WorldWideScience

Sample records for barriers to entry competition

  1. Sunk Costs and Antitrust Barriers to Entry

    OpenAIRE

    SCHMALENSEE, Richard

    2004-01-01

    US antitrust policy takes as its objective consumer welfare, not total economic welfare. With that objective, Joe Bain's definition of entry barriers is more useful than George Stigler's or definitions based on economic welfare. It follows that economies of scale that involve sunk costs may create antitrust barriers to entry. A simple model shows that sunk costs without scale economies may discourage entry without creating an antitrust entry barrier.

  2. Barriers to entry : abolishing the barriers to understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Keppler, Jan Horst

    2009-01-01

    BARRIERS TO ENTRY: ABOLISHING THE BARRIERS TO UNDERSTANDING by Jan-Horst Keppler Professor of economics Université Paris – Dauphine, LEDa, and Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne, PHARE Port.: (+33 6) 77 81 37 46; Email: . Abstract The concept of a barrier to entry has been discussed least since Bain (1956) with important contributions by Spence (1977), Dixit (1980) or Milgrom and Roberts (1982). The more recent discussion is synth...

  3. Sunk Costs and Risk-Based Barriers to Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Robert S. Pindyck

    2009-01-01

    In merger analysis and other antitrust settings, risk is often cited as a potential barrier to entry. But there is little consensus as to the kinds of risk that matter - systematic versus non-systematic and industry-wide versus firm-specific - and the mechanisms through which they affect entry. I show how and to what extent different kinds of risk magnify the deterrent effect of exogenous sunk costs of entry, and thereby affect industry dynamics, concentration, and equilibrium market prices. ...

  4. Duopoly Dynamics with a Barrier to Entry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbring, J.H.; Campbell, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the effects of raising the cost of entry for a potential competitor on infinite-horizon Markov-perfect duopoly dynamics with ongoing demand uncertainty. All entrants serving the model industry incur sunk costs, and exit avoids future fixed costs. We focus on the unique equilibri

  5. From nascent to actual entrepreneurship: the effect of entry barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Stel, André; Storey, David; Wennekers, Sander; Thurik, Roy

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis exploratory study focuses on the conversion from nascent to actual entrepreneurship and the role of entry barriers in this process. Using data for a sample of countries participating in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor between 2002 and 2004, we estimate a twoequation model explaining the nascent entrepreneurship rate and the young business entrepreneurship rate, while taking into account the interrelationship between the two variables (i.e. the conversion). Furthermore var...

  6. Overcoming inadvertent barriers to entry in large infrastructure projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vincent Livesey

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The history behind the award of Brisbane City Council’s Legacy Way project is discussed and the possible impact of cognitive bias in the Expression of Interest  (EOI process together with the steps that were taken during the EOI development and evaluation phase to reduce the impact that this may have had on the selection of Contractors from their EOI submissions.  The paper concludes that Cognitive Bias may have created a greater barrier to entry to Contractors attempting to enter the Australian PPP market than has been previously realised and makes suggestions as to how this effect could be minimised in the future. 

  7. The Perceptions of the Automotive Supply Industry Related to Information Technology Utilization and Creating Barriers to Competitive Market Entry: A Case Study of the Implications for Strategic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargal, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine information technology/systems strategy related factors in the automotive supply industry based on responses to the Strategic Planning and Business Performance Survey provided to automotive suppliers. This population produces supplies to the automotive industry with products valued at hundreds of billions…

  8. Perceived barriers to entry: are there any differences between small, medium-sized and large companies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemp, R.G.M.; Lutz, C.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide empirical evidence about the importance of barriers to entry. In particular, the perceptions of firms are considered. Three questions are addressed: which entry-barriers are important in the perception of firms in the Dutch economy? Do these perceptions diff

  9. Barriers to the Entry of Biofield Healing Into "Mainstream" Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufford, David J; Sprengel, Meredith; Ives, John A; Jonas, Wayne

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we describe barriers to the entry of biofield healing into mainstream contemporary science and clinical practice. We focus on obstacles that arise from the social nature of the scientific enterprise, an aspect of science highlighted by the influential work of Thomas Kuhn (1922-1996), one of the most important- and controversial-philosophers of science in the 20th century. Kuhn analyzed science and its revolutionary changes in terms of the dynamics within scientific communities. Kuhn's approach helps us understand unconventional medical theories and practices such as biofield healing. For many years, these were called "complementary and alternative medicine" (CAM). However, because most people use nonmainstream approaches in conjunction with conventional treatments, the National Institutes of Health and many practitioners now prefer "Complementary and Integrative Medicine" (CIM) where integrative implies "bringing conventional and complementary approaches together in a coordinated way."(1) Biofield healing fits the integrative model well, provides a novel approach to therapeutic intervention, and is developing in a manner that can integrate with current medical science in simple ways. Yet, it still remains outside the conventional framework because of its conceptual bases, which contrast sharply with conventional assumptions regarding the nature of reality.

  10. Barriers to the Entry of Biofield Healing Into "Mainstream" Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufford, David J; Sprengel, Meredith; Ives, John A; Jonas, Wayne

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we describe barriers to the entry of biofield healing into mainstream contemporary science and clinical practice. We focus on obstacles that arise from the social nature of the scientific enterprise, an aspect of science highlighted by the influential work of Thomas Kuhn (1922-1996), one of the most important- and controversial-philosophers of science in the 20th century. Kuhn analyzed science and its revolutionary changes in terms of the dynamics within scientific communities. Kuhn's approach helps us understand unconventional medical theories and practices such as biofield healing. For many years, these were called "complementary and alternative medicine" (CAM). However, because most people use nonmainstream approaches in conjunction with conventional treatments, the National Institutes of Health and many practitioners now prefer "Complementary and Integrative Medicine" (CIM) where integrative implies "bringing conventional and complementary approaches together in a coordinated way."(1) Biofield healing fits the integrative model well, provides a novel approach to therapeutic intervention, and is developing in a manner that can integrate with current medical science in simple ways. Yet, it still remains outside the conventional framework because of its conceptual bases, which contrast sharply with conventional assumptions regarding the nature of reality. PMID:26665046

  11. Network Competition and Entry Deterrence

    OpenAIRE

    Calzada, Joan; Valletti, Tommaso

    2005-01-01

    We develop a model of logit demand that extends to a multi-firm industry the traditional duopoly framework of network competition with access charges. Firstly, we show that, when incumbents do not face the threat of entry and compete in prices, they inefficiently establish the reciprocal access charge below cost. This inefficiency disappears if incumbents compete in utilities instead of prices. Secondly, we study how incumbents change their choices under the threat of entry when they determin...

  12. Contextualizing Territories in Gvc Supplier Nodes to Understand Chain Entry Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lotte; Kamau, Paul; McCormick, Dorothy

    This paper deals with entry barriers for developing country suppliers to global value chains (GVCs). It is based on a study of food processing firms in Kenya undertaken between 2012 and 2014. The paper focuses on how entry barriers to GVCs are sometimes constructed within supplier countries...... of how ‘the local’ interacts with ‘the global’, and thus to our understanding of the construction, existence and outcomes of entry barriers to GVCs. To conceptualize such a comprehensive and in-depth understanding of a supplier context, and of the processes and relations at play within it, we take our...

  13. Barriers to migrant entry to occupations in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iredale, R

    1989-03-01

    In 1986, 21.3% of the population of Australia had been born overseas; currently, foreign born workers comprise 25% of the labor force. The level of skilled immigration has continued to increase throughout the 1980s. In the past, most English-speaking migrants gained recognition of their overseas qualifications, but about half of those from non-English speaking countries have never been able to return to their pre-migration occupations. Beginning with the medical field, occupational regulating gradually grew with state autonomy being a marked feature. Australia has 1 of the most highly regulated labor markets in the world, with hundreds of bodies to determine entry criteria. The Council of Overseas Professional Qualifications, established in 1969, guides selection and tests professionals both overseas and already resident in Australia. The Tradesmen's Rights Regulation Act recognizes acceptable tradesmen. Aside from these 2 bodies, the majority of qualifications are assessed at the state or local level. Problems skilled immigrants have encountered in attempting to gain recognition of their overseas qualifications include 1) preference for locally trained workers or discrimination against non-British/non-Australian qualifications; 2) lack of adequate information about assessment procedures; 3) inadequate use of interpreting and translating services; 4) language difficulties in tests; and 5) frequent assessment only on formal qualifications, with skills and experience not being evaluated. The 2 basic models for assessing occupational suitability are the valuation of qualifications approach and the valuation of skills approach. To illustrate the operation of various models of assessment, the author discusses these occupations: medicine, nursing, engineering, computing, and electrical trades. The major factors that are essential for an overall strategy of change include 1) less occupational regulation in the labor market; 2) national registration and licensing systems

  14. Barriers to migrant entry to occupations in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iredale, R

    1989-03-01

    In 1986, 21.3% of the population of Australia had been born overseas; currently, foreign born workers comprise 25% of the labor force. The level of skilled immigration has continued to increase throughout the 1980s. In the past, most English-speaking migrants gained recognition of their overseas qualifications, but about half of those from non-English speaking countries have never been able to return to their pre-migration occupations. Beginning with the medical field, occupational regulating gradually grew with state autonomy being a marked feature. Australia has 1 of the most highly regulated labor markets in the world, with hundreds of bodies to determine entry criteria. The Council of Overseas Professional Qualifications, established in 1969, guides selection and tests professionals both overseas and already resident in Australia. The Tradesmen's Rights Regulation Act recognizes acceptable tradesmen. Aside from these 2 bodies, the majority of qualifications are assessed at the state or local level. Problems skilled immigrants have encountered in attempting to gain recognition of their overseas qualifications include 1) preference for locally trained workers or discrimination against non-British/non-Australian qualifications; 2) lack of adequate information about assessment procedures; 3) inadequate use of interpreting and translating services; 4) language difficulties in tests; and 5) frequent assessment only on formal qualifications, with skills and experience not being evaluated. The 2 basic models for assessing occupational suitability are the valuation of qualifications approach and the valuation of skills approach. To illustrate the operation of various models of assessment, the author discusses these occupations: medicine, nursing, engineering, computing, and electrical trades. The major factors that are essential for an overall strategy of change include 1) less occupational regulation in the labor market; 2) national registration and licensing systems

  15. The Spanish company in China: Entry forms and barriers to internationalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Àngels Niñerola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The Chinese market is a sought-after investment destination for numerous companies across the world for their great sales potential. However, because of the complexity of the country, the investment should be made with caution. The choice of form of entry is one of the most crucial decisions that the company has to face when it decides to undertake an internationalization process. This paper aims, first, determine the form of entry used by Spanish companies in China and what factors have influenced the choice, and secondly, identify what are the entry barriers that they have been found.Methodology: To answer these questions interviews were held with managers or heads of the department involved in the internationalization process of fifteen Spanish companies from different economic sectors with direct investment in China.Findings: As a result, we found that implantation in China has been a sequential process for the following reasons: lack of market knowledge, compulsory investment with a local partner or gradual commitment of resources. Once the company decides to settle permanently, the form used is a subsidiary company, known in China as Wholly Foreign Owned Enterprise.Regulatory and bureaucratic, cultural and language, competitive and risk of imitation, human resources and, finally, informal barriers have been identified by companies during their internationalization process in the Chinese market.Originality: More studies like this are needed for shed light to the internationalization process in this market for being so culturally different to Spanish and so unknown for not being the first destination of the Spanish company historically.

  16. Clinician-Scientists in Canada: Barriers to Career Entry and Progress

    OpenAIRE

    Lander, Bryn; Gillian E Hanley; Atkinson-Grosjean, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Background Clinician-scientists play an important role in translating between research and clinical practice. Significant concerns about a decline in their numbers have been raised. Potential barriers for career entry and progress are explored in this study. Methods Case-study research methods were used to identify barriers perceived by clinician-scientists and their research teams in two Canadian laboratories. These perceptions were then compared against statistical analysis of data from Can...

  17. Clinician-Scientists in Canada: Barriers to Career Entry and Progress

    OpenAIRE

    Bryn Lander; Hanley, Gillian E.; Janet Atkinson-Grosjean

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinician-scientists play an important role in translating between research and clinical practice. Significant concerns about a decline in their numbers have been raised. Potential barriers for career entry and progress are explored in this study. METHODS: Case-study research methods were used to identify barriers perceived by clinician-scientists and their research teams in two Canadian laboratories. These perceptions were then compared against statistical analysis of data from C...

  18. Perceptions regarding strategic and structural entry barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutz, Clemens H. M.; Kemp, Ron G. M.; Dijkstra, S. Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the underlying dimensions of strategic and structural entry barriers. We find that, in the perception of firms, both types of barriers are important and that the effectiveness of strategic barriers depends on attributes of the market structure. Based on

  19. Real and Imagined Barriers to College Entry: Perceptions of Cost

    OpenAIRE

    Grodsky, Eric; Jones, Melanie

    2004-01-01

    Patterns of postsecondary attendance in the United States continue to be stratified by socioeconomic background and race/ethnicity. We suggest that inequalities in knowledge of the costs of going to college contribute to persistent patterns of stratification. We hypothesize that disadvantaged parents who believe their child will attend college are less certain of the costs of college attendance. As a result, they are less able or willing to provide an estimate of the costs of college attendan...

  20. Pioneers' Marketing Mix Reactions to Entry in Different Competitive Game Structures: Theoretical Analysis and Empirical Illustration

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh Shankar

    1997-01-01

    Pioneers' marketing mix reactions to new entries are recognized as important determinants of the outcome of pioneerlate mover competition, particularly in price-inelastic markets such as those for pharmaceuticals, cigarettes, and luxury goods. Managers in such markets are interested in better understanding when to accommodate (i.e., decrease marketing spending) or retaliate (i.e., increase spending) in nonprice marketing variables such as advertising and salesforce. In addition, the reallocat...

  1. Barriers to the Entry of Biofield Healing Into “Mainstream” Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Hufford, David J.; Sprengel, Meredith; Ives, John A.; Jonas, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we describe barriers to the entry of biofield healing into mainstream contemporary science and clinical practice. We focus on obstacles that arise from the social nature of the scientific enterprise, an aspect of science highlighted by the influential work of Thomas Kuhn (1922-1996), one of the most important— and controversial—philosophers of science in the 20th century. Kuhn analyzed science and its revolutionary changes in terms of the dynamics within scientific communitie...

  2. Reducing Barriers to Career Entry for Latinos: An Examination of Pathways into Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony De Jesús

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Demand for bilingual/bicultural social work practitioners presents a mutually beneficial opportunity for the social work profession and Latinos who are increasingly in positions to be employed as social workers (Acevedo, González, Santiago, & Vargas-Ramos, 2007; Ortíz-Hendricks, 2007. Uneven academic preparation, limited access to information about college, high tuition/opportunity costs and family obligations are among the barriers to higher education for Latinos (Arbona & Nora, 2007; Hurtado & Ponjuan, 2005; Ortíz et al., 2007. Using comparative methods, this article describes career pathway program models that address obstacles to successful entry into social work careers. These models also demonstrate the potential to reduce barriers to degree completion and career entry for Latinos. Salient program components include reduced tuition and tuition assistance, transportation assistance, child care, support in strengthening oral and written English skills, and access to networks of employers (Takahashi & Melendez, 2004. Implications for social work and social work education are also discussed.

  3. Clinician-scientists in Canada: barriers to career entry and progress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryn Lander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinician-scientists play an important role in translating between research and clinical practice. Significant concerns about a decline in their numbers have been raised. Potential barriers for career entry and progress are explored in this study. METHODS: Case-study research methods were used to identify barriers perceived by clinician-scientists and their research teams in two Canadian laboratories. These perceptions were then compared against statistical analysis of data from Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR databases on grant and award performance of clinician-scientists and non-clinical PhDs for fiscal years 2000 to 2008. RESULTS: Three main barriers were identified through qualitative analysis: research training, research salaries, and research grants. We then looked for evidence of these barriers in the Canada-wide statistical dataset for our study period. Clinician-scientists had a small but statistically significant higher mean number of degrees (3.3 than non-clinical scientists (3.2, potentially confirming the perception of longer training times. But evidence of the other two barriers was equivocal. For example, while overall growth in salary awards was minimal, awards to clinician-scientists increased by 45% compared to 6.3% for non-clinical PhDs. Similarly, in terms of research funding, awards to clinician-scientists increased by more than 25% compared with 5% for non-clinical PhDs. However, clinician-scientist-led grants funded under CIHR's Clinical thematic area decreased significantly from 61% to 51% (p-value<0.001 suggesting that clinician-scientists may be shifting their attention to other research domains. CONCLUSION: While clinician-scientists continue to perceive barriers to career entry and progress, quantitative results suggest improvements over the last decade. Clinician-scientists are awarded an increasing proportion of CIHR research grants and salary awards. Given the translational importance of

  4. Deregulation of Bank Entry and Branching: Impact on Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Milo, Melanie S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper looks at public policy towards bank entry and branching in the Philippines and its impact on the sector’s structure, conduct and performance. In particular, it argues that regulatory restrictions on bank entry and branching have had adverse effects on competition, while the liberalization of these restrictions have led to a more competitive banking sector. The paper has two main sections. Section II presents the history of regulation of bank entry and branching in the Philippines. ...

  5. Softening Competition by Enhancing entry : An Example from the Banking Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouckaert, J.M.C.; Degryse, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    We show that competing firms relax overall competition by lowering future barriers to entry.We illustrate our findings in a two-period model with adverse selection where banks strategically commit to disclose borrower information.By doing this, they invite rivals to enter their market.Disclosure of

  6. Barriers to the Entry of Biofield Healing Into “Mainstream” Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprengel, Meredith; Ives, John A.; Jonas, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we describe barriers to the entry of biofield healing into mainstream contemporary science and clinical practice. We focus on obstacles that arise from the social nature of the scientific enterprise, an aspect of science highlighted by the influential work of Thomas Kuhn (1922-1996), one of the most important— and controversial—philosophers of science in the 20th century. Kuhn analyzed science and its revolutionary changes in terms of the dynamics within scientific communities. Kuhn's approach helps us understand unconventional medical theories and practices such as biofield healing. For many years, these were called “complementary and alternative medicine” (CAM). However, because most people use nonmainstream approaches in conjunction with conventional treatments, the National Institutes of Health and many practitioners now prefer “Complementary and Integrative Medicine” (CIM) where integrative implies “bringing conventional and complementary approaches together in a coordinated way.”1 Biofield healing fits the integrative model well, provides a novel approach to therapeutic intervention, and is developing in a manner that can integrate with current medical science in simple ways. Yet, it still remains outside the conventional framework because of its conceptual bases, which contrast sharply with conventional assumptions regarding the nature of reality. PMID:26665046

  7. Can Social Capital Networks Assist Re-entry Felons to Overcome Barriers to Re-entry and Reduce Recidivism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earl Smith

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on interviews with 25 reentry felons, this article examines the impact that social capital plays in successful reentry; specifically with securing stable housing and employment. We found that access to social capital allowed those with the lowest probability for success—African American men with felony convictions—to secure both stable employment and housing and thus avoid engaging in illegitimate behavior that leads to recidivism. The findings suggest that even for those individuals reentering society with the most strikes against them (as noted by researchers such as Pager and Travis, access to the resource rich social capital networks provided by reentry programs can allow these individuals to overcome the barriers to reentry and find stable jobs and secure housing. Our findings suggest that more research be done on the impact of social capital embedded in reentry programs and that referrals be made to these types of programs and funding be provided for those that demonstrate the ability to significantly reduce recidivism. As Putman has noted, "Just as a screwdriver (physical capital or a college education (human capital can increase productivity (both individual and collective, so do social contacts affect the productivity of individuals and groups."

  8. 广告壁垒的结构性效应研究%Research on the Effects of Structural Barriers to Entry of Advertising

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田野

    2014-01-01

    Advertising can be seen as a type of barrier to entry , which helps the firm within the industry to prevent an-other firm from entering the market .A model of two-firm price competition with differential products is introduced to an-alyze different key parameters in order to explain how different effects of barriers to entry of advertising prevent another firm entry into the market.In the end, the industry of everyday chemicals is briefly analyzed in application of the model , hoping that this paper is able to provide a brand new way of thinking and theoretical basis for the future research .%广告可以被视作一种市场进入壁垒,能够帮助在位企业阻止潜在厂商的进入。本文通过建立两厂商的差异产品价格竞争模型、对不同关键参数进行分析,研究了广告的各种市场进入壁垒效应如何有效阻止潜在厂商进入,并以日化行业为例,说明了模型在具体行业分析中的作用,旨在为日后研究提供一种新的分析思路和理论参考。

  9. SME's perceptions regarding strategic and structural entry barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutz, Clemens; Kemp, Ron; Dijkstra, S. Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Extant literature discusses a large number of different entry barriers that may hamper market efficiency or entrepreneurial activity. In practice several of these barriers cohere and stem from the same root. Factor analysis is used to identify the underlying dimensions of these barriers. 7

  10. A new way to measure competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Boone

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces a new way to measure competition based on firms' profits. Within a general model, we derive conditions under which this measure is monotone in competition, where competition can be intensified both through a fall in entry barriers and through more aggressive interaction betwe

  11. A New Way to Measure Competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a new way to measure competition based on firms' profits.Within a general model, we derive conditions under which this measure is monotone in competition, where competition can be intensified both through a fall in entry barriers and through more aggressive interaction between

  12. The Heterochromatic Barrier to DNA Double Strand Break Repair: How to Get the Entry Visa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron A. Goodarzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over recent decades, a deep understanding of pathways that repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB has been gained from biochemical, structural, biophysical and cellular studies. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR represent the two major DSB repair pathways, and both processes are now well understood. Recent work has demonstrated that the chromatin environment at a DSB significantly impacts upon DSB repair and that, moreover, dramatic modifications arise in the chromatin surrounding a DSB. Chromatin is broadly divided into open, transcriptionally active, euchromatin (EC and highly compacted, transcriptionally inert, heterochromatin (HC, although these represent extremes of a spectrum. The HC superstructure restricts both DSB repair and damage response signaling. Moreover, DSBs within HC (HC-DSBs are rapidly relocalized to the EC-HC interface. The damage response protein kinase, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM, is required for HC-DSB repair but is dispensable for the relocalization of HC-DSBs. It has been proposed that ATM signaling enhances HC relaxation in the DSB vicinity and that this is a prerequisite for HC-DSB repair. Hence, ATM is essential for repair of HC-DSBs. Here, we discuss how HC impacts upon the response to DSBs and how ATM overcomes the barrier that HC poses to repair.

  13. Barriers of access to care in a managed competition model: lessons from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogollón-Pérez Amparo Susana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health sector reform in Colombia, initiated by Law 100 (1993 that introduced a managed competition model, is generally presented as a successful experience of improving access to care through a health insurance regulated market. The study's objective is to improve our understanding of the factors influencing access to the continuum of care in the Colombian managed competition model, from the social actors' point of view. Methods An exploratory, descriptive-interpretative qualitative study was carried out, based on case studies of four healthcare networks in rural and urban areas. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted to a three stage theoretical sample: I cases, II providers and III informants: insured and uninsured users (35, health professionals (51, administrative personnel (20, and providers' (18 and insurers' (10 managers. Narrative content analysis was conducted; segmented by cases, informant's groups and themes. Results Access, particularly to secondary care, is perceived as complex due to four groups of obstacles with synergetic effects: segmented insurance design with insufficient services covered; insurers' managed care and purchasing mechanisms; providers' networks structural and organizational limitations; and, poor living conditions. Insurers' and providers' values based on economic profit permeate all factors. Variations became apparent between the two geographical areas and insurance schemes. In the urban areas barriers related to market functioning predominate, whereas in the rural areas structural deficiencies in health services are linked to insufficient public funding. While financial obstacles are dominant in the subsidized regime, in the contributory scheme supply shortage prevails, related to insufficient private investment. Conclusions The results show how in the Colombian healthcare system structural and organizational barriers to care access, that are common in developing countries

  14. Spatial Competition with Entry Deterrence considering Horizontal Product Differentiations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-nong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial competition plays important roles in economics, which attracts extensive research. This paper addresses spatial competitions along with horizontal product differentiations and entry deterrence. By the dynamic game theory model about one firm and a potential entrant with different cost in a linear city, this paper finds that both the higher fixed setup cost and the higher transportation cost deter entrants. To efficiently deter the entrants, the establisher is inclined to locating at the middle point of the linear city.

  15. Does competitive entry structurally change key marketing metrics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornelis, M.; Dekimpe, de M.G.; Leeflang, P.S.H.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent does competitive entry create a structural change in keymarketingmetrics? New players may just be a temporal nuisance to incumbents, but could also fundamentally change the latter's performance evolution, or induce them to permanently alter their spending levels and/or pricing decisio

  16. Does competitive entry structurally change key marketing metrics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornelis, Marcel; Dekimpe, Marnik G.; Leeflang, Peter S. H.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent does competitive entry create a structural change in key marketing metrics? New players mayjust be a temporal nuisance to incumbents, but could also fundamentally change the latter's performance evolution, or induce them to permanently alter their spending levels and/or pricing decisi

  17. Price discrimination, entry, and switching costs in network competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifunović Dejan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews theoretical models of network competition in telecommunications. We will discuss two alternative approaches. The first approach assumes Hoteling’s horizontal differentiation and the second approach is based on switching costs. We will first analyse spatial competition with linear prices and continue with price discrimination between on-net and off-net calls. Price discrimination can also be used to deter entry to the market. We will also deal with the regulator’s optimal choice of access price, which should be designed to induce entry of new firms. Furthermore, pricing of roaming services and the switching cost approach to network competition will be considered. Finally, we will illustrate the theoretical results with data from the Serbian mobile and fixed telephony market.

  18. DNA-AuNP networks on cell membranes as a protective barrier to inhibit viral attachment, entry and budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun Mei; Zheng, Lin Ling; Yang, Xiao Xi; Wan, Xiao Yan; Wu, Wen Bi; Zhen, Shu Jun; Li, Yuan Fang; Luo, Ling Fei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections have caused numerous diseases and deaths worldwide. Due to the emergence of new viruses and frequent virus variation, conventional antiviral strategies that directly target viral or cellular proteins are limited because of the specificity, drug resistance and rapid clearance from the human body. Therefore, developing safe and potent antiviral agents with activity against viral infection at multiple points in the viral life cycle remains a major challenge. In this report, we propose a new modality to inhibit viral infection by fabricating DNA conjugated gold nanoparticle (DNA-AuNP) networks on cell membranes as a protective barrier. The DNA-AuNPs networks were found, via a plaque formation assay and viral titers, to have potent antiviral ability and protect host cells from human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Confocal immunofluorescence image analysis showed 80 ± 3.8% of viral attachment, 91.1 ± 0.9% of viral entry and 87.9 ± 2.8% of viral budding were inhibited by the DNA-AuNP networks, which were further confirmed by real-time fluorescence imaging of the RSV infection process. The antiviral activity of the networks may be attributed to steric effects, the disruption of membrane glycoproteins and limited fusion of cell membrane bilayers, all of which play important roles in viral infection. Therefore, our results suggest that the DNA-AuNP networks have not only prophylactic effects to inhibit virus attachment and entry, but also therapeutic effects to inhibit viral budding and cell-to-cell spread. More importantly, this proof-of-principle study provides a pathway for the development of a universal, broad-spectrum antiviral therapy.

  19. A Choice Prediction Competition for Market Entry Games: An Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ido Erev

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A choice prediction competition is organized that focuses on decisions from experience in market entry games (http://sites.google.com/site/gpredcomp/ and http://www.mdpi.com/si/games/predict-behavior/. The competition is based on two experiments: An estimation experiment, and a competition experiment. The two experiments use the same methods and subject pool, and examine games randomly selected from the same distribution. The current introductory paper presents the results of the estimation experiment, and clarifies the descriptive value of several baseline models. The experimental results reveal the robustness of eight behavioral tendencies that were documented in previous studies of market entry games and individual decisions from experience. The best baseline model (I-SAW assumes reliance on small samples of experiences, and strong inertia when the recent results are not surprising. The competition experiment will be run in May 2010 (after the completion of this introduction, but they will not be revealed until September. To participate in the competition, researchers are asked to E-mail the organizers models (implemented in computer programs that read the incentive structure as input, and derive the predicted behavior as an output. The submitted models will be ranked based on their prediction error. The winners of the competition will be invited to publish a paper that describes their model.

  20. SMEs, Competition and Entry - A developing country perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla

    The paper develops a simple model for a developing country with a dual economic structure. The model is a further theoretical extension and empirical work to an earlier published book chapter on the same topic. The abstract was updated after presentation at the conference in Gold Coast, Australia...... with a sizeable informal sector in developing countries and corruption. Other leading transition researchers such as Andrei Shleifer offer a variety of views on the informal sector from the romantic to the parasitic. This paper leans on the realist interpretation of de Soto grounded in institutional theory. High...... entry barriers push the entrepreneurs towards the informal sector. Whether entrepreneurs succeed in the transition towards the formal sector depends on the size of the entry barriers which are indirectly regulated both by informal institutions such as corruption and formal institutions...

  1. Does competitive entry structurally change key marketing metrics?

    OpenAIRE

    Kornelis, M.; Dekimpe, de, M.G.; Leeflang, P.S.H.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent does competitive entry create a structural change in keymarketingmetrics? New players may just be a temporal nuisance to incumbents, but could also fundamentally change the latter's performance evolution, or induce them to permanently alter their spending levels and/or pricing decisions. Similarly, the addition of a new marketing channel could permanently shift shopping preferences, or could just create a short-lived migration from existing channels. The steady-state impact of ...

  2. Entry, Investment and Competition in Telecommunications and Media Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Balmer, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis builds on the new empirical industrial organization (NEIO) literature trying to use market data to determine fundamental market drivers such as demand parameters, entry and investment thresholds or the level and development of competition in the market. The thesis addresses two sectors: telecommunications (high-speed internet as well as fixed telephony) and media (newspaper sellers). It is divided in three articles 1) Geographic regulation and cooperative investme...

  3. Market Entry, Product Quality And Price Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathur Sameer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We study an entrant firm’s product quality choice and the price competition arising between the entrant and the incumbent firm. We show that the entrant firm should introduce a relatively higher (lower quality than the incumbent firm when the consumers’ valuation for quality is sufficiently large (small. We also study how the incumbent firm modifies its price in response to the ensuing price competition. We find that the incumbent firm should decrease its price. We also profile how the incumbent firm’s price non-linearly depends on consumers’ valuation for quality.

  4. Breaking the barriers of resistance to electronic journal entry: Experiences of BlToday

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, G.; S. Polovina; G. Rourke; Tyrell, T.

    1997-01-01

    There are a number of socio-econoniicissues that are generally understood in the area of electronic publishing. Primary among these is an apparent reluctance within the academic community to accept a replacement to paper-based journals. This sits incongruously with the fact that the WWW was born at CERN primarily as a vehicle for the effective dissemination of scientific research papers. This paper focuses on research, problems and issues encountered at South Bank University in attempting to ...

  5. Breaking the barriers of resistance to electronic journal entry: Experiences of BIToday

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, G.; S. Polovina; G. Rourke; Tyrell, T.

    1997-01-01

    There are a number of socio-economic issues that are generally understood in the area of electronic publishing. Primary among these is an apparent reluctance within the academic community to accept a replacement for paper-based journals. This sits incongruously with the fact that the WWW was born at CERN primarily as a vehicle for the effective dissemination of scientific research papers. The present paper focuses on research, problems and issues encountered at South Bank University in attemp...

  6. Fish wars on the high seas : erecting economic barriers to entry

    OpenAIRE

    McKelvey, Robert W.; Sandal, Leif Kristoffer; Steinshamn, Stein Ivar

    2000-01-01

    The 1993 U.N. Straddling Stock Agreement prescribes a multi-national organizational structure for management of an exploited marine fish stock, one whose range straddles both “Extended Economic Zones” (EEZs) and high seas waters. However, the Agreement provides to the Regional Organization no coercive enforcement powers. In this connections two problems in particular have been cited: The first, called the “interloper problem” concerns the difficulty of controlling the harvesting by non-member...

  7. Bringing More Competition to Real Estate Brokerage

    OpenAIRE

    Gurman, Jesse; Hahn, Robert W.; Litan, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an economic analysis of the residential real estate brokerage industry. We find that the traditional model for residential real estate brokerage services may be dated, and could be improved substantially with some public policy interventions that spur innovation. We believe that there are numerous barriers to entry that are slowing the emergence of new models for serving consumers. Some of these barriers are likely to be anti-competitive. Examples include discrimination ag...

  8. Entries for the UK Business Plan Competition 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    PPARC is supporting the Research Councils' Business Plan Competition 2003, for which outline (one page) entries should be submitted by 31.1.03. The competition is open to CERN staff and visiting academics from UK establishments. The main condition on entry for CERN staff is that there should be intent to commercialise the technology in the UK. Postgraduates, postdocs and academic staff who have a business idea arising from their research and want to develop this further are encouraged to participate. There is a £25,000 first prize and advice and training along the way. The first step is simple - just prepare a one page summary of your business idea - without giving away any potential business secrets and fill in your details on the short application form. The training element will provide a comprehensive coverage on the issues you need to know about with case studies and special sessions on specific issues of relevance to different research areas. Staff from CERN EP division submitted an entry last year, w...

  9. Competitive electricity markets, prices and generator entry and exit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, Robert George

    The electric power industry in the United States is quickly being deregulated and restructured. In the past, new electric generation capacity was added by regulated utilities to meet forecasted demand levels and maintain reserve margins. With competitive wholesale generation, investment will be the responsibility of independent private investors. Electricity prices will assume the coordinating function which has until recently been the responsibility of regulatory agencies. Competitive prices will provide the entry and exit signals for generators in the future. Competitive electricity markets have a distinctive price formation process, and thus require a specialized price model. A mean-reverting price process with stochastic jumps is proposed as an appropriate long-run price process for annual electricity prices. This price process is used to develop an analytic real options model for private investment decisions. The required recursive infinite series solutions have not been widely used for real option models. Entry thresholds and asset values for competitive wholesale electricity markets, and exit decisions for plants with significant retirement costs (i.e. nuclear power plants), are examined. The proposed model results in significantly lower trigger prices for both entry and exit decisions, and higher asset values, when compared with other standard models. The model is used to show that the incentives for retiring a nuclear plant are very sensitive to the treatment of decommissioning costs (e.g. if plant owners do not face full decommissioning costs, retirement decisions may be economically premature.) An econometric model of short-run price behavior is estimated by the method of maximum likelihood using daily electricity prices from markets in the USA and Australia. The model specifies two mean reverting price processes with stochastic Markov switching between the regimes, which allows discontinuous jumps in electricity prices. Econometric tests show that a two

  10. Maximizing competition : reducing barriers for new players

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This session included highlights from four guest speakers who commented on ways to reduce barriers to competition in Ontario's electric power industry. Topics of discussion included intertie transaction failures, the lack of overall investment in the market, the government's inaction which is preventing investment, the continued underwriting of Ontario Power Generation's activities by the government which discourages investment in the private sector, and indecisiveness regarding policy on coal plants. It was emphasized that investors need to know for certain that they can get a reasonable rate of return on their investments, that the market will be transparent and there will be no shift in policy. The need to promote new, efficient power generation by means of nuclear, coal, natural gas, and hydro energy was also emphasized. Charts depicting total energy production by source were presented for 2001 with projections to 2012. figs

  11. Regulated competition in health care: Switching and barriers to switching in the Dutch health insurance system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rijken Mieke

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2006, a number of changes in the Dutch health insurance system came into effect. In this new system mobility of insured is important. The idea is that insured switch insurers because they are not satisfied with quality of care and the premium of their insurance. As a result, insurers will in theory strive for a better balance between price and quality. The Dutch changes have caught the attention, internationally, of both policy makers and researchers. In our study we examined switching behaviour over three years (2007-2009. We tested if there are differences in the numbers of switchers between groups defined by socio-demographic and health characteristics and between the general population and people with chronic illness or disability. We also looked at reasons for (not-switching and at perceived barriers to switching. Methods Switching behaviour and reasons for (not-switching were measured over three years (2007-2009 by sending postal questionnaires to members of the Dutch Health Care Consumer Panel and of the National Panel of people with Chronic illness or Disability. Data were available for each year and for each panel for at least 1896 respondents - a response of between 71% and 88%. Results The percentages of switchers are low; 6% in 2007, 4% in 2008 and 3% in 2009. Younger and higher educated people switch more often than older and lower educated people and women switch more often than men. There is no difference in the percentage of switchers between the general population and people with chronic illness or disability. People with a bad self-perceived health, and chronically ill and disabled, perceive more barriers to switching than others. Conclusion The percentages of switchers are comparable to the old system. Switching is not based on quality of care and thus it can be questioned whether it will lead to a better balance between price and quality. Although there is no difference in the frequency of switching

  12. Entry time effects and follow-on drug competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Luiz Flavio; Sermet, Catherine; Pichetti, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical firms have been criticized for concentrating efforts of R&D on the so-called me-too or follow-on drugs. There have been many comments for and against the dissemination of these incremental innovations but few papers have broached the subject from an econometric point of view, possibly because identification of me-too or follow-on drugs is not so obvious. This paper focuses on the impact of entry order on follow-on drug competition in the French market between the years 2001 and 2007. More precisely, this study examines the effects on market share of first entrants in the follow-on drug market and how this possible competitive advantage changes over time. First results are coherent with theoretical microeconomic issues concerning the importance of being first. We find evidence that first movers in the follow-on drug market have the ability to capture and maintain greater market share for a long period of time. The hierarchical market position of follow-on drugs does not seem to be affected by generic drug emergence. From a dynamic perspective, our analysis shows that market share is positively correlated with the ability of follow-on drugs to set prices higher than the average follow-on drug prices in a specific therapeutic class, which means that market power remains considerably important for first movers. Moreover, we found that the optimum level of innovation to maximize market share is the highest one. PMID:25501258

  13. Entry into the electricity market: Uncertainty, competition, and mothballing options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper analyzes the entry strategies into the electricity market of two firms that have power plants under price uncertainty and competition. We consider the symmetric and asymmetric two firms, which have either a thermal power plant or a nuclear power plant. The differences between the thermal power plant and the nuclear power plant, such as the cost structure and operational flexibility are modeled. The threshold values of market entry are calculated for each firm with either the thermal power plant or the nuclear power plant as the leader or the follower. We show the dependence of cost structures on entry thresholds of the leader and the follower into the electricity market. For various market and cost conditions, the diagrams of the leader are also shown

  14. Barriers to radiant barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, C.

    Radiant barriers are an energy saving device which decrease the heat lost through radiant heat transfer. The primary reason to install it is to save on air conditioning costs, as it prevents the loss of heat through the attic. They have been the subject of much controversy, as the claims made by many manufacturers were extreme (up to 100% heat shielding), with the consumer paying high prices for ineffective devices. The authors outline criteria for the consumer to consider when buying radiant warmers and then give installation tips for both new constructions and retrofits.

