on US defense satellites for monitoring launches of ballistic missiles. The data from these sensors, however, is largely inaccessible to scientists. The knowledge on emission of light by meteors/bolides at infrared wavelengths is very limited while it can be suspected that the continuum emission from meteors/bolides have stronger emission at infrared wavelengths than in the visible due to the likely low temperatures of these events. At the same time line emission is dominating over the continuum in the visible so it is not clear how this will compare with the continuum in the infrared. We have developed a bread-board version of an IR video rate camera, the SPOSH-IR. The instrument is based on an earlier technology development, SPOSH --- Smart Panoramic Optical Sensor Head, for operation in the visible range, but with the sensor replaced by a cooled IR detector and new infrared optics. The earlier work has proven the concept of the instrument and of automatic detection of meteors/bolides in the visible wavelength range. The new hardware has been built by Jena-Optronik, Jena, Germany and has been tested during several meteor showers in the Netherlands and at ESA's OGS

  3. Meteor observations with Mini-MegaTORTORA wide-field monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, S; Beskin, G; Biryukov, A; Bondar, S; Ivanov, E; Katkova, E; Perkov, A; Sasyuk, V

    2016-01-01

    Here we report on the results of meteor observations with 9-channel Mini-MegaTORTORA (MMT-9) wide-field optical monitoring system with high temporal resolution. During first 1.5 years of operation more than 90 thousands of meteors have been detected, at a rate of 300-350 per night, with durations from 0.1 to 2.5 seconds and angular velocities up to 38 degrees per second. The faintest detected meteors has the peak brightness about 10 mag, while the majority - from 4 to 8 mag. Some of the meteors have been observed in BVR filters simultaneously. Color variations along the trail for them are determined. All parameters of detected meteors are published online. The database also includes the information on 10 thousands meteors detected by our previous FAVOR camera in 2006-2009 years.

  4. Authentication controversies and impactite petrography of the New Quebec Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Ursula B.; Kring, David A.

    1992-12-01

    The literature reports that led to the current acceptance of New Quebec Crater (Chubb Crater) as an authentic impact crater are reviewed, and it is noted that, for reasons that are not entirely clear, a meteoritic origin for the New Quebec Crater achieved wider acceptance at an earlier data than for the Lake Bosumtwi Crater, for which petrographic and chemical evidence is more abundant and compelling. The petrography of two impact melt samples from the New Quebec Crater was investigated, and new evidence is obtained on the degrees of shock metamorphism affecting the accessory minerals such as apatite, sphene, magnetite, and zircon.

  5. Cratering Equations for Zinc Orthotitanate Coated Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, James; Christiansen, Eric; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Ryan, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    The final STS-125 servicing mission (SM4) to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May of 2009 saw the return of the 2nd Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC2) aboard the shuttle Discovery. This hardware had been in service on HST since it was installed during the SM1 mission in December of 1993 yielding one of the longest low Earth orbit exposure times (15.4 years) of any returned space hardware. The WFPC2 is equipped with a 0.8 x 2.2 m radiator for thermal control of the camera electronics (Figure 1). The space facing surface of the 4.1 mm thick aluminum radiator is coated with Z93 zinc orthotitanate thermal control paint with a nominal thickness of 0.1 0.2 mm. Post flight inspections of the radiator panel revealed hundreds of micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MMOD) impact craters ranging in size from less than 300 to nearly 1000 microns in diameter. The Z93 paint exhibited large spall areas around the larger impact sites (Figure 2) and the craters observed in the 6061-T651 aluminum had a different shape than those observed in uncoated aluminum. Typical hypervelocity impact craters in aluminum have raised lips around the impact site. The craters in the HST radiator panel had suppressed crater lips, and in some cases multiple craters were present instead of a single individual crater. Humes and Kinard observed similar behavior after the WFPC1 post flight inspection and assumed the Z93 coating was acting like a bumper in a Whipple shield. Similar paint behavior (spall) was also observed by Bland2 during post flight inspection of the International Space Station (ISS) S-Band Antenna Structural Assembly (SASA) in 2008. The SASA, with similar Z93 coated aluminum, was inspected after nearly 4 years of exposure on the ISS. The multi-crater phenomena could be a function of the density, composition, or impact obliquity angle of the impacting particle. For instance, a micrometeoroid particle consisting of loosely bound grains of material could be responsible for creating the

  6. Meteor detections at the Metsähovi Fundamental Geodetic Research Station (Finland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja-Halli, A.; Gritsevich, M.; Näränen, J.; Moreno-Ibáñez, M.; Lyytinen, E.; Virtanen, J.; Zubko, N.; Peltoniemi, J.; Poutanen, M.

    2016-01-01

    We provide an overview and present some spectacular examples of the recent meteor observations at the Metsähovi Geodetic Research Station. In conjunction with the Finnish Fireball Network the all-sky images are used to reconstruct atmospheric trajectories and to calculate the pre-impact meteor orbits in the Solar System. In addition, intensive collaborative work is pursued with the meteor research groups worldwide. We foresee great potential of this activity also for educational and outreach purposes.

  7. A Numerical Model to Assess Soil Fluxes from Meteoric 10Be Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, B.; Govers, G.; Vanacker, V.; Vanderborght, J.; Smolders, E.; Baken, S.

    2015-12-01

    Meteoric 10Be may be mobile in the soil system. The latter hampers a direct translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into spatial variations in erosion and deposition rates. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows us to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system. The Be2D model is then used to analyse the potential impact of human-accelerated soil fluxes on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be within the soil profile including particle migration, chemical leaching and bioturbation, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes from creep, water and tillage erosion. Model simulations show that meteoric 10Be inventories can indeed be related to erosion and deposition, across a wide range of geomorphological and pedological settings. However, quantification of the effects of vertical mobility is essential for a correct interpretation of the observed spatial patterns in 10Be data. Moreover, our simulations suggest that meteoric 10Be can be used as a tracer to unravel human impact on soil fluxes when soils have a high retention capacity for meteoric meteoric 10Be. Application of the Be2D model to existing data sets shows that model parameters can reliably be constrained, resulting in a good agreement between simulated and observed meteoric 10Be concentrations and inventories. This confirms the suitability of the Be2D model as a robust tool to underpin quantitative interpretations of spatial variability in meteoric 10Be data for eroding landscapes.

  8. Short and long-term delivery rates of meteoric 10Be to terrestrial soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, Joseph A.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Bierman, Paul R.

    2011-02-01

    Well-constrained, long-term average meteoric 10Be deposition rates are important when meteoric 10Be is used as a chronometer or tracer of Earth surface processes. To constrain meteoric 10Be delivery to terrestrial soils, we estimate time-integrated 10Be deposition rates from meteoric 10Be inventories measured in dated soils and compare these results to a new synthesis of short-term measurements of 10Be in precipitation. Comparison of these long-term rates to short-term measurements suggests that short-term measurements likely predict long-term meteoric 10Be deposition rates within uncertainties of ~ 20%. In precipitation measurements, it is possible to deconvolve the contribution of atmospherically-produced "primary" meteoric 10Be from "recycled" meteoric 10Be delivered by terrestrial dust if a second isotope is measured that quantifies either the recycled or primary components of meteoric 10Be deposition. We use dust-concentration dependent differences between 7Be and 10Be measurements to make new estimates of the recycled contribution to total meteoric 10Be flux delivered to the Earth's surface. These dust-corrected data show a strong linear dependence between precipitation amount and primary meteoric 10Be flux. Concentrations of primary meteoric 10Be in mid- and low-latitude precipitation vary predictably by latitude between 0.63 · 10 4 and 2.05 · 10 4 atoms/cm 3 of precipitation, providing a first-order estimate of primary meteoric 10Be deposition for a given latitude and precipitation rate.

  9. Application of a Self-Organizing State Space Model to the Leonid Meteor Storm in 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu T; Miyamoto, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Kitazume, Jun; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2012-01-01

    The Leonids show meteor storms in a period of 33 years, and known as one of the most active meteor showers. It has recently shown a meteor stream consisting of several narrow dust trails made by meteoroids ejected from a parent comet. Hence, an analysis of the temporal behavior of the meteor flux is important to study the structure of the trails. However, statistical inference for the count data is not an easy task, because of its Poisson characteristics. We carried out a wide-field video observation of the Leonid meteor storm in 2001. We formulated a state-of-the-art statistical analysis, which is called a self-organizing state space model, to infer the true behavior of the dust density of the trails properly from the meteor count data. {}From this analysis, we found that the trails have a fairly smooth spatial structure, with small and dense clumps that cause a temporal burst of meteor flux. We also proved that the time behavior (trend) of the fluxes of bright meteors and that of faint meteors are significa...

  10. How to estimate the effect of an intense meteor shower on human space activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In the present age,the potential threat to space projects coming from some intense meteor storms has been noticed.Especially,the increasing activities of mankind in space for scientific,commercial and military purposes have led to an increase in safety-related problems about the satellites,space stations and astronauts.Several new techniques for observing meteors and meteor showers have been developed.However,how to estimate even predict the effect of an intense meteor shower should be further studied.The initial definition about a meteor storm based on visual observations with a Zenithal Hourly Rate of over one thousand seems insufficient,since it only means a storm or burst of meteors in numbers.In 2006 the author suggested a synthetical index of the potential threats about intense activities of meteors;however,it is too complex to determine several parameters.In this paper,the author suggests a Special True Number Flux Density(STNFD).Set a certain energy-limit,or a certain electric-charge-limit,and then calculate the number flux density.Through the comparison between two of the 10 strong meteor showers in recent years it is found that the important factor affecting the space flight security is not only the number of meteoroids,but also their velocities,their average energy and the population index r.Calculations show that Giacobinids,even June Bootids,should be one of the most hazardous meteor showers.

  11. How to estimate the effect of an intense meteor shower on human space activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU GuangJie

    2009-01-01

    In the present age, the potential threat to space projects oming from some intense meteor storms has been noticed. Especially, the increasing activities of mankind in space for scientific, commercial and military purposes have led to an increase in safety-related problems about the satellites, space stations and astronauts. Several new techniques for observing meteors end meteor showers have been devel-oped. However, how to estimate even predict the effect of an intense meteor shower should be further studied. The initial definition about a meteor storm based on visual observations with a Zenithal Hourly Rate of over one thousand seems insufficient, since it only means a storm or burst of meteors in numbers. In 2006 the author suggested a synthetical index of the potential threats about intense aotivi-ties of meteors; however, it is too complex to determine several parameters. In this paper, the author suggests a Special True Number Flux Density (STNFD). Set a certain energy-limit, or a certain elec-tric-charge-limit, end then calculate the number flux density. Through the comparison between two of the 10 strong meteor showers in recent years it is found that the important factor affecting the space flight security is not only the number of meteoroids, but also their velocities, their average energy and the population index r. Calculations show that Giacobinids, even June Bootids, should be one of the most hazardous meteor showers.

  12. A Radial Profile of Tycho Secondary Crater Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kassandra; Campbell, D. B.; Campbell, B. A.; Carter, L. M.; Anderson, R. F.

    2009-09-01

    Determining the typical secondary crater production of individual primary events is an important step in gauging the extent of secondary crater contamination of crater-counting derived ages. Previous lunar observations of secondary crater production from individual primary events have focused on secondary craters near the parent primary and extrapolated to larger radial distances where morphological identification of secondaries is more difficult [Hirata and Nakamura, JGR, E03005, doi:10.1029/2005JE002484, 2006]. As some workers suggest that more distant secondaries may constitute much of the total secondary crater population [McEwen et al., Icarus, 176, 2005; Hirata and Nakamura, JGR, E03005, doi:10.1029/2005JE002484, 2006], lunar observational evidence in this regime is critical to building a robust picture of secondary crater production on the Moon. We present preliminary results of a survey of Tycho secondaries ranging in distance from 1-25 crater radii from the parent crater. Secondary craters in this study lie along a ray extending south from Tycho across Clavius crater and are identified by characteristic, asymmetric ejecta blankets visible in 2.38 GHz (12.6 cm) radar circular polarization ratio (CPR) images acquired during bi-static observations with the Arecibo and Green Bank telescopes. In addition to presenting the size-frequency distributions of these secondary craters and implications thereof, we compare the population of Tycho secondaries identified in the radar CPR near Pictet crater to that identified via morphology in optical images by Hirata and Nakamura, JGR, 2006.

  13. METEOR v1.0 - Design and structure of the software package; METEOR v1.0 - Estructura y modulos informaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, E.

    1994-07-01

    This script describes the structure and the separated modules of the software package METEOR for the statistical analysis of meteorological data series. It contains a systematic description of the subroutines of METEOR and, also, of the required shape for input and output files. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph.D. Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIMASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds thc graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written in spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v 1.0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  14. Physics of soft impact and cratering

    CERN Document Server

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the impact dynamics and cratering of soft matter to describe its importance, difficulty, and wide applicability to planetary-related problems. A comprehensive introduction to the dimensional analysis and constitutive laws that are necessary to discuss impact mechanics and cratering is first provided. Then, particular coverage is given to the impact of granular matter, which is one of the most crucial constituents for geophysics. While granular matter shows both solid-like and fluid-like behaviors, neither solid nor fluid dynamics is sufficient to fully understand the physics of granular matter. In order to reveal its fundamental properties, extensive impact tests have been carried out recently. The author reveals the findings of these recent studies as well as what remains unsolved in terms of impact dynamics. Impact crater morphology with various soft matter impacts also is discussed intensively. Various experimental and observational results up to the recent Itokawa asteroid’s terrain...

  15. Tempest in Vailulu'u Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, S. R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Young, C.; Baker, E.

    2005-12-01

    The summit crater of the Samoan submarine volcano, Vailulu'u, has been actively erupting since 2001. Based on water chemistry, CTD and temperature logger data from 2000 and 2001, we formulated a model for the hydrothermal system in the crater involving a tidally-modulated "breathing" (Staudigel et al., 2004). During low stands of internal waves (exterior to the crater), the crater exhales warm buoyant hydrothermal water that forms a "halo" around the crater rich in Mn, 3He, and particulates. During "high tides", cold dense external water is inhaled into the crater through the three breaches, and cascades to the crater floor. In April 2005, we used the HURL PISCES V submersible to deploy various temperature and particulate loggers and current meters in and around the crater; these were retrieved by Pisces V in July 2005. In addition, continuous CTD profiling was carried out over 12 hour tidal cycles at one location inside, and one outside, the crater. The accumulated data set fully reinforces our "breathing" model. An ADCP, deployed for 93 days in the NW breach at 752m, showed dominant easterly inflow currents and westerly outflow currents, with maximum velocities of approximately 25 cm/s. The flows were coherent for distances up to 50-60m above the ADCP; the mean inflow velocity and azimuth (20-40 m interval above the ADCP) was 7 cm/s due east; the mean outflow velocity and azimuth was 5 cm/s at 260 degrees. Mean inflows were consistently colder than outflows (5.00 C vs 5.20 C); the maximum observed range in temperature was 1.1 C, correlated with peak flow velocities. The coldest inflows would require very large regional internal wave amplitudes, up to 50-100 meters. A 2-D acoustic current meter was deployed on top of the west crater rim summit (582m) for 90 days, and in the S breach (697m) for 4 days. The summit flows are presumed to represent the regional scale currents; these were largely from the SW quadrant, with typical velocities of 8-15 cm/s, and peaks to

  16. DYNAMICAL MODEL FOR THE ZODIACAL CLOUD AND SPORADIC METEORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Pokorny, Petr; Bottke, William F. [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut St., Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Janches, Diego [Space Weather Laboratory, Code 674, GSFC/NASA, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jenniskens, Peter [Carl Sagan Center, SETI Institute, 515 N. Whisman Road, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    The solar system is dusty, and would become dustier over time as asteroids collide and comets disintegrate, except that small debris particles in interplanetary space do not last long. They can be ejected from the solar system by Jupiter, thermally destroyed near the Sun, or physically disrupted by collisions. Also, some are swept by the Earth (and other planets), producing meteors. Here we develop a dynamical model for the solar system meteoroids and use it to explain meteor radar observations. We find that the Jupiter Family Comets (JFCs) are the main source of the prominent concentrations of meteors arriving at the Earth from the helion and antihelion directions. To match the radiant and orbit distributions, as measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) and Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR), our model implies that comets, and JFCs in particular, must frequently disintegrate when reaching orbits with low perihelion distance. Also, the collisional lifetimes of millimeter particles may be longer ({approx}> 10{sup 5} yr at 1 AU) than postulated in the standard collisional models ({approx}10{sup 4} yr at 1 AU), perhaps because these chondrule-sized meteoroids are stronger than thought before. Using observations of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite to calibrate the model, we find that the total cross section and mass of small meteoroids in the inner solar system are (1.7-3.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} km{sup 2} and {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} g, respectively, in a good agreement with previous studies. The mass input required to keep the zodiacal cloud in a steady state is estimated to be {approx}10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} kg s{sup -1}. The input is up to {approx}10 times larger than found previously, mainly because particles released closer to the Sun have shorter collisional lifetimes and need to be supplied at a faster rate. The total mass accreted by the Earth in particles between diameters D = 5 {mu}m and 1 cm is found to be {approx}15

  17. MOLA Topography and Morphometry of Rampart and Pedestal Craters, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, D. E.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Garvin, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    Martian rampart and pedestal craters have characteristic geometric parameter ranges that are significantly different than fresh craters. Combined MOLA geometric measurements and MOC analyses can be used to constrain their modification. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Novel approach of crater detection by crater candidate region selection and matrix-pattern-oriented least squares support vector machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Meng; Cao Yunfeng; Wu Qingxian

    2013-01-01

    Impacted craters are commonly found on the surface of planets,satellites,asteroids and other solar system bodies.In order to speed up the rate of constructing the database of craters,it is important to develop crater detection algorithms.This paper presents a novel approach to automatically detect craters on planetary surfaces.The approach contains two parts:crater candidate region selection and crater detection.In the first part,crater candidate region selection is achieved by Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) detector.Matrix-pattern-oriented least squares support vector machine (MatLSSVM),as the matrixization version of least square support vector machine (SVM),inherits the advantages of least squares support vector machine (LSSVM),reduces storage space greatly and reserves spatial redundancies within each image matrix compared with general LSSVM.The second part of the approach employs MatLSSVM to design classifier for crater detection.Experimental results on the dataset which comprises 160 preprocessed image patches from Google Mars demonstrate that the accuracy rate of crater detection can be up to 88%.In addition,the outstanding feature of the approach introduced in this paper is that it takes resized crater candidate region as input pattern directly to finish crater detection.The results of the last experiment demonstrate that MatLSSVM-based classifier can detect crater regions effectively on the basis of KLT-based crater candidate region selection.

  19. Knut Lundmark, meteors and an early Swedish crowdsourcing experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärnfelt, Johan

    2014-10-01

    Mid twentieth century meteor astronomy demanded the long-term compilation of observations made by numerous individuals over an extensive geographical area. Such a massive undertaking obviously required the participation of more than just professional astronomers, who often sought to expand their ranks through the use of amateurs that had a basic grasp of astronomy as well as the night sky, and were thus capable of generating first-rate astronomical reports. When, in the 1920s, renowned Swedish astronomer Knut Lundmark turned his attention to meteor astronomy, he was unable to rely even upon this solution. In contrast to many other countries at the time, Sweden lacked an organized amateur astronomy and thus contained only a handful of competent amateurs. Given this situation, Lundmark had to develop ways of engaging the general public in assisting his efforts. To his advantage, he was already a well-established public figure who had published numerous popular science articles and held talks from time to time on the radio. During the 1930s, this prominence greatly facilitated his launching of a crowdsourcing initiative for the gathering of meteor observations. This paper consists of a detailed discussion concerning the means by which Lundmark's initiative disseminated astronomical knowledge to the general public and encouraged a response that might directly contribute to the advancement of science. More precisely, the article explores the manner in which he approached the Swedish public, the degree to which that public responded and the extent to which his efforts were successful. The primary aim of this exercise is to show that the apparently recent Internet phenomenon of 'crowdsourcing', especially as it relates to scientific research, actually has a pre-Internet history that is worth studying. Apart from the fact that this history is interesting in its own right, knowing it can provide us with a fresh vantage point from which to better comprehend and appreciate

  20. 'Sharks Teeth' -- Sand Dunes in Proctor Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Sometimes, pictures received from Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) are 'just plain pretty.' This image, taken in early September 2000, shows a group of sand dunes at the edge of a much larger field of dark-toned dunes in Proctor Crater. Located at 47.9oS, 330.4oW, in the 170 km (106 mile) diameter crater named for 19th Century British astronomer Richard A. Proctor (1837-1888), the dunes shown here are created by winds blowing largely from the east/northeast. A plethora of smaller, brighter ripples covers the substrate between the dunes. Sunlight illuminates them from the upper left.

  1. Automated detection of meteors in observed image sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimberová, Stanislava; Suk, Tomáš

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new detection technique based on statistical characteristics of images in the video sequence. These characteristics displayed in time enable to catch any bright track during the whole sequence. We applied our method to the image datacubes that are created from camera pictures of the night sky. Meteor flying through the Earth's atmosphere leaves a light trail lasting a few seconds on the sky background. We developed a special technique to recognize this event automatically in the complete observed video sequence. For further analysis leading to the precise recognition of object we suggest to apply Fourier and Hough transformations.

  2. On classical meteor light curves and utilitarian model atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, M.; Hargrove, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a series of classical meteor light curve profiles based upon a set of simplified analytic atmospheric models. The model atmospheres specifically express the density variation as a power law in atmospheric height, and are derived under a variety of assumptions relating to the atmospheric temperature profile and the variation of the acceleration due to gravity. We find that the light curve profiles show only small differences with respect to any variation in the temperature profile and the geometry imposed upon the atmospheres.

  3. The radiant of the Leonids meteor storm in 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Torii, K; Yanagisawa, T; Ohnishi, K; Torii, Ken'ichi; Kohama, Mitsuhiro; Yanagisawa, Toshifumi; Ohnishi, Kouji

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the radiant of the Leonids meteor storm in November 2001 by using new observational and analysis techniques. The radiant was measured as the intersections of lines which were detected and extrapolated from images obtained at a single observing site (Akeno Observatory, Japan). The images were obtained by two sets of telephoto lenses equipped with cooled CCD cameras. The measured radiant, (R.A., Dec.)=(154$^\\circ$.35, 21$^\\circ$.55) (J2000), is found to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretical prediction by McNaught and Asher (2001), which verifies their dust trail theory.

  4. Lunar Crater Interiors with High Circular Polarization Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, C. M.; Campbell, B. A.; Morgan, G.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed 12.6-cm Earth-based radar images of the Moon to search for older craters (pre-Copernican) that display high values of the circular polarization ratio (CPR) on their interior walls. These craters have highly eroded rims and ejecta, indicating that there must be a source exposed within the crater interior that is continuously creating a rougher surface. Of particular interest are craters between 10-25 km in diameter that occur in smooth plains in the highlands, where competent layers are not expected as they are for the mare. After identifying these high-CPR interiors in pre-Copernican craters, we studied LROC NAC and Kaguya TC images to search for possible albedo and layering on crater interior walls that might signal the presence of anomalous material. Our results indicate that high-CPR craters generally have boulder fields clustered around their upper interior walls. We divide the high-CPR craters into three types: (1) craters on the layered mare lava flows; (2) craters in the highlands that correlate to mapped locations of smooth plains; and (3) craters on the highlands that are not associated with smooth plains. Most of the high-CPR craters in the highlands are associated with Eratosthenian-period craters, and most of these are also on smooth plains, indicating that impact melt sheets are a likely source for the boulders exposed on their interior walls. Statistical analyses will be performed after incorporating multiple lunar datasets into GIS to quantify these preliminary interpretations. Figure 1. Example of high-CPR crater Zagut A located on smooth plains in the highlands. LROC images showing boulders on (a) northern crater interior wall and (b) southern crater interior wall. (c) Stronlgy enhanced values of CPR are observed for the interior of Zagut A.

  5. Ancient Impact and Aqueous Processes at Endeavour Crater, Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Knoll, Andrew Herbert; Squyres, S. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F.; Calef, F., III; Clark, B.C.; Cohen, B. A.; Crumpler, L. A.; P.A. Souza; Farrand, W. H.; Gellert, R.; Grant, J; Hurowitz, J. A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; J. R. Johnson

    2012-01-01

    The rover Opportunity has investigated the rim of Endeavour Crater, a large ancient impact crater on Mars. Basaltic breccias produced by the impact form the rim deposits, with stratigraphy similar to that observed at similar-sized craters on Earth. Highly localized zinc enrichments in some breccia materials suggest hydrothermal alteration of rim deposits. Gypsum-rich veins cut sedimentary rocks adjacent to the crater rim. The gypsum was precipitated from low-temperature aqueous fluids flowing...

  6. Kinematic Characteristics of Meteor Showers by Results of the Combined Radio-Television Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narziev, Mirhusen

    2016-07-01

    One of the most important tasks of meteor astronomy is the study of the distribution of meteoroid matter in the solar system. The most important component to address this issue presents the results of measurements of the velocities, radiants, and orbits of both showers and sporadic meteors. Radiant's and orbits of meteors for different sets of data obtained as a result of photographic, television, electro-optical, video, Fireball Network and radar observations have been measured repeatedly. However, radiants, velocities and orbits of shower meteors based on the results of combined radar-optical observations have not been sufficiently studied. In this paper, we present a methods for computing the radiants, velocities, and orbits of the combined radar-TV meteor observations carried out at HisAO in 1978-1980. As a result of the two-year cycle of simultaneous TV-radar observations 57 simultaneous meteors have been identified. Analysis of the TV images has shown that some meteor trails appeared as dashed lines. Among the simultaneous meteors of d-Aquariids 10 produced such dashed images, and among the Perseids there were only 7. Using a known method, for such fragmented images of simultaneous meteors - together with the measured radar distance, trace length, and time interval between the segments - allowed to determine meteor velocity using combined method. In addition, velocity of the same meteors was measured using diffraction and radar range-time methods based on the results of radar observation. It has been determined that the mean values of meteoroid velocity based on the combined radar-TV observations are greater in 1 ÷ 3 km / c than the averaged velocity values measured using only radar methods. Orbits of the simultaneously observed meteors with segmented photographic images were calculated on the basis of the average velocity observed using the combined radar-TV method. The measured results of radiants velocities and orbital elements of individual meteors

  7. Characterization of Boulders Ejected from Small Impact Craters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.D. Bart; H.J. Melosh; R.G. Strom

    2004-01-01

    When an asteroid or comet impacts the surface of a solid body, some of the surface material is often ejected from the crater in the form of blocks. We are characterizing the size and location of such blocks around craters on the Moon and Mars. The lunar craters were observed in Lunar Orbiter III ima

  8. The nomogram of density distribution of lunar craters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugacheva, S. G.; Bolkhovitinov, I. S.

    1994-12-01

    Least-square fits to the density of the distribution of lunar craters described by the approximating function are found for craters larger then 10 km in diamater. The nomogram of parameters of the approximating function is given for the estimate of density of primary, secondary and tertiary craters over an area of 104km2.

  9. Recharge from a subsidence crater at the Nevada test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G. V.; Ely, D.M.; Hokett, S. L.; Gillespie, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    Current recharge through the alluvial fans of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is considered to be negligible, but the impact of more than 400 nuclear subsidence craters on recharge is uncertain. Many of the craters contain a playa region, but the impact of these playas has not been addressed. It was hypothesized that a crater playa would focus infiltration through the surrounding coarser-grained material, thereby increasing recharge. Crater U5a was selected because it represented a worst case for runoff into craters. A borehole was instrumented for neutron logging beneath the playa center and immediately outside the crater. Physical and hydraulic properties were measured along a transect in the crater and outside the crater. Particle-size analysis of the 14.6 m of sediment in the crater and morphological features of the crater suggest that a large ponding event of ≈63000 m3 had occurred since crater formation. Water flow simulations with HYDRUS-2D, which were corroborated by the measured water contents, suggest that the wetting front advanced initially by as much as 30 m yr−1 with a recharge rate 32 yr after the event of 2.5 m yr−1Simulations based on the measured properties of the sediments suggest that infiltration will occur preferentially around the playa perimeter. However, these sediments were shown to effectively restrict future recharge by storing water until removal by evapotranspiration (ET). This work demonstrated that subsidence craters may be self-healing.

  10. Martian impact cratering rate over the last 3 billions years derived from layered ejecta craters dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagain, Anthony; Bouley, Sylvain; Costard, François; Baratoux, David

    2016-04-01

    All chronology models used in dating planetary surfaces are based on the lunar chronology system. The cratering density of the Moon has been calibrated with absolute ages from Apollo lunar samples. However, there are no lunar samples between 3 Gy and 800 My and only four samples have been dated between 800 My and present. Therefore, the evolution of the cratering rate after the LHB and before 3 Gy is well constrained. The cratering rate between 3 Gy and present has been assumed to be constant [1, 2]. Nevertheless, this assumption is challenged by the analysis of the geological record, such as the frequency of landslide on Mars as a function of time [3, 4]. It is therefore necessary to re-examine the validity of this assumption and place constraints on the cratering rate since the last 3 Gy. For this purpose, we study the rate of impact cratering using small craters on a set of 53 layered ejecta craters larger than 5 km in diameter in Acidalia Planitia, Mars. LECs larger than 5km have large enough surfaces to date their formation by counting craters larger than 100m present on their blankets. Furthermore, limits of their ejecta blankets are clearly defined by a terminal bead. In order to determine the crater emplacement ages, we have applied the methodology dating described in our previous study [6] on all ejecta layers. Errors on measured ages were calculated following [7]. The age of the study area is 2.8±0.2 Gy. Our crater counts on distal ejecta blankets reveal ages younger than the age of the surrounding surface, as expected. It is essential to take into account errors on measured ages. The statistical sample used to build this emplacement frequency distribution and our dating methodology are sufficiently reliable to deduce that a constant impact cratering rate over the last 3 Gy is not a correct approximation. The excessive number of craters emplaced 1Gy ago compared to the cratering rate used suggests a decreased impact cratering rate over the last 1Gy and

  11. Martian Atmospheric Methane Plumes from Meteor Shower Infall: A Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Christou, A.; Archer, D.; Conrad, P.; Cooke, W.; Eigenbrode, J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Matney, M.; Niles, P.; Sykes, M.

    2016-01-01

    Methane plumes in the martian atmosphere have been detected using Earth-based spectroscopy, the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer on the ESA Mars Express mission, and the NASA Mars Science Laboratory. The methane's origin remains a mystery, with proposed sources including volcanism, exogenous sources like impacts and interplanetary dust, aqueous alteration of olivine in the presence of carbonaceous material, release from ancient deposits of methane clathrates, and/or biological activity. To date, none of these phenomena have been found to reliably correlate with the detection of methane plumes. An additional source exists, however: meteor showers could generate martian methane via UV pyrolysis of carbon-rich infall material. We find a correlation between the dates of Mars/cometary orbit encounters and detections of methane on Mars. We hypothesize that cometary debris falls onto Mars during these interactions, depositing freshly disaggregated meteor shower material in a regional concentration. The material generates methane via UV photolysis, resulting in a localized "plume" of short-lived methane.

  12. Heavy metals determinations in dry and wet meteoric deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acid rain is now widely studied by analyzing the parameters that characterize it. As the latest researches demonstrate, it is possible to further understanding of meteoric deposition (i.e. bulk, wet and dry) by the metering of such micropollutants as heavy metals. These are released into the atmosphere as by-products of household heating fuels and industrial wastes. This paper seeks to provide an assessment of certain heavy metals present in meteoric samples and link their presence to the actual state of the environment in which they were detected. Samples of bulk and wet depositions were collected weekly and those of dry deposition monthly so as to achieve a uniform and representative quantity of the latter for subsequent determination. Both the wet and dry samples were collected from the center and outskirts of a large urban community, whereas only wet samples were also collected in the vicinity of a power plant. The wet samples were treated with HNO3 up to pH 1.8 and analyzed by atomic absorption in a Perkin-Elmer 4000 graphite furnace. The elements analyzed were Ni, V, Cd, As, Zn, Cr, Se, Pb. The dry samples were homogenized in an agate mortar and analyzed by high resolution neutron activation gamma spectrometry. Radiation time and flow of the Triga Mark II reactor varied depending on isotope, i.e. whether long, medium or short life. The heavy metals analyzed were Fe, Ni, V, Zn, Cr, Co, As, Sb and some others

  13. Charge Balance in the Mesosphere with Meteoric Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, S. H.; Asmus, H.; Dickson, S.; Friedrich, M.; Megner, L. S.

    2013-12-01

    An aerosol particle charging model developed initially for noctilucent cloud particles has been extended in several steps in order to better explain data for charged meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) returned by the nighttime and daytime CHAMPS rockets launched from the Andøya rocket Range, Norway, in October 2011. Addition of photodetachment to the model shows that this process reduces the number density of positively charged MSPs as well as the number density of negatively charged MSPs as a consequence of the photodetached electrons neutralizing the positively charged MSPs. In addition, the model shows that the ionization rate can be deduced from the electron number density and the electron-ion recombination rate only at the highest altitudes as a consequence of recombination of electrons on the MSPs at lower altitudes. The differences between the daytime and nighttime data place constraints on the photodetachment rate. A further extension of the model to include the formation of negative ions and their destruction by atomic oxygen helps explain the ledge seen in the number density of the lightest negatively charged particles. MSP particle densities from the CARMA/CHEM2D model are in better agreement with rocket data for assumed values of the meteor input flux that are at the low end of the generally accepted range.

  14. Political astronomy: Comet and meteor observations by Muslim historians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander Kapoor, Ramesh

    2015-08-01

    Eclipses and unexpected phenomena like comets, meteors, novae and earthquakes were viewed among various cultures as violating the established order of the heavens. They were considered to be ill omens for kings and emperors and were routinely monitored. The present work looks into the texts of history and literature by Muslim historians and chroniclers in West Asia and India that carry stray references to such phenomena. The accounts often relate the apparitions to specific disastrous events or prognosticate revolts, deaths, epidemics, earthquakes all that that took place in later times. Obviously, the occurrences interested the astrologers more. Comet appearances would last for days and weeks but nearly all the writings lack sequential observations. Meteor showers are annual features but the Islamic calendar being lunar would not easily lead one to notice periodic nature of the incidents, let alone sensing a periodicity in comet appearances. These are non-astronomy texts with little scientific content but being from different ages permit us to see how the astronomical perceptions changed over the times. The recorded details and firm chronology, tested against modern back calculations, can provide valuable information on them, keeping in mind the text and the context in which the original reference was made. We also notice a qualitative change in the Indian writings of the 18th century and later where the authors begin to show up with influence of exposure to the European scientific progress.

  15. Comparing Eyewitness-Derived Trajectories of Bright Meteors to Ground Truth Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) is the only US government agency tasked with analyzing meteors of public interest. When queried about a meteor observed over the United States, the MEO must respond with a characterization of the trajectory, orbit, and size within a few hours. Using observations from meteor networks like the NASA All Sky Fireball Network or the Southern Ontario Meteor Network, such a characterization is often easy. If found, casual recordings from the public and stationary web cameras can be used to roughly analyze a meteor if the camera's location can be identified and its imagery calibrated. This technique was used with great success in the analysis of the Chelyabinsk meteorite fall. But if the event is outside meteor network coverage, if an insufficient number of videos are found, or if the imagery cannot be geolocated or calibrated, a timely assessment can be difficult if not impossible. In this situation, visual reports made by eyewitnesses may be the only resource available. This has led to the development of a tool to quickly calculate crude meteor trajectories from eyewitness reports made to the American Meteor Society. The output is illustrated in Figure 1. A description of the tool, example case studies, and a comparison to ground truth data observed by the NASA All Sky Fireball Network will be presented.

  16. Signs of Landscape Modifications at Martian Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for larger version The lower portion of this image from the Thermal Emission Imaging System camera (THEMIS) on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter shows a crater about 16 kilometers (10 miles) in diameter with features studied as evidence of deposition or erosion. The crater is centered at 40.32 degrees south latitude and 132.5 degrees east longitude, in the eastern portion of the Hellas basin on Mars. It has gullies and arcuate ridges on its north, pole-facing interior wall. This crater is in the center of a larger (60-kilometer or 37-mile diameter) crater with lobate flows on its north, interior wall. The image, number V07798008 in the THEMIS catalog, covers a swath of ground 17.4 kilometers (10.8 miles) wide. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science. THEMIS was developed by Arizona State University in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Slab Ice Characterization on Martian Richardson Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, F.; Andrieu, F.; Douté, S.

    2016-09-01

    We compare two models: granular and slab in order to study the ice properties in the Richardson crater using spectroscopy. Thanks to radiative transfer modeling, we determine compactness of CO2 ice, grain size, and abundances of water ice and dust.

  18. Comet C/1917 F1 (Mellish) meteor shower complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdukova, M.; Neslusan, L.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we mapped the whole meteor complex of the long-period comet C/1917 F1 (Mellish), using a procedure of proven reliability when investigating the 96P/Machholz and 2003 EH1 streams (Neslusan et al., 2013a; 2013b). For five perihelion passages of the comet C/1917 F1 in the past, we modeled associated theoretical streams, each consisting of 10000 test particles, and followed their dynamical evolution until the present. Subsequently, we analyzed the orbital characteristics of the parts of a stream that approach the Earth's orbit. These particles were used to predict the corresponding meteor showers. The predicted showers were searched for in the databases of actually observed meteors. According to our modeling, the meteoroid stream of the comet Mellish can be split into 4 filaments (F1 to F4), with 4 distinct radiant areas. The most numerous shower that originates in the comet nucleus of C/1917 F1 corresponds to theoretical filament F3. The meteoroids of this filament approach to the Earth's orbit relatively soon after their ejection from the nucleus. We identified this filament as the December Monocerotids (No. 19 in the IAU MDC list of the established showers). In the phase space of orbital elements, the shower occurs in the vicinity of another established shower, 250 November Orionids. However, shower No. 250 is obviously not related to C/1917 F1 since no single theoretical particle, in all five models, is in an orbit similar to the mean orbit of this shower. Filament F1 might be identified to 348 April rho-Cygnids, the meteoroid stream that was recently discovered by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (Brown et al., 2010). In our models, this filament is numerous and, hence, the shower is well predicted. The particles of filament F1 and, therefore, the real April rho-Cygnids originating in C/1917 F1 can approach the Earth's orbit and collide with our planet not earlier than about 20 millennia after their release from the parent-comet nucleus. Despite this

  19. 'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater (False Color)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Photojournal note: This very large image (487.9 MB TIFF and 17.71 MB JPEG) may be too large for some web browsers to handle. Users may right-click on the TIFF or JPEG link in the legend above to download the file to their desktop. The image can then be viewed in an image manipulation application such as Adobe Photoshop. During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater. The main body of the crater appears in the upper right of this stereo panorama, with the far side of the crater lying about 800 meters (half a mile) away. Bracketing that part of the view are two promontories on the crater's rim at either side of Duck Bay. They are 'Cape Verde,' about 6 meters (20 feet) tall, on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' about 15 meters (50 feet) tall, on the right. The rest of the image, other than sky and portions of the rover, is ground within Duck Bay. Opportunity's targets of study during the last quarter of 2007 were rock layers within a band exposed around the interior of the crater, about 6 meters (20 feet) from the rim. Bright rocks within the band are visible in the foreground of the panorama. The rover science team assigned informal names to three subdivisions of the band: 'Steno,' 'Smith,' and 'Lyell.' This view combines many images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) from the 1,332nd through 1,379th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (Oct. 23 to Dec. 11, 2007). Images taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers were mixed to produce this view, which is presented in a false-color stretch to bring out subtle color differences in the scene. Some visible patterns in dark and light tones are the result of combining frames that were affected by dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera. Opportunity landed on Jan. 25, 2004

  20. Is the Large Crater on the Asteroid (2867) Steins Really an Impact Crater?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. J. W.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    The large crater on the asteroid (2867) Steins attracted much attention when it was first observed by the Rosetta spacecraft in 2008. Initially, it was widely thought to be unusually large compared to the size of the asteroid. It was quickly realized that this was not the case and there are other examples of similar (or larger) craters on small bodies in the same size range; however, it is still widely accepted that it is a crater arising from an impact onto the body which occurred after its formation. The asteroid (2867) Steins also has an equatorial bulge, usually considered to have arisen from redistribution of mass due to spin-up of the body caused by the YORP effect. Conversely, it is shown here that, based on catastrophic disruption experiments in laboratory impact studies, a similarly shaped body to the asteroid Steins can arise from the break-up of a parent in a catastrophic disruption event; this includes the presence of a large crater-like feature and equatorial bulge. This suggests that the large crater-like feature on Steins may not be a crater from a subsequent impact, but may have arisen directly from the fragmentation process of a larger, catastrophically disrupted parent.

  1. IS THE LARGE CRATER ON THE ASTEROID (2867) STEINS REALLY AN IMPACT CRATER?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, A. J. W.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J., E-mail: m.j.burchell@kent.ac.uk [Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, School of Physical Science, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-01

    The large crater on the asteroid (2867) Steins attracted much attention when it was first observed by the Rosetta spacecraft in 2008. Initially, it was widely thought to be unusually large compared to the size of the asteroid. It was quickly realized that this was not the case and there are other examples of similar (or larger) craters on small bodies in the same size range; however, it is still widely accepted that it is a crater arising from an impact onto the body which occurred after its formation. The asteroid (2867) Steins also has an equatorial bulge, usually considered to have arisen from redistribution of mass due to spin-up of the body caused by the YORP effect. Conversely, it is shown here that, based on catastrophic disruption experiments in laboratory impact studies, a similarly shaped body to the asteroid Steins can arise from the break-up of a parent in a catastrophic disruption event; this includes the presence of a large crater-like feature and equatorial bulge. This suggests that the large crater-like feature on Steins may not be a crater from a subsequent impact, but may have arisen directly from the fragmentation process of a larger, catastrophically disrupted parent.

  2. The Working Group on Meteor Showers Nomenclature: a History, Current Status and a Call for Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopek, T. J.; Jenniskens, P. M.

    2011-01-01

    During the IAU General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro in 2009, the members of Commission 22 established the Working Group on Meteor Shower Nomenclature, from what was formerly the Task Group on Meteor Shower Nomenclature. The Task Group had completed its mission to propose a first list of established meteor showers that could receive officially names. At the business meeting of Commission 22 the list of 64 established showers was approved and consequently officially accepted by the IAU. A two-step process is adopted for showers to receive an official name from the IAU: i) before publication, all new showers discussed in the literature are first added to the Working List of Meteor Showers, thereby receiving a unique name, IAU number and three-letter code; ii) all showers which come up to the verification criterion are selected for inclusion in the List of Established Meteor Showers, before being officially named at the next IAU General Assembly.