  15. The competitive advantage of nations and choice of entry strategies : a three scenario case study

    OpenAIRE

    Helvik, Marianne; Harnecker, Maria Luisa Garrido

    2005-01-01

    Michael E. Porter’s Diamond framework has been used as an analysis tool the last 15 years to define the competitive advantage of nations, but few researchers have discussed if there is a link between the Diamond framework and how international firms can pursue the best entry mode. Different variables will be presented linking the Diamond framework to entry strategies, designing an extended framework. Three case scenarios are used for analysis purposes; the first two originating in Porter’s Di...

  16. Optimal R&D investment strategies with quantity competition under the threat of superior entry

    OpenAIRE

    Lukach, R.; Kort, P.M.; Plasmans, J.E.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper studies R&D investment decisions of a firm facing the threat of new technology entry and subject to technical uncertainty. We distinguish four scenarios: inevitable entry, entry deterrence, entry blockade, and non-credible entry threat. The entry threat stimulates the incumbent to innovate in case entry prevention is possible, but discourages R&D if entry is inevitable. In the case of entry deterrence the incumbent successfully prevents entry by innovating. Greater technical uncert...

  17. The Impact of Entry and Competition by Open Source Software on Innovation Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Bitzer, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    This chapter presents the stylized facts of open source software innovation and provides empirical evidence on the impact of increased competition by OSS on the innovative activity in the software industry. Furthermore, we introduce a simple formal model that captures the innovation impact of OSS...... entry by examining a change in market structure from monopoly to duopoly under the assumption that software producers compete in technology rather than price or quantities. The chapter identifies a pro-innovative effect of OSS competition....

  18. Polycentrism: Boon or barrier to metropolitan competitiveness? The case of the Randstad Holland [publication in Chinese

    OpenAIRE

    Lambregts, B.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the ways Dutch planners try to come to terms with some of the more problematic aspects related to the polycentric make-up of the Randstad. As such, it aims to provide some counterweight to the sometimes overly enthusiastic belief among policy-makers that polycentricity or polycentric spatial development offers a solution to a wide array of urban and regional problems. In addition, the article draws attention to the fact that in order better to understand both the poten...

  19. Identifying and Tackling Entry Barriers in Canada : A study for the Dutch shipbuilding and marine equipment industry

    OpenAIRE

    Laan, Jari

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to retain Dutch prominence in the global maritime cluster by enabling the Dutch shipbuilding and marine equipment industry to respond to Canada’s National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy opportunities through identifying and proposing solutions to the market entry barriers existing in the Canadian shipbuilding industry. The reviewed literature focuses on internationalizing theories, market entry barriers and various tools to assess the attractiveness of international ma...

  20. Entrepreneurs' Percieved Factors of Success and Barriers-to-Entry for Small Business and Farm Operations in Rural Paraguay

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Braden J.

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture and commerce activities make up a significant part of Paraguay’s economy. The success of these sectors is important for Paraguay’s continued development in rural areas where agriculture activities are most prevalent and nonagriculture activities are increasing in demand. Current literature indicates many factors that contribute to success in both business and farming operations; however, little information is available regarding the perception of young entrepreneurs and farmers. P...

  1. 进入壁垒的七种基本定义及其意蕴比较%Comparison of Seven Basic Definitions of Barriers to Entry and Their Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘广生; 孙瑞华

    2012-01-01

    进入壁垒是研究市场定义和市场势力的核心概念。自从贝恩提出这一概念以来,进入壁垒主要有七种基本定义,其定义有不同的缺点及其效率含义。经济学家围绕进入壁垒的含义进行了大量深入分析,但是对进入壁垒的基本含义、判定标准和主要形式等方面还存在实质性的分歧。%Barriers to entry is the core concept in the study of market definition and market power. Since Bain introduced the concept, a lot of analyses have been made on the meaning of barriers to entry and seven major basic definitions have been developed. However, there are still substantial differences on the basic meaning, judgment standard, and major forms of barriers to entry.

  2. The Impact of Entry and Competition by Open Source Software on Innovation Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Jürgen Bitzer; Philipp J. H. Schröder

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the stylized facts of open source software innovation and provides empirical evidence on the impact of increased competition by OSS on the innovative activity in the software industry. Furthermore, we introduce a simple formal model that captures the innovation impact of OSS entry by examining a change in market structure from monopoly to duopoly under the assumption that software producers compete in technology rather than price or quantities. The paper identifies a pro-i...

  3. Effect of multiple-source entry on price competition after patent expiration in the pharmaceutical industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Suh***, D.C.; Manning, W G; Schondelmeyer, S; Hadsall, R S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of multiple-source drug entry on price competition after patent expiration in the pharmaceutical industry. DATA SOURCES: Originators and their multiple-source drugs selected from the 35 chemical entities whose patents expired from 1984 through 1987. Data were obtained from various primary and secondary sources for the patents' expiration dates, sales volume and units sold, and characteristics of drugs in the sample markets. STUDY DESIGN: The study was designed...

  4. Barriers to SCM implementing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Rosli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper explores the barriers faced by Malaysian manufacturing companies in successfullyimplementing the Supply Chain Management (SCM. The study has highlighted some pertinent factorsperforming the barriers that are most frequently reported by the studied companies. Sixteen companies, fromservice and manufacturing companies were studied over a period of two years to assess their SCM practicesthrough survey and interview processes.Design/methodology/approach: This part discusses the research design and methodological issues upon whichthe research is based. The explanation includes two types of research methods, short survey and follow-upinterviews that were identified as being suitable to achieve the aims of this study, which is to identify the currentproblem of SCM practices within the Malaysian SMEs. Research design is a framework or plan for researchused as a guide in collecting and analysing data.Findings: The results showed that the barriers are depending on the types or group of companies business; suchas either it is an SME or a big company. The barriers inhibiting the practice of SCM can be summarized inthe following factors: partnership with suppliers, limited expertise, management commitment, understanding ofSCM, supported technologies and customer satisfaction. The findings are also compared with the results of asimilar study on SCM in other country.Practical implications: Some suggestions are also offered, which is believed to be a good strategy to the companiesto manage the SCM that will lead to sustainable competitive advantage and hence improve their market share.Originality/value: There are interesting barriers between the companies in Malaysia and other country in therespect of SCM implementation. These findings can be used by both Malaysian and other companies to worktogether or review the SCM strategies that will lead to sustainable competitive advantage and hence improvetheir business performance.

  5. Are there barriers to competition on the market for energy services?; Finns det konkurrenshinder paa marknaden foer energitjaenster?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Under orders from the Government, offices of Swedish Energy Authority conduct an in-depth analysis of the competitive conditions in various segments of the energy services market. In particular, the competitive relationship between energy suppliers and on the other hand, other companies providing energy services. Also the relationship between municipal-owned companies and other companies providing energy services should be analyzed. The institutional framework is already known, as well as much of the activity in the market. However, there still seems to be perspective on actors' own perceptions of market conditions that should be clarified. For this reason, the starting point for this investigation was the companies' own statements and comments, which were obtained partly through a questionnaire and interviews. A basic assumption has been that the opinions and beliefs also guide companies actions. This means that the actors' own voices form a kind of recurring theme in the study and contributes to a deeper understanding of the actors' motivations. It should be noted that Energy Agency does not necessarily share the views that emerge in this context.

  6. Airline competition at European airports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Frenken; S. van Terwisga; T. Verburg; G. Burghouwt

    2004-01-01

    Hub-and-spoke networks of airlines create entry barriers at large hub airports. As a result, deregulation does not necessary lead to more competition. In this paper, airline competition at European airports in the 1990s is analysed. Results show important differences between airports, which are rela

  7. Foreign Direct Investment Theories, Entry Barriers and Reverse Investments in U.S Manufacturing Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Wi Saeng Kim; Esmeralda O Lyn

    1987-01-01

    This paper investigates empirically whether industrial organization-oriented FDI theories explain the recent phenomenon of reverse foreign direct investment in the U.S. Based on the distribution of FDI in two-digit SIC manufacturing industries, we find that capital and advertising intensities act as entry barriers to foreign investments in the U.S. We also observe that foreign multinationals are attracted by the U.S. market size, and that they invest heavily in industries with intensive R&D c...

  8. Marketing Mix Reactions to Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, William T.

    1988-01-01

    Initial product, distribution, marketing expenditure, and price reactions by incumbents are examined for 115 entrants into oligopolistic markets. The most common reaction pattern is either no reaction or only a single reaction. It is very unusual for entrants to face reactions across the entire marketing mix. Reactions in the first two years after entry are explained as a function of the entrant's strategy, incumbent characteristics, and industry characteristics. The explanation provides insi...

  9. Winning and short-listed entries from the 2007 Feminist and Woman's Studies Association annual student essay competition

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Yvette; Waters, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of International Women’s Studies showcases the winning and short-listed entries from the 2007 Feminist and Women's Studies Association (FWSA) annual student essay competition. A cornerstone of academic feminism in the UK and Ireland since its inception in 1987, the FWSA is dedicated to the development of feminist research and pedagogy across the disciplines. As feminism broadens and diversifies in response to changing social, political, and cultural circumsta...

  10. Export Barriers and its Impact on Export Competitiveness of Leather Footwear Manufacturing Firms in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Gebrewahid, Gebreyohannes Gebreslassie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: the purpose of this research was to identify the export barriers that affect the export competitiveness of the Ethiopian leather footwear-manufacturing firms, with a special emphasis on the SMEs. SMEs occupy a prominent position in the development agenda of many developing countries like Ethiopia. Hence, this study investigated the export barriers of SMEs in ELFMFs. Research Methodology: A survey of 15 manufacturing firms was conducted in Ethiopian, Addis Ababa. Out of 100 sampled...

  11. News Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

  12. Zero entry barriers in an NP-complete world: Transaction streams and the complexity of electronic commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Subirana, Brian

    1999-01-01

    The adoption of electronic markets in an industry has a disintermediation potential because it can create a direct link between the producer and the consumer (without the need for the intermediation role of distributors). Electronic markets lower the search cost, allowing customers to choose among more providers (which ultimately reduces both the costs for the customer and the profits for the producer). Electronic markets on the Internet have the opposite effect: they lower some entry barrier...

  13. The Evolving Food Chain: Competitive Effects of Wal-Mart's Entry Into The Supermarket Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Noel, Michael; Basker, Emek

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the effect of Wal-Mart's entry into the grocery market using a unique stor-level price panel data set. We use OLS and two IV specifications to estimate the effect of Wal-Mart's entry on competitors' prices of 24 grocery items across several categories. Wal-Mart's price advantage over competitors for these products averages approximately 10%. On average, competitors' response to Wal-Mart's entry is a price reduction of 1-1.2%, mostly due to smaller-scale competitors: the response...

  14. Where is Merlin When I Need Him? The Barriers to Higher Education are Still in Place: Recent Re-Entry Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Benie B.

    2013-01-01

    While the GI bill after WWII encouraged education for the older students, the combination of baby boomers and the rise of feminism have prompted a new wave of returning students to academia. The nontraditional student since the 1970s has often been an older female returning for a graduate degree. Making the decision to return has not been easy,…

  15. Barriers to Effective Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, Jack E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the following barriers which interfere with listening efficiency: content, speaker, medium, distractions, mindset, language, listening speed, and feedback. Suggests ways to combat these obstacles to accurate comprehension. (MM)

  16. Competition between surface barriers and bulk pinning in a Nd2-xCexCuO4-y single crystal down to T/Tc=0.02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isothermal dc magnetization measurements with the magnetic field applied parallel to the tetragonal c axis were made on an overdoped Nd2-xCexCuO4-y single crystal with a superconducting critical temperature Tc∼19 K down to a reduced temperature T/Tc∼0.02, an order of magnitude lower than values reported to date. The measurements revealed a pronounced 'peak effect' anomaly in the irreversible part of the magnetization loop in which the magnetic field at which the peak occurs increases linearly with decreasing temperature down to T/Tc∼0.05. The field where flux initially penetrates the sample increases exponentially as T→0 due to surface barriers, obscuring the features of the peak anomaly at low temperatures. The irreversibility field follows a power law down to T/Tc∼0.2 and deviates from the power law at low temperatures, again indicative of surface barriers. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility and Competitive Advantage: Overcoming the Trust Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Shuili; C.B. Bhattacharya; Sen, Sankar

    2011-01-01

    This research builds on the complementary corporate social responsibility (CSR) literatures in strategy and marketing to provide insight into the efficacy of CSR as a challenger's competitive weapon against a market leader. Through an investigation of a real-world CSR initiative, we show that the challenger can reap superior business returns (i.e., more positive attitudinal and behavioral outcomes) among consumers who had participated in its CSR initiative, relative to those who were merely a...

  18. Transcriptomic profiling revealed the signatures of intestinal barrier alteration and pathogen entry in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) following Vibrio anguillarum challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chengbin; Fu, Qiang; Su, Baofeng; Zhou, Shun; Liu, Fengqiao; Song, Lin; Zhang, Min; Ren, Yichao; Dong, Xiaoyu; Tan, Fenghua; Li, Chao

    2016-12-01

    The mucosal immune system serves as the frontline barriers of host defense against pathogen infection, especially for the fishes, which are living in the pathogen rich aquatic environment. The intestine constitutes the largest surface body area in constantly contact with the external pathogens, and plays a vital role in the immune defense against inflammation and pathogen infection. Previous studies have revealed that fish intestine might serves as the portal of entry for Vibrio anguillarum. To characterize the immune actors and their associated immune activities in turbot intestine barrier during bacterial infection, here we examined the gene expression profiles of turbot intestine at three time points following experimental infection with V. anguillarum utilizing RNA-seq technology. A total of 122 million reads were assembled into 183,101 contigs with an average length of 1151 bp and the N50 size of 2302 bp. Analysis of differential gene expression between control and infected samples at 1 h, 4 h, and 12 h revealed 2079 significantly expressed genes. Enrichment and pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes showed the centrality of the pathogen attachment and recognition, antioxidant/apoptosis, mucus barrier modification and immune activation/inflammation in the pathogen entry and host immune responses. The present study reported the novel gene expression patterns in turbot mucosal immunity, which were overlooked in previous studies. Our results can help to understand the mechanisms of turbot host defense, and may also provide foundation to identify the biomarkers for future selection of disease-resistant broodstock and evaluation of disease prevention and treatment options. PMID:27431928

  19. 78 FR 38069 - Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... Register on February 6, 2012 (77 FR 5681), promulgated the regulation to establish Global Entry as an... FR 17492.) Travelers who wish to participate in Global Entry must apply via the CBP Global Entry Web... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports AGENCY:...

  20. Business Strategy and Perceived Benefits of Internet Banking: Their Impact on Banks' Strategic Responses to China's Entry to WTO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春红; 江静; 李杰

    2003-01-01

    With the entry to WRO and development of IT, banks in China are adjusting their competitive strategies to meet the competition. Internet banking has become a kind of strategic choice to response to the entry to WTO. Based on relevantly selective reviews of literature of strategy theory and research, a model is developed to study banks' strategic response to entry to WTO. According to a survey of 192 sets of questionnaires, this study finds that external pressure, business strategy and perceived benefits of Internet banking would influence banks' perceived increase in Internet banking investment. And banks'perceived increase in Internet banking investment has no difference between big banks and small banks.

  1. The effects of financial liberalization and new bank entry on market structure and competition in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Denizer, Cevdet

    1997-01-01

    Until 1980 Turkey's financial system was shaped to support state-oriented development. After the 1960s the financial system, dominated by commercial banks, became an instrument of planned industrialization. Turkey had an uncompetitive financial market and an inefficient banking system. Controlled interest rates, directed credit, high reserve requirements and other restrictions on financial intermediation, and restricted entry of new banks -plus the exit of many banks between 1960 and 1980- cr...

  2. Restructuring and Barriers: Cross-Country Evidence on the Competitiveness of Exporters in Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heri Bezic

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of exporters attracts the attention of researchers andpolicy makers interested in the competitiveness of their economies.Through participation on the international market, domestic firms cangenerate foreign exchange needed to pay for imports and learn aboutnew technologies which can be used at home to improve the overallcompetitiveness of their industries. The paper develops a model inwhich the ability of firms from transition economies to compete on theinternational market is defined as a function of their activities, characteristicsand features of their environment. The results of our researchindicate that sunk costs of entry, technology transfer, innovations andcompetition play an important role for the decision of firms to export,while once they are on the international market cost advantages becomemore important.

  3. How (not) to measure competition

    OpenAIRE

    Boone, J.; van Ours, J.C.; Wiel, H.P. van der

    2007-01-01

    We discuss and apply a new measure of competition: the elasticity of a firm's profits with respect to its cost level. A higher value of this profit elasticity (PE) signals more intense competition. Using firm level data we compare PE with the most popular competition measures such as the price cost margin (PCM). We show that PE and PCM are highly correlated on average. However, PCM tends to misrepresent the development of competition over time in markets with few firms and high concentration,...

  4. Cournot Competition and Hit-and-Run Entry and Exit in a Teaching Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachter, Simon; Thoni, Christian; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    2006-01-01

    Instructors can use a computerized experiment to introduce students to imperfect competition in courses on introductory economics, industrial organization, game theory, and strategy and management. In addition to introducing students to strategic thinking in general, the experiment serves to demonstrate that profits of a firm fall as the number of…

  5. 31 CFR 337.6 - Conversions to book-entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conversions to book-entry. 337.6... HOUSING ADMINISTRATION DEBENTURES Certificated Debentures § 337.6 Conversions to book-entry. Upon implementation of the book-entry debenture system, to be announced in advance by separate public notice, all...

  6. Cournot Competition and Hit-and-Run Entry and Exit in a Teaching Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Gaechter, Simon; Thoeni, Christian; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    2006-01-01

    We describe a computerized experiment which can be used to introduce students to imperfect competition in courses on introductory economics, industrial organization, game theory, and strategy & management. In addition to introducing students to strategic thinking in general, the experiment serves to demonstrate that firm profits fall as the number of competitors is increased in a market, and that firms enter profitable markets. The authors have used the experiment in undergraduate classes on ...

  7. 77 FR 17492 - Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... selection process, and the initial airport locations. See 77 FR 5681 and 8 CFR 235.12. Travelers who wish to... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports AGENCY: U.S... as Global Entry, at twenty major U.S. airports. Global Entry allows pre-approved,...

  8. Evaluation and Analysis of the Strategies of Food Products Entry to Foreign Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hamidreza rezvani

    2011-12-01

    Over the last decade, foreign market entry has continued to play a critical role in global economic development. Because of dynamics and complexity of entry modes and the influences of many variables, decision making on selection of international market entry strategies is a difficult task. Therefore, it is necessary to identify the strategic variables determining foreign market entry strategies. In every study, a different set of variables and findings has entered, which are often inconsistent. Hence, this study intends to identify the factors affecting selection of foreign market entry strategies and their influences on the selection. For this purpose, the content and types of foreign market entry strategies have been introduced by studying relevant literature. These strategies have been then divided into three main categories of export strategies, non-export strategies, and intermediate strategies. Then, the factors that make effect on selection of these strategies have been identified and classified. Finally, all factors are used to form two separate structural equation models (SEMs based on the theory of Strategic Reference Points and respectively it has been explained that how foreign entry strategies are chosen according to these reference points. To support this explanation empirically, 42 export companies of food industry have been studied in Mazandaran. SPSS18, MINITAB15, and AMOS18 have been used for analyzing and testing the research hypotheses. Findings imply that uncertainty of host country, uncertainty of product market, competitive uncertainty, uncertainty of partner behavior, international experience, technical knowledge, marketing skills, total investment, competitive intensity, nature of foreign activity, attractiveness of location and business relatedness affect selecting foreign market entry strategies. Moreover, with our SEMs, Attractiveness of location, language diversity and uncertainty of the host country are proved to be good manifests of

  9. Exploring limits to market-based reform: managed competition and rehabilitation home care services in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Glen E; Williams, A Paul

    2006-04-01

    The rise of neo-liberalism, which suggests that only markets can deliver maximum economic efficiency, has been a driving force behind the trend towards using market-based solutions to correct health care problems. However, the broad application of market-based reforms has tended to assume the presence of fully functioning markets. When there are barriers to markets functioning effectively, such as the absence of adequate competition, recourse to market-based solutions can be expected to produce less than satisfactory, if not paradoxical results. One such case is rehabilitation homecare in Ontario, Canada. In 1996, a "managed competition" model was introduced as part of a province-wide reform of home care in an attempt to encourage high quality at competitive prices. However, in the case of rehabilitation home care services, significant obstacles to achieving effective competition existed. Notably, there were few private provider agencies to bid on contracts due to the low volume and specialized nature of services. There were also structural barriers such as the presence of unionized employees and obstacles to the entry of new providers. This paper evaluates the impact of Ontario's managed competition reform on community-based rehabilitation services. It draws on data obtained through 49 in-depth key informant interviews and a telephone survey of home care coordinating agencies and private rehabilitation provider agencies. Instead of reducing costs and improving quality, as the political rhetoric promised, the analysis suggests that providing rehabilitation homecare services under managed competition resulted in higher per-visit costs and reduced access to services. These findings support the contention that there are limits to market-based reforms. PMID:16198035

  10. How (Not) to Measure Competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; van Ours, J.C.; van der Wiel, H.P.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a new measure of competition: the elasticity of a firm’s profits with respect to its cost level. A higher value of this profit elasticity (PE) signals more intense competi- tion. Using firm-level data we compare PE with the most popular competition measures such as the price cost margin

  11. Cournot competition, contestability, and hit-and-run entry and exit in a teaching experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gächter, Simon; Thöni, Christian; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    2006-01-01

    to demonstrate that profits of a firm fall as the number of competitors is increased in a market and that firms enter profitable markets. The authors have used the experiment in undergraduate classes on strategy and management as well as in master of business administration courses with great success......Instructors can use a computerized experiment to introduce students to imperfect competition in courses on introductory economics, industrial organization, game theory, and strategy and management. In addition to introducing students to strategic thinking in general, the experiment serves...

  12. Barriers to Women in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    The Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales, Rosemary Butler AM, has put the issue of barriers to women in public life at the top of the political agenda in Wales. She has held sessions with women across Wales to find out what those barriers are and how they can be tackled. On International Women's Day in February, she invited…

  13. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  14. Structure-based design, synthesis and validation of CD4-mimetic small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry: conversion of a viral entry agonist to an antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courter, Joel R; Madani, Navid; Sodroski, Joseph; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Kwong, Peter D; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Chaiken, Irwin M; LaLonde, Judith M; Smith, Amos B

    2014-04-15

    This Account provides an overview of a multidisciplinary consortium focused on structure-based strategies to devise small molecule antagonists of HIV-1 entry into human T-cells, which if successful would hold considerable promise for the development of prophylactic modalities to prevent HIV transmission and thereby alter the course of the AIDS pandemic. Entry of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) into target T-cells entails an interaction between CD4 on the host T-cell and gp120, a component of the trimeric envelope glycoprotein spike on the virion surface. The resultant interaction initiates a series of conformational changes within the envelope spike that permits binding to a chemokine receptor, formation of the gp41 fusion complex, and cell entry. A hydrophobic cavity at the CD4-gp120 interface, defined by X-ray crystallography, provided an initial site for small molecule antagonist design. This site however has evolved to facilitate viral entry. As such, the binding of prospective small molecule inhibitors within this gp120 cavity can inadvertently trigger an allosteric entry signal. Structural characterization of the CD4-gp120 interface, which provided the foundation for small molecule structure-based inhibitor design, will be presented first. An integrated approach combining biochemical, virological, structural, computational, and synthetic studies, along with a detailed analysis of ligand binding energetics, revealed that modestly active small molecule inhibitors of HIV entry can also promote viral entry into cells lacking the CD4 receptor protein; these competitive inhibitors were termed small molecule CD4 mimetics. Related congeners were subsequently identified with both improved binding affinity and more potent viral entry inhibition. Further assessment of the affinity-enhanced small molecule CD4 mimetics demonstrated that premature initiation of conformational change within the viral envelope spike, prior to cell encounter, can lead to irreversible

  15. Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Boone, J.

    2000-01-01

    Competition has been modelled in the literature in a number of ways.What do these different parametrizations of competition have in common?For instance, it turns out that it is not always the case that a rise in competition reduces price cost margins, industry wide profits or concentration.All parametrizations of competition, considered here, have two features in common.First, the reallocation effect: a rise in competition raises the profits of a firm relative to the profits of a less efficie...

  16. NEW APPROACHES TO EXPORT COMPETITIVENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Alina Petronela NEGREA

    2015-01-01

    The economic literature and the political discourse typically look at international competitiveness mainly by the means of export market shares. However, globalisation, production fragmentation and the growing importance of global value chains (GVCs) increasingly challenge traditional approaches of export competitiveness and call for a more accurate and disaggregated level of analysis. Due to the growing fragmentation of production, a country exports now include a significant amount of import...

  17. Competition between social and private landlords: Exploring landlords’ perceptions of rivalry and the barriers to a rivalrous relationship in local housing markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lennartz, C.

    2011-01-01

    Governments in many countries have required social housing providers to operate more marketorientated and engage in commercial activities. Conversely, public authorities in some countries have tried to strengthen the role of the private rental sector in the provision of housing for lowincome househo

  18. Dental hygienists' perceptions of barriers to graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Linda D; Bailey, Angela

    2011-08-01

    To advance the profession of dental hygiene, graduate education is necessary to support growth in research, education, administration, and practice in the discipline and to sustain credibility in a climate in which other health professions require entry-level master's and doctoral degrees. The purpose of this study was to explore what dental hygienists perceive as barriers to pursuing a graduate degree. A survey was developed based on the literature and other national surveys. Data were collected from 160 respondents to the survey: 50 percent held an entry-level baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene, while the rest held an entry-level associate degree (48 percent) or certificate (2 percent) in dental hygiene. All respondents had completed a bachelor's degree. The top five barriers these respondents identified in pursuing graduate education were as follows: 1) cost of graduate education, 2) family responsibilities are too great, 3) concerns about personal funding to pay for graduate education, 4) finding time for graduate school while working, and 5) fear of thesis research. Dental hygiene is one of the few health professions that still have entry-level degrees at the associate and baccalaureate levels. The profession needs to reduce such barriers to enable dental hygienists to pursue graduate education and thus ensure an adequate supply of future leaders, educators, and researchers. PMID:21828296

  19. Mobility Barriers and the Socially Differentiated Effects of Food Marketing Liberalization in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, Christopher B.

    1996-01-01

    Decontrol of commercial food marketing channels was widely expected to induce massive trader entry and engender more competitive, efficient markets in Africa. Despite strong empirical evidence of trader entry, enterprise expansion is proving difficult and many market observers and participants claim market power continues, ifperhaps exercised now by private traders instead of public enterprises. This paper uses the industrial organization concept of mobility barriers to confront this puzzle o...

  20. Competition and Market Dynamics on the Russian Deposits Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P-H. Admiraal (Piet-Hein); M.A. Carree (Martin)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn the early transition era in Russia entry barriers for commercial banks were about absent. It resulted in the mushrooming of hundreds of small, poorly-endowed and inexperienced banks. In this paper we address the question whether the claimed benefits of low entry barriers - competition

  1. How Do Hospitals Respond to Market Entry? Evidence from a Deregulated Market for Cardiac Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suhui; Dor, Avi

    2015-08-01

    Regulatory entry barriers to hospital service markets, namely Certificate of Need (CON) regulations, are enforced in many US states. Policy makers in other states are considering reinstating CON policies in tandem with service expansions mandated under the Affordable Care Act. Although previous studies examined the volume effects of CON, demand responses to actual entry into local hospital markets are not well understood. In this paper, we empirically examine the demand-augmenting, demand-redistribution, and risk-allocation effects of hospital entry by studying the cardiac revascularization markets in Pennsylvania, a state in which dynamic market entry occurred after repeal of CON in 1996. Results from interrupted time-series analyses indicate demand-augmenting effects for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and business-stealing effects for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures: high entrant market share mitigated the declining incidence of CABG, but it had no significant effect on the rising trend in PCI use, among patients with coronary artery disease. We further find evidence that entry by new cardiac surgery centers tended to sort high-severity patients into the more invasive CABG procedure and low-severity patients into the less invasive PCI procedures. These findings underscore the importance of considering market-level strategic responses by hospitals when regulatory barriers are rescinded.

  2. Opportunities and barriers to straw construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Caroline Meyer; Howard, Thomas J.; Lenau, Torben Anker

    2012-01-01

    solution for these demands, while also offering the opportunity for very financially competitive solutions, it is of interest to determine their appropriateness in the design phase of a building. Through a study carried out by means of a review of the current state of the-art literature on straw...... construction, and a series of qualitative interviews with a variety of stakeholders from previous straw build housing projects, results were gathered to find the most influential motives, barriers and considerations for straw build housing construction. Based on this empirical data, a design guide has been...... dealt with and thus perceived as a barrier to straw build, rather than simply a problem of a general character....

  3. Phobetor: Princeton University's entry in the 2010 Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Joshua; Zhu, Han; Partridge, Brenton A.; Szocs, Laszlo J.; Abiola, Solomon O.; Corey, Ryan M.; Suresh, Srinivasan A.; Yu, Derrick D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present Phobetor, an autonomous outdoor vehicle originally designed for the 2010 Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC). We describe new vision and navigation systems that have yielded 3x increase in obstacle detection speed using parallel processing and robust lane detection results. Phobetor also uses probabilistic local mapping to learn about its environment and Anytime Dynamic A* (AD*) to plan paths to reach its goals. Our vision software is based on color stereo images and uses robust, RANSAC-based algorithms while running fast enough to support real-time autonomous navigation on uneven terrain. AD* allows Phobetor to respond quickly in all situations even when optimal planning takes more time, and uses incremental replanning to increase search efficiency. We augment the cost map of the environment with a potential field which addresses the problem of "wall-hugging" and smoothes generated paths to allow safe and reliable path-following. In summary, we present innovations on Phobetor that are relevant to real-world robotics platforms in uncertain environments.

  4. Endogenous, Imperfectly Competitive Business Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitta-Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen

    We investigate how imperfect competition affects the occurrence and the properties of endogenous, rational expectations business cycles in an overlapping generations model with constant returns to scale in production. The model has explicit product and labor markets all characterized...... by monopolistic competition. An implicit assumption of barriers to entry justifies that the number of firms is fixed even when positive profits occur. It turns out that both market power of firms on the product markets and market power of unions on the labor markets make the occurrence of cycles more likely....... In particular, imperfect competition on the product markets and the positive profits associated with it may have the effect that there is a cycle even if the labor supply curve is increasing in the real-wage rate. For competitive cycles is required not only a decreasing labor supply curve, but a wage elasticity...

  5. Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, D W

    1997-01-01

    Our ambivalence toward competition can be traced to an unspoken preference for certain types of competition which give us an advantage over the types we value less. Four types are defined (a) pure (same rules, same objectives), (b) collaborative (same rules, shared objective), (c) market share (different rules, same objectives), and (d) market growth (different rules, value added orientation). The defining characteristics of the four types of competition are respectively: needing a referee, arguing over the spoils, differentiation and substitutability, and customer focus. Dentistry has features of all four types of competition, thus making it difficult to have a meaningful discussion or frame a coherent policy on this topic.

  6. NEW APPROACHES TO EXPORT COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Petronela NEGREA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The economic literature and the political discourse typically look at international competitiveness mainly by the means of export market shares. However, globalisation, production fragmentation and the growing importance of global value chains (GVCs increasingly challenge traditional approaches of export competitiveness and call for a more accurate and disaggregated level of analysis. Due to the growing fragmentation of production, a country exports now include a significant amount of imports of intermediate goods which are part of the export value. In this case, a simple analysis of the evolution of exports can distort the international competitive position of a country. The article suggests a new approach based on the value-added content of international trade measured by means of global value chain analysis.

  7. RENEWABLE ENERGY, A KEY TO INTEGRATING COMPETITIVE POLICIES WITH ADVANCED ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinade Lucian Ovidiu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of competitive policies and improvement of environment protection strategies are two basic trends of the development of the European Unique Market. Energy, also known as 'industry bread', is basic product and strategic resource, where energy industry plays an obvious role in the economic and social development of any community. Traditional energy production is marred by three major drawbacks: it generates negative externalities by polluting; it is totally in the hands of the producers; hence, prices rise at their will, of fossil fuels such as oil and gas. Present study focuses on electric energy industry, yet bearing over the whole length of the chain producer-to-end-consumer, thus revealed as particularly complex. The question is do alternative energy sources meet the prerequisite of market being competitive meanwhile environment protection being highly observed. We identify limits in point, of the energy market; effects of market liberalization; entry barriers; interchangeability level of energy sources; active forces on the energy market. Competitive rivalry has been expressed as per market micro-economic analysis, based on Michael Porter's 5-forces model. It will thus be noticed that, morphologically, competition evolution depends firstly on the market type. For the time being, the consumer on the energy market stays captive, for various reasons such as: legislation; limits of energy transfer infrastructure; scarcity of resources; resources availability imbalance; no integrative strategy available, of renewable energy resources usage. Energy availability is vital for human society to function. Comparative advantages of renewable energy resources are twofold, as manifested: in terms of economics, i.e. improving competition by substitute products entered at the same time as new producers enter market; and in terms of ecology, by reducing CO2 emissions. As to energy production technology and transfer, the complementary nature will

  8. Competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Bridoux

    2014-01-01

    Competition traditionally refers to the actions that firms take in a product market to outperform rivals in attracting customers and generating revenues. Yet, competition extends beyond product markets to other arenas such as factor markets, where firms compete for resources, and the political arena

  9. Hershey’s Entry to the Australian Market with a New Brand: An Accounting and Marketing Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Cevdet Kızıl; Valorie Eddy; Laura Clary; Katrina Crowell

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the entry of Hershey’s Chocolates Company tothe Australian market with a new brand. For this purpose, background information and key performance indicators about the firm are presented. Also target customers and market summary, market demographics and target customer profile of the firm are mentioned in the context of situational analysis. Then,Hershey’s entry to the Australian market with a new product is proposed by providing and commenting on SWOT analysis, competition...

  10. Entry Threat and Entry Deterrence: The Timing of Broadband Rollout

    OpenAIRE

    Mo Xiao; Orazem, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    Past empirical literature provides strong evidence that competition increases when new firms enter a market. However, rarely have economists been able to examine how competition changes with the threat of entry. This paper uses the evolution of the zip code level market structure of facilities-based broadband providers from 1999 to 2004 to investigate how a firm adjusts its entry strategy when facing the threat of additional entrants. We identify the potential entrant into a local market as t...