  3. Meteors as a Delivery Vehicle for Organic Matter to the Early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Only in recent years has a concerted effort been made to study the circumstances under which extraterrestrial organic matter is accreted on Earth by way of meteors. Meteors are the luminous phenomena associated with the (partial) ablation of meteoric matter and represent the dominant pathway from space to Earth, with the possible exception of rare giant impacts of asteroids and comets. Meteors dominated the supply of organics to the early Earth if organic matter survived this pathway efficiently. Moreover, meteors are a source of kinetic energy that can convert inert atmospheric gases such as CO, N, and H2O into useful compounds, such as HCN and NO. Understanding these processes relies heavily on empirical evidence that is still very limited. Here I report on the observations in hand and discuss their relevance in the context of the origin of life.

  4. Impact-derived features of the Xiuyan meteorite crater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming

    2008-01-01

    Up to now, 176 meteorite impact craters have been found on the Earth. Among these craters, none of them lies in China. The Xiuyan crater is located in the Liaodong Peninsula of China. This bowl-shaped crater has a diameter of 1.8 km and depth of about 150 m. The impact-derived features include planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz, shatter cones, impact breccia, and radial valleys on the wall of rim. It is the first confirmed meteorite impact crater in China.

  5. Exploration of Victoria crater by the mars rover opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squyres, S. W.; Knoll, A.H.; Arvidson, R. E.; Ashley, James W.; Bell, J.F.; Calvin, W.M.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; Cohen, B. A.; De Souza, P.A.; Edgar, L.; Farrand, W. H.; Fleischer, I.; Gellert, Ralf; Golombek, M.P.; Grant, J.; Grotzinger, J.; Hayes, A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B.; Klingelhofer, G.; Knudson, A.; Li, R.; McCoy, T.J.; McLennan, S.M.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Rice, J. W.; Schroder, C.; Sullivan, R.J.; Yen, A.; Yingst, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars rover Opportunity has explored Victoria crater, a ???750-meter eroded impact crater formed in sulfate-rich sedimentary rocks. Impact-related stratigraphy is preserved in the crater walls, and meteoritic debris is present near the crater rim. The size of hematite-rich concretions decreases up-section, documenting variation in the intensity of groundwater processes. Layering in the crater walls preserves evidence of ancient wind-blown dunes. Compositional variations with depth mimic those ???6 kilometers to the north and demonstrate that water-induced alteration at Meridiani Planum was regional in scope.

  6. On the scaling of crater dimensions. II - Impact processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsapple, K. A.; Schmidt, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    Holsapple and Schmidt (1980) previously addressed the problem of the scaling of explosive cratering. Their analysis included results which show under which conditions the scaling can be bounded between quarter-root and cube-root rules. The present investigation is an extension of the earlier analysis and approaches the case of impact cratering. More restrictive bounds are found for impact cratering than for the explosive case. These stronger results come from considering the role of the impactor momentum as an independent variable for impact cratering. Attention is given to impact cratering variables, general scaling rules, the bounds on scaling rules, a generalization to more variables, and previous scaling rules and results.

  7. Diurnal and annual variations of meteor rates at the arctic circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Meteors are an important source for (a the metal atoms of the upper atmosphere metal layers and (b for condensation nuclei, the existence of which are a prerequisite for the formation of noctilucent cloud particles in the polar mesopause region. For a better understanding of these phenomena, it would be helpful to know accurately the annual and diurnal variations of meteor rates. So far, these rates have been little studied at polar latitudes. Therefore we have used the 33 MHz meteor radar of the ALOMAR observatory at 69° N to measure the meteor rates at this location for two full annual cycles. This site, being within 3° of the Arctic circle, offers in addition an interesting capability: The axis of its antenna field points (almost towards the North ecliptic pole once each day of the year. In this particular viewing direction, the radar monitors the meteoroid influx from (almost the entire ecliptic Northern hemisphere. We report on the observed diurnal variations (averaged over one month of meteor rates and their significant alterations throughout the year. The ratio of maximum over minimum meteor rates throughout one diurnal cycle is in January and February about 5, from April through December 2.3±0.3. If compared with similar measurements at mid-latitudes, our expectation, that the amplitude of the diurnal variation is to decrease towards the North pole, is not really borne out. Observations with the antenna axis pointing towards the North ecliptic pole showed that the rate of deposition of meteoric dust is substantially larger during the Arctic NLC season than the annual mean deposition rate. The daylight meteor showers of the Arietids, Zeta Perseids, and Beta Taurids supposedly contribute considerably to the June maximum of meteor rates. We note, though, that with the radar antenna pointing as described above, all three meteor radiants are close to the local horizon but all three radiants were detected.

  8. Radar observations of meteor trails, and their interpretation using Fresnel holography: a new tool in meteor science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. G. Elford

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available A Fresnel Transform technique has been developed at Adelaide to analyse radar meteor echoes detected in the transverse mode. The genesis for this technique was the study of the structure of the scattering ionization immediately behind the head of the trail, in order to deduce the degree of fragmentation of the ablating meteoroid. The technique has been remarkably successful in not only giving insight into the fragmentation of meteoroids, but also revealing other significant features of the trails including diffusion, lateral motion of the trail during formation due to wind drift, and phase of the scattered signal in the vicinity of the head of the trail.

    A serendipitous outcome of the analysis is the measurement of the speed and deceleration of the meteoroid producing the trail to a precision far exceeding that available from any other method applied to transverse scatter data.

    Examples of the outcomes of the technique applied to meteor echoes obtained with a 54 MHz narrow beam radar are presented.

  9. Lunar polar craters -- icy, rough or just sloping?

    CERN Document Server

    Eke, Vincent R; Lane, David A; Smith, David; Teodoro, Luis F A

    2013-01-01

    Circular Polarisation Ratio (CPR) mosaics from Mini-SAR on Chandrayaan-1 and Mini-RF on LRO are used to study craters near to the lunar north pole. The look direction of the detectors strongly affects the appearance of the crater CPR maps. Rectifying the mosaics to account for parallax also significantly changes the CPR maps of the crater interiors. It is shown that the CPRs of crater interiors in unrectified maps are biased to larger values than crater exteriors, because of a combination of the effects of parallax and incidence angle. Using the LOLA Digital Elevation Map (DEM), the variation of CPR with angle of incidence has been studied. For fresh craters, CPR~0.7 with only a weak dependence on angle of incidence or position interior or just exterior to the crater, consistent with dihedral scattering from blocky surface roughness. For anomalous craters, the CPR interior to the crater increases with both incidence angle and distance from the crater centre. Central crater CPRs are similar to those in the cra...

  10. Saliency detection and edge feature matching approach for crater extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Liu; Donghua Zhou; Lixin Chen; Maoyin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Craters are salient terrain features on planetary sur-faces, and provide useful information about the relative dating of geological unit of planets. In addition, they are ideal landmarks for spacecraft navigation. Due to low contrast and uneven il u-mination, automatic extraction of craters remains a chal enging task. This paper presents a saliency detection method for crater edges and a feature matching algorithm based on edges informa-tion. The craters are extracted through saliency edges detection, edge extraction and selection, feature matching of the same crater edges and robust el ipse fitting. In the edges matching algorithm, a crater feature model is proposed by analyzing the relationship between highlight region edges and shadow region ones. Then, crater edges are paired through the effective matching algorithm. Experiments of real planetary images show that the proposed approach is robust to different lights and topographies, and the detection rate is larger than 90%.

  11. Crater morphology in sandstone targets: The MEMIN impact parameter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Anja; Poelchau, Michael H.; Kenkmann, Thomas; Deutsch, Alex; Hoerth, Tobias; SchńFer, Frank; Thoma, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Hypervelocity (2.5-7.8 km s-1) impact experiments into sandstone were carried out to investigate the influence of projectile velocity and mass, target pore space saturation, target-projectile density contrast, and target layer orientation on crater size and shape. Crater size increases with increasing projectile velocity and mass as well as with increasing target pore space saturation. Craters in water-saturated porous targets are generally shallower and larger in volume and in diameter than craters from equivalent impacts into dry porous sandstone. Morphometric analyses of the resultant craters, 5-40 cm in diameter, reveal features that are characteristic of all of our experimental craters regardless of impact conditions (I) a large central depression within a fragile, light-colored central part, and (II) an outer spallation zone with areas of incipient spallation. Two different mechanical processes, grain fragmentation and intergranular tensile fracturing, are recorded within these crater morphologies. Zone (I) approximates the shape of the transient crater formed by material compression, displacement, comminution, and excavation flow, whereas (II) is the result of intergranular tensile fracturing and spallation. The transient crater dimensions are reconstructed by fitting quadric parabolas to crater profiles from digital elevation models. The dimensions of this transient and of the final crater show the same trends: both increase in volume with increasing impact energy, and with increasing water saturation of the target pore space. The relative size of the transient crater (in percent of the final crater volume) decreases with increasing projectile mass and velocity, signifying a greater contribution of spallation on the final crater size when projectile mass and velocity are increased.

  12. Galileo SSI lunar observations: Copernican craters and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcewen, A. S.; Greeley, R.; Head, James W.; Pieters, C. M.; Fischer, E. M.; Johnson, T. V.; Neukum, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft completed its first Earth-Moon flyby (EMI) in December 1990 and its second flyby (EM2) in December 1992. Copernican-age craters are among the most prominent features seen in the SSI (Solid-State Imaging) multispectral images of the Moon. The interiors, rays, and continuous ejecta deposits of these youngest craters stand out as the brightest features in images of albedo and visible/1-micron color ratios (except where impact melts are abundant). Crater colors and albedos (away from impact melts) are correlated with their geologic emplacement ages as determined from counts of superposed craters; these age-color relations can be used to estimate the emplacement age (time since impact event) for many Copernican-age craters on the near and far sides of the Moon. The spectral reflectivities of lunar soils are controlled primarily by (1) soil maturity, resulting from the soil's cumulative age of exposure to the space environment; (2) steady-state horizontal and vertical mixing of fresh crystalline materials ; and (3) the mineralogy of the underlying bedrock or megaregolith. Improved understanding of items (1) and (2) above will improve our ability to interpret item (3), especially for the use of crater compositions as probes of crustal stratigraphy. We have examined the multispectral and superposed crater frequencies of large isolated craters, mostly of Eratosthenian and Copernican ages, to avoid complications due to (1) secondaries (as they affect superposed crater counts) and (2) spatially and temporally nonuniform regolith mixing from younger, large, and nearby impacts. Crater counts are available for 11 mare craters and 9 highlands craters within the region of the Moon imaged during EM1. The EM2 coverage provides multispectral data for 10 additional craters with superposed crater counts. Also, the EM2 data provide improved spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratios over the western nearside.

  13. Retention time of rays around small lunar craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, S.; Honda, C.; Hirata, N.; Asada, N.; Demura, H.; Kitazato, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Terazono, J.; Moroda, T.; Ohtake, M.; Haruyama, J.; Matsunaga, T.

    2010-12-01

    Fresh lunar impact craters have rays which are bright features radially expanding from host craters. It has been suggested that the rays are erased by space weathering that modify surface materials by exposure to solar wind and micrometeorite bombardments, and by impact gardening that mixes surface materials and subsurface materials by meteorite bombardments (Wilhelms, 1987). Werner and Medvedev (2010) surveyed lunar rayed craters with Clementine UVVIS images and showed that retention time of the rays of craters larger than 5 km in diameter is 750 Myr. The purpose of this research is to estimate the retention time of rays around smaller lunar craters with high-resolution multiband images from Kaguya/MI (Multiband Imager). In our research, we surveyed rayed craters using OMAT (Optical Maturity) parameter developed by Lucey et al. (2000). The OMAT parameter is the optical index representing the degree of space weathering, which is derived from multiband images. Crater rays are not only bright, but also have larger OMAT value than the background. We conducted a survey of rayed craters from 300 m to 2 km in diameter in lunar highland with MI images and MI-OMAT data. A crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) plot is constructed for detected small rayed craters. Our preliminary result suggest that the CSFD of the rayed craters of less than 1 km in diameter falls beneath an isochrone 750 Ma, the ray retention time for large craters estimated by Werner and Medvedev (2010). This result supports an idea that the retention time of rayes depends on the crater diameter (Werner and Medvedev, 2010). Smaller craters would show shorter ray retention times.

  14. The influence of meteoric smoke particles on stratospheric aerosol properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Graham; Brooke, James; Dhomse, Sandip; Plane, John; Feng, Wuhu; Neely, Ryan; Bardeen, Chuck; Bellouin, Nicolas; Dalvi, Mohit; Johnson, Colin; Abraham, Luke

    2016-04-01

    The ablation of metors in the thermosphere and mesosphere introduces a signficant source of particulate matter into the polar upper stratosphere. These meteoric smoke particles (MSP) initially form at nanometre sizes but in the stratosphere have grown to larger sizes (tens of nanometres) following coagulation. The presence of these smoke particles may represent a significant mechanism for the nucleation of polar stratospheric clouds and are also known to influence the properties of the stratospheric aerosol or Junge layer. In this presentation we present findings from experiments to investigate the influence of the MSP on the Junge layer, carried out with the UM-UKCA composition-climate model. The UM-UKCA model is a high-top (up to 80km) version of the general circulation model with well-resolved stratospheric dynamics, includes the aerosol microphysics module GLOMAP and has interactive sulphur chemistry suitable for the stratosphere and troposphere (Dhomse et al., 2014). We have recently added to UM-UKCA a source of meteoric smoke particles, based on prescribing the variation of the smoke particles from previous simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). In UM-UKCA, the MSP particles are transported within the GLOMAP aerosol framework, alongside interactive stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. For the experiments presented here, we have activated the interaction between the MSP and the stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The MSP provide an important sink term for the gas phase sulphuric acid simulated in the model, with subsequent effects on the formation, growth and temporal evolution of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol particles. By comparing simulations with and without the MSP-sulphur interactions we quantify the influence of the meteoric smoke on the properties of volcanically-quiescent Junge layer. We also investigate the extent to which the MSP may modulate the effects from SO2 injected into the stratosphere from volcanic

  15. Paleomagnetism of Lonar Crater Impact Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.; Weiss, B. P.; Maloof, A. C.; Stewart, S. T.; Louzada, K. L.; Soule, S. A.; Swanson-Hysell, N.

    2006-12-01

    The source of magnetic fields on extraterrestrial bodies is largely unknown. There is particularly little information about magnetic fields on asteroids and the Moon for the last 3 billion years because most samples from these bodies predate this time. An exception is the small amount of impact-melt which has been continuously created by hypervelocity impactors over most of solar system history. Impact melt can be used to test the controversial hypothesis that magnetic fields on extraterrestrial bodies were predominantly the product of impact-produced plasmas rather than of core dynamos. However, to date only a small amount of impact melt has been analyzed paleomagnetically. To assess the quality of impact melts as recorders of magnetic fields, in January 2004 and January 2005 we collected thousands of samples of basaltic glass from the perimeter of Lonar Crater, a 1.8 km diameter impact crater which formed approximately 50,000 years ago in the Deccan Traps in Maharashtra, India. Lonar crater is a unique extraterrestrial analog because it is the only fresh impact crater on the Earth in a basaltic target. Most glass samples have rounded features and are between 0.01 and 1 cm in size, indicating that they are fladen and impact spherules (microtektites) formed from molten ejecta that cooled in mid-air while subject to rotational and aerodynamic forces. We have found that both types of glasses are strongly magnetic (saturation remanence of ~2 A m-1), contain ferromagnetic crystals that are predominantly single domain in size, and have no significant remanence anisotropy. The glasses also carry a natural remanent magnetization (NRM) presumably acquired just after the impact. However, alternating field demagnetization results in large directional changes of the magnetic moment, with little decrease in moment intensity. We interpret this unusual behavior as progressive removal of different coercivity components that cooled while the orientation of the spinning glasses

  16. 4-D imaging and monitoring of the Solfatara crater (Italy) by ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, Marco; Parolai, Stefano; Woith, Heiko; Gresse, Marceau; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Imaging shallow subsurface structures and monitoring related temporal variations are two of the main tasks for modern geosciences and seismology. Although many observations have reported temporal velocity changes, e.g., in volcanic areas and on landslides, new methods based on passive sources like ambient seismic noise can provide accurate spatially and temporally resolved information on the velocity structure and on velocity changes. The success of these passive applications is explained by the fact that these methods are based on surface waves which are always present in the ambient seismic noise wave field because they are excited preferentially by superficial sources. Such surface waves can easily be extracted because they dominate the Greeńs function between receivers located at the surface. For real-time monitoring of the shallow velocity structure of the Solfatara crater, one of the forty volcanoes in the Campi Flegrei area characterized by an intense hydrothermal activity due to the interaction of deep convection and meteoric water, we have installed a dense network of 50 seismological sensing units covering the whole surface area in the framework of the European project MED-SUV (The MED-SUV project has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme FP7 under Grant agreement no 308665). Continuous recordings of the ambient seismic noise over several days as well as signals of an active vibroseis source have been used. Based on a weighted inversion procedure for 3D-passive imaging using ambient noise cross-correlations of both Rayleigh and Love waves, we will present a high-resolution shear-wave velocity model of the structure beneath the Solfatara crater and its temporal changes. Results of seismic tomography are compared with a 3-D electrical resistivity model and CO2 flux map.

  17. Analysis of the Lyrids' meteor stream structure for long timeslots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, M.; Nefedyev, Y.; Sergienko, M.; Demina, N.; Andreev, A.

    2016-08-01

    Lyrids' structural parameters (luminosity function parameter r of meteors distribution magnitudes, the S parameter distribution of meteoroids in the mass flow, zenithal hour number (ZHR)) are determined by visual observations made in the 1900-2007 interval. The minimal value of S is equal to 1.54 ± 0.02 and corresponds to the Sun longitude 32.19° ± 0.04°. Lyrids' activity profiles as ZHR depending on the Sun longitude (L) were constructed for studying the flow activity. ZHR averaging for the individual values was held according the observation in 1900-1963, 1900-2000, 2001-2007 and 1900-2007. The peak position for all groups is the same within the error and equal to 32.326° ± 0.107. Two periods of Lyrids activity were revealed: a period which is close to 60 years; and s period of about 10-12 years.

  18. What do we see as ANT, Apex and Toroidal sources? - What meteors are, where meteors came from, where meteoroids are going

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseki, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    We found that the observabilities of meteors depend strongly on meteor velocity; the ratio of the number of CCD to photographic meteors is expressed as a quadratic function of the velocity, and the observability for radar observations has a clear peak around V_g=30 km/s. If we do not compensate for the observability, we are under the impression that radar observations contribute most to the Toroidal activity, CCD observations record a huge number of the Apex meteors, and photographic meteors concentrate on the ANT area. We assume that the observed number against the velocity shows roughly the observability for each observational technique and get more plausible results: in first place in radar observations is the Apex source and in optical observations ANT, while the Toroidal source is not so impressive. We calculated the radiants of 3212 comets and 1533 PHAs (potentially hazardous asteroids), finding 193 radiants of periodic comets, 1013 radiants of non-periodic comets and 3018 radiants of PHAs. Comparison of predicted to observed radiants reveals a very interesting fact: the contribution of the periodic comets to sporadic meteor activities is small, though we have clear recollections of meteor showers made up by a substantial number of massive meteoroids. It is clear many meteoroids from periodic comets meet Earth with low velocity and do not radiate enough light to be visible. Both predicted and observed radiant distributions clearly separate into two regions except for radiant areas relating to periodic comets. It is suggested that the Apex source is descended from non-periodic comets, ANT from asteroid kinsfolk and the Toroidal source is accumulated by older particles near Earth's orbit from both comets and asteroids.

  19. Earth-viewing satellite perspectives on the Chelyabinsk meteor event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven D.; Straka, William C.; Bachmeier, A. Scott; Schmit, Timothy J.; Partain, Philip T.; Noh, Yoo-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Large meteors (or superbolides [Ceplecha Z, et al. (1999) Meteoroids 1998:37–54]), although rare in recorded history, give sobering testimony to civilization’s inherent vulnerability. A not-so-subtle reminder came on the morning of February 15, 2013, when a large meteoroid hurtled into the Earth’s atmosphere, forming a superbolide near the city of Chelyabinsnk, Russia, ∼1,500 km east of Moscow, Russia [Ivanova MA, et al. (2013) Abstracts of the 76th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society, 5366]. The object exploded in the stratosphere, and the ensuing shock wave blasted the city of Chelyabinsk, damaging structures and injuring hundreds. Details of trajectory are important for determining its specific source, the likelihood of future events, and potential mitigation measures. Earth-viewing environmental satellites can assist in these assessments. Here we examine satellite observations of the Chelyabinsk superbolide debris trail, collected within minutes of its entry. Estimates of trajectory are derived from differential views of the significantly parallax-displaced [e.g., Hasler AF (1981) Bull Am Meteor Soc 52:194–212] debris trail. The 282.7 ± 2.3° azimuth of trajectory, 18.5 ± 3.8° slope to the horizontal, and 17.7 ± 0.5 km/s velocity derived from these satellites agree well with parameters inferred from the wealth of surface-based photographs and amateur videos. More importantly, the results demonstrate the general ability of Earth-viewing satellites to provide valuable insight on trajectory reconstruction in the more likely scenario of sparse or nonexistent surface observations. PMID:24145398

  20. METEOR v1.0 - Design and structure of the software package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This script describes the structure and the separated modules of the software package METEOR for the statistical analysis of meteorological data series. It contains a systematic description of the subroutines of METEOR and, also, of the required shape for input and output files. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph.D. Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIMASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds thc graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written in spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v 1.0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  1. Treatment of non-sparse cratering in planetary surface dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneissl, T.; Michael, G. G.; Schmedemann, N.

    2016-10-01

    We here propose a new technique to derive crater size-frequency distributions (CSFDs) from non-sparsely cratered surfaces, by accounting for the loss of craters due to subsequent crater/ejecta coverage. This approach, which we refer to as the buffered non-sparseness correction (BNSC), relates each crater to a measurement area found by excluding regions in the study area that have been resurfaced by larger craters and their ejecta blankets. The approach includes the well-known buffered crater counting (BCC) technique in order to consider the potential identification of craters whose centers are located outside the counting area. We demonstrate the new approach at two test sites on the Moon, one on the ancient lunar highlands outside the South Pole Aitken basin and the other on the much younger surface of lunar Mare Serenitatis. As expected, the correction has a much stronger effect on ancient, densely cratered surfaces than on younger, sparsely cratered surfaces. Furthermore, these first results indicate that the shapes of CSFDs on ancient terrains are actually very similar to the shapes of CSFDs on younger terrains.

  2. Optical observations of meteors generating infrasound-I: Acoustic signal identification and phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Elizabeth A.; Brown, Peter G.

    2014-11-01

    We analyse infrasound signals from 71 bright meteors/fireballs simultaneously detected by video to investigate the phenomenology and characteristics of meteor-generated near-field infrasound (trail where the infrasound signal originates, we find most signals are associated with cylindrical shocks, with about a quarter of events evidencing spherical shocks associated with fragmentation episodes and optical flares. The video data indicate that all events with ray launch angles >117° from the trajectory heading are most likely generated by a spherical shock, while infrasound produced by the meteors with ray launch angles ≤117° can be attributed to both a cylindrical line source and a spherical shock. We find that meteors preferentially produce infrasound toward the end of their trails with a smaller number showing a preference for mid-trail production. Meteors producing multiple infrasound arrivals show a strong infrasound source height skewness to the end of trails and are much more likely to be associated with optical flares. We find that about 1% of all our optically-recorded meteors have associated detected infrasound and estimate that regional meteor infrasound events should occur on the order of once per week and dominate in numbers over infrasound associated with more energetic (but rarer) bolides. While a significant fraction of our meteors generating infrasound (~1/4 of single arrivals) are produced by fragmentation events, we find no instances where acoustic radiation is detectable more than about 60° beyond the ballistic regime at our meteoroid sizes (grams to tens of kilograms) emphasizing the strong anisotropy in acoustic radiation for meteors which are dominated by cylindrical line source geometry, even in the presence of fragmentation.

  3. Simultaneous optical and radar observations of meteor head-echoes utilizing SAAMER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michell, R. G.; Janches, D.; Samara, M.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Brunini, C.; Bibbo, I.

    2015-12-01

    We present simultaneous optical and radar observations of meteors observed with the Southern Argentine Agile MEteor Radar (SAAMER). Although such observations were performed in the past using High Power and Large Aperture radars, the focus here is on meteors that produced head echoes that can be detected by a significantly less sensitive but more accessible radar system. An observational campaign was conducted in August of 2011, where an optical imager was operated near the radar site in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. Six head echo events out of 150 total detections were identified where simultaneous optical meteors could also be clearly seen within the main radar beam. The location of the meteors derived from the radar interferometry agreed very well with the optical location, verifying the accuracy of the radar interferometry technique. The meteor speeds and origin directions calculated from the radar data were accurate-compared with the optics-for the 2 meteors that had radar signal-to-noise ratios above 2.5. The optical meteors that produced the head echoes had horizontal velocities in the range of 29-91 km/s. These comparisons with optical observations improve the accuracy of the radar detection and analysis techniques, such that, when applied over longer periods of time, will improve the statistics of southern hemisphere meteor observations. Mass estimates were derived using both the optical and radar data and the resulting masses agreed well with each other. All were within an order of magnitude and in most cases, the agreement was within a factor of two.

  4. A Spanish Tagset for the CRATER Project

    OpenAIRE

    León, Fernando Sánchez

    1994-01-01

    This working paper describes the Spanish tagset to be used in the context of CRATER, a CEC funded project aiming at the creation of a multilingual (English, French, Spanish) aligned corpus using the International Telecommunications Union corpus. In this respect, each version of the corpus will be (or is currently) tagged. Xerox PARC tagger will be adapted to Spanish in order to perform the tagging of the Spanish version. This tagset has been devised as the ideal one for Spanish, and has been ...

  5. Analytical formulation of lunar cratering asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    We formulate the lunar cratering distribution and verify the cratering asymmetries generated by the main-belt asteroids (MBAs) as well as the near-Earth objects (NEOs). Based on a planar model that excludes the terrestrial and lunar gravitations on the impactors and assuming the impactor encounter speed with Earth $v_{\\rm{enc}}$ is higher than the lunar orbital speed $v_{\\rm{M}}$, we rigorously integrated the lunar cratering distribution, and derived its approximation to the first order of $v_{\\rm{M}}/v_{\\rm{enc}}$. Numerical simulations of lunar bombardment by the MBAs during the late heavy bombardment were performed with an Earth-Moon distance $a_{\\rm{M}}$ = 20--60 Earth radii in five cases. The analytical model directly proves the existence of a leading/trailing asymmetry and the absence of near/far asymmetry. The approximate form of the leading/trailing asymmetry is $(1 + A_1 \\cos\\beta)$, which decreases as the apex distance $\\beta$ increases. The numerical simulations show evidence of a pole/equator asym...

  6. A (revised) confidence index for the forecasting of the meteor showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaubaillon, Jeremie

    2016-10-01

    The prediction of meteor shower is known to provide several quality results depending on how it is performed. As a consequence it is hard to have an idea of how much one can trust a given prediction. In this paper I will present a revised confidence index, aiming to provide users with information regarding the way the prediction was performed. An effort to quantify the influence of close encounters with the parent body of a meteor shower is part of this confidence index. In fine, a single code will be provided for each prediction of meteor showers at any planet with a focus on Earth, Mars and Venus.

  7. Hard- and software problems of spaced meteor observations by optical electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiev, R. I.; Mukhamednazarov, S.; Ataev, A. SH.

    1987-01-01

    An optical electronic facility is being used for meteor observations along with meteor radars and astronomical TV. The main parts of the facility are cameras using UM-92 optical electronic image tubes. The three cascade optical electronic image tube with magnetic focusing has a 40 mm cathode and resolution in the center of up to 30 pairs of lines/mm. The photocathode is of a multislit S-20 type. For meteor spectra observations, replica gratings of 200 and 300 lines/mm are used as the dispersive element.

  8. Meteoric 10Be as a tool to investigate human induced soil fluxes: a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; De Vente, Joris; Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Minella, Jean; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The use of meteoric 10Be as a tool to understand long term landscape behavior is becoming increasingly popular. Due its high residence time, meteoric 10Be allows in principle to investigate in situ erosion rates over time scales exceeding the period studied with classical approaches such as 137Cs. The use of meteoric 10Be strongly contributes to the traditional interpretation of sedimentary archives which cannot be unequivocally coupled to sediment production and could provide biased information over longer time scales (Sadler, 1981). So far, meteoric 10Be has successfully been used in geochemical fingerprinting of sediments, to date soil profiles, to assess soil residence times and to quantify downslope soil fluxes using accumulated 10Be inventories along a hill slope. However, less attention is given to the potential use of the tracer to directly asses human induced changes in soil fluxes through deforestation, cultivation and reforestation. A good understanding of the processes governing the distribution of meteoric 10Be both within the soil profile and at landscape scale is essential before meteoric 10Be can be successfully applied to assess human impact. We developed a spatially explicit 2D-model (Be2D) in order to gain insight in meteoric 10Be movement along a hillslope that is subject to human disturbance. Be2D integrates both horizontal soil fluxes and vertical meteoric 10Be movement throughout the soil prolife. Horizontal soil fluxes are predicted using (i) well studied geomorphical laws for natural erosion and soil formation as well as (ii) human accelerated water and tillage erosion. Vertical movement of meteoric 10Be throughout the soil profile is implemented by inserting depth dependent retardation calculated using experimentally determined partition coefficients (Kd). The model was applied to different environments such as (i) the Belgian loess belt, characterized by aeolian deposits enriched in inherited meteoric 10Be, (ii) highly degraded and stony

  9. Mexican site for K/T impact crater?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, K. O.; Ocampo, A. C.; Duller, C. E.

    1991-05-01

    Research throughout the Caribbean suggests that the geophysical anomalies in the Yucatan first noted by Penfield and Camargo (1981) and called the Chicxulub crater could be the site of the impact purported to have caused the K/T extinctions. A semicircular ring of sink holes, known locally as cenotes, which correlates with the geophysical anomalies has been identified, and it is argued that the origin of the cenote ring is related to postimpact subsidence of the Chicxulub crater rim. If there is indeed a crater, the region within the cenote ring corresponds to its floor and the crater rim diameter is probably larger than 200 km. If confirmed as a site of impact, the Chicxulub crater would be the largest terrestrial impact crater known, which is consistent with the uniqueness of the K/T global catastrophe.

  10. Structural uplift and ejecta thickness of lunar mare craters: New insights into the formation of complex crater rims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Tim; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Most complex impact craters on solid planetary surfaces throughout the Solar System exhibit elevated crater rims similar to the elevated crater rims of simple craters. In principal the final elevation of the crater rim is due to the deposition of ejecta on the structurally uplifted bedrock of the pre-impact surface. For simple craters the elevated crater rim is due to two well understood factors: (i) Emplacement of the coherent proximal ejecta material at the transient cavity rim (overturned flap) [1]. (ii) Structural uplift of the pre-impact surface in the proximity of the transient cavity [1, 2]. The amount of structural uplift at the rim of simple craters is due to plastic thickening of the target rock, the emplacement of interthrust wedges and/or the injection of dike material in the underlying target [1, 2, 3, 4]. Both factors, (i) and (ii), are believed to equally contribute to the structural uplift of simple craters. Larger craters have complex morphologies and the crater's extent may considerably exceed that of the transient cavity due to gravity-driven adjustment movements. For instance, the Ries crater's final diameter is twice of its transient cavity size. It is expected that both ejecta thickness and structural uplift decrease with increasing distance from the rim of the transient crater. For lunar craters the continuous ejecta extends up to 2 crater radii from the crater center. The ejecta blanket thickness ET at the rim crest of the transient crater (which is inside the final crater) is a function of the distance r from the crater center, with RT as the radius of the transient crater [2, 6, 7] and is expressed by the following function: (1) ET = 0.033 RT (r/RT)^-3.0 for r ≥ RT [5, 6] The structural uplift is largest at the transient cavity rim and gets rapidly smaller with increasing distance to the crater center and disappears after 1.3 - 1.7 crater radii [1]. These circumstances raise the question, how elevated rims of complex craters form? Based

  11. Zumba crater, Daedalia Planum, Mars: Geologic investigation of a young, rayed impact crater and its secondary field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Frank C.; Crown, David A.; Tornabene, Livio L.

    2016-05-01

    Zumba is a ∼2.9 km diameter rayed crater on Mars located on extensive lava plains in Daedalia Planum to the southwest of Arsia Mons. It is a well-preserved young crater with large ejecta rays that extend for hundreds of kilometers from the impact site. The rays are thermally distinct from the background lava flows in THEMIS daytime and nighttime thermal infrared data, a unique characteristic among martian rayed craters. Concentrated within the rays are solitary or dense clusters of secondary craters with associated diffuse dark-toned deposits along with fewer secondary craters lacking dark-toned deposits. Using CTX images, we have mapped secondary craters with dark-toned deposits, collectively termed "secondary fields", to investigate their distribution as a function of distance from the impact site. The mapped secondary field was then used to investigate various aspects of the crater-forming event such as the surface angle and direction of the projectile, the effect of secondary craters on surface age estimates, and the number of secondary craters produced by the impact event. From our mapping, a total of 13,064 secondary fields were documented out to a 200 km radial distance beyond a 15 km-wide non-secondary zone around Zumba crater. Results show that the highest areal coverage of secondary fields occurs within 100 km of Zumba and within its rays, decreasing radially with distance to a background scattering of small secondary fields that are primary craters in a ∼101 km2 sample region and all craters (primaries and secondaries) from 43 select secondary fields in two map sectors in the study area, we obtain ages of ∼580 ± 100 Ma and ∼650 ± 70 Ma, respectively, for the lava flows into which Zumba impacted. These ages are consistent with and intermediate to 0.1-1 Ga volcanic flow units within and near Daedalia Planum. For craters within the secondary fields, a log differential plot of the data shows a pronounced downward deflection of the binned points for

  12. Zumba crater, Daedalia Planum, Mars: Geologic investigation of a young, rayed impact crater and its secondary field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Frank C.; Crown, David A.; Tornabene, Livio L.

    2016-05-01

    Zumba is a ∼2.9 km diameter rayed crater on Mars located on extensive lava plains in Daedalia Planum to the southwest of Arsia Mons. It is a well-preserved young crater with large ejecta rays that extend for hundreds of kilometers from the impact site. The rays are thermally distinct from the background lava flows in THEMIS daytime and nighttime thermal infrared data, a unique characteristic among martian rayed craters. Concentrated within the rays are solitary or dense clusters of secondary craters with associated diffuse dark-toned deposits along with fewer secondary craters lacking dark-toned deposits. Using CTX images, we have mapped secondary craters with dark-toned deposits, collectively termed "secondary fields", to investigate their distribution as a function of distance from the impact site. The mapped secondary field was then used to investigate various aspects of the crater-forming event such as the surface angle and direction of the projectile, the effect of secondary craters on surface age estimates, and the number of secondary craters produced by the impact event. From our mapping, a total of 13,064 secondary fields were documented out to a 200 km radial distance beyond a 15 km-wide non-secondary zone around Zumba crater. Results show that the highest areal coverage of secondary fields occurs within 100 km of Zumba and within its rays, decreasing radially with distance to a background scattering of small secondary fields that are moderately oblique impact projectile coming from the south. Using primary craters in a ∼101 km2 sample region and all craters (primaries and secondaries) from 43 select secondary fields in two map sectors in the study area, we obtain ages of ∼580 ± 100 Ma and ∼650 ± 70 Ma, respectively, for the lava flows into which Zumba impacted. These ages are consistent with and intermediate to 0.1-1 Ga volcanic flow units within and near Daedalia Planum. For craters within the secondary fields, a log differential plot of the

  13. New meteor showers identified in the CAMS and SonotaCo meteoroid orbit surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Rudawska, Regina

    2014-01-01

    A cluster analysis was applied to the combined meteoroid orbit database derived from low-light level video observations by the SonotaCo consortium in Japan (64,650 meteors observed between 2007 and 2009) and by the Cameras for All-sky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) project in California, during its first year of operation (40,744 meteors from Oct. 21, 2010 to Dec. 31, 2011). The objective was to identify known and potentially new meteoroid streams and identify their parent bodies. The database was examined by a single-linking algorithm using the Southworth and Hawkins D-criterion to identify similar orbits, with a low criterion threshold of D < 0.05. A minimum member threshold of 6 produced a total of 88 meteoroid streams. 43 are established streams and 45 are newly identified streams. The newly identified streams were included as numbers 448-502 in the IAU Meteor Shower Working List. Potential parent bodies are proposed.

  14. First observational evidence for the connection between the meteoric activity and occurrence of equatorial counter electrojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vineeth, C.; Mridula, N.; Muralikrishna, P.; Kumar, K. K.; Pant, T. K.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the first direct observational evidence for the possible role of meteoric activity in the generation of the equatorial Counter Electrojets (CEJ), an enigmatic daytime electrodynamical process over the geomagnetic equatorial upper atmosphere. The investigation carried out using the data from Proton Precession Magnetometer and Meteor Wind Radar over a geomagnetic dip equatorial station, Trivandrum (8.5°N, 77°E, 0.5°N dip lat.) in India, revealed that the occurrence of the afternoon CEJ events during a month is directly proportional to the average monthly meteor counts over this location. The observation is found to be very consistent during the considered period of study, i.e the years 2006 and 2007. The study vindicates that the meteor showers play a major role in setting up the background condition conducive for the generation of CEJ by reducing the strength of the upward polarization field.

  15. ANALYTICAL MODEL FOR MARS CRATER-SIZE FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Bruckman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical and analytical curve that reproduces essential features of the frequency distributions vs. diameter of the 42,000 impact craters contained in Barlow's Mars Catalog. The model is derived using reasonable simple assumptions that allow us to relate the present craters population with the craters population at each particular epoch. The model takes into consideration the reduction of the number of craters as a function of time caused by their erosion and obliteration, and this provides a simple and natural explanation for the presence of di erent slopes in the empirical log-log plot of number of craters (N vs. diameter (D. A mean life for martians craters as a function of diameter is deduced, and it is shown that this result is consistent with the corresponding determination of craters mean life based on Earth data. Arguments are given to suggest that this consistency follows from the fact that a crater mean life is proportional to its volumen. It also follows that in the absence of erosions and obliterations, when craters are preserved, we would have N / 1=D4:3, which is a striking conclusion, since the exponent 4:3 is larger than previously thought. Such an exponent implies a similar slope in the extrapolated impactors size-frequency distribution.

  16. Retention time of crater ray materials on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, C.; Suzuki, S.; Hirata, N.; Morota, T.; Demura, H.; Ohtake, M.; Haruyama, J.; Asada, N.

    2011-12-01

    Surfaces of planetary bodies are scarred with numerous impact craterings. Much of fresh material ejected from the impact cratering is deposited in the area surrounding the crater. These ejecta blanket reveals bright ray because the ejecta shortly after the impact cratering are immature (fresh). Adjacent to the crater rim, the ejecta typically forms a thick, continuous layer and shows brighter feature. At larger distances from the crater rim, the ejecta may occur as discontinuous clumps of materials. Lunar crater rays disappear over time, and it is suggested that these are the reason why space weathering that is the process of surface materials alternated by exposure to solar wind, cosmic rays, and micro-meteorite bombardments and impact gardening that is the mixing process of surface and subsurface materials. Wilhelms described that the presence of crater rays is considered as the marker to define the Copernican - Eratosthenian boundary, and the persistence of immature rays is less than about 1.1 Ga. The Copernican is one of the lunar geological timescale and runs from approximately 1.1 Ga to the present day. This is defined by impact craters having bright immature rays. It is important to estimate the crater rays retention time for the well-understanding of lunar geology. The purpose of this research is to investigate crater ray retention time of lunar craters using high-resolution data from Multiband Imager (MI) and Terrain Camera (TC) onboard Kaguya. We surveyed craters from 300 m to 10 km in diameter in lunar highland. The craters larger than 1 km in diameter are plotted above the 750 Ma isochron which was estimated by Werner and Medvedev (2010). However, the distribution cannot be fitted by a single isochron, this might suggest that the retention time of crater ray materials is longer than 750 Myr. As a point of space weathering which related to production of nano-phase iron (Sasaki et al., 2001), the cause of long time to disappear the crater ray on the

  17. Low-velocity impact craters in ice and ice-saturated sand with implications for Martian crater count ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, S. K.; Kieffer, S. W.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports on a series of low-velocity impact experiments performed in ice and ice-saturated sand. It is found that crater diameters in ice-saturated sand were about 2 times larger than in the same energy and velocity range in competent blocks of granite, basalt and cement, while craters in ice were 3 times larger. It is shown that if this dependence of crater size on strength persists to large hypervelocity impact craters, then surface of geologic units composed of ice or ice-saturated soil would have greater crater count ages than rocky surfaces with identical influx histories. Among the conclusions are that Martian impact crater energy versus diameter scaling may also be a function of latitude.