  11. Evaluation and Analysis of the Strategies of Food Products Entry to Foreign Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Rezvani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, foreign market entry has continued to play a critical role in global economic development. Because of dynamics and complexity of entry modes and the influences of many variables, decision making on selection of international market entry strategies is a difficult task. Therefore, it is necessary to identify the strategic variables determining foreign market entry strategies. In every study, a different set of variables and findings has entered, which are often inconsistent. Hence, this study intends to identify the factors affecting selection of foreign market entry strategies and their influences on the selection. For this purpose, the content and types of foreign market entry strategies have been introduced by studying relevant literature. These strategies have been then divided into three main categories of export strategies, non-export strategies, and intermediate strategies. Then, the factors that make effect on selection of these strategies have been identified and classified. Finally, all factors are used to form two separate structural equation models (SEMs based on the theory of Strategic Reference Points and respectively it has been explained that how foreign entry strategies are chosen according to these reference points. To support this explanation empirically, 42 export companies of food industry have been studied in Mazandaran. SPSS18, MINITAB15, and AMOS18 have been used for analyzing and testing the research hypotheses. Findings imply that uncertainty of host country, uncertainty of product market, competitive uncertainty, uncertainty of partner behavior, international experience, technical knowledge, marketing skills, total investment, competitive intensity, nature of foreign activity, attractiveness of location and business relatedness affect selecting foreign market entry strategies. Moreover, with our SEMs, Attractiveness of location, language diversity and uncertainty of the host country are proved to

  12. Barriers to Employment for Welfare Recipients: The Role of Race/Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, John A.; Harris, Randall D.

    2001-01-01

    A study examined barriers to employment faced by 4,014 welfare recipients in Merced County, California. Ethnic groups differed in the importance of various barriers to workforce entry: educational attainment; family composition; and lack of work experience, vocational training, English language fluency, a vehicle, or driver's license. Asians,…

  13. The Solution to Green Barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Yan

    2009-01-01

    @@ The recovery process of world economy is rough and full of twists and turns.Especially the trade protectionism,having reemerged under the mask of"green barrier",is making a great impact on the slowly recovering world economy and trade.Then,what are the characteristics of trade barriers in the post-crisis era?Where is the outlet of Chinese manufacturing industry?With these questions,ourreporter interviewed Professor Zhou Shijian,Standing Director to China Association of International Trade and Senior Researcher to SINO-US Relationship Research Centre of Tsinghua University.

  14. Communities Address Barriers to Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Anne

    1996-01-01

    Rural areas lag behind urban areas in access to information technologies. Public institutions play a critical role in extending the benefits of information technologies to those who would not otherwise have access. The most successful rural telecommunications plans address barriers to use, such as unawareness of the benefits, technophobia, the…

  15. Barriers to Innovation among Iranian SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminreza Kamalian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of innovation in organizations' competitiveness is an undeniable fact. Innovations reflect a critical way in which organizations respond to either technological or market challenges. Small and Medium sized enterprises (SMEs constitute 94% of Iranian firms. According to Iran statistic website the value added of 94% of Iranian firms is just about 10% of the whole value added in country. This study assumes the lag of innovation is the reason of uncompetitive nature of Iranian SMEs. This study reports on the results of a study that examined barriers to firms’ innovation among a sample of 86 managers of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs in Iran. Findings of the study show that the most significant barriers are associated with costs, whereas the least significant are associated with lag of information. The survey results show that Iranian SMSs are not collaborating with universities and higher education institutions; they do not see university as a main source of information. Then it is not a surprising point that 29.0% unemployment rate is reported in 2009 however 50% of studied SMEs reported lack of skilled labour as a barrier to innovation.

  16. Federal Barriers to Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Raegen; Lake, Robin

    2012-01-01

    With educational outcomes inadequate, resources tight, and students' academic needs growing more complex, America's education system is certainly ready for technological innovation. And technology itself is ripe to be exploited. Devices harnessing cheap computing power have become smart and connected. Voice recognition, artificial intelligence,…

  17. Graduate entry to medicine in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashidian Arash

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds In Iran medical students are selected from high school graduates via a very competitive national university entrance exam. New proposals have been seriously considered for admitting students from those with bachelor degrees. We assessed the opinions of different stakeholders on the current situation of admission into medicine in Iran, and their views on positive and negative aspects of admitting graduates into medicine. Methods We conducted five focus group discussions and seven in-depth interviews with stakeholders including medical students, science students, university professors of basic sciences, medical education experts, and policy makers. Main themes were identified from the data and analyzed using content analysis approach. Results Medical students believed "graduate admission" may lead to a more informed choice of medicine. They thought it could result in admission of students with lower levels of academic aptitude. The science students were in favor of "graduate admission". The education experts and the professors of basic science all mentioned the shortcomings of the current system of admission and considered "graduate admission" as an appropriate opportunity for correcting some of the shortcomings. The policy makers pointed out the potential positive influences of "graduate admission" on strengthening basic science research. They thought, however, that "graduate admission" may result in lengthening the overall duration of medical education, which is already long in Iran (over 7 years. On the whole, the participants thought that "graduate admission" is a step in the right direction for improving quality of medical education. Conclusion "Graduate admission" has the potential to correct some of shortcomings of medical education. Unlike other countries where "graduate admission" is used mainly to admit students who are mentally mature, in Iran the main objective seems to be strengthening basic sciences.

  18. The effects of market structure and payment rate on the entry of private health plans into the Medicare market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakt, Austin B; Pizer, Steven D; Feldman, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Private insurance firms participating in Medicare can offer up to three principal plan types: coordinated care plans (CCPs), prescription drug plans (PDPs), and private fee-for-service (PFFS) plans. Firms can make entry and marketing decisions separately across plan types and geographic regions. In this study, we estimate firm-level models of Medicare private plan entry using data from the years 2007 to 2009. Our models include a measure of market structure and separately identify CCP, PDP, and PFFS entry. We find evidence that entry barriers associated with CCP market concentration affect all three product types. We also find evidence of cross-product competition and common cost or demand factors that make entry with certain product combinations more likely. We predict that the market presence of CCPs and PFFS plans will decrease and that of PDPs will increase in response to payment reductions included in the new health reform law.

  19. Overcome barriers to career success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raudsepp, E.

    1983-04-01

    A test is given to determine if an engineer suffers from one of the three barriers to technical success: fear of success, fear of failure, or perfectionism. As in most such tests, the middle way is best. Successful engineers know that perfection cannot be attained, that they don't have time to worry about failure or success, and that by aiming and perservering in doing things well, success can be achieved.

  20. Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

  1. Endothelial cells are a replicative niche for entry of Toxoplasma gondii to the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konradt, Christoph; Ueno, Norikiyo; Christian, David A; Delong, Jonathan H; Pritchard, Gretchen Harms; Herz, Jasmin; Bzik, David J; Koshy, Anita A; McGavern, Dorian B; Lodoen, Melissa B; Hunter, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    An important function of the blood-brain barrier is to exclude pathogens from the central nervous system, but some microorganisms benefit from the ability to enter this site. It has been proposed that Toxoplasma gondii can cross biological barriers as a motile extracellular form that uses transcellular or paracellular migration, or by infecting a host cell that then crosses the blood-brain barrier. Unexpectedly, analysis of acutely infected mice revealed significant numbers of free parasites in the blood and the presence of infected endothelial cells in the brain vasculature. The use of diverse transgenic parasites combined with reporter mice and intravital imaging demonstrated that replication in and lysis of endothelial cells precedes invasion of the central nervous system, and highlight a novel mechanism for parasite entry to the central nervous system. PMID:27572166

  2. Competitiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minihan, Charles E.

    1991-03-01

    Competition is defined as a spirited, sometimes ruthless, engagement of rivals such as in a race, a match, or an effort by one person to sell goods or services to customers in the marketplace of another. Sound familiar? If you will bear with me for a few minutes, I would like to examine competitiveness on a more global basis with emphasis on the rules of the game. You may be thinking that more often than not the competitive arena is relatively small and far from global, and its consequences are singularly influential on a trivial document called the P & L. However, with the newly established freedom of a major segment of the world population and with the industrial capability formerly known as Communist moving into what has heretofore been "our" limited arena, the competition could get very brisk. Brisk, and perhaps ruthless, unless we work together to try to establish an international industrial policy that is truly based on equality of competitive opportunity for all.

  3. Barriers to Physical Activity Among Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Miranda A; Brittain, Danielle R; Dinger, Mary K; Ford, Melissa L; Cain, Meagan; Sharp, Teresa A

    2016-09-01

    Gay men may not be physically active at recommended levels to achieve health benefits. Thus, a need exists to identify general (i.e., common across populations) and population-specific barriers that hinder or stop gay men from participating in physical activity (PA). Salient barriers may be identified through the extent each barrier limits PA (i.e., barrier limitation) and the level of one's confidence to overcome barriers and engage in PA (i.e., self-regulatory efficacy). The purposes of this study were to (1) provide a description of general and population-specific barriers to PA among sufficiently and insufficiently active gay men, (2) identify barrier limitation and self-regulatory efficacy for the reported barriers, and (3) examine the associations between meeting the current PA recommendation, barrier limitation, and self-regulatory efficacy. Participants were 108 self-identified gay males aged 21 to 64 years who completed a web-based survey. A total of 35 general barriers and no population-specific barriers were identified by the sufficiently and insufficiently active groups. The sufficiently active group reported higher self-regulatory efficacy and lower barrier limitation for nearly all reported barriers. A binary logistic regression used to examine the associations between PA, barrier limitation, and self-regulatory efficacy was statistically significant, χ(2)(2, N = 108) = 19.26, p < .0001, R(2) = .16. Only barrier limitation significantly contributed to the model. Future research should continue to examine barriers to PA among gay men to determine whether an intervention needs to be designed specifically for gay men or whether a one-size-fits-all intervention would be effective in helping all men overcome common barriers to engaging in PA. PMID:25643585

  4. Overcoming Barriers to Shared Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... team to break it down. Barriers to shared decision making and solutions to overcome them include: Barrier: Fear, anger, stress or other emotions Solution: Strong emotions can interfere with your ability ...

  5. 基于多期信贷竞争的外资银行进入模式研究%Entry modes of foreign banks in the multi-phase credit competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘彬; 曾勇; 李强

    2012-01-01

    With the full opening-up of the banking industry, foreign banks are allowed to enter the Chinese credit market either through Greenfield investment or by cooperating with the Chinese banks as strategic investors. Under the assumption that the foreign bank has the cost advantage and the domestic bank has the information advantage from old customers and screening, this paper first extends the single-phase credit competition model to the multi-phase, and then studies the entry modes of foreign banks in the multi-phase credit competition. The results show that, unlike that both the information advantage from old customers and screening can affect the equilibrium in the single-phase competition, only the information advantage from screening can affect the multi-phase competition equilibrium. With regard to the entry modes of foreign banks, the results suggest that the information advantage from screening is a barrier to Greenfield investment. Under the policy that foreign banks can only become minority shareholders of domestic banks, a foreign bank will tend to buy the share of the domestic bank with screening in order to eliminate the information disadvantage, and thus the policy can protect the weaker domestic bank from merging.%银行业全面开放后,外资银行可以绿地投资或作为本地银行的战略投资者两种模式进入.本文考虑本地银行具有老客户和甄别能力带来的信息优势,外资银行具有信贷成本优势,首先在银行不损失优质老客户利润的竞争规则下,将单期信贷模型扩展到多期,然后利用多期竞争的结论对两种进入模式进行了研究.结论表明:与单期信贷竞争中本地银行信息优势来源于老客户和甄别能力两方面不同,在多期信贷竞争中,本地银行信息优势主要来源于甄别能力,并成为外资银行绿地投资的进入壁垒;在少数股权政策的限制下,为了消除信息劣势,外资银行倾向于入股因拥

  6. Overcoming cultural barriers to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, S; McNulty, D

    1998-01-01

    This article is a case study which focuses on organisational and cultural change associated with the incorporation of a college which provided pre- and post-registration nursing and midwifery education into a much larger institution within the university sector. Among the issues addressed is whether transformational change, such as that represented by incorporation or merger, can be used by managers to successfully refashion the culture of the organisation, making more effective than traditional or discipline-based management structures. It examines the barriers to change and the various considerations that arose in determining the fit of managerial styles and assesses the outcomes of the process of change. PMID:10346302

  7. A Study on Entry Barriers of Chinese Service Industry Based on Extended Orr Model%基于拓展Orr模型的中国服务业进入壁垒研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵骏; 张捷

    2015-01-01

    The entry barriers of Chinese service industry consist of institutional environment, factor cost and governmental intervention.This paper uses extended Orr model to empirically test the effects of the above entry barriers on entry rate of 40 Chinese 2-digit service industries.The empirical results show that, the growth of entry rate of service industries is significantly promoted by releasing the regulation of entry access based on administrative approval system, meanwhile, it is obstructed by tax burden, capital intensity, R&D investment and overwhelming revenue and capital proportion of state-owned economy.Especially, higher requirement for human capital and R&D investment significantly impedes outside entry activities in knowledge-and technology-intensive service industries.%从制度环境质量、要素使用特征以及政府干预等方面探讨了中国服务业进入壁垒的形成机理,并利用拓展Orr模型实证检验进入壁垒对中国2008年40个二位数服务行业进入率的影响。结果表明:依托行政审批制度的行业准入管制的放松有利于提高服务业进入率,但税收负担、资产规模和研发投入构成显著的进入壁垒,其中知识和技术密集型服务业对人力资本和研发投入的要求更高;政府干预形成的进入壁垒主要表现在国有企业庞大的营业额和资产规模上。

  8. Identifying barriers to billing compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorence, Daniel P; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Awad

    2003-01-01

    Programs designed toward the control of health care fraud are leading to increasingly aggressive enforcement and prosecutorial efforts by federal regulators, related to over-reimbursement for service providers. Greater penalties for fraudulent practices have been touted as an effective deterrent to practices that encourage, or fail to prevent, incorrect claims for reimbursement. In such a context, this study sought to examine the extent of compliance management barriers through a national survey of all accredited US health information managers, examining likely barriers to payment of health care claims. Using data from a series of surveys on the stated compliance actions of more than 16,000 health care managers, we find that the publication and dissemination of compliance enforcement regulations had a significant effect on the reduction of fraud. Results further suggest that significant non-adoption of proper billing compliance measures continues to occur, despite the existence of counter-fraud prosecution risk designed to enforce proper compliance. Finally, we identify benchmarks of compliance management and show how they vary across demographic, practice setting, and market characteristics. We find significant variation in influence across practice settings and managed care markets. While greater publicity related to proper billing procedures generally leads to greater compliance awareness, this trend may have created pockets of "institutional non-compliance," which result in an increase in the prevalence of non-compliant management actions. As a more general proposition, we find that it is not sufficient to consider compliance actions independent of institutional or industry-wide influences. PMID:12967244

  9. Analysis of interactions among the barriers to JIT production: interpretive structural modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, J. R.; Mantha, S. S.; Rane, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    `Survival of the fittest' is the reality in modern global competition. Organizations around the globe are adopting or willing to embrace just-in-time (JIT) production to reinforce the competitiveness. Even though JIT is the most powerful inventory management methodologies it is not free from barriers. Barriers derail the implementation of JIT production system. One of the most significant tasks of top management is to identify and understand the relationship between the barriers to JIT production for alleviating its bad effects. The aims of this paper are to study the barriers hampering the implementation of successful JIT production and analysing the interactions among the barriers using interpretive structural modelling technique. Twelve barriers have been identified after reviewing literature. This paper offers a roadmap for preparing an action plan to tackle the barriers in successful implementation of JIT production.

  10. Regulatory and Non-Regulatory Barriers which Limit the Entry of International Telecommunication Service Companies into Asian Markets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper compares the development of telecom regulation andderegulation between some typical Asian countries, and analyzes the telecom regulatory systems and industrial organizations of China. This paper also investigates the approaches and strategies of Asian countries to reduce the regulation, reinforce the competition and establish efficient telecom industries. Having examined the Asian telecommunication markets, the paper attempts to apply the lessons learned from the opening of the telecoms markets of the developed economies. Finally the paper contends that if Asian economies wish to have nationally based companies, state or private enterprises, in a competitive postion, the format of the implementation of the WTO/GATS basic telecoms agreement should be carefully examined.

  11. Barriers to medical error reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Poorolajal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to explore the prevalence of medical error underreporting and associated barriers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed from September to December 2012. Five hospitals, affiliated with Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, in Hamedan,Iran were investigated. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Participants consisted of physicians, nurses, midwives, residents, interns, and staffs of radiology and laboratory departments. Results: Overall, 50.26% of subjects had committed but not reported medical errors. The main reasons mentioned for underreporting were lack of effective medical error reporting system (60.0%, lack of proper reporting form (51.8%, lack of peer supporting a person who has committed an error (56.0%, and lack of personal attention to the importance of medical errors (62.9%. The rate of committing medical errors was higher in men (71.4%, age of 50-40 years (67.6%, less-experienced personnel (58.7%, educational level of MSc (87.5%, and staff of radiology department (88.9%. Conclusions: This study outlined the main barriers to reporting medical errors and associated factors that may be helpful for healthcare organizations in improving medical error reporting as an essential component for patient safety enhancement.

  12. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography…

  13. Market barriers to welfare product innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnekamp, M.H.A.; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    New products that are based on higher animal welfare standards encounter several barriers on the road to market acceptance. The authors focus on the Dutch poultry sector and distinguish between retailer and consumer barriers. Retailer barriers include the powerful position of retailers, the price co

  14. Entry, Competition, and Regulation in Cognitive Radio Scenarios: A Simple Game Theory Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guijarro

    2012-01-01

    operators and the subscription decision by users is proposed. We conclude that an entrant operator adopting an innovative technology is better off entering the market, and that a regulatory authority should intervene first allowing the entrant operator to enter the market and then setting a maximum amount of spectrum leased. This regulatory intervention is justified in terms of users utility and social welfare.

  15. Barriers to Business Model Innovation in Swedish Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof Sivertsson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Swedish agricultural companies, especially small farms, are struggling to be profitable in difficult economic times. It is a challenge for Swedish farmers to compete with imported products on prices. The agricultural industry, however, supports the view that through business model innovation, farms can increase their competitive advantage. This paper identifies and describes some of the barriers Swedish small farms encounter when they consider business model innovation. A qualitative approach is used in the study. Agriculture business consultants were interviewed. In a focus group led by the researchers, farmers discussed business model innovation, including the exogenous and endogenous barriers to such innovation. The paper concludes many barriers exist when farmers consider innovation of agricultural business models. Some barriers are caused by human factors, such as individuals’ attitudes, histories, and traditions. Other barriers are more contextual in nature and relate to a particular industry or company setting. Still other barriers, such as government regulations, value chain position, and weather, are more abstract. All barriers, however, merit attention when Swedish agricultural companies develop new business models.

  16. Late entry to antenatal care in New South Wales, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin George

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims This study aimed to assess the prevalence of women who entered antenatal care (ANC late and to identify factors related to the late entry to ANC in New South Wales (NSW in 2004. Methods The NSW Midwives Data Collection contained data of 85,034 women who gave birth in 2004. Data were downloaded using SAS and transferred to STATA 8.0. Entering ANC after 12 weeks of gestation was classified as late. The Andersen Health Seeking Behaviour Model was used for selection and analyses of related factors. Regression and hierarchical analyses were used to identify significant factors and their relative contributions to the variation of pregnancy duration at entry to ANC. Results 41% of women commenced ANC after 12 weeks of gestation. Inequality existed between groups of women with predisposing characteristics and enabling resources contributed more to the variation in pregnancy duration at entry to ANC than needs. The groups of women with highest risk were teenagers, migrants from developing countries, women living in Western Sydney, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, women with three or more previous pregnancies and heavy smokers. The high risk groups with largest number of women were migrants from developing countries and women living in Western Sydney. Conclusion A large number of women in NSW entered ANC late in their pregnancies. Efforts to increase early entry to ANC should be targeted on identified high risk groups of women.

  17. The Formation of Wenzhou Footwear Clusters: How Were the Entry Barriers Overcome?

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Zuhui; Zhang, Xiaobo; Zhu, Yunwei

    2006-01-01

    Wenzhou used to be one of the poorest regions in eastern China. With limited arable land, poor road access to major cities, and little support from the government, it seemed to lack all the necessary conditions for economic growth according to the standard textbook. However, over the past several decades, Wenzhou has achieved one of the fastest growing rates and owned the most dynamic private sector in China. The footwear industry in particular has grown from a negligible place to the largest...

  18. Thresholds to access the market for small-scale energy consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entry of and options for expansion are import aspects for a well-functioning free market. The Netherlands Competition Authority (NMa)/The Office of Energy Regulation (DTe/Energiekamer) received signals that there are barriers for entering or further growth on the small consumer market. The regulator has asked SEO Economic Research to examine which entry barriers are significant and require further monitoring. For this purpose, more than 20 interviews were held with market parties and stakeholders. [mk

  19. 23 CFR 636.404 - Can a competitive range be used to limit competition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a competitive range be used to limit competition... used to limit competition? If the solicitation notifies offerors that the competitive range can be... permit an efficient competition. However, you must provide written notice to any offeror whose...

  20. Competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

      The Staff Association is organising a competition from April 11 to 20. There are several Go Sport gift vouchers with a value of 50 € each to win. Try your luck! To participate, you just have to be a member of the Staff Association and take the online quiz: https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/content/jeu-concours. The winners will be drawn among the correct answers.

  1. Barriers to Business Model Innovation in Swedish Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Olof Sivertsson; Joakim Tell

    2015-01-01

    Swedish agricultural companies, especially small farms, are struggling to be profitable in difficult economic times. It is a challenge for Swedish farmers to compete with imported products on prices. The agricultural industry, however, supports the view that through business model innovation, farms can increase their competitive advantage. This paper identifies and describes some of the barriers Swedish small farms encounter when they consider business model innovation. A qualitative approach...

  2. Graduate entry to medicine: widening psychological diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munro Don

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At Nottingham University more than 95% of entrants to the traditional 5-year medical course are school leavers. Since 2003 we have admitted graduate entrants (GEM to a shortened (4-year course to 'widen access to students from more disadvantaged backgrounds'. We have recently shown that the GEM course widens academic and socio-demographic diversity of the medical student population. This study explored whether GEM students also bring psychological diversity and whether this could be beneficial. Methods We studied: a 217 and 96 applicants to the Nottingham 5- and 4-year courses respectively, applying in the 2002-3 UCAS cycle, and, b 246 school leavers starting the 5-year course and 39 graduate entrants to the 4-year course in October 2003. The psychological profiles of the two groups of applicants and two groups of entrants were compared using their performance in the Goldberg 'Big 5' Personality test, the Personal Qualities Assessment (PQA; measuring interpersonal traits and interpersonal values, and the Lovibond and Lovibond measure of depression, anxiety and stress. For the comparison of the Entrants we excluded the 33 school leavers and seven graduates who took the tests as Applicants. Statistical analyses were undertaken using SPSS software (version 16.0. Results Graduate applicants compared to school leaver applicants were significantly more conscientious, more confident, more self controlled, more communitarian in moral orientation and less anxious. Only one of these differences was preserved in the entrants with graduates being less anxious. However, the graduate entrants were significantly less empathetic and conscientious than the school leavers. Conclusion This study has shown that school leaver and graduate entrants to medical school differ in some psychological characteristics. However, if confirmed in other studies and if they were manifest in the extreme, not all the traits brought by graduates would be

  3. Linking net entry to regional economic growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.F.G. Dejardin (Marcus)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractRegional growth differentials could be explained by how intensively and dynamically new firms of a particular region enter expanding industries. Although the direct contribution of new firms to value creation and growth may be regarded as tautological, the aggregate impacts are largely e

  4. Lowering barriers to engage in innovation: evidence from the Spanish innovation Survey

    OpenAIRE

    D'Este Cukierman, Pablo; Rentocchini, Francesco; Vega Jurado, Jaider

    2010-01-01

    The literature on innovation studies has extensively examined the main drivers of innovation activity, while putting less attention on factors that are crucial in order to foster competition dynamics, as well as to attenuate systemic failures to innovation. This paper aims to filling this gap by distinguishing between firms facing deterring barriers to innovation (i.e. those barriers that deter firms from engaging in innovation activities) and firms confronting revealed barriers (i.e. those b...

  5. Social barriers to pathogen transmission in wild animal populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehle, C.

    1995-03-01

    Diseases and pathogens are receiving increasing recognition as sources of mortality in animal populations. Immune system strength is clearly important in fending off pathogen attack. Physical barriers to pathogen entry are also important. Various individual behaviors are efficacious in reducing contact with diseases and pests. This paper focuses on a fourth mode of defense: social barriers to transmission. Various social behaviors have pathogen transmission consequences. Selective pressures on these social behaviors may therefore exist. Effects on pathogen transmission of mating strategies, social avoidance, group size, group isolation, and other behaviors are explored. It is concluded that many of these behaviors may have been affected by selection pressures to reduce transmission of pathogens. 84 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Mucus as a Barrier to Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Marie; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-01-01

    Viscoelastic mucus lines all mucosal surfaces of the body and forms a potential barrier to mucosal drug delivery. Mucus is mainly composed of water and mucins; high-molecular weight glycoproteins forming an entangled network. Consequently, mucus forms a steric barrier and due to its negative char...... in the development of future oral drug delivery systems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......Viscoelastic mucus lines all mucosal surfaces of the body and forms a potential barrier to mucosal drug delivery. Mucus is mainly composed of water and mucins; high-molecular weight glycoproteins forming an entangled network. Consequently, mucus forms a steric barrier and due to its negative charge...... barrier to drug delivery. Current knowledge of mucus characteristics and barrier properties, as achieved by state-of-the-art methodologies, is the topic of this MiniReview emphasizing the gastrointestinal mucus and an overall focus on oral drug delivery. Cell culture-based in vitro models are well...

  7. The immunological barriers to xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadori, M; Cozzi, E

    2015-10-01

    The availability of cells, tissues and organs from a non-human species such as the pig could, at least in theory, meet the demand of organs necessary for clinical transplantation. At this stage, the important goal of getting over the first year of survival has been reported for both cellular and solid organ xenotransplantation in relevant preclinical primate models. In addition, xenotransplantation is already in the clinic as shown by the broad use of animal-derived medical devices, such as bioprosthetic heart valves and biological materials used for surgical tissue repair. At this stage, however, prior to starting a wide-scale clinical application of xenotransplantation of viable cells and organs, the important obstacle represented by the humoral immune response will need to be overcome. Likewise, the barriers posed by the activation of the innate immune system and coagulative pathway will have to be controlled. As far as xenogeneic nonviable xenografts, increasing evidence suggests that considerable immune reactions, mediated by both innate and adaptive immunity, take place and influence the long-term outcome of xenogeneic materials in patients, possibly precluding the use of bioprosthetic heart valves in young individuals. In this context, the present article provides an overview of current knowledge on the immune processes following xenotransplantation and on the possible therapeutic interventions to overcome the immunological drawbacks involved in xenotransplantation.

  8. Competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    2000-01-01

    Competition has been modelled in the literature in a number of ways.What do these different parametrizations of competition have in common?For instance, it turns out that it is not always the case that a rise in competition reduces price cost margins, industry wide profits or concentration.All param

  9. Measurements and Determinates of Entry Barriers of Chinese Construction Industry%我国建筑业进入壁垒度量及其影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝晓明; 郝生跃; 任旭

    2014-01-01

    建筑业产业形态与进入壁垒的高低有着直接的关系,为了充分阐释这一命题背后的因果关系,采用市场驱动力和累计进入率测算了我国建筑业的进入壁垒指数,结果发现我国建筑业进入较低,存在过度进入的问题。而造成这一问题的原因在于规模经济、必要资本量、绝对成本优势等影响因素未能对新进企业的进入造成障碍。同时从“结构-行为”的互动效应来看,进入壁垒低也导致了我国建筑业市场集中度低、盈利水平差、市场秩序恶化等现象。最后结合我国建筑业市场进入壁垒低的问题,对建筑行业、企业发展提出了相关管理启示。%There is a direct correlation between the industrial patterns and entry barriers of construction industry. In order to fully explain the causation behind this proposition,this paper measures the entry barriers of Chinese construction industry by using market drivers and entry rates.The result demonstrates that the entry barriers is low and there is “over-entry” in Chinese construction industry. The key reason is that scale economy,minimum capital requirement,advantage of absolute expenditure and other factors have little effect on the entering of new enterprises. Meanwhile low entry barriers also result in the low concentration,low profit margins and market order worsened. Finally,some suggestions for firms and the industry are proposed.

  10. Hepatic tight junctions:From viral entry to cancer metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikki; P; Lee; John; M; Luk

    2010-01-01

    The tight junction (TJ) is a critical cellular component for maintenance of tissue integrity, cellular interactions and cell-cell communications, and physiologically functions as the "great wall" against external agents and the surrounding hostile environment. During the host-pathogen evolution, viruses somehow found the key to unlock the gate for their entry into cells and to exploit and exhaust the host cells. In the liver, an array of TJ molecules is localized along the bile canaliculi forming the blood-...

  11. Franchising as a form of entry to the market

    OpenAIRE

    Palásková, Dana

    2008-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with franchising as a form of entry to the market. This work is devided into three chapters. The first chapter is focused on general theory in franchising (definition, different kinds of franchising, advantages and disadvantages, franchising history etc.). The second chapter is devoted to the application of franchising in particular firm accor hotels, where I introduce the brand ibis hotels and its operation in the world. In the third chapter I describe and introduc...

  12. Emerging antiviral strategies to interfere with influenza virus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinden, Evelien; Naesens, Lieve

    2014-03-01

    Influenza A and B viruses are highly contagious respiratory pathogens with a considerable medical and socioeconomical burden and known pandemic potential. Current influenza vaccines require annual updating and provide only partial protection in some risk groups. Due to the global spread of viruses with resistance to the M2 proton channel inhibitor amantadine or the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir, novel antiviral agents with an original mode of action are urgently needed. We here focus on emerging options to interfere with the influenza virus entry process, which consists of the following steps: attachment of the viral hemagglutinin to the sialylated host cell receptors, endocytosis, M2-mediated uncoating, low pH-induced membrane fusion, and, finally, import of the viral ribonucleoprotein into the nucleus. We review the current functional and structural insights in the viral and cellular components of this entry process, and the diverse antiviral strategies that are being explored. This encompasses small molecule inhibitors as well as macromolecules such as therapeutic antibodies. There is optimism that at least some of these innovative concepts to block influenza virus entry will proceed from the proof of concept to a more advanced stage. Special attention is therefore given to the challenging issues of influenza virus (sub)type-dependent activity or potential drug resistance. PMID:23801557

  13. China to Hold Third International Piano Competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuYan

    2004-01-01

    The third China InternationalPiano Competition will be held inMay at the Beijing Sun Yat-SenConcert Hall. Since its inceptionin 1994, the competition hasgarnered attention from aroundthe globe for its high standards,world-class panel of judges, andtalented candidates. Prior to the

  14. Introducing the competitive dimension to corporate foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Jan Oliver; Rohrbeck, René

    While the competitive dimension plays an important role in strategy, the aspect of competitors seems to be rather neglected in corporate foresight. In this paper we want to shed some more light on this underexplored field of corporate foresight. The literature review discusses approaches...... in corporate foresight, in particular scenario planning and business wargaming, which address competitive dynamics. Further, literature on competitive strategy is discussed to assess approaches towards the identification of new rivals. One can conclude that there is an absence of structured approaches...... or frameworks towards the competitive dimension in corporate foresight. In the paper an illustrative case study is discussed, with a first attempt to provide a framework for structuring the competitive dimension in corporate foresight....

  15. Barriers to adherence in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf

    2012-01-01

    Danish patients with cystic fibrosis aged 14 to 25 years and their parents. Conclusions: The present study showed that the majority of adolescents with CF and their parents experienced barriers to treatment adherence. Patients and parents agreed that the three most common barriers encountered lack...

  16. Alternative approach to study fusion barrier distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion reactions induced by heavy-ions (HIs) at around barrier energies, play an important role in nuclear physics since they enable to study the nuclei away from the valley of stability. On the other hand, heavy-ion collisions, at below and near barrier energies, provide an ideal opportunity to study quantum tunneling phenomena in systems with many degrees of freedom. In a simple model, a potential barrier for the relative motion between the interacting nuclei is created by the strong interplay of the repulsive Coulomb and the attractive nuclear force. It has, now, been well recognized that heavy-ion collisions at energies around the Coulomb barrier are strongly affected by the internal structure of interacting nuclei. The couplings of the relative motion to the intrinsic degrees of freedom (such as collective inelastic excitations of the colliding nuclei and/or transfer processes) replaced a single potential barrier to a number of distributed barriers, leading to the enhancement in heavy ion fusion cross sections at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier than those expected from single one-dimensional barrier

  17. Strategic Advantage and the Optimal Exercise of Entry Options

    OpenAIRE

    Perotti, Enrico C; Rossetto, Silvia

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the timing and the valuation of strategic investment aimed at enhancing entry opportunities in related market segments. As demand is uncertain, entry options should be exercised at the optimal time, trading off the market share gain against the option to wait until more information is revealed, while anticipating competitors' entry behaviour. When the strategic investment grants a strong competitive advantage, the innovator can optimally choose the timing of entry; in case of w...

  18. Competitive Pressures and Transition to Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Failla, Virgilio; Melillo, Francesca; Reichstein, Toke

    This paper investigates whether the likelihood of entrepreneurial activity is associated with the competitive pressures for promotion within a firm. We argue that competitive pressures increase the relative attractiveness of entrepreneurship as a career option. We test our prediction using a...... comprehensive matched employer-employee longitudinal data set from Denmark. To mitigate endogeneity concerns, we exploit variation in the gender composition of established firms as women are systematically found to be less competitive than man. We find that workers are more likely to become entrepreneurs if...... entrepreneurship has a positive non-linear effect. Our results have strong implications for managers, prospect entrepreneurs and policy makers....

  19. Examination of the influences of the industrial attributes on the entry mode selection: case studies of the Coca-Cola Company from U.S entering the Chinese beverage industry and the BT Group plc from U.K entering the Chinese telecommunication industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Lingyu

    2015-01-01

    The study has the purpose of examining the influences of industrial attributes, such as market structure and industrial policies, on the choice of entry mode for MNEs. It adopts the case study approach with two firms entering China, one is the Coca-Cola Company from the U.S and the other is the BT Group plc from the U.K, which enable us to see how the market structure, competition conditions, entry barriers and policies of these two different industries can influent the entry mode selection o...

  20. Competition law and the obligation to supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergqvist, Christian

    2015-01-01

    While accepted in theory and practice that an obligation to supply, ser-vice or license can emerge under competition law, the scope of this is subject to many, if not lacunas, at least ambiguities, and no general ob-li¬gations of such nature can, no should, be identified. Further, and equally...... important, the narrow set of circumstances warranting inter-vention against refusals is defined by competition law in accordance with its underlying principles of a predominantly economic nature. Hence, competition law should not be relied upon as a corrective in-strument to lacunas in other areas of law, e.......g. compulsory licenses un-der IP law. Below, some considerations regarding the obligation to supply under competition law are offered for the purpose of correcting the misunderstandings....

  1. Pollen competition between two sympatric Orchis species (Orchidaceae): the overtaking of conspecific of heterospecific pollen as a reproductive barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, A; Palermo, A M; Bellusci, F; Pellegrino, G

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of hybrid formation in angiosperms depends on how and when heterospecific pollen is transferred to the stigma, and on the success of that heterospecific pollen at fertilising ovules. We applied pollen mixtures to stigmas to determine how pollen interactions affect siring success and the frequency of hybrid formation between two species of Mediterranean deceptive orchid. Plants of Orchis italica and O. anthropophora were pollinated with conspecific and heterospecific pollen (first conspecific pollen then heterospecific pollen and vice versa) and molecular analysis was used to check the paternity of the seeds produced. In this pair of Mediterranean orchids, competition between conspecific and heterospecific pollen functions as a post-pollination pre-zygotic barrier limiting the frequency of the formation of hybrids in nature. Flowers pollinated with heterospecific pollen can remain receptive for the arrival of conspecific pollen for a long time. There is always an advantage of conspecific pollen for fruit formation, whether it comes before or after heterospecific pollen, because it overtakes the heterospecific pollen. The conspecific pollen advantage exhibited in O. italica and O. anthropophora is likely to result from the reduced germination of heterospecific pollen or retarded growth of heterospecific pollen tubes in the stigma and ovary. Overall, the results indicate that our hybrid zone represents a phenomenon of little evolutionary consequence, and the conspecific pollen advantage maintains the genetic integrity of the parental species.

  2. Cultural Barriers to International Business Negotiations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘竹林; 王俊

    2013-01-01

    Studies in international business negotiation acquire unprecedented significance, as globalization closely connects vari⁃ous business fields into a dynamic whole. Cultural factors play a vital role in international business negotiation. This paper begins with a brief introduction to business negotiation, international business negotiation and significance of cultural barriers to interna⁃tional business negotiation. It then explores two fundamental cultural differences of China and western countries:value differenc⁃es and thinking-pattern differences, which pose cultural barriers. The author then puts forward three strategies to help remove the cultural barriers and achieve successful negotiations.