  18. Assessing soil fluxes using meteoric 10Be: development and application of the Be2D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be is a promising and increasingly popular tool to better understand soil fluxes at different timescales. Unlike other, more classical, methods such as the study of sedimentary archives it enables a direct coupling between eroding and deposition sites. However, meteoric 10Be can be mobilized within the soil. Therefore, spatial variations in meteoric 10Be inventories cannot directly be translated into spatial variations in erosion and sedimentation rates: a correct interpretation of measured 10Be inventories requires that both lateral and vertical movement of meteoric 10Be are accounted for. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system over timescales of up to 1 million year and use the model to investigate the impact of accelerated erosion on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility within the soil profile, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes. Different types of erosion such as creep, water and tillage erosion are supported. Model runs show that natural soil fluxes can be well reconstructed based on meteoric 10Be inventories, and this for a wide range of geomorphological and pedological conditions. However, extracting signals of human impact and distinguishing them from natural soil fluxes is only feasible when the soil has a rather high retention capacity so that meteoric 10Be is retained in the top soil layer. Application of the Be2D model to an existing data set in the Appalachian Mountains [West et al.,2013] using realistic parameter values for the soil retention capacity as well as for vertical advection resulted in a good agreement between simulated and observed 10Be inventories. This confirms the robustness of the model. We

  19. Reaction Kinetics of Meteoric Sodium Reservoirs in the Upper Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Martín, J C; Garraway, S A; Plane, J M C

    2016-03-10

    The gas-phase reactions of a selection of sodium-containing species with atmospheric constituents, relevant to the chemistry of meteor-ablated Na in the upper atmosphere, were studied in a fast flow tube using multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. For the first time, unambiguous observations of NaO and NaOH in the gas phase under atmospheric conditions have been achieved. This enabled the direct measurement of the rate constants for the reactions of NaO with H2, H2O, and CO, and of NaOH with CO2, which at 300-310 K were found to be (at 2σ confidence level): k(NaO + H2O) = (2.4 ± 0.6) × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule (-1) s(-1), k(NaO + H2) = (4.9 ± 1.2) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule (-1) s(-1), k(NaO + CO) = (9 ± 4) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule (-1) s(-1), and k(NaOH + CO2 + M) = (7.6 ± 1.6) × 10(-29) cm(6) molecule (-2) s(-1) (P = 1-4 Torr). The NaO + H2 reaction was found to make NaOH with a branching ratio ≥ 99%. A combination of quantum chemistry and statistical rate theory calculations are used to interpret the reaction kinetics and extrapolate the atmospherically relevant experimental results to mesospheric temperatures and pressures. The NaO + H2O and NaOH + CO2 reactions act sequentially to provide the major atmospheric sink of meteoric Na and therefore have a significant impact on the underside of the Na layer in the terrestrial mesosphere: the newly determined rate constants shift the modeled peak to about 93 km, i.e., 2 km higher than observed by ground-based lidars. This highlights further uncertainties in the Na chemistry cycle such as the unknown rate constant of the NaOH + H reaction. The fast Na-recycling reaction between NaO and CO and a re-evaluated rate constant of the NaO + CO2 sink should be now considered in chemical models of the Martian Na layer. PMID:25723735

  20. Dependences of Ratio of the Luminosity to Ionization on Velocity and Chemical Composition of Meteors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narziev, M.

    2011-01-01

    On the bases of results simultaneous photographic and radio echo observations, the results complex radar and television observations of meteors and also results of laboratory modeling of processes of a luminescence and ionization, correlation between of luminous intensity Ip to linear electronic density q from of velocities and chemical structure are investigated. It is received that by increasing value of velocities of meteors and decrease of nuclear weight of substance of particles, lg Ip/q decreased more than one order.

  1. On the influence of neutral turbulence on ambipolar diffusivities deduced from meteor trail expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hall

    Full Text Available By measuring fading times of radar echoes from underdense meteor trails, it is possible to deduce the ambipolar diffusivities of the ions responsible for these radar echoes. It could be anticipated that these diffusivities increase monotonically with height akin to neutral viscosity. In practice, this is not always the case. Here, we investigate the capability of neutral turbulence to affect the meteor trail diffusion rate.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence

  2. Central European MetEor NeTwork: Current status and future activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srba, J.; Koukal, J.; Ferus, M.; Lenža, L.; Gorková, S.; Civiš, S.; Simon, J.; Csorgei, T.; Jedlièka, M.; Korec, M.; Kaniansky, S.; Polák, J.; Spurný, M.; Brázdil, T.; Mäsiar, J.; Zima, M.; Delinèák, P.; Popek, M.; Bahýl, V.; Piffl, R.; Èechmánek, M.

    2016-06-01

    The Central European video Meteor Network (CEMeNt) established in 2010 is a platform for cross-border cooperation in the field of video meteor observations between Czech Republic and Slovakia. During five years of operation the CEMeNt network went through an extensive development. In total, 37 video systems were working on 20 permanent stations located in Czech Republic and Slovakia during 2015. In this paper we summarize CEMeNt current status and introduce some future activities.

  3. Cosmic meteor dust: potentially the dominant source of bio-available iron in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Marsh, D. R.; Del Castillo, C. E.; Fentzke, J.; Lopez-Rosado, R.; Behrenfeld, M.

    2012-12-01

    Johnson, 2001 [Johnson, Kenneth. S. (2001), Iron supply and demand in the upper ocean: Is extraterrestrial dust a significant source of bioavailable iron?, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 15(1), 61-63, doi:10.1029/2000GB001295], first suggested that meteoric particulate flux could be a significant source of bio-available iron, particularly in regions with little or no eolean sources, such as the Southern Ocean. While these calculations raised intriguing questions, there were many large unknowns in the input calculations between meteor flux and bio-available ocean molecular densities. There has been significant research in the intervening decade on related topics, such as the magnitude (~200 ktons per year) and composition of the meteoric flux, its atmospheric evaporation, transport, mesospheric formation of potentially soluble meteoric smoke, and extraterrestrial iron isotope identification. Paramount of these findings are recent NCAR WACCM atmosphere model results demonstrating that the majority of meteoric constituents are transported towards the winter poles and the polar vortex. This may lead to a focusing of meteoritic iron deposition towards the Southern Ocean. We present a proposed research plan involving Southern Ocean sample collection and analysis and atmospheric and biological modeling to determine both the current relevance of meteoric iron, and examine the past and future consequences of cosmic dust under a changing climate.

  4. Observations of Leonid Meteors Using a Mid-Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, George S.; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Tessensohn, Ted K.; Warren, David; Jenniskens, Peter

    We report broadband 3-5.5 µm detections of two Leonid meteors observed during the 1998 Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. Each meteor was detected at only one position along their trajectory just prior to the point of maximum light emission. We describe the particular aspects of the Aerospace Corp. Mid-wave Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph (MIRIS) developed for the observation of short duration transient events that impact its ability to detect Leonid meteors. This instrument had its first deployment during the 1998 Leonid MAC. We infer from our observations that the mid-wave IR light curves of two Leonid meteors differed from the visible light curve. At the points of detection, the infrared emission in the MIRIS passband was 25 +/- 4 times that at optical wavelengths for both meteors. In addition, we find an upper limit of 800 K for the solid body temperature of the brighter meteor we observed, at the point in the trajectory where we made our mid-wave IR detection.

  5. On the Binning and Associated Uncertainty of Crater Diameter Size-Frequency Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, B. P.; Robbins, S. J.; Plesko, C. S.; Riggs, J. D.

    2015-05-01

    The tabulation and graphical display of crater size-frequency data (crater diameters) is a critical part of analyzing crater populations, but despite a landmark 1979 paper, standardization remains elusive. We will discuss recommendations.

  6. Determining Statistically Significant Deviations from a Model Crater Production Function for Estimating Resurfacing Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, B. P.; Hilbe, J. M.; Robbins, S. J.; Plesko, C. S.; Riggs, J. D.

    2015-05-01

    Many crater analysts will search for deviations of observed crater population data from model crater populations and treat those deviations as a modification event - usually resurfacing. We will discuss how to assign confidences for these deviations.

  7. The Variability of Crater Identification Among Expert and Community Crater Analysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, S. J.; Antonenko, I.; Kirchoff, M. R.; Chapman, C. R.; Fassett, C. I.; Herrick, R. R.; Singer, K.; Zanetti, M.; Lehan, C.; Huang, D.; Gay, P. L.

    2015-05-01

    We all know it in the back of our minds, but we tend to ignore the fact that crater identification and measurement is not an exact science. This work was to start to quantify the variation in how independent analysts identify and measure impacts.

  8. Crater size distributions on Ganymede and Callisto: fundamental issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Roland; Schmedemann, Nico; Werner, Stefanie; Ivanov, Boris; Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Crater size distributions on the two largest Jovian satellites Ganymede and Callisto and the origin of impactors are subject of intense and controversial debates. In this paper, we reinvestigate crater size distributions measured in surface units derived from a recently published global geologic map, based on Voyager and Galileo SSI images at a scale of 1 km/pxl (Collins G. C. et al. (2013), U. S. Geol. Surv., Sci. Inv. Map 3237). These units are used as a context to units mapped in more detail at higher resolution in Galileo SSI images. We focus on the following fundamental issues: (1) Similarity between shapes of crater distributions on the Galilean satellites and on inner solar system bodies; (2) production versus equilibrium distributions; (3) apex/antapex variations in crater distributions. First, our results show a strong similarity in shape between the crater distributions on the most densely cratered regions on Ganymede and Callisto with those in the lunar highlands. We conclude that the shape of the crater distributions on these two Jovian satellites implies the craters were preferentially formed from members of a collisionally evolved projectile family, derived either from Main Belt asteroids as candidates of impactors on the Jovian satellites, or from projectiles stemming from the outer solar system which have undergone collisional evolution, resulting in a size distribution similar to those of Main Belt asteroids. Second, the complex shape of the crater distributions on Ganymede and Callisto indicates they are mostly production distributions and can be used to infer the underlying shape of the projectile size distribution. Locally, equilibrium distributions occur, especially at smaller sub-kilometer diameters. Third, the most densely cratered regions on both satellites do not show apex-antapex variations in crater frequency, as inferred for bodies from heliocentric orbits (e.g., Zahnle K. et al. (2003), Icarus 163, 263-289). This indicates that these

  9. [Abdominal spasms, meteorism, diarrhea: fructose intolerance, lactose intolerance or IBS?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litschauer-Poursadrollah, Margaritha; El-Sayad, Sabine; Wantke, Felix; Fellinger, Christina; Jarisch, Reinhart

    2012-12-01

    Meteorism, abdominal spasms, diarrhea, casually obstipation, flatulence and nausea are symptoms of fructose malabsorption (FIT) and/or lactose intolerance (LIT), but are also symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Therefore these diseases should be considered primarily in patients with digestive complaints. For diagnosis an H(2)-breath test is used.In 1,935 patients (526 m, 1,409 f) a fructose intolerance test and in 1,739 patients (518 m,1,221 f) a lactose intolerance test was done.FIT is found more frequently than LIT (57 versus 52 % in adults (p < 0,02) and in children 90 versus 62 % (p < 0,001)) and is in polyintolerances most frequently correlated to histamine intolerance (HIT). Headache (ca. 10 %), fatigue (ca. 5 %) and dizziness (ca. 3 %) may occur after the test, irrespective whether the test was positive or negative.In more than 2/3 of patients a diet reduced in fructose or lactose may lead to improvement or remission of these metabolic disorders. IBS, which is often correlated with FIT (183/221 patients = 83 %), can be improved by relevant but also not relevant diets indicating that irritable bowel disease seems to be caused primarily by psychological disorders.

  10. A Spanish Tagset for the CRATER Project

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-León, F

    1994-01-01

    This working paper describes the Spanish tagset to be used in the context of CRATER, a CEC funded project aiming at the creation of a multilingual (English, French, Spanish) aligned corpus using the International Telecommunications Union corpus. In this respect, each version of the corpus will be (or is currently) tagged. Xerox PARC tagger will be adapted to Spanish in order to perform the tagging of the Spanish version. This tagset has been devised as the ideal one for Spanish, and has been posted to several lists in order to get feedback to it.

  11. Cratering record in the inner solar system: Implications for earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal and external processes have reworked the Earth's surface throughout its history. In particular, the effect of meteorite impacts on the early history of the earth is lost due to fluvial, aeolian, volcanic and plate tectonic action. The cratering record on other inner solar system bodies often provides the only clue to the relative cratering rates and intensities that the earth has experienced throughout its history. Of the five major bodies within the inner solar system, Mercury, Mars, and the Moon retain scars of an early episode of high impact rates. The heavily cratered regions on Mercury, Mars, and the Moon show crater size-frequency distribution curves similar in shape and crater density, whereas the lightly cratered plains on the Moon and Mars show distribution curves which, although similar to each other, are statistically different in shape and density from the more heavily cratered units. The similarities among crater size-frequency distribution curves for the Moon, Mercury, and Mars suggest that the entire inner solar system was subjected to the two populations of impacting objects but Earth and Venus have lost their record of heavy bombardment impactors. Thus, based on the cratering record on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars, it can be inferred that the Earth experienced a period of high crater rates and basin formation prior to about 3.8 BY ago. Recent studies have linked mass extinctions to large terrestrial impacts, so life forms were unable to establish themselves until impact rates decreased substantially and terrestrial conditions became more benign. The possible periodicity of mass extinctions has led to the theory of fluctuating impact rates due to comet showers in the post heavy bombardment period. The active erosional environment on the Earth complicates attempts to verify these showers by erasing geological evidence of older impact craters

  12. Gravitational signatures of lunar floor-fractured craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorey, Clément; Michaut, Chloé; Wieczorek, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters are impact craters characterized by distinctive shallow floors crossed by important networks of fractures. Different scenarios have been proposed to explain their formations but recent studies showed that the intrusion of magma at depth below the crater floor is the most plausible explanation. The intrusion of dense magma within the light upper-most part of the lunar crust should have left a positive signature in the gravity field. This study takes advantage of the unprecedented resolution of the lunar gravity field obtained from the NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, in combination with topographic data obtained from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument, to investigate the gravitational signatures of both normal and floor-fractured craters. Despite the large variability in their gravitational signatures, the floor-fractured and normal craters in the Highlands show significant differences: the gravitational anomalies are significantly larger at floor-fractured craters. The anomaly amplitudes for floor-fractured craters are in agreement with synthetic gravity anomalies based on the predicted intrusion shapes from a theoretical flow model. Our results are consistent with magmatic intrusions intruding a crust characterized by a 12% porosity and where the intrusion has no porosity. Similar studies have been carried out in the lunar maria and South Pole-Aikten basin. Although the average gravitational signature of floor-fractured craters is larger than at normal craters in these regions, they cannot be distinguished statistically due to the small number of craters and the large variability of the anomalies. In general, a better characterization of the signal due solely to the initial impact crater is needed to isolate the magmatic intrusion signal and characterize the density contrast between the magma and crust.

  13. Origin of the rock abundance anomaly at Tsiolkovskiy crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhagen, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Early Diviner measurements have indicated that Tsiolkovskiy crater has unexpectedly high rock abundance relative to its age. New datasets from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter enable further analysis of this crater through measurements of surface and near-subsurface rock populations at a variety of spatial scales and wavelengths. We used Diviner, Mini-RF, and LROC datasets to analyze the block population and distribution around Tsiolkovskiy crater. We found that Tsiolkovskiy has an external deposit where (1) Diviner rock abundance was anomalously high, similar to Copernican aged craters, (2) Diviner estimates of rock-free regolith thickness were anomalously low, consistent with CPR indicated well preserved massive impact melt, which is rough at the decimeter scale, and (4) LROC imagery provided clear examples of surface block population morphology similar to the crater interior. Furthermore, we used LROC imagery to perform a new calculation of modeled crater age consistent with an ancient origin at least 3.2 Ga. Together these data showed that Tsiolkovskiy has a unique massive impact melt and blocky ejecta deposit for a crater of its size and age and may be the youngest crater capable of producing this type and scale of deposit. To reconcile the anomalously blocky appearance of Tsiolkovskiy with its age, we propose mechanisms that support a higher surface rock production rate. The most likely scenario requires (1) Tsiolkovkiy's impactor and target properties and/or impact geometry to produce a massive impact melt deposit with sufficiently large blocks, and (2) the recent disruption of surface fines exposing original blocks from local, regional, and/or antipodal impacts. The source of this disruption is unknown, but Tsiolkovskiy crater is located antipodal to the Copernican-aged Aristarchus crater. Future modeling of the seismic effects of this impact may help to determine whether this was a likely source for the recent surface modification at Tsiolkovskiy crater.

  14. Be2D: A model to understand the distribution of meteoric 10Be in soilscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides have revolutionised our understanding of earth surface process rates. They have become one of the standard tools to quantify soil production by weathering, soil redistribution and erosion. Especially Beryllium-10 has gained much attention due to its long half-live and propensity to be relatively conservative in the landscape. The latter makes 10Be an excellent tool to assess denudation rates over the last 1000 to 100 × 103 years, bridging the anthropogenic and geological time scale. Nevertheless, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in soil systems makes translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates difficult. Here we present a coupled soil hillslope model, Be2D, that is applied to synthetic and real topography to address the following three research questions. (i) What is the influence of vertical meteoric Be10 mobility, caused by chemical mobility, clay translocation and bioturbation, on its lateral redistribution over the soilscape, (ii) How does vertical mobility influence erosion rates and soil residence times inferred from meteoric 10Be inventories and (iii) To what extent can a tracer with a half-life of 1.36 Myr be used to distinguish between natural and human-disturbed soil redistribution rates? The model architecture of Be2D is designed to answer these research questions. Be2D is a dynamic model including physical processes such as soil formation, physical weathering, clay migration, bioturbation, creep, overland flow and tillage erosion. Pathways of meteoric 10Be mobility are simulated using a two step approach which is updated each timestep. First, advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be is simulated within the soil profile and second, lateral redistribution because of lateral soil fluxes is calculated. The performance and functionality of the model is demonstrated through a number of synthetic and real model runs using existing datasets of meteoric 10Be from case-studies in southeastern US. Brute

  15. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7.2 Section 7.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a)...

  16. Impact craters on venus: initial analysis from magellan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R J; Arvidson, R E; Boyce, J M; Campbell, D B; Guest, J E; Schaber, G G; Soderblom, L A

    1991-04-12

    Magellan radar images of 15 percent of the planet show 135 craters of probable impact origin. Craters more than 15 km across tend to contain central peaks, multiple central peaks, and peak rings. Many craters smaller than 15 km exhibit multiple floors or appear in clusters; these phenomena are attributed to atmospheric breakup of incoming meteoroids. Additionally, the atmosphere appears to have prevented the formation of primary impact craters smaller than about 3 km and produced a deficiency in the number of craters smaller than about 25 km across. Ejecta is found at greater distances than that predicted by simple ballistic emplacement, and the distal ends of some ejecta deposits are lobate. These characteristics may represent surface flows of material initially entrained in the atmosphere. Many craters are surrounded by zones of low radar albedo whose origin may have been deformation of the surface by the shock or pressure wave associated with the incoming meteoroid. Craters are absent from several large areas such as a 5 million square kilometer region around Sappho Patera, where the most likely explanation for the dearth of craters is volcanic resurfacing. There is apparently a spectrum of surface ages on Venus ranging approximately from 0 to 800 million years, and therefore Venus must be a geologically active planet.

  17. Impact craters on Venus: Initial analysis from Magellan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R.J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Boyce, J.M.; Campbell, D.B.; Guest, J.E.; Schaber, G.G.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    Magellan radar images of 15 percent of the planet show 135 craters of probable impact origin. Craters more than 15 km across tend to contain central peaks, multiple central peaks, and peak rings. Many craters smaller than 15 km exhibit multiple floors or appear in clusters; these phenomena are attributed to atmospheric breakup of incoming meteoroids. Additionally, the atmosphere appears to have prevented the formation of primary impact craters smaller than about 3 km and produced a deficiency in the number of craters smaller than about 25 km across. Ejecta is found at greater distances than that predicted by simple ballistic emplacement, and the distal ends of some ejecta deposits are lobate. These characteristics may represent surface flows of material initially entrained in the atmosphere. Many craters are surrounded by zones of low radar albedo whose origin may have been deformation of the surface by the shock or pressure wave associated with the incoming meteoroid. Craters are absent from several large areas such as a 5 million square kilometer region around Sappho Patera, where the most likely explanation for the dearth of craters is volcanic resurfacing, There is apparently a spectrum of surface ages on Venus ranging approximately from 0 to 800 million years, and therefore Venus must be a geologically active planet.

  18. A Monte-Carlo based extension of the Meteor Orbit and Trajectory Software (MOTS) for computations of orbital elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, T.; Koschny, D.; Soja, R.; Srama, R.; Poppe, B.

    2016-01-01

    The Canary Islands Long-Baseline Observatory (CILBO) is a double station meteor camera system (Koschny et al., 2013; Koschny et al., 2014) that consists of 5 cameras. The two cameras considered in this report are ICC7 and ICC9, and are installed on Tenerife and La Palma. They point to the same atmospheric volume between both islands allowing stereoscopic observation of meteors. Since its installation in 2011 and the start of operation in 2012 CILBO has detected over 15000 simultaneously observed meteors. Koschny and Diaz (2002) developed the Meteor Orbit and Trajectory Software (MOTS) to compute the trajectory of such meteors. The software uses the astrometric data from the detection software MetRec (Molau, 1998) and determines the trajectory in geodetic coordinates. This work presents a Monte-Carlo based extension of the MOTS code to compute the orbital elements of simultaneously detected meteors by CILBO.

  19. Ordovician meteoric carbon and oxygen isotopic values: Implications for the latitudinal variations of ancient stable isotopic values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, K.J.; Steinhauff, D.M.; Walker, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    Columnar and clear blocky calcite cement from a Middle Ordovician carbonate succession in east Tennessee is interpreted as meteoric in origin. Columnar and clear blocky calcite from this succession does not show extremely large 13C depletions reported from meteoric phases of younger rocks. Meteoric fluid ??18O values calculated from clear blocky calcite are ??? 2 to 3??? more negative than approximately coeval sea water; a relationship typical of modern, low-latitude, coastal meteoric water. Comparison with meteoric ??18O values from Ordovician units elsewhere suggests that the geographic distribution of these values may be broadly similar to that observed today. Therefore, we tentatively suggest that geographic distribution of meteoric ??18O values during both icehouse and greenhouse eras are similar.

  20. Chemical hazards from acid crater lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, M. J.; Sumarti, S.; Heikens, A.; Bogaard, T. A.; Hartiyatun, S.

    2003-04-01

    Acid crater lakes, which are hosted by a considerable number of active volcanoes, form a potential threat for local ecosystems and human health, as they commonly contain large amounts of dissolved chemicals. Subsurface seepage or overflow can lead to severe deterioration of the water quality of rivers and wells, as observations around several of these volcanoes have shown. The Ijen crater lake in East Java (Indonesia) is a striking example, as this reservoir of hyperacid (pHfluorosis is widespread among the ca. 100,000 residents of the area. A conspicuous spatial correlation between fluoride concentrations and the irrigation system suggest that long-term (century) infiltration of irrigation water may have affected the quality of groundwater. Fluorosis is also a problem in some villages within the caldera, where well water sources may have a more direct subsurface connection with the lake system. From our observations we conclude that water-quality monitoring is especially needed for health reasons in volcanic areas where volatile elements, derived from passively degassing magma, are intercepted by (sub) surface water bodies.

  1. A Giant Crater on 90 Antiope?

    CERN Document Server

    Descamps, P; Michalowski, T; Berthier, J; Pollock, J; Wiggins, P; Birlan, M; Colas, F; Vachier, F; Fauvaud, S; Fauvaud, M; Sareyan, J -P; Pilcher, F; Klinglesmith, D A

    2009-01-01

    Mutual event observations between the two components of 90 Antiope were carried out in 2007-2008. The pole position was refined to lambda0 = 199.5+/-0.5 eg and beta0 = 39.8+/-5 deg in J2000 ecliptic coordinates, leaving intact the physical solution for the components, assimilated to two perfect Roche ellipsoids, and derived after the 2005 mutual event season (Descamps et al., 2007). Furthermore, a large-scale geological depression, located on one of the components, was introduced to better match the observed lightcurves. This vast geological feature of about 68 km in diameter, which could be postulated as a bowl-shaped impact crater, is indeed responsible of the photometric asymmetries seen on the "shoulders" of the lightcurves. The bulk density was then recomputed to 1.28+/-0.04 gcm-3 to take into account this large-scale non-convexity. This giant crater could be the aftermath of a tremendous collision of a 100-km sized proto-Antiope with another Themis family member. This statement is supported by the fact ...

  2. Mass Movement on Vesta at Steep Scarps and Crater Rims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, K.; Jaumann, R.; Otto, K.; Hoogenboom, T.; Wagner, R.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Garry, B.; Williams, D. A.; Yingst, R. A.; Scully, J.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Kneissl, T.; Schmedemann, N.; Kersten, E.; Stephan, K.; Matz, K.-D.; Pieters, C. M.; Preusker, F.; Roatsch, T.; Schenk, P.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Quadrangles Av-11 and Av-12 on Vesta are located at the northern rim of the giant Rheasilvia south polar impact basin. The primary geologic units in Av-11 and Av-12 include material from the Rheasilvia impact basin formation, smooth material and different types of impact crater structures (such as bimodal craters, dark and bright crater ray material and dark ejecta material). Av-11 and Av-12 exhibit almost the full range of mass wasting features observed on Vesta, such as slump blocks, spur-and-gully morphologies and landslides within craters. Processes of collapse, slope instability and seismically triggered events force material to slump down crater walls or scarps and produce landslides or rotational slump blocks. The spur-and-gully morphology that is known to form on Mars is also observed on Vesta; however, on Vesta this morphology formed under dry conditions.

  3. Does saturation cratering exist in the solar system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, W. K.

    1984-01-01

    A number of researchers have concluded that saturation equilibrium cratering exists nowhere in the solar system, and therefore that diameter distributions in even the most heavily cratered provinces reveal initial production functions related to impacting bodies. Based on this premise, different populations of impactors are identified in different epochs and regions of the solar system. These hypotheses are clearly crucial to interpreting planetary history and need further independent examination. The production function in the outer solar system may differ from that in the inner solar system, but it is also possible that viscous relaxation of ice craters or immediate flooding of craters that penetrate through an ice lithosphere into watery substrate may explain the greater deficiency of large craters on icy moons. This problem is controversial and needs more study.

  4. Origin of the anomalously rocky appearance of Tsiolkovskiy crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Neish, Catherine D.; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Ghent, Rebecca R.; Hayne, Paul O.; Lawrence, Samuel J.; Petro, Noah E.; Bandfield, Joshua L.

    2016-07-01

    Rock abundance maps derived from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) show Tsiolkovskiy crater to have high surface rock abundance and relatively low regolith thickness. The location of the enhanced rock abundance to the southeast of the crater is consistent with a massive, well-preserved impact melt deposit apparent in LRO Miniature Radio Frequency instrument circular polarization ratio data. A new model crater age using LRO Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera imagery suggests that while it originated in the Late Imbrian, Tsiolkovskiy may be the youngest lunar crater of its size (∼180 km diameter). Together these data show that Tsiolkovskiy has a unique surface rock population and regolith properties for a crater of its size and age. Explanation of these observations requires mechanisms that produce more large blocks, preserve boulders and large blocks from degradation to regolith, and/or uncover buried rocks. These processes have important implications for formation of regolith on the Moon.

  5. Simulating the mobility of meteoric 10Be in the landscape through a coupled soil-hillslope model (Be2D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be allows for the quantification of vertical and lateral soil fluxes over long time scales (103-105 yr). However, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in the soil system makes a translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates complex. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model simulating the behaviour of meteoric 10Be on a hillslope. The model consists of two parts. The first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be within the soil profile, and the second component describes lateral soil and meteoric 10Be fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering as well as downslope fluxes of soil due to creep, water and tillage erosion. Synthetic model simulations show that meteoric 10Be inventories can be related to erosion and deposition across a wide range of geomorphological and pedological settings. Our results also show that meteoric 10Be can be used as a tracer to detect human impact on soil fluxes for soils with a high affinity for meteoric 10Be. However, the quantification of vertical mobility is essential for a correct interpretation of the observed variations in meteoric 10Be profiles and inventories. Application of the Be2D model to natural conditions using data sets from the Southern Piedmont (Bacon et al., 2012) and Appalachian Mountains (Jungers et al., 2009; West et al., 2013) allows to reliably constrain parameter values. Good agreement between simulated and observed meteoric 10Be concentrations and inventories is obtained with realistic parameter values. Furthermore, our results provide detailed insights into the processes redistributing meteoric 10Be at the soil-hillslope scale.

  6. Seismic detections of the 15 February 2013 Chelyabinsk meteor from the dense ChinArray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Wang, Baoshan; Peng, Zhigang; Wang, Weitao

    2016-07-01

    ChinArray is a dense portable broadband seismic network to cover the entire continental China, and the Phase I is deployed along the north-south seismic belt in southwest China. In this study, we analyze seismic data recorded on the ChinArray following the February 15, 2013 Chelyabinsk (Russia) meteor. This was the largest known object entering the Earth's atmosphere since the 1908 Tunguska meteor. The seismic energy radiated from this event was recorded by seismic stations worldwide including the dense ChinArray that are more than 4000 km away. The weak signal from the meteor event was contaminated by a magnitude 5.8 Tonga earthquake occurred ~20 min earlier. To test the feasibility of detecting the weak seismic signals from the meteor event, we compute vespagram and perform F-K analysis to the surface-wave data. We identify a seismic phase with back azimuth (BAZ) of 329.7° and slowness of 34.73 s/deg, corresponding to the surface wave from the Russian meteor event (BAZ ~325.97°). The surface magnitude (M S) of the meteor event is 3.94 ± 0.18. We also perform similar analysis on the data from the broadband array F-net in Japan, and find the BAZ of the surface waves to be 316.61°. With the different BAZs of ChinArray and F-net, we locate the Russian meteor event at 58.80°N, 58.72°E. The relatively large mislocation (~438 km as compared with 55.15°N, 61.41°E by others) may be a result of the bending propagation path of surface waves, which deviates from the great circle path. Our results suggest that the dense ChinArray and its subarrays could be used to detect weak signals at teleseismic distances.

  7. Meteor Ablation as Origin for the D-region Ledge in Electrical Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. R.; Wu, Y. J.; Friedrich, M.; Hsu, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The ledge in electron density and electrical conductivity in the 80-90 km altitude range has been a consistent feature in rocket and electromagnetic observations of the D-region for half a century. Most conspicuous at nighttime and at low latitudes, the abrupt increase in electron density with altitude near 85 km often shows a scale height of less than 1 km. This observed behavior is a marked departure from the Wait-Spies exponential profile that is often used to model the D-region. Calculations show that the conduction current and displacement current are matched at the height of the observed ledge over a wide range of VLF frequencies, pinning this altitude as the sharp boundary for the global VLF waveguide. Meteor ablation involves the abrupt transformation in altitude of faint sub-millimeter-sized meteoroids to nanometer-sized dust, when the meteor boiling temperature near 2100K is attained. The ablation dust can reach concentrations comparable to electron density near the ledge height and in the polluted continental boundary layer. The electron affinity of this silicate mineral dust together with the suppression of negative molecular ions (e.g., O2- ) by monatomic O (Plane et al., 2014), serves to reduce the free electron concentration to form the ledge in conductivity. Calculations with the classical model for meteor ablation require a mean incoming meteor speed of 15 km/s. with rapid decline at higher speeds, to produce a ledge height at 85 km altitude. The key role for meteor ablation in this ionosphere context has likely not received due recognition because neither the meteoric dust nor the meteors that create it are readily detectable by remote sensing, and in situ observations of the mesosphere are scarce.

  8. Seismic detections of the 15 February 2013 Chelyabinsk meteor from the dense ChinArray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Wang, Baoshan; Peng, Zhigang; Wang, Weitao

    2016-08-01

    ChinArray is a dense portable broadband seismic network to cover the entire continental China, and the Phase I is deployed along the north-south seismic belt in southwest China. In this study, we analyze seismic data recorded on the ChinArray following the February 15, 2013 Chelyabinsk (Russia) meteor. This was the largest known object entering the Earth's atmosphere since the 1908 Tunguska meteor. The seismic energy radiated from this event was recorded by seismic stations worldwide including the dense ChinArray that are more than 4000 km away. The weak signal from the meteor event was contaminated by a magnitude 5.8 Tonga earthquake occurred ~20 min earlier. To test the feasibility of detecting the weak seismic signals from the meteor event, we compute vespagram and perform F-K analysis to the surface-wave data. We identify a seismic phase with back azimuth (BAZ) of 329.7° and slowness of 34.73 s/deg, corresponding to the surface wave from the Russian meteor event (BAZ ~325.97°). The surface magnitude ( M S) of the meteor event is 3.94 ± 0.18. We also perform similar analysis on the data from the broadband array F-net in Japan, and find the BAZ of the surface waves to be 316.61°. With the different BAZs of ChinArray and F-net, we locate the Russian meteor event at 58.80°N, 58.72°E. The relatively large mislocation (~438 km as compared with 55.15°N, 61.41°E by others) may be a result of the bending propagation path of surface waves, which deviates from the great circle path. Our results suggest that the dense ChinArray and its subarrays could be used to detect weak signals at teleseismic distances.

  9. Small craters on the meteoroid and space debris impact experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Donald H.

    1995-01-01

    Examination of 9.34 m(exp 2) of thick aluminum plates from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) using a 25X microscope revealed 4341 craters that were 0.1 mm in diameter or larger. The largest was 3 mm in diameter. Most were roughly hemispherical with lips that were raised above the original plate surface. The crater diameter measured was the diameter at the top of the raised lips. There was a large variation in the number density of craters around the three-axis gravity-gradient stabilized spacecraft. A model of the near-Earth meteoroid environment is presented which uses a meteoroid size distribution based on the crater size distribution on the space end of the LDEF. An argument is made that nearly all the craters on the space end must have been caused by meteoroids and that very few could have been caused by man-made orbital debris. However, no chemical analysis of impactor residue that will distinguish between meteoroids and man-made debris is yet available. A small area (0.0447 m(exp 2)) of one of the plates on the space end was scanned with a 200X microscope revealing 155 craters between 10 micron and 100 micron in diameter and 3 craters smaller than 10 micron. This data was used to extend the size distribution of meteoroids down to approximately 1 micron. New penetration equations developed by Alan Watts were used to relate crater dimensions to meteoroid size. The equations suggest that meteoroids must have a density near 2.5 g/cm(exp 3) to produce craters of the shape found on the LDEF. The near-Earth meteoroid model suggests that about 80 to 85 percent of the 100 micron to 1 mm diameter craters on the twelve peripheral rows of the LDEF were caused by meteoroids, leaving 15 to 20 percent to be caused by man-made orbital debris.

  10. The effect of craters on the lunar neutron flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, V. R.; Bower, K. E.; Diserens, S.; Ryder, M.; Yeomans, P. E. L.; Teodoro, L. F. A.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Hermalyn, B.; Lavelle, C. M.; Lawrence, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    The variation of remotely sensed neutron count rates is measured as a function of cratercentric distance using data from the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer. The count rate, stacked over many craters, peaks over the crater center, has a minimum near the crater rim, and at larger distances, it increases to a mean value that is up to 1% lower than the mean count rate observed over the crater. A simple model is presented, based upon an analytical topographical profile for the stacked craters fitted to data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter. The effect of topography coupled with neutron beaming from the surface largely reproduces the observed count rate profiles. However, a model that better fits the observations can be found by including the additional freedom to increase the neutron emissivity of the crater area by ˜0.35% relative to the unperturbed surface. It is unclear what might give rise to this effect, but it may relate to additional surface roughness in the vicinities of craters. The amplitude of the crater-related signal in the neutron count rate is small, but not too small to demand consideration when inferring water-equivalent hydrogen (WEH) weight percentages in polar permanently shaded regions (PSRs). If the small crater-wide count rate excess is concentrated into a much smaller PSR, then it can lead to a large bias in the inferred WEH weight percentage. For instance, it may increase the inferred WEH for Cabeus crater at the Moon's south pole from ˜1% to ˜4%.

  11. Prebiotic Processing induced by Comet and Meteor Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In their study of organic synthesis from impact shocks using the laser-induced-plasma (LIP) technique, McKay and Borucki(l) found that organic synthesis preferentially occurred in a reducing gas mixture rich in methane, and not in a mixture rich in carbon dioxide. This result means chemical models based on the thermodynamical equilibrium approach do not apply to shock chemistry. In this study, we employ the technique of reacting flow, i.e., chemical kinetics in a fluid flow, to simulate the chemistry occurring in LIP and in the wake region from comet or meteor impact. Three different air compositions have been used: (1) 1/3 CO2 and 2/3 H2, (2) pure CH4, and (3) 1/4 CH4, 1/4 CO2, and 1/2 H2O. The stoichiometric ratio of gas mixtures (1) and (3) are kept the same. For (1) we obtain equal mole fractions of CO and H2O as the major products and for (2) C2H2 is the major product. In both cases our results are in agreement with Ref. (1). For (3) we find an interesting case where the nature of chemicals produced to be critically dependent on the flowfield temperature. At the higher temperature part of the wake region, CO and H2O are the dominant products, whereas in the cooler region C2H2 is the dominant product. Further studies of these reactions, as well as for the gas mixture including N2, are being pursued.

  12. El Chichón crater lake dynamic based on continuous physical data and mass-heat budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, L.; Taran, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The March-April 1982 Plinian eruption of El Chichón volcano destroyed the summit domes system and created a new 200 m deep crater. Since then, a shallow lake (~3 m) with acidic pH (~2.3), and temperature around 30°C appeared in the crater. This lake has never disappeared until now although its volume has suffered important variations from 40,000 m3 to 160,000 m3. Chemical composition of the lake is also highly variable (Cl/SO4 = 0-79 molar ratio), alternating between acid-sulfate and acid-chloride-sulfate composition. These variations can occur very fast within few weeks and are not directly correlated with precipitation. Due to its shallow depth and small volume, El Chichón crater lake is probably one of the most dynamic crater lake on earth. These rapid changes in chemistry and volume reflect the dynamic of one group of geyser-type springs ('Soap Pools springs, SP') located offshore and the input of hydrothermal steam underneath the crater. The SP springs discharge sporadically to the lake neutral waters with Cl content currently around 3000 mg/l, while the condensed steam feeds the lake with Cl-free and SO4-rich acid water. In this study, we present for the first time continuous physical data of the crater lake (temperature, depth, meteoric precipitation, wind velocity, solar radiation, air humidity). These data were registered by a meteorological station and two dataloggers installed inside and outside the lake. Using a mass and heat budget model constrained with these data, we were able to estimate the flux of 'hydrothermal' fluid entering the lake through the sub-lacustrian fumaroles and SP springs. Tracing the variations of the input flux in time can be help to understand the dynamic of the 'crater lake-SP springs-fumaroles' system but also can provide an efficient way of monitoring the volcanic activity. During the observation period, the mean mass flux entering the lake (Min) was respectively of 12 ± 2 kg/s, corresponding to a total heat flux (Ein) of

  13. Geomorphology of Lowell crater region on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, N.; Varatharajan, I.

    2016-03-01

    Surface topography, surface morphology and crater chronology studies have been carried out for the Lowell crater region (occupying ∼198 × 198 km2 in the northwestern quadrant of the Orientale basin) using Kaguya TC-DTM, LRO-WAC data, and Chandrayaan-1 M3-750 nm image, to characterize and date Lowell impact event and to identify and assess the geological importance of the Lowell crater and effect of pre-existing geological conditions on the present day appearance of Lowell crater. The Lowell crater has been found to be polygonal in shape with an average diameter of 69.03 km. Its average rim height and depth from pre-existing surface are 1.02 km and 2.82 km respectively. A prominent central peak with average height of 1.77 km above the crater floor is present, which could have exposed undifferentiated mantle rocks. The peak exhibits a pronounced "V" shaped slumped zone on the eastern side and a distinct "V" shaped depression in the adjacent region on the crater floor. Several other peculiarities noticed and mapped here include W-E asymmetry in the degree of slumping of the walls and height of the topographic rim, N-S asymmetry in the proximal ejecta distribution with most of the material lying in the northern direction, concentration of exterior melt pools in the northeastern direction only, presence of several cross cutting pre-existing lineaments on the crater walls, presence of a superposed rayed crater on the eastern wall, and a geologically interesting resurfaced unit, which could be an outcome of recent volcanic activity in the region. It has been inferred that the Lowell crater formed due to impact of a ∼5.7 km diameter bolide in the Montes Rook region. The impact occurred at an angle of ∼30-45° from the S-SW direction. The age of the Lowell crater has been estimated as 374 ± 28 Ma, therefore it is a Younger Copernican crater consistent with the possibility expressed by McEwen et al. (McEwen, A.S., et al. [1993]. J. Geophys. Res. 98(E9), 17207

  14. Riddles in the Dark: Imaging Inside Mercury's Permanently Shadowed Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, C. M.; Chabot, N. L.; Denevi, B. W.; Nair, H.; Deutsch, A. N.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Blewett, D. T.; Head, J. W.; Harmon, J. K.; Neumann, G. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous lines of evidence independently point to the presence of water ice in Mercury's polar regions: Earth-based radar shows radar-bright regions; Mariner 10 and MESSENGER Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) images reveal that these regions are permanently (south polar region) or persistently (north polar region) shadowed; neutron spectrometry indicates hydrogen-rich material; thermal models support the presence of water ice; and Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) reflectance measurements at 1064 nm show high and low reflectance deposits consistent in location to where models predict surface and buried water ice, respectively. Throughout 2013, MESSENGER executed a campaign dedicated to imaging the permanently shadowed crater floors of Mercury's north polar region using sunlight scattered from nearby terrain. The campaign makes use of the broadband clear filter (central wavelength 700 nm, bandwidth 600 nm) of the MDIS wide-angle camera (WAC) to target and image radar-bright areas within all host craters > 10 km in diameter under multiple lighting conditions. To date, MESSENGER has imaged the interiors of nearly 20 craters that host radar-bright deposits, including the largest such deposits near the north pole that are likely to host surface water ice. The images reveal a variety of surface morphologies, ranging from the smooth crater floor of the fresh Kandinsky crater, to the moderately cratered floor of Tolkien crater, and to the battered floor of Prokofiev crater, in which the permanently shadowed region does not differ morphologically from the rest of the crater floor. Thus, no distinct morphology is identified in association with polar deposits, and craters hosting such material span the typical range of degradation states relative to their illuminated counterparts. MDIS images also reveal albedo differences in craters with floors not fully in permanent shadow. Prokofiev provides a special environment for viewing a radar- and MLA-bright region suspected to host

  15. Theory and experiments on centrifuge cratering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, R. M.; Holsapple, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Centrifuge experimental techniques provide possibilities for laboratory simulation of ground motion and cratering effects due to explosive loadings. The results of a similarity analysis for the thermomechanical response of a continuum show that increased gravity is a necessary condition for subscale testing when identical materials for both model and prototype are being used. The general similarity requirements for this type of subscale testing are examined both theoretically and experimentally. The similarity analysis is used to derive the necessary and sufficient requirements due to the general balance and jump equations and gives relations among all the scale factors for size, density, stress, body forces, internal energy, heat supply, heat conduction, heat of detonation, and time. Additional constraints due to specific choices of material constitutive equations are evaluated separately. The class of constitutive equations that add no further requirements is identified. For this class of materials, direct simulation of large-scale cratering events at small scale on the centrifuge is possible and independent of the actual constitutive equations. For a rate-independent soil it is shown that a small experiment at gravity g and energy E is similar to a large event at 1 G but with energy equal to g3E. Consequently, experiments at 500 G with 8 grams of explosives can be used to simulate a kiloton in the field. A series of centrifuge experiments was performed to validate the derived similarity requirements and to determine the practicality of applying the technique to dry granular soils having little or no cohesion. Ten shots using Ottawa sand at various gravities confirmed reproducibility of results in the centrifuge environment, provided information on particle size effects, and demonstrated the applicability of the derived similitude requirements. These experiments used 0.5-4 grams of pentaerythritol-tetranitrate (PETN) and 1.7 grams of lead-azide explosives. They

  16. Unexpected Delivery of Meteoric 10Be to Critical Zone Soils, Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouimet, W. B.; Dethier, D. P.; Bierman, P. R.; Wyshnytsky, C.; Rood, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    Using meteoric 10Be in geomorphic studies requires knowing its long-term delivery rate to the earth surface. Delivery rates vary by latitude due to the influence of geomagnetic field intensity and solar activity and locally due to differences in precipitation and rates of dustfall accumulation, which are responsible for depositing primary and recycled meteoric 10Be to geomorphic surfaces, respectively. Because influences on delivery rate vary in space and time, recent studies emphasize the use of inventory sites where the total concentration of meteoric 10Be is measured on stable landforms of known age to determine site-specific, long-term delivery rates. To date, measured long-term delivery rates typically have fallen within the range of expected rates for the site's latitude and modern annual rate of precipitation, including minor contributions of dust to the total inventory of meteoric 10Be. Here, we present the results of a meteoric 10Be inventory measured on a Pinedale (~15 ka) moraine within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory, Front Range, Colorado. We report a long-term delivery rate of meteoric 10Be for this site of 4.2 to 4.6 × 106 atoms/cm2/yr, significantly higher than the expected delivery rate (1 to 1.3 × 106 atoms/cm2/yr) for it's latitude (40 degrees) and annual precipitation rate (85-95 cm/yr). A detailed analysis of soils in the Front Range (of various age) indicate that long-term dust accumulation rates are less than ~0.1 grams/cm2/kyr and therefore do not significantly influence the total amount of meteoric 10Be delivered to geomorphic surfaces. When applied to measured concentrations of meteoric 10Be in soils within the Gordon Gulch CZO catchment, our high, inventory-based delivery rate suggests that hillslopes are 10 to 40 ka younger (all post-LGM) than suggested by published precipitation based delivery rates. Furthermore, this result, combined with a long-term delivery rate calibrated nearby on the High Plains (1200 m lower in

  17. Meteoric 10Be in Lake Cores as a Measure of Climatic and Erosional Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R. E.; Dixon, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Utilization of meteoric 10Be as a paleoenvironmental proxy has the potential to offer new insights into paleoprecipitation records and paleoclimate models, as well as to long-term variations in erosion with climate. The delivery of meteoric 10Be to the surface varies with precipitation and its strong adsorption to sediment has already proven useful in studies of erosion. Thus, it is likely meteoric 10Be concentrations in lake sediments vary under both changing climate and changing sediment influx. Assessment of the relative importance of these changes requires the comparison of 10Be concentrations in well-dated lake cores with independent paleoenvironmental proxies, including oxygen isotope, pollen, and charcoal records, as well as variation in geochemical composition of the sediments. Blacktail Pond details 15,000 years of climatic change in the Yellowstone region. We develop a new model framework for predicting meteoric 10Be concentrations with depth in the core, based on sedimentation rates of both lake-derived and terrigenous sediments and changes in the flux of meteoric 10Be with precipitation. Titanium concentrations and previously determined 10Be concentrations in wind-derived loess provide proxies for changing delivery of 10Be to the lake by terrigenous sources. We use existing paleoenvironmental data obtained from this core and the surrounding region to develop models for changing rainfall across the region and predict meteoric 10Be delivery to the lake by precipitation. Based on a suite of ~10 models, sedimentation rate is the primary control of meteoric 10Be in the Blacktail Pond core unless terrestrial input is very high, as it was post-glacial in the early Holocene when the lake experienced a high influx of loess and terrigenous sediments. We used these models to inform sample selection for 10Be analysis along the Blacktail pond core. Core sediments are processed for meteoric 10Be analysis using sequential digestions and standard extraction procedures

  18. Mitigation of transient meteor events in sodium layer by TMT NFIRAOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herriot, Glen; Irvin, Craig

    2012-07-01

    NFIRAOS Small meteors usually bum up near the bottom of the sodium layer. Meteor trails can lead to temporary dra­ matic changes in the altitude of the sodium layer. This altitude change is very rapid, typically over 1 second, and after some unpredictable period of 10-20 seconds, can transition back to the nominal mean altitude also in about 1 second. The altitude change is very drastic and can jump by up to 1 km which, on the face of it, would cause 4 micrometers defocus errors on LGS WFS measurements for a 30-m telescope, unless properly tracked. Measurements by the UBC Lidar detected 20 meteor trails I hour, and of these, 1-2 are significant events. We report on a full end-to-end Simulink simulation for TMT NFIRAOS including: meteor events measured by the UBC Lidar; on-instrument NGS focus sensor running at 90 Hz (median sky coverage frame rate); optimal temporal blending with LGS WFS focus measurements; LGS WFS centroiding matched filter update and Truth WFS update very 3s; full trombone servo model including non-linear focus range vs stage position. We optimized our control architecture and traded off motor power dissipation versus residual wavefront error and Shack-Hartmann spot displacement and found range tracking errors induce 12 nm WFE in normal conditions and brief (Is) jumps of 30-80 nm WFE at the beginning and ending of meteor transients.

  19. Meteor head echo characteristics observed with MAARSY in the polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schult, Carsten; Stober, Gunter; Chau, Jorge L.

    2016-04-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY, 53.5 MHz), on the North Norwegian island Andoya (69.30° N, 16.04° E) , is the only high power large aperture (HPLA) radar system with interferometric capabilities providing daily meteor head echo observations since November 2013. Meanwhile, the data set of meteor head echoes contains over one million events with a perfect daily and seasonal coverage of the four northern hemisphere sporadic sources. Although, the North Apex meteor source dominates the observation by far (more than 40%), the statistic is large enough for a comparison of the observational meteor parameters for all sporadic sources. Furthermore, due to the large spread of the antenna gain of the HPLA radar system in combination with the interferometric solutions, the observation area can be divided into high and low sensitive regions with different collecting sizes. This separation is equivalent with a measurement of various radar systems with different beam characteristics, observing at the same time and geographical location. This helps answering question on the impact of the radar specifications on the meteor head echo measurements.

  20. Comet 209P/LINEAR and the associated Camelopardalids meteor shower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Q.; Hui, M.; Wiegert, P.; Campbell-Brown, M.; Brown, P.; Weryk, R.

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that comet 209P/LINEAR may produce strong meteor activity on the Earth on 2014 May 24. Here we present our observations and simulations prior to the event. We reanalyze the optical observations of P/LINEAR obtained during its 2009 apparition to model the corresponding meteor stream. We find that the comet is relatively depleted in dust production, with Afρ at 1-cm level within eight months around its perihelion. A syndyne simulation shows that the optical cometary tail is dominated by larger particles with β˜0.003. Numerical simulation of the cometary dust trails confirms the arrival of particles on 2014 May 24 from some of the 1798--1979 trails, with nominal radiant in the constellation of Camelopardalis. Given that the comet is found to be depleted in dust production, we concluded that a meteor storm may be unlikely. However, our simulation also shows that the size distribution of the arrived particles is skewed strongly towards larger particles, which, coupling with the result of the syndyne simulation, suggested that the event (if detectable) may be dominated by bright meteors. Preliminary results from the observations of P/LINEAR during its 2014 apparition as well as the Camelopardalids meteor shower will also be presented.

  1. The Micrometeor Input Function: A study using model predictions HPLA radar meteor observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, D.; Fentzke, J. T.; Sparks, J. J.

    2008-05-01

    In this work we use a semi-empirical model of the Micrometeor Input Function (MIF) together with meteor head- echo observations obtained with two High Power and Large Aperture (HPLA) radars to study the seasonal and geographical dependence of the meteoric flux in the upper atmosphere. The model includes an initial mass flux that is provided by six known meteor sources (i.e. orbital families of dust) as well as detailed modeling of meteoroid atmospheric entry and ablation physics. In addition, we use a simple ionization model to treat radar sensitivity issues by defining minimum electron volume density production thresholds required in the meteor head-echo plasma for detection. This simplified approach works well because we use observations from two radars with similar frequencies, but different sensitivities and locations. This methodology allows us the explore the initial input of particles and how it manifests in different parts of the MLT as observed by these instruments without the need to invoke more sophisticated plasma models, which are under current development. The comparisons between model predictions and radar observations show excellent agreement between diurnal, seasonal, and latitudinal variability of the detected meteor rate and radial velocity distributions, allowing us to understand how individual meteoroid populations contribute to the overall flux at a particular location and season.

  2. Tristatic observations of meteors using the 930 MHz European Incoherent Scatter radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, Diego; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta; Wannberg, Gudmund; Westman, Assar; HäGgströM, Ingemar; Meisel, David D.

    2002-11-01

    We report results from the first tristatic measurements of radar meteors obtained during 17 November 1997 and 1998, using the UHF (930 MHz) European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) radar system. The observing technique utilized for these observations was first reported by [1998a]. This system consists of three 32-m parabolic antennae located in northern Scandinavia. Since EISCAT observes mostly meteor head echoes, a general characteristic of high-power/large-aperture radars, direct Doppler velocity (±1 km/s) determinations are possible. In addition, using the technique reported here, absolute geocentric meteor velocity and good radiant information (±5°) are deduced for those meteors that are detected simultaneously by all three receivers. An overview of the methodology and a summary of the results obtained so far are reported in this work. We compare the results obtained using this method with those reported by previous large-aperture meteor radar work at lower frequencies and find general agreement. EISCAT detects mainly sporadic particles extending the fast daily sporadic micrometeor storms first suggested by [2000b] and [2001] to submillimeter particles. To the best of our knowledge, these observations represent the first of their kind and prove EISCAT to be a crucial instrument for the study of extraterrestrial particles entering the Earth's atmosphere, in particular at very high geocentric latitudes and high geocentric speeds.

  3. Calibrating a long-term meteoric 10Be accumulation rate in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusser, Lucas; Graly, Joseph; Bierman, Paul; Rood, Dylan

    2010-10-01

    Using 13 samples collected from a 4.1 meter profile in a well-dated and stable New Zealand fluvial terrace, we present the first long-term accumulation rate for meteoric 10Be in soil (1.68 to 1.72 × 106 at/(cm2·yr)) integrated over the past ˜18 ka. Site-specific accumulation data, such as these, are prerequisite to the application of meteoric 10Be in surface process studies. Our data begin the process of calibrating long-term meteoric 10Be delivery rates across latitude and precipitation gradients. Our integrated rate is lower than contemporary meteoric 10Be fluxes measured in New Zealand rainfall, suggesting that long-term average precipitation, dust flux, or both, at this site were less than modern values. With accurately calibrated long-term delivery rates, such as this, meteoric 10Be will be a powerful tool for studying rates of landscape change in environments where other cosmogenic nuclides, such as in situ 10Be, cannot be used.

  4. Diatremes and craters attributed to natural explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Eugene Merle

    1956-01-01

    Diatremes - volcanic pipes attributed to explosion - and craters have been studied to infer the ultimate causes and physical conditions attending natural explosive processes. Initial piercement of diatremes on the Navajo reservation, Arizona was probably along a fracture propagated by a high-pressure aqueous fluid. Gas rising at high velocity along the fracture would become converted to a gas-solid fluidized system by entrainment of wall- rock fragments. The first stages of widening of the vent are probably accomplished mainly by simple abrasion of the high-velocity fluidized system on the walls of the fracture. As the vent widens, its enlargement may be accelerated by inward spalling of the walls. The inferred mechanics of the Navajo-Hopi diatremes is used to illustrate the possibility of diatreme formation over a molten salt mass.

  5. Ancient aqueous environments at Endeavour crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Bell, J.F.; Catalano, J.G.; Clark, B. C.; Crumpler, L.S.; de Souza, P.A.; Fairén, A.G.; Farrand, W. H.; Fox, V.K.; Gellert, Ralf; Ghosh, A.; Golombeck, M.P.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Guinness, E.A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Jolliff, B.L.; Knoll, A.H.; Li, R.; McLennan, S.M.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Morris, R.V.; Murchie, S.L.; Parker, T.J.; Paulsen, G.; Rice, J.W.; Ruff, S.W.; Smith, M.D.; Wolff, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Opportunity has investigated in detail rocks on the rim of the Noachian age Endeavour crater, where orbital spectral reflectance signatures indicate the presence of Fe+3-rich smectites. The signatures are associated with fine-grained, layered rocks containing spherules of diagenetic or impact origin. The layered rocks are overlain by breccias, and both units are cut by calcium sulfate veins precipitated from fluids that circulated after the Endeavour impact. Compositional data for fractures in the layered rocks suggest formation of Al-rich smectites by aqueous leaching. Evidence is thus preserved for water-rock interactions before and after the impact, with aqueous environments of slightly acidic to circum-neutral pH that would have been more favorable for prebiotic chemistry and microorganisms than those recorded by younger sulfate-rich rocks at Meridiani Planum.

  6. The Microstructure of Lunar Micrometeorite Impact Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The peak of the mass flux of impactors striking the lunar surface is made up of objects approximately 200 micrometers in diameter that erode rocks, comminute regolith grains, and produce agglutinates. The effects of these micro-scale impacts are still not fully understood. Much effort has focused on evaluating the physical and optical effects of micrometeorite impacts on lunar and meteoritic material using pulsed lasers to simulate the energy deposited into a substrate in a typical hypervelocity impact. Here we characterize the physical and chemical changes that accompany natural micrometeorite impacts into lunar rocks with long surface exposure to the space environment (12075 and 76015). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations were obtained from cross-sections of approximately 10-20 micrometers diameter craters that revealed important micro-structural details of micrometeorite impact processes, including the creation of npFe (sup 0) in the melt, and extensive deformation around the impact site.

  7. Flyover Animation of Becquerel Crater on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] View the Movie Click on image to view the movie This simulated flyover shows rhythmic layers of sedimentary rock inside Becquerel crater on Mars. The animation uses three-dimensional modeling based on a stereo pair of images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the instrument was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo.

  8. Slope activity in Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution repeat imaging of Aeolis Mons, the central mound in Gale crater, reveals active slope processes within tens of kilometers of the Curiosity rover. At one location near the base of northeastern Aeolis Mons, dozens of transient narrow lineae were observed, resembling features (Recurring Slope Lineae) that are potentially due to liquid water. However, the lineae faded and have not recurred in subsequent Mars years. Other small-scale slope activity is common, but has different spatial and temporal characteristics. We have not identified confirmed RSL, which Rummel et al. (Rummel, J.D. et al. [2014]. Astrobiology 14, 887–968) recommended be treated as potential special regions for planetary protection. Repeat images acquired as Curiosity approaches the base of Aeolis Mons could detect changes due to active slope processes, which could enable the rover to examine recently exposed material.

  9. Crater Topography on Titan: Implications for Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Kirk, R.L.; Lorenz, R. D.; Bray, V. J.; Schenk, P.; Stiles, B. W.; Turtle, E.; Mitchell, K.; Hayes, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a comprehensive review of available crater topography measurements for Saturn's moon Titan. In general, the depths of Titan's craters are within the range of depths observed for similarly sized fresh craters on Ganymede, but several hundreds of meters shallower than Ganymede's average depth vs. diameter trend. Depth-to-diameter ratios are between 0.0012 +/- 0.0003 (for the largest crater studied, Menrva, D approximately 425 km) and 0.017 +/- 0.004 (for the smallest crater studied, Ksa, D approximately 39 km). When we evaluate the Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit parameter, we find that there is less than a 10% probability that Titan's craters have a current depth distribution that is consistent with the depth distribution of fresh craters on Ganymede. There is, however, a much higher probability that the relative depths are uniformly distributed between 0 (fresh) and 1 (completely infilled). This distribution is consistent with an infilling process that is relatively constant with time, such as aeolian deposition. Assuming that Ganymede represents a close 'airless' analogue to Titan, the difference in depths represents the first quantitative measure of the amount of modification that has shaped Titan's surface, the only body in the outer Solar System with extensive surface-atmosphere exchange.

  10. Mars: New Determination of Impact Crater Production Function Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William K.

    2006-12-01

    Several authors have questioned our knowledge of Martian impact crater production function size-frequency distribution (PFSFD), especially at small diameters D. Plescia (2005) questioned whether any area of Mars shows size distributions used for estimating crater retention ages on Mars. McEwen et al. (2005) and McEwen and Bierhaus (2006) suggested existing PFSFD’s are hopelessly confused by the presence of secondaries, and that my isochrons give primary crater densities off by factors of several thousand at small D. In 2005, I addressed some of these concerns, noting my curves do not estimate primary crater densities per se, but show total numbers of primaries + semi-randomly “distant secondaries” (negating many McEwen et al. critiques). In 2006 I have conducted new crater counts on a PFSFD test area suggested by Ken Tanaka. This area shows young lava flows of similar crater density, west of Olympus Mons (around 30 deg N, 100 deg W). Multiple crater counts were made on several adjacent Odyssey THEMIS images and MGS MOC images, giving the SFD over a range of 11mMcEwen, A.S., Bierhaus, E.B., 2006, Ann. Rev. Earth. Planet. Sci. 34, 535-567. McEwen, A.S., 2005, Icarus 176, 351-381. Plescia, J.B. 2005, LPSC 36, 2171.

  11. The effect of craters on the lunar neutron flux

    CERN Document Server

    Eke, V R; Diserens, S; Ryder, M; Yeomans, P E L; Teodoro, L F A; Elphic, R C; Feldman, W C; Hermalyn, B; Lavelle, C M; Lawrence, D J

    2015-01-01

    The variation of remotely sensed neutron count rates is measured as a function of cratercentric distance using data from the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer. The count rate, stacked over many craters, peaks over the crater centre, has a minimum near the crater rim and at larger distances it increases to a mean value that is up to 1% lower than the mean count rate observed over the crater. A simple model is presented, based upon an analytical topographical profile for the stacked craters fitted to data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA). The effect of topography coupled with neutron beaming from the surface largely reproduces the observed count rate profiles. However, a model that better fits the observations can be found by including the additional freedom to increase the neutron emissivity of the crater area by ~0.35% relative to the unperturbed surface. It is unclear what might give rise to this effect, but it may relate to additional surface roughness in the vicinities of craters. The ampl...

  12. The Morphology of Craters on Mercury: Results from MESSENGER Flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnouin, Oliver S.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Herrick, Robert R.; Chappelow, John E.; Murchie, Scott L.; Prockter, Louise M.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic data measured from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft were used for investigations of the relationship between depth and diameter for impact craters on Mercury. Results using data from the MESSENGER flybys of the innermost planet indicate that most of the craters measured with MLA are shallower than those previously measured by using Mariner 10 images. MDIS images of these same MLA-measured craters show that they have been modified. The use of shadow measurement techniques, which were found to be accurate relative to the MLA results, indicate that both small bowl-shaped and large complex craters that are fresh possess depth-to-diameter ratios that are in good agreement with those measured from Mariner 10 images. The preliminary data also show that the depths of modified craters are shallower relative to fresh ones, and might provide quantitative estimates of crater in-filling by subsequent volcanic or impact processes. The diameter that defines the transition from simple to complex craters on Mercury based on MESSENGER data is consistent with that reported from Mariner 10 data.

  13. Mineralogy of Eolian Sands at Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, C. N.; Vaniman, D. T.; Blake, D. F.; Bristow, T. F.; Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Chipera, S. J.; Morris, R. V.; Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Fendrich, K. V.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Yen, A. S.; Sarrazin, P. C.; Treiman, A. H.; Craig, P. I.; Lapotre, M. G. A.; Edgett, K. S.; Gellert, R.; Crisp, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Des Marais, D. J.; Farmer, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has been exploring outcrop and regolith in Gale crater since August 6, 2012. During this exploration, the mission has collected 10 samples for mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD), using the CheMin instrument. The CheMin (Chemistry and Mineralogy) instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity uses a CCD detector and a Co-anode tube source to acquire both mineralogy (from the pat-tern of Co diffraction) and chemical information (from energies of fluoresced X-rays). A detailed description of CheMin is provided in [1]. As part of the rover checkout after landing, the first sample selected for analysis was an eolian sand deposit (the Rocknest "sand shadow"). This sample was selected in part to characterize unconsolidated eolian regolith, but primarily to prove performance of the scoop collection system on the rover. The focus of the mission after Rocknest was on the consolidated sediments of Gale crater, so all of the nine subsequent samples were collected by drilling into bedrock com-posed of lithified sedimentary materials, including mudstone and sandstone. No scoop samples have been collected since Rocknest, but at the time this abstract was written the mission stands poised to use the scoop again, to collect active dune sands from the Bagnold dune field. Several abstracts at this conference outline the Bagnold dune campaign and summarize preliminary results from analyses on approach to the Namib dune sampling site. In this abstract we review the mineralogy of Rocknest, contrast that with the mineralogy of local sediments, and anticipate what will be learned by XRD analysis of Bagnold dune sands.

  14. Remote Sensing and Electrodynamic Model of Chicxulub Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, V.; Silva, M.; Salguero, E.; Fucugauchi, J.

    2004-05-01

    Advances on space observational systems have opened new exiting possibilities to investigate our planet in an unprecedented detail and in a global scale. Information retrieved from surveys of other solar system bodies like our moon, planets and satellites, from missions like Apollo, have documented the origin of planetary surfaces and the role of impacts as a major process. Voyagers 1 and 2 and Galileo have showed impact craterism is a process rather generalized in all bodies of the solar system. Thus establishing it as part of the major processes to be considered for the evolution of our planet, together with tectonics, mantle process, volcanism, weathering, etc. Investigations on impact craters from solar systems provide valuable information on different surfaces, crustal thickness, existence of crust layers, type of material under the most superficial layer, type of bolide which formed crater, impact angle, etc. The studies constitute an important tool to rebuild the planets' geological history and develop theories on their internal structure. The Chicxulub crater in the carbonate platform of the Yucatan peninsula is one of the largest multiring structures found on Earth. The crater is some 180-200 km in diameter, is well preserved and has been studied in the past few years (geophysical surveys and drilling programs). The crater is buried under a thick sequence of tertiary carbonate rocks, and on the surface there are relatively few indications of the crater (e.g., topographic depression, ring of cenotes). In this study, it is analyzed and presented an electrodynamic model for an impact crater and its electrophysical properties, these data are derived from Fisher inverse matrix elements. We also present a surface model for the buried Chicxulub crater derived from remote sensing data.

  15. Evaluation of Recharge Potential at Crater U5a (WISHBONE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard H. French; Samuel L. Hokett

    1998-11-01

    Radionuclides are present both below and above the water table at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), as the result of underground nuclear testing. Mobilization and transport of radionuclides from the vadose zone is a complex process that is influenced by the solubility and sorption characteristics of the individual radionuclides, as well as the soil water flux. On the NTS, subsidence craters resulting from testing underground nuclear weapons are numerous, and many intercept surface water flows. Because craters collect surface water above the sub-surface point of device detonation, these craters may provide a mechanism for surface water to recharge the groundwater aquifer system underlying the NTS. Given this situation, there is a potential for the captured water to introduce contaminants into the groundwater system. Crater U5a (WISHBONE), located in Frenchman Flat, was selected for study because of its potentially large drainage area, and significant erosional features, which suggested that it has captured more runoff than other craters in the Frenchman Flat area. Recharge conditions were studied in subsidence crater U5a by first drilling boreholes and analyzing the collected soil cores to determine the soil properties and moisture conditions. This information, coupled with a 32-year precipitation record, was used to conduct surface and vaodse zone modeling. Surface water modeling predicted that approximately 13 ponding events had occurred during the life of the crater. Vadose zone modeling indicated that since the crater's formation approximately 5,900 m3 of water were captured by the crater. Of this total, approximately 5,200 m3 of potential recahrge may have occurred, and the best estimates of annual average potential recharge rates lie between 36 and 188 cm of water per year. The term potential is used here to indicate that the water is not technically recharged because it has not yet reached the water table.

  16. The extra-atmospheric masses of small meteoric fireballs from the Prairie and the Canadian camera networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelenskaya, N.

    2007-08-01

    Existing methods of definition of extra-atmospheric masses of small meteoric bodies according to supervision of their movement in an atmosphere contain the certain arbitrariness. Vigorous attempts to overcome a divergence of results of calculations on the basis of various approaches often lead to physically incorrect conclusions. The output consists in patient accumulation of estimations and calculations for gradual elimination uncertainties. The equations of meteoric physics include two dimensionless parameters - factor ablation ? and factor of braking ?. In work are cited the data processing supervision of small meteors Prairie and Canadian networks, by a finding of values of parameters ? and ? with use of a method of the least squares. Also values of heights blackout a meteor which turn out from conditions of full destruction or final braking with use of the received values of ? and ? are considered. In prevailing number of supervision for considered meteors braking is insignificant. Results of calculations of height of blackout meteors confirm suitability of the approximations used in work for the description of movement of small meteors. In work results of calculation of extra-atmospheric masses with use of factor of braking for meteoric bodies of the spherical form with density of an ice and a stone are presented. On the basis of the received results discrepancy of photometric masses to values of masses of the input, received on observable braking proves to be true. In most cases received magnitude of masses essentially less photometric masses. Processing of supervision of small meteors Prairie and Canadian camera networks has shown, that the so-called photometric mass mismatches values of mass of the input, defined on observable braking. Acceptance of photometric value as the mass defining braking of a body, leads to obviously underestimated values of density of substance meteoric body. The further researches on specification of interpretation of supervision

  17. Measurement of the Earth's Radiation Budget components from Russian satellites "Meteor-M" № 1 and "Meteor-M" № 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherviakov, M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the foremost challenges to monitoring the climate system is the ability to make a precise measurement of Earth's radiation budget components from space. Thereupon a new "Meteor-M" satellite program has been started in Russia. The first satellite of new generation "Meteor-M" № 1 was put into orbit in September, 2009 and second satellite "Meteor-M" № 2 - in July, 2014. Some measurements results obtained by the nadir looking medium field of view radiometers IKOR-M which was installed on "Meteor-M" satellites are presented. These equipments were created in Saratov State University under the direction of Yu. A. Sklyarov for monitoring of outgoing shortwave radiation (OSR), albedo and absorbed solar radiation (ASR) at TOA. The basic products of data processing are given in the form of global maps of distribution OSR, albedo and ASR. Such maps were made for each month during observation period. Fig. 1 presents the map of global distribution of monthly averaged values of albedo in April, 2014. Two series of measurements from two different IKOR-M are available. The first radiometer had worked from October, 2009 to August, 2014 and second - from August, 2014 to the present. Therefore, there is a period when both radiometers work at the same time. TOA fluxes deduced from the "Meteor-M" № 1 measurements in August, 2014 show very good agreement with the fluxes determined from "Meteor-M" № 2. The seasonal and interannual variations of OSR, albedo and ASR were discussed. The variations between SW radiation budget components seem to be within observational uncertainty and natural variability governed by cloudiness, water vapor and aerosol variations. It was assessed spatial and temporal variations of albedo and ASR over different regions. Latitudinal distributions of albedo and ASR were estimated in more detail. Meridional cross sections over oceans and land were used separately for this estimation. It was shown that the albedo and ASR data received from the

  18. Comparing Characteristics of Polygonal Impact Craters on Mercury and Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Polygonal impact craters (PICs) are defined as craters, which rims are composed of at least two straight segments. These PICs are often found on terrestrial planets like Mercury, Venus, and Mars and on the Moon. In our current study we compare characteristics of PICs: the numbers, the mean diameters, and the PICs' ages on Mercury and Venus. The surfaces of both planets show significant differences in age - Mercury’s surface is about 4.5 Gyr, but Venus' not more than 1 Gyr old. The age of polygonal impact craters correspond to this difference. (author)

  19. Crater Morphologies on Pluto and Charon: Anticipating New Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P.; Bray, V. J.; McKinnon, W. B.; White, O. L.; Moore, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Impact craters are among the few geologic features we have some confidence will be present in the Pluto/Charon system. Crater morphologies are important as tracers of thermal history (through the mechanism of viscous relaxation), and can be used to probe through icy crusts (in terms of excavating deeper layers as on Ganymede or penetrating through floating ice shells as on Europa). New Horizons will have the opportunity to examine crater morphologies on Pluto to resolutions Charon to ~250 meters over significant areas. Stereo-derived topography maps are anticipated over 20-35% of each body. The first task will be to place the observed craters (assuming they are not deeply eroded) into Solar System context. Crater morphology on icy satellites is controlled primarily by surface gravity. Charon has similar surface gravity to the icy Saturnian satellites and we expect craters on Charon to resemble those seen by Cassini, where the dominant landform will be prominent central peaks. Pluto surface gravity is midway between Ganymede and Rhea. Triton, with similar surface gravity and internal composition to Pluto, is of no help due to the paucity of resolved craters there. This opens the possibility of observing landforms seen on Ganymede, such as central dome craters, palimpsests and perhaps even a multiring basin or two, albeit at larger diameters than we would see on Ganymede. Several issues complicate our rosy picture. A key unresolved concern is that impact velocities in the Pluto system are only a few km/s, in the low end of the hypervelocity range. Numerical models imply possible differences during excavation, producing deeper simple craters than on the icy satellites. Impacts occurring at velocities well below the mean (topographic data sets is unclear. Any viscous relaxation (driven by internal or modest tidal heating) or mass wasting erosion (by volatile redistribution) will also work to reduce crater depths on Pluto in different ways, but cratering onto the likely

  20. Observations of the Quadrantid meteor shower from 2008 to 2012: Orbits and emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiedo, José M.; Espartero, Francisco; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Pujols, Pep; Pastor, Sensi; de los Reyes, José A.; Rodríguez, Diego

    2016-09-01

    The activity of the Quadrantids in January during several years (2008, 2010, 2011 and 2012) has been investigated in the framework of the SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN). For this purpose, an array of high-sensitivity CCD video devices and CCD all-sky cameras have been used to obtain multi-station observations of these meteors. These allowed to obtain precise radiant and orbital information about this meteoroid stream. This paper presents a large set of orbital data (namely, 85 orbits) of Quadrantid meteoroids. Most meteors produced by these particles were recorded during the activity peak of this shower. Besides, we discuss four Quadrantid emission spectra. The tensile strength of Quadrantid meteoroids has been also obtained.

  1. Meteor localization via statistical analysis of spatially temporal fluctuations in image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukal, Jaromír.; Klimt, Martin; Šihlík, Jan; Fliegel, Karel

    2015-09-01

    Meteor detection is one of the most important procedures in astronomical imaging. Meteor path in Earth's atmosphere is traditionally reconstructed from double station video observation system generating 2D image sequences. However, the atmospheric turbulence and other factors cause spatially-temporal fluctuations of image background, which makes the localization of meteor path more difficult. Our approach is based on nonlinear preprocessing of image intensity using Box-Cox and logarithmic transform as its particular case. The transformed image sequences are then differentiated along discrete coordinates to obtain statistical description of sky background fluctuations, which can be modeled by multivariate normal distribution. After verification and hypothesis testing, we use the statistical model for outlier detection. Meanwhile the isolated outlier points are ignored, the compact cluster of outliers indicates the presence of meteoroids after ignition.

  2. Dormant Comets Among the Near-Earth Object Population: A Meteor-Based Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Quan-Zhi; Pokorný, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Dormant comets in the near-Earth object (NEO) population are thought to be involved in the terrestrial accretion of water and organic materials. Identification of dormant comets is difficult as they are observationally indistinguishable from their asteroidal counterparts, however they may have produced dust during their final active stages which potentially are detectable today as weak meteor showers at the Earth. Here we present the result of a reconnaissance survey looking for dormant comets using 13~567~542 meteor orbits measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR). We simulate the dynamical evolution of the hypothetical meteoroid streams originated from 407 near-Earth asteroids in cometary orbits (NEACOs) that resemble orbital characteristics of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs). Out of the 44 hypothetical showers that are predicted to be detectable by CMOR, we identify 5 positive detections that are statistically unlikely to be chance associations, including 3 previously known associations. This transla...

  3. Observations of the Quadrantid meteor shower from 2008 to 2012: orbits and emission spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Madiedo, José M; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J; Pujols, Pep; Pastor, Sensi; Reyes, José A de los; Rodríguez, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The activity of the Quadrantids in January during several years (2008, 2010, 2011 and 2012) has been investigated in the framework of the SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN). For this purpose, an array of high-sensitivity CCD video devices and CCD all-sky cameras have been used to obtain multi-station observations of these meteors. These allowed us to obtain precise radiant and orbital information about this meteoroid stream. This paper presents a large set of orbital data (namely, 85 orbits) of Quadrantid meteoroids. Most meteors produced by these particles were recorded during the activity peak of this shower. Besides, we discuss four Quadrantid emission spectra. The tensile strength of Quadrantid meteoroids has been also obtained.

  4. Absolute ages from crater statistics: Using radiometric ages of Martian samples for determining the Martian cratering chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukum, G.

    1988-01-01

    In the absence of dates derived from rock samples, impact crater frequencies are commonly used to date Martian surface units. All models for absolute dating rely on the lunar cratering chronology and on the validity of its extrapolation to Martian conditions. Starting from somewhat different lunar chronologies, rather different Martian cratering chronologies are found in the literature. Currently favored models are compared. The differences at old ages are significant, the differences at younger ages are considerable and give absolute ages for the same crater frequencies as different as a factor of 3. The total uncertainty could be much higher, though, since the ratio of lunar to Martian cratering rate which is of basic importance in the models is believed to be known no better than within a factor of 2. Thus, it is of crucial importance for understanding the the evolution of Mars and determining the sequence of events to establish an unambiguous Martian cratering chronology from crater statistics in combination with clean radiometric ages of returned Martian samples. For the dating goal, rocks should be as pristine as possible from a geologically simple area with a one-stage emplacement history of the local formation. A minimum of at least one highland site for old ages, two intermediate-aged sites, and one very young site is needed.

  5. Meteoroid Streams at Earth Detected by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter G.; Weryk, R. J.; Wong, D. K.; Jones, J.

    2007-10-01

    The Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) is a multi-frequency backscatter meteor radar which has been in routine operation since 1999, with an orbit measurement capability since 2002. In total, CMOR has measured over 5 million orbits of meteoroids with masses greater than 10 micrograms, while recording more than 20 million meteor echoes in total to mid-2007. We have applied a two stage comparative technique for identifying meteor showers in CMOR data. In the first stage, showers are delineated using single station echo directions to compute apparent radiant activity per degree of solar longitude. A second stage employs quasi 3D wavelet transforms to examine clustering of individually measured geocentric radiants and velocities based on measured orbits detected per degree of solar longitude. From this analysis we have identified 44 annual minor and major meteor showers with high reliability. A dozen of these showers are previously unreported in the literature. We find that several streams reported as distinct in the literature are in fact continuously active over long time periods. Most prominent among these are the Iota Aquariid /Piscid / Taurid showers of August - November all of which are part of one stream linked to the broad 2P/Encke meteoroid complex. Several of our newly reported streams occur in regions of aei space with few or no obvious parent bodies. In particular, many streams have i 90 degs and a 1 AU with e > 0.6. These showers are rich in faint meteors and suggestive of evolutionary processes driven by Poynting-Robertson drag separating meteoroids from original parent body orbits. We also report details from our radar survey of a number of newly recognized cometary dust trails which intersect the Earth defining orbital elements of unrecognized potentially hazardous comets or extinct cometary nuclei.

  6. Hydrogen emission in meteors as a potential marker for the exogenous delivery of organics and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Mandell, Avram M.

    2004-01-01

    We detected hydrogen Balmer-alpha (H(alpha)) emission in the spectra of bright meteors and investigated its potential use as a tracer for exogenous delivery of organic matter. We found that it is critical to observe the meteors with high enough spatial resolution to distinguish the 656.46 nm H(alpha) emission from the 657.46 nm intercombination line of neutral calcium, which was bright in the meteor afterglow. The H(alpha) line peak stayed in constant ratio to the atmospheric emissions of nitrogen during descent of the meteoroid. If all of the hydrogen originates in the Earth's atmosphere, the hydrogen atoms are expected to have been excited at T = 4400 K. In that case, we measured an H(2)O abundance in excess of 150 +/- 20 ppm at 80-90 km altitude (assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium in the air plasma). This compares with an expected <20 ppm from H(2)O in the gas phase. Alternatively, meteoric refractory organic matter (and water bound in meteoroid minerals) could have caused the observed H(alpha) emission, but only if the line is excited in a hot T approximately 10000 K plasma component that is unique to meteoric ablation vapor emissions such as Si(+). Assuming that the Si(+) lines of the Leonid spectrum would need the same hot excitation conditions, and a typical [H]/[C] = 1 in cometary refractory organics, we calculated an abundance ratio [C]/[Si] = 3.9 +/- 1.4 for the dust of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. This range agreed with the value of [C]/[Si] = 4.4 measured for comet 1P/Halley dust. Unless there is 10 times more water vapor in the upper atmosphere than expected, we conclude that a significant fraction of the hydrogen atoms in the observed meteor plasma originated in the meteoroid.

  7. Formation of complex impact craters - Evidence from Mars and other planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the depth vs diameter data of Arthur (1980), is given along with geomorphic data for 73 Martian craters. The implications for the formation of complex impact craters on solid planets is discussed. The analysis integrates detailed morphological observations on planetary craters with geologic data from terrestrial meteorite and explosion craters. The simple to complex transition for impact craters on Mars appears at diameters in the range of 3 to 8 km. Five features appear sequentially with increasing crater size, flat floors, central peaks and shallower depths, scalloped rims, and terraced walls. This order suggests that a shallow depth of excavation and a rebound mechanism have produced the central peaks, not centripetal collapse and deep sliding. Simple craters are relatively uniform in shape from planet to planet, but complex craters vary considerably. Both the average onset diameter for complex impact craters on Mars and the average depth of complex craters vary inversely with gravitational acceleration on four planets.

  8. Geomorphology of crater and basin deposits - Emplacement of the Fra Mauro formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R. H.; Oberbeck, V. R.

    1975-01-01

    Characteristics of continuous deposits near lunar craters larger than about 1 km wide are considered, and it is concluded that (1) concentric dunes, radial ridges, and braided lineations result from deposition of the collision products of ejecta from adjacent pairs of similarly oriented secondary-crater chains and are, therefore, concentrations of secondary-crater ejecta; (2) intracrater ridges are produced within preexisting craters surrounding a fresh primary crater by ricocheting and focusing of secondary-crater ejecta from the preexisting craters' walls; and (3) secondary cratering has produced many of the structures of the continuous deposits of relatively small lunar craters and is the dominant process for emplacement of most of the radial facies of the continuous deposits of large lunar craters and basins. The percentages of Imbrium ejecta in deposits and the nature of Imbrium sculpturing are investigated.

  9. Ionosonde observations of ionospheric disturbances due to the 15 February 2013 Chelyabinsk meteor explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradipta, Rezy; Valladares, Cesar E.; Doherty, Patricia H.

    2015-11-01

    We report the results of our investigations on the potential ionospheric effects caused by the 15 February 2013 Chelyabinsk meteor explosion. We used the data from a number of digisonde stations located in Europe and Russia to detect the traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) likely to have been caused by the meteor explosion. We found that certain characteristic signatures of the TIDs can be identified in individual ionogram records, mostly in the form of Y-forking/splitting of the ionogram traces. Based on the arrival times of the disturbances, we have inferred the overall propagation speed of the TIDs from Chelyabinsk to be 171 ± 14 m/s.

  10. Prediction of meteor shower associated with Comet 122P/de Vico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, Dusan; Neslusan, Lubos

    2013-01-01

    We model, for a far past, a theoretical stream associated with Comet 122P/de Vico and follow its dynamical evolution until present. Selecting the modeled particles approaching the Earth's orbit at the present, we predict the characteristics of a potential meteor shower and try to identify these particles with the meteors in three databases (photo, radar, and video). Our overall prediction is, however, negative because only the particles released from the comet nucleus before approximately 37 000 years ago are found to evolve into a collision course with the Earth and, therefore, form a possible shower. Meteoroids are known to survive a much shorter time in interplanetary space, unfortunately.

  11. An initial meteoroid stream survey in the southern hemisphere using the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, D.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Brunini, C.; Hocking, W.; Fritts, D. C.

    2013-04-01

    We present in this manuscript a 4 year survey of meteor shower radiants utilizing the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER). SAAMER, which operates at the southern most region of South America, is a new generation SKiYMET system designed with significant differences from typical meteor radars including high transmitted power and an 8-antenna transmitting array enabling large detected rates at low zenith angles. We applied the statistical methodology developed by Jones and Jones (Jones, J., Jones, W. [2006]. Month. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 367, 1050-1056) to the data collected each day and compiled the results into 1 composite representative year at 1° resolution in Solar Longitude. We then search for enhancements in the activity which last for at least 3 days and evolve temporally as is expected from a meteor shower. Using this methodology, we have identified in our data 32 shower radiants, two of which were not part of the IAU commission 22 meteor shower working list. Recently, SAAMER's capabilities were enhanced by adding two remote stations to receive meteor forward scatter signals from meteor trails and thus enable the determination of meteoroid orbital parameters. SAAMER started recording orbits in January 2012 and future surveys will focus on the search for unknown meteor streams, in particular in the southern ecliptic sky.

  12. Experimental Impact Cratering into Sandstone: A MEMIN-Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Deutsch, A.; Kenkmann, T.; Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Thoma, K.; Memin Team

    2011-03-01

    The MEMIN Project is currently focused on impact experiments into sandstone. First results are presented here, including the evaluation of high-speed cameras, ejecta catchment devices, crater morphology, and chemical projectile-target interaction.

  13. Measured and Modeled Morphometry of Simple Impact Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, W. A.; Collins, G. S.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the measured diameter dependence of well-preserved simple crater morphometry on Mars and compare with iSALE simulations. We also describe future work to fully characterize the dependence on impactor velocity and mass, and target properties.

  14. Hale Crater — Ancient Water Science, Contemporary Water Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, D. E.; Grimm, R. E.; Robbins, S. J.; Michaels, T. I.; Enke, B. L.

    2015-10-01

    Hale has easy access to liquid water via RSL. Scientifically the site has a rich history of water via outflow channel, fluidized ejecta, hydrothermal activity, gullies, and RSL. Lastly, the site would allow age dating of Aryge and Hale crater.