  3. Competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕思思

    2007-01-01

    <正> The term competition reminds me of asoul-stirring fight between a mother monkeyand a crocodile,The crocodile caught her babywhen the baby was drinking water in a pool,Inthe end,the mother got her baby,but herbaby’s body only,She lost her child forever,just for a mouthful of water.Such is competition,cruel and merciless,But if we see the other side of the coin,we’ll

  4. Breaching barriers to collaboration in public spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemann, Trine; Mitchell, Robb

    2014-01-01

    Technology provoking disparate individuals to collaborate or share experiences in the public space faces a difficult barrier, namely the ordinary social order of urban places. We employed the notion of the breaching experiment to explore how this barrier might be overcome. We analyse responses...... of life in public spaces. Arising from this, we argue for the importance of qualities such as availability, facilitation, perspicuous settings, and perspicuous participants to encourage and support co-located strangers to collaborate and share experiences....

  5. Addressing language barriers to healthcare in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Lalit

    2013-01-01

    In spite of a growing recognition of the importance of doctor-patient communication, the issue of language barriers to healthcare has received very little attention in India. The Indian population speaks over 22 major languages with English used as the lingua franca for biomedicine. Large-scale internal migration has meant that health workers are encountering increasing instances of language discordance within clinical settings. Research done predominantly in the West has shown language discordance to significantly affect access to care, cause problems of comprehension and adherence, and decrease the satisfaction and quality of care. Addressing language barriers to healthcare in India requires a stronger political commitment to providing non-discriminatory health services, especially to vulnerable groups such as illiterate migrant workers. Research will have to address three broad areas: the ways in which language barriers affect health and healthcare, the efficacy of interventions to overcome language barriers, and the costs of language barriers and efforts to overcome them. There is a need to address such barriers in health worker education and clinical practice. Proven strategies such as hiring multilingual healthcare workers, providing language training to health providers, employing in situ translators or using telephone interpretation services will have to be evaluated for their appropriateness to the Indian context. Internet-based initiatives, the proliferation of mobile phones and recent advances in machine translation promise to contribute to the solution. PMID:24758452

  6. Phonic Attenuation due to Screen-Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Vasile Bacria; Nicolae Herişanu

    2011-01-01

    The technique of noise decreasing admits two basic approaches: an active approach and a passive one. In the frame of passive method one can count the employment of screen-barriers. In this paper we present some considerations on sound attenuation due to screen-barriers emphasizing the elements which influence it. The elucidation of these elements is made by measurements. The obtained results can be applied in every other practical situation concerning the protection against ...

  7. Mammalian cell entry genes in Streptomyces may provide clues to the evolution of bacterial virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Laura C.; Seipke, Ryan F.; Prieto, Pilar; Willemse, Joost; van Wezel, Gilles P.; Hutchings, Matthew I.; Hoskisson, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of virulence is key to appreciating the role specific loci play in pathogenicity. Streptomyces species are generally non-pathogenic soil saprophytes, yet within their genome we can find homologues of virulence loci. One example of this is the mammalian cell entry (mce) locus, which has been characterised in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To investigate the role in Streptomyces we deleted the mce locus and studied its impact on cell survival, morphology and interaction with other soil organisms. Disruption of the mce cluster resulted in virulence towards amoebae (Acanthamoeba polyphaga) and reduced colonization of plant (Arabidopsis) models, indicating these genes may play an important role in Streptomyces survival in the environment. Our data suggest that loss of mce in Streptomyces spp. may have profound effects on survival in a competitive soil environment, and provides insight in to the evolution and selection of these genes as virulence factors in related pathogenic organisms. PMID:23346366

  8. Sourcing Strategies to Keep up with Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antero, Michelle; Hedman, Jonas; Henningsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies the Red Queen theory to explain how organizations utilize various sourcing arrangements in order to compete in an evolutionary arms race where only the strongest competitors will survive. The case study incorporates competition, and views sourcing strategies as a means to improve...... the firm’s viability to survive competition in the marketplace. The study begins by positioning the Red Queen theory within the sourcing literature. It subsequently applies the framework to a case study of SAP AG to illustrate how sourcing strategies have changed over time in response to the logic...... of competition. The case study reveals that (a) organizations are adaptive systems and capable of learning to make strategic changes pertaining to sourcing arrangements; (b) organizations select the terms on which they want to compete by developing certain capabilities within the firm; (c) organizations...

  9. Indonesia: Innovation strategies and competitive forces to enter the European seafood market

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuf, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Aims – This thesis examines the capabilities of the Indonesian seafood export industry to enter the European market, which is the world’s largest seafood importer. The aim is to offer a knowledge-based competitive marketing strategy which is analysed in four parts: Paper I: Competitive framework; Paper II: Legal barriers; Paper III: Demand for seafood trade innovation in Europe; Paper IV: The Indonesian supply advantage. Focus of study – Fisheries has the potential to become a leading co...

  10. Dissociative recombination in reactive flows related to planetary atmospheric entries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bultel Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dissociative Recombination (DR processes play a significant role in plasma chemistry. This article illustrates this role from the modeling point of view in the case of reactive flows related to atmospheric entry plasmas. Two situations are investigated, for which the studied plasma is nitrogen. The first configuration corresponds to the relaxation process behind a strong shock wave moving at high Mach number in a shock tube, the second one to the recombination taking place in an expanding plasma flowing in a diverging nozzle. In both cases, the collisional-radiative model CoRaM-N2, involving N2, N, N2+, N+ and electrons, is implemented in an Eulerian 1D code able to compute the aerodynamic fields; calculations are performed in standard conditions. We show that, according to the rate coefficients used for the DR processes, the population density of the charged species especially N2+ is strongly modified only for the post-shock flow.

  11. Substitutive Competition: Virtual Pets as Competitive Buffers to Alleviate Possible Negative Influence on Pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Hong; Chou, Chih-Yueh; Biswas, Gautam; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2012-01-01

    Although competition is regarded as a powerful motivator in game-based learning, it might have a negative influence, such as damage to confidence, on students who lose the competition. In this paper, we propose an indirect approach, substitutive competition, to alleviate such negative influences. The approach is used to develop a My-Pet v3 system,…

  12. Barriers to the implementation of E-learning system with focus on organizational culture

    OpenAIRE

    Bashiruddin, Muhammad; Basit, Abdul; Naeem, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Title: Barriers to the implementation of E-learning system with focus on organizational culture Introduction: Nowadays, Information Technology has become a necessity for businesses not only to gain competitive advantage but also to survive. Strategic use of new educational technologies can enhance learning and teaching process. In order to stay viable in this intense competitive environment, providers of education and trainings have developed efficient and effective learning environment, call...

  13. From harmonisation to regulatory competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan; Vitols, Sigurt; Heuschmid, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    In his contribution (Chapter 4) Jan Cremers provides a historical account of the European-level approach to company law and its effect on national systems. Originally, the European Commission pursued a project of company law harmonisation on the basis of high standards which were designed to discour

  14. Competition within Physical Education: Using Sport Education and Other Recommendations to Create a Productive, Competitive Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, Todd E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of Sport Education by physical education teachers to implement developmentally appropriate competitive activities is explored. The potential positive and negative consequences of competitive activities are discussed along with suggestions for teachers on how they can foster an appropriate competitive environment in physical education.

  15. Hershey’s Entry to the Australian Market with a New Brand: An Accounting and Marketing Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevdet Kızıl

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the entry of Hershey’s Chocolates Company tothe Australian market with a new brand. For this purpose, background information and key performance indicators about the firm are presented. Also target customers and market summary, market demographics and target customer profile of the firm are mentioned in the context of situational analysis. Then,Hershey’s entry to the Australian market with a new product is proposed by providing and commenting on SWOT analysis, competition environment, accounting-finance indicators, marketing strategy and marketing mix (4P factors. Thus, a deeper focus on the organization is realized and shared. As aresult, firm’s entry to the Australian market is discussed with a new product by suggesting recent and altered target customer base, customer profile,marketing strategy and marketing mix. Our study evaluates the potential disadvantages and advantages in detail and argues that there is a need for Hershey’s to enter the Australian market with a new product. In general, this article discusses and defends the entry of Hershey’s to Australian market witha new product by logical reasoning and draws a strategic roadmad to reach this goal.

  16. Strengthening SMEs to make export competitive

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Bhagaban; Shil, Nikhil Chandra; Pramanik, Alok Kumar

    2007-01-01

    The importance of SMEs in any economy cannot be overlooked as they form a major chunk in the economic activity of nations. India has nearly three million SMEs, which account for almost 50 per cent of industrial output. However, SMEs which form the backbone of industrial development in India are not export competitive and contribute only about 34 percent of exports. It is this feature of the SMEs that make it an ideal target to realize its potential export competitive. Drawing from the experie...

  17. Ranking Barriers to Green Supply Chain Management Using DIMATEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Omidvar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Today's organizations in order to achieve and maintain proper position requires the use of a model of supply chain management in order to fulfill the competitive advantage and expectations of customers. Due to the challenging economic, social and environmental organizations in recent decades has threatened, Customer-oriented approach and focus on the demands of the organization's strategy and design basis for competitive advantage in organizations is less. In this regard, green supply chain management, new approach to achieve these goals. Green supply chain management, supply chain management is the integration of environmental requirements in all stages of product design, selection and procurement of raw materials, manufacturing, distribution and transport processes, and finally delivered to the customer after consumption, waste management and consumption of energy and resources in order to maximize productivity and improve the overall performance of the supply chain. Therefore, the present study sought to investigate the barriers to green supply chain management practices in the company's vehicle using DIMATEL. The logistics company for the car was studied. After the conclusion of these obstacles, the second step of the analysis and ranking DIMATEL barriers were causal. ISO 14000, the most important influence on the lack of green supply chain management practices.

  18. Barriers To Successful Implementation of STEM Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Ejiwale

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of STEM education in schools across the globe is to prepare the future workforce with strong scientific and mathematical backgrounds to enhance skills development across STEM disciplines. However, for STEM education to achieve its goals and objectives, addressing the barriers to STEM education should start by fixing the problems at the elementary, junior and senior high school levels; the grassroots and potential feeders to colleges and universities. Since many nations including the United States of America is in dire need of the workforce with adequate preparation in science and mathematics to help address the nation’s economy that is in shambles, the barriers to its successful implementation should be identified and addressed. In this paper, (a the definition of STEM education and (b some barriers to successful implementation of STEM education are discussed and elaborated.

  19. Leading to Learning and Competitive Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Trong Tuan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to examine whether there is the chain effect from corporate social responsibility (CSR) and emotional intelligence (EI) to organizational learning and competitive intelligence in chemical companies in a Vietnam business setting. Design/methodology/approach: Structural equation modeling (SEM) approach was used to analyze…

  20. Identify and Rank Barriers to Tourism Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parchekani Choozaki Parvaneh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey study and is practical and in nature is analytical descriptive. This is an analytical study because samples were used to collect data and it is descriptive because its variables are studied and reported as there are in the real world. In this study we study the barriers to tourism development and will rank the barriers for the use planners. In this study, to determine the validity the content validity was determined and to determine reliability the Cronbach's alpha method has been used. Also to check the normality of questions’ answers the Kolmogorov - Smirnov test is used. The sample population has also been determined by computational methods. In conclusion, according to the results of questionnaires and fuzzy Analytical Hierarchy process method, results were presented in two parts: result analysis for ranking the barriers to the development of tourism and suggestions.

  1. BARRIERS TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SME GROWTH IN TRANSITION: THE CASE OF KOSOVA

    OpenAIRE

    BESNIK A. KRASNIQI

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the barriers to growth of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Kosova. It is based on a SME survey conducted by Riinvest Institute at the end of 2002 which identified critical business environment barriers perceived by entrepreneurs such as legal environment, administrative burden, external financing, tax burden and unfair competition. First, based on this SME survey, the econometric model is constructed in order to test empirically the validity of Gibrat's La...

  2. Design for logistics to gain competitive advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhuri, Atanu; Biskoptsø, Rogvi

    2015-01-01

    . Considering logistical requirements in design of a product which is heavy and bulky and involves significant logistics costs enabled to firm to gain competitiveness. The exercise underscored the importance of understanding logistical requirements, freight costs and dimensional constraints early in the design...

  3. Acquisition versus greenfield: The impact of the mode of foreign bank entry on information and bank lending rates

    OpenAIRE

    Claeys, Sophie; Hainz, Christa

    2006-01-01

    Policy makers often decide to liberalize foreign bank entry but put limitations on the mode of entry. We study how different entry modes affect the lending rate set by foreign and domestic banks. Our model captures two essential features of banking competition in emerging markets: Domestic banks possess private information about their incumbent clients and foreign banks have better screening skills. Our model predicts that competition is stronger if foreign entry occurs through a greenfield i...

  4. STRATEGY FROM CONCEPTUALIZATION TO COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giurgiu Catalin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to show how important the process of defining strategy can be for a company in the economical context that we all face now days. This study shows that although the results after a company has defined its strategy can be seen in a longer or shorter period of time, the process is complex and needs managers that can foresee the future. And at the end of every strategy defining the final result should be competitive advantage, this competitive advantage that can bring a company in front of its main competitors, and if the company manages to stay in front of those competitors it can gain sustainable competitive advantage. In fact this should be the goal of every company: to try by all means, off course legal means, to do things better than other companies using the right strategy. Companies can use their capabilities and knowledge in these fields, a constant innovation process can help the society to undergo powerful changes. These changes can be firstly seen in the mentality, the behaviour and the process of knowledge. It is important for a company to understand its role in the modern society. Managers of important companies do their best to keep those respective companies at a level that can secure profit, but profit is not always the entire issue. It takes time in order for those innovations to reach the whole society, because companies are not willing to give information about their products, and keep this information to be able to have future profit. The role of competitive advantage can be seen in any field of activity, it provides the values that keep our society moving forward. Competitive advantage is needed in fields like: medicine, education or environmental protection. Companies have to innovate constantly in order to obtain this competitive advantage, but this competitive advantage can be present today and gone tomorrow, because the conditions on the market are changing at a very fast rate.In the past years

  5. Hepatitis C Treatment and Barriers to Eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konerman, Monica A; Lok, Anna S F

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is highly efficacious, well-tolerated, and of short duration for the majority of patients. Despite the dramatic advances in therapy, there remain several barriers to disease eradication. These include deficiencies in screening, diagnosis, and access to care, and high cost of the direct-acting antiviral medications. In addition, incident cases and reinfection associated with injection drug use contribute to the persistent worldwide disease burden. This article will review the current CHC treatments, and outline the remaining gaps in therapy and barriers to disease eradication. PMID:27657495

  6. Dynamic Peer-to-Peer Competition

    CERN Document Server

    Caram, L F; Proto, A N; Ausloos, M

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a multiagent system in which the agent size $s_{i}$ is variable it is studied along a Lotka-Volterra approach. The agent size has hereby for meaning the fraction of a given market that an agent is able to capture (market share). A Lotka-Volterra system of equations for prey-predator problems is considered, the competition factor being related to the difference in size between the agents in a one-on-one competition. This mechanism introduces a natural self-organized dynamic competition among agents. In the competition factor, a parameter $\\sigma$ is introduced for scaling the intensity of agent size similarity, which varies in each iteration cycle. The fixed points of this system are analytically found and their stability analyzed for small systems (with $n=5$ agents). We have found that different scenarios are possible, from chaotic to non-chaotic motion with cluster formation as function of the $\\sigma$ parameter and depending on the initial conditions imposed to the system. The prese...

  7. Barrier qualities of the mouse eye to topically applied drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao; Do, Chi Wai; Avila, Marcel Y; Stone, Richard A; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Civan, Mortimer M

    2007-07-01

    The mouse eye displays unusually rapid intraocular pressure (IOP) responses to topically applied drugs as measured by the invasive servo-null micropipette system (SNMS). To learn if the time course reflected rapid drug transfer across the thin mouse cornea and sclera, we monitored a different parameter, pupillary size, following topical application of droplets containing 40 microM (0.073 microg) carbachol. No miosis developed from this low carbachol concentration unless the cornea was impaled with an exploring micropipette as used in the SNMS. We also compared the mouse IOP response to several purinergic drugs, measured by the invasive SNMS and non-invasive pneumotonometry. Responses to the previously studied non-selective adenosine-receptor (AR) agonist adenosine, the A(3)-selective agonist Cl-IB-MECA and the A(3)-selective antagonist MRS 1191 were all enhanced to varying degrees, in time and magnitude, by corneal impalement. We conclude that the thin ocular coats of the mouse eye actually present a substantial barrier to drug penetration. Corneal impalement with even fine-tipped micropipettes can significantly enhance entry of topically-applied drugs into the mouse aqueous humor, reflecting either direct diffusion around the tip or a more complex impalement-triggered change in ocular barrier properties. Comparison of invasive and non-invasive measurement methods can document drug efficacy at intraocular target sites even if topical drug penetration is too slow to manifest convincing physiologic effects in intact eyes. PMID:17490649

  8. Re-Entry of Women to the Labour Market After an Interruption in Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seear, B. N.

    The problems involved in the re-entry of women into employment were studied, and the extent to which there exists a demand for employment for re-entry women was examined. A growing number of women are seeking re-entry in a wide range of income levels. The demand for part-time work appears to exceed supply. Official machinery for assisting re-entry…

  9. ON AFFECTIVE BARRIERS TO LANGUAGE LEARNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiangMaoying

    2004-01-01

    Affective factors play a significant role in languagelearning. This paper argues that positive emotions can facilitatethe language learning process and improve learners' languageperformance, while negative emotions will bring barriers tolanguage learning and reduce learners learning capacity. Withtwo true stories as an introduction and some relevant answersobtained from my questionnaire, this paper mainly discusses theinfluences of negative emotional factors on language learning.such as anxiety, low self-esteem, insecure classroomatmosphere, lack of rapport between teachers and students, etc.Some suggestions about how to overcome affective barriers areput forward.

  10. The transition to automated practitioner order entry in a teaching hospital: the VA Puget Sound experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, T. H.

    1999-01-01

    We recently installed an automated practitioner order entry system on our busiest inpatient wards and critical care units. The installation followed 20 months preparation in which we created the workstation, network, and host infrastructure, developed requisite policies, recruited personnel to support the system, and installed the software in areas where the pace of order entry was less intense. Since implementing automated order entry, we have experienced problems such as an increase in time...

  11. Concurso CORVI para viviendas en Valparaiso: comentario sobre el proyecto ganador, el Conjunto Habitacional “Villa Italia” /Housing in Valparaiso CORVI competition: coments on the winning entry “Villa Italia”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Raposo [1967

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La reedición de este artículo busca recoger la línea de diseño urbano residencial que se desarrollaba en la Facultad de Arquitectura y Urbanismo en esa época. /This competition entry presents the urban housing design taught at that time (1967 in FAU.

  12. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AS A SOLUTION TO AGRICULTURAL COMPETITIVENESS: THE CASE OF GREECE IN THE ERA OF EUROPEAN INTEGRATION

    OpenAIRE

    PAPAGEORGIOU, Athanassios

    2012-01-01

    The liberalization of international trade, due to the elimination of market barriers between countries within the context of economic unions, like the European Union (EU) and the expansion of globalization have caused increased competitiveness, at both geographical and sector level. European Commission documents state competitiveness as a continuous rise in the standards of living of a nation or region, a definition which combines competitiveness with sustainability and social goals. Although...

  13. Penetrating the Barriers to Teaching Higher Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supon, Viola

    1998-01-01

    Considers five ways to overcome barriers teachers face when they attempt to create thinking classrooms: (1) acquisition of conscious commitment; (2) legitimization of students' experiences; (3) integration of visualizing into the curriculum; (4) use of reflective analysis; and (5) diversification of perspectives. (SR)

  14. Understanding Motivators and Barriers to Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patay, Mary E.; Patton, Kevin; Parker, Melissa; Fahey, Kathleen; Sinclair, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the factors that influence physical activity among year-round residents in an isolated summer resort community. Specifically, we explored the personal, environmental, social, and culture-specific perceived motivators and barriers to physical activity. Participants were formally interviewed about their…

  15. Barriers to Distance Education in Rural Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvin, Matthew J.; Hannum, Wallace H.; Varre, Claire de la; Farmer, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of the current study was to examine barriers to the use of distance education and explore related factors in small and low-income rural schools. Data were collected via a telephone survey with administrators or other qualified personnel. The sample involved 417 randomly selected small and low-income rural school districts…

  16. Exploring the Barriers to Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Christian Gormsen

    Buyers are typically unaware of the full set of offers when making a purchase. This paper examines how international trade interacts with this problem of market intransparency. Sellers must communicate their offers through costly advertising, but cannot reach all buyers. Consequently, no market...... clearing price exists, and sellers randomize over an equilibrium price distribution. Letting sellers advertise their offers abroad leads to international trade, which would not take place under complete information. Buyers then receive more offers, leading to lower prices and welfare gains. Sellers...... in the model are identical, but appear heterogeneous due to their price randomization. In larger and more open economies, prices and markups will be lower, and exports are primarily realized by sellers who charge low prices. These predictions are similar to those of trade models where firm heterogeneity...

  17. Barriers To Supply Network Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Harland, C; Knight, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on an on-going action research project on supply network strategy. Supply network strategy is a concept integrating operations management, purchasing and supply management, logistics, service management and value chain management (Harland, 1996a). Findings of an interim review of efforts to promote change in the English National Health Service's inter-organizational supply networks are presented.

  18. Barriers to medical device innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergsl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jacob Bergsland, Ole Jakob Elle, Erik Fosse The Intervention Centre, Oslo University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Abstract: The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA has defined a medical device as a health care product that does not achieve it's purpose by chemical action or by being metabolized. This means that a vast number of products are considered medical devices. Such devices play an essential role in the practice of medicine. The FDA classifies medical devices in three classes, depending on the risk of the device. Since Class I and II devices have relatively simple requirements for getting to the market, this review will focus on “implantable devices”, which, in general, belong to Class III. The European Union and Canada use a slightly different classification system. While early generations of medical devices were introduced without much testing, either technical or clinical, the process of introducing a Class III medical device from concept to clinical practice has become strongly regulated and requires extensive technological and clinical testing. The modern era of implantable medical devices may be considered to have started in the 1920s with development of artificial hips. The implantable pacemaker was another milestone and pacemakers and cardioverters/defibrillators have since saved millions of lives and created commercial giants in the medical device industry. This review will include some examples of cardiovascular devices. Similar considerations apply to the total implantable device market, although clinical and technological applications obviously vary considerably. Keyword: implantable, FDA, regulation, CE-mark, innovation

  19. Implement Obligations Seriously, Enjoy Rights Fully Make Active Countermeasure to the Barrier of Foreign Technology Trade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Changjiang

    2007-01-01

    @@ December 11th, 2006 is the fifth anniversary of China's entry into WTO. Over the past five years, what AQSIQ has done in implementing the obligations and enjoying the rights as a member of WTO? How's the performance? Facing with the current complicated barrier of technology trade worldwide, how will China reply to it? For these questions, reporters have made a special interview with Li Changjiang, Minister of AQSIQ.

  20. On Emotional Barriers to Second Language Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Qin

    2012-01-01

    Language learning is a very complex process, which is related to many factors, either internal or external. Affective factors plays an important role in a second language learning. If only we realize such affective factors, we can overcome the emotional barriers effectively and have a successful learning.

  1. Images as Barriers to Intercultural Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Kazuo

    Images that nations have of each other become barriers to effective intercultural communication if they are overgeneralized, oversimplified, or unfairly exaggerated. The communication difficulties between Japan and the United States, for example, exemplify how images negatively influence the political and economic relations between two countries.…

  2. Traveling Towards Disease: Transportation Barriers to Health Care Access

    OpenAIRE

    Syed, Samina T.; Gerber, Ben S.; Sharp, Lisa K.

    2013-01-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthes...

  3. A Factor Analysis of Barriers to Effective Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golen, Steven

    1990-01-01

    Conducts a factor analysis to determine listening barriers perceived as most frequently affecting the listening effectiveness among business college students. Finds the presence of six listening barriers, with the barrier "listen primarily for details or facts" as the most frequently encountered barrier perceived by students. (MM)

  4. Barriers to Physical Activity Among Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Brazeau, Anne-Sophie; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Strychar, Irene; Mircescu, Hortensia

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine, in an adult population with type 1 diabetes, barriers to regular physical activity using a diabetes-specific barriers measure (the Barriers to Physical Activity in Diabetes [type 1] [BAPAD1] scale) and factors associated with these barriers. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—One hundred adults with type 1 diabetes answered a questionnaire assessing perceived barriers to physical activity and related factors. A1C was obtained from the medical chart of each individual. RESULTS...

  5. Transformation from Comparative Advantage to Competitive Advantage——A Way to Improve Regional Agricultural Competitiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Primarily this paper analyses the internal correlation between comparative advantage and competitive advantage,and holds that there are no conflict and contradiction between the two,the industries with comparative advantage often easily to have strong competitive advantage.Then this paper analyses the factors influencing regional agricultural competitiveness,including resources endowment,ecological environment,quality of labour forces,infrastructure,technology innovation and transformation capacity,industrialization degree,relevant support industries,market demand structure,government management and policy and so on.Finally,based on the analysis of conversion mechanism of regional agriculture from comparative advantage to competitive advantage,this paper puts forward the countermeasures for promoting regional agricultural competitiveness as follows:vigorously develop agricultural industrialization,and foster the leading enterprises;improve the national policy system for supporting agriculture,and increase the inputs into infrastructure and scientific research innovation;promote the development of related industries and support industries,and promote agricultural competitiveness;increase consumers’ demand for the quality of agricultural products,and propel business investment and innovation.

  6. From Higher Education to Work Patterns of Labor Market Entry in Germany and the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Marita; Weiss, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Comparative studies describing the transition from higher education to work have often simplified the complex transition processes involved. In this paper we extend previous research by taking into account several steps that comprise labor market entry, e.g., recurrent education leading to more than one instance of labor market entry. By comparing…

  7. Retail distribution channel barriers to international trade

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, Frederic Michael

    1996-01-01

    With the referral of the Kodak - Fuji market access dispute to the World Trade Organization, the role of retail distribution channel control by incumbent firms as a barrier to imports has drawn much interest. This paper reviews the issues from an historical perspective and analyzes the difficulties facing firms attempting to sell their products in other nations' automobile and photo supplies markets. There has been a natural evolution of retail distribution channels from mom and pop stores to...

  8. BARRIERS TO PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN THE ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Matias

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The population awareness of the physical exercise’s benefits is widely diffused. These benefits are particularly important in the elderly because, with increasing age, there is a decline of the musculoskeletal system and the maximum oxygen consumption which reduces the functional fitness of the elderly and can often lead to a significant decline in the quality of life. Despite this awareness, a large part of the population remains sedentary. It is important to know what the barriers are, so they can be circumvented in order to increase the engagement of the elderly population in existing physical activity programs.Objectives: This study aims to identify some of the personal, behavioral and environmental barriers that prevent older adults to be physically active.

  9. Nurses' Psychosocial Barriers to Suicide Risk Management

    OpenAIRE

    Sharon Valente

    2011-01-01

    Suicide remains a serious health care problem and a sentinel event tracked by The Joint Commission. Nurses are pivotal in evaluating risk and preventing suicide. Analysis of nurses' barriers to risk management may lead to interventions to improve management of suicidal patients. These data emerged from a random survey of 454 oncology nurses' attitudes, knowledge of suicide, and justifications for euthanasia. Instruments included a vignette of a suicidal patient and a suicide attitude question...

  10. Methods to increase the competitiveness in industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ion STANCU; Lazarescu, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    Industrial firms are different between them for their economical characteristics, competitive situations and their prospects. Industry and competitive analysis use a lot of concepts and methods for obtaining a clear image concerning the variable conditions from industry and competitive strong forces. Economical characteristics of industry are important for their strategic implications.

  11. To Develop Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Zhao, Weixun; Wang, Ping; Wei, Zheng

    Advanced turbine engines require the application of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) to provide still higher reliability, thermal insulation effect and longer lifetime under harsh operating conditions. TBCs with nanostructure proved to be promising to deliver the desired property and performance. To exploit full potentials of the current widely used yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), nano-sized YSZ powders were developed and used as the ceramic source material. By controlling the deposition processes, novel TBCs with outstanding nanostructure such as nano-sized grains and pores were produced by atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD), respectively. The incorporated nanostructure in TBCs resulted in substantial increase in thermal barrier effect and their lifetime. The long-term microstructure stability of the nanocoating was also investigated.

  12. There are many barriers to species' migrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J Feeley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature-change trajectories are being used to identify the geographic barriers and thermal ‘cul-de-sacs’ that will limit the ability of many species to track climate change by migrating. We argue that there are many other potential barriers to species’ migrations. These include stable ecotones, discordant shifts in climatic variables, human land use, and species’ limited dispersal abilities. To illustrate our argument, for each 0.5° latitude/longitude grid cell of the Earth’s land surface, we mapped and tallied the number of cells for which future (2060–2080 climate represents an analog of the focal cell’s current climate. We compared results when only considering temperature with those for which both temperature and total annual precipitation were considered in concert. We also compared results when accounting for only geographic barriers (no cross-continental migration with those involving both geographic and potential ecological barriers (no cross-biome migration. As expected, the number of future climate analogs available to each pixel decreased markedly with each added layer of complexity (e.g. the proportion of the Earth’s land surface without any available future climate analogs increased from 3% to more than 36% with the inclusion of precipitation and ecological boundaries. While including additional variables can increase model complexity and uncertainty, we must strive to incorporate the factors that we know will limit species’ ranges and migrations if we hope to predict the effects of climate change at a high-enough degree of accuracy to guide management decisions.

  13. The analysis of barriers to knowledge management

    OpenAIRE

    Ujwary-Gil, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this article is to highlight the need for cooperation and exchange of knowledge among communities of the organization to develop and achieve competitive advantage in the market. On the other hand, research indicates that cooperation is not always the case, so it is worth considering why this is happening. An important part of this article is to present the latest results of research carried out under the EU project entitled Knowledge Management System M...

  14. Barriers to Teaching Introductory Physical Geography Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. RITTER

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning geography online is becoming an option for more students but not without controversy. Issues of faculty resources, logistics, professional recognition, and pedagogical concerns are cited as barriers to teaching online. Offering introductory physical geography online presents special challenges. As a general education course, an introductory physical geography course has a diverse population of students with disparate educational needs and goals that impacts its ability to be delivered online. Online learning is further complicated when lab courses require specialized laboratory equipment and fieldwork. A survey of geography departments in the United States was conducted to determine barriers to the deployment of introductory physical geography lab courses. Lack of faculty interest, faculty resources, and pedagogical concerns were found to be the most important barriers to deploying online physical geography lab courses. Knowing the challenges faced by geography departments offering online courses provides insight into where valuable support services and resources can best be used to address them. Recent advances in blogging, podcasting, lecture capture, web conferencing, and augmented reality are offered as solutions to the concerns expressed by survey respondents.

  15. Entry Regulation under Asymmetric Information about Demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Sarmento

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate how an incumbent firm can use the regulatory policy about entry and the informational advantage to protect his market position. This question is studied through the construction of a signalling game where we assume that the regulator has less information about demand than the firms. We conclude that there is a pooling equilibrium and partially separating equilibria in which entry is deterred and, if demand is high, there will be insufficient entry. The final effect on welfare depends on the tradeoff between short-run benefits (lower price and long-run losses (weaker competition.

  16. Tissue Barriers to Arbovirus Infection in Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Alexander W E; Kantor, Asher M; Passarelli, A Lorena; Clem, Rollie J

    2015-07-08

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) circulate in nature between arthropod vectors and vertebrate hosts. Arboviruses often cause devastating diseases in vertebrate hosts, but they typically do not cause significant pathology in their arthropod vectors. Following oral acquisition of a viremic bloodmeal from a vertebrate host, the arbovirus disease cycle requires replication in the cellular environment of the arthropod vector. Once the vector has become systemically and persistently infected, the vector is able to transmit the virus to an uninfected vertebrate host. In order to systemically infect the vector, the virus must cope with innate immune responses and overcome several tissue barriers associated with the midgut and the salivary glands. In this review we describe, in detail, the typical arbovirus infection route in competent mosquito vectors. Based on what is known from the literature, we explain the nature of the tissue barriers that arboviruses are confronted with in a mosquito vector and how arboviruses might surmount these barriers. We also point out controversial findings to highlight particular areas that are not well understood and require further research efforts.

  17. Barriers to accessing surgical care in Pakistan: healthcare barrier model and quantitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Furqan B; Irfan, Bismah B; Spiegel, David A

    2012-07-01

    Inadequate access to surgical services results in increased morbidity and mortality from a spectrum of conditions in Pakistan. We employed a modification of Andersen's model of health services utilization and developed a 'Healthcare Barrier Model,' to characterize the barriers to accessing health care in developing countries, using surgical care in Pakistan as a case study. We performed a literature search from MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Global Health Database, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and selected 64 of 3113 references for analysis. Patient-related variables included age (elderly), gender (female), preferential use of alternative health providers (Hakeem, traditional healers, others), personal perceptions regarding disease and potential for treatment, poverty, personal expenses for healthcare, lack of social support, geographic constraints to accessing a health facility, and compromised general health status as it relates to the development of surgical disease. Environmental barriers include deficiencies in governance, the burden of displaced or refugee populations, and aspects of the medicolegal system, which impact treatment and referral. Barriers relating to the health system include deficiencies in capacity (infrastructure, physical resources, human resources) and organization, and inadequate monitoring. Provider-related barriers include deficiencies in knowledge and skills (and ongoing educational opportunities), delays in referral, deficient communication, and deficient numbers of female health providers for female patients. The Healthcare Barrier model addresses this broad spectrum of barriers and is designed to help formulate a framework of healthcare barriers. To overcome these barriers will require a multidisciplinary, multisectoral effort aimed at strengthening the health system. PMID:22079839

  18. Competitive Reactions to Advertising and Promotion Attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Jan-Benedict E. M. Steenkamp; Vincent R. Nijs; Dominique M. Hanssens; Dekimpe, Marnik G.

    2005-01-01

    How do competitors react to each other's price-promotion and advertising attacks? What are the reasons for the observed reaction behavior? We answer these questions by performing a large-scale empirical study on the short-run and long-run reactions to promotion and advertising shocks in over 400 consumer product categories over a four-year time span. Our results clearly show that the most predominant form of competitive response is passive in nature. When a reaction does occur, it is usually ...

  19. 77 FR 59932 - Single Source Award; Exception to Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Competition AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Exception to Competition--Single Source Award to Texas Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) East--University of...

  20. THE ROLE OF SUNK COSTS IN ENTRY PROCESS INTO A FOREIGN MARKET: THEORETICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nadtochii

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The category of sunk costs is studied along with specific features of entry barriers. Different scientific approaches in defining a category are compared to make author's own. The study elucidates a role of sunk costs, including its influence on researching a market, evaluating an efficiency of entering into market and evaluating its risk. The paper highlights three main components of sunk costs, that are: investments to reduce production costs of incumbents relative to newcomers, investments to change a structure of rival's costs and investments to positive change of a demand on a product. Author proposes to consider sunk costs as a strategic barrier, due to a huge influence of incumbents' activities. A need to invest these costs also determines a high competitiveness of a new firm.

  1. The spirit of competition: to win or not to win.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Szczepinska

    Full Text Available A competition is a contest between individuals or groups. The gain is often an award or recognition, which serves as a catalyst to motivate individuals to put forth their very best. Such events for recognition and success are part of many International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB Student Council Regional Student Groups (RSGs activities. These include a popular science article contest, a Wikipedia article competition, travel grants, poster and oral presentation awards during conferences, and quizzes at social events. Organizing competitions is no different than any other event; they require a lot of hard work to be successful. Each event gives remarkable organizational and social experience for students running it, while at the same time the participants of the competitions are rewarded by prizes and recognition. It gives everybody involved an opportunity to demonstrate their extraordinary talents and skills. Competitions are unique because they bring out both the best and worst in people.

  2. The Spirit of Competition: To Win or Not To Win

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepinska, Teresa; Iwasaki, Wataru; Abeel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A competition is a contest between individuals or groups. The gain is often an award or recognition, which serves as a catalyst to motivate individuals to put forth their very best. Such events for recognition and success are part of many International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) Student Council Regional Student Groups (RSGs) activities. These include a popular science article contest, a Wikipedia article competition, travel grants, poster and oral presentation awards during conferences, and quizzes at social events. Organizing competitions is no different than any other event; they require a lot of hard work to be successful. Each event gives remarkable organizational and social experience for students running it, while at the same time the participants of the competitions are rewarded by prizes and recognition. It gives everybody involved an opportunity to demonstrate their extraordinary talents and skills. Competitions are unique because they bring out both the best and worst in people. PMID:24385894

  3. Stem cell gene therapy for HIV: strategies to inhibit viral entry and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiusto, David L

    2015-03-01

    Since the demonstration of a cure of an HIV+ patient with an allogeneic stem cell transplant using naturally HIV-resistant cells, significant interest in creating similar autologous products has fueled the development of a variety of "cell engineering" approaches to stem cell therapy for HIV. Among the more well-studied strategies is the inhibition of viral entry through disruption of expression of viral co-receptors or through competitive inhibitors of viral fusion with the cell membrane. Preclinical evaluation of these approaches often starts in vitro but ultimately is tested in animal models prior to clinical implementation. In this review, we trace the development of several key approaches (meganucleases, short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and fusion inhibitors) to modification of hematopoietic stem cells designed to impart resistance to HIV to their T-cell and monocytic progeny. The basic evolution of technologies through in vitro and in vivo testing is discussed as well as the pros and cons of each approach and how the addition of postentry inhibitors may enhance the overall antiviral efficacy of these approaches. PMID:25578054

  4. Significance of Creative Competitions to Lithuanian Art of Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Linartas, Darius

    2012-01-01

    The subject matter of the research is architectural competitions in Lithuania to begin with their origin (end of the 18th century) up to the present times (2010). The dissertation aims at disclosing the significance of architectural competitions to art of architecture in Lithuania, improvement of architects’ professional excellence and public meaning of competitive selection, as well as analyzing the preconditions for improvement of the competition system. The following tasks have been raised...