  15. Impact Metamorphism of Sandstones at Amguid Crater, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoui, R.; Belhai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Amguid is a 450 m diameter sample crater; it is emplaced in Lower Devonian sandstones.We have carried out a petrographic study in order to investigate shock effects recorded in these sandstones and define shock stages in Amguid.

  16. Ceres' internal structure as inferred from its large craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Simone; Raymond, Carol; Fu, Roger; Ermakov, Anton I.; O'Brien, David P.; De Sanctis, Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    The Dawn spacecraft has gathered important data about the surface composition, internal structure, and geomorphology of Ceres, revealing a cratered landscape. Digital terrain models and global mosaics have been used to derive a global catalog of impact craters larger than 10 km in diameter. A surface dichotomy appears evident: a large fraction of the northern hemisphere is heavily cratered as the result of several billion of years of collisions, while portions of the equatorial region and southern hemisphere are much less cratered. The latter are associated with the presence of the two largest (~270-280 km) impact craters, Kerwan and Yalode. The global crater count shows a severe depletion for diameters larger than 100-150 km with respect to collisional models and other large asteroids, like Vesta. This is a strong indication that a significant population of large cerean craters has been obliterated over geological time-scales. This observation is supported by the overall topographic power spectrum of Ceres, which shows that long wavelengths in topography are suppressed (that is, flatter surface) compared to short wavelengths.Viscous relaxation of topography may be a natural culprit for the observed paucity of large craters. Relaxation accommodated by the creep of water ice is expected to result in much more rapid and complete decay of topography than inferred. In contrast, we favor a strong crust composed of a mixture of silicates and salt species (depression, known as Vendimia Planitia. The overall topography of Vendimia Planitia is compatible with a partially relaxed mega impact structure. The presence of such a large scale depression bears implications for the rheology of the deeper interior, potentially implying a transition to higher viscosity/higher density materials at a depth of ~200 km. This is compatible with the presence of a central mass concentration, as inferred from gravity measurements.

  17. Direct evidence for the origin of low-18O silicic magmas: quenched samples of a magma chamber's partially-fused granitoid walls, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, C.R.; Adami, L.H.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Partially fused granitoid blocks were ejected in the climactic eruption of Mount Mazama, which was accompanied by collapse of Crater Lake caldera. Quartz, plagioclase, and glass in the granitoids have much lower ??18O values (-3.4 to +4.9???) than any fresh lavas of Mount Mazama and the surrounding region (+5.8 to +7.0???). Oxygen isotope fractionation between phases in granitoids is consistent with equilibrium at T ??? 900??C following subsolidus exchange with hydrothermal fluids of meteoric origin. Assimilation of ??? 10-20% of material similar to these granitoids can account for the O and Sr isotopic compositions of lavas and juvenile pyroclasts derived from the climactic magma chamber, many of which have ??18O values ??? 0.5??? or more lower than comparable lavas of Mount Mazama. The O isotope data provide the only clear evidence for such assimilation because the mineralogy and chemical and radiogenic isotopic compositions of the granitoids (dominantly granodiorite) are similar to those of erupted juvenile magmas. The granitoid blocks from Crater Lake serve as direct evidence for the origin of 18O depletion in large, shallow silicic magma bodies. ?? 1989.

  18. Direct evidence for the origin of low-18O silicic magmas: Quenched samples of a magma chamber's partially-fused granitoid walls, Crater Lake, Oregon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partially fused granitoid blocks were ejected in the climactic eruption of Mount Mazama, which was accompanied by collapse of Crater Lake caldera. Quartz, plagioclase, and glass in the granitoids have much lower δ18O values (-3.4 to +4.9per mille) than any fresh lavas of Mount Mazama and the surrounding region (+5.8 to +7.0per mille). Oxygen isotope fractionation between phases in granitoids is consistent with equilibrium at T≥900deg C following subsolidus exchange with hydrothermal fluids of meteoric origin. Assimilation of ≅ 10-20% of material similar to these granitoids can account for the O and Sr isotopic compositions of lavas and juvenile pyroclasts derived from the climactic magma chamber, many of which have δ18O values ≅ 0.5per mille or more lower than comparable lavas of Mount Mazama. The O isotope data provide the only clear evidence for such assimilation because the mineralogy and chemical and radiogenic isotopic compositions of the granitoids (dominantly granodiorite) are similar to those of erupted juvenile magmas. The granitoid blocks from Crater Lake serve as direct evidence for the origin of 18O depletion in large, shallow silicic magma bodies. (orig.)

  19. The Impact Cratering Record of Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesonen, L. J.

    1996-02-01

    The current database of craterform structures in Fennoscandia contains 22 structures of impact origin and about fifty other structures which lack sufficient evidence for impact. The discovery rate of new structures has been one or two per year during the past ten years. The proven impact structures are located in southern Fennoscandia and the majority have been found in Proterozoic target rocks. The age of the structures varies from prehistoric to ≤ 1000 Ma and their diameters (D) from 0.04 km to 55 km. Nine of the structures contain impact melt. A characteristic feature of the Fennoscandian impact record is a relatively large number of small (≤ 5 km) but old (> 200 Ma) structures: this is a result of success of geophysical methods to discover small but old impact structures in an eroded shield covered with relatively thin overburden. Some of the large circular structures in satellite images and/or in geophysical maps may represent deeply eroded scars of very old impacts, but due to the lack of shock metamorphic features, impact-generated rocks or identified ejecta layers, they cannot yet be classified as impact sites. Two huge structures are proposed here as possible impact sites on the basis of circular satellite images and distinct geophysical anomalies: the Lycksele structure in northern Sweden (D ~ 120 km, see also Witschard, 1984) and the Valga structure in Latvia/Estonia (D ~ 180 km). However, endogeneous explanations, like buried granites, basement domings, or fault-bounded blocks are also possible for these structures. Hints, such as distal ejecta layers or impact produced breccia dykes, of an Archaean or Early Proterozoic impact structure have not been found in Fennoscandia so far. New ways of searching for these structures are proposed with particular emphasis on high-resolution integrated geophysical methods. The impact cratering rate in Fennoscandia is ~ 2.0 · 10-14 km-2 a-1 (for craters with D > 3 km) corresponding to about two events per every

  20. Surficial geology of the Chicxulub impact crater, Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kevin O.; Ocampo, Adriana C.; Duller, Charles E.

    1993-11-01

    The Chicxulub impact crater in northwestern Yucatan, Mexico is the primary candidate for the proposed impact that caused mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous Period. The crater is buried by up to a kilometer of Tertiary sediment and the most prominent surface expression is a ring of sink holes, known locally as cenotes, mapped with Landsat imagery. This 165 +/- 5 km diameter Cenote Ring demarcates a boundary between unfractured limestones inside the ring, and fractured limestones outside. The boundary forms a barrier to lateral ground water migration, resulting in increased flows, dissolution, and collapse thus forming the cenotes. The subsurface geology indicates that the fracturing that created the Cenote Ring is related to slumping in the rim of the buried crater, differential thicknesses in the rocks overlying the crater, or solution collapse within porous impact deposits. The Cenote Ring provides the most accurate position of the Chicxulub crater's center, and the associated faults, fractures, and stratigraphy indicate that the crater may be approximately 240 km in diameter.

  1. Basin Formation and Cratering on Mercury Revealed by MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C. R.; Fassett, C.; Marchi, S.; Merline, W. J.; Ostrach, L. R.; Prockter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury has been bombarded by asteroids and comets throughout its history. The resulting craters and basins are the dominant topographic features on the planet. Although visible basins contain some of the most interesting tectonic features, plains, and evidence of vertical stratigraphy, they fall far short of saturating the surface. Nevertheless, Mercury has a greater spatial density of peak-ring basins and protobasins than any other Solar System body, partly because these morphologies begin at smaller sizes than on most bodies. Cratering at approximately three times the cratering rate on the Moon, combined with likely plains-forming volcanism, prevents recognition of surface features older than 4.0 to 4.1 Ga. Severe losses of craters Mercury suggest that most plains formation ended about 3.6 to 3.7 Ga, though activity has continued in a few small regions until much more recently (e.g., inside the Rachmaninoff basin). Mercury, compared with other terrestrial bodies, is struck by projectiles impacting at much higher velocities, which is probably responsible for the formation of abundant secondary craters that dominate the numbers of craters Mercury-specific impactors ("vulcanoids") cannot be excluded, imaging searches by MESSENGER have revealed no remaining vulcanoids and no other evidence suggests that Mercury has been bombarded by anything other than the same populations of asteroids and comets that have impacted the Moon and other terrestrial planets from the end of the period of heavy bombardment 3.8 to 3.9 Ga to the present.

  2. Surface property variations in Venusian fluidized ejecta blanket craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Baker, Victor R.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive study of Magellan Cycles 1 and 2 radar data from Venus reveals surface roughness and dielectric variations associated with fluidized ejecta blanket (FEB) craters that help illuminate styles of flow ejecta emplacement. This study develops new procedures of digital unit mapping and polygon-filling algorithms using Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR), altimetry, and radiometry data. These techniques allow the extraction of radiophysical information for FEB crater materials, nearby plains, and lava flows. Backscatter curve slopes of the FEBs studied here are consistent with surface textures that are transitional between a'a and pahoehoe-like. Average surface property values of ejecta units are relatively similar for a given crater, but are discernibly different from other craters. Individual crater ejecta reflectivity and emissivity values are relatively similar to those for the surrounding plains, which may suggest a link between plains material and ejecta dielectric properties. Increasing FEB roughness downflow are interpreted to be associated with more lava-like flows, while decreasing roughness are more similar to trends typical of gravity (pyroclastic-like or debris-like) flows. Most commonly, FEB crater flow materials exhibit transitions from proximal, lava/melt-like flow styles to distal, gravity flow-like styles. Some FEBs show more complicated behavior, however, or appear to be more dominated by dielectric differences downflow, as inferred from correlations between the data sets. Such transitions may result from changes in local topography or from overlapping of flow lobes during FEB emplacement.

  3. Fractal dimensions of rampart impact craters on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Delwyn; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Mouginis-Mark, Peter; Bruno, Barbara C.

    1993-01-01

    Ejecta blanket morphologies of Martian rampart craters may yield important clues to the atmospheric densities during impact, and the nature of target materials (e.g., hard rock, fine-grained sediments, presence of volatiles). In general, the morphologies of such craters suggest emplacement by a fluidized, ground hugging flow instead of ballistic emplacement by dry ejecta. We have quantitatively characterized the shape of the margins of the ejecta blankets of 15 rampart craters using fractal geometry. Our preliminary results suggest that the craters are fractals and are self-similar over scales of approximately 0.1 km to 30 km. Fractal dimensions (a measure of the extent to which a line fills a plane) range from 1.06 to 1.31. No correlations of fractal dimension with target type, elevation, or crater size were observed, though the data base is small. The range in fractal dimension and lack of correlation may be due to a complex interplay of target properties (grain size, volatile content), atmospheric pressure, and crater size. The mere fact that the ejecta margins are fractals, however, indicates that viscosity and yield strength of the ejecta were at least as low as those of basalts, because silicic lava flows are not generally fractals.

  4. Modelling the surface deposition of meteoric smoke particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, James S. A.; Feng, Wuhu; Mann, Graham W.; Dhomse, Sandip S.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    The flux of meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) in Greenland and Antarctica has been measured using Ir and Pt observations in ice cores, by Gabrielli et al. [1,2]. They obtained MSP deposition fluxes of 1.5 ± 0.45 × 10-4 g m-2 yr-1 (209 ± 63 t d-1) in Greenland and 3.9 ± 1.4 × 10-5 g m-2 yr-1 (55 ± 19 t d-1) in Antarctica, where the values in parentheses are total atmospheric inputs, assuming a uniform global deposition rate. These results show reasonable agreement with those of Lanci et al. [3], who used ice core magnetisation measurements, resulting in MSP fluxes of 1.7 ± 0.23 × 10-4 g m-2 yr-1 (236 ± 50 t d-1) (Greenland) and 2.0 ± 0.52 × 10-5 g m-2 yr-1 (29 ± 5.0 t d-1) (Antarctica). Atmospheric modelling studies have been performed to assess the transport and deposition of MSPs, using WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model), and the CARMA (Community Aerosol and Radiation Model) aerosol microphysics package. An MSP input function totalling 44 t d-1 was added between about 80 and 105 km. Several model runs have been performed in which the aerosol scavenging by precipitation was varied. Wet deposition is expected (and calculated here) to be the main deposition process; however, rain and snow aerosol scavenging coefficients have uncertainties spanning up to two and three orders of magnitude, respectively [4]. The model experiments that we have carried out include simple adjustments of the scavenging coefficients, full inclusion of a parametrisation reported by Wang et al. [4], and a scheme based on aerosol removal where relative humidity > 100 %. The MSP fluxes obtained vary between 1.4 × 10-5 and 2.6 × 10-5 g m-2 yr-1 for Greenland, and 5.1 × 10-6 and 1.7 × 10-5 g m-2 yr-1 for Antarctica. These values are about an order of magnitude lower than the Greenland observations, but show reasonable agreement for Antarctica. The UM (Unified Model), UKCA (United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols Model), and GLOMAP (GLObal Model of Aerosol Processes) have

  5. Meteor bodies entering the Martian atmosphere: possible impact consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Daria; Gritsevich, Maria

    The investigation of meteorite production on Mars has attracted considerable attention during the recent years. The possible meteorite showers are identified e.g. [1], and the estimates of meteorite fluxes on Mars are found e.g. [2,3]. In this study, we develop the theory describing a meteoroid entry into an atmosphere of a planet and apply our results to the Martian atmosphere. We introduce two key dimensionless parameters, which are based on physical parameterization and have unique values for every single meteoroid case. This allows us to derive the condition for the meteorite fall identification in a simple analytical form, which can be directly implemented for analysis and classification of the possible impact consequences. To describe the motion we use the classical equations of the model of meteor body deceleration [4,5]. The analytical dimensionless solution for the mass-velocity dependence and the height-velocity dependence can be expressed using two main parameters: (i) the ballistic coefficient alpha, which shows the ratio between the mass of the atmospheric column along the trajectory and the body's pre-entry mass, and (ii) the mass loss parameter beta, which is proportional to the ratio between the initial kinetic energy of the body and energy which is required to insure total mass loss of the body due to ablation and fragmentation [6-8]. To determine the possible consequences of impact for any given meteoroid, we use the meteorite-fall condition: the terminal mass of the meteoroid should exceed or be equal to a certain chosen value. This condition can be written using the parameters alpha and beta, so the impact consequences are described by the position of the case-under-investigation point relatively to the boundary curve in the (alpha,beta) space. Following a number of studies [9-11] we analyze the hypothesis that describes the possible evolution of Martian atmospheric density until present. Based on the properties of the meteorites recently found

  6. New additional material of meteor showers during 9th -19th centuries in the Islamic history

    CERN Document Server

    Basurah, Hassan M

    2012-01-01

    This article presents twelve records of meteor showers in Arabic chronicles covering period from the 9th to the 19th century. The observations were in Egypt, Morocco, Syria and Yemen. These new addition historical records are considered to be important events which indicate a serious current interest in astronomy.

  7. Effects of probiotics on the faecal production of hydrogen and methane in patients with meteorism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Julie Bernstorf; Jespersen, Lene; Westermann, Peter;

    Meteorism is a dominating problem in the western world, especially in women. The condition is very difficult to quantify, and effective and documented therapies are not avaiable. We wanted to develop a method for measuring anaerobic production of hydrogen and methane in faeces, and to correlate t...

  8. MU head echo observations of the 2010 Geminids: radiant, orbit, and meteor flux observing biases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kero

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report Geminid meteor head echo observations with the high-power large-aperture (HPLA Shigaraki middle and upper atmosphere (MU radar in Japan (34.85° N, 136.10° E. The MU radar observation campaign was conducted from 13 December 2010, 08:00 UTC to 15 December, 20:00 UTC and resulted in 48 h of radar data. A total of ~ 270 Geminids were observed among ~ 8800 meteor head echoes with precisely determined orbits. The Geminid head echo activity is consistent with an earlier peak than the visual Geminid activity determined by the International Meteor Organization (IMO. The observed flux of Geminids is a factor of ~ 3 lower than the previously reported flux of the 2009 Orionids measured with an identical MU~radar setup. We use the observed flux ratio to discuss the relation between the head echo mass–velocity selection effect, the mass distribution indices of meteor showers and the mass threshold of the MU radar.

  9. Meteor reporting made easy- The Fireballs in the Sky smartphone app

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, E.; Ridgewell, J.; Bland, P.; Paxman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Using smartphone technology, the award-winning 'Fireballs in the Sky' app provides a new approach to public meteor reporting. Using the internal GPS and sensors of a smartphone, a user can record the start and end position of a meteor sighting with a background star field as reference. Animations are used to visualize the duration and characteristics of the meteor. The intuitive application can be used in situ, providing a more accurate eye witness account than after-the-fact reports (although reports may also be made through a website interface). Since its launch in 2013, the app has received over 2000 submissions, including 73 events which were reported by multiple users. The app database is linked to the Desert Fireball Network in Australia (DFN), meaning app reports can be confirmed by DFN observatories. Supporting features include an integrated meteor shower tool that provides updates on active showers, their visibility based on moon phase, as well as a tool to point the user toward the radiant. The locations of reports are also now shown on a live map on the Fireballs in the Sky webpage.

  10. Fragmentation of specular overdense meteor trail echoes observed with Gadanki MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenna Reddy, K.; Yellaiah, G.

    2016-02-01

    The pulse-integrated signal to noise ratio as a function of time known as radar meteor light curve (analogous to optical light curve), is an indicative of ablation processes during meteoroid flight in the atmosphere. In this study, we present and discuss few examples of light curves of long duration specular overdense meteor echoes detected with 53 MHz Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) MST radar. These echoes are of several seconds duration, where pulsation in amplitude is about ten cycles within few seconds. This means the fluctuations in amplitude are much slower than typical Fresnel oscillations of underdense as well as the head echo fluctuations. These light curves reveal several features unreported previously in the radar meteor returns that are consistent with meteoroid fragmentation. Some of them provide the strong observational evidence of a sub-millimeter-sized meteoroid, breaking apart into two distinct fragments. The pulsations in light curves are interpreted as being due to interference from two distinct scattering centers. Some other meteor events such as meteoroids undergoing quasi-continuous disintegration are also discussed.

  11. Design Architecture and Initial Results from an FPGA Based Digital Receiver for Multistatic Meteor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo, Scott; Vaudrin, Cody

    Defined by a minimal RF front-end followed by an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and con-trolled by a reconfigurable logic device (FPGA), the digital receiver will replace conventional heterodyning analog receivers currently in use by the COBRA meteor radar. A basic hardware overview touches on the major digital receiver components, theory of operation and data han-dling strategies. We address concerns within the community regarding the implementation of digital receivers in small-scale scientific radars, and outline the numerous benefits with a focus on reconfigurability. From a remote sensing viewpoint, having complete visibility into a band of the EM spectrum allows an experiment designer to focus on parameter estimation rather than hardware limitations. Finally, we show some basic multistatic receiver configurations enabled through GPS time synchronization. Currently, the digital receiver is configured to facilitate range and radial velocity determination of meteors in the MLT region for use with the COBRA meteor radar. Initial measurements from data acquired at Platteville, Colorado and Tierra Del Fuego in Argentina will be presented. We show an improvement in detection rates compared to conventional analog systems. Scientific justification for a digital receiver is clearly made by the presentation of RTI plots created using data acquired from the receiver. These plots reveal an interesting phenomenon concerning vacillating power structures in a select number of meteor trails.

  12. Lunar cold spots and crater production on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jean-Pierre; Bandfield, Joshua

    2016-10-01

    A new class of small, fresh impact craters has been recently identified on the Moon through the systematic mapping of lunar surface temperatures by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer instrument aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter [1]. These craters are distinguished by anomalously low nighttime temperatures at distances ~10–100 crater radii. This thermal behavior indicates that impacts modify the surrounding regolith surfaces making them highly insulating with little evidence for either significant deposition or erosion of surface material [2]. These thermophysically distinct surfaces, or "cold spots", appear to be common to all recent impacts and provide a means of uniquely identifying the most recent impact craters on the Moon. We have conducted a survey of the crater population associated with cold spots. Comparison with existing crater chronology models [e.g., 3] constrains the retention-age of the cold spots to ~200,000 yr with a size-frequency distribution (SFD) slope that is consistent with the modeled production function. This implies the rate at which cold spots fade to background levels is independent of initial cold spot size and that the SFD of crater production in the last 200 ka is similar to the long-term average used to establish modeled production functions, though the rate of cratering may have varied [4]. In addition, we observe a longitudinal heterogeneity in cold spot crater density that is consistent with that predicted to occur as a result of the Moon's synchronous rotation [5] and has been observed in the rayed crater population [6], with the cold spot density at the apex of motion (90°W) nearly twice that observed at the antapex (90°E).[1] Bandfield, J., et al. (2011) JGR 116, E00H02. [2] Bandfield, J., et al. (2014) Icarus, 231, 221-231. [3] Neukum, G., et al. (2001) SSR 96, 55–86. [4] Mazrouei, S. et al. (2015) LPSC 46, 2331. [5] Le Fleuvre, M., and Wieczorek, M. A. (2011) Icarus 214, 1-20. [6] Morota, T. and Furumoto, M. (2002) EPSL

  13. Observations of meteor-head echoes using the Jicamarca 50MHz radar in interferometer mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Chau

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results of recent observations of meteor-head echoes obtained with the high-power large-aperture Jicamarca 50MHz radar (11.95°S, 76.87°W in an interferometric mode. The large power-aperture of the system allows us to record more than 3000 meteors per hour in the small volume subtended by the 1° antenna beam, albeit when the cluttering equatorial electrojet (EEJ echoes are not present or are very weak. The interferometry arrangement allows the determination of the radiant (trajectory and speed of each meteor. It is found that the radiant distribution of all detected meteors is concentrated in relative small angles centered around the Earth's Apex as it transits over the Jicamarca sky, i.e. around the corresponding Earth heading for the particular observational day and time, for all seasons observed so far. The dispersion around the Apex is ~18° in a direction transverse to the Ecliptic plane and only 8.5° in heliocentric longitude in the Ecliptic plane both in the Earth inertial frame of reference. No appreciable interannual variability has been observed. Moreover, no population related to the optical (larger meteors Leonid showers of 1998-2002 is found, in agreement with other large power-aperture radar observations. A novel cross-correlation detection technique (adaptive match-filtering is used in combination with a 13 baud Barker phase-code. The technique allows us to get good range resolution (0.75km without any sensitivity deterioration for the same average power, compared to the non-coded long pulse scheme used at other radars. The matching Doppler shift provides an estimation of the velocity within a pulse with the same accuracy as if a non-coded pulse of the same length had been used. The velocity distribution of the meteors is relatively narrow and centered around 60kms-1. Therefore most of the meteors have an almost circular retrograde orbit around the Sun. Less than 8% of the velocities correspond to interstellar orbits

  14. Craters on Earth, Moon, and Mars - Multivariate classification and mode of origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Testing extraterrestrial craters and candidate terrestrial analogs for morphologic similitude is treated as a problem in numerical taxonomy. According to a principal-components solution and a cluster analysis, 402 representative craters on the Earth, the Moon, and Mars divide into two major classes of contrasting shapes and modes of origin. Craters of net accumulation of material (cratered lunar domes, Martian calderas, and all terrestrial volcanoes except maars and tuff rings) group apart from craters of excavation (terrestrial meteorite impact and experimental explosion craters, typical Martian craters, and all other lunar craters). Maars and tuff rings belong to neither group but are transitional. The classification criteria are four independent attributes of topographic geometry derived from seven descriptive variables by the principal-components transformation. Morphometric differences between crater bowl and raised rim constitute the strongest of the four components.

  15. Modeling the Meteoroid Input Function at Mid-Latitude Using Meteor Observations by the MU Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifko, Steven; Janches, Diego; Close, Sigrid; Sparks, Jonathan; Nakamura, Takuji; Nesvorny, David

    2012-01-01

    The Meteoroid Input Function (MIF) model has been developed with the purpose of understanding the temporal and spatial variability of the meteoroid impact in the atmosphere. This model includes the assessment of potential observational biases, namely through the use of empirical measurements to characterize the minimum detectable radar cross-section (RCS) for the particular High Power Large Aperture (HPLA) radar utilized. This RCS sensitivity threshold allows for the characterization of the radar system s ability to detect particles at a given mass and velocity. The MIF has been shown to accurately predict the meteor detection rate of several HPLA radar systems, including the Arecibo Observatory (AO) and the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR), as well as the seasonal and diurnal variations of the meteor flux at various geographic locations. In this paper, the MIF model is used to predict several properties of the meteors observed by the Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU) radar, including the distributions of meteor areal density, speed, and radiant location. This study offers new insight into the accuracy of the MIF, as it addresses the ability of the model to predict meteor observations at middle geographic latitudes and for a radar operating frequency in the low VHF band. Furthermore, the interferometry capability of the MU radar allows for the assessment of the model s ability to capture information about the fundamental input parameters of meteoroid source and speed. This paper demonstrates that the MIF is applicable to a wide range of HPLA radar instruments and increases the confidence of using the MIF as a global model, and it shows that the model accurately considers the speed and sporadic source distributions for the portion of the meteoroid population observable by MU.

  16. Tracing hillslope sediment production and transport with in situ and meteoric 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungers, Matthew C.; Bierman, Paul R.; Matmon, Ari; Nichols, Kyle; Larsen, Jennifer; Finkel, Robert

    2009-12-01

    We use in situ-produced and meteoric 10Be, analyzed in soils from 28 pits on four hillcrest-parallel transects along a 14° hillslope in the Great Smoky Mountains, North Carolina, as tracers of soil production and transport. We rely upon amalgamation both to investigate and smooth spatial variability in 10Be concentrations. Lidar indicates that the hillslope is topographically complex and that soil is moved downslope diffusively until it encounters the ephemeral channel network and is rapidly exported. In situ-produced 10Be, measured in depth profiles, indicates that over millennial timescales, soils are mixed above the soil-saprolite boundary. In contrast, meteoric 10Be concentrations increase with depth and are correlated to concurrent increases of dithionite-extractable Al and pH, observations explained by similar Al and Be mobility in the soil. The concentrations of both meteoric and in situ-produced 10Be increase downslope proportional to the maximum soil particle path length. The data suggest virtual downslope soil velocities of 1.1-1.7 cm yr-1 in a well-mixed active transport layer ˜60 cm thick. The thickness of this transport layer is constant downslope and depends on the rooting depth and consequent root wad thickness of downed trees on the slope, both of which reflect depth to the soil/saprolite boundary. Both meteoric and in situ-produced 10Be suggest that soil production is balanced by surface denudation at rates between 10 and 13 m Myr-1. Soil residence times on the slope range from 21 to 33 kyr based on the meteoric 10Be inventories. Major element geochemical analysis suggests little if any elemental loss during soil transport downslope.

  17. Comparison of the Cratering Records of Ceres and Rhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedemann, N.; Wagner, R. J.; Michael, G.; Kneissl, T.; Hiesinger, H.; Ivanov, B.; Denk, T.; Jaumann, R.; Neesemann, A.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C.

    2015-12-01

    Comparing the cratering records of dwarf planet Ceres and the Saturnian satellite Rhea, offers a great opportunity in comparative planetology to fill the gaps of understanding of the cratering history of the two bodies. Both bodies show strong indications for a water-ice rich crust. For Ceres, the amount of ice in the crust is indeterminate. Early Dawn imaging data shows complex craters on Ceres which are smaller than those on the basaltic asteroid Vesta. The smallest complex craters on Ceres are similar in size (~10-15 km) to those on Rhea, which might indicate a rather high water-ice content in Ceres' crust. The surface gravity on both bodies is almost equal, differing by only ~4%. Thus, regardless of their absolute values many variables required to relate projectile and crater size should be very similar on both bodies (surface gravity, strength to gravity transition, simple to complex transition, target density). The remaining variables such as projectile density and impact velocity are comparatively well known for Ceres but still in discussion for the Saturnian satellites. If the crater size-frequency distributions for craters >5 km from Rhea and Ceres are plotted together and are corrected for different projectile flux and exposure time, both records plot nearly on top of each other. This could indicate a common projectile population that impacted both bodies at nearly the same velocity. However, if the impacting projectile populations are very different, the impact velocity would have to compensate for such differences. Different ice temperatures may also play some role. Reducing the degrees of freedom increases the chance of understanding the projectile source and dynamics in the Saturnian system. We acknowledge the support of the Dawn and Cassini Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR), grants 50OW1101, 50OH1102 and 50OH0305.

  18. Acid Sulfate Alteration in Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Catalano, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit landed on the Gusev Crater plains west of the Columbia Hills in January, 2004, during the Martian summer (sol 0; sol = 1 Martian day = 24 hr 40 min). Spirit explored the Columbia Hills of Gusev Crater in the vicinity of Home Plate at the onset on its second winter (sol approximately 900) until the onset of its fourth winter (sol approximately 2170). At that time, Spirit became mired in a deposit of fined-grained and sulfate-rich soil with dust-covered solar panels and unfavorable pointing of the solar arrays toward the sun. Spirit has not communicated with the Earth since sol 2210 (January, 2011). Like its twin rover Opportunity, which landed on the opposite side of Mars at Meridiani Planum, Spirit has an Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument for chemical analyses and a Moessbauer spectrometer (MB) for measurement of iron redox state, mineralogical speciation, and quantitative distribution among oxidation (Fe(3+)/sigma Fe) and coordination (octahedral versus tetrahedral) states and mineralogical speciation (e.g., olivine, pyroxene, ilmenite, carbonate, and sulfate). The concentration of SO3 in Gusev rocks and soils varies from approximately 1 to approximately 34 wt%. Because the APXS instrument does not detect low atomic number elements (e.g., H and C), major-element oxide concentrations are normalized to sum to 100 wt%, i.e., contributions of H2O, CO2, NO2, etc. to the bulk composition care not considered. The majority of Gusev samples have approximately 6 plus or minus 5 wt% SO3, but there is a group of samples with high SO3 concentrations (approximately 30 wt%) and high total iron concentrations (approximately 20 wt%). There is also a group with low total Fe and SO3 concentrations that is also characterized by high SiO2 concentrations (greater than 70 wt%). The trend labeled "Basaltic Soil" is interpreted as mixtures in variable proportions between unaltered igneous material and oxidized and SO3-rich basaltic

  19. Atmospheric tides in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Newman, C. E.; de la Torre Juárez, M.; Wilson, R. J.; Lemmon, M.; Smith, M. D.; Kahanpää, H.; Harri, A.-M.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric tides are the primary source of daily air pressure variation at the surface of Mars. These tides are forced by solar heating of the atmosphere and modulated by the presence of atmospheric dust, topography, and surface albedo and thermal inertia. This results in a complex mix of sun-synchronous and non-sun-synchronous tides propagating both eastward and westward around the planet in periods that are integer fractions of a solar day. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station on board the Mars Science Laboratory has observed air pressure at a regular cadence for over 1 Mars year and here we analyze and diagnose atmospheric tides in this pressure record. The diurnal tide amplitude varies from 26 to 63 Pa with an average phase of 0424 local true solar time, while the semidiurnal tide amplitude varies from 5 to 20 Pa with an average phase of 0929. We find that both the diurnal and semidiurnal tides in Gale Crater are highly correlated to atmospheric opacity variations at a value of 0.9 and to each other at a value of 0.77, with some key exceptions occurring during regional and local dust storms. We supplement our analysis with MarsWRF general circulation modeling to examine how a local dust storm impacts the diurnal tide in its vicinity. We find that both the diurnal tide amplitude enhancement and regional coverage of notable amplitude enhancement linearly scales with the size of the local dust storm. Our results provide the first long-term record of surface pressure tides near the martian equator.

  20. Possible interaction of meteor explosion with stratospheric aerosols on cloud nucleation based on 2011 observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courty, M.-A.; Vaillant, M.; Benoit, R.

    2012-04-01

    The lack of knowledge on the nature and the variability through time of stratospheric aerosols strongly constrains the understanding of precipitation events at local to regional scales. Along other causes, meteoroid ablation is assumed to creating significant disturbances on the upper stratosphere layers, particularly by debris production and flash heating. Due to the lack of observations, the impact on cloud and precipitation processes of cosmic debris that are annually delivered to Earth is not taken into account in climate modeling. Here we report on the data collected from 2011 cosmic events that occurred on the Angles village in Pyrenees Orientales (France). The trajectory of a meteor was traced by the CNES from Toulouse (France) to the Pyrenees boarder with Spain where it exploded at high altitude on August 2. 30 hours later, a detonation with debris pulverization at the ground was recorded at the same location across a restricted area. In the following days, unusual heavy rainstorms and violent fall of hailstones were locally recorded from the Pyrenees to the coastal plain. Meticulous sampling of the 2011 August 3rd debris fall and of the soils affected by the subsequent precipitation events has been performed. A similar assemblage of organic and mineral components of stratospheric origin was revealed. It is formed of aliphatic carbonaceous polymorphs of terrestrial origin, volcanic dust, charred and fresh organic grains, fine grained sandstones with native metals and micrometeorite spherules. Microscopic assemblage, isotopes and geochemical data show composite materials formed of imbricated terrestrial and extra-terrestrial components. Based on their C14 and C13 values the terrestrial carbonaceous polymorphs appear to derive from fossil combustible. The fine imbrication of all the other terrestrial components with the carbonaceous polymorphs indicates a common origin from the upper stratosphere. The mixing of the extraterrestrial debris with the

  1. Chemical abundances of giant stars in the Crater stellar system

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifacio, P; Zaggia, S; François, P; Sbordone, L; Andrievsky, S M; Korotin, S A

    2015-01-01

    We obtained spectra for two giants of Crater (Crater J113613-105227 and Crater J113615-105244) using X-Shooter at the VLT. The spectra have been analysed with the MyGIsFoS code using a grid of synthetic spectra computed from one dimensional, Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) model atmospheres. Effective temperature and surface gravity have been derived from photometry measured from images obtained by the Dark Energy Survey. The radial velocities are 144.3+-4.0 km/s for Crater J113613-105227 and and 134.1+-4.0 km/s for Crater J113615-105244. The metallicities are [Fe/H]=-1.73 and [Fe/H]=-1.67, respectively. Beside the iron abundance we could determine abundances for nine elements: Na, Mg, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni and Ba. For Na and Ba we took into account deviations from LTE, since the corrections are significant. The abundance ratios are similar in the two stars and resemble those of Galactic stars of the same metallicity. On the deep photometric images we could detect several stars that lie to the blue of t...

  2. Inferring conduit process from population studies of cinder cone craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, Karen G.

    2014-05-01

    One of the most observable aspects of magma conduits is of course their exit to the Earth's surface: the volcanic crater. The craters resulting from small mostly-monogenetic volcanic eruptions vary in considerable in size and shape, even after accounting for variation in size. Presumably, these variations tell us something about the state of the conduit at least in the ending stages of eruption. But what? This work explores the statistical properties of crater populations in Guatemala and elsewhere and speculates on the conduit processes that may explain the complex behavior. Crater depths are strongly correlated with cone slopes even when normalized by cone diameter, which suggests the importance of the impact of the volatile content (which may influence slope through fragmentation and the resulting grain size) and the duration of eruption (which may influence whether the cone is built to its maximum slope) despite erosion acting to reduce observed crater depths (cone slopes are known to decrease with erosion but cone diameters increase).

  3. Volatile-rich Crater Interior Deposits on Mars: An Energy Balance Model of Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Patrick S.; Head, James W.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Several craters on Mars are partially filled by material emplaced by post-impact processes. Populations of such craters include those in the circumsouth polar cap region, in Arabia Terra, associated with the Medusae Fossae Formation, and in the northern lowlands proximal to the north polar cap. In this study, crater fill material refers to an interior mound, generally separated from the interior walls of the crater by a trough that may be continuous along the crater s circumference (i.e. a ring-shaped trough), or may only partially contact the crater walls (i.e. a crescent-shaped trough). The fill deposit is frequently off-center from the crater center and may be asymmetric, (i.e. not circular) in plan view shape. Here we test the hypothesis that asymmetries in volatile fill shape, profile, and center-location within a crater result from asymmetries in local energy balance within the crater due mainly to variation of solar insolation and radiative effects of the crater walls over the crater interior. We first focus on Korolev crater in the northern lowlands. We can then apply this model to other craters in different regions. If asymmetry in morphology and location of crater fill are consistent with radiative-dominated asymmetries in energy budget within the crater, then 1) the volatile-rich composition of the fill is supported (this process should not be effective at shaping volcanic or sedimentary deposits), and 2) the dominant factor determining the observed shape of volatile-rich crater fill is the local radiative energy budget within the crater (and erosive processes such as eolian deflation are not necessary).

  4. A comparison of detection sensitivity between ALTAIR and Arecibo meteor observations: Can high power and large aperture radars detect low velocity meteor head-echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, Diego; Close, Sigrid; Fentzke, Jonathan T.

    2008-01-01

    Meteor head-echo observations using High Power and Large Aperture (HPLA) radars have been routinely used for micrometeor studies for over a decade. The head-echo is a signal from the radar-reflective plasma region traveling with the meteoroid and its detection allows for very precise determination of instantaneous meteor altitude, velocity and deceleration. Unlike specular meteor radars (SMR), HPLA radars are diverse instruments when compared one to another. The operating frequencies range from 46 MHz to 1.29 GHz while the antenna configurations changes from 18,000 dipoles in a 300 m×300 m square array, phase arrays of dipoles to single spherical or parabolic dishes of various dimensions. Hunt et al. [Hunt, S.M., Oppenheim, M., Close, S., Brown, P.G., McKeen, F., Minardi, M., 2004. Icarus 168, 34-42] and Close et al. [Close, S., Brown, P., Campbell-Brown, M., Oppenheim, M., Colestock, P., 2007. Icarus, doi: 10.1016/j.icarus.2006.09.07] recently showed, by utilizing a head-echo plasma-based model, the presence of instrumental biases in the ALTAIR VHF radar system against detecting meteors produced by very small particles (<1 μg) moving at slow (˜20 km/s) velocities due to the low head echo radar cross-section (RCS) associated with these particles. In this paper we apply the same methodology to the Arecibo 430 MHz radar and compare the results with those presented by Close et al. [Close, S., Brown, P., Campbell-Brown, M., Oppenheim, M., Colestock, P., 2007. Icarus, doi: 10.1016/j.icarus.2006.09.07]. We show that, if the methodology applied by Hunt et al. [Hunt, S.M., Oppenheim, M., Close, S., Brown, P.G., McKeen, F., Minardi, M., 2004. Icarus 168, 34-42] and Close et al. [Close, S., Brown, P., Campbell-Brown, M., Oppenheim, M., Colestock, P., 2007. Icarus, doi: 10.1016/j.icarus.2006.09.07] is accurate, for particles at least 1 μg or heavier, while the bias may exist for the ALTAIR measurements, it does not exist in the Arecibo data due to its greater sensitivity.

  5. Processes in complex (dusty) plasmas in the midlatitude ionosphere during high-speed meteor showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popel, S. I.; Kopnin, S. I.

    2007-08-01

    The emission low-frequency lines in the frequency range of 12 to 60 Hz recorded [1] against the radio-frequency noise background during high-speed (the speed of entry into the atmosphere is about 70 km/s) meteor showers (Perseids, Orionids, Leonids, and Gemenids) are shown to serve as an evidence of the existence of complex (dusty) plasmas in the midlatitude ionosphere. The mechanism for generating the radio-frequency noises in the frequency range of 12 to 60 Hz is shown to be as follows. During Perseid, Orionid, Gemenid, and Leonid meteor showers, the meteors are ablated at altitudes of 70-130 km, depending on their sizes and initial velocities. The result of ablation is the production of supersaturated vapors of such metals as sodium, calcium, magnesium, etc., which then condense into nanometer-to-micrometer-sized secondary (dust) grains of cosmic origin. The grains can acquire an electric charge because of the action of unbalanced electron and ion currents and because of the photoelectric effect resulting from solar light. As an electromagnetic wave propagates in a complex (dusty) plasma in the ionosphere, the modulational interaction [2] excites low-frequency electrostatic waves at characteristic frequencies close to those of the dust acoustic waves, with the result that electromagnetic waves may become modulated. It is the low-frequency component of the wave modulated against the ionospheric noise background that is recorded at the Earth's surface. Our theoretical results are shown to agree well with the data on ionospheric plasma noise observed during meteor showers. We show also that along with the low-frequency component of modulated electromagnetic waves, the lines of infrasonic waves generated in the meteoric precipitation regions should be recorded as well. The infrasonic waves are generated by the dust acoustic waves interacting with neutrals. We determine the conditions for generation of both linear and nonlinear infrasonic waves by the dust acoustic

  6. Imaging the Buried Chicxulub Crater with Gravity Gradients and Cenotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, A. R.; Pilkington, M.; Halpenny, J. F.; Ortiz-Aleman, C.; Chavez, R. E.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Connors, M.; Graniel-Castro, E.; Camara-Zi, A.; Vasquez, J.

    1995-09-01

    Differing interpretations of the Bouguer gravity anomaly over the Chicxulub crater, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, have yielded diameter estimates of 170 to 320 km. Knowing the crater's size is necessary to quantify the lethal perturbations to the Cretaceous environment associated with its formation. The crater's size (and internal structure) is revealed by the horizontal gradient of the Bouguer gravity anomaly over the structure, and by mapping the karst features of the Yucatan region. To improve our resolution of the crater's gravity signature we collected additional gravity measurements primarily along radial profiles, but also to fill in previously unsurveyed areas. Horizontal gradient analysis of Bouguer gravity data objectively highlights the lateral density contrasts of the impact lithologies and suppresses regional anomalies which may obscure the gravity signature of the Chicxulub crater lithologies. This gradient technique yields a striking circular structure with at least 6 concentric gradient features between 25 and 85 km radius. These features are most distinct in the southwest probably because of denser sampling of the gravity field. Our detailed profiles detected an additional feature and steeper gradients (up to 5 mGal/km) than the original survey. We interpret the outer four gradient maxima to represent concentric faults in the crater's zone of slumping as is also revealed by seismic reflection data. The inner two probably represent the margin of the central uplift and the peak ring and or collapsed transient cavity. Radial gradients in the SW quadrant over the inferred ~40 km-diameter central uplift (4) may represent structural "puckering" as revealed at eroded terrestrial craters. Gradient features related to regional gravity highs and lows are visible outside the crater, but no concentric gradient features are apparent at distances > 90 km radius. The marginal gradient features may be modelled by slump faults as observed in large complex craters on

  7. Craters on Mars: Global Geometric Properties from Gridded MOLA Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Frawley, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    Impact craters serve as natural probes of the target properties of planetary crusts and the tremendous diversity of morphological expressions of such features on Mars attests to their importance for deciphering the history of crustal assembly, modification, and erosion. This paper summarizes the key findings associated with a five year long survey of the three-dimensional properties of approx. 6000 martian impact craters using finely gridded MOLA topography. Previous efforts have treated representative subpopulations, but this effort treats global properties from the largest survey of impact features from the perspective of their topography ever assimilated. With the Viking missions of the mid-1970 s, the most intensive and comprehensive robotic expeditions to any Deep Space location in the history of humanity were achieved, with scientifically stunning results associated with the morphology of impact craters. The relationships illustrated and suggest that martian impact features are remarkably sensitive to target properties and to the local depositional processes.

  8. Artificial Crater Formation on Satellite Surfaces Using an Orbiting Railgun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissly, R. W.; Miller, K. L.; Carlson, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The specification of greater than 45kW of disposable power available on the JIMO spacecraft raises the possibility of a new class of instrumentation that has utility at such power levels. In this presentation we discuss the concept of an electromagnetic mass driver that can launch projectiles from orbit around one of the Galilean satellites directed on a trajectory that will impact the satellite surface. The resulting impact will create a crater that will provide information on the mechanical properties of surface and near-surface materials, expose subsurface materials for remote spectral identification, and form a vapor cloud that can be sensed for composition either remotely or in-situ. An analog for such a controlled cratering experiment is Deep Impact, a mission to observe the crater and ensuing ejecta cloud formed by a ballistic projectile into a comet surface in July, 2005.

  9. Impact craters at falling of large asteroids in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    Catastrophes of different scale that are associated with the fall of celestial bodies to the Earth - occurred repeatedly in its history. But direct evidence of such catastrophes has been discovered recently. Thus, in the late 1970s studies of terrestrial rocks showed that in layers of the earth's crust that corresponded to the period of 65 million years before the present, marked by the mass extinction of some species of living creatures, and the beginning of the rapid development of others. It was then - a large body crashed to Earth in the Gulf of Mexico in Central America. The consequence of this is the Chicxulub crater with a diameter of ~170 km on Yucatan Peninsula. Modern Earth's surface retains many traces of collisions with large cosmic bodies. To indicate the craters with a diameter of more than 2 km using the name "astrobleme". Today, it found more than 230. The largest astroblems sizes exceeding 200 km. Ukraine also has some own astroblems. In Ukraine, been found nine large impact craters. Ukrainian crystalline shield, because of its stability for a long time (more than 1.5 billion years), has the highest density of large astroblems on the Earth's surface. The largest of the Ukrainian astroblems is Manevytska. It has a diameter of 45 km. There are also Ilyinetskyi (7 km), Boltysh (25 km), Obolon' (20 km), Ternivka (12-15 km), Bilylivskyi (6 km), Rotmystrivka (3 km) craters. Zelenohayska astrobleme founded near the village Zelenyi Gay in Kirovograd region and consists of two craters: larger with diameter 2.5-3.5 km and smaller - with diameter of 800 m. The presence of graphite, which was the basis for the research of the impact diamond in astroblems of this region. As a result, the diamonds have been found in rocks of Ilyinetskyi crater; later it have been found in rocks in the Bilylivska, Obolon' and other impact structures. The most detailed was studied the geological structure and the presence of diamonds in Bilylivska astrobleme

  10. Cratering on a Comet: Expectations for Deep Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, P. H.

    2001-11-01

    In 2005, the Deep Impact Mission will witness the collision of a 350kg impactor into Comet P-Temple 1. Laboratory impact experiments provide scaling laws that relate impactor mass to crater diameter and depth for various target and impactor properties. A series of experiments have been performed at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range in order to assess the effects of the density and impedance ratio between target and impactor, target compressibility, target porosity, and impact angle. Although the maximum velocity achievable in the laboratory is below that for Deep Impact (7km/sec versus 10.3 km/sec), varying impactor diameter and velocity allows extrapolating beyond this range, for certain assumptions. This approach has been used for various particulate targets including pumice (1.1 to 1.5 g/cc, sand (1.7g/cc), vermiculite (0.09 g/cc), and micro-spheres (0.05g/cc), which provide the maximum possible diameter produced on Temple 1. Smaller sizes are expected if strength, rather than gravity, controls limits of crater growth or if internal energy losses (e.g., pore-space collapse) reduce the coupling efficiency. Crater size also can be augmented through back pressures created by vapor expansion within the crater cavity. The maximum predicted crater diameters (without back pressure) for the DI impact into a 0.3 g/cc porous target are: 89 m (pumice), 124 m (fine sand), 98m (fine sand with compaction losses). Formation times approach 200 seconds. Crater size, plume evolution (size and photometry), formation time, ejection (curtain) angle, and the ejecta deposit will all contribute to meaningful interpretations of the near-surface properties.

  11. Survey of TES high albedo events in Mars' northern polar craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J.C.; Nielson, S.K.; Titus, T.N.

    2007-01-01

    Following the work exploring Korolev Crater (Armstrong et al., 2005) for evidence of crater interior ice deposits, we have conducted a survey of Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (TES) temperature and albedo measurements for Mars' northern polar craters larger than 10 km. Specifically, we identify a class of craters that exhibits brightening in their interiors during a solar longitude, Ls, of 60 to 120 degrees, roughly depending on latitude. These craters vary in size, latitude, and morphology, but appear to have a specific regional association on the surface that correlates with the distribution of subsurface hydrogen (interpreted as water ice) previously observed on Mars. We suggest that these craters, like Korolev, exhibit seasonal high albedo frost events that indicate subsurface water ice within the craters. A detailed study of these craters may provide insight in the geographical distribution of the ice and context for future polar missions. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. The Links Between Target Properties and Layered Ejecta Craters in Acidalia and Utopia Planitiae Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E.; Osinski, G. R.

    2013-08-01

    Layered ejecta craters on Mars may form from excavation into subsurface volatiles. We examine a new catalogue of martian craters to decipher differences between the single- and double-layered ejecta populations in Acidalia and Utopia.

  13. Impact Cratering Experiments into Quartzite and Tuff: First Results from the MEMIN Research Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Deutsch, A.; Thoma, K.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-09-01

    The effects of porosity on the cratering process will be examined in experiments planned for June 2012. Porosity in combination with target strength is expected to have an effect on crater morphology and ejection behavior.

  14. Hypothetical Source Crater for Australasian Tektites: Moving from Indochina to Northwest China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizera, J.; Řanda, Z.; Kameník, J.; Klokočník, J.; Kostelecký, J.

    2016-08-01

    We argue against the generally accepted hypothetical location of the unknown source crater for Australasian tektites to Indochina, and present a hypothesis of a possible location of the AAT source crater in deserts of NW China.

  15. On the Fitting of Non-Linear, Empirical Functions for the Fitting of Model Crater Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, B. P.; Hilbe, J. M.; Robbins, S. J.; Plesko, C. S.; Riggs, J. D.

    2015-05-01

    Fitting model crater production functions to observed crater data is considered an "art" by many, and there is no standard in the field for how best to do it. We will discuss mathematical techniques' pros and cons and make recommendations.

  16. Testing Formation Theories of NW Arabia Terra, Mars: New Clues from Old Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, S. J.; Hynek, B. M.

    2008-03-01

    Northwest Arabia Terra has topography and crater populations indicating a unique history. We directly tested two proposed formation mechanisms. Crater size-frequency and d/D ratios suggest neither scenario is easily reconcilable with the new datasets.

  17. Search for Impact Craters in Iran: Citizen Science as a Useful Method

    CERN Document Server

    Pourkhorsandi, Hamed

    2013-01-01

    To recognition probable impact craters in Iran, we use Google Earth data in the first step. Some probable structures identified and studies suggest non-impact origin for them. Studies on other craters in Iran are in progress.

  18. Mossbauer studies on impactites from Lonar impact crater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verma, H.C.; Misra, S.; ShyamPrasad, M.; Bijlani, N.; Tripathi, A.; Newsom, H.

    codes and short descriptions of the samples studied Sample code Description Source GE1 Glassy material of size ∼ 1 cm Prof N Bhandari, Physical from the northern side Research Laboratory, India of the Rim GE2 Glassy material from some distance away from... from the Lonar crater region and one sample from the Ries crater are studied in this work using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The sample Codes and their short descriptions are given in Table 1. The samples GE1, GE2 and GE3 are ejecta material in the form...

  19. Impactor Flux and Cratering on the Pluto-Charon System

    OpenAIRE

    de Elía, G. C.; Di Sisto, R. P.; A. Brunini

    2010-01-01

    We study the impactor flux and cratering on Pluto and Charon due to the collisional evolution of Plutinos. Plutinos are those trans-Neptunian objects located at 39.5 AU, in the 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune. To do this, we develop a statistical code that includes catastrophic collisions and cratering events, and takes into account the stability and instability zones of the 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune. We proposes different initial populations that account for the uncertain...

  20. SOLID STATE PHYSICS OF IMPACT CRATER FORMATION: FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Celebonovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact craters exist on solid surface planets, their satellites and many asteroids. The aim of this paper is to propose a theoretical expression for the product ρr3 v2 1 , where the three symbols denote the mass density, radius and speed of the impactor. The expression is derived using well known results of solid state physics, and it can be used in estimating parameters of impactors which have led to formation of craters on various solid bodies in the Solar System.

  1. Geomorphometric analysis of selected Martian craters using polar coordinate transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Zoltán; Koma, Zsófia; Székely, Balázs

    2016-04-01

    Centrally symmetric landform elements are very common features on the surface of the planet Mars. The most conspicuous ones of them are the impact craters of various size. However, a closer look on these features reveals that they show often asymmetric patterns as well. These are partially related to the geometry of the trajectory of the impacting body, but sometimes it is a result of surface processes (e.g., freeze/thaw cycles, mass movements). Geomorphometric studies have already been carried out to reveal these pecularities. Our approach, the application of polar coordinate transformation (PCT) very sensitively enhances the non-radial and non-circular shapes. We used digital terrain models (DTMs) derived from the ESA Mars Express HRSC imagery. The original DTM or its derivatives (e.g. slope angle or aspect) are PCT transformed. We analyzed the craters inter alia with scattergrams in polar coordinates. The resulting point cloud can be used directly for the analysis, but in some cases an interpolation should be applied to enhance certain non-circular features (especially in case of smaller craters). Visual inspection of the crater slopes, coloured by the aspect, reveals smaller features. Some of them are processing artefacts, but many of them are related to local undulations in the topography or indications of mass movements. In many cases the undulations of the crater rim are due to erosional processes. The drawbacks of the technology are related to the uneven resolution of the projected image: features in the crater centre should be left out from the analysis because PCT has a low resolution around the projection center. Furthermore, the success of the PCT depends on the correct definition of the projection centre: erroneously centered images are not suitable for analysis. The PCT transformed images are also suitable for radial averaging and calculation of standard deviations, resulting in typical, comparable craters shapes. These studies may lead to a deeper

  2. Local and long-distance effects of meteor showers in the low ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas Boas, J. W. S.; Paes Leme, N. M.; Rizzo Piazza, L.; da Costa, A. M.; Macedo Moura, M. S. S.

    1986-07-01

    The effect of the Geminids and alpha Scorpiids meteor showers in the lower ionosphere have been observed using two different methods. Low ionosphere group heights, measured by a VLF ionosonde located in southern Brazil, indicated significant anomalous lowering of the effective reflection height which was in good correlation with the transit of the alpha Scorpiids stream. The diurnal VLF phase variations over two long-distance propagation paths showed significant phase deviations from the average during the transits of the showers' radiants. Geomagnetic activity during the periods concerned was low and the results obtained using the two different techniques confirm the occurrence of changes in the physical conditions of the low ionosphere produced by meteor showers on local, as well as on long-distance, scales.

  3. Hazards due to Meteor and Asteroids and Infux of Cosmic Matter on the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruchynenko, V. G.; Voloshchuk, Yu. I.; Kashcheev, B. L.; Kazantsev, A. M.; Lupishko, D. F.; Yatskiv, Ya. S.

    The problem of meteor and asteroid hazards is considered on the basis of modern studies of small bodies in the solar system. Using one of the largest meteor data banks and the results of calculations of asteroid orbits, new approaches to the search for space bodies which may be dangerous to our planet are formulated. The problem of destruction of meteoroids of various masses in the atmosphere and on the surface of the Earth is considered, and a criterion for distinguishing between impact and explosion meteorites is presented. Analysis of the data on influx of cosmic bodies on the Earth in a wide range of masses is made. The probability of collision of space vehicles with meteoroid particles is given.

  4. Leonid Shower Probe of Aerothermochemistry in Meteoric Plasmas and Implication for the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter S. I.; Packan, D.; Laux, C.; Wilson, Mike; Boyd, I. D.; Kruger, C. H.; Popova, O.; Fonda, M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The rarefied and high Mach number (up to 270) of the flow field of a typical meteoroid as it enters the Earth's atmosphere implies conditions of ablation and atmospheric chemistry that have proven to be as difficult to grasp as the proverbial shooting star. An airborne campaign was organized to study these processes during an intense Leonid shower. A probe of molecular band emission now demonstrates that the flash of light from a common meteor originates in the wake of the object rather than in the meteor head. A new theoretical approach using the direct simulation Monte Carlo technique demonstrates that the ablation process is critical in heating the air in that wake. Air molecules impinge on a dense cloud of ablated material in front of the meteoroid head into an extended wake that has the observed excitation temperatures. These processes determine what extraterrestrial materials may have been delivered to Earth at the time of the origin of life.

  5. Prediction of evolution of meteor shower associated with comet 122P/de Vico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, D.

    2014-04-01

    We deal with a theoretical meteoroid stream of the comet 122P/de Vico. For five perihelion passages in the distant past, we model a theoretical stream and follow its dynamical evolution until the present. We predict the characteristics of potential a meteor shower approaching the Earth's orbit and we make also the identification of the particles of the predicted shower with the real meteors in three databases (photo, radar, and video). Our overall prediction is, however, negative because only the particles released from the comet nucleus before approximately 37 000 years are found to evolve into a collision course with the Earth and, therefore, form a possible shower. Many meteoroids do not survive such a long time in interplanetary space.

  6. Modeling an enhancement of the lunar sodium tail during the Leonid Meteor Shower of 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jody K.; Smith, Steven M.; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Mendillo, Michael

    A region of non-terrestrial sodium emission seen in the sky on the nights of November 18-20, 1998, has been interpreted as the Moon's distant sodium tail, possibly enhanced by micrometeor impact vaporization of the lunar regolith by the Leonid meteor shower. We show that the location and morphology of the spot can be explained by standard steady-state models of the Moon's sodium atmosphere. Moreover, using a new time-dependent simulation of the lunar atmosphere, we find that the Na escape rate from the Moon increased to 2 or 3 times its normal level during the most intense period of the 1998 Leonid meteor shower on November 16th and 17th.

  7. An antenna, a radio and a microprocessor: which kinds of observation are possible in meteor radio astronomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, L.

    2016-01-01

    Radio meteors are usually investigated by professional radars. Amateur astronomers cannot have transmitters, so usually they can only listen to sounds generated by a radio tuned to a TV or military transmitter. Until recently, this kind of observation has not produced good data. The experience of "RAMBo" (Radar Astrofilo Meteorico Bolognese) shows which data can be extracted from an amateur meteor scatter observatory and the results which can be achieved.

  8. Contrasting hydrological processes of meteoric water incursion during magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposition: An oxygen isotope study by ion microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Meteoric water convection has long been recognized as an efficient means to cool magmatic intrusions in the Earth's upper crust. This interplay between magmatic and hydrothermal activity thus exerts a primary control on the structure and evolution of volcanic, geothermal and ore-forming systems. Incursion of meteoric water into magmatic-hydrothermal systems has been linked to tin ore deposition in granitic plutons. In contrast, evidence from porphyry copper ore deposits suggests that crystallizing subvolcanic magma bodies are only affected by meteoric water incursion in peripheral zones and during late post-ore stages. We apply high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyze oxygen isotope ratios of individual growth zones in vein quartz crystals, imaged by cathodo-luminescence microscopy (SEM-CL). Existing microthermometric information from fluid inclusions enables calculation of the oxygen isotope composition of the fluid from which the quartz precipitated, constraining the relative timing of meteoric water input into these two different settings. Our results confirm that incursion of meteoric water directly contributes to cooling of shallow granitic plutons and plays a key role in concurrent tin mineralization. By contrast, data from two porphyry copper deposits suggest that downward circulating meteoric water is counteracted by up-flowing hot magmatic fluids. Our data show that porphyry copper ore deposition occurs close to a magmatic-meteoric water interface, rather than in a purely magmatic fluid plume, confirming recent hydrological modeling. On a larger scale, the expulsion of magmatic fluids against the meteoric water interface can shield plutons from rapid convective cooling, which may aid the build-up of large magma chambers required for porphyry copper ore formation.

  9. Morphometry of impact craters on Mercury from MESSENGER altimetry and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susorney, Hannah C. M.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Johnson, Catherine L.

    2016-06-01

    Data acquired by the Mercury Laser Altimeter and the Mercury Dual Imaging System on the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury provide a means to measure the geometry of many of the impact craters in Mercury's northern hemisphere in detail for the first time. The combination of topographic and imaging data permit a systematic evaluation of impact crater morphometry on Mercury, a new calculation of the diameter Dt at which craters transition with increasing diameter from simple to complex forms, and an exploration of the role of target properties and impact velocity on final crater size and shape. Measurements of impact crater depth on Mercury confirm results from previous studies, with the exception that the depths of large complex craters are typically shallower at a given diameter than reported from Mariner 10 data. Secondary craters on Mercury are generally shallower than primary craters of the same diameter. No significant differences are observed between the depths of craters within heavily cratered terrain and those of craters within smooth plains. The morphological attributes of craters that reflect the transition from simple to complex craters do not appear at the same diameter; instead flat floors first appear with increasing diameter in craters at the smallest diameters, followed with increasing diameter by reduced crater depth and rim height, and then collapse and terracing of crater walls. Differences reported by others in Dt between Mercury and Mars (despite the similar surface gravitational acceleration on the two bodies) are confirmed in this study. The variations in Dt between Mercury and Mars cannot be adequately attributed to differences in either surface properties or mean projectile velocity.

  10. "Pit Craters", lava tubes, and open vertical volcanic conduits in Hawaii: a problem in terminology

    OpenAIRE

    William R. Halliday

    1998-01-01

    Almost from the 1849 publication of the term pit crater, volcanologists have disagreed about the parameters differentiating these features from other vertical volcanic structures. Kaluaiki is a jameo giving entry to Thurston Lava Tube in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Long-standing misidentification of it as a pit crater is an example of misunderstandings arising from the lack of a clear definition of pit crater. In general, pit craters are unrelated to lava tube caves genetically, but two s...

  11. The MEMIN research unit: First results from impact cratering experiments into quartzite and tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Deutsch, A.; Thoma, K.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-09-01

    The MEMIN research unit is focused on performing and evaluating impact cratering experiments into geological materials. As a research unit, MEMIN uses a multidisciplinary approach, with different subprojects analyzing various aspects of the same cratering experiments, including crater morphology, ejecta dynamics, subsurface deformation, etc., along with numerical simulations of the impact process. A series of impact cratering experiments into quartzite and tuff targets is planned for June 2012. We intend to have completed a preliminary evaluation of these experiments for the EPSC conference.

  12. CPR evolution of kilometer-scale craters on the lunar mare

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Isabel; Fassett, Caleb; Thomson, Bradley J.; Minton, David A.; Watters, Wesley A.

    2016-10-01

    This study analyzes the 12.6-cm radar signature of kilometer-scale craters using data from the Mini-RF instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. We examine the circular polarization ratio (CPR), which is sensitive to rockiness and surface roughness at the decimeter scale, to determine if there is a relationship between CPR signature and age for craters on the lunar mare. The craters come from an existing dataset of >13,000 craters ranging 800 m to 5 km in diameter that have previously determined degradation states based on their topography. The locations of craters in the original data set were manually co-registered to Mini-RF level 2 observations from the PDS, and for each crater, radial CPR profiles were extracted. In total, there were 5,142 unique craters with Mini-RF observations; 914 craters had repeat measurements that were used to assess uncertainties in CPR profiles. To characterize the time evolution of CPR, the craters were analyzed by finding the median profiles for groups of craters sorted by age and diameter. The highest CPR values are found in the interiors of the craters, and for craters ≤2 km, the freshest craters have the highest CPR values. In the ejecta, fresh craters exhibit the highest CPR, and this decreases with time until an equilibrium is reached. As expected from theory, larger craters' profiles evolve less quickly, with only minor changes in CPR inside their rim and a slower decrease of CPR in their ejecta. In conjunction with other datasets like topography, optical maturity, and rockiness, these data are important for constraining models of regolith evolution and crater degradation on the Moon.

  13. Preliminary chemical data from basaltic rocks dredged at Great Meteor, Hyeres and Plato seamounts

    OpenAIRE

    Madureira, Pedro; Pinto Ribeiro, Luísa; Lourenço, Nuno; Martins, Sofia; Pinto de Abreu, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    The seafloor near the Azores archipelago and the southern seamounts are still greatly unexplored. Cruise EMEPC/Açores/G3/2007 was planned to collect geological and geophysical data for the Portuguese Proposal for the Extension of the Continental Shelf under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) along a track from the Azores to the Great Meteor seamount. Over 40 dredge operations were performed and a significant volume of cemented carbonate rocks, sediment...

  14. Evaluation of meteoric calcite cements as a proxy material for mass-47 clumped isotope thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defliese, William F.; Lohmann, Kyger C.

    2016-01-01

    Meteoric diagenetic cements are ubiquitous throughout geologic history, affecting most carbonate exposures worldwide. They can often be difficult to interpret, as it is usually difficult to separate the influences of water δ18O and temperature on isotopic signals contained within the carbonate rock body. Despite this difficulty in interpretation, meteoric phreatic cements can potentially be a useful proxy material, as they form slowly in equilibrium at mean annual temperature and are not affected by any biogenic effects that can bias other proxy materials. We applied the mass-47 clumped isotope paleothermometer to Pleistocene and Holocene carbonates from Bermuda and Barbados in order to investigate the effects of meteoric diagenesis on Δ47 signals, and to determine their suitability as a paleotemperature proxy. Phreatic calcite cements are found to record the same temperatures as unaltered carbonate sediments, while any sample exhibiting vadose characteristics is biased towards unreasonably hot apparent formation temperatures. Burial heating and re-equilibration are not geologically viable explanations for the anomalously hot temperatures recorded in vadose cements, as neither Bermuda or Barbados has any burial history. Instead, it is likely that precipitation in the vadose zone occurs on timescales quicker than isotopic equilibrium can be achieved, driven by a combination of CO2 degassing and evaporation, which have been previously shown to cause problems in speleothems and pedogenic carbonates. We conclude by suggesting that meteoric phreatic calcites may be an ideal phase for paleotemperature reconstruction, as they accurately record mean annual temperatures and form under equilibrium conditions, while also being resistant to further mineral driven diagenesis. Vadose cements, and any sample likely affected by processes similar to vadose diagenesis, should be avoided for climate reconstructions using the mass-47 clumped isotope thermometer.

  15. The Nippon/Norway Svalbard Meteor Radar: First results of small-scale structure observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The Nippon/Norway Svalbard Meteor Radar(NSMR), has been in operation since March 2001. While primarily thought of as an instrument for examining mean wind, tidal and gravity wave neutral atmosphere dynamics in the upper mesosphere region, it is also possible to investigate spatial and temporal structure of temperature and windshear. Here, the radar itself is described followed by a presentation of these derived parameters.

  16. The MEMIN research unit: Scaling impact cratering experiments in porous sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, Michael H.; Kenkmann, Thomas; Thoma, Klaus; Hoerth, Tobias; Dufresne, Anja; SchńFer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The MEMIN research unit (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling Impact research Network) is focused on analyzing experimental impact craters and experimental cratering processes in geological materials. MEMIN is interested in understanding how porosity and pore space saturation influence the cratering process. Here, we present results of a series of impact experiments into porous wet and dry sandstone targets. Steel, iron meteorite, and aluminum projectiles ranging in size from 2.5 to 12 mm were accelerated to velocities of 2.5-7.8 km s-1, yielding craters with diameters between 3.9 and 40 cm. Results show that the target's porosity reduces crater volumes and cratering efficiency relative to nonporous rocks. Saturation of pore space with water to 50% and 90% increasingly counteracts the effects of porosity, leading to larger but flatter craters. Spallation becomes more dominant in larger-scale experiments and leads to an increase in cratering efficiency with increasing projectile size for constant impact velocities. The volume of spalled material is estimated using parabolic fits to the crater morphology, yielding approximations of the transient crater volume. For impacts at the same velocity these transient craters show a constant cratering efficiency that is not affected by projectile size.

  17. Stable isotope ratios in meteoric recharge and groundwater at Mt. Vulture volcano, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternoster, M.; Liotta, M.; Favara, R.

    2008-01-01

    SummaryA rain gauge network consisting of five sites located at different altitudes, ranging from 320 to 1285 m.a.s.l., was installed at Mt. Vulture volcano (southern Italy). Rain water samples were collected monthly over a two-year period and their isotopic composition (δ 18O and δD) was analyzed. During the same period, circulating groundwater was sampled from 24 springs and wells distributed throughout the study area. Monthly isotopic composition values were used to determine the local meteoric water line (LMWL). Its slope is slightly lower than the relationship defined by Longinelli and Selmo (Longinelli, A., Selmo, E., 2003. Isotopic composition of precipitation in Italy: a first overall map. J. Hydrol. 270, 75-88) for southern Italy. The groundwater samples analyzed were distributed essentially along the LMWL. The weighted local meteoric water line (WLMWL), defined through the mean values weighted by the rainfall amount, however, may define in a short range the meteoric end-member in the local hydrological cycle more precisely. Since most of the groundwater sampling locations do not show seasonal variations in their stable isotope values, the flow system appears to be relatively homogeneous. The mean altitude of the recharge by rainfall infiltration was estimated on the basis of the local vertical isotopic gradient δ 18O. A few springs, which show anomalous isotopic values, reveal more regional circulation systems, associated with tectonic structures responsible for the ascent of deeper water.

  18. Possible detection of meteor stream effects on the lunar sodium atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verani, S.; Barbieri, C.; Benn, C.; Cremonese, G.

    1998-08-01

    We report two sets of observations of sodium emission from the lunar atmosphere. The spectra were taken on two nights having very similar lunar phases, at various distances from the limb. Using Chamberlains model of the exosphere, we obtained values of the temperature, scale height and number density at the surface. These values differ significantly between the two nights. The spectra of the first night were taken when the Earth-Moon system was entering the Leonid meteor stream and show a marked increase in intensity, temperature and scale height relative to those of the second night, and relative to data for similar lunar phases published in the literature. We believe that this increase is related to an enhanced flux of micrometeoroids associated with the Leonid and possible with the Taurid meteor streams. The micrometeoroid component is generally considered the least important contribution to the sodium flux, and its distribution is assumed to be isotropic. We have previously suggested that an anisotropic and enhanced micrometeor component could be associated with meteor streams. The results reported below support this suggestion.

  19. Using Wide-Field Meteor Cameras to Actively Engage Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, D. M.; Scales, J. N.

    2012-08-01

    Astronomy has always afforded teachers an excellent topic to develop students' interest in science. New technology allows the opportunity to inexpensively outfit local school districts with sensitive, wide-field video cameras that can detect and track brighter meteors and other objects. While the data-collection and analysis process can be mostly automated by software, there is substantial human involvement that is necessary in the rejection of spurious detections, in performing dynamics and orbital calculations, and the rare recovery and analysis of fallen meteorites. The continuous monitoring allowed by dedicated wide-field surveillance cameras can provide students with a better understanding of the behavior of the night sky including meteors and meteor showers, stellar motion, the motion of the Sun, Moon, and planets, phases of the Moon, meteorological phenomena, etc. Additionally, some students intrigued by the possibility of UFOs and "alien visitors" may find that actual monitoring data can help them develop methods for identifying "unknown" objects. We currently have two ultra-low light-level surveillance cameras coupled to fish-eye lenses that are actively obtaining data. We have developed curricula suitable for middle or high school students in astronomy and earth science courses and are in the process of testing and revising our materials.

  20. Experimental Radar Studies of Anisotropic Diffusion of High Altitude Meteor Trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, W. K.

    2004-12-01

    At altitudes above 93 km in the atmosphere, magnetic and electric fields can affect the modes and rates of non-turbulent diffusion of ionized meteor trails. Anisotropic diffusion is expected. Most theories of anisotropic diffusion, and indeed most experimental studies, have concentrated on the effects of the magnetic field in producing this anisotropy, and different rates of expansion are expected in directions parallel to and perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. In this study, we use interferometric meteor radars to investigate the dependence of the ambipolar diffusion coefficient on viewing direction relative to the magnetic field, and show that the dependence is at best weak when daily averages are used. We then demonstrate that the reason for this effect is that the positions of maximum and minimum diffusion rates varies as a function of time of day, and that daily averaging masks the anisotropy. One possibility to account for the observations is that this strong diurnal variation is a consequence of the electric fields in the upper atmosphere, which are often tidally driven. An alternative possibility is a diurnal cycle in mean meteor entrance speeds. We lean towards the first hypothesis, but both possibilities are discussed. We demonstrate our results with data from several sites, but particularly using the Clovar radar near London, Ontario, Canada.

  1. A year of convective vortex activity at Gale crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steakley, Kathryn; Murphy, James

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric convective vortices, which become dust devils when they entrain dust from the surface, are prominent features within Mars' atmosphere which are thought to be a primary contributor to the planet's background dust opacity. Buoyantly produced in convectively unstable layers at a planet's surface, these vertically aligned vortices possess rapidly rotating and ascending near-surface warm air and are readily identified by temporal signatures of reduced atmospheric surface pressure measured within the vortex as it passes by. We investigate such signatures in surface pressure measurements acquired by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover located within Gale crater. During the first 707 sols of the mission, 245 convective vortices are identified with pressure drops in the range of 0.30-2.86 Pa with a median value of 0.67 Pa. The cumulative distribution of their pressure drops follows a power law of slope -2.77 and we observe seasonal and diurnal trends in their activity. The vast majority of these pressure signatures lack corresponding reductions in REMS-measured UV flux, suggesting that these vortices rarely cast shadows upon the rover and therefore are most often dust-free. The relatively weak-magnitude, dustless vortices at Gale crater are consistent with predictions from mesoscale modeling indicating that the planetary boundary layer is suppressed within the crater and are also consistent with the almost complete absence of both dust devils within Mars Science Laboratory camera images and Gale crater surface dust devil streaks within orbiter images.

  2. Raindrop impact on sand: dynamic and crater formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song-Chuan; de Jong, Rianne; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2015-03-01

    Droplet impact on a granular bed is very common in nature, industry, and agriculture and extends from raindrops falling on earth to wet granulation in the production process of many pharmaceuticals. In contrast to more traditionally studied impact phenomena, such as a droplet impact on solid substrate and solid object impact on fluid-like substrate, raindrop impact on sand induces more complicated interactions. First, both the intruder and the target deform during impact; second, the liquid composing the droplet may penetrate into the substrate during the impact and may, in the end, completely merge with the grains. These complex interactions between the droplet intruder and the granular target create the very diverse crater morphologies that has been described in the literature. An appealing and natural question is how the craters are formed. To gain insight in the mechanism of crater formation, we resolve the dynamics with high-speed laser profilometry and study the dependence of the dynamics on impact speed and packing fraction of the granular substrate. Finally, we establish a dynamical model to explain the various crater morphologies.

  3. Fluid mechanical scaling of impact craters in unconsolidated granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Colin S.; Dowling, David R.

    2015-11-01

    A single scaling law is proposed for the diameter of simple low- and high-speed impact craters in unconsolidated granular materials where spall is not apparent. The scaling law is based on the assumption that gravity- and shock-wave effects set crater size, and is formulated in terms of a dimensionless crater diameter, and an empirical combination of Froude and Mach numbers. The scaling law involves the kinetic energy and speed of the impactor, the acceleration of gravity, and the density and speed of sound in the target material. The size of the impactor enters the formulation but divides out of the final empirical result. The scaling law achieves a 98% correlation with available measurements from drop tests, ballistic tests, missile impacts, and centrifugally-enhanced gravity impacts for a variety of target materials (sand, alluvium, granulated sugar, and expanded perlite). The available measurements cover more than 10 orders of magnitude in impact energy. For subsonic and supersonic impacts, the crater diameter is found to scale with the 1/4- and 1/6-power, respectively, of the impactor kinetic energy with the exponent crossover occurring near a Mach number of unity. The final empirical formula provides insight into how impact energy partitioning depends on Mach number.

  4. Combined position and diameter measures for lunar craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, D.W.G.

    1977-01-01

    The note addresses the problem of simultaneously measuring positions and diameters of circular impact craters on wide-angle photographs of approximately spherical planets such as the Moon and Mercury. The method allows for situations in which the camera is not aligned on the planet's center. ?? 1977.

  5. Mineralogy of a mudstone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale crater, Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaniman, D.T.; Bish, D.L.; Ming, D.W.; Bristow, T.F.; Morris, R.V.; Blake, D.F.; Chipera, S.J.; Morrison, S.M.; Treiman, A.H.; Rampe, E.B.; Rice, M.; Achilles, C.N.; Grotzinger, J.P.; McLennan, S.M.; Williams, J.; Bell III, J.F.; Newsom, H.E.; Downs, R.T.; Maurice, S.; Sarrazin, P.; Yen, A.S.; Morookian, J.M.; Farmer, J.D.; Stack, K.; Milliken, R.E.; Ehlmann, B.L.; Sumner, D.Y.; Berger, G.; Crisp, J.A.; Hurowitz, J.A.; Anderson, R.; Des Marais, D.J.; Stolper, E.M.; Edgett, K.S.; Gupta, S.; Spanovich, N.; MSL Science Team, the

    2014-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks at Yellowknife Bay (Gale crater) on Mars include mudstone sampled by the Curiosity rover. The samples, John Klein and Cumberland, contain detrital basaltic minerals, calcium sulfates, iron oxide or hydroxides, iron sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral smectites. The John

  6. Impact Crater Experiments for Introductory Physics and Astronomy Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Activity-based collisional analysis is developed for introductory physics and astronomy laboratory experiments. Crushable floral foam is used to investigate the physics of projectiles undergoing completely inelastic collisions with a low-density solid forming impact craters. Simple drop experiments enable determination of the average acceleration,…

  7. A new study of crater concentric ridges on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood-Stone, Corwin; Bray, Veronica J.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2016-07-01

    Crater concentric ridges (CCRs) are topographic ridges found in the ejecta blankets of fresh few-kilometer-scale lunar craters. These ridges, which were last studied in detail in the late 1970 s (referred to as 'lunar concentric dunes'), were hypothesized to form due to ballistic impact sedimentation and erosion. We have surveyed the Moon to find 59 craters with CCRs and have constructed mosaics of these craters where possible using high-resolution LROC NAC (Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera-Narrow Angle Camera) images. We then map from some of these mosaics in order to measure the CCRs and examine their morphologies. Ejecta scaling models and some of our observations of the CCRs contradict the current hypothesis for the formation of these features. We therefore propose new hypotheses to consider for the formation of CCRs, specifically interaction of ejecta with initial topography or formation via interactions of shocks in the ejecta. Additionally, for the first time we have found CCRs on Mercury, but they are rare or absent on Mars.

  8. Venus - Stereo Image Pair of Crater Geopert-Meyer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    During the third global cycle of Magellan's radar mapping mission, images were obtained at viewing angles that were slightly different than those used in the first two cycles. This strategy was designed to produce stereo image pairs, which take advantage of distortions induced by the different views to provide details of the surface topography. This is a stereo image pair of crater Geopert-Meyer, named for the 20th Century Polish physicist and Nobel laureate (60 degrees north latitude, 26.5 degrees east longitude). The crater, 35 kilometers (22 miles) in diameter, lies above an escarpment at the edge of a ridge belt in southern Ishtar Terra. West of the crater the scarp has more than one kilometer (0.6 mile) of relief. Perception of relief may be obtained with stereo glasses or a stereoscope. Some individuals may be able to fuse the images without the aid of those devices. The radar illumination for both images is from the west, or left side of the scene. Incidence angles are: (Cycle 1 (left) 28 degrees, Cycle 3 (right) 15 degrees from vertical. Analysis of stereo image pairs allows planetary scientists to resolve details of topographic relationships on Venusian craters, volcanoes, mountain belts and fault zones. The spatial resolution of this topographic information is approximately ten times better than that obtained by Magellan's altimetry experiment.

  9. Organic molecules in the Sheepbed Mudstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Miller, K. E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Summons, R. E.; Brunner, A. E.; Buch, A.; Szopa, C.; Archer, P. D.; Franz, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Conrad, P. G.; Des Marais, D. J.; Dworkin, J. P.; Fairén, A. G.; François, P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Kashyap, S.; ten Kate, I. L.; Leshin, L. A.; Malespin, C. A.; Martin, M. G.; Martin-Torres, F. J.; Mcadam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-González, R.; Pavlov, A. A.; Prats, B. D.; Squyres, S. W.; Steele, A.; Stern, J. C.; Sumner, D. Y.; Sutter, B.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on board the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover is designed to conduct inorganic and organic chemical analyses of the atmosphere and the surface regolith and rocks to help evaluate the past and present habitability potential of Mars at Gale Crater. C

  10. Determining the Volume of Material Excavated during a Cratering Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The two most commonly used parameters of crater shape are the diameter of the rim crest (D) and the floor to rim depth (d). However, the widespread application of d/D has limitations. This paper provides high ability students with the opportunity to use real scientific data to derive the depth/diameter ratio of rimmed (d:D) and rimless craters…

  11. Education Opportunities Using the CRaTER Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, A. W.; Gross, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Instrument Team, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) will quantify the effects of both solar energetic particles (SEP’s) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR’s) on living tissue. A number of education and public outreach opportunities for this project have presented themselves, including work with librarians in Massachusetts and presentations at the Museum of Science, Boston. These opportunities have allowed the CRaTER team to explain, in both formal and informal settings, what radiation is, what its effects are on living tissue, and what can be done to protect astronauts and instruments on the Moon. In addition, the CRaTER instrument is simple enough that the working engineering model can be shown to the public and the CRaTER team can describe the design process for development of an instrument that will fly on a spacecraft. This provides the public with important insight into the process of science.

  12. Meteoric cosmogenic Beryllium-10 adsorbed to river sediment and soil: Applications for Earth-surface dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbring, Jane K.; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    Rainfall scavenges meteoric cosmogenic 10Be from the atmosphere. 10Be falls to the Earth's surface, where it binds tightly to sediment particles in non-acidic soils over the life-span of those soils. As such, meteoric 10Be has the potential to be an excellent geochemical tracer of erosion and stability of surfaces in a diverse range of natural settings. Meteoric 10Be has great potential as a recorder of first-order erosion rates and soil residence times. Even though this tracer was first developed in the late 1980s and showed great promise as a geomorphic tool, it was sidelined in the past two decades with the rise of the "sister nuclide", in situ10Be, which is produced at a known rate inside quartz minerals. Since these early days, substantial progress has been made in several areas that now shed new light on the applicability of the meteoric variety of this cosmogenic nuclide. Here, we revisit the potential of this tracer and we summarize the progress: (1) the atmospheric production and fallout is now described by numeric models, and agrees with present-day measurements and paleo-archives such as from rain and ice cores; (2) short-term fluctuations in solar modulation of cosmic rays or in the delivery of 10Be are averaged out over the time scale soils accumulate; (3) in many cases, the delivery of 10Be is not dependent on the amount of precipitation; (4) we explore where 10Be is retained in soils and sediment; (5) we suggest a law to account for the strong grain-size dependence that controls adsorption and the measured nuclide concentrations; and (6) we present a set of algebraic expressions that allows calculation of both soil or sediment ages and erosion rates from the inventory of meteoric 10Be distributed through a vertical soil column. The mathematical description is greatly simplified if the accumulation of 10Be is at a steady state with its export through erosion. In this case, a surface sample allows for the calculation of an erosion rate. Explored

  13. Discrete exterior calculus for numerical simulation of meteor head-echo radar reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räbinä, J.; Mönkölä, S.; Rossi, T.; Penttilä, A.; Markkanen, J.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    The meteor head-echo feature has been studied by high-power large-aperture (HPLA) radars since 1960's (see Evans 1965). Based on the observations conducted by the different radar systems and post-processing techniques, there exist several models for the meteor head-echo simulations. One reason for this is the characteristics of the radar system, e.g., in terms of frequency and antenna geometry (see Kero et al. 2012). It is also worth mentioning that there are significant differences in the meteor sizes. According to the observations reported by, e.g., Vertatschitsch et al. (2011) and Wannberg et al. (2011), the head echo can be modeled as overdense scatter from a plasma layer, surrounding the meteor, with a certain density distribution. In these models, the plasmatic object is assumed to be a conducting spherical object, and the electromagnetic phenomenon can be presented by partial differential equations coupling the electric and magnetic fields. The traditional way of solving electromagnetic problems presented in space-time-domain as partial differential equations is to use the finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD; see Dyrud et al. 2008). In this study, we use more generalized finite differences by applying the discrete exterior calculus (DEC) to the numerical simulation of meteor head-echo radar reflections. The properties and calculus of differential forms is provided in a natural way at the discretization stage, and we associate the degrees of freedom of the electric and magnetic fields to the primal and dual mesh structures, respectively. The connection between the primal and dual forms is obtained by the discrete Hodge operator, the quality of which depends on the mesh construction. Our generalized formulation of the DEC for the Maxwell equations (see Pauly and Rossi 2011) works basically on unstructured grids, and it covers both the classical Yee's FDTD scheme and the Bossavit-Kettunen approach (Bossavit and Kettunen 1999). The method has been shown

  14. Numerical modeling of Stickney crater and its aftermath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stephen R.; Michel, Patrick; Bruck Syal, Megan; Owen, J. Michael; Miller, Paul L.; Richardson, Derek C.; Zhang, Yun

    2016-10-01

    Phobos is characterized by a large crater called Stickney. Its collisional formation and its aftermath have important implications on the final structure, morphology, and surface properties of Phobos that still need further clarification. This is particularly important in the current environment, with space mission concepts to Phobos under active study by several space agencies. SPH hydrocode simulations of the impact that formed Stickney crater [1] have been performed. Using the Soft-Sphere Discrete Element Method (SSDEM) collisional routine of the N-body code pkdgrav [2], we take the outcome of SPH simulations as inputs and model the ensuing phase of the crater formation process and its ejecta evolution under the gravitational influence of Phobos and Mars. In our simulations, about 9 million particles comprise Phobos' shape [3], and the evolution of particles that are expected to form or leave the crater is followed using multiple plausible orbits for Phobos around Mars. We track the immediate fate of low-speed ejecta (~3–8 m/s), allowing us to test an hypothesis [4] that they may scour certain groove marks that have been observed on Phobos' surface and to quantify the amounts and locations of re-impacting ejecta. We also compute the orbital fate of ejecta whose speed is below the system escape speed (about 3 km/s). This allows us to estimate the thickness and distribution of the final ejecta blanket and to check whether crater chains may form. Finally, particles forming the crater walls are followed until achieving stability, allowing us to estimate the final crater depth and diameter. We will show examples of these simulations from a set of SPH initial conditions and over a range of parameters (e.g., material friction coefficients). Work ongoing to cover a larger range of plausible impact conditions, allowing us to explore different scenarios to explain Phobos' observed properties and to infer more, giving useful constraints to space mission studies. [1

  15. Hydrogeology associated to faulting of the Chicxulub Impact Crater rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Hernandez-Terrones, L.; Almazan-Becerril, A.; Valadez-Cruz, F.