  5. Overcoming Barriers to Wind Development in Appalachian Coal Country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Bailey; Evan Hansen

    2012-10-09

    This research project synthesizes existing data and communication from experts to assess barriers to wind development in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, and Kentucky, and makes recommendations where feasible to reduce or eliminate those barriers.

  6. MARKET ENTRY STRATEGIES TO EMERGING MARKETS: A CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF TURNKEY PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bistra Vassileva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the paper is to analyse the international market entry strategies in the light of globalisation processes and to propose a conceptual model of turnkey projects as market entry mode. The specific research objectives are as follows: 1. to develop an integrated framework of the turnkey marketing process as a conceptual model; 2. to analyse BRICS countries as potential host countries for turnkey projects implementation; 3. to assess potential implications of proposed conceptual model for global market entry decisions.

  7. Differential rollover risk in vehicle-to-traffic barrier collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabauer, Douglas J; Gabler, Hampton C

    2009-10-01

    In the roadside safety community, there has been debate over the influence of vehicle and barrier type on rollover rates in traffic barrier crashes. This study investigated rollover rates between sport utility vehicles (SUVs), pickup trucks, and cars in vehicle-traffic barrier crashes and has examined the effect of barrier type on rollover risk for concrete barrier and metal barrier impacts. The analysis included 955 barrier impact cases that were selected from 11-years of in-depth crash data available through the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) / Crashworthiness Data System (CDS). In real world tow-away level longitudinal barrier collisions, the most important predictors of vehicle rollover were found to be vehicle type and whether the vehicle was tracking prior to barrier impact. Based on binary logistic regression, SUVs were found to have 8 times the risk of rollover as cars in barrier impacts. Although pickups were found to have an increased risk of rollover compared to cars, the risk was not as pronounced as that found for SUVs. This finding has direct implications for the full scale crash testing of longitudinal barriers as the testing procedures have been predicated on the assumption that the pickup truck provides a critical or worst case impact scenario. In towaway crashes, our study does not support the notion that concrete barriers have a higher risk of vehicle rollover than metal beam barriers. PMID:20184839

  8. Analyzing of Trade Barriers to Timber Trade Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Rabiul Islam; Shaharuddin M. Ismail; Chamhuri Siwar

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: This study investigated the issues of trade barriers to timber trade in Malaysia. In recent years, there has been decreasing the trade barriers to timber trade in Malaysia. Approach: Trade barriers to timber trade are an important role in the forest economics sector and take a major player in Malaysias economic growth. There is a growing concern that trade barriers to timber trade are creating both direct and indirect opportunities to environmental trade issues. Results: We...

  9. Analyzing Sustainable Competitive Advantage: Strategically Managing Resource Allocations to Achieve Operational Competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Malek Nurul Aida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In today’s dynamic business environment, a key challenge for all companies is to make adaptive adjustments to their manufacturing strategy. This study demonstrates the competitive priorities of manufacturing strategy in hydro-power case company to evaluate the level of sustainable competitive advantage and also to further analyze how business strategies are aligned with manufacturing strategies. This research is based on new holistic analytical evaluation of manufacturing strategy index, sense and respond, and sustainable competitive advantage models. These models help to describe, evaluate, and optimize resource allocation to meet the performance requirements in dynamic decision making. Furthermore, these models evaluate operational competitiveness for manufacturing strategies according to the multi-criteria priority. The results show that the adjustments of competitive priorities in manufacturing strategies by implementing the proposed holistic analytical models are helpful in strategically managing business operations. The discussion derives the most critical attributes in business operations while alignment of resource allocation with competitive priorities help to strategically focus those attributes. In conclusion, we argue that resource allocation and manufacturing strategies have become the most important capabilities in a business environment where companies focus to get a sustainable competitive advantage.

  10. How to use Competitive Intelligence in nonprofit organizations.

    OpenAIRE

    Dufek, Josef

    2014-01-01

    This work analyzes the possibilities of using of Competitive Intelligence in nonprofit organizations and suggests a method of implementation of Competitive Intelligence in the existing nonprofit organization. In the theoretical part I write about the nonprofit sector in the Czech Republic and selected countries of the European Union and I briefly describe the term Competitive Intelligence. In the practical part I use a questionnaire to analyze the possibilities of using of Competitive Intelli...

  11. Foreign competition and disintermediation: no threat to the German banking system?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia M. Buch

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The German financial system is characterized by low degrees of penetration by foreign commercial banks and of (bank disintermediation compared to, for instance, the United States. This could be attributed to the fact that universal banking in Germany creates implicit barriers to entry. Yet, regulatory and informational differences which are unrelated to universal banking could be responsible for the observed difference. This paper provides a stylized theoretical model of the banking industry, which suggests that market segmentation and limited market entry can be due to a number of factors, including information costs. Preliminary empirical evidence does not provide clear evidence for the hypothesis that universal banking is the reason for the observed differences in financial systems.

  12. 1976 Energy Resource Alternatives II Competition. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill, R.A.; Iannucilli, M.; Marshal, J.; Sununu, J.H.; Eschbach, J.E.; Anson, J.; Wark, D.; Stock, D.E.

    1977-10-01

    Descriptions of all the entries in the competition are presented. Competition rules and judging procedures are described. Entries consisted of team efforts from colleges and universities. The competition called for the student teams to develop means for producing electrical power sufficient to meet the needs of a single family home, using an energy source other than oil or natural gas. The electric power produced had to be economically realistic when compared to present energy sources.

  13. Barriers to increased market-oriented activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisp, Søren

    1999-01-01

    -oriented activity. A framework of six generic domains is suggested: Organizational structure, human resource management, market-oriented activity competence, psychological climate, managers' personality characteristics, and individually held beliefs. A model is suggested inter-relating the domains....... and related activities still seem to attract relatively few resources is not answered by supplying another checklist or package of facilitators. Based on published conceptual writings and empirical studies this article makes an account of what the intra-organizational barriers may be to increased market...

  14. Designing Competitions: How to Maintain Motivation for Losers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Rita J.; Cummings, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Competition can either increase motivation by providing an added incentive or decrease motivation by threatening participants' sense of competence. The authors used two rounds of competition to examine whether competitions can be structured in ways that motivate high performance and do not discourage losers. Results indicated that a focus on…

  15. Entry and incumbent innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Weinschenk, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    We explore how the threat of entry influences the innovation activity of an incumbent. We show that the incumbent’s investment is hump-shaped in the entry threat. When the entry threat is small and increases, the incumbent invests more to deter entry, or to make it unlikely. This is due to the entry deterrence effect. However, when the threat becomes huge, entry can no longer profitably be deterred or made unlikely and the investment becomes small. Then the Schumpeterian effect dominates. The...

  16. The prequalified competition - how are architects appointed to invited architectural competitions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Rönn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents results from a study of prequalification in architectural competitions. The aim is to develop knowledge of how the organizer appoints candidates to invited competitions. Prequalification is a selection procedure used early in the competition process to identifysuitable candidates for the following design phase. Usually three to six teams are invited to develop design proposals. The overall research question in the study is about how organizers identify architects / design teams for competitions with limited participation. The methodology includes an inventory of competitions, case studies, document review and interviews of key-persons. Ten municipal and governmental competitions have been examined in the study. There are 375 applications from design teams in the competitions. 43 architect firms/teams (11 % have been invited. In five of the ten competitions 19 informants have reported their experiences of prequalification. The informants responded to an interview guide with questions on the background of the competition, development of the invitation, and the need for information about the candidates, assessment process and experience from the selection of architects / design teams. The invitation emerges during negotiation at the organizing body, which includes discussion with the Swedish Association of Architects.General conditions, submission requirements and criteria for the evaluation of applications by architect firms are part of an established practice. All clients have an assessment procedure made up of two distinct stages. First they check whether applications meet the specific “must requirements” in the invitation. Thereafter follows an evaluative assessment of the candidate’s professional profile, which is based on the criteria in the invitation. Reference projects and information from the referees are important sources of information in this stage. Decisivein the final assessment is the organizer

  17. STRATEGY TO INCREASE THE FARM COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Sgroi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Italy’s wine-growing production structure is highly pulverized. So, for many wine-growing farms lowering the production cost represents the only way of gaining a competitive advantage. Production at average unit costs lower than competitors allows to improve profitability. Among farming operations, winter pruning and tying of productive vine-branches require a high human labor. For this reason the paper presents the results of research conducted on a sample of Sicilian wine-producing farms in order to study the cost-effectiveness to make the pruning and the subsequent ligation of productive branches with tools that facilitate the work. The economic analysis, after the determination of minimum optimum size, shows that the investment is suitable for both large or small farms. This denotes how the process innovation could represent a way to achieve a cost leadership and improve profit margin.

  18. Nurses' Psychosocial Barriers to Suicide Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Valente

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicide remains a serious health care problem and a sentinel event tracked by The Joint Commission. Nurses are pivotal in evaluating risk and preventing suicide. Analysis of nurses' barriers to risk management may lead to interventions to improve management of suicidal patients. These data emerged from a random survey of 454 oncology nurses' attitudes, knowledge of suicide, and justifications for euthanasia. Instruments included a vignette of a suicidal patient and a suicide attitude questionnaire. Results. Psychological factors (emotions, unresolved grief, communication, and negative judgments about suicide complicate the nurse's assessment and treatment of suicidal patients. Some nurses (=122 indicated that euthanasia was never justified and 11 were unsure of justifications and evaluated each case on its merits. Justifications for euthanasia included poor symptom control, poor quality of life, incurable illness or permanent disability, terminal illness, and terminal illness with inadequate symptom control or impending death, patient autonomy, and clinical organ death. The nurses indicated some confusion and misconceptions about definitions and examples of euthanasia, assisted suicide, and double effect. Strategies for interdisciplinary clinical intervention are suggested to identify and resolve these psychosocial barriers.

  19. BRAND AS A SOURCE OF COMPETITIVE BANKS IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Rutecka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Competition companies enterprises in every sector of the economy. In the age of twenty-first century all parties compete with each other for recognition and trust of cus-tomers. It is a tough challenge especially in the banking services sector. These institutions are not able to stand out in the market offer, because this is similar to competitors. High barriers to entry and a large number of entities that provide services similar to banks threaten these organizations. Currently on the market of banking services is proving to be an important brand. Distinguishing itself from the competition image and brand loyalty is a source of advantage for Polish banks. The building of a strong brand plays an important role such factors as internal communication-on company, advertising, business processes, quality, relations with investors and customers. Its construction is a challenge for many banks, because around it must focus on the whole strategy of the company.

  20. Advanced bibliometric to model the relationship between entry behaviour and networking emerging technological communities

    OpenAIRE

    Debackere, Koenraad; B. CLARYSSE

    1997-01-01

    Organisational ecology and social network theory are used to explain entries in technological communities. Using bibliometric data on 411 organisations in the field of plant biotechnology, we test several hypotheses that entry is not only influenced by the density of the field, but also by the structure of the R&D network within the community. The empirical findings point to the usefulness of bibliometric data in mapping change and evolution in technological communities as well as to the ef...

  1. Strategic Entry Deterrence and the Behavior of Pharmaceutical Incumbents Prior to Patent Expiration

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn Ellison; Sara Fisher Ellison

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops a new approach to testing for strategic entry deterrence and applies it to the behavior of pharmaceutical incumbents just before they lose patent protection. The approach involves looking at a cross-section of markets and examining whether behavior is nonmonotonic in the size of the market. Under certain conditions, investment levels will be monotone in market size if firms are not influenced by a desire to deter entry. Strategic investments, however, may be nonmonotone be...

  2. The entry-level occupational therapy clinical doctorate: advantages, challenges, and international issues to consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Crabtree, Jeffrey L; Mu, Keli; Wells, Joe

    2015-04-01

    Internationally, occupational therapy education has gone through several paradigm shifts during the last few decades, moving from certificate to diploma to bachelors to masters and now in some instances to clinical doctorate as the entry-level professional credential to practice. In the United States there is a recommendation under consideration by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) that by 2025, all occupational therapy university programs will move to the clinical doctorate level. It should be noted, however, that the AOTA Board can only make recommendations and it is the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) who has regulatory authority to approve such a change. What are the potential implications for the profession, our clients, and funders of occupational therapy services? What are the primary drivers for the move towards the clinical doctorate being the educational entry point? Is the next step in the evolution of occupational therapy education globally a shift to the entry-level clinical doctorate? This article reviews current literature and discusses issues about the occupational therapy entry-level clinical doctorate. The published evidence available about the occupational therapy entry-level clinical doctorate is summarized and the perceived or frequently cited pros and cons of moving to the clinical doctorate as the singular entry point to occupational therapy practice are considered. The potential impacts of the introduction of the clinical doctorate as the entry-to-practice qualification across the United States on the occupational therapy community internationally will be briefly discussed. If the United States moves toward the entry-level clinical doctorate as the only educational starting point for the profession, will other jurisdictions follow suit? Further discourse and investigation of this issue both inside and outside of the United States is needed so that informed decisions can be made.

  3. Analyzing Sustainable Competitive Advantage: Strategically Managing Resource Allocations to Achieve Operational Competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Malek Nurul Aida; Shahzad Khuram; Takala Josu; Bojnec Stefan; Papler Drago; Liu Yang

    2015-01-01

    In today’s dynamic business environment, a key challenge for all companies is to make adaptive adjustments to their manufacturing strategy. This study demonstrates the competitive priorities of manufacturing strategy in hydro-power case company to evaluate the level of sustainable competitive advantage and also to further analyze how business strategies are aligned with manufacturing strategies. This research is based on new holistic analytical evaluation of manufacturing strategy index, sens...

  4. Mission Sizing and Trade Studies for Low Ballistic Coefficient Entry Systems to Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Soumyo; Smith, Brandon; Prabhu, Dinesh; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2012-01-01

    The U.S and the U.S.S.R. have sent seventeen successful atmospheric entry missions to Venus. Past missions to Venus have utilized rigid aeroshell systems for entry. This rigid aeroshell paradigm sets performance limitations since the size of the entry vehicle is constrained by the fairing diameter of the launch vehicle. This has limited ballistic coefficients (beta) to well above 100 kg/m2 for the entry vehicles. In order to maximize the science payload and minimize the Thermal Protection System (TPS) mass, these missions have entered at very steep entry flight path angles (gamma). Due to Venus thick atmosphere and the steep-gamma, high- conditions, these entry vehicles have been exposed to very high heat flux, very high pressures and extreme decelerations (upwards of 100 g's). Deployable aeroshells avoid the launch vehicle fairing diameter constraint by expanding to a larger diameter after the launch. Due to the potentially larger wetted area, deployable aeroshells achieve lower ballistic coefficients (well below 100 kg/m2), and if they are flown at shallower flight path angles, the entry vehicle can access trajectories with far lower decelerations (50-60 g's), peak heat fluxes (400 W/cm2) and peak pressures. The structural and TPS mass of the shallow-gamma, low-beta deployables are lower than their steep-gamma, high-beta rigid aeroshell counterparts at larger diameters, contributing to lower areal densities and potentially higher payload mass fractions. For example, at large diameters, deployables may attain aeroshell areal densities of 10 kg/m2 as opposed to 50 kg/m2 for rigid aeroshells. However, the low-beta, shallow-gamma paradigm also raises issues, such as the possibility of skip-out during entry. The shallow-gamma could also increase the landing footprint of the vehicle. Furthermore, the deployable entry systems may be flexible, so there could be fluid-structure interaction, especially in the high altitude, low-density regimes. The need for precision in

  5. Barriers to the exchange of hydrometeorological data in Europe: Results from a survey and implications for data policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglione, A.; Borga, M.; Balabanis, P.; Blöschl, G.

    2010-11-01

    SummaryA survey has been conducted to understand what are the perceived barriers to the free exchange of hydrometeorological data in Europe. A total of 127 questionnaires were received of which 61 were completed by data providers and 66 by data users in 32 European countries with a total 631 entries (i.e. assessments of barriers affecting one data type) in the questionnaires. The responses have been analysed in terms of what barriers are perceived to exist, whether there are differences between research, industry and administration, between the West and East of Europe, and between different data types. The responses suggest that the most important barriers are of economic nature. The majority of the data users think there exist economic barriers to the free exchange of the data (significant at the 0.01% level) while the data providers give mixed results. Out of the types of institutions, the research institutions give the most significant response of the existence of economic barriers, followed by industry and administration. For the East European countries economic barriers are considered a much more serious problem than for the West. Out of the data types surveyed, precipitation and geospatial data are considered to be the most critical in terms of costs. The differences between the perceptions of data providers and data users depend strongly on the type of barrier. The differences are smallest for legal barriers (such as licensing of data), followed by the economic barriers and are largest for the practical barriers. Conflict of interest is another potential barrier examined in the survey. Suggestions are given on how to address the economic barriers in a European context.

  6. Market Entry Strategy of Casamundo GmbH to the Czech Market

    OpenAIRE

    Zapletalová, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to select the most suitable market entry mode and create a marketing strategy for accommodation rental company Casamundo GmbH. Suggested strategy will be based on characteristics of the Czech market and consumers and will help the company to establish itself in the market. The thesis is divided into three parts. Theoretical part summarizes main concepts and frameworks focused on foreign market entry and marketing strategy creation. It is followed by introductio...

  7. Barriers to drug delivery in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraman, Shravan Kumar; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in the field of drug delivery. The advent of engineered nanoparticles has allowed us to circumvent the initial limitations to drug delivery such as pharmacokinetics and solubility. However, in spite of significant advances to tumor targeting, an effective treatment strategy for malignant tumors still remains elusive. Tumors possess distinct physiological features which allow them to resist traditional treatment approaches. This combined with the complexity of the biological system presents significant hurdles to the site-specific delivery of therapeutic drugs. One of the key features of engineered nanoparticles is that these can be tailored to execute specific functions. With this review, we hope to provide the reader with a clear understanding and knowledge of biological barriers and the methods to exploit these characteristics to design multifunctional nanocarriers, effect useful dosing regimens and subsequently improve therapeutic outcomes in the clinic. PMID:25068098

  8. Summary and frequency of barriers to adoption of CPOE in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Clemens Scot; Goetz, Kristina

    2015-02-01

    Medical errors are common, costly, and can potentially be life threatening to patients. Recent studies have established that Computer Provider Order Entry (CPOE) systems reduce medical errors as well as improve safety, quality, and value of patient care. However, research regarding adoption factors associated with CPOE systems is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to determine adoption factors by identifying the frequency of barriers through the analysis of literature and research. A systematic literature review was conducted from EBSCO Host and Google Scholar. The search criteria focused on publication date, keywords, and peer reviewed articles. The final set established for evaluation was ten articles. The authors summarized each article and then identified common barriers. Throughout the ten articles, 31 barriers were identified; 15 of which were unique. The three most frequent barriers identified were: process changes (23%), training (13%), and efficacy (10%). The results of this review identify to policy makers levers to incentivize to encourage adoption. The results also illustrate to vendors the importance of factors to include in both marketing and development. The leadership of healthcare organizations should be encouraged to see such results and know that their concerns are heard. If policy makers and vendors help healthcare organizations overcome barriers to adoption, the organization has a better chance of successful CPOE implementation. If successfully implemented, a CPOE system can improve the process of care, quality of care, and patient outcomes; all of which address issues of Meaningful Use. PMID:25638719

  9. 品牌市场竞争壁垒评价模型在蜂行业的应用研究%Application Research of Bee Industry Based on Brand Market Competitive Barriers Evaluation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭必丽; 罗正公

    2015-01-01

    品牌是竞争日趋激烈的商品市场上一个熟悉的热名词,打造一流品牌并能够建立起厚实有力的品牌防线是当前企业突破重围的关键。品牌市场竞争壁垒是企业维护其品牌优势的核心力量,对其准确的评价是维护品牌持续永久发展的重要工作之一。通过建立品牌市场竞争壁垒评价模型,说明品牌市场竞争壁垒由符合市场需求、满足情感需求、消费者习惯的建立、产品品质的独特性、品类创新能力等五个主要元素构成,根据品牌竞争壁垒的指标体系,运用模糊综合评价法对品牌的竞争壁垒强弱做出一定的判断。为了验证品牌竞争壁垒评价模型,选取蜂行业中具有代表性的蜂品牌作为实证研究对象,分析了蜂行业品牌市场竞争壁垒现状,为蜂企业营销策略的制定提供了参考依据。%Brand is a familiar heat term to the increasingly competitive commodity market, it is the key to be able to break the siege for enterprise to create first-class brand and build brand of defense. Brand market competitive barriers is the core force of enterprise to maintain its brand advantage, accurating evaluation for it is one of the important work of maintain sustained permanent brand development. In this paper, through establishing the brand market competitive barriers evaluation model, introduced the brand market barriers to competition consists of five main elements were as follows, to line with market demand, to meet the emotional needs, to establish the consumer habits, the unique quality of products and the category innovation ability. According to the index system brand barriers to competition, using fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method to make certain judgments of strong or weak of the brand barriers to competition. In order to verify the brand market competitive barriers evaluation model, select the representative bee brand of bee industry as the research object

  10. A Brief Introduction to Competition and Play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Scanlan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This introduction sets the stage for a NANO special issue on how competition and play revolutionized Victorian work, how these ideas operate in endurance sports, and how they might get remade in digital spaces.

  11. Entry Modes of Starbucks

    OpenAIRE

    Santamaría Sotillo, Beatriz; Ni, Shuang

    2008-01-01

    Topic:When an MNC seeks to enter a foreign country, it must choose the most appropriate entry mode for that specific market, such as exporting, licensing, a turnkey project, franchising, joint ventures or wholly-owned subsidiaries. There are many factors which affect the choice of entry modes. Influential factors contributing to the entry mode decision can have different degrees of impact for each particular country. As a consequence, an MNC has to use different entry modes in order to adapt ...

  12. ENTRYSAT: A 3U Cubesat to Study the Re-Entry Atmospheric Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R. F.; Chaix, J.; Mimoun, D.; EntrySat student Team

    2014-04-01

    The EntrySat is a 3U CubeSat designed to study the uncontrolled atmospheric re-entry. The project, developed by ISAE in collaboration with ONERA, is funded by CNES and is intended to be launched in January 2016, in the context of the QB50 network. The scientific goal is to relate the kinematics of the satellite with the aerothermodynamic environment during re-entry. In particular, data will be compared with the computations of MUSIC/FAST, a new 6-degree of freedom code developed by ONERA to predict the trajectory of space debris. According to these requirements, the satellite will measure the temperature, pressure, heat flux, and drag force during re-entry, as well as the trajectory and attitude of the satellite. One of the major technological challenges is the retrieval of data during the re-entry phase, which will be based on the Iridium satellite network. The system design is based on the use of commercial COTS components, and is mostly developed by students from ISAE. As such, the EntrySat has an important educational value in the formation of young engineers.

  13. Competitive Intelligence in Perspective to be a Source of Competitive Advantage and Strategic Contributions

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Gama Buzzerio; Reynaldo Cavalheiro Marcondes

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the prospect of Competitive Intelligence (CI) constitute a source of competitive advantage in light of the Resource Based View and its contribution to the strategic management of the company. Relies on exploratory and descriptive research using the qualitative method. Six managers responsible for CI activities institutionalized in large different business companies were interviewed. Data were processed and analyzed with the application of content analysis. It was conclud...

  14. Does it Pay to do Well in Competitions? The case of the Queen Elizabeth Piano Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Ginsburgh, V.; van Ours, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Pianists who achieve high scores in the Queen Elizabeth musical competition are rewarded by subsequent success.It is not clear whether this is caused by the score itself or because those who have high scores are better pianists anyway. Since the timing and the order of appearance are good instrumental variables for the nal ranking, our data on eleven subsequent competitions make it possible to distinguish between the two alternative explanations.We find that high scores have an impact on late...

  15. Barriers to emergency obstetric care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Echoka, Elizabeth; Makokha, Anselimo; Dubourg, Dominique;

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pregnancy-related mortality and morbidity in most low and middle income countries can be reduced through early recognition of complications, prompt access to care and appropriate medical interventions following obstetric emergencies. We used the three delays framework to explore...... barriers to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) services by women who experienced life threatening obstetric complications in Malindi District, Kenya. Methods: A facility-based qualitative study was conducted between November and December 2010. In-depth interviews were conducted with 30 women who experienced...... obstetric "near miss" at the only public hospital with capacity to provide comprehensive EmOC services in the district. Elizabeth Echoka1,&, Anselimo Makokha2, Dominique Dubourg3, Yeri Kombe1, Lillian Nyandieka1, Jens Byskov4 Results: Findings indicate that pregnant women experienced delays in making...

  16. Barriers to increasing market-oriented activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisp, Søren

    innovation rather than supplying large volumes of consistent quality products. One recommendation from policy-makers and academia to industry is to increase its market-oriented activity. A major reason for the recommendation is that market-oriented activity is considered a major contributor to successful...... product development. Despite the increasing evidence of a positive relationship between above average business performance and a high level of market-oriented activity, normative recommendations on how to increase the level of market-oriented activity is sparse. The scientific contribution of the present......Introduction: The Danish food processing industry faces a situation in which intensified competition in its primary markets and product categories forces several companies to rethink their relative focus in terms of marketing rather than production, or, in other words, in terms of value adding...

  17. Rethinking Social Barriers to Effective Adaptive Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Simon; Schultz, Lisen; Bekessy, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to environmental management based on learning-by-doing, where complexity, uncertainty, and incomplete knowledge are acknowledged and management actions are treated as experiments. However, while adaptive management has received significant uptake in theory, it remains elusively difficult to enact in practice. Proponents have blamed social barriers and have called for social science contributions. We address this gap by adopting a qualitative approach to explore the development of an ecological monitoring program within an adaptive management framework in a public land management organization in Australia. We ask what practices are used to enact the monitoring program and how do they shape learning? We elicit a rich narrative through extensive interviews with a key individual, and analyze the narrative using thematic analysis. We discuss our results in relation to the concept of 'knowledge work' and Westley's (2002) framework for interpreting the strategies of adaptive managers-'managing through, in, out and up.' We find that enacting the program is conditioned by distinct and sometimes competing logics-scientific logics prioritizing experimentation and learning, public logics emphasizing accountability and legitimacy, and corporate logics demanding efficiency and effectiveness. In this context, implementing adaptive management entails practices of translation to negotiate tensions between objective and situated knowledge, external experts and organizational staff, and collegiate and hierarchical norms. Our contribution embraces the 'doing' of learning-by-doing and marks a shift from conceptualizing the social as an external barrier to adaptive management to be removed to an approach that situates adaptive management as social knowledge practice. PMID:27351578

  18. Rethinking Social Barriers to Effective Adaptive Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Simon; Schultz, Lisen; Bekessy, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to environmental management based on learning-by-doing, where complexity, uncertainty, and incomplete knowledge are acknowledged and management actions are treated as experiments. However, while adaptive management has received significant uptake in theory, it remains elusively difficult to enact in practice. Proponents have blamed social barriers and have called for social science contributions. We address this gap by adopting a qualitative approach to explore the development of an ecological monitoring program within an adaptive management framework in a public land management organization in Australia. We ask what practices are used to enact the monitoring program and how do they shape learning? We elicit a rich narrative through extensive interviews with a key individual, and analyze the narrative using thematic analysis. We discuss our results in relation to the concept of `knowledge work' and Westley's 2002) framework for interpreting the strategies of adaptive managers—`managing through, in, out and up.' We find that enacting the program is conditioned by distinct and sometimes competing logics—scientific logics prioritizing experimentation and learning, public logics emphasizing accountability and legitimacy, and corporate logics demanding efficiency and effectiveness. In this context, implementing adaptive management entails practices of translation to negotiate tensions between objective and situated knowledge, external experts and organizational staff, and collegiate and hierarchical norms. Our contribution embraces the `doing' of learning-by-doing and marks a shift from conceptualizing the social as an external barrier to adaptive management to be removed to an approach that situates adaptive management as social knowledge practice.

  19. Barriers to and driving forces for energy efficiency in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing industry in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Rohdin, Patrik; Thollander, Patrik

    2006-01-01

    The manufacturing industry is facing tougher competition which increases the demand to implement cost-effective energy efficiency measures. However, studies have indicated that obvious cost-efficient measures are not always undertaken. This is explained by the existence of barriers to energy efficiency. The aim of this study is to investigate the existence and importance of different barriers to the implementation of energy efficiency measures in the Swedish non energy intensive manufacturing...

  20. The Effects of Entry in Bilateral Oligopoly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Dickson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of entry into the market for a single commodity in which both sellers and buyers are permitted to interact strategically. With the inclusion of an additional seller, the market is quasi-competitive: the price falls and volume of trade increases, as expected. However, contrary to the conventional wisdom, existing sellers’ payoffs may increase. The conditions under which entry by new sellers raises the equilibrium payoffs of existing sellers are derived. These depend in an intuitive way on the elasticity of a strategic analog of demand and the market share of existing sellers, and encompass entirely standard economic environments. Similar results are derived relating to the entry of additional buyers and the effects of entry on both sides of the market are investigated.

  1. Organizational barriers to effective communication and how to overcome them

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何一民

    2013-01-01

    Effective communication has long been credited as a prime factor in achieving high levels of organizational effective-ness. In this essay, the author will discuss the five barriers to or-ganizational communication and the resolutions to overcome them. the author concludes that the overall ways to overcome communication barriers are communication audits and establish differentiated communication cultures to ensure two-way com-munication.

  2. Navigating the Road to Success: A Systematic Approach to Preparing Competitive Grant Proposals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Mackenzie

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Difficulty in securing research funding has been cited as one barrier to the involvement of more librarians and information professionals in conducting original research. This article seeks to support the work of librarians who wish to secure research funding by describing a systematic approach to the creation of successful grant applications.Approach The authors draw on more than fifteen years collective experience in supporting the development of successful research grant proposals. Eleven grant‐writing best practicesor ‘key approaches’ are described, and a planning timeline is suggested.Conclusions: Use of these best practices can assist researchers in creating successful research grant proposals that will also help streamline the research process once it is underway. It is important to recognize the competitive nature of research grant competitions, obtain feedback from an internal review panel, and use feedback from funding agencies to strengthen future grant applications.

  3. 9 CFR 381.208 - Poultry products offered for entry and entered to be handled and transported as domestic; entry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Poultry products offered for entry and... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Imported Poultry Products §...

  4. Territorial Competitiveness Index applied to Heredia cantons in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Fonseca Hernández

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Territorial Competitiveness Index in Heredia cantons is assessed in this paper using a weighted index including five basic components: economic-business, socio-demographic, infrastructure, local governance, and environmental. Results help identify competitive strengths and weaknesses of each canton, which provides valuable information to entrepreneurial investors in order to assess the permanence or opening of a productive activity in the territory and to local authorities in order to identify variables to improve.  The Territorial Competitiveness Index classifies cantons by the level of competitiveness associated and identifies the variables that explain such competitiveness and the location of SMEs.  Results are compared with other methodologies used in the country to measure socio-economic aspects, human, and local government development, allowing for a broad view of the particular competitive aspects related to each canton.

  5. Barriers to the exchange of hydrometeorological data across Europe - results from a survey and implications for data policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöschl, Günter; Viglione, Alberto; Balabanis, Panos; Borga, Marco

    2010-05-01

    A survey has been conducted to understand what are the perceived barriers to the free exchange of hydrometeorological data across Europe. A total of 127 questionnaires were received of which 61 were completed by data providers and 66 by data users in 32 European countries with a total 631 entries (i.e. assessments of barriers affecting one data type) in the questionnaires. The responses have been analysed in terms of what barriers are perceived to exist, whether there are differences between research, industry and administration, between the West and East of Europe, and between different data types. The responses suggest that the most important barriers are of economic nature. The majority of the data users think there exist economic barriers to the free exchange of the data (significant at the 0.01% level) while the data providers give mixed results. Out of the types of institutions, the research institutions give the most significant response of the existence of economic barriers, followed by industry and administration. For the East European countries economic barriers are considered a much more serious problem than for the West. Out of the data types surveyed, precipitation and geospatial data are considered to be the most critical in terms of costs. The differences between the perceptions of data providers and data users depend strongly on the type of barrier. The differences are smallest for legal barriers (such as licensing of data), followed by the economic barriers and are largest for the practical barriers. Conflict of interest is another potential barrier examined in the survey.

  6. 外资银行进入对我国银行业竞争度的影响--基于Panzar-Rosse模型的实证研究%The Effects of Foreign Banks Entry on the Competition Degree in Banking Industry of China---Based on Empirical Research of Panzar-Rosse Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周立; 王涛; 赵玮

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the authors apply the Panzar-Rosse model to assess the degree of market competition in the banking industry of China between 1997 and 2011, and then analyze the relationship between foreign bank penetration and the degree of market competition empirically. The empirical results suggest that the banks China are operation under monopo-listic competition and the competition in banking industry is U-shaped curve, and the degree of competition dropped signifi-cantly after the financial crisis in 2008. The asset share of foreign banks is negatively correlated with the degree of market competition, while the number of foreign banks is not relevant to the degree of market competition, so foreign banks entry can not promote the market competition in China banking industry. Chinese banking market gradually developed is the root reason of the change of the degree of market competition.%1997~2011年这15年间我国银行业处于垄断竞争状态,市场竞争度呈现先减后增的U型变化趋势,而2008年国际金融危机后我国银行业市场竞争度下降。外资银行资产份额与市场竞争程度存在负相关关系,而机构数量与竞争度不相关,外资银行进入未能促进我国银行业的竞争,中国银行业市场逐步发展完善是市场竞争度变化的根本原因。

  7. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Report to Congress, June 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This report examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome these barriers. Three groups of energy efficiency technologies and measures were examined: industrial end-use energy efficiency, industrial demand response, and industrial combined heat and power. This report also includes the estimated economic benefits from hypothetical Federal energy efficiency matching grants, as directed by the Act.

  8. Market barriers and success factors in the competition between gas suppliers; Marktbarrieren und Erfolgsfaktoren im Gas-zu-Gas-Wettbewerb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Credo, Franziska; Kranzusch, Sabrina; Lueers, Thomas [Prof. Homburg und Partner Managementberatung, Mannheim (Germany). Kompetenzzentrum Energy and Utilities

    2010-06-15

    Over the past years customers have heightened their awareness of matters relating to gas. Moreover, as a result of increasing market transparency, the removal of regulatory barriers and the growing number of suppliers, customers are finding themselves more and more in the focus of energy suppliers. Established suppliers now face the challenge of strengthening their market position in order to solidify their position in a restless energy market. A new market study examines the current status of the gas market and gives an outlook on future developments.

  9. Domain Ⅲ of Dengue Virus Serotype 2 Envelope:Expression at High Levels in Escherichia coli and Competitive Inhibition of Virus Entry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Obejective The domainⅢof dengue virus type 2 envelope was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the inhibited effects of recombinant protein on virus was detected. Methods In this study, the domainⅢ(DⅢ) protein of the dengue virus type-2 (DENV-2) envelope (E) antigen was expressed in Escherichia coli by fusion with a carrier protein. The protein was puriifed using enzymatic cleavage and afifnity puriifcation. Rabbit immunization and antibody detection was carried out. Inhibition of DENV-2 infection was observed by DENV-2 EDⅢprotein and its immunity rabbits serum. Results The recombinant expression DENV-2 EDⅢ protein plasmid was constructed successfully. After isopropyl thiogalactoside induction, a speciifc soluble 29 kD protein was obtained, and the expression product accounted for 68.87%of the total protein of the cell lysate. Western blot demonstrated the reactivity of the recombinant protein with his-tag and DENV (Ⅰ-Ⅳ) monoclonal antibodies. The protein was puriifed using enzymatic cleavage and affinity purification. The purified recombinant EDⅢ protein inhibited the entry of DENV-2 into BHK-21 cells. DENV-2 plaque neutralization assays were carried out using serially diluted antibodies against EDⅢprotein. At a 1︰16 dilution, the antibodies produced at least 90%neutralization of the DENV-2 virus. Furthermore, the antibodies continued to exhibit high neutralization effects (approximately 80%) until the anti-EDⅢantibody titer reached 1︰1 024. Conclusions DENV-2 EDⅢwas cloned and expressed successfully. DENV-2 EDⅢprotein could be useful in the development of inexpensive dengue vaccine. The data also suggested that DENV-2 employed an attachment molecule or receptor for its entry into C6/36 mosquito cells.

  10. 76 FR 33809 - Amendment and Update to the Entry for an Individual Named in the Annex to Executive Order 13219...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... Persons (``SDN List''). The individual's date of birth has been amended and two addresses and an alternate place of birth have been added to the SDN List entry. The individual was listed in the Annex to... Executive Order 13219 of June 26, 2001.'' DATES: The update to the entry of this individual on the SDN...

  11. Use of technology to provide competitive advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of technology in plotting a new paradigm is explored by means of reviewing NOVA Chemicals' technology strategy for feedstocks, petrochemicals and polymers. As part of this transformation of technology from that of a servant to a key contributor to the success of the company, the expansion (in a 50/50 joint venture with DOW/Union Carbide) of a mammoth 2.8 billion pound ethylene plant at Joffre, Alberta is 'the jewel in the crown'. This plant, with the two ethylene units already on site will make Joffre in the year 2000 the world's largest single site for the manufacture of ethylene. An 800 million pound Advanced SCLAIRTECHTM polystyrene plant, (a proprietary process for the manufacture of high performance polymers initially developed, but considered 'non-strategic' to their own needs, by DuPont and sold to NOVA Chemicals for $ 45 million in 1994), the largest single train of its kind in the world, is also under construction. Also in the early stages of construction on the site is a large linear alpha olefin plant owned by BP-Amoco to supply co-monomer to the polyethylene plant, To back up these facilities, there is a 400 MW cogeneration unit to supply power and steam. NOVA Chemicals Research and Technology Laboratory is a focused world class research facility with an annual budget of $ 37 million, combined with the active collaboration with all major Canadian universities, and targeted projects with other universities around the world , are all necessary components of creating and acquiring the technology that is required to achieve the corporate goals of the company. The high level of investment in research and technology is seen as the pathway to fundamentally change the business and create value which can be realized in the marketplace. Research and technology also help the company to advance the competitiveness of their own processes, keep the company on the cutting edge of technology, and assure its survival among the leaders of the industry

  12. A model for competitiveness level analysis in sports competitions: Application to basketball

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saá Guerra, Y.; Martín González, J. M.; Sarmiento Montesdeoca, S.; Rodríguez Ruiz, D.; García-Rodríguez, A.; García-Manso, J. M.

    2012-05-01

    The degree of overall competitiveness of a sport league is a complex phenomenon. It is difficult to assess and quantify all elements that yield the final standing. In this paper, we analyze the general behavior of the result matrices of each season and we use the corresponding results as a probably density. Thus, the results of previous seasons are a way to investigate the probability that each team has to reach a certain number of victories. We developed a model based on Shannon entropy using two extreme competitive structures (a hierarchical structure and a random structure), and applied this model to investigate the competitiveness of two of the best professional basketball leagues: the NBA (USA) and the ACB (Spain). Both leagues’ entropy levels are high (NBA mean 0.983; ACB mean 0.980), indicating high competitiveness, although the entropy of the ACB (from 0.986 to 0.972) demonstrated more seasonal variability than that of the NBA (from 0.985 to 0.990), a possible result of greater sporting gradients in the ACB. The use of this methodology has proven useful for investigating the competitiveness of sports leagues as well as their underlying variability across time.

  13. METHODS TO INCREASE THE COMPETITIVENESS IN INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion STANCU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial firms are different between them for their economicalcharacteristics, competitive situations and their prospects. Industry andcompetitive analysis use a lot of concepts and methods for obtaining a clearimage concerning the variable conditions from industry and competitivestrong forces. Economical characteristics of industry are important for theirstrategic implications.

  14. Curveball strategies to fool the competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalk, George

    2006-09-01

    In this follow-on piece to his article "Hardball: Five Killer Strategies for Trouncing the Competition" (HBR April 2004), George Stalk of the Boston Consulting Group offers another approach for prevailing over rivals. Strategic hardball is about playing rough and tough with competitors; strategic curveball is about outfoxing them. It involves getting rivals to do something dumb that they otherwise wouldn't (that is, swing at a pitch that appears to be in the strike zone but isn't) or not do something smart that they otherwise would (that is, fail to swing at a pitch that's in the strike zone but appears not to be). Stalk describes four types of curveball: Draw your rival out of the profit zone. Lure competitors into disadvantageous areas--for example, by competing for, but intentionally failing to win, the business of less profitable customers. Borrow techniques from unexpected places. Using the hardball tactic of plagiarizing good ideas, put rivals off balance by importing techniques from other industries--for example, employing the retailer's hard sell in the stodgy world of retail financial services. Disguise how you attain your success. Veil your methods by achieving an advantage through unlikely means--for example, generating product sales through your service operations. Let rivals misinterpret the reasons for your success. Allow them to act on conventional but incomplete explanations for your success--for example, squeezing costs rather than aggressively utilizing assets. The author provides extended examples of these curveball strategies in action, at companies such as the industrial-cleaning chemical supplier Ecolab and the Australian airline Jetstar. PMID:16967625

  15. ASSEMBLED PRODUCTS: THE KEY TO MORE EFFECTIVE COMPETITION AND ANTITRUST OVERSIGHT IN HEALTH CARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, William M

    2016-01-01

    This Article argues that recent calls for antitrust enforcement to protect health insurers from hospital and physician consolidation are incomplete. The principal obstacle to effective competition in health care is not that one or the other party has too much bargaining power, but that they have been buying and selling the wrong things. Vigorous antitrust enforcement will benefit health care consumers only if it accounts for the competitive distortions caused by the sector's long history of government regulation. Because of regulation, what pass for products in health care are typically small process steps and isolated components that can be assigned a billing code, even if they do little to help patients. Instead of further entrenching weakly competitive parties engaged in artificial commerce, antitrust enforcers and regulators should work together to promote the sale of fully assembled products and services that can be warranted to consumers for performance and safety. As better products emerge through innovation and market entry, competition may finally succeed at lowering medical costs, increasing access to treatment, and improving quality of care. PMID:27062731

  16. ASSEMBLED PRODUCTS: THE KEY TO MORE EFFECTIVE COMPETITION AND ANTITRUST OVERSIGHT IN HEALTH CARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, William M

    2016-01-01

    This Article argues that recent calls for antitrust enforcement to protect health insurers from hospital and physician consolidation are incomplete. The principal obstacle to effective competition in health care is not that one or the other party has too much bargaining power, but that they have been buying and selling the wrong things. Vigorous antitrust enforcement will benefit health care consumers only if it accounts for the competitive distortions caused by the sector's long history of government regulation. Because of regulation, what pass for products in health care are typically small process steps and isolated components that can be assigned a billing code, even if they do little to help patients. Instead of further entrenching weakly competitive parties engaged in artificial commerce, antitrust enforcers and regulators should work together to promote the sale of fully assembled products and services that can be warranted to consumers for performance and safety. As better products emerge through innovation and market entry, competition may finally succeed at lowering medical costs, increasing access to treatment, and improving quality of care.

  17. Barriers to student success in Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail R. Wills

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Various indicators suggest that many students in developing countries are not learning in school. Using Madagascar as a case study, we aimed to: (1 evaluate the effectiveness of education among those enrolled in science and math programs of primary, secondary, and university institutions; and (2 understand barriers to student progression through the education system. To address these aims, we conducted 63 semi-structured interviews in June and August 2012 with science and math teachers in five population centers, across all three levels of the public and private school system. We found that crowded classes, limited resources (pedagogical and infrastructural, an average student age range of seven years per classroom (suggestive of grade repetition and/or late school starting age, and discontinuities in the language of instruction explain why teachers estimated that almost 25% of their students would not finish school. Although most secondary and university teachers taught the sciences only in French, they estimated that just one-third of students could fully understand the language. There were also urban-rural and public-private disparities. Teachers in urban areas were significantly more likely to teach using French than their rural counterparts, while public schools housed significantly larger classes than private institutions. While resource equalisation will help to resolve many of these disparities, improved early training in professional languages and increased local autonomy in designing appropriate curriculums will be necessary to tackle other shortfalls.

  18. Barriers to Research and Evidence (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Brettle

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available I often find attending conferences or workshops a source of reflection or inspiration for editorials, and today I attended an event that proved to be no exception. The HEALER network is a UK grouping of professionals interested in health library research. It brings together those working in health information at an academic, practitioner or strategic capacity as well as those working in higher education, research and the NHS. (http://www.libraryservices.nhs.uk/healer/minutes.htmlThere were a number of interesting presentations, but one (and the subsequent interactive discussions left me with some worrying thoughts. Hannah Spring (2013 presented some of the findings from her PhD that found when health librarians were asked about their barriers to research they reported that they didn't know what research questions to ask! Alternatively if they had research questions they didn't think to engage with the literature or believed that there was no evidence to answer them! If we really don't have any research questions, and we really don't think to look at the literature or there really is no evidence, this is worrying indeed for the future of EBLIP. It's also a situation I don't recognize from being involved in the EBLIP journal and was left wondering whether it was the health librarians perceptions of “research” and “evidence” that was the issue; questions which are being examined in the LIRG Scan which was described in another presentation. The scan is a review of the evidence on: What practitioners understand by research; what kind of research is relevant to LIS practitioners? How do they use research and what are the barriers and facilitators to using research in practice? (https://sites.google.com/site/lirgweb/home/awards/lirg-scan-award The results will be used to help inform the Chartered Institute for Library and Information Professionals’ policy on research.The barrier which I’m much more familiar in terms of engaging with

  19. Barriers to international supply chain management in Iranian flower industry

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Riasi

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the major barriers to international supply chain management in Iranian flower industry. The results of the research revealed that the most important barrier is lack of investment in Iranian flower distribution sector. The results also indicated that the second most important barrier to international supply chain management in Iranian flower industry might be the rules that limit the presence of international distributors in the country’s flower ...

  20. Perceived barriers to physical activity in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzu, Daskapan; Tuzun, Emine Handan; Eker, Levent

    2006-01-01

    Many studies which were published in other countries identified certain benefits and barriers to physical activity among young people. But there is no data about the subject pertaining to Turkish adolescents. This study tries to rectify this with a study of Turkish university students. Undergraduate university students (n = 303) were recruited to the study. Current exercise habits and perceived barriers to physical activity were assessed in the sample. Using a Likert Type scale, participants responded an instrument with 12 items representing barriers to physical activity. Mean scores were computed. External barriers were more important than internal barriers. "Lack of time due to busy lesson schedule", "My parents give academic success priority over exercise. "and "lack of time due to responsibilities related to the family and social environment "were most cited items for physical activity barriers. There is a need for future research, which will be carried out with larger sample groups to develop national standardized instrument. It will be helpful for accurately identify perceived barriers and then recommend changes to enhance physical activity among young people. Key PointsThe purpose of this study was to analyze perceived barriers to physical activity in the university students.The results showed that not having enough time was the most important barrier for not participating in physical activity among our samples.This study with relatively small sample must be considered as pilot study for related studies in the future.

  1. Drivers and barriers to heat stress resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatvani-Kovacs, Gertrud; Belusko, Martin; Skinner, Natalie; Pockett, John; Boland, John

    2016-11-15

    Heatwaves are the most dangerous natural hazard to health in Australia. The frequency and intensity of heatwaves will increase due to climate change and urban heat island effects in cities, aggravating the negative impacts of heatwaves. Two approaches exist to develop population heat stress resilience. Firstly, the most vulnerable social groups can be identified and public health services can prepare for the increased morbidity. Secondly, the population level of adaptation and the heat stress resistance of the built environment can be increased. The evaluation of these measures and their efficiencies has been fragmented across research disciplines. This study explored the relationships between the elements of heat stress resilience and their potential demographic and housing drivers and barriers. The responses of a representative online survey (N=393) about heat stress resilience at home and work from Adelaide, South Australia were analysed. The empirical findings demonstrate that heat stress resistant buildings increased adaptation capacity and decreased the number of health problems. Air-conditioning increased dependence upon it, limited passive adaptation and only people living in homes with whole-house air-conditioning had less health problems during heatwaves. Tenants and respondents with pre-existing health conditions were the most vulnerable, particularly as those with health conditions were not aware of their vulnerability. The introduction of an Energy Performance Certificate is proposed and discussed as an effective incentive to increase the heat stress resistance of and the general knowledge about the built environment. PMID:27432732

  2. FAQ and Recommendations of Amateur Piano Competition Entries%业余钢琴比赛参赛的常见问题及建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨云

    2014-01-01

    近年来业余学习钢琴的人数不断增多,各种形式的钢琴比赛也逐渐丰富起来。要想在比赛中取得好的成绩,曲目的的选择十分重要。不论日常的学琴、练琴还是比赛,重要的音乐的表达,而不是演奏技术的表现。音乐是根本,技术是手段。演奏的过程中音乐性和完整性是取得好成绩的两个至关重要的方面。还有注意临场发挥的问题,逐步积累经验,抱着表达内心音乐的心态去参赛。%In recent years, the number of part-time study piano growing, various forms of piano competitions is gradually en-riched. To achieve good results in the race, the track selection is very important. Whether everyday piano, the piano or compe-tition, the expression of important music playing technique rather than performance. Music is the fundamental technology is the means. Playing music and integrity of the process is to achieve good results in two crucial respects. Also note that the problem spot to play, the gradual accumulation of experience, holding the mind to express inner music competition.

  3. NTCP and Beyond: Opening the Door to Unveil Hepatitis B Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Watashi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection, affecting approximately 240 million people worldwide, is a major public health problem that elevates the risk of developing liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Given that current anti-HBV drugs are limited to interferon-based regimens and nucleos(tide analogs, the development of new anti-HBV agents is urgently needed. The viral entry process is generally an attractive target implicated in antiviral strategies. Using primary cells from humans and Tupaia belangeri, as well as HepaRG cells, important determinants of viral entry have been achieved. Recently, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP was identified as an HBV entry receptor and enabled the establishment of a susceptible cell line that can efficiently support HBV infection. This finding will allow a deeper understanding of the requirements for efficient HBV infection, including the elucidation of the molecular entry mechanism. In addition, pharmacological studies suggest that NTCP is able to serve as a therapeutic target. This article summarizes our current knowledge on the mechanisms of HBV entry and the role of NTCP in this process.

  4. Barriers to participation in mental health research: are there specific gender, ethnicity and age related barriers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Louise

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that the incidence, prevalence and presentation of mental disorders differ by gender, ethnicity and age, and there is evidence that there is also differential representation in mental health research by these characteristics. The aim of this paper is to a review the current literature on the nature of barriers to participation in mental health research, with particular reference to gender, age and ethnicity; b review the evidence on the effectiveness of strategies used to overcome these barriers. Method Studies published up to December 2008 were identified using MEDLINE, PsycINFO and EMBASE using relevant mesh headings and keywords. Results Forty-nine papers were identified. There was evidence of a wide range of barriers including transportation difficulties, distrust and suspicion of researchers, and the stigma attached to mental illness. Strategies to overcome these barriers included the use of bilingual staff, assistance with travel, avoiding the use of stigmatising language in marketing material and a focus on education about the disorder under investigation. There were very few evaluations of such strategies, but there was evidence that ethnically matching recruiters to potential participants did not improve recruitment rates. Educational strategies were helpful and increased recruitment. Conclusion Mental health researchers should consider including caregivers in recruitment procedures where possible, provide clear descriptions of study aims and describe the representativeness of their sample when reporting study results. Studies that systematically investigate strategies to overcome barriers to recruitment are needed.

  5. Analysis on Effective Competition Barrier and Measures of Weapons Equipment Procurement Market%影响武器装备采购市场有效竞争的障碍和对策分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒绍干; 李晓松; 陈庆华

    2013-01-01

    有效竞争理论是解决武器装备采购市场规模经济与竞争活力之间矛盾的有效理论与方法.首先对武器装备采购市场有效竞争进行了分析;研究了制约武器装备采购市场有效竞争障碍;最后提出了促进我国武器装备采购市场实现有效竞争的建议.%Effective competition theory is effective theory and method to solve the conflict between economies of scale and competition in weapons and equipment procurement market. First of all for weapon and equipment procurement market effective competition is analyzed. The restriction of weapons and equipment procurement market effective competition barrier is studied. Finally some advice to promote our country's weapons and equipment procurement market effective competition is suggested.

  6. Educating Students to Give Them a Sustainable Competitive Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Christopher D.; Raymond, Mary Anne; Carlson, Les

    2011-01-01

    With an increasingly competitive job market, this study focuses on what marketing educators can do to help students develop a sustainable competitive advantage. The authors conducted a survey of students, faculty, and recruiters to develop a better understanding of what skills and characteristics might be of value to each group of respondents and…

  7. The competition 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants.

  8. The competition 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzkowski, W.; Surya, Y.; Żuberek, R.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants.

  9. The Competition "First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzkowski, W.; Surya, Y; Zuberek, R

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants. (Contains 1 table.)

  10. Baseline cortisol moderates testosterone reactivity to women's intercollegiate athletic competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David A; Casto, Kathleen V

    2015-04-01

    Recent research suggests that cortisol (C) level moderates testosterone (T) reactivity to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) in men. The extent to which C moderates T reactivity in other circumstances and in women is not known. In this retrospective study, before- and after-competition salivary levels of C and T from 97 intercollegiate women athletes competing in one of four different sports (soccer, volleyball, softball, tennis) were used to evaluate the influence of before-competition C level on T reactivity in women's athletic competition. Athletic competition was associated with a substantial increase in salivary levels of C and T in the vast majority of athletes. Before-competition level of C significantly moderated testosterone reactivity to athletic competition - women with relatively low levels of C showed larger increases in T to competition than women with higher levels of C. Clearly, the moderating effect of C on T reactivity is not limited to laboratory settings intended to increase social stress, but is also seen in (as we show here) the context of athletic competition.

  11. Preferential entry of botulinum neurotoxin A Hc domain through intestinal crypt cells and targeting to cholinergic neurons of the mouse intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Couesnon

    Full Text Available Botulism, characterized by flaccid paralysis, commonly results from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT absorption across the epithelial barrier from the digestive tract and then dissemination through the blood circulation to target autonomic and motor nerve terminals. The trafficking pathway of BoNT/A passage through the intestinal barrier is not yet fully understood. We report that intralumenal administration of purified BoNT/A into mouse ileum segment impaired spontaneous muscle contractions and abolished the smooth muscle contractions evoked by electric field stimulation. Entry of BoNT/A into the mouse upper small intestine was monitored with fluorescent HcA (half C-terminal domain of heavy chain which interacts with cell surface receptor(s. We show that HcA preferentially recognizes a subset of neuroendocrine intestinal crypt cells, which probably represent the entry site of the toxin through the intestinal barrier, then targets specific neurons in the submucosa and later (90-120 min in the musculosa. HcA mainly binds to certain cholinergic neurons of both submucosal and myenteric plexuses, but also recognizes, although to a lower extent, other neuronal cells including glutamatergic and serotoninergic neurons in the submucosa. Intestinal cholinergic neuron targeting by HcA could account for the inhibition of intestinal peristaltism and secretion observed in botulism, but the consequences of the targeting to non-cholinergic neurons remains to be determined.

  12. Advertising Dynamics and Competitive Advantage

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich Doraszelski; Sarit Markovich

    2004-01-01

    Can advertising lead to a sustainable competitive advantage? To answer this question, we propose a dynamic model of advertising competition where firms repeatedly advertise, compete in the product market, and make entry as well as exit decisions. Within this dynamic framework, we study two different models of advertising: In the first model, advertising influences the goodwill consumers extend towards a firm ("goodwill advertising"), whereas in the second model it influences the share of cons...

  13. Pollen competition as a reproductive isolation barrier represses transgene flow between compatible and co-flowering citrus genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Pons

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Despite potential benefits granted by genetically modified (GM fruit trees, their release and commercialization raises concerns about their potential environmental impact, and the transfer via pollen of transgenes to cross-compatible cultivars is deemed to be the greatest source for environmental exposure. Information compiled from field trials on GM trees is essential to propose measures to minimize the transgene dispersal. We have conducted a field trial of seven consecutive years to investigate the maximum frequency of pollen-mediated crop-to-crop transgene flow in a citrus orchard, and its relation to the genetic, phenological and environmental factors involved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three different citrus genotypes carrying the uidA (GUS tracer marker gene (pollen donors and a non-GM self-incompatible contiguous citrus genotype (recipient were used in conditions allowing natural entomophilous pollination to occur. The examination of 603 to 2990 seeds per year showed unexpectedly low frequencies (0.17-2.86% of transgene flow. Paternity analyses of the progeny of subsets of recipient plants using 10 microsatellite (SSR loci demonstrated a higher mating competence of trees from another non-GM pollen source population that greatly limited the mating chance of the contiguous cross-compatible and flowering-synchronized transgenic pollen source. This mating superiority could be explained by a much higher pollen competition capacity of the non-GM genotypes, as was confirmed through mixed-hand pollinations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Pollen competition strongly contributed to transgene confinement. Based on this finding, suitable isolation measures are proposed for the first time to prevent transgene outflow between contiguous plantings of citrus types that may be extendible to other entomophilous transgenic fruit tree species.

  14. Sandberg : Key Strategic Decisions in Regards to Entry on the Japanese Market -

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Anna; Wennberg, Gustaf

    2006-01-01

    Problem: What key strategic decisions are required when choosing the right entry mode for a small Swedish firm, with a high-end jewellery brand, on the complex Japanese market? Purpose: The purpose of this research is to investigate different strategic choices in regards to the entry mode and the introduction of an exclusive brand on the Japanese market. The research will be supported by analysing the current situation of Sandberg and its aim to enter new markets. The authors of this thesis a...

  15. Robotics Competitions: The Choice Is up to You!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard T.; Londt, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Competitive robotics as an interactive experience can increase the level of student participation in technology education, inspire students to consider careers in technical fields, and enhance the visibility of technology education programs. Implemented correctly, a competitive robotics program can provide a stimulating learning environment for…

  16. Competitive Advantaje Anatomy: from Methodological Holism to State Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmin Marinescu

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the orthodox theory of international trade, the argument of selective industrial policy means the state capability of identifying competitive advantages and to exploit them. In this approach, I want to emphasize the necessity of a critical reconsideration of the “competitive advantage” and “national competitiveness”, and also of the implications deriving from these concepts over public policy. First of all, I analyzed the scientifically basis of competitiveness: on the free market, the competitive advantage is given by the entrepreneurial ability, which so becomes the real source of the economic success. Being given any other conditions, meaning here a market affected by state’s interventionism, reaching “competitive advantages” derives from rent-seeking activities which attend to capture public policy.

  17. EntrySat: A 3U CubeStat to study the reentry atmospheric environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Sournac; Raphael, Garcia; David, Mimoun; Jeremie, Chaix

    2016-04-01

    ISAE France Entrysat has for main scientific objective the study of uncontrolled atmospheric re-entry. This project, is developed by ISAE in collaboration with ONERA and University of Toulouse, is funded by CNES, in the overall frame of the QB50 project. This nano-satellite is a 3U Cubesat measuring 34*10*10 cm3, similar to secondary debris produced during the break up of a spacecraft. EntrySat will collect the external and internal temperatures, pressure, heat flux, attitude variations and drag force of the satellite between ≈150 and 90 km before its destruction in the atmosphere, and transmit them during the re-entry using the IRIDIUM satellite network. The result will be compared with the computations of MUSIC/FAST, a new 6-degree of freedom code developed by ONERA to predict the trajectory of space debris. In order to fulfil the scientific objectives, the satellite will acquire 18 re-entry sensors signals, convert them and compress them, thanks to an electronic board developed by ISAE students in cooperation with EREMS. In order to transmit these data every second during the re-entry phase, the satellite will use an IRIDIUM connection. In order to keep a stable enough attitudes during this phase, a simple attitude orbit and control system using magnetotorquers and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is developed at ISAE by students. A commercial GPS board is also integrated in the satellite into Entry Sat to determine its position and velocity which are necessary during the re-entry phase. This GPS will also be used to synchronize the on-board clock with the real-time UTC data. During the orbital phase (≈2 year) EntrySat measurements will be recorded transmitted through a more classical "UHF/VHF" connection. Preference for presentation: Poster Most suitable session: Author for correspondence: Dr Raphael F. Garcia ISAE 10, ave E. Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France Raphael.GARCIA@isae.fr +33 5 61 33 81 14

  18. Competition, the Global Crisis, and Alternatives to Neoliberal Capitalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigger, Angela; Buch-Hansen, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, and particularly throughout the first decade of the twenty-first century, the imperative of capitalist competition has become a totalizing and all-pervasive logic expanding to ever more social domains and geographical areas around the world. Sustained by neoliberal competition...... regulation and other regulatory provisions, excessive competition (over-competition) in the process of capital accumulation has become a major global force with highly detrimental social and environmental downsides. From the vantage point of a historical materialist perspective, the article provides......, and environmental sustainability, the article seeks to outline an alternative vision to the ideas and social practices that have sustained the existing competition order thus far....

  19. Process for Administering Distributed Academic Competitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-02-04

    Currently, academic-type competitions are scored using a combination of timer clocks, entries on paper, and individual computers to consolidate individual entries. Such a system is unwieldy, time-consuming, and depends on the individual computer skills that might be present amount the competition administrators. The new Academic Competition Software combines digital clocks, along with a scoring system that permits different point values for different types of questions. Bonus or ‚Âœtoss-up‚ questions can be monitored during the competition, using a subtimer system. All data is consolidated on the fly and the system can be operated by a single person. Results from different sites (rooms) can be added in as well. As such, the software is extremely flexible. It is anticipated that this new software will be useful for‚Science or Science Olympiad type competitions held in many high schools and colleges, as well as for preparation and training for such competitions.

  20. Student Athletes' Perceived Barriers to and Preferences for Seeking Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Renee L.; Levy, Jacob J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate attitudes of intercollegiate student athletes regarding their use of counseling services. The authors assessed student athletes' perceived barriers to seeking counseling services and their preferred characteristics of a helping professional. Several barriers to counseling were identified. Results…

  1. A Comparative Study of Pioneer Entry Decisions in the United States and China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Y. Lisa; Song, Michael; Parry, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    According to the resource-based view of the firm, competitive advantages arise from control and deployment of productive resources that are rare and difficult to imitate. Through early entry, pioneers can gain preferential access to key resources. However, the value of that access depends on the presence of isolating mechanisms that limit or prevent competitive imitation. Isolating mechanisms increase the desirability of early entry by lengthening the time horizon over which the firm can earn...

  2. On the nature of barriers to climate change adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesbroek, G.R.; Klostermann, J.E.M.; Termeer, C.J.A.M.; Kabat, P.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable barriers can emerge in developing and implementing climate change adaptation strategies. Understanding the nature of barriers to adaptation is important so as to find strategic ways of dealing with them. However, our current understanding is limited and highly fragmented across the acad

  3. Use of computer modeling to aid in hydraulic barrier design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Releases of No. 6 and No. 4 fuel oil were discovered at a private boarding school. The releases impact a nearby pond with non-aqueous phase liquid hydrocarbon (NAPL), and threaten to impact an adjacent wetland. Prior to implementation of a permanent remedial solution, such as surfactant treatment and bioremediation, immediate containment of the NAPL was proposed via a barrier-gate containment system. The proposed barrier-gate containment system consisted of a high-density polyethylene barrier, horizontal wells, three flow-through gates, and downgradient infiltration galleries. Computer modeling of groundwater and NAPL flow was conducted utilizing a finite element multiphase model to evaluate the impacts to local hydrogeology associated with the barrier. These impacts included upgradient groundwater mounding and restriction of groundwater flux to the wetland. Model simulations aided in the identification of improvements to the initial barrier design and guided subsequent design modifications. Results of the simulations indicate the usefulness of computer modeling in containment system design

  4. Identifying entry points to improve fertilizer use efficiency in Taihu Basin, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Li; Feng, S.; Reidsma, P.; Qu, F.; Heerink, N.

    2014-01-01

    Overuse of fertilizers in China causes environmental problems and high costs for farmers. In this paper we aim to identify entry points to improve fertilizer use efficiency in Taihu Basin, China. We use stochastic frontier analysis to estimate the technical and fertilizer use efficiency of rice prod

  5. Role of Dickeya dadantii 3937 chemoreceptors in the entry to Arabidopsis leaves through wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Río-Álvarez, Isabel; Muñoz-Gómez, Cristina; Navas-Vásquez, Mariela; Martínez-García, Pedro M; Antúnez-Lamas, María; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2015-09-01

    Chemotaxis enables bacteria to move towards an optimal environment in response to chemical signals. In the case of plant-pathogenic bacteria, chemotaxis allows pathogens to explore the plant surface for potential entry sites with the ultimate aim to prosper inside plant tissues and to cause disease. Chemoreceptors, which constitute the sensory core of the chemotaxis system, are usually transmembrane proteins which change their conformation when sensing chemicals in the periplasm and transduce the signal through a kinase pathway to the flagellar motor. In the particular case of the soft-rot pathogen Dickeya dadantii 3937, jasmonic acid released in a plant wound has been found to be a strong chemoattractant which drives pathogen entry into the plant apoplast. In order to identify candidate chemoreceptors sensing wound-derived plant compounds, we carried out a bioinformatics search of candidate chemoreceptors in the genome of Dickeya dadantii 3937. The study of the chemotactic response to several compounds and the analysis of the entry process to Arabidopsis leaves of 10 selected mutants in chemoreceptors allowed us to determine the implications of at least two of them (ABF-0020167 and ABF-0046680) in the chemotaxis-driven entry process through plant wounds. Our data suggest that ABF-0020167 and ABF-0046680 may be candidate receptors of jasmonic acid and xylose, respectively.

  6. Tentative Techniques against Barriers to Intercultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石玉

    2014-01-01

    跨文化交际时通常有四大障碍:民族优越感、刻板印象、言语及非言语因素、压力。如果能建立一个模式,选择一些技巧和练习来帮助学生克服跨文化交际障碍,让他们勇于和外国人交谈,对外语教师是大有益处的。此模式涉及一个定量和定性的教学实验研究。教学实验证明:实验组在经过克服跨文化交际障碍培训之后,在与外国人交流时表现得更好。一些经历性的练习,比如听读目标文化者的自传,是有利于减小民族优越感的;模拟角色扮演,比如像目标文化者那样表现自己,对克服刻板印象有益;做一些因为非言语因素引起的跨文化冲突对话会让学生了解更多的非言语因素;而压力是一个情感因素,只能通过更多的跨文化交际来减小了。%This paper seeks to describe a model for selecting techniques and exercises by experimenting both quantitatively and qualitatively to help students break barriers to intercultural communication.The results indicate that Exercises such as listening to or reading autobiography of people from the target culture contribute to reducing ethnocentrism;simulation role-play, i.e.to behave like a native of the target culture, is useful to the breakthrough of stereotype;dialogues about intercultural conflicts caused by non-verbal language can be made to acquaint students with some non-verbal language.

  7. From coexistence to competitive exclusion: can overfishing change the outcome of competition in skates (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia L Ruocco

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Competition for food could be a major force driving changes in the community structure of skates (Rajidae subjected to fishing exploitation. Under this hypothesis, small skates are released from competition with larger skates after fishing has depleted the larger species. Here, we compare the abundance patterns of two sympatric skates with similar niches but different life histories, Bathyraja albomaculata (larger and slow-reproducing and Bathyraja macloviana (smaller and faster-reproducing, before (1971, 1978 and after (1998-2004 a 108% increase in industrial bottom trawling on the southeastern South American shelf in order to test the prediction that B. macloviana should competitively exclude B. albomaculata after the increase in fishing mortality. In 1971 and 1978, there was no relationship between the abundance of both species, indicating that they coexisted over large scales. In 1998-2004, the relationship between the abundances of these skates was bell-shaped, indicating that both species increased in abundance at low densities until peaking, after which B. albomaculata decreased when B. macloviana became more abundant, consistent with resource competition. We tested whether food may be a potential limiting resource by comparing the diet of both species. The two species consumed mostly polychaetes, differing only in the consumption of polychaetes from the family Nephthyidae, which was much higher for B. macloviana. Bathyraja macloviana could replace B. albomaculata at high densities when food resources may become scarce. These results support the hypothesis that competition release is an important factor explaining the changes in skate communities in overexploited areas.

  8. Understanding barriers to implementation of an adaptive land management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Susan K; Morris, Julie K; Sanders, J Scott; Wiley, Eugene N; Brooks, Michael; Bennetts, Robert E; Percival, H Franklin; Marynowski, Susan

    2006-10-01

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission manages over 650,000 ha, including 26 wildlife management and environmental areas. To improve management, they developed an objective-based vegetation management (OBVM) process that focuses on desired conditions of plant communities through an adaptive management framework. Our goals were to understand potential barriers to implementing OBVM and to recommend strategies to overcome barriers. A literature review identified 47 potential barriers in six categories to implementation of adaptive and ecosystem management: logistical, communication, attitudinal, institutional, conceptual, and educational. We explored these barriers through a bureau-wide survey of 90 staff involved in OBVM and personal interviews with area managers, scientists, and administrators. The survey incorporated an organizational culture assessment instrument to gauge how institutional factors might influence OBVM implementation. The survey response rate was 69%. Logistics and communications were the greatest barriers to implementing OBVM. Respondents perceived that the agency had inadequate resources for implementing OBVM and provided inadequate information. About one-third of the respondents believed OBVM would decrease their job flexibility and perceived greater institutional barriers to the approach. The 43% of respondents who believed they would have more responsibility under OBVM also had greater attitudinal barriers. A similar percentage of respondents reported OBVM would not give enough priority to wildlife. Staff believed that current agency culture was hierarchical but preferred a culture that would provide more flexibility for adaptive management and would foster learning from land management activities. In light of the barriers to OBVM, we recommend the following: (1) mitigation of logistical barriers by addressing real and perceived constraints of staff, funds, and other resources in a participatory manner; (2) mitigation of

  9. Understanding barriers to implementation of an adaptive land management program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, S.K.; Morris, J.K.; Sanders, J.S.; Wiley, E.N.; Brooks, M.; Bennetts, R.E.; Percival, H.F.; Marynowski, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission manages over 650,000 ha, including 26 wildlife management and environmental areas. To improve management, they developed an objective-based vegetation management (OBVM) process that focuses on desired conditions of plant communities through an adaptive management framework. Our goals were to understand potential barriers to implementing OBVM and to recommend strategies to overcome barriers. A literature review identified 47 potential barriers in six categories to implementation of adaptive and ecosystem management: logistical, communication, attitudinal, institutional, conceptual, and educational. We explored these barriers through a bureau-wide survey of 90 staff involved in OBVM and personal interviews with area managers, scientists, and administrators. The survey incorporated an organizational culture assessment instrument to gauge how institutional factors might influence OBVM implementation. The survey response rate was 69%. Logistics and communications were the greatest barriers to implementing OBVM. Respondents perceived that the agency had inadequate resources for implementing OBVM and provided inadequate information. About one-third of the respondents believed OBVM would decrease their job flexibility and perceived greater institutional barriers to the approach. The 43% of respondents who believed they would have more responsibility under OBVM also had greater attitudinal barriers. A similar percentage of respondents reported OBVM would not give enough priority to wildlife. Staff believed that current agency culture was hierarchical but preferred a culture that would provide more flexibility for adaptive management and would foster learning from land management activities. In light of the barriers to OBVM, we recommend the following: (1) mitigation of logistical barriers by addressing real and perceived constraints of staff, funds, and other resources in a participatory manner; (2) mitigation of

  10. 50 CFR 26.23 - Exception for entry to the headquarters office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... office. 26.23 Section 26.23 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Exception for entry to the headquarters office. The headquarters office of any national wildlife refuge is open to public access and admission during regularly established business hours....

  11. Contributions of Male and Female Guests and Hosts to Peer Group Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja-Alvarez, Teresita; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Second and third grade guests were observed while they tried to join peer hosts who were playing a game. Females guests were less obtrusive than male guests in their entries, and males guests were more assertive. Guests were less constrained when approaching same-sex than opposite-sex hosts. Female hosts were more attentive to guests than were…

  12. An Application of Fuzzy Theory to Technical Competency Analysis for the Entry-Level Electronic Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Liang-Te; And Others

    A study was conducted to develop the electronic technical competencies of duty and task analysis by using a revised DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) method, a questionnaire survey, and a fuzzy synthesis operation. The revised DACUM process relied on inviting electronics trade professionals to analyze electronic technology for entry-level…

  13. Linguistic and Cultural Barriers to Intercultural Communication in Foreign Subsidiaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltokorpi, Vesa; Clausen, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the causes and consequences of linguistic and cultural barriers to inter-cultural communication in Nordic subsidiaries in Japan. Interviews with 30 Nordic (Finland, Denmark, Norway and Sweden) expatriates and 29 Japanese employees show that the main linguistic barriers...... to intercultural communication were lack of a shared language and low motivation to improve foreign-language proficiency. The main cultural barriers were collectivism, and status and power differences. Combined, the consequences of these barriers were extensive reliance on language intermediaries, information...... filtering, in-group/out-group categorization, receiver-centred communication and incongruent supervisor-subordinate expectations. The interviews suggest that linguistic and cultural barriers have a differentiated impact on intercultural communication....