    2011-12-01

    The only surface expression of the Chicxulub Impact Crater is a Ring of Cenotes (sinkholes) whose density varies from several cenotes per kilometer, to several kilometers between each cenote. This ring has a radius of approximately 90 km and it is centered at Chicxulub Puerto. It is not known today whether the Ring of Cenotes is the surface expression of the transient cavity as some authors have suggested, or whether it is the outer rim of the impact structure. The center of the ring is approximately coincident with the center of the Chicxulub Impact Crater. Reactivation of K/T rim faults had been associated to the formation of the ring of cenotes. However, none of these models project such faults to the Tertiary sedimentary sequence; therefore we can only infer that the cenotes are associated to these faults. Other hypotheses include "post impact subsidence induced by slumping and viscous relaxation in the rim" and "slumping in the rim of the buried crater, differential thickness in the rocks overlying the crater, or solution collapse within porous impact deposits", others suggest duration of subaerial exposure and weathering as a principal reason both for difference in permeability and cenote density inside and outside the Ring. This is consistent with the evolution of surface features reported. While sedimentation occurred in the basin outlined by the Ring, erosion and karst weathering were taking place outside the Ring. The karst features are associated with gravity gradients, which have been interpreted as corresponding to peripheral faults of the buried crater. We conducted geoelectric tomography perpendicular to the ring of cenotes, where we mapped the karstic features in the area and we interpret the high permeability in this area, to be associated to the faults generated by the differential compaction of the sedimentary sequence within the crater. This fault system generates a secondary porosity with high permeability that allows the circulation of water

  16. Long-term erosion and interglacial period exposure in Western Greenland from meteoric 10Be in ice-bound sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, J. A.; Corbett, L.; Bierman, P. R.; Neumann, T.; Rood, D. H.; Finkel, R. C.

    2010-12-01

    To examine the history of surface exposure and erosion in areas of Western Greenland presently covered by ice, we measured the concentration of meteoric 10Be in ice-bound fine sediment at three locations: Kangerlussuaq (67.1°N), Ilulissat (69.4°N), and Upernavik (72.5°N). Meteoric 10Be concentrations at Ilulissat and Upernavik range from 2×106 to 2×108 atoms/g and are statistically indistinguishable from each other. Meteoric 10Be concentrations at Kangerlussuaq range from 2×106 to 5×107 atoms/g and are significantly lower than the values found at the northern two sites. Through comparison to typical meteoric 10Be distribution in soils, source soil ages can be estimated at each of these locations. These estimates suggest on the order of 105 years of exposure at the northern sites and on the order of 104 years of exposure at Kangerlussuaq. Because meteoric 10Be is lost from the soil system both by erosion and isotope decay, these exposure ages represent a minimum length of cumulative interglacial exposure. This exposure signal likely developed over several Late Pliocene and Pleistocene interglacial periods and prior to the onset of Northern hemisphere glaciation, ~2.7 Ma before present. To further constrain the glacial history of Western Greenland implied from the meteoric 10Be data, we constructed forward models of interglacial period exposure and glacial period erosion. The high levels of meteoric 10Be at Upernavik and Ilulissat imply erosion rates below 5 m/My and some preservation of pre-glacial regolith. The lower levels of meteoric 10Be at Kangerlussuaq can be explained with erosion rates as high as 20 m/My. Because of the substantial debris fluxes in modern Kangerlussuaq glaciers [Knight, et al., 2002], erosion rates greater than 10 m/My are likely. Meteoric 10Be inventories at Kangerlussuaq under 10-20 m/My of long-term erosion imply substantial interglacial exposure and the slow evacuation of sediment by glacial transport. These results suggest that

  17. Chemical variations observed on Aeolis Mons in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenvang, Jens; Gasda, Patrick J.; Thompson, Lucy; Hurowitz, Joel; Grotzinger, John P.; Blaney, Diana L.; Gellert, Ralf; Wiens, Roger; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; MSL Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The extraordinarily extensive exposure of hematite-, clay-, sulfate-bearing stratigraphic layers in the lower part of Aeolis Mons was the primary reason Gale Crater was selected as the landing site for the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity. 753 martian solar days (sols) after the Curiosity rover landed in Gale Crater in August 2012, and after driving more than 9 km, the Curiosity rover arrived at the first exposure of the Murray formation, the basal layer of Aeolis Mons. The Murray formation is a thinly laminated lacustrine mudstone showing stratification down to the millimeter scale. This supports the idea that the stratigraphic layers of Aeolis Mons are sedimentary, and likely deposited in a series of long-lived lakes extending into the early Hesperian time, as recently described by Grotzinger et al. (Science, vol. 350, 2015). The chemical variations observed throughout the Murray formation by the ChemCam and APXS instruments in the 600+ sols since first arriving at Aeolis Mons will be presented. While Murray remains thinly laminated throughout the 30+ vertical meters of stratigraphy explored, large chemical variations are observed. The most extreme variations arise from likely co-located detrital and diagenetic silica enrichments in Murray. Remarkably, an associated diagenetic silica enrichment is also observed in the unconformably overlying eolian sandstone of the Stimson formation in that location. The detrital enrichment provides evidence of how the source region chemistry varied as the sedimentary layers of Aeolis Mons were deposited. Conversely, the diagenetic enrichment observed across both the Murray and Stimson formations provides compelling evidence for the presence of subsurface fluids in Gale Crater, thousands to millions of years after the crater lakes disappeared. This evidence of liquid water greatly extends the timescale in which Gale Crater might have been habitable.

  18. Characterization of the Morphometry of Impact Craters Hosting Polar Deposits in Mercury's North Polar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpe Matthieu; Zuber, Maria T.; Yang, Di; Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Mazarico, Erwan; Vilas, Faith

    2012-01-01

    Earth-based radar images of Mercury show radar-bright material inside impact craters near the planet s poles. A previous study indicated that the polar-deposit-hosting craters (PDCs) at Mercury s north pole are shallower than craters that lack such deposits. We use data acquired by the Mercury Laser Altimeter on the MESSENGER spacecraft during 11 months of orbital observations to revisit the depths of craters at high northern latitudes on Mercury. We measured the depth and diameter of 537 craters located poleward of 45 N, evaluated the slopes of the northern and southern walls of 30 PDCs, and assessed the floor roughness of 94 craters, including nine PDCs. We find that the PDCs appear to have a fresher crater morphology than the non-PDCs and that the radar-bright material has no detectable influence on crater depths, wall slopes, or floor roughness. The statistical similarity of crater depth-diameter relations for the PDC and non-PDC populations places an upper limit on the thickness of the radar-bright material (< 170 m for a crater 11 km in diameter) that can be refined by future detailed analysis. Results of the current study are consistent with the view that the radar-bright material constitutes a relatively thin layer emplaced preferentially in comparatively young craters.

  19. Craters on Earth, Moon, and Mars: Multivariate classification and mode of origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    Testing extraterrestrial craters and candidate terrestrial analogs for morphologic similitude is treated as a problem in numerical taxonomy. According to a principal-components solution and a cluster analysis, 402 representative craters on the Earth, the Moon, and Mars divide into two major classes of contrasting shapes and modes of origin. Craters of net accumulation of material (cratered lunar domes, Martian "calderas," and all terrestrial volcanoes except maars and tuff rings) group apart from craters of excavation (terrestrial meteorite impact and experimental explosion craters, typical Martian craters, and all other lunar craters). Maars and tuff rings belong to neither group but are transitional. The classification criteria are four independent attributes of topographic geometry derived from seven descriptive variables by the principal-components transformation. Morphometric differences between crater bowl and raised rim constitute the strongest of the four components. Although single topographic variables cannot confidently predict the genesis of individual extraterrestrial craters, multivariate statistical models constructed from several variables can distinguish consistently between large impact craters and volcanoes. ?? 1974.

  20. Assessment of Gravity Wave Momentum Flux Measurement Capabilities by Meteor Radars Having Different Transmitter Power and Antenna Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Hocking, W. K.; Mitchell, N. J.; Taylor, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurement capabilities of five meteor radars are assessed and compared to determine how well radars having different transmitted power and antenna configurations perform in defining mean winds, tidal amplitudes, and gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes. The five radars include two new-generation meteor radars on Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53.8 deg S) and on King George Island in the Antarctic (62.1 deg S) and conventional meteor radars at Socorro, New Mexico (34.1 deg N, 106.9 deg W), Bear Lake Observatory, Utah (approx 41.9 deg N, 111.4 deg W), and Yellowknife, Canada (62.5 deg N, 114.3 deg W). Our assessment employs observed meteor distributions for June of 2009, 2010, or 2011 for each radar and a set of seven test motion fields including various superpositions of mean winds, constant diurnal tides, constant and variable semidiurnal tides, and superposed GWs having various amplitudes, scales, periods, directions of propagation, momentum fluxes, and intermittencies. Radars having higher power and/or antenna patterns yielding higher meteor counts at small zenith angles perform well in defining monthly and daily mean winds, tidal amplitudes, and GW momentum fluxes, though with expected larger uncertainties in the daily estimates. Conventional radars having lower power and a single transmitting antenna are able to describe monthly mean winds and tidal amplitudes reasonably well, especially at altitudes having the highest meteor counts. They also provide qualitative estimates of GW momentum fluxes at the altitudes having the highest meteor counts; however, these estimates are subject to uncertainties of approx 20 to 50% and uncertainties rapidly become excessive at higher and lower altitudes. Estimates of all quantities degrade somewhat for more complex motion fields.

  1. Assessment of gravity wave momentum flux measurement capabilities by meteor radars having different transmitter power and antenna configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Hocking, W. K.; Mitchell, N. J.; Taylor, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    Measurement capabilities of five meteor radars are assessed and compared to determine how well radars having different transmitted power and antenna configurations perform in defining mean winds, tidal amplitudes, and gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes. The five radars include two new-generation meteor radars on Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53.8°S) and on King George Island in the Antarctic (62.1°S) and conventional meteor radars at Socorro, New Mexico (34.1°N, 106.9°W), Bear Lake Observatory, Utah (˜41.9°N, 111.4°W), and Yellowknife, Canada (62.5°N, 114.3°W). Our assessment employs observed meteor distributions for June of 2009, 2010, or 2011 for each radar and a set of seven test motion fields including various superpositions of mean winds, constant diurnal tides, constant and variable semidiurnal tides, and superposed GWs having various amplitudes, scales, periods, directions of propagation, momentum fluxes, and intermittencies. Radars having higher power and/or antenna patterns yielding higher meteor counts at small zenith angles perform well in defining monthly and daily mean winds, tidal amplitudes, and GW momentum fluxes, though with expected larger uncertainties in the daily estimates. Conventional radars having lower power and a single transmitting antenna are able to describe monthly mean winds and tidal amplitudes reasonably well, especially at altitudes having the highest meteor counts. They also provide reasonable estimates of GW momentum fluxes at the altitudes having the highest meteor counts; however, these estimates are subject to uncertainties of ˜20 to 50% and uncertainties rapidly become excessive at higher and lower altitudes. Estimates of all quantities degrade somewhat for more complex motion fields.

  2. An Igneous Origin for Features of a Candidate Crater-Lake System in Western Memnonia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leverington, D. W.; Maxwell, T. A.

    2004-01-01

    The association of channels, inner terraces, and delta-like features with Martian impact craters has previously been interpreted as evidence in favor of the past existence of crater lakes on Mars. However, examination of a candidate crater-lake system in western Memnonia suggests instead that its features may have formed through igneous processes involving the flow and ponding of lava. Accumulations of material in craters and other topographic lows throughout much of the study region have characteristics consistent with those of volcanic deposits, and terraces found along the inner flanks of some of these craters are interpreted as having formed through drainage or subsidence of volcanic materials. Channels previously identified as inlets and outlets of the crater-lake system are interpreted instead as volcanic rilles. These results challenge previous interpretations of terrace and channel features in the study region and suggest that candidate crater lakes located elsewhere should be reexamined.

  3. 78 FR 39009 - Notice of Intent To Amend the Management Plan for the Craters of the Moon National Monument and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Intent To Amend the Management Plan for the Craters of the Moon...) for the Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve (Craters of the Moon). This notice... conservation measures for sage-grouse in the Craters of the Moon may be submitted in writing until July...

  4. Automated detection of lunar craters based on object-oriented approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE ZongYu; LIU JianZhong; WU GanGuo

    2008-01-01

    The object-oriented approach is a powerful method in making classification. With the segmentation of images to objects, many features can be calculated based on the objects so that the targets can be distinguished. However, this method has not been applied to lunar study. In this paper we attempt to apply this method to detecting lunar craters with promising results. Craters are the most obvious features on the moon and they are important for lunar geologic study. One of the important questions in lunar research is to estimate lunar surface ages by examination of crater density per unit area. Hence,proper detection of lunar craters is necessary. Manual crater identification is inefficient, and a more efficient and effective method is needed. This paper describes an object-oriented method to detect lunar craters using lunar reflectance images. In the method, many objects were first segmented from the image based on size, shape, color, and the weights to every layer. Then the feature of "contrast to neighbor objects" was selected to identify craters from the lunar image. In the next step, by merging the adjacent objects belonging to the same class, almost every crater can be taken as an independent object except several very big craters in the study area. To remove the crater rays diagnosed as craters,the feature of "length/width" was further used with suitable parameters to finish recognizing craters.Finally, the result was exported to ArcGIS for manual modification to those big craters and the number of craters was acquired.

  5. Meteoroids Interaction With The Earth Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turchak Leonid I.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluate meteoroid mass and its other properties based on the observed atmospheric trajectory. With account for aerodynamics, we formulate a problem by introducing key dimensionless parameters in the model, responsible for the drag, mass loss and rotation of meteoroid. The proposed model is suitable to categorize various impact events in terms of meteor survivability and impact damage and thus, to analyze consequences that accompany collisions of cosmic bodies with planetary atmosphere and surface. The different types of events, namely, formation of a massive single crater (Barringer, Lonar Lake, dispersion of craters and meteorites over a large area (Sikhote-Alin, absent of craters and meteorites, but huge damage (Tunguska are considered as illustrative examples. The proposed approach helps to summarize the data on existing terrestrial impacts and to formulate recommendations for further studies valuable for planetary defence. It also significantly increases chances of successful meteorite recoveries in future. In other words, the study represents a ’cheap’ possibility to probe cosmic matter reaching planetary surface and it complements results of sample-return missions bringing back pristine samples of the materials.

  6. In Situ-produced vs. Meteoric 10Be in Hillslope Soils: One Isotope, Two Tracers, Different Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungers, M. C.; Bierman, P. R.; Matmon, A.; Cox, R.; Pavich, M.; Finkel, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    In situ-produced and meteoric 10Be are both powerful tools for tracing the production and transport of hillslope sediment. In situ-produced 10Be is used to infer sediment production rates as well as investigate sediment sources and transport. Meteoric 10Be may also be useful for inferring sediment production and transport rates in some landscapes, especially those that lack the target minerals for in situ-produced 10Be. Few studies have investigated the insights gained by a comparing in situ-produced and meteoric 10Be inventories. We present a series of paired 10Be inventories from different climatic and tectonic regimes to illustrate both the value and the potential pitfalls of coupling these geomorphic tracers. The mean in situ and meteoric 10Be near surface (within a meter) inventories for our field areas are as follows: Great Smoky Mountains, NC, USA: 3.6 x 107 atoms cm-2 and 3.3 x 1010 atoms cm-2; Laurely Fork, PA, USA: 2.6 x 106 atoms cm-2 and 3.0 x 109 atoms cm-2; Oregon Coast Range, OR, USA: no in situ data and 3.87 x 1010 atoms cm-2; North Island, New Zealand: no in situ data and 1.8 x 109 atoms cm-2; and Amparafaravola, Madagascar: 1.86 x 107 atoms cm-2 and 8.0 x 109 atoms cm-2. The associated inferred soil residence times, respectively, are: Great Smoky Mountains, NC, USA: 40.9 ky and 25.6 ky; Laurely Fork, PA, USA: 2.9 ky and 2.3 ky; Oregon Coast Range, OR, USA: n/a and 30ky; North Island, New Zealand: n/a and 1.5 ky; and Amparafaravola, Madagascar: 21 ky and 6.2 ky. Soil residence times inferred from meteoric 10Be assume a global average delivery rate of 1.3 x 106 atoms cm-2 yr-1. These soil residence times are minimum values that assume that all in situ and meteoric 10Be is accounted for. Discrepancies between inferred soil residence times most likely highlight some error in assumptions regarding meteoric 10Be retention in the soil mantles that we sampled. For example, if meteoric 10Be is not retained at the near surface where we collected our samples

  7. US Air Force Space Weather Products Rapid Prototyping Efforts - Solar Radio Background/Burst Effects and Meteor Effects Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, S.; Scro, K.

    2001-12-01

    The Space Vehicles Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/VSB) has joined efforts with the Technology Applications Division of the Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC Det 11/CIT) to rapidly transition space weather research into prototype, operational, system-impact products. These Rapid Prototyping Center (RPC) products are used to analyze, specify, and forecast the effects of the near-earth space environment on Department of Defense systems and communications. A summary of RPC activity is provided. Emphasis will be placed on current products under development, to include Solar Radio Background/Burst Effects (SoRBE) and Meteor Effects (ME) products. These will be added to real-time operations in the near future. SoRBE specifies the detrimental interference effects of background and event-level solar radio output on radar observations and satellite communications. ME will provide general meteor shower "nowcast" and forecast information, along with more specific meteor and meteor shower impact, radar clutter, and bolide (exploding meteor) effects. A brief overview of recently delivered products: Radar Auroral Clutter, Satellite Scintillation, HF Illumination, and GPS Single-Frequency Error Maps will also be provided.

  8. Performance of D-criteria in isolating meteor showers from the sporadic background in an optical data set

    CERN Document Server

    Moorhead, Althea V

    2015-01-01

    Separating meteor showers from the sporadic meteor background is critical for the study of both showers and the sporadic complex. The linkage of meteors to meteor showers, to parent bodies, and to other meteors is done using measures of orbital similarity. These measures often take the form of so-called D-parameters and are generally paired with some cutoff value within which two orbits are considered related. The appropriate cutoff value can depend on the size of the data-set (Southworth & Hawkins 1963), the sporadic contribution within the observed size range (Jopek 1995), or the inclination of the shower (Galligan 2001). If the goal is to minimize sporadic contamination of the extracted shower, the cutoff value should also reflect the strength of the shower compared to the local sporadic background. In this paper, we present a method for determining, on a per-shower basis, the orbital similarity cutoff value that corresponds to a chosen acceptable false-positive rate. This method also assists us in dis...

  9. DUSTER: collection of meteoric CaO and carbon smoke particles in the upper stratosphere .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Corte, V.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Rotundi, A.; Ferrari, M.; Palumbo, P.

    Nanometer- to micrometer-size particles present in the upper stratosphere are a mixture of terrestrial and extra-terrestrial origins. They can be extraterrestrial particles condensed after meteor ablation. Meteoric dust in bolides is occasionally deposited into the lower stratosphere around 20 km altitude. Nanometer CaO and pure carbon smoke particles were collected at 38 km altitude in the upper stratosphere in the Arctic during June 2008 using DUSTER (Dust in the Upper Stratosphere Tracking Experiment and Retrieval), a balloon-borne instrument for the non-destructive collection of solid particles between 200 nm to 40 microns. We report the collection of micron sized CaCO_3 (calcite) grains. Their morphologies show evidence of melting and condensation after vaporization suggest at temperatures of approximately 3500 K. The formation environment of the collected grains was probably a dense dust cloud formed by the disintegration of a carbonaceous meteoroid during deceleration in the Earth� atmosphere. For the first time, DUSTER collected meteor ablation products that were presumably associated with the disintegration of a bolide crossing the Earth's atmosphere. The collected mostly CaO and pure carbon nanoparticles from the debris cloud of a fireball, included: 1) intact fragments; 2) quenched melted grains; and 3) vapor phase condensation products. The DUSTER project was funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), PRIN2008/MIUR (Ministero dell'Istruzione dell'Universitá e della Ricerca), PNRA 2013(Piano Nazionale Ricerca Antartide). CNES graciously provided this flight opportunity. We thank E. Zona and S. Inarta at the Laboratorio di Fisica Cosmica INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte-Universitá di Napoli Parthenope. F.J.M.R. was supported by grant NNX07AI39G from the NASA Cosmochemistry Program. We thank three anonymous reviewers who assisted us in introducing our new instrument.

  10. A time-resolved model of the mesospheric Na layer: constraints on the meteor input function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. C. Plane

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A time-resolved model of the Na layer in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere region is described, where the continuity equations for the major sodium species Na, Na+ and NaHCO3 are solved explicity, and the other short-lived species are treated in steady-state. It is shown that the diurnal variation of the Na layer can only be modelled satisfactorily if sodium species are permanently removed below about 85 km, both through the dimerization of NaHCO3 and the uptake of sodium species on meteoric smoke particles that are assumed to have formed from the recondensation of vaporized meteoroids. When the sensitivity of the Na layer to the meteoroid input function is considered, an inconsistent picture emerges. The ratio of the column abundance of Na+ to Na is shown to increase strongly with the average meteoroid velocity, because the Na is injected at higher altitudes. Comparison with a limited set of Na+ measurements indicates that the average meteoroid velocity is probably less than about 25 km s-1, in agreement with velocity estimates from conventional meteor radars, and considerably slower than recent observations made by wide aperture incoherent scatter radars. The Na column abundance is shown to be very sensitive to the meteoroid mass input rate, and to the rate of vertical transport by eddy diffusion. Although the magnitude of the eddy diffusion coefficient in the 80–90 km region is uncertain, there is a consensus between recent models using parameterisations of gravity wave momentum deposition that the average value is less than 3×105 cm2 s-1. This requires that the global meteoric mass input rate is less than about 20 td-1, which is closest to estimates from incoherent scatter radar observations. Finally, the diurnal variation in the meteoroid input rate only slight perturbs the Na layer, because the residence time of Na in the layer is several days, and diurnal effects are effectively averaged out.

  11. The Zodiacal Cloud Model applied to the Martian atmosphere. Diurnal variations in Meteoric ion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Carrillo-Sánchez, Juan; Plane, John M. C.; Withers, Paul; Fallows, Kathryn; Nesvorný, David; Pokorný, Petr; Feng, Wuhu

    2016-04-01

    Sporadic metal layers have been detected in the Martian atmosphere by radio occultation measurements using the Mars Express Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. More recently, metallic ion layers produced by the meteor storm event following the close encounter between Comet Siding Spring (C/2013 A1) and Mars were identified by the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft. However, the background metal layers produced by the influx of sporadic meteors have not yet been detected at Mars (contrary to the permanent metal layers identified in the Earth's atmosphere). The Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model for particle populations released by asteroids (AST), and dust grains from Jupiter Family Comets (JFC) and Halley-Type Comets (HTC) has been combined with a Monte Carlo sampling method and the Chemical ABlation MODel (CABMOD) to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca and Al above 40 km altitude in the Martian atmosphere. CABMOD considers the standard treatment of meteor physics, including the balance of frictional heating by radiative losses and the absorption of heat energy through temperature increases, melting phase transitions and vaporization, as well as sputtering by inelastic collisions with the air molecules. These vertical profiles are input into the Leeds 1-D Mars atmospheric model which includes photo-ionization, and gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral chemistry, in order to explore the evolution of the resulting metallic ions and atoms. We conclude that the formation of the sporadic ion layers observed below 100 km with a plasma density exceeding 104 cm-3 requires the combination of the three different influx sources considered by the ZDC model, with a significant asteroidal contribution. Finally, we explore the changes of the neutral and ionized Mg and Fe layers over a diurnal cycle.

  12. On Meteoric Dust Particles in the Near-Earth Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Farahani, Majid Mazraeh Ei; Mohebalhojeh, Ali R.; Scales, Wayne

    2016-07-01

    Over 40 metric tons of meteoric dust enters the earth's atmosphere every day. This dust settles and creates natural dust layers in the altitude ranges between 80 and 100 kilometers which spans the earth's upper mesosphere to lower thermosphere. The dust layers in the lower atmosphere have a great impact on climate, human health as well as communication and navigation signals. The main goal of this study is the role of meteoric smoke particles on the formation of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC). Recent rocket experiments have detected the presence of these particles. Since these dust layers are immersed in the earth's upper atmosphere, they become charged due to collection of electrons and ions from the earth's ionospheric plasma. Noctilucent Clouds NLCs are a fascinating visual manifestation of these dust layers. So-called Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes PMSEs are radar echoes that are a direct consequence of the sub-visible charged dust that exists at altitudes above NLC regions. Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) are strong echoes that have been typically observed in the frequency range from 50MHz to 1.3GHz and in the altitude about 85km. Unlike PMSE, Polar mesospheric winter echoes (PMWE) are less known. PMWE appear at a lower altitude and is weaker in comparison with PMSE. The focus of this study is on meteoric smoke particles and how they affect PMWE source region. Parameters associated with smoke dust particles such as size distribution, charging characteristics, density and positive or negative charge will be considered. The second part of this presentation will be on the effect of gravity waves on PMC. Full coupling to a turbulent neutral field with a statistical analysis will be discussed. Impact of a neutral turbulence driving field on small amplitude plasma fluctuations in such a configuration and some of the important consequences will be also presented. This has important consequences for electric field and potential measurements on rocket probes as

  13. Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar: Initial assessment of gravity wave momentum fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Hocking, W. K.

    2010-10-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) was installed on Tierra del Fuego (53.8°S) in May 2008 and has been operational since that time. This paper describes tests of the SAAMER ability to measure gravity wave momentum fluxes and applications of this capability during different seasons. Test results for specified mean, tidal, and gravity wavefields, including tidal amplitudes and gravity wave momentum fluxes varying strongly with altitude and/or time, suggest that the distribution of meteors throughout the diurnal cycle and averaged over a month allows characterization of both monthly mean profiles and diurnal variations of the gravity wave momentum fluxes. Applications of the same methods for real data suggest confidence in the monthly mean profiles and the composite day diurnal variations of gravity wave momentum fluxes at altitudes where meteor counts are sufficient to yield good statistical fits to the data. Monthly mean zonal winds and gravity wave momentum fluxes exhibit anticorrelations consistent with those seen at other midlatitude and high-latitude radars during austral spring and summer, when no strong local gravity wave sources are apparent. When stratospheric variances are significantly enhanced over the Drake Passage “hot spot” during austral winter, however, MLT winds and momentum fluxes over SAAMER exhibit very different correlations that suggest that MLT dynamics are strongly influenced by strong local gravity wave sources within this “hot spot.” SAAMER measurements of mean zonal and meridional winds at these times and their differences from measurements at a conjugate site provide further support for the unusual momentum flux measurements.

  14. Meteoric isotopic gradient on the windward side of theSierra Madre Oriental area, Veracruz Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Pérez Quezadas; Alejandra Cortés Silva; Salvatore Inguaggiato; María del Rocío Salas Ortega; Juan Cervantes Pérez; Victor Michael Heilweil

    2015-01-01

    The isotopic composition ( d 18 O , d D ) of precipitation in the windward side of the Sierra Madre Oriental on the eastern flank of the Mexican Volcanic Belt was characterized along a 90 km transect from sea level up to an altitude of 4220 meters. Rain samples were collected during the rainy season (May through October) from 2007 through 2012. The Local Meteoric Water Line (LMWL), determined with linear regression of isotope results, is d D = 7.44 d 18 O + 7.3, R 2 = 0.99. Thi...

  15. Disruption of meteor streams due to dynamic effects of solar radiation with allowance for planetary perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galibina, I.V.; Poliakhova, E.N.

    1978-01-01

    Formulas are derived for secular perturbations of the Keplerian heliocentric orbital elements of dust or micrometeor particles due to the relativistic dynamic Poynting-Robertson effect of solar radiation. This transverse dynamic effect consists of the dynamic effects of solar photon radiation (the light flux) and corpuscular radiation (the solar wind). Results are presented for a determination of the secular perturbations of small particles in a meteor swarm due to the four giant planets, with allowance for the dynamic effects of solar radiation. It is shown that the nongravitational perturbing forces are important only for small particles but affect swarm disruption and the dispersion of the swarm particles' heliocentric orbits.

  16. Seasonal and diurnal variability of the meteor flux at high latitudes observed using PFISR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, J. J.; Janches, D.; Nicolls, M. J.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2009-05-01

    We report in this and a companion paper [Fentzke, J.T., Janches, D., Sparks, J.J., 2008. Latitudinal and seasonal variability of the micrometeor input function: A study using model predictions and observations from Arecibo and PFISR. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, this issue, doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2008.07.015] a complete seasonal study of the micrometeor input function (MIF) at high latitudes using meteor head-echo radar observations performed with the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR). This flux is responsible for a number of atmospheric phenomena; for example, it could be the source of meteoric smoke that is thought to act as condensation nuclei in the formation of ice particles in the polar mesosphere. The observations presented here were performed for full 24-h periods near the summer and winter solstices and spring and autumn equinoxes, times at which the seasonal variability of the MIF is predicted to be large at high latitudes [Janches, D., Heinselman, C.J., Chau, J.L., Chandran, A., Woodman, R., 2006. Modeling of the micrometeor input function in the upper atmosphere observed by High Power and Large Aperture Radars, JGR, 11, A07317, doi:10.1029/2006JA011628]. Precise altitude and radar instantaneous line-of-sight (radial) Doppler velocity information are obtained for each of the hundreds of events detected every day. We show that meteor rates, altitude, and radial velocity distributions have a large seasonal dependence. This seasonal variability can be explained by a change in the relative location of the meteoroid sources with respect to the observer. Our results show that the meteor flux into the upper atmosphere is strongly anisotropic and its characteristics must be accounted for when including this flux into models attempting to explain related aeronomical phenomena. In addition, the measured acceleration and received signal strength distribution do not seem to depend on season; which may suggest that these observed

  17. Direct evidence for the origin of low- sup 18 O silicic magmas: Quenched samples of a magma chamber's partially-fused granitoid walls, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, C.R.; Adami, L.H.; Lanphere, M.A. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Partially fused granitoid blocks were ejected in the climactic eruption of Mount Mazama, which was accompanied by collapse of Crater Lake caldera. Quartz, plagioclase, and glass in the granitoids have much lower {delta}{sup 18}O values (-3.4 to +4.9per mille) than any fresh lavas of Mount Mazama and the surrounding region (+5.8 to +7.0per mille). Oxygen isotope fractionation between phases in granitoids is consistent with equilibrium at T{ge}900deg C following subsolidus exchange with hydrothermal fluids of meteoric origin. Assimilation of {approx equal} 10-20% of material similar to these granitoids can account for the O and Sr isotopic compositions of lavas and juvenile pyroclasts derived from the climactic magma chamber, many of which have {delta}{sup 18}O values {approx equal} 0.5per mille or more lower than comparable lavas of Mount Mazama. The O isotope data provide the only clear evidence for such assimilation because the mineralogy and chemical and radiogenic isotopic compositions of the granitoids (dominantly granodiorite) are similar to those of erupted juvenile magmas. The granitoid blocks from Crater Lake serve as direct evidence for the origin of {sup 18}O depletion in large, shallow silicic magma bodies. (orig.).

  18. Mars - Gravity data analysis of the crater Antoniadi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Ritke, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    Topography and gravity information for this 370-km crater are analyzed to determine a depth of compensation with an Airy isostatic model. A least squares fit to the gravity profile gives an estimate of 115 km for the depth of compensation. It is noted that Antoniadi is the only large Martian crater for which both topographic and gravity data are available for analysis. The goal here is to reduce these geophysical data for additional information on the internal structure of Mars. The results show that if Antoniadi had fully isostatically adjusted, the additional mass material would have been about 100 km below the surface. This is regarded as another data point for geophysicists developing the internal structure of Mars.

  19. An Impact Crater in Palm Valley, Central Australia?

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W; O'Neill, Craig; Britton, Tui R

    2012-01-01

    We explore the origin of a ~280 m wide, heavily eroded circular depression in Palm Valley, Northern Territory, Australia using gravity, morphological, and mineralogical data collected from a field survey in September 2009. From the analysis of the survey, we debate probable formation processes, namely erosion and impact, as no evidence of volcanism is found in the region or reported in the literature. We argue that the depression was not formed by erosion and consider an impact origin, although we acknowledge that diagnostics required to identify it as such (e.g. meteorite fragments, shatter cones, shocked quartz) are lacking, leaving the formation process uncertain. We encourage further discussion of the depression's origin and stress a need to develop recognition criteria that can help identify small, ancient impact craters. We also encourage systematic searches for impact craters in Central Australia as it is probable that many more remain to be discovered.

  20. Louth Crater: Evolution of a layered water ice mound

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Tornabene, Livio L; Roush, Ted L

    2014-01-01

    We report on observations made of the ~36km diameter crater, Louth, in the north polar region of Mars (at 70{\\deg}N, 103.2{\\deg}E). High-resolution imagery from the instruments on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft has been used to map a 15km diameter water ice deposit in the center of the crater. The water ice mound has surface features that include roughened ice textures and layering similar to that found in the North Polar Layered Deposits. Features we interpret as sastrugi and sand dunes show consistent wind patterns within Louth over recent time. CRISM spectra of the ice mound were modeled to derive quantitative estimates of water ice and contaminant abundance, and associated ice grain size information. These morphologic and spectral results are used to propose a stratigraphy for this deposit and adjoining sand dunes. Our results suggest the edge of the water ice mound is currently in retreat.

  1. Quaternary Eruptions of the Mono-Inyo Craters, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursik, M. I.; Pouget, S.; Mangan, M.; Marcaida, M.; Vazquez, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The eruptive products of the Mono-Inyo Craters volcanic chain include the tephra and associated volcanic rocks of Black Point, islands of Mono Lake, Mono Craters, Inyo Craters, late eruptions of Mammoth Mountain and Red Cones. Most of the eruptions were explosive, and generated numerous pyroclastic flows, surges and falls as well as the prominent domes and lava flows that now cover vents. The eruptions range in age from several hundred years to at least 60,000 yr BP. The Mono-Inyo tephras are dispersed throughout the Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range, providing key time-stratigraphic marker layers. Recent work has not only resulted in high-precision radiometric dating of many of the tephras, but also detailed geochemical data that for the first time provides fingerprinting sufficiently precise to discriminate among the tephras. Lithostratigraphy of many of the layers is herein described for the first time, based on careful sampling and description in the field, and laboratory grain size, grain shape and componentry analyses of the late Pleistocene tephras of the Wilson Creek Formation. Most of the Wilson Creek volcanic layers are fall deposits accumulated within paleolake Russell, which were generated by eruptions of variable intensity and influenced by paleowinds of different orientation. Prevailing winds were generally to the North and East, but often the Pleistocene layers less than 25 ka were dispersed to the West. Many of the fall layers show evidence of wave reworking, generally near the top, although in some cases it is pervasive. Only near the vent do some layers of apparent debris flow origin occur. Maximum pumice sizes range up to nearly 3 cm, and lithics range up to 1 cm in the rhyolitic fall beds, while thicknesses range up to c. 30 cm. These data are consistent with relatively low volume, subplinian style eruptive behavior for most of the life of the Mono-Inyo Craters.

  2. Martian fresh crater depths: More evidence for subsurface volatiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadow measurements on Viking Orbiter photography have yielded depths for 172 fresh martian craters spanning a diameter range of 0.7 to 80 km. Most craters studied are shallower than their lunar and mercurian counterparts. While the martian data exhibit a break in the depth/diameter distribution similar to those found for the Moon and Mercury, the ''inflection'' occurs at a smaller diameter on Mars, and the slopes below and above the break are respectively less than and greater than those of the other two planets. In addition to possible substrate-related transient cavity modification mechanisms, flash vaporization of proposed subsurface H2O would alter the original impact-induced velocity field by enhancing horizontal to subhorizontal target flow an excavation, thus yielding shallower craters. On the basis of the observed distribution, it is suggested that this process is more active at diameters near the break in slope (approx.4 km), declining in efficiency with increasing diameter, and can account for many dissimilarities between the martian distribution and those of the Moon and Mercury, which cannot be reconciled with gravity , impact velocity, or projectile differences alone

  3. Impact-generated Hydrothermal Activity at the Chicxulub Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, D. A.; Zurcher, L.; Abramov, O.

    2007-05-01

    Borehole samples recovered from PEMEX exploration boreholes and an ICDP scientific borehole indicate the Chicxulub impact event generated hydrothermal alteration throughout a large volume of the Maya Block beneath the crater floor and extending across the bulk of the ~180 km diameter crater. The first indications of hydrothermal alteration were observed in the crater discovery samples from the Yucatan-6 borehole and manifest itself in the form of anhydrite and quartz veins. Continuous core from the Yaxcopoil-1 borehole reveal a more complex and temporally extensive alteration sequence: following a brief period at high temperatures, impact- melt-bearing polymict breccias and a thin, underlying unit of impact melt were subjected to metasomatism, producing alkali feldspar, sphene, apatite, and magnetite. As the system continued to cool, smectite-series phyllosilicates appeared. A saline solution was involved. Stable isotopes suggest the fluid was dominated by a basinal brine created mostly from existing groundwater of the Yucatan Peninsula, although contributions from down-welling water also occurred in some parts of the system. Numerical modeling of the hydrothermal system suggests circulation occurred for 1.5 to 2.3 Myr, depending on the permeability of the system. Our understanding of the hydrothermal system, however, is still crude. Additional core recovery projects, particularly into the central melt sheet, are needed to better evaluate the extent and duration of hydrothermal alteration.

  4. Cones and craters on Mount Pavagadh, Deccan Traps: Rootless cones?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hetu C Sheth; George Mathew; Kanchan Pande; Soumen Mallick; Balaram Jena

    2004-12-01

    Rootless cones, also (erroneously) called pseudocraters, form due to explosions that ensue when a lava flow enters a surface water body, ice, or wet ground. They do not represent primary vents connected by vertical conduits to a subsurface magma source. Rootless cones in Iceland are well studied. Cones on Mars, morphologically very similar to Icelandic rootless cones, have also been suggested to be rootless cones formed by explosive interaction between surface lava flows and ground ice. We report here a group of gentle cones containing nearly circular craters from Mount Pavagadh, Deccan volcanic province, and suggest that they are rootless cones. They are very similar morphologically to the rootless cones of the type locality of Mý vatn in northeastern Iceland. A group of three phreatomagmatic craters was reported in 1998 from near Jabalpur in the northeastern Deccan, and these were suggested to be eroded cinder cones. A recent geophysical study of the Jabalpur craters does not support the possibility that they are located over volcanic vents. They could also be rootless cones. Many more probably exist in the Deccan, and volcanological studies of the Deccan are clearly of value in understanding planetary basaltic volcanism.

  5. Moessbauer studies on impactites from Lonar impact crater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, H. C., E-mail: hcverma@iitk.ac.in [I I T Kanpur, Department of Physics (India); Misra, S., E-mail: misrasaumitra@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism (India); Shyam Prasad, M., E-mail: shyam@nio.org [National Institute of Oceanography, Geological Oceanography Division (India); Bijlani, N.; Tripathi, A., E-mail: rpt2002@sify.com [J.N.V. University, Department of Physics (India); Newsom, Horton, E-mail: newsom@unm.edu [University of New Mexico, Institute of Meteoritics and Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (United States)

    2008-09-15

    Iron mineralogy has been studied using Moessbauer spectroscopy on eight glassy impactite samples from different parts of the Lonar Crater Rim Region. Distinct changes are observed when compared to the host basaltic samples. Significant amount of Fe{sup 3+} phase is observed in the impactite samples whereas this phase is known to be almost absent in the basalt. Besides this we have a strong Fe{sup 2+} doublet showing up corresponding to the main iron-containing mineral. The Moessbauer results are very similar to those with glasses from Ries crater which is also believed to have formed by meteoritic impact but on nonbasaltic rock bed. Besides the glassy samples, we also study some spherules found in the crater region and some fine glassy particles on the surfaces of melt impact bombs. These contain a good amount of magnetically ordered phase, most likely nanosize hematite. Interestingly, part of it is strongly attracted by a magnet and part of it is not. But both parts show a significantly strong six-line component corresponding to hematite.