  14. Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie; Kirby, Brendan

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

  15. The Inside, Out: Diaries as Entry Points to Historical Perspective-Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemisko, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Diaries can serve as meaningful entry points for advancing historical consciousness and develop historical thinking (Seixas, 2002) because they can connect readers/learners with the diverse emotions, thoughts and motivations of the people who wrote them in particular times and particular places. According to philosopher and historian, R.G.…

  16. Thermophysics Issues Relevant to High-Speed Earth Entry of Large Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, D.; Saunders, D.; Agrawal, P.; Allen, G.; Bauschlicher, C.; Brandis, A.; Chen, Y.-K.; Jaffe, R.; Schulz, J.; Stern, E.; Tauber, M.; White, S.

    2016-01-01

    Physics of atmospheric entry of meteoroids was an active area of research at NASA ARC up to the early 1970s (e.g., the oft-cited work of Baldwin and Sheaffer). However, research in the area seems to have ended with the Apollo program, and any ties with an active international meteor physics community seem to have significantly diminished thereafter. In the decades following the 1970s, the focus of entry physics at NASA ARC has been on improvement of the math models of shock-layer physics (especially in chemical kinetics and radiation) and thermal response of ablative materials used for capsule heatshields. With the overarching objectives of understanding energy deposition into the atmosphere and fragmentation, could these modern analysis tools and processes be applied to the problem of atmospheric entry of meteoroids as well? In the presentation we will explore: (i) the physics of atmospheric entries of meteoroids using our current state-of-the-art tools and processes, (ii) how multiple bodies interact, and (iii) the influence of wall blowing on flow dynamics.

  17. Changes in Estonian General Education from the Collapse of the Soviet Union to EU Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Edgar; Trasberg, Karmen

    2006-01-01

    This article introduces and discusses the nature and development of Estonian system of general education in the period of last thirty years. The main focus is paid on the changes resulting from the collapse of the Soviet Union and the period of integration leading up to EU entry. Also changes in other spheres of education and social life are…

  18. Entry and release of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus are restricted to apical surfaces of polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Bekker, C P; Voorhout, W F; Strous, G J; van der Ende, A; Rottier, P J

    1994-01-01

    The transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) infects the epithelial cells of the intestinal tract of pigs, resulting in a high mortality rate in piglets. This study shows the interaction of TGEV with a porcine epithelial cell line. To determine the site of viral entry, LLC-PK1 cells were gro

  19. Advanced Bibliometric Methods To Model the Relationship between Entry Behavior and Networking in Emerging Technological Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debackere, Koenraad; Clarysse, Bart

    1998-01-01

    Technological communities used bibliometric data on 411 plant biotechnology organizations to study the effect of field density and structure of the research and development network. Findings indicate the usefulness of bibliometric data in mapping change in technological communities and in the effects of networking on entry behavior. (PEN)

  20. 7 CFR 319.24a - Administrative instructions relating to entry of corn into Guam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative instructions relating to entry of corn into Guam. 319.24a Section 319.24a Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Corn Diseases Quarantine § 319.24a...

  1. Competition can lead to unexpected patterns in tropical ant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, M. D. Farnon; Blüthgen, Nico; Fayle, Tom M.; Foster, William A.; Menzel, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Ecological communities are structured by competitive, predatory, mutualistic and parasitic interactions combined with chance events. Separating deterministic from stochastic processes is possible, but finding statistical evidence for specific biological interactions is challenging. We attempt to solve this problem for ant communities nesting in epiphytic bird's nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) in Borneo's lowland rainforest. By recording the frequencies with which each and every single ant species occurred together, we were able to test statistically for patterns associated with interspecific competition. We found evidence for competition, but the resulting co-occurrence pattern was the opposite of what we expected. Rather than detecting species segregation-the classical hallmark of competition-we found species aggregation. Moreover, our approach of testing individual pairwise interactions mostly revealed spatially positive rather than negative associations. Significant negative interactions were only detected among large ants, and among species of the subfamily Ponerinae. Remarkably, the results from this study, and from a corroborating analysis of ant communities known to be structured by competition, suggest that competition within the ants leads to species aggregation rather than segregation. We believe this unexpected result is linked with the displacement of species following asymmetric competition. We conclude that analysing co-occurrence frequencies across complete species assemblages, separately for each species, and for each unique pairwise combination of species, represents a subtle yet powerful way of detecting structure and compartmentalisation in ecological communities.

  2. Chfr acts with the p38 stress kinases to block entry to mitosis in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Matsusaka, Takahiro; Pines, Jonathon

    2004-01-01

    Entry into mitosis in vertebrate cells is guarded by a checkpoint that can be activated by a variety of insults, including chromosomal damage and disrupting microtubules (Rieder, C.L., and R.W. Cole. 1998. J. Cell Biol. 142:1013–1022; Rieder, C.L., and R.W. Cole. 2000. Curr. Biol. 10:1067–1070). This checkpoint acts at the end of interphase to delay cells from entering mitosis, causing cells in prophase to decondense their chromosomes and return to G2 phase. Here, we show that in response to ...

  3. Better to be red than blue in virtual competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilie, Andrei; Ioan, Silvia; Zagrean, Leon;

    2008-01-01

    In the 2004 Olympic Games, opponents wearing red athletic uniforms were more likely to win against opponents wearing blue uniforms. To investigate whether this color bias extends to the world of virtual competition, we compared the performance of red and blue teams in a popular multiplayer first...... that joining the red team may offer a slight advantage over the blue team in virtual competition, and this should be accounted for when designing FPS games. It is likely that "seeing red" may trigger a powerful psychological distractor signal in human aggressive competition that can affect the outcome...

  4. Experimental adaptation of wild-type canine distemper virus (CDV to the human entry receptor CD150.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bieringer

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV, a close relative of measles virus (MV, is widespread and well known for its broad host range. When the goal of measles eradication may be achieved, and when measles vaccination will be stopped, CDV might eventually cross the species barrier to humans and emerge as a new human pathogen. In order to get an impression how fast such alterations may occur, we characterized required adaptive mutations to the human entry receptors CD150 (SLAM and nectin-4 as first step to infect human target cells. Recombinant wild-type CDV-A75/17(red adapted quickly to growth in human H358 epithelial cells expressing human nectin-4. Sequencing of the viral attachment proteins (hemagglutinin, H, and fusion protein, F genes revealed that no adaptive alteration was required to utilize human nectin-4. In contrast, the virus replicated only to low titres (10(2 pfu/ml in Vero cells expressing human CD150 (Vero-hSLAM. After three passages using these cells virus was adapted to human CD150 and replicated to high titres (10(5 pfu/ml. Sequence analyses revealed that only one amino acid exchange in the H-protein at position 540 Asp→Gly (D540G was required for functional adaptation to human CD150. Structural modelling suggests that the adaptive mutation D540G in H reflects the sequence alteration from canine to human CD150 at position 70 and 71 from Pro to Leu (P70L and Gly to Glu (G71E, and compensates for the gain of a negative charge in the human CD150 molecule. Using this model system our data indicate that only a minimal alteration, in this case one adaptive mutation, is required for adaptation of CDV to the human entry receptors, and help to understand the molecular basis why this adaptive mutation occurs.

  5. Strategic Orientation and Order of Market Entry of Food Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rasoul ghollamzadeh

    2011-12-01

    One of the strategic launch decisions is the order of market entry. Adoption of a suitable competitive strategy is dependent on firm's decision on market entry earlier or later than competitors. This research aims to analyze the relationship between order of market entry and firms’ strategic orientation. For this purpose, three strategies have been defined as cost leadership strategy, innovation differentiation strategy and marketing differentiation strategy. In this study, the essential question is whether firms use a different strategy based on their order of market entry? The proposed model has been examined on a sample of 102 manufacturing companies in the food industry using Structural Equation Modeling based on the methodology of Partial Least Squares (PLS. Findings indicate a direct influence of order of market entry on adopting a particular strategy by the firms, so that pioneer companies tend more to use differentiation strategy at two levels of marketing and innovation, while cost leadership is more common among followers.

  6. Strategic Orientation and Order of Market Entry of Food Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Ghollamzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the strategic launch decisions is the order of market entry. Adoption of a suitable competitive strategy is dependent on firm's decision on market entry earlier or later than competitors. This research aims to analyze the relationship between order of market entry and firms’ strategic orientation. For this purpose, three strategies have been defined as cost leadership strategy, innovation differentiation strategy and marketing differentiation strategy. In this study, the essential question is whether firms use a different strategy based on their order of market entry? The proposed model has been examined on a sample of 102 manufacturing companies in the food industry using Structural Equation Modeling based on the methodology of Partial Least Squares (PLS. Findings indicate a direct influence of order of market entry on adopting a particular strategy by the firms, so that pioneer companies tend more to use differentiation strategy at two levels of marketing and innovation, while cost leadership is more common among followers.

  7. Barriers to and enablers for European rail freight transport for integrated door-to-door logistics service. Part 1: Barriers to multimodal rail freight transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Md Zahurul ISLAM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to examine and identify barriers to and enablers for the European rail freight transport services as a transport chain partner along the supply chains in the changing market scenario. The changing market scenario includes, among others, requiring 'door-to-door' rather than 'terminal to terminal' and integrated service, competitive ability to attract non-rail cargo type, changes in the customer requirements (e.g. reliable service and changes in the operational requirements and practices. Using a literature review method, the paper is presented in two parts. The part 1 focuses on the identification of barriers to the European rail freight service by reviewing freight logistics services for global supply chains followed by the current performance of European rail freight transport followed by a discussion on the rail freight market liberalisation in Europe. Then rail freight transport in the Unites States (U.S. is discussed. The research notes that although the background, scope and necessity for reform measures in Europe differ from those of the U.S., some lessons can be learned and the main lesson is that an appropriate reform measure can enhance rail sector competitive ability in Europe. Examining and identifying the barriers in the part 1 (with the pan-Pacific examples of rail freight transports, the part 2 of the paper focuses on recommending clear actions and steps as enablers for the rail freight industry in general and operators in particular. The research in part 1 of the paper finds that: •\tIn many European countries, the rail freight market is not fully liberalised. In such market segment, infrastructure managers do act independently for incumbents and new entrant operators that hamper the progress of building a competitive market; •\tThe rail operators have not yet achieved the service quality (e.g. customer tailored service needed for the modern supply chains; •\tThey operate ‘terminal-to

  8. Genetic Barriers to Resistance and Impact on Clinical Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luber Andrew D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of drug resistance and cross-resistance continues to pose a challenge to successful long-term antiretroviral therapy despite the availability of new antiretroviral agents. The genetic barrier to resistance of a regimen does not directly correlate with its effectiveness. For some regimens with a low genetic barrier to resistance, however, the emergence of only 1 or 2 key resistance mutations may confer drug resistance not only to that regimen but also to other agents, thereby limiting subsequent treatment options. In addition to the genetic barrier to resistance, factors such as efficacy, safety, tolerability, convenience, and adherence must be considered when choosing a regimen.

  9. PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Daskapan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Many studies which were published in other countries identified certain benefits and barriers to physical activity among young people. But there is no data about the subject pertaining to Turkish adolescents. This study tries to rectify this with a study of Turkish university students. Undergraduate university students (n = 303 were recruited to the study. Current exercise habits and perceived barriers to physical activity were assessed in the sample. Using a Likert Type scale, participants responded an instrument with 12 items representing barriers to physical activity. Mean scores were computed. External barriers were more important than internal barriers. "Lack of time due to busy lesson schedule", "My parents give academic success priority over exercise." and "lack of time due to responsibilities related to the family and social environment" were most cited items for physical activity barriers. There is a need for future research, which will be carried out with larger sample groups to develop national standardized instrument. It will be helpful for accurately identify perceived barriers and then recommend changes to enhance physical activity among young people.

  10. Barriers to accessing radiation therapy in Canada: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy (RT) is effective treatment for curing and palliating cancer, yet concern exists that not all Canadians for whom RT is indicated receive it. Many factors may contribute to suboptimal use of RT. A review of recent Canadian literature was undertaken to identify such barriers. MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBase databases were used to search keywords relating to barriers to accessing or utilizing RT in Canada. Collected abstracts were reviewed independently. Barriers identified in relevant articles were categorized as relating to the health systems, patient socio-demographic, patient factors, or provider factors contexts and thematic analysis performed for each context. 535 unique abstracts were collected. 75 met inclusion criteria. 46 (61.3%) addressed multiple themes. The most cited barriers to accessing RT when indicated were patient age (n = 26, 34.7%), distance to treatment centre (n = 23, 30.7%), wait times (n = 22, 29.3%), and lack of physician understanding about the use of RT (n = 16, 21.6%). Barriers to RT are reported in many areas. The role of provider factors and the lack of attention to patient fears and mistrust as potential barriers were unexpected findings demanding further attention. Solutions should be sought to overcome identified barriers facilitating more effective cancer care for Canadians

  11. Convergence to equilibrium in competitive Lotka-Volterra equations

    CERN Document Server

    Champagnat, Nicolas; Raoul, Gael

    2010-01-01

    We study a generalized system of ODE's modeling a finite number of biological populations in a competitive interaction. We adapt the techniques in two previous articles to prove the convergence to a unique stable equilibrium.

  12. Barriers to cataract surgery in Africa: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheer Aboobaker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract remains the leading cause of blindness in Africa. We performed a systematic literature search of articles reporting barriers to cataract surgery in Africa. PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched with the terms "barriers, cataract, Africa, cataract surgery, cataract surgical coverage (CSC, and rapid assessment of avoidable blindness (RAAB." The review covered from 1999 to 2014. In RAAB studies, barriers related to awareness and access were more commonly reported than acceptance. Other type of studies reported cost as the most common barrier. Some qualitative studies tended to report community and family dynamics as barriers to cataract surgery. CSC was lower in females in 88.2% of the studies. The variability in outcomes of studies of barriers to cataract surgery could be due to context and the type of data collection. It is likely that qualitative data will provide a deeper understanding of the complex social, family, community, financial and gender issues relating to barriers to uptake of cataract surgery in Africa.

  13. 30 CFR 877.13 - Entry and consent to reclaim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... property to be entered where it is readily visible to the public and advertised once in a newspaper of... advertised in the newspaper shall include a statement of where the findings required by this section may...

  14. Entry Strategies to Indonesian Market Case: MoveaRoll

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Zahedul

    2013-01-01

    MoveRoll Oy, an internationally growing and expanding Finnish company located in Porvoo, has invented a unique technology to produce a paper roll conveyor which the company believes will revolutionise the paper roll handling industry. Moreover, after establishing itself in the Finnish market, the company has started expanding its business to countries like Sweden, USA, and China. Likewise, the process of expanding to the Russian market is currently underway and the company has recently launch...

  15. Barriers and perceived limitations to early treatment of hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kapil Saxena Boston Hemophilia Center, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Early treatment of bleeds in hemophilia patients, both with and without inhibitors, has been shown to be of immense benefit in the overall clinical outcome. Despite the advantages of treating the bleeding episodes early, significant barriers and limitations remain. The aim of this review is to highlight the various barriers and perceived limitations to early therapy of bleeding episodes, especially in patients who have developed inhibitors to factor VIII. The peer-reviewed literature was searched for articles on hemophilia patients, with and without inhibitors, and early treatment, to identify the barriers to early treatment and potential impact on patient outcomes. The most important barrier is the educational barrier, which involves lack of awareness among patients regarding the signs of a bleed, as well as importance of early therapy. It is also common for parents or caregivers of school-age children to exhibit inconvenience and scheduling barriers. Distance to the treatment center can also play a role here. Some patients experience financial barriers related to cost of clotting factor products, insurance coverage, or insurance caps and out-of-pocket costs. Rarely, there can also be problems related to venous access or home infusion. Lastly, multiple psychosocial barriers can prevent adherence to treatment regimens. Identification and addressing these individual barriers will result in improved compliance rates, prevent joint damage, be more cost-effective, and lead to better overall health of these patients. Keywords: hemophilia A, hemophilia B, inhibitors, outcomes, quality of life, cost of care

  16. PARTICULARS OF LEASING CONTRACTS ENTRIES ACCORDING TO IAS 17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta ISAI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Leasing operations are today an efficient means for the leasing companies to sell long-term use goods under advantageous conditions of price and delivery terms while third companies become owners without outstanding financial efforts.

  17. THE STUDY OF BARRIERS TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN MEN AND WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher Gorji

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the barriers to individual entrepreneurship as well as comparing them in men and women population. This study was applied, correlation-survey method. Using field method, the data are collected from 113 men entrepreneurs and 65 women entrepreneurs. One questionnaire whose validity and reliability is verified by content and Cranach’s  methods is also used to collect the research data. To analyze the data, T-test and ANOVA are used. The results indicated that there is a meaningful difference between individual and environmental barriers to entrepreneurship and order of effectiveness of barriers in men and women.

  18. Architectural Barriers Removal: Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Human Development (DHEW), Washington, DC. Office for Handicapped Individuals.

    The guide presents information on resources for eliminating architectural barriers for handicapped persons. Entries are grouped according to information resources, funding sources, and publications available from the federal government. Seven organizations are described in terms of agency goals, publications, and materials. Federal programs…

  19. The Impact of China's WTO Entry on the Industrial Structure of the Yangtze River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-qiong; WANG Wei-gong; LI Zheng; SHAO Shi-huang

    2002-01-01

    In the areas of China access into WTO Agreements,Chinese government has made lots of promises in reducing tariffs of some industrial products. While industrial products make up a very large share of import and export, so nearly all kinds of them will be influenced, especially those which are protected by means of national tariffs and taxes and non-tariffs barriers on import-sand, to a lesser extent, on exports.Meanwhile we have noticed that most of these industries are the pillar ones of Yangtze Delta. As it is well known that Yangtze Delta has become the most developed area in Yangtze valley or even in China and had an important effect on China economy. Thus entry to the WTO requires reform to be accelerated in this district so as to put the industry of this region in a position to be able to cope with the greater foreign competition that will follow accession to the trade body.

  20. 基于博弈论的我国竞争情报产业组织研究——市场进入策略分析%Research on Industrial Organization of Competitive Intelligence Based on Game Theory:Analysis onMarket Entry Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张圣明

    2012-01-01

    Whether at home or abroad, many consulting companies are offering competitive intelligence service. Although it is difficult to separate competitive intelligence from business activities totally to establish a special department, the intelligence industry will emerge as the utility of competitive intelligence increasingly. Based on the market status and the routine of other industry, monopoly will prevent it from fast development. Hence, the paper analyzes and discusses the three possible conditions of market entry through game theory, and puts forward three market entry strategies for the industrial organization of competitive intelligence.%无论在国内还是在国外,许多咨询公司都开展竞争情报服务.虽然要将竞争情报完全从企业的经营活动中分离出来,成为一个专门的社会化服务的产业部门似乎是困难的,但随着情报在知识经济中效用日益彰显,情报产业势必应运而生.结合市场实际和其他产业行规惯例,定会出现垄断,从而阻碍该产业发展.就此,笔者运用博弈论对三种可能的情况进行了分析探讨,并提出我国竞争情报产业组织市场进入策略.

  1. The Propensity to Tax Competition: The Case of Implementation Local Tax Policy by Polish Local Governments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Walasik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study is dedicated to identify the main factors determining the propensity of local authorities to compete for the access to the limited as well as mobile sources of local tax revenue. The success of such an activity should be discussed in relation to the stabilization of local budget revenues; hence it seems that the barriers of leaving tax jurisdiction could be better index to evaluate of the efficiency of local tax policy. The theoretical approach is based on the assumption that, if central government provides limitations of the right to improve local tax policy means (the scope of local tax jurisdiction, the local governments should focus on both the efficient acquiring the sources of tax revenues, and the stabilization of tax revenues in the future, in particular by the implementation of the barriers of leaving tax jurisdiction. The paper suggests studying a propensity to tax competition. The article formulates desideratum of the efficiency of spending on acquiring the sources of tax revenue, in particular, the need to identify the barriers to leave tax jurisdiction is suggested. The first and foremost way to build the barrier to leave tax jurisdiction could be reducing tax liabilities by local tax authorities, in particular by introducing local tax reliefs and local tax exemptions, as well as lowering local tax rates. Hence, the model of local authorities’ competition for local tax resources could be proposed. The empirical studies are dedicated to identify the actual propensity of Polish local government to execute the legal ability to impose tax policy instruments. The inquiry is based on comparing the fiscal consequences of implementing local tax policy within two groups of local authorities: small towns and countries (gminas and medium-size towns and big cities (cities with powiat status. The period under investigation contains 14 fiscal years, started 2000 and finished in 2013. The method is based on the analysis of the

  2. HYBRID MODELING APPROACH TO COMPETITIVENESS THROUGH FAST STRATEGY

    OpenAIRE

    SAMULI KORTELAINEN; LAURI LÄTTILÄ

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the sources of sustained competitive advantage is the fundamental task of strategic management research. An interesting concept of fast strategy has emerged, which builds a firm's competitiveness from its ability to react to change more rapidly than its competitors. We approach this concept with a simulation model based on a hybrid modeling technique. The simulation model is used to test the profitability of the fast strategy concept in different business environment conditions....

  3. Using Competencies to Assess Entry-Level Knowledge of Students Graduating from Parks and Recreation Academic Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Amy R.; Elkins, Daniel J.; Beggs, Brent A.

    2014-01-01

    To address the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism, and Related Professions accreditation standard 7.01.01, the Entry Level Competency Assessment was developed to measure 46 competencies in four categories needed by entry level professionals. Students rated their competence prior to beginning their senior internship. The results…

  4. Ethiopia's Tourism Sector : Strategic Paths to Competitiveness and Job Creation

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes strategic intervention options that can inform the implementation process of Ethiopia s national tourism development policy in an effort to make the sector globally competitive. It also outlines the analytical foundations for technical assistance that will be provided to Ministry of Culture and Tourism (MoCT) by the World Bank-funded Ethiopian Sustainable Tourism Development Program (ESTDP). This study uses the world economic forum tourism and travel competitiveness index ...

  5. An activation-repolarization time metric to predict localized regions of high susceptibility to re-entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Nicholas; Bishop, Martin J.; Hanson, Ben; Coronel, Ruben; Opthof, Tobias; Bourkens, Bastiaan; Walton, Richard; Efimov, Igor; Bostock, Julian; Hill, Yolanda; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Initiation of re-entrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) involves complex interactions between activation and repolarization wavefronts. Recent experimental work has identified the time interval between S2 repolarization proximal to a line of functional block and the activation at the adjacent distal side, as a critical determinant of re-entry. Objective We hypothesized: (1) an algorithm could be developed which would generate a spatial map of this interval (designated the “re-entry vulnerability index”-RVI); (2) that this would accurately identify a pathway of re-entry as well as rotor formation in animal experiments and in a computational model; and, (3) that it would be possible to generate an RVI map in humans during routine clinical procedures and co-register with anatomical and electrophysiological features. Methods and Results An algorithm was developed which sampled all points on a multielectrode grid and calculated RVI between all pairs of electrodes within a given radius. The algorithm successfully identified the spatial region with increased susceptibility to re-entry in an established Langendorff pig heart model and the site of re-entry and rotor formation in an optically mapped sheep heart model and corresponding computational simulations. The feasibility of RVI mapping was evaluated during a clinical procedure by co-registering with the anatomy and physiology in a patient undergoing a VT ablation. Conclusions We developed an algorithm to calculate a re-entry vulnerability index from intervals between local repolarization and activation times at all adjacent points over a multielectrode grid. The algorithm accurately identified the region of re-entry in two animal models of functional re-entry. The possibility of clinical application was demonstrated in a patient with VT. PMID:25863160

  6. War games: using MRP (material requirements planning) audits to pinpoint problems and keep the competitive edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, S H; Yocus, T E

    1994-05-01

    In today's world, it is a challenge just to stay in business, let alone remain competitive in a specific industry. We will show you how to pinpoint MRP II problems and attack them through self-assessment audits. You will discover the secrets of breaking down barriers between Master Schedulers, Material Planners, Production Control Planners, and the Manufacturing Line. Self-assessment audits are one way to take care of your planning functions before outside auditors take care of them for you. PMID:10134158

  7. One-year transitional programme increases knowledge to level sufficient for entry into the fourth year of the medical curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Bouwkamp-Timmer, Tineke; van Scheltinga, Gerard R. Terwisscha; Kuks, Jan B. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: To cope with a lack of doctors and in anticipation of the Bachelor-Master structure for Medicine, several Dutch universities offer graduate entry programmes for students with degrees in areas related to Medicine. The graduate entry programme is a four-year programme: after a transition p

  8. Competitiveness of Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Compared to US Corn Ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Crago, Christine Lasco; Khanna, Madhu; Barton, Jason; Giuliani, Eduardo; Amaral, Weber

    2010-01-01

    Corn ethanol produced in the US and sugarcane ethanol produced in Brazil are the world’s leading sources of biofuel. Current US biofuel policies create both incentives and constraints for the import of ethanol from Brazil, and together with the competitiveness and greenhouse gas intensity of sugarcane ethanol compared to corn ethanol will determine the extent of these imports. This study analyzes the supply-side determinants of this competitiveness and compares the greenhouse gas intensity of...

  9. How Gaussian competition leads to lumpy or uniform species distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pigolotti, Simone; Lopez, Cristóbal; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio;

    2010-01-01

    A central model in theoretical ecology considers the competition of a range of species for a broad spectrum of resources. Recent studies have shown that essentially two different outcomes are possible. Either the species surviving competition are more or less uniformly distributed over the resource...... spectrum, or their distribution is “lumped” (or “clumped”), consisting of clusters of species with similar resource use that are separated by gaps in resource space. Which of these outcomes will occur crucially depends on the competition kernel, which reflects the shape of the resource utilization pattern...... to either uniform or lumped species distributions. Here, we illustrate the non-robustness of the Gaussian assumption by simulating different implementations of the standard competition model with constant carrying capacity. In this scenario, lumped species distributions can come about by secondary...

  10. Growing Competition for Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Questia subscription-based online academic digital books library. Highlights include weaknesses of the collection; what college students want from a library; importance of marketing; competition for traditional academic libraries that may help improve library services; and the ability of Questia to overcome barriers and…

  11. Revisiting Barriers to Trade: Do Foregone Health Benefits Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Sidi; Kerr, William A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examins the question of revisiting the imposition of existing trade barriers in one case of an evolving marketplace – when a traditional food product is altered to provide, or discovered to have, human health benefits that increases their value to consumers. In other words, the food becomes a functional food. A functional food has the potential provide direct benefits to consumers as well as indirect benefits to society in the form of health care cost savings. If the trade barrier ...

  12. Barrier Busting: Leapfrogging Zombie Science Arguments to Get to Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassol, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Climate literacy certainly requires a basic understanding of the causes and impacts of climate change, and this has motivated our community to focus on ever better ways to communicate this knowledge. This has been very worthwhile. But continuing to dwell on refuting climate myths that seem impossible to put to rest has often kept us mired in the framing of those who reject the science and seek to stall action. Moving past misconceptions and barriers may require added emphasis on responses to climate change. Research focused on the American public has revealed a broader acceptance of the reality of climate change than many people think. In particular, there is broad support for solutions, such as clean energy, even among those who say they do not accept that human activity is the primary driver of climate change. This presents an opportunity to open a side door to understanding that avoids unproductive confrontation with ideological barriers. Research is also revealing effective models for behavioral change that tap into social norms. Leapfrogging basic science arguments and going straight to solutions that most agree on can help us clear some of the barriers to understanding and the hurdles to action.

  13. A resource-based approach to performance and competition : An overview of the connections between resources and competition

    OpenAIRE

    Bridoux, Flore

    2004-01-01

    This paper extends the resource-based view of the firm to give an overview of the connections between resources and competition. Specifically, it develops a conceptual framework explaining competitive advantage and performance that incorporate the resource-based view of the firm and Porter?s approach to competitive environment. On the basis of this framework, it shows how firms compete for resources and may use their resources to compete.

  14. Barriers to Mammography Screening: How to Overcome Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Hassoun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Screening mammography is an established intervention that leads to early breast cancer detection and reduced mortality. The Lebanese Ministry of Health has initiated yearly awareness campaigns and provided free mammography in multiple centers around the country. Methods: The study took place in two major areas of Lebanon - Beirut and South Lebanon. This cross-sectional survey aimed to assess knowledge about breast cancer screening and screening behaviors in the Lebanese population. The primary outcome of the study was to assess the reasons that prevented women from performing screening mammography based on our categories of questions: lack of knowledge about breast cancer, lack of access to screening facilities, failure of primary care physician to encourage screening behavior, and other reasons. Results: The major barriers to seek screening that had statistically significant P-values, in order of prevalence, included: lack of knowledge about breast cancer, followed by social reasons and lack of access. Conclusion: Given the prevalence of breast cancer in our population, it is important to understand the pitfalls that we experience in promoting awareness. Our study is the first study to reach out to the community to assess perceived barriers against screening and provide solutions for such barriers.

  15. Telerobotic Excavator Designed to Compete in NASA's Lunabotics Mining Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Rodney; Santin, Cara; Yousef, Ahmed; Nguyen, Thien; Helferty, John; Pillapakkam, Shriram

    2011-01-01

    The second annual NASA Lunabotics Mining competition is to be held in May 23-28, 2011. The goal of the competition is for teams of university level students to design, build, test and compete with a fully integrated lunar excavator on a simulated lunar surface. Our team, named Lunar Solutions I, will be representing Temple University's College of Engineering in the competition. The team's main goal was to build a robot which is able to compete with other teams, and ultimately win the competition. The main challenge of the competition was to build a wireless robot that can excavate and collect a minimum of 10 kilograms of the regolith material within 15 minutes. The robot must also be designed to operate in conditions similar to those found on the lunar surface. The design of the lunar excavator is constrained by a set of requirements determined by NASA and detailed in the competition's rulebook. The excavator must have the ability to communicate with the "main base" wirelessly, and over a Wi-Fi network. Human operators are located at a remote site approximately 60 meters away from the simulated lunar surface upon which the robot must excavate the lunar regolith surface. During the competition, the robot will operate in a separate area from the control room in an area referred to as the "Lunarena." From the control room, the operators will have to control the robot using visual feedback from cameras placed both within the arena and on the robot. Using this visual feedback the human operators control the robots movement using both keyboard and joystick commands. In order to place in the competition, a minimum of 10 kg of regolith material has to be excavated, collected, and dumped into a specific location. For that reason, the robot must be provided with an effective and powerful excavation system. Our excavator uses tracks for the drive system. After performing extensive research and trade studies, we concluded that tracks would be the most effective method for

  16. Nuclear dynamics around the barrier: from fusion to evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is devoted to aspects of nuclear dynamics around the barrier. It is shown that for fusion reactions, the Coulomb field couples relative motion of nuclei to rotation of a deformed projectile independently of the energy and the charge of the nuclei. An experimental study of the reaction 6He + 190Os via gamma spectroscopy of product nuclei has shown that the break up of the 6He is coupled to the relative motion too, a strong hindrance resulting in the fusion around and above the fusion barrier. The path to fusion after overcoming the barrier, especially the charge equilibration, have been studied in the framework of the TDHF theory via the preequilibrium GDR excited in N/Z asymmetric reactions. An application to formation of the super-heavy elements has been proposed. Finally, couplings between protons and neutrons have been shown up in mean field calculations. Their main expected effect is an emission of protons under the Coulomb barrier. (author)

  17. Radiative Heating in MSL Entry: Comparison of Flight Heating Discrepancy to Ground Test and Predictive Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.; White, Todd R.; Mahzari, Milad; Bose, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    During the recent entry of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), the heat shield was equipped with thermocouple stacks to measure in-depth heating of the thermal protection system (TPS). When only convective heating was considered, the derived heat flux from gauges in the stagnation region was found to be underpredicted by as much as 17 W/sq cm, which is significant compared to the peak heating of 32 W/sq cm. In order to quantify the contribution of radiative heating phenomena to the discrepancy, ground tests and predictive simulations that replicated the MSL entry trajectory were performed. An analysis is carried through to assess the quality of the radiation model and the impact to stagnation line heating. The impact is shown to be significant, but does not fully explain the heating discrepancy.

  18. Experience using a programmable rules engine to implement a complex medical protocol during order entry.

    OpenAIRE

    Starmer, J. M.; Talbert, D. A.; Miller, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    WizOrder, Vanderbilt University Medical Center's (VUMC) clinician order entry system, is an excellent platform for delivering high-quality decision support to clinical end-users. A scripting language designed to make it easy for non-programmer domain experts to enter rules helps distribute the generation and maintenance of the knowledge-base necessary to drive effective decision support. Domain-experts have used this system to successfully implement relatively simple protocols. The VUMC Care ...

  19. The Evolution of Industrial Development Strategy up to China's Entry into the WTO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuoKesha

    2005-01-01

    Changes in China's industrial development strategy undertaken prior to its entry into the WTO centered on strategies for foreign trade, foreign capital utilization, and industry structure. The foreign trade strategy tended to involve a shift from the importsubstitution strategy adopted before the reforms of 1978 to an export-oriented strategy, mainly still one of preferential export promotion. Strategy with regard to foreign capital utilization changed from restricting foreign capital to encouraging foreign capital.

  20. Adjusted barrier management to improve glass eel migration at an estuarine barrier

    OpenAIRE

    A. Mouton; Buysse, D.; STEVENS, M.; Van den Neucker, T.; Coeck, J.

    2013-01-01

    European eel Anguilla Anguilla (L.) populations have declined dramatically during the last decades and are now among the most critically endangered fish populations in Europe. The limitation of upstream migration of glass eels is considered to be one of the key factors reducing eel populations. The migration of eels in their juvenile stage (glass eels) was studied, and options to improve eel passage at a tidal barrier complex at the mouth of the Yser River, Flanders, Belgium, were assessed. G...

  1. Nontechnical Barriers to Solar Energy Use: Review of Recent Literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolis, R.; Zuboy, J.

    2006-09-01

    This paper reviews the nontechnical barriers to solar energy use, drawing on recent literature to help identify key barriers that must be addressed as part of the Technology Acceptance efforts under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar America Initiative. A broad literature search yielded more than 400 references, which were narrowed to 19 recent documents on nontechnical barriers to the use of solar energy and other energy efficiency and renewable energy (EE/RE) technologies. Some of the most frequently identified barriers included lack of government policy supporting EE/RE, lack of information dissemination and consumer awareness about energy and EE/RE, high cost of solar and other EE/RE technologies compared with conventional energy, and inadequate financing options for EE/RE projects.

  2. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  3. 'FLYING UNDER RADAR': SOUTHWEST AIRLINES AND INCUMBENTS¡¯ RESPONSE TO ENTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Jun-Byoung Oh

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the competitive effect of Southwest Airlines, considering the factors affecting its decision to offer service in particular city-pairs and the effect of Southwest¡¯s presence on overall fares and the fare distribution of major airlines. Southwest is a formidable, apparently low-cost competitor when it is present it often garners a large share and creates significant fare pressure on major airlines. Despite this competitive success Southwest¡¯s network does not include ...

  4. Administrative Barriers to Foreign Investment : Reducing Red Tape in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Emery, James J.; Spence, Melvin T., Jr.; Louis T Wells; Timothy S. Buehrer

    2000-01-01

    The book consists of two papers which provide an overview of administrative barriers in Africa, and a very in-depth look at how one country, Mozambique, used a very large foreign investment as a mechanism to begin to tear them down. The first paper is based on a series of country-specific studies on administrative barriers done by Foreign Investment Advisory Service (FIAS) and the United S...

  5. An early view of the barriers to entry and career development in Building Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Infante-Perea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El sector de la construcción desempeña un importante rol en la economía mundial, ya que genera alrededor del 10% del PIB y da trabajo en torno al 7% de las personas empleadas. Se investigan las salidas profesionales de los ingenieros(as de edificación y las barreras de carrera que pueden encontrar en su acceso al mercado de trabajo y en su desarrollo profesional en el sector. A partir de la identificación de variables como barreras relevantes, se adopta un enfoque descriptivo e inferencial de carácter exploratorio para analizar la influencia del género en la percepción de dichas barreras en dos universidades españolas. Los resultados muestran un escenario laboral más difícil para ellas y nos permiten reflexionar sobre las repercusiones que estas percepciones tempranas pueden tener en el desarrollo profesional de la próxima generación de ingenieros(as de la edificación.

  6. An early view of the barriers to entry and career development in Building Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Margarita Infante-Perea; Marisa Román-Onsalo; Elena Navarro-Astor

    2015-01-01

    El sector de la construcción desempeña un importante rol en la economía mundial, ya que genera alrededor del 10% del PIB y da trabajo en torno al 7% de las personas empleadas. Se investigan las salidas profesionales de los ingenieros(as) de edificación y las barreras de carrera que pueden encontrar en su acceso al mercado de trabajo y en su desarrollo profesional en el sector. A partir de la identificación de variables como barreras relevantes, se adopta un enfoque descriptivo e inferencial d...

  7. Binding of Adenovirus Capsid to Dipalmitoyl Phosphatidylcholine Provides a Novel Pathway for Virus Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Balakireva, Larissa; Schoehn, Guy; Thouvenin, Eric; Chroboczek, Jadwiga

    2003-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) is an airborne, nonenveloped virus infecting respiratory epithelium. To study the mechanism of Ad entry, we used alveolar adenocarcinoma A549 cells, which have retained the ability of alveolar epithelial type II cells to synthesize the major component of pulmonary surfactant, disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Stimulation of phosphatidylcholine secretion by calcium ionophore or phorbol ester augmented the susceptibility of these cells to Ad. Both Ad infection and recombinant-Ad-...

  8. Demand uncertainty in skill-based competition

    OpenAIRE

    Artinger, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    How does demand uncertainty affect entry into skill-based competition? I investigate this question in a market entry experiment with skill-based payoffs by systematically varying two key elements of the market environment: demand risk and expected market size. Results show that people's reactions to demand risk depend on the market size: in small markets people enter more when demand is risky, in large markets they enter less when demand is risky. This leads to substantial inefficiencies in b...

  9. Long-term athletic development, part 2: barriers to success and potential solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Oliver, Jon L; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Howard, Rick; De Ste Croix, Mark B A; Williams, Craig A; Best, Thomas M; Alvar, Brent A; Micheli, Lyle J; Thomas, D Phillip; Hatfield, Disa L; Cronin, John B; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-05-01

    The first installment of this two-part commentary reviewed existing models of long-term athletic development. However, irrespective of the model that is adopted by practitioners, existing structures within competitive youth sports in addition to the prevalence of physical inactivity in a growing number of modern-day youth may serve as potential barriers to the success of any developmental pathway. The second part of this commentary will initially highlight common issues that are likely to impede the success of long-term athletic development programs and then propose solutions that will address the negative impact of such issues.

  10. Lifespan extension in a semelparous chordate occurs via developmental growth arrest just prior to meiotic entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunasekaran Subramaniam

    Full Text Available It is proposed that the ageing process is linked to signaling from the germline such that the rate of ageing can be adjusted to the state of the reproductive system, allowing these two processes to co-evolve. Mechanistic insight into this link has been primarily derived from iteroparous reproductive models, the nematode C. elegans, and the arthropod Drosophila. Here, we examined to what extent these mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved in a semelparous chordate, Oikopleura dioica, where we identify a developmental growth arrest (GA in response to crowded, diet-restricted conditions, which can extend its lifespan at least three-fold. Under nutritional stress, the iteroparative models sacrifice germ cells that have entered meiosis, while maintaining a reduced pool of active germline stem cells (GSCs. In contrast, O. dioica only entered GA prior to meiotic entry. Stress conditions encountered after this point led to maturation in a normal time frame but with reduced reproductive output. During GA, TOR signaling was inhibited, whereas MAPK, ERK1/2 and p38 pathways were activated, and under such conditions, activation of these pathways was shown to be critical for survival. Direct inhibition of TOR signaling alone was sufficient to prevent meiotic entry and germline differentiation. This inhibition activated the p38 pathway, but did not activate the ERK1/2 pathway. Thus, the link between reproductive status and lifespan extension in response to nutrient-limited conditions is interpreted in a significantly different manner in these iteroparative versus semelparous models. In the latter case, meiotic entry is a definitive signal that lifespan extension can no longer occur, whereas in the former, meiotic entry is not a unique chronological event, and can be largely erased during lifespan extension in response to nutrient stress, and reactivated from a pool of maintained GSCs when conditions improve.

  11. CinéGlobe invites you to participate in a poster design competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Neal David Hartman

    2013-01-01

    For its 2014 publicity campaign, CinéGlobe invites CERN people to participate in a poster design competition.  The entries are now on display on the Pas Perdus in the main building, and the CERNois are invited to vote for their favourites.    CinéGlobe is the international festival of short films inspired by science that takes place every two years at CERN, in the Globe of Science and Innovation. From 18 to 23 March 2014, CERN will host the fourth edition of the festival. The mission of the CinéGlobe Film Festival is to challenge the commonly perceived divisions between science and art by demonstrating that they are both essential to interpreting our world. Open to short film creators from around the world, the CinéGlobe festival is truly international, the first three editions having attracted more than 4,000 entries from more than 100 countries around the globe.  In addition to screening...

  12. Evaluation of Data Entry Errors and Data Changes to an Electronic Data Capture Clinical Trial Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchel, Jules T; Kim, Yong Joong; Choi, Joonhyuk; Park, Glen; Cappi, Silvana; Horn, David; Kist, Morgan; D Agostino, Ralph B

    2011-07-01

    Monitoring of clinical trials includes several disciplines, stakeholders, and skill sets. The aim of the present study was to identify database changes and data entry errors to an electronic data capture (EDC) clinical trial database, and to access the impact of the changes. To accomblish the aim, Target e*CRF was used as the EDC tool for a multinational, dose-finding, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, parallel, placebo-controlled trial to investigate efficacy and safety of a new treatment in men with lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia. The main errors observed were simple transcription errors from the paper source documents to the EDC database. This observation was to be expected, since every transaction has an inherant error rate. What and how to monitor must be assessed within the risk-based monitoring section of the comprehensive data monitoring plan. With the advent of direct data entry, and the elimination of the requirement to transcribe from a paper source record to an EDC system, error rates should go down dramatically. In addition, protocol violations and data outside the normal range can be identified at the time of data entry and not days, weeks, and months after the fact. PMID:24058221

  13. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Study (Appendix A), June 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This study examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome these barriers. Three groups of energy efficiency technologies and measures were examined: industrial end-use energy efficiency, industrial demand response, and industrial combined heat and power. This study also includes the estimated economic benefits from hypothetical Federal energy efficiency matching grants, as directed by the Act.

  14. Equation of Energy Injection to a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shuiliang; Weng, Shan; Jin, Qi; Han, Jingyi; Jiang, Boqiong; Wu, Zuliang

    2016-08-01

    The electric energy injection from a pulsed power supply to a planar type of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor at atmospheric pressure was studied. Relations of the energy injection with barrier materials, barrier thickness, peak voltage, gap distance, electrode area, and operation temperature were experimentally investigated. The energy injection is a function of relative permittivity, barrier thickness, peak voltage, gap distance, and electrode area. The influence of operation temperature on energy injection is slight in the range of 27-300 °C but becomes obvious in the range of 300-500 °C. A model was established using which the energy injection can be easily predicted. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11575159), Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. LY13B070004), Program for Zhejiang Leading Team of S&T Innovation (No. 2013TD07), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51206146)

  15. Trek1 contributes to maintaining nasal epithelial barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Li, Jing; Li, Meng; Chen, Hong-Bin; Yan, Hao; Mo, Li-Hua; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial barrier integrity is critical to maintain the homeostasis in the body. The regulatory mechanism of the epithelial barrier function has not been fully understood. This study aims to elucidate the role of the TWIK-related potassium channel-1 (Trek1) in the regulation of the epithelial barrier function of the nasal mucosa. In this study, the levels of Trek1 were assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The epithelial barrier function of the rat nasal epithelia was evaluated by the Ussing chamber system. The results showed that Trek1 was detected in the human and rat nasal epithelia, which were significantly lower in patients and rats with allergic rhinitis than that in healthy controls. Exposure to the signature T helper 2 cytokine, interleukin (IL)-4, markedly suppressed the expression of Trek1 in the nasal mucosa via up regulating the expression of the histone deacetylase (HDAC)1. The IL-4-induced rat nasal epithelial barrier dysfunction could be blocked by HDAC1 inhibitor (Trichostatin A), or sodium butyrate, or administration of Clostridium Butyricum. We conclude that Trek1 is critical to maintain the nasal epithelial barrier function. PMID:25778785

  16. Barriers to the Development of SME's in the Australian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Mills

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Small and medium sized companies (SMEs operating in the construction industry in regionalareas of Australia often struggle to compete against city-based companies for constructionwork. This paper identifies the barriers that confront SMEs in areas outsidemajor cities, specifically in regional areas of Victoria (Australia where local firms oftencompete unsuccessfully against large Melbourne-based organisations. The authors alsolook at the possibility of using e-commerce solutions to give regional SMEs greater competitivenessas well as considering possible policy initiatives that may assist these companiesto be more successful in tendering against city-based competition.

  17. Children's social/emotional characteristics at entry to school: implications for school nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Helen; Kendall, Garth; Shields, Linda

    2013-09-01

    Children entering school need to build healthy peer relationships; school, however, is the central place for bullying. School nurses have a growing focus on providing care for students with social, emotional and behavioural problems. We examined the relational development of children at school entry in regard to aggression and empathy, showing that teacher-reported aggression decreased between Pre-primary and Year One, while empathy increased between Year One and Year Two classes. No gender difference was found in teacher-reported total, or covert aggression. Understanding how development of empathy can be supported in children at school entry is important, thereby supporting development of pro-social behaviour and decreasing bullying. School nurses must understand the importance of surrounding children with safety in relationships as they begin school. PMID:23455873

  18. Direct-to-Earth Communications with Mars Science Laboratory During Entry, Descent, and Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Melissa; Finley, Susan; Fort, David; Schratz, Brian; Ilott, Peter; Mukai, Ryan; Estabrook, Polly; Oudrhiri, Kamal; Kahan, Daniel; Satorius, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) undergoes extreme heating and acceleration during Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) on Mars. Unknown dynamics lead to large Doppler shifts, making communication challenging. During EDL, a special form of Multiple Frequency Shift Keying (MFSK) communication is used for Direct-To-Earth (DTE) communication. The X-band signal is received by the Deep Space Network (DSN) at the Canberra Deep Space Communication complex, then down-converted, digitized, and recorded by open-loop Radio Science Receivers (RSR), and decoded in real-time by the EDL Data Analysis (EDA) System. The EDA uses lock states with configurable Fast Fourier Transforms to acquire and track the signal. RSR configuration and channel allocation is shown. Testing prior to EDL is discussed including software simulations, test bed runs with MSL flight hardware, and the in-flight end-to-end test. EDA configuration parameters and signal dynamics during pre-entry, entry, and parachute deployment are analyzed. RSR and EDA performance during MSL EDL is evaluated, including performance using a single 70-meter DSN antenna and an array of two 34-meter DSN antennas as a back up to the 70-meter antenna.

  19. Market entry and exit by biotech and device companies funded by venture capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lawton R; Housman, Michael G; Robinson, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    Start-up companies in the biotechnology and medical device sectors are important sources of health care innovation. This paper describes the role of venture capital in supporting these companies and charts the growth in venture capital financial support. The paper then uses longitudinal data to describe market entry and exit by these companies. Similar factors are associated with entry and exit in the two sectors. Entries and exits in one sector also appear to influence entry in the other. These findings have important implications for developing innovative technologies and ensuring competitive markets in the life sciences.

  20. New criteria to select foreign entry mode choice of global franchise chains into emerging markets

    OpenAIRE

    Baena Graciá, Verónica; Cerviño Fernández, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Despite emerging markets are some of the fastest growing economies in the world and represent countries that are experiencing a substantial economic transformation, little is known about the factors influencing choices of foreign entry mode in those markets. Especially, regarding companies that franchise overseas. In an attempt to expand our knowledge of this topic, this paper presents an empirical assessment of the relationship between a set of different variables with the four poss...

  1. Externalizing Symptoms among Children of Alcoholic Parents: Entry Points for an Antisocial Pathway to Alcoholism

    OpenAIRE

    Hussong, A.M.; Wirth, R. J.; Edwards, M. C.; Curran, P. J.; Chassin, L.A.; Zucker, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    We examined heterogeneity in risk for externalizing symptoms in children of alcoholic parents as it may inform the search for entry points into an antisocial pathway to alcoholism. Specifically, we tested whether the number of alcoholic parents in a family, the comorbid subtype of parent alcoholism, and the gender of the child predicted trajectories of externalizing symptoms over the early life course as assessed in high-risk samples of children of alcoholic parents and matched controls. Thro...

  2. Collaborative Competition? A Great Way to Teach and Motivate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanello, Tony

    2005-02-01

    In my physics classes, I strive to motivate my students to do their very best work and inspire them to work harder than they have ever been asked to before. To reach that level, I find that my students need an outside motivation. They need to have someone from outside of their education community judge their skills and efforts. I have found that participation in team competitions provides students with the motivation to excel and also has the benefits of teaching students to work in a team setting. Thanks to several science-oriented organizations, there are a number of what I like to call "collaborative competitions" just begging for our students to enter, compete, and yes, even win! In this paper, I will describe some of the competitions my students have participated in and provide some tips for other teachers who may want to do likewise.

  3. PE_PGRS33 Contributes to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Entry in Macrophages through Interaction with TLR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palucci, Ivana; Camassa, Serena; Cascioferro, Alessandro; Sali, Michela; Anoosheh, Saber; Zumbo, Antonella; Minerva, Mariachiara; Iantomasi, Raffaella; De Maio, Flavio; Di Sante, Gabriele; Ria, Francesco; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Palù, Giorgio; Brennan, Michael J; Manganelli, Riccardo; Delogu, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    PE_PGRS represent a large family of proteins typical of pathogenic mycobacteria whose members are characterized by an N-terminal PE domain followed by a large Gly-Ala repeat-rich C-terminal domain. Despite the abundance of PE_PGRS-coding genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genome their role and function in the biology and pathogenesis still remains elusive. In this study, we generated and characterized an Mtb H37Rv mutant (MtbΔ33) in which the structural gene of PE_PGRS33, a prototypical member of the protein family, was inactivated. We showed that this mutant entered macrophages with an efficiency up to ten times lower than parental or complemented strains, while its efficiency in infecting pneumocytes remained unaffected. Interestingly, the lack of PE_PGRS33 did not affect the intracellular growth of this mutant in macrophages. Using a series of functional deletion mutants of the PE_PGRS33 gene to complement the MtbΔ33 strain, we demonstrated that the PGRS domain is required to mediate cell entry into macrophages, with the key domain encompassing position 140-260 amino acids of PE_PGRS33. PE_PGRS33-mediated entry into macrophages was abolished in TLR2-deficient mice, as well as following treatment with wortmannin or an antibody against the complement receptor 3 (CR3), indicating that PE_PGRS33-mediated entry of Mtb in macrophages occurs through interaction with TLR2.

  4. MEK1 inactivates Myt1 to regulate Golgi membrane fragmentation and mitotic entry in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Julien; Scarpa, Margherita; Ortega-Bellido, Maria; Malhotra, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    The pericentriolar stacks of Golgi cisternae are separated from each other in G2 and fragmented extensively during mitosis. MEK1 is required for Golgi fragmentation in G2 and for the entry of cells into mitosis. We now report that Myt1 mediates MEK1's effects on the Golgi complex. Knockdown of Myt1 by siRNA increased the efficiency of Golgi complex fragmentation by mitotic cytosol in permeabilized and intact HeLa cells. Myt1 knockdown eliminated the requirement of MEK1 in Golgi fragmentation and alleviated the delay in mitotic entry due to MEK1 inhibition. The phosphorylation of Myt1 by MEK1 requires another kinase but is independent of RSK, Plk, and CDK1. Altogether our findings reveal that Myt1 is inactivated by MEK1 mediated phosphorylation to fragment the Golgi complex in G2 and for the entry of cells into mitosis. It is known that Myt1 inactivation is required for CDK1 activation. Myt1 therefore is an important link by which MEK1 dependent fragmentation of the Golgi complex in G2 is connected to the CDK1 mediated breakdown of Golgi into tubules and vesicles in mitosis.

  5. Barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Karen; Anies, Maria; Folb, Barbara L; Zallman, Leah

    2015-01-01

    With the unprecedented international migration seen in recent years, policies that limit health care access have become prevalent. Barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants go beyond policy and range from financial limitations, to discrimination and fear of deportation. This paper is aimed at reviewing the literature on barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants and identifying strategies that have or could be used to address these barriers. To address study questions, we conducted a literature review of published articles from the last 10 years in PubMed using three main concepts: immigrants, undocumented, and access to health care. The search yielded 341 articles of which 66 met study criteria. With regard to barriers, we identified barriers in the policy arena focused on issues related to law and policy including limitations to access and type of health care. These varied widely across countries but ultimately impacted the type and amount of health care any undocumented immigrant could receive. Within the health system, barriers included bureaucratic obstacles including paperwork and registration systems. The alternative care available (safety net) was generally limited and overwhelmed. Finally, there was evidence of widespread discriminatory practices within the health care system itself. The individual level focused on the immigrant's fear of deportation, stigma, and lack of capital (both social and financial) to obtain services. Recommendations identified in the papers reviewed included advocating for policy change to increase access to health care for undocumented immigrants, providing novel insurance options, expanding safety net services, training providers to better care for immigrant populations, and educating undocumented immigrants on navigating the system. There are numerous barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants. These vary by country and frequently change. Despite concerns that access to health care attracts

  6. Geothermal(Ground-Source)Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

    2008-12-01

    More effective stewardship of our resources contributes to the security, environmental sustainability, and economic well-being of the nation. Buildings present one of the best opportunities to economically reduce energy consumption and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), sometimes called ground-source heat pumps, have been proven capable of producing large reductions in energy use and peak demand in buildings. However, GHPs have received little attention at the policy level as an important component of a national strategy. Have policymakers mistakenly overlooked GHPs, or are GHPs simply unable to make a major contribution to the national goals for various reasons? This brief study was undertaken at DOE's request to address this conundrum. The scope of the study includes determining the status of global GHP markets and the status of the GHP industry and technology in the United States, assembling previous estimates of GHP energy savings potential, identifying key barriers to application of GHPs, and identifying actions that could accelerate market adoption of GHPs. The findings are documented in this report along with conclusions and recommendations.

  7. Eave Screening and Push-Pull Tactics to Reduce House Entry by Vectors of Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, David J; Omusula, Philemon; Wouters, Karlijn; Oketch, Charles; Carreira, Ana S; Durka, Maxime; Derycke, Jean-Luc; Loy, Dorothy E; Hahn, Beatrice H; Mukabana, Wolfgang R; Mweresa, Collins K; van Loon, Joop J A; Takken, Willem; Hiscox, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying have contributed to a decline in malaria over the last decade, but progress is threatened by the development of physiological and behavioral resistance of mosquitoes against insecticides. Acknowledging the need for alternative vector control tools, we quantified the effects of eave screening in combination with a push-pull system based on the simultaneous use of a repellent (push) and attractant-baited traps (pull). Field experiments in western Kenya showed that eave screening, whether used in combination with an attractant-baited trap or not, was highly effective in reducing house entry by malaria mosquitoes. The magnitude of the effect varied for different mosquito species and between two experiments, but the reduction in house entry was always considerable (between 61% and 99%). The use of outdoor, attractant-baited traps alone did not have a significant impact on mosquito house entry but the high number of mosquitoes trapped outdoors indicates that attractant-baited traps could be used for removal trapping, which would enhance outdoor as well as indoor protection against mosquito bites. As eave screening was effective by itself, addition of a repellent was of limited value. Nevertheless, repellents may play a role in reducing outdoor malaria transmission in the peridomestic area. PMID:26834195

  8. Plastic responses of Abies pinsapo xylogenesis to drought and competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Juan Carlos; Camarero, J Julio; Carreira, José Antonio

    2009-12-01

    Radial growth and xylogenesis were studied to investigate the influence of climate variability and intraspecific competition on secondary growth in Abies pinsapo Boiss., a relic Mediterranean fir. We monitored the responses to three thinning treatments (unthinned control -C-, 30% -T30- and 60% -T60- of basal area removed) to test the hypothesis that they may improve the adaptation capacity of tree growth to climatic stress. We also assessed whether xylogenesis was differentially affected by tree-to-tree competition. Secondary growth was assessed using manual band dendrometers from 2005 to 2007. In 2006, xylogenesis (phases of tracheid formation) was also investigated by taking microcores and performing histological analyses. Seasonal dynamics of radial increment were modeled using Gompertz functions and correlations with microclimate and radiation were performed. Histological analyses revealed it as fundamental to calibrate the dendrometer estimates of radial increment and to establish the actual onset and end dates of tracheid production. The lower radial-increment rates and number of produced tracheids were observed in the trees subjected to high competition in the unthinned plots. The growing season differed among the plots, and its duration ranged from an average of 78 days in unthinned plots to 115 days in thinned ones (T60). Variations in the beginning of the growing season (13 April to 22 May) and earlywood-latewood transition (early August) were mainly determined by the temperature pattern, while the onset and the end of the growing season were related to both annual precipitation and tree-to-tree competition. The tracheid-formation phases of radial enlargement and cell-wall thickening showed similar patterns in the trees from thinned and unthinned plots subjected to low and high competition, respectively, but the mean number of tracheids in each phase was always higher in the trees from the thinned plots. The reduction of competition through thinning

  9. HOW TO MAKE A DESTINATION MORE COMPETITIVE IN TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIEL SANDA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to make an overview on the concept of destination competitiveness, starting with the importance of tourism in the economy and ending with what actually means the concept, taking into consideration also the importance of developing quality tourism products.Powerful destinations manage to attract millions of tourists annually. The key of establishing proper strategies for tourism destinations is to determine the competitiveness of a tourism destination. This subject has been researched by many important researchers from the tourism area and the findings obtained can help marketers. It must also be taken into discussion the fact that competitiveness may not only relate to factors of related to the destination

  10. BVA members wow judges in photo competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Earlier this year, BVA ran its inaugural photo competition, giving members the opportunity to showcase the work of the veterinary profession and the animals and wildlife they encounter. Standing out from over 400 high-quality entries, judges picked the images reproduced in this month's BVA News as the winning and highly commended photos. To see all the entries and hear from the winners, visit www.bva.co.uk/vet-photos-2016/. There will be another photo competition in 2017 with more categories to be announced. PMID:27585899

  11. Applying Foreign Entry Market Strategies to UK Higher Education Transnational Education Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Victoria; Antoniou, Christos

    2016-01-01

    We take a multidisciplinary approach mapping the models used by UK higher education (HE) institutions against established international business foreign market entry strategies. We review the conditions in host markets that facilitate market entry and consider how these will determine foreign market entry strategy. We specifically consider four…

  12. Determining when a set of compute nodes participating in a barrier operation on a parallel computer are ready to exit the barrier operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.

    2011-12-20

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for determining when a set of compute nodes participating in a barrier operation on a parallel computer are ready to exit the barrier operation that includes, for each compute node in the set: initializing a barrier counter with no counter underflow interrupt; configuring, upon entering the barrier operation, the barrier counter with a value in dependence upon a number of compute nodes in the set; broadcasting, by a DMA engine on the compute node to each of the other compute nodes upon entering the barrier operation, a barrier control packet; receiving, by the DMA engine from each of the other compute nodes, a barrier control packet; modifying, by the DMA engine, the value for the barrier counter in dependence upon each of the received barrier control packets; exiting the barrier operation if the value for the barrier counter matches the exit value.

  13. Competitive energy markets. The effective route to improving the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Market forces, operating in an increasingly competitive energy market, are a preferred route to achieving environmental and energy efficiency benefits, than those which can be achieved through a managed approach adopted by many governments. It is shown, through examples, how electricity is a catalyst for change at several levels in business, the community and the general economy. Experience in the United Kingdom indicates that free market forces and inter-energy competition not only help improve the regional and therefore national economy, but they offer a very effective way of introducing improvements in energy efficiency and the environment. Governments should establish the framework for competition and regulation but not attempt to manage an industry, which is invariably done more effectively by those who run them. (author)

  14. THE ROMANIAN BANKING COMPETITION AND THE ACCESSION TO EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Capraru

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we try to assess banking competition in the Romania for 2001 – 2008, taking into account the evolution of market share of the top five, Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI, performances indicators like ROA and ROE and evolutions of deposit and loans rates. We observed that the competition in the Romanian banking system increases continuously in the last years. The main factors which have influenced this process were: the privatization of the majority of state capital banks and the perspective of accession of our country in the EU. In the period assessed, there are two approaches: in the first period banks have had very good performances due to their market share in a low competitive banking environment and after the privatization of some state capital banks, the leader of the market lost market share in the favor of other bank with greater performances.

  15. Barriers to tacit knowledge retention: An understanding of the perceptions of the knowledge management of people inside and outside the organisation

    OpenAIRE

    Jacky Bessick; Visvanathan Naicker

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge loss causes challenges for organisations that wish to remain competitive. These organisations must identify the risks that could lead to knowledge loss and become aware of issues that affect knowledge retention.Objectives: The objective of this research was to identify tacit knowledge retention barriers that could cause knowledge loss in an organisation. The paper presents a framework for the assessment of the impact of these barriers and discusses the research finding...

  16. Roll-to-roll vacuum deposition of barrier coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    It is intended that the book will be a practical guide to provide any reader with the basic information to help them understand what is necessary in order to produce a good barrier coated web or to improve the quality of any existing barrier product. After providing an introduction, where the terminology is outlined and some of the science is given (keeping the mathematics to a minimum), including barrier testing methods, the vacuum deposition process will be described. In theory a thin layer of metal or glass-like material should be enough to convert any polymer film into a perfect barrier material. The reality is that all barrier coatings have their performance limited by the defects in the coating. This book looks at the whole process from the source materials through to the post deposition handling of the coated material. This holistic view of the vacuum coating process provides a description of the common sources of defects and includes the possible methods of limiting the defects. This enables readers...

  17. How Gaussian competition leads to lumpy or uniform species distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pigolotti, Simone; Lopez, Cristóbal; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio;

    2010-01-01

    of the competing species. Most models considered in the literature assume a Gaussian competition kernel. This is unfortunate, since predictions based on such a Gaussian assumption are not robust. In fact, Gaussian kernels are a border case scenario, and slight deviations from this function can lead to either...... or evolutionary mechanisms or by details of the numerical implementation of the model. We analyze the origin of this sensitivity and discuss it in the context of recent applications of the model.......A central model in theoretical ecology considers the competition of a range of species for a broad spectrum of resources. Recent studies have shown that essentially two different outcomes are possible. Either the species surviving competition are more or less uniformly distributed over the resource...

  18. Digital Competition Game to Improve Programming Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Julian

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a digital game with an educational purpose in the subject of computer programming, which enables students to reinforce and improve their abilities on the concepts of sequencing, defined iteration and nesting. For its design, a problem solving approach was followed and a score comparing mechanism was implemented…

  19. Cooperation for competition : linking Ethiopian farmers to markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francesconi, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout history, rural smallholders have formed various forms of associations to confront access-barriers to the market. It is estimated that 250 million farmers participate in agricultural cooperatives in developing countries. Agricultural cooperatives are considered to be a fundamental pillar o

  20. Provider barriers to telemental health: obstacles overcome, obstacles remaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth; Turvey, Carolyn; Augusterfer, Eugene F

    2013-06-01

    Many providers are hesitant to use telemental health technologies. When providers are queried, various barriers are presented, such as the clinician's skepticism about the effectiveness of telemental health (TMH), viewing telehealth technologies as inconvenient, or reporting difficulties with medical reimbursement. Provider support for TMH is critical to its diffusion because clinicians often serve as the initial gatekeepers to telehealth implementation and program success. In this article, we address provider concerns in three broad domains: (1) personal barriers, (2) clinical workflow and technology barriers, and (3) licensure, credentialing, and reimbursement barriers. We found evidence that, although many barriers have been discussed in the literature for years, advancements in TMH have rapidly reduced obstacles for its use. Improvements include extensive opportunities for training, a growing evidence base supporting positive TMH outcomes, and transformations in technologies that improve provider convenience and transmission quality. Recommendations for further change are discussed within each domain. In particular, it is important to grow and disseminate data underscoring the promise and effectiveness of TMH, integrate videoconferencing capabilities into electronic medical record platforms, expand TMH reimbursement, and modify licensure standards.

  1. Competitive Approach To Information System Risk Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Miroslaw Ryba

    2004-01-01

    This article presents the method of IT risk assessment from human behaviour perspective, developed by the author. It is an alternative for the commonly used approaches to risk assessment, based on vulnerability and threat identification and the probability estimation of their occurrence. The authors method applies to risk calculation factors such as administrators or users skills, attackers knowledge and determination, or attack method used. The key element of the proposed risk analysis compe...

  2. Dominican NGOs move from competition to collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, H

    1995-07-01

    In 1992, the seven nongovernmental organizations (NGO) working to prevent HIV/AIDS in the Dominican Republic received most of their funding and technical assistance from the US Agency for International Development (USAID). In September 1992, however, USAID's AIDSTECH project asked the AIDS Control and Prevention (AIDSCAP) Project to prepare the NGOs for the time when USAID would no longer be their main source of support. To that end, AIDSCAP worked with NGO staff to assess their technical, managerial, and administrative needs, and identified a lack of administrative and managerial experience among many NGO staff. AIDSCAP therefore developed an institutional strengthening plan, including a series of capacity building workshops, in 1993. Many NGOs, however, foreseeing the impending need to compete with other NGOs for limited funds, were not interested in sharing ideas and working together. This article describes how Coordinadora de Animacion Socio-Cultural (CASCO) and the Instituto Dominicano de Desarrollo Integral (IDDI) competed in the context of uncertainty over continued donor funding, but now meet regularly to coordinate HIV/AIDS prevention projects for youth in the Dominican Republic.

  3. Dominican NGOs move from competition to collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, H

    1995-07-01

    In 1992, the seven nongovernmental organizations (NGO) working to prevent HIV/AIDS in the Dominican Republic received most of their funding and technical assistance from the US Agency for International Development (USAID). In September 1992, however, USAID's AIDSTECH project asked the AIDS Control and Prevention (AIDSCAP) Project to prepare the NGOs for the time when USAID would no longer be their main source of support. To that end, AIDSCAP worked with NGO staff to assess their technical, managerial, and administrative needs, and identified a lack of administrative and managerial experience among many NGO staff. AIDSCAP therefore developed an institutional strengthening plan, including a series of capacity building workshops, in 1993. Many NGOs, however, foreseeing the impending need to compete with other NGOs for limited funds, were not interested in sharing ideas and working together. This article describes how Coordinadora de Animacion Socio-Cultural (CASCO) and the Instituto Dominicano de Desarrollo Integral (IDDI) competed in the context of uncertainty over continued donor funding, but now meet regularly to coordinate HIV/AIDS prevention projects for youth in the Dominican Republic. PMID:12291823

  4. Cost based interconnection charges as a way to induce competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten

    The objective of this paper is to analyse the relationship between regulation of interconnection charges and the level of competition. One of the most important issues in the debate on interconnect regulation has been use of forward looking costs for setting of interconnection charges. This debate...... has been ongoing within the EU as well as in US. This paper discusses the European experiences and in particular the Danish experiences with use of cost based interconnection charges, and their impact on competition in the telecom market....

  5. Barrier isolators as an alternative to a cleanroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, L

    1999-07-15

    The use of barrier isolators as an alternative to a cleanroom for the preparation of sterile products at ASHP-defined risk levels 2 and 3 and cytotoxic and hazardous drugs is described. The two isolators selected provide enclosed microenvironments. The isolator used for preparing products of risk level 2 has white acrylic and polycarbonate rigid walls that isolate the sterile product from the operator. The isolator used for preparing level 3 products and cytotoxic and hazardous drugs has epoxy-painted steel walls, a front window, and a pair of glove ports; its design theoretically prevents cross contamination between the operator and the product under preparation and between the product and the external environment. An independent contractor familiar with barrier isolators certifies the equipment every six months. A random microbiological sampling is periodically compared with a control. The isolators have been in operation since July 1998 without microbial growth in any sample tested. The barrier isolators cost more than traditional laminar-airflow hoods, but the hospital considers the barrier isolators to be more cost-effective than a cleanroom. A cost saving in supplies for cytotoxic and hazardous drug preparation as a result of a reduction in overall gown and glove use was observed. Barrier isolators offer an alternative to a cleanroom for the preparation of products at risk levels 2 and 3 and offer an aseptic, safe environment for preparing cytotoxic and hazardous agents.

  6. Barriers to diabetes management: patient and provider factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soohyun; Chesla, Catherine; Stotts, Nancy A; Kroon, Lisa; Janson, Susan L

    2011-07-01

    Despite significant advances in diagnosis and treatment, the persistence of inadequate metabolic control continues. Poor glycemic control may be reflected by both the failure of diabetes self-management by patients as well as inadequate intervention strategies by clinicians. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize existing knowledge regarding various barriers of diabetes management from the perspectives of both patients and clinicians. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, and PsycINFO identified 1454 articles in English published between 1990 and 2009, addressing type 2 diabetes, patient's barriers, clinician's barriers, and self-management. Patients' adherence, attitude, beliefs, and knowledge about diabetes may affect diabetes self-management. Culture and language capabilities influence the patient's health beliefs, attitudes, health literacy, thereby affecting diabetes self-management. Other influential factors include the patient's financial resources, co-morbidities, and social support. Clinician's attitude, beliefs and knowledge about diabetes also influence diabetes management. Clinicians may further influence the patient's perception through effective communication skills and by having a well-integrated health care system. Identifying barriers to diabetes management is necessary to improve the quality of diabetes care, including the improvement of metabolic control, and diabetes self-management. Further research that considers these barriers is necessary for developing interventions for individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  7. Overcoming barriers to seedling regeneration during forest restoration on tropical pasture land and the potential value of woody weeds

    OpenAIRE

    Amelia eElgar; Kylie eFreebody; Catherine ePohlman; Luke Paul Shoo; Carla eCatterall

    2014-01-01

    Combating the legacy of deforestation on tropical biodiversity requires the conversion to forest of large areas of established pasture, where barriers to native plant regeneration include competition with pasture grasses and poor propagule supply (seed availability). In addition, initial woody plants that colonise pasture are often invasive non-native species whose ecological roles and management in the context of forest regeneration are contested. In a restoration experiment at two 0.64 ha s...

  8. Understanding male cancer patients' barriers to participating in cancer rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Lomborg, Kirsten; Nielsen, Claus Vinther;

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to describe male cancer survivors' barriers towards participation in cancer rehabilitation as a means to guiding future targeted men's cancer rehabilitation. Symbolic Interactionism along with the interpretive descriptive methodology guided the study of 35 male cancer survivors...... representing seven cancer types. Data were generated through a 5-month fieldwork study comprising participant observations, semi-structured individual interviews and informal conversations. The analyses revealed two overarching findings shedding light on male cancer survivors' barriers to rehabilitation: ‘Fear...... hinder: ‘Autonomy and purpose’, ‘Solidarity and fellowship’ and ‘Forget and move on’. This study of male cancer survivors' and cancer rehabilitation documents how masculine ideals may constitute barriers for participation in rehabilitation and provides insights about why men are underrepresented in...

  9. WAVE TRANSMISSION AND REFLECTION DUE TO A THIN VERTICAL BARRIER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A numerical method, the boundary fitted coordinate method (BFC),was used to investigate the transmission and reflection of water waves due to a rigid thin vertical barrier descending from the water surface to a depth, i. e. , a curtain-wall type breakwater. A comparison between the present computed results and previous experimental and analytical results was carried out which verifies the prediction of the BFC method. Wave transmission and reflection due to the barrier were computed, and the transmission and refiection coefficients were given in a figure.

  10. Female chimpanzees use copulation calls flexibly to prevent social competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon W Townsend

    Full Text Available The adaptive function of copulation calls in female primates has been debated for years. One influential idea is that copulation calls are a sexually selected trait, which enables females to advertise their receptive state to males. Male-male competition ensues and females benefit by getting better mating partners and higher quality offspring. We analysed the copulation calling behaviour of wild female chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii at Budongo Forest, Uganda, but found no support for the male-male competition hypothesis. Hormone analysis showed that the calling behaviour of copulating females was unrelated to their fertile period and likelihood of conception. Instead, females called significantly more while with high-ranking males, but suppressed their calls if high-ranking females were nearby. Copulation calling may therefore be one potential strategy employed by female chimpanzees to advertise receptivity to high-ranked males, confuse paternity and secure future support from these socially important individuals. Competition between females can be dangerously high in wild chimpanzees, and our results indicate that females use their copulation calls strategically to minimise the risks associated with such competition.

  11. Organizational, interface, and financial barriers to the commercial development of community energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schladale, R.; Ritschard, R.

    1979-12-01

    The scope of this analysis was limited to systems producing electricity - the output of a community energy system typically falling in the range 10 kW to 150 MW. The purpose of this study was to identify the barriers that groups and individuals will face when attempting to commercialize community energy systems. Three