  6. Calculation of ejecta thickness and structural uplift for Lunar and Martian complex crater rims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Tim; Sturm, Sebastian; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Crater rims of simple and complex craters have an elevation that is formed during the excavation stage of crater formation. For simple crater rims it is believed that the elevation is due to the sum of two equal parts, the thickness of the most proximal impact ejecta blanket (overturned flap) plus the thickness that results from plastic deformation including injection [1, 2, 3]. We intend to measure and quantify the kinematics of mass movements, especially concerning the question why complex impact craters have elevated crater rims like simple craters and precisely constrain the ejecta thickness and structural uplift of Lunar and Martian crater rims to understand what the main contributor to the elevated rim is [4]. We investigated a pristine 16 km-diameter unnamed Martian complex crater (21.52°N, 184.35°) and the lunar complex craters Bessel (21.8°N, 17.9°E) 16 km in diameter and Euler (23.3°N, 29.2°W) 28 km in diameter [5, 6]. In the crater walls of these craters we found columnar lavas on Mars and basaltic layering on the Moon. We used the uppermost layers of these exposed outcrops along the crater wall to determine the dip of the target rocks (Mars) and to distinguish between the bedrock and the overlying ejecta. We precisely measured the structural uplift and ejecta thickness of these complex craters. The unnamed crater on Mars has a mean rim height of 375.75 m, with a structural uplift of 233.88 m (57.44%), exposed as columnar lavas and the superposing ejecta has a height of 141.87 m (43.56%). For the Lunar complex crater Euler the mean total rim height is 790 ± 100 m, with a minimal structural uplift of 475 ± 100 m (60 ± 10 %), exposed as basaltic layers [e.g., 7, 8] and a maximum ejecta thickness of 315 ± 100 m (40 ± 10%). The Lunar complex crater Bessel has a total rim height of 430 ± 15 m , with a minimal structural uplift of 290 ± 15 m (67 ± 3 %), exposed as basaltic layers and a maximum ejecta thickness of 140 ± 115 m (33 ± 3%). For the

  7. Suevites from the Rochechouart Impact Crater, France, and the Lake Mien Impact Crater, Sweden: The Search for Robust Carbon Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, R. M.; Langenhorst, F.; Stoffler, D.; Pillinger, C. T.; Gilmour, I.

    1995-09-01

    Suevite from the 24km Ries crater in southern Germany has recently been shown to contain diamond, lonsdaleite and silicon carbide (1). These minerals are of impact, not meteoritic, origin and probably formed by a combination of shock and plasma processes with the contribution due to each mechanism yet to be resolved (1). Diamonds are increasingly becoming an accepted impact signature and have been reported for several Ukranian impact craters including Zapadnaya (2) and also for the Popigai impact crater in Siberia (3). We have also found diamonds associated with the K/T boundary event 65 Ma ago in North America (4) and Mexico (5). The genesis of suevite at the Ries is thought to be within a fireball at very high temperatures and travelling at high velocities. Shocked minerals are associated with the suevite as are the high pressure polymorphs of quartz namely coesite and stishovite (6). Such an extreme temperature and pressure history for the suevite make it an ideal rock type to search for impact diamonds, we are therefore endeavouring to study other suevites from further impact craters, including Rochechouart and Mien. The 165-200 Ma Rochechouart impact crater in the Massif Central, France, is thought to have originally been some 20 km across and therefore is very similar in size to the Ries (7). The basement material of gneisses and granites is also akin to the Ries and as such makes it an ideal candidate for diamond poltypes and possibly silicon carbide. Lake Mien in Sweden has no outcrops of suevite breccia but does have glacial erratic blocks of suevite. The impact crater is only some 7-9 km in size and has an age of 120 Ma (8). It affords a useful method of investigating the importance of size as a controlling factor in formation of carbon impact minerals. The samples were treated with an acid demineralization procedure first developed for the extraction of diamond from meteorites and modified for the particular needs of studying terrestrial samples

  8. Dating a small impact crater: An age of Kaali crater (Estonia) based on charcoal emplaced within proximal ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, A.; Wild, E. M.; Geppert, W. D.; Huber, M. S.; Jõeleht, A.; Kriiska, A.; Kulkov, A.; Paavel, K.; Pirkovic, I.; Plado, J.; Steier, P.; VäLja, R.; Wilk, J.; Wisniowski, T.; Zanetti, M.

    2016-04-01

    The estimates of the age of the Kaali impact structure (Saaremaa Island, Estonia) provided by different authors vary by as much as 6000 years, ranging from ~6400 to ~400 before current era (BCE). In this study, a new age is obtained based on 14C dating charred plant material within the proximal ejecta blanket, which makes it directly related to the impact structure, and not susceptible to potential reservoir effects. Our results show that the Kaali crater was most probably formed shortly after 1530-1450 BCE (3237 ± 10 14C yr BP). Saaremaa was already inhabited when the bolide hit the Earth, thus, the crater-forming event was probably witnessed by humans. There is, however, no evidence that this event caused significant change in the material culture (e.g., known archeological artifacts) or patterns of human habitation on Saaremaa.

  9. The Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar II: A new Facility for Measurement of the Dust Environment in near-Earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter G.; Weryk, R. J.; Wong, D. K.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.

    2012-10-01

    The Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) is a backscatter, multi-station meteor radar operating at 29.85 MHz. CMOR has been in operation as a three station system since 2001, but a major upgrade in 2009 has expanded the system to six stations and doubled the transmit power to 15 kW; the new facility is termed CMOR II. CMOR II measures 5000 individual orbits per day of meteoroids with masses 10-8 kg. These large number statistics permit near real-time identification of as many as a dozen significant daily meteor showers, through application of a 3D wavelet transform. As individual meteor echoes are detected at up to six stations, CMOR II is able to measure electron line density profiles and decelerations for select events. This permits estimation of meteoroid bulk density through comparison with entry models for particles as small 100 μm. For events with more than four station detections, errors in radiant and speed are comparable to similar measurements made with video systems. Making use of multiple, independent techniques for speed measurements, including time-of-flight, Fresnel amplitude and Fresnel phase fitting, it is possible to estimate speed accuracy for individual events. Monte Carlo modeling of individual echoes allow a separate estimate for uncertainty in both speed and radiant measurement. Here we present initial results from CMOR II measurements of major meteor showers including the 2012 Daytime Arietids and South Delta Aquariid streams. Detections of several unusual meteor shower outbursts with CMOR II and verification of previously reported weak showers will also be shown. We will demonstrate the capacity of CMOR II for individual meteoroid physical characterization by using measured trajectory, speed, deceleration and electron line density measurements combined with entry model fits to estimate meteoroid parameters. Funding from the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office through cooperative agreement NNX11AB76A is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Regolith production and transport at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, Part 2: Insights from meteoric 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nicole; Kirby, Eric; Bierman, Paul; Slingerland, Rudy; Ma, Lin; Rood, Dylan; Brantley, Susan

    2013-09-01

    Regolith-mantled hillslopes are ubiquitous features of most temperate landscapes, and their morphology reflects the climatically, biologically, and tectonically mediated interplay between regolith production and downslope transport. Despite intensive research, few studies have quantified both of these mass fluxes in the same field site. Here we present an analysis of 87 meteoric 10Be measurements from regolith and bedrock within the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHO), in central Pennsylvania. Meteoric 10Be concentrations in bulk regolith samples (n = 73) decrease with regolith depth. Comparison of hillslope meteoric 10Be inventories with analyses of rock chip samples (n = 14) from a 24 m bedrock core confirms that >80% of the total inventory is retained in the regolith. The systematic downslope increase of meteoric 10Be inventories observed at SSHO is consistent with 10Be accumulation in slowly creeping regolith (~ 0.2 cm yr-1). Regolith flux inferred from meteoric 10Be varies linearly with topographic gradient (determined from high-resolution light detection and ranging-based topography) along the upper portions of hillslopes at SSHO. However, regolith flux appears to depend on the product of gradient and regolith depth where regolith is thick, near the base of hillslopes. Meteoric 10Be inventories at the north and south ridgetops indicate minimum regolith residence times of 10.5 ± 3.7 and 9.1 ± 2.9 ky, respectively, similar to residence times inferred from U-series isotopes in Ma et al. (2013). The combination of our results with U-series-derived regolith production rates implies that regolith production and erosion rates are similar to within a factor of two on SSHO hillcrests.

  11. Meteor cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Strack, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    This book is meant for developers of all experience levels looking to create mobile and full-stack web applications in JavaScript. Many of the simple recipes can easily be followed by less-experienced developers, while some of the advanced recipes will require extensive knowledge of existing web, mobile, and server technologies. Any application or enterprise web developer looking to create full-stack JavaScript-based apps will benefit from the recipes and concepts covered in this book.

  12. Seasonal Variations in Dust Loading within Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Casey; Moores, John; Smith, Christina L.; MSL Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has been exploring Gale Crater for more than two martian years. Such tenure allows seasonal variability of the weather record for the current era to be studied with aid from Mast Cameras (Mastcam), Navigation Cameras (Navcam) and Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS). Dust is a key component in the Martian atmosphere which helps drive atmospheric circulation. As such, these three instruments are integral in the characterization of the dust-loading environment both within and above the crater. This study uses Navcam imagery and a digital terrain model provided from HRSC on Mars Express to derive geographical line-of-sight extinction (LOS-Ext) coefficients, a quantity that assesses dust loading local to the air within the crater and which reveals differences in dust loading along different lines of sight.We report two martian years worth of LOS-Ext at Gale Crater, covering Ls 210° in Mars year (MY) 31 to Ls 210° in MY33. All seasons have been observed twice with the only significant exception being a gap in data between Ls 270° – 315° in MY31 (early southern summer). Visibility conditions within the crater range from a few tens of km in spring and summer to over 100 km peaking around the winter solstice. The LOS-Ext record is also compared to the column extinction record derived from the Mastcam Tau observations. The first year shows a convergence of the two values around Ls 270° in MY31 and similar values around Ls 350° in MY31 and Ls 135° in MY32. Otherwise, during the first year of observation, the LOS-Ext has lower values than the Mastcam column extinction indicating two non-interacting atmospheric layers. In the second year, not only are similar values observed more frequently, the LOS-Ext coefficients have a global peak and overtake Mastcam column extinction during Ls 270° – 315° in MY32, which correspond to the missing timeframe from the previous year. As this season is prone to high wind speeds

  13. Complex explosive volcanic activity on the Moon within Oppenheimer crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kristen A.; Horgan, Briony H. N.; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Allen, Carlton C.; Hayne, Paul O.; Bell, James F.; Paige, David A.

    2016-07-01

    Oppenheimer crater is a floor-fractured crater located within the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon, and exhibits more than a dozen localized pyroclastic deposits associated with the fractures. Localized pyroclastic volcanism on the Moon is thought to form as a result of intermittently explosive Vulcanian eruptions under low effusion rates, in contrast to the higher-effusion rate, Hawaiian-style fire fountaining inferred to form larger regional deposits. We use Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images and Diviner Radiometer mid-infrared data, Chandrayaan-1 orbiter Moon Mineralogy Mapper near-infrared spectra, and Clementine orbiter Ultraviolet/visible camera images to test the hypothesis that the pyroclastic deposits in Oppenheimer crater were emplaced via Vulcanian activity by constraining their composition and mineralogy. Mineralogically, we find that the deposits are variable mixtures of orthopyroxene and minor clinopyroxene sourced from the crater floor, juvenile clinopyroxene, and juvenile iron-rich glass, and that the mineralogy of the pyroclastics varies both across the Oppenheimer deposits as a whole and within individual deposits. We observe similar variability in the inferred iron content of pyroclastic glasses, and note in particular that the northwest deposit, associated with Oppenheimer U crater, contains the most iron-rich volcanic glass thus far identified on the Moon, which could be a useful future resource. We propose that this variability in mineralogy indicates variability in eruption style, and that it cannot be explained by a simple Vulcanian eruption. A Vulcanian eruption should cause significant country rock to be incorporated into the pyroclastic deposit; however, large areas within many of the deposits exhibit spectra consistent with high abundances of juvenile phases and very little floor material. Thus, we propose that at least the most recent portion of these deposits must have erupted via a Strombolian or more continuous fire

  14. Lunar Radar Scattering from Near-Surface Buried Crater Ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, T. W.; Ustinov, E. A.; Heggy, E.

    2009-12-01

    The Apollo 15, 16, and 17 core tubes show that the uppermost few meters of the lunar regolith are interlaced layers of a fine grained powders and blocky crater ejecta. The layers of crater ejecta have dielectric constants in the range of 7-9 while the fine-grained powders has dielectric constant on the order of 2.7. These differences in dielectric constant, in turn, create radar reflections that are both refracted and reflected back through the space-regolith interface. Note that for a dielectric constant of 2.7 for the lunar regolith, radio waves incident on the lunar surface at the angle of 30-degrees from the normal will propagate in the regolith at an angle of 18-degrees. At the limb, radio waves incident on the lunar surface at an angle near 90-degrees from the normal will propagate in the regolith at an angle of about 37-degrees. These angles are within the range where radar backscatter is in the quasi-specular regime. When these buried crater ejecta layers are modeled using Hagfors’ formulation (Hagfors, 1963), echo powers match the behavior observed for average lunar backscatter at centimeter wavelengths for higher (30° to 90°) angles of incidence. In addition, Hagfors et al. (1965) conducted an experiment where the Moon was illuminated at 23-cm wavelength with circular polarization and the differences were observed in orthogonal linear polarizations. Modeling of these observations and assuming again that the buried crater ejecta scatter in a quasi-specular manner, echo differences in horizontal and vertical linear polarizations are in relatively good agreement with the observations. The data from Chandrayaan Mini-RF radar, which operated at S-Band (13cm) wavelength, and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Mini-RF radar, which is operating at S-Band and X-Band (4-cm) wavelengths, provide an opportunity for a new examination of whether radar backscatter from buried crater ejecta behaves like a quasi-specular scatter. These radars reproduce the

  15. An ET Origin for Stratospheric Particles Collected during the 1998 Leonids Meteor Shower

    CERN Document Server

    Noever, D A; Horack, J M; Jerman, G; Myszka, E

    1999-01-01

    On 17 November 1998, a helium-filled weather balloon was launched into the stratosphere, equipped with a xerogel microparticle collector. The three-hour flight was designed to sample the dust environment in the stratosphere during the Leonid meteor shower, and possibly to capture Leonid meteoroids. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope analyses of the returned collectors revealed the capture of a $\\sim$30-$\\mu$m particle, with a smooth, multigranular shape, and partially melted, translucent rims; similar to known Antarctic micrometeorites. Energy-dispersive X-ray Mass Spectroscopy shows enriched concentrations of the non-volatile elements, Mg, Al, and Fe. The particle possesses a high magnesium to iron ratio of 2.96, similar to that observed in 1998 Leonids meteors (Borovicka, {\\it et al.} 1999) and sharply higher than the ratio expected for typical material from the earth's crust. A statistical nearest-neighbor analysis of the abundance ratios Mg/Si, Al/Si, and Fe/Si demonstrates that the particle is mo...

  16. Enhancement of the Moon's Sodium Tail Following the Leonid Meteor Shower of 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. K.; Smith, S. M.; Baumgardner, J.; Mendillo, M.

    1999-09-01

    We have made the first detections of the distant lunar sodium tail with an all-sky camera on the nights of August 21-22 and November 18-20, 1998. The lunar sodium tail represents the escaping component of the lunar sodium atmosphere, which is generated from the Moon's regolith by a combination of surface processes. On nights near new Moon, the sodium tail appears in the sky as a spot near the anti-solar point; the location and morphology of this spot are consistent with standard models of the Moon's atmosphere. We interpret the changing brightness of the spot from night to night using a new time-dependent model of the lunar atmosphere, and we find that the atomic sodium escape rate from the Moon temporarily increased by a factor of 2 to 3 during the most intense period of the 1998 Leonid meteor shower on November 16 and 17. This is the most significant meteor-related atmospheric enhancement yet observed, and it may help to quantify the contribution of micrometeor bombardment to the lunar atmosphere.

  17. Estimation of surface UV levels based on Meteor-3/TOMS ozone data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, Y.A. [Central Aerological Observatory, Moscow (Russian Federation); Geogdzhaev, I.V. [Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khattatov, V.U. [Central Aerological Observatory, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The major consequence of ozone layer depletion for the environment is an increase of harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the Earth surface and in the upper ocean. This implies the importance of environmental UV monitoring. Since the direct global monitoring is not currently possible, indirect estimations of surface UV levels may be used based on satellite ozone data (Madronich, S. 1992). Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on board the METEOR-3 satellite provided regular set of data for such estimates. During the time of its operation (August, 1991 - December, 1994) the instrument registered several ozone hole events over Antarctica, when ozone levels dropped by as much as 60 % from their unperturbed values. Probably even more alarming ozone depletions were observed over highly populated regions of middle latitudes of northern hemisphere. Radiative transfer modeling was used to convert METEOR-3/TOMS daily ozone values into regional and global maps of biologically active UV. Calculations demonstrate the effect on surface UV levels produced by ozone hole over Antarctica and ozone depletions over the territory of Russia (March, 1994). UV contour lines deviate from the normal appearance which is determined by growing southward solar elevation. UV contour lines are almost perpendicular to the ozone ones in the ozone depletions areas. The 30 % ozone depletion, over Siberia caused more than 30 % increase in noontime erythemal UV levels, which is equivalent to 10-15 degrees southward latitude displacement. Higher UV radiation increases were found in ozone hole over South America (October 1992) equivalent to about 20 degrees southward displacement

  18. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth of water vapor on meteoric smoke particle analogues at mesospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbar, Mario; Duft, Denis; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sub 2 nm meteoric smoke particles (MSP) produced from the ablation and recondensation of meteoric material are believed to be the major kind of nuclei causing the formation of water ice particles in the mesopause of Earth at heights of 80-90 km. These so called noctiLucent clouds (NLC) are frequently detected during polar summer, whereas the microphysical nucleation process and subsequent growth on such small particles are understood only poorly. Parameterizing these processes results in large uncertainties especially due to a lack of experimental data on desorption energies and critical saturation for the activation of nucleation under realistic mesospheric conditions, which states the need of laboratory measurements. We produce charged nanometer sized (2-3 nm) MSP analogues in a microwave plasma particle source and transfer them to a novel linear ion trap which allows us to trap the particles under typical mesospheric temperatures and H2O concentrations. The adsorption of H2O molecules on the particles surface followed by nucleation and growth can be examined by analyzing the mass distribution of the particles with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer as function of the residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this contribution we present such measurements for single positively as well as negatively charged particles which allow us to determine the desorption energy of water vapor on the investigated nanoparticles as well as the critical saturation needed to activate nucleation and subsequent growth.

  19. Meteoric 10Be in volcanic materials and its behavior during acid-leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimaoka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Minoru; Hiyagon, Hajime; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Kaneoka, Ichiro; Imamura, Mineo

    2004-08-01

    We have investigated the chemical and isotopic behavior of beryllium (Be) during acid leaching for removing meteoric 10Be in volcanic samples. Determination of the Be isotopic ratio in the leachate was carried out using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and inductivity coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Elemental distribution of Be and other incompatible elements including boron (B) were also examined by ion microprobe (SIMS) for a deeper understanding of their chemical behavior in volcanic samples. SIMS analysis show that Be is concentrated in the groundmass together with B. However, the behavior of their elements during acid leaching is quite different. The Be concentration decreases through progressive leaching, while the concentration of B remains constant. Furthermore, the variation in the Be isotopic ratio after acid leaching is different between the two samples, neither of which has altered minerals under microscopic observation. It is demonstrated that meteoric 10Be resides in a rather narrow region of the rock and can be removed by acid leaching with minimum loss of the main host phase of Be.

  20. Extreme decay of meteoric beryllium-10 as a proxy for persistent aridity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valletta, Rachel D.; Willenbring, Jane K.; Lewis, Adam R.; Ashworth, Allan C.; Caffee, Marc

    2015-12-01

    The modern Antarctic Dry Valleys are locked in a hyper-arid, polar climate that enables the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) to remain stable, frozen to underlying bedrock. The duration of these dry, cold conditions is a critical prerequisite when modeling the long-term mass balance of the EAIS during past warm climates and is best examined using terrestrial paleoclimatic proxies. Unfortunately, deposits containing such proxies are extremely rare and often difficult to date. Here, we apply a unique dating approach to tundra deposits using concentrations of meteoric beryllium-10 (10Be) adhered to paleolake sediments from the Friis Hills, central Dry Valleys. We show that lake sediments were emplaced between 14-17.5 My and have remained untouched by meteoric waters since that time. Our results support the notion that the onset of Dry Valleys aridification occurred ~14 My, precluding the possibility of EAIS collapse during Pliocene warming events. Lake fossils indicate that >14 My ago the Dry Valleys hosted a moist tundra that flourished in elevated atmospheric CO2 (>400 ppm). Thus, Dry Valleys tundra deposits record regional climatic transitions that affect EAIS mass balance, and, in a global paleoclimatic context, these deposits demonstrate how warming induced by 400 ppm CO2 manifests at high latitudes.

  1. Species composition and distribution patterns of early life stages of cephalopods at Great Meteor Seamount (subtropical NE Atlantic)

    OpenAIRE

    Diekmann, Rabea; Piatkowski, Uwe

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of early life stages of cephalopods was studied during a cruise of RV Meteor in September 1998 at Great Meteor Seamount, an isolated flat-topped seamount in the subtropical eastern North Atlantic. Zooplankton sampling was conducted with a multi-opening-closing net (modified MOCNESS, 1 m² net opening, 335 µm mesh size) in seven depth strata between 290 m depth and the surface. 1180 early life stages of cephalopods were collected, representing at least 18 families and 31 mainly...

  2. Probing of meteor showers at Mars during the encounter of comet C/2013 A1: predictions for the arrival of MAVEN/Mangalyaan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Syed A.; Pandya, Bhavin M.

    2015-12-01

    We have estimated (1) production rates, (2) ion and electron densities of meteor ablation and (3) ionization for different masses and velocities of meteoroids when comet C/2013 A1 crossed the orbit of Mars on 19 October, 2014 at 18:27 UT. Meteor ablations of small masses Mars Express (MEX), Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) and Mangalyaan.

  3. Observations on Stratospheric-Mesospheric-Thermospheric temperatures using Indian MST radar and co-located LIDAR during Leonid Meteor Shower (LMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Selvamurugan

    Full Text Available The temporal and height statistics of the occurrence of meteor trails during the Leonid meteor shower revealed the capability of the Indian MST radar to record large numbers of meteor trails. The distribution of radio meteor trails due to a Leonid meteor shower in space and time provided a unique opportunity to construct the height profiles of lower thermospheric temperatures and winds, with good time and height resolution. There was a four-fold increase in the meteor trails observed during the LMS compared to a typical non-shower day. The temperatures were found to be in excellent continuity with the temperature profiles below the radio meteor region derived from the co-located Nd-Yag LIDAR and the maximum height of the temperature profile was extended from the LIDAR to ~110 km. There are, how-ever, some significant differences between the observed profiles and the CIRA-86 model profiles. The first results on the meteor statistics and neutral temperature are presented and discussed below. 

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (pres-sure, density, and temperature History of geophysics (at-mospheric sciences Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics

  4. Measurement of crater geometries after laser ablation of bone tissue with optical coherence tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenlin Zhan; Xianzeng Zhang; Qing Ye; Shusen Xie

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring crater geometries by use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) is examined. Bovine shank bone on a motorized translation stage with a motion velocity of 3 mm/s is ablated with a pulsed CO2 laser in vitro. The laser pulse repetition rate is 60 Hz and the spot size on the tissue surface is 0.5 mm. Crater geometries are evaluated immediately by both OCT and histology methods after laser irradiation. The results reveal that OCT is capable of measuring crater geometries rapidly and noninvasively as compared to histology. There are good correlation and agreement between crater depth estimates obtained by two techniques, whereas there exists distinct difference between crater width estimates when the carbonization at the sides of craters is not removed.

  5. Central ring structure identified in one of the world's best-preserved impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, A. C.; Niessen, F.; Kopsch, C.

    2006-03-01

    Seismic refraction and reflection data were acquired in 2000 and 2003 to study the morphology and sedimentary fill of the remote El'gygytgyn crater (Chukotka, northeastern Siberia; diameter 18 km). These data allow a first insight into the deeper structure of this unique impact crater. Wide-angle data from sonobuoys reveal a five-layer model: a water layer, two lacustrine sedimentary units that fill a bowl-shaped apparent crater morphology consisting of an upper layer of fallback breccia with P-wave velocities of ˜3000 m/s, and a lower layer of brecciated bedrock (velocities >3600 m/s). The lowermost layer shows a distinct anticline structure that, by analogy with other terrestrial and lunar craters of similar size, can be interpreted as a central ring structure. The El'gygytgyn crater exhibits a well-expressed morphology that is typical of craters formed in crystalline target rocks.

  6. Granular impact cratering by liquid drops: Understanding raindrop imprints through an analogy to asteroid strikes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Runchen; Zhang, Qianyun; Tjugito, Hendro; Cheng, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    When a granular material is impacted by a sphere, its surface deforms like a liquid yet it preserves a circular crater like a solid. Although the mechanism of granular impact cratering by solid spheres is well explored, our knowledge on granular impact cratering by liquid drops is still very limited. Here, by combining high-speed photography with high-precision laser profilometry, we investigate liquid-drop impact dynamics on granular surface and monitor the morphology of resulting impact cra...

  7. Sulfate-rich eolian and wet interdune deposits, Erebus crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Metz, Joannah M.; Grotzinger, John P.; Rubin, David M; Lewis, Kevin W.; Squyres, Steven W.; Bell, James F.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates three bedrock exposures at Erebus crater, an ~ 300 m diameter crater approximately 4 km south of Endurance crater on Mars. These outcrops, called Olympia, Payson, and Yavapai, provide additional evidence in support of the dune–interdune model proposed for the formation of the deposits at the Opportunity landing site in Meridiani Planum. There is evidence for greater involvement of liquid water in the Olympia outcrop exposures than was observed in Eagle or Endurance cra...

  8. Morphology of meteoroid and space debris craters on LDEF metal targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, S. G.; Brownlee, D. E.; King, N. L.; Hoerz, F.

    1994-01-01

    We measured the depths, average diameters, and circularity indices of over 600 micrometeoroid and space debris craters on various metal surfaces exposed to space on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite, as a test of some of the formalisms used to convert the diameters of craters on space-exposed surfaces into penetration depths for the purpose of calculating impactor sizes or masses. The topics covered include the following: targe materials orientation; crater measurements and sample populations; effects of oblique impacts; effects of projectile velocity; effects of crater size; effects of target hardness; effects of target density; and effects of projectile properties.

  9. Planetary surface dating from crater size-frequency distribution measurements: Poisson timing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, G. G.; Kneissl, T.; Neesemann, A.

    2016-10-01

    The predictions of crater chronology models have customarily been evaluated by dividing a crater population into discrete diameter intervals, plotting the crater density for each, and finding a best-fit model isochron, with the uncertainty in the procedure being assessed using 1/√n estimates, where n is the number of craters in an interval. This approach yields an approximate evaluation of the model predictions. The approximation is good until n becomes small, hence the often-posed question: what is the minimum number of craters for an adequate prediction? This work introduces an approach for exact evaluation of a crater chronology model using Poisson statistics and Bayesian inference, expressing the result as a likelihood function with an intrinsic uncertainty. We demonstrate that even in the case of no craters at all, a meaningful likelihood function can be obtained. Thus there is no required minimum count: there is only varying uncertainty, which can be well described. We recommend that the Poisson timing analysis should be preferred over binning/best-fit approaches. Additionally, we introduce a new notation to make it consistently clear that crater chronology model calibration errors are inseparable from stated crater model ages and their associated statistical errors.

  10. The Chicxulub multi-ring impact crater, Yucatan carbonate platform, Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime Urrutia-Fucugauchi; Antonio Camargo-Zanoguera; Ligia Pérez-Cruz; Guillermo Pérez-Cruz

    2011-01-01

    The Chicxulub impact crater is part of a select group of unique geological sites, being a natural laboratory to investigate crater formation processes and global effects of large-scale impacts. Chicxulub is one of only three multi-ring craters documented in the terrestrial record and impact has been related to the global environmental/climatic effects and mass extinction that mark the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary. The crater is buried under ~1.0 km of carbonate sediments in the Yucata...

  11. The MEMIN Research Unit: New results from impact cratering experiments into geological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Deutsch, A.; Thoma, K.; Kenkmann, T.

    2013-09-01

    The MEMIN research unit (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling Impact research Network) is focused on performing hypervelocity impact experiments, analyzing experimental impact craters and modeling cratering rocesses in geological materials. The main goal of the MEMIN project is to comprehensively quantify impact processes by conducting stringently controlled experimental impact cratering campaigns on the mesoscale with a multidisciplinary analytical approach. As a unique feature we use two-stage light gas guns capable of producing impact craters in thedecimeter size-range in solid rocks that, in turn, allow detailed spatial analysis of petrophysical, structural, and geochemical changes in target rocks and ejecta.

  12. Quantifying Slope Effects and Variations in Crater Density across a Single Geologic Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Heather; Mahanti, Prasun; Robinson, Mark; Povilaitis, Reinhold

    2016-10-01

    Steep underlying slopes (>~5°) significantly increase the rate of degradation of craters [1-3]. As a result, the density of craters is less on steeper slopes for terrains of the same age [2, 4]. Thus, when age-dating a planetary surface, an area encompassing one geologic unit of constant low slope is chosen. However, many key geologic units, such as ejecta blankets, lack sufficient area of constant slope to derive robust age estimates. Therefore, accurate age-dating of such units requires an accurate understanding of the effects of slope on age estimates. This work seeks to determine if the observed trend of decreasing crater density with increasing slopes [2] holds for craters >1 km and to quantify the effect of slope for craters of this size, focusing on the effect of slopes over the kilometer scale. Our study focuses on the continuous ejecta of Orientale basin, where we measure craters >1 km excluding secondaries that occur as chains or clusters. Age-dating via crater density measurements relies on uniform cratering across a single geologic unit. In the case of ejecta blankets and other impact related surfaces, this assumption may not hold due to the formation of auto- secondary craters. As such, we use LRO WAC mosaics [5], crater size-frequency distributions, absolute age estimates, a 3 km slope map derived from the WAC GLD100 [6], and density maps for various crater size ranges to look for evidence of non-uniform cratering across the continuous ejecta of Orientale and to determine the effect of slope on crater density. Preliminary results suggest that crater density does decrease with increasing slope for craters >1 km in diameter though at a slower rate than for smaller craters.References: [1] Trask N. J. and Rowan L. C. (1967) Science 158, 1529–1535. [2] Basilevsky (1976) Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 7th, p. 1005-1020. [3] Pohn and Offield (1970) USGS Prof. Pap., 153-162. [4] Xiao et al. (2013) Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 376, pgs. 1-11. doi:10.1016/j

  13. Geology of McLaughlin Crater, Mars: A Unique Lacustrine Setting with Implications for Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, J. R.; Niles, P. B.; Rogers, A. D.; Johnson, S. S.; Ashley, J. W.; Golombek, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    McLaughlin crater is a 92-kmdiameter Martian impact crater that contained an ancient carbonate- and clay mineral-bearing lake in the Late Noachian. Detailed analysis of the geology within this crater reveals a complex history with important implications for astrobiology [1]. The basin contains evidence for, among other deposits, hydrothermally altered rocks, delta deposits, deep water (>400 m) sediments, and potentially turbidites. The geology of this basin stands in stark contrast to that of some ancient basins that contain evidence for transient aqueous processes and airfall sediments (e.g. Gale Crater [2-3]).

  14. Geology of the Selk crater region on Titan from Cassini VIMS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Jaumann, R.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Sotin, C.; Stephan, K.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of Titan obtained by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have revealed Selk crater, a geologically young, bright-rimmed, impact crater located ???800. km north-northwest of the Huygens landing site. The crater rim-crest diameter is ???90. km; its floor diameter is ???60. km. A central pit/peak, 20-30. km in diameter, is seen; the ratio of the size of this feature to the crater diameter is consistent with similarly sized craters on Ganymede and Callisto, all of which are dome craters. The VIMS data, unfortunately, are not of sufficient resolution to detect such a dome. The inner rim of Selk crater is fluted, probably by eolian erosion, while the outer flank and presumed ejecta blanket appear dissected by drainages (particularly to the east), likely the result of fluvial erosion. Terracing is observed on the northern and western walls of Selk crater within a 10-15. km wide terrace zone identified in VIMS data; the terrace zone is bright in SAR data, consistent with it being a rough surface. The terrace zone is slightly wider than those observed on Ganymede and Callisto and may reflect differences in thermal structure and/or composition of the lithosphere. The polygonal appearance of the crater likely results from two preexisting planes of weakness (oriented at azimuths of 21?? and 122?? east of north). A unit of generally bright terrain that exhibits similar infrared-color variation and contrast to Selk crater extends east-southeast from the crater several hundred kilometers. We informally refer to this terrain as the Selk "bench." Both Selk and the bench are surrounded by the infrared-dark Belet dune field. Hypotheses for the genesis of the optically bright terrain of the bench include: wind shadowing in the lee of Selk crater preventing the encroachment of dunes, impact-induced cryovolcanism, flow of a fluidized-ejecta blanket (similar to the bright crater outflows observed on Venus), and erosion of a streamlined upland formed

  15. Ejecta velocity distribution of impact craters formed on quartz sand: Effect of projectile density on crater scaling law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujido, Sayaka; Arakawa, Masahiko; Suzuki, Ayako I.; Yasui, Minami

    2015-12-01

    In order to clarify the effects of projectile density on ejecta velocity distributions for a granular target, impact cratering experiments on a quartz sand target were conducted by using eight types of projectiles with different densities ranging from 11 g cm-3 to 1.1 g cm-3, which were launched at about 200 m s-1 from a vertical gas gun at Kobe University. The scaling law of crater size, the ejection angle of ejecta grains, and the angle of the ejecta curtain were also investigated. The ejecta velocity distribution obtained from each projectile was well described by the π-scaling theory of v0/√{gR} =k2(x0/R)-1/μ, where v0, g, R and x0 are the ejection velocity, gravitational acceleration, crater radius and ejection position, respectively, and k2 and μ are constants mostly depending on target material properties (Housen, K.R., Holsapple, K.A. [2011]. Icarus 211, 856-875). The value of k2 was found to be almost constant at 0.7 for all projectiles except for the nylon projectile, while μ increased with the projectile density, from 0.43 for the low-density projectile to 0.6-0.7 for the high-density projectile. On the other hand, the π-scaling theory for crater size gave a μ value of 0.57, which was close to the average of the μ values obtained from ejecta velocity distributions. The ejection angle, θ, of each grain decreased slightly with distance, from higher than 45° near the impact point to 30-40° at 0.6 R. The ejecta curtain angle is controlled by the two elementary processes of ejecta velocity distribution and ejection angle; it gradually increased from 52° to 63° with the increase of the projectile density. The comparison of our experimental results with the theoretical model of the crater excavation flow known as the Z-model revealed that the relationship between μ and θ obtained by our experiments could not be described by the Z-model (Maxwell, D.E. [1977]. In: Roddy, D.J., Pepin, R.O., Merrill, R.B. (Eds.), Impact and Explosion Cratering

  16. VNIR Multispectral Observations of Rocks at Spirit of St. Louis Crater and Marathon Valley on Th Rim of Endeavour Crater Made by the Opportunity Rover Pancam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrand, W. H.; Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F., III; Mittlefehldt, D.W.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring the western rim of the 22 km diameter Endeavour crater since August, 2011. Recently, Opportunity has reached a break in the Endeavour rim that the rover team has named Mara-thon Valley. This is the site where orbital observations from the MRO CRISM imaging spectrometer indicated the presence of iron smectites. On the outer western portion of Marathon Valley, Opportunity explored the crater-form feature dubbed Spirit of St. Louis (SoSL) crater. This presentation describes the 430 to 1009 nm (VNIR) reflectance, measured by the rover's Pancam, of rock units present both at Spirit of St. Louis and within Marathon Valley.

  17. Seismoacoustic Signatures from Chelyabinsk Meteor Observed by the Kazakhstan Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Network (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A.; Mikhailova, N.; Garces, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Infrasound and seismic stations of the Kazakhstan Nuclear Explosion Monitoring network recorded high-fidelity seismoacoustic signatures from the Chelyabinsk meteor. Infrasound array I31KZ in Aktyubinsk was the closest IMS infrasound station to the source. This station is in the Northwest Kazakhstan, approximately 520 km southward from the bolide blast. The propitious station position relative to the entry trajectory, coupled with calm weather during the event, permitted a detailed, broadband record of the bolide explosion. All eight I31KZ infrasound array channels show an extremely strong broadband signal at 03:48 UTC and a duration of ~20 minutes. Array processing of the signal with PMCC4 shows that signal contains unprecedented detail on the source characteristics. Another Kazakhstani infrasound array in Kurchatov, Northeast Kazakhstan, also recorded the explosion signals. This is third closest infrasound array to the source. The second one is Russian array I43RU, Dubna. Epicentral distances are 1090 km for Dubna and 1300 km for Kurchatov. Traveltimes are 26 minutes for I31KZ Aktyubinsk and 66 minutes for the Kurchatov array. In addition to infrasound arrays, Kazakhstani seismic arrays belonging to Institute of Geophysical Research also recorded the signals generated by the bolide. The epicentral seismic source location corresponds to the pressure shock wave ground impact, and is under the meteor hypercenter. The seismic signal was recorded by Akbulak, Borovoe, Karatau and Makanchy arrays and other Kazakhstani seismic stations. Akbulak was the station nearest to epicenter, at a range of 630 km southward. The estimated origin time of the seismic event following the bolide explosion is 03:21:59.64 GMT. The difference between ground truth time 3:20:33 GMT provided by NASA and the seismic origin time is in reasonable agreement with the reported hypercenter altitude range of 25-30 km asl. The seismic event had a body wave magnitude of Mb 3.5, with energy class K 8

  18. Interactions of meteoric smoke particles with sulphuric acid in the Earth's stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Saunders

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-sized meteoric smoke particles (MSPs with iron-magnesium silicate compositions, formed in the upper mesosphere as a result of meteoric ablation, may remove sulphuric acid from the gas-phase above 40 km and may also affect the composition and behaviour of supercooled H2SO4-H2O droplets in the global stratospheric aerosol (Junge layer. This study describes a time-resolved spectroscopic analysis of the evolution of the ferric (Fe3+ ion originating from amorphous ferrous (Fe2+-based silicate powders dissolved in varying Wt % sulphuric acid (30–75% solutions over a temperature range of 223–295 K. Complete dissolution of the particles was observed under all conditions. The first-order rate coefficient for dissolution decreases at higher Wt % and lower temperature, which is consistent with the increased solution viscosity limiting diffusion of H2SO4 to the particle surfaces. Dissolution under stratospheric conditions should take less than a week, and is much faster than the dissolution of crystalline Fe2+ compounds. The chemistry climate model UMSLIMCAT (based on the UKMO Unified Model was then used to study the transport of MSPs through the middle atmosphere. A series of model experiments were performed with different uptake coefficients. Setting the concentration of 1.5 nm radius MSPs at 80 km to 3000 cm−3 (based on rocket-borne charged particle measurements, the model matches the reported Wt % Fe values of 0.5–1.0 in Junge layer sulphate particles, and the MSP optical extinction between 40 and 75 km measured by a satellite-borne spectrometer, if the global meteoric input rate is about 20 t d−1. The model indicates that an uptake coefficient ≥0.01 is required to account for the observed two orders of magnitude depletion of H2SO4 vapour above 40 km.

  19. Interactions of meteoric smoke particles with sulphuric acid in the Earth's stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Saunders

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Nano-sized meteoric smoke particles (MSPs with iron-magnesium silicate compositions, formed in the upper mesosphere as a result of meteoric ablation, may remove sulphuric acid from the gas-phase above 40 km and may also affect the composition and behaviour of supercooled H2SO4-H2O droplets in the global stratospheric aerosol (Junge layer.

    This study describes a time-resolved spectroscopic analysis of the evolution of the ferric (Fe3+ ion originating from amorphous ferrous (Fe2+-based silicate powders dissolved in varying Wt % sulphuric acid (30–75 % solutions over a temperature range of 223–295 K. Complete dissolution of the particles was observed under all conditions. The first-order rate coefficient for dissolution decreases at higher Wt % and lower temperature, which is consistent with the increased solution viscosity limiting diffusion of H2SO4 to the particle surfaces. Dissolution under stratospheric conditions should take less than a week, and is much faster than the dissolution of crystalline Fe2+ compounds.

    The chemistry climate model UMSLIMCAT (based on the UKMO Unified Model was then used to study the transport of MSPs through the middle atmosphere. A series of model experiments were performed with different uptake coefficients. Setting the concentration of 1.5 nm radius MSPs at 80 km to 3000 cm−3 (based on rocket-borne charged particle measurements, the model matches the reported Wt % Fe values of 0.5–1.0 in Junge layer sulphate particles, and the MSP optical extinction between 40 and 75 km measured by a satellite-borne spectrometer, if the global meteoric input rate is about 20 tonnes per day. The model indicates that an uptake coefficient ≥0.01 is required to account for the observed two orders of magnitude depletion of H2SO4 vapour above 40 km.

  20. Meteor-Shower on Mars Indicates Cometary Activity Far Away From the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Aswin; ASHER, DAVID

    2015-08-01

    Introduction: The close encounter of Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) with Mars on 2014 Oct 19 at 1830h (UT) generated a lot of interest and modelling work [1] [2] [3] in the solar system community. A recent (on 2014 Nov 7) press release from NASA implied that a meteor shower was detected on Mars by their space instruments some hours after the comet-Mars close encounter. Various work [4] [5] [6] has suggested that very specific meteoroid sizes and ejection conditions may be required to produce meteor phenomena at Mars at the given times.Stream dynamics: Meteoroid stream modelling and their orbital geometry calculations have gained high precision over the years. In this work, we compute in detail the structure of the cloud of meteoroids released by C/2013 A1, showing its dependence on heliocentric ejection distances, 3-dimensional ejection velocities, and particle sizes. Our calculations using numerical integrator MERCURY, [7], incorporating radiation pressure, [8], show that ejection of particles at large heliocentric distances (about 7 au to 13 au) from C/2013 A1 could lead to evolution of a dense meteoroid cloud which intersects Mars a few hours after the comet-Mars close encounter. Hence this detection of a meteor shower on Mars by space instruments is an indirect confirmation of cometary activity at large distances which has rarely been observed directly by telescopes so far. Furthermore it shows that comprehensive threat estimation needs to be done for satellites orbiting the Earth when dynamically new comets come very close to the Earth in future.References:[1] Vaubaillon J., Macquet L., Soja R. 2014. MNRAS. 439: 3294.[2] Moorhead A. V., Wiegert P. A., Cooke W. J. 2014. Icarus. 231:13.[3] Ye Q.-Z., Hui M.-T., 2014, ApJ, 787: 115.[4] Farnocchia D. et al. 2014. ApJL. 790: 114.[5] Kelley M. S. P. et al. 2014, ApJL, 792: 16.[6] Tricarico P. et al., 2014, ApJL, 787: 35.[7] Chambers J. E. 1999. MNRAS. 304: 793.[8] Burns J. A, Lamy P. L., Soter S. 1979. Icarus. 40: 1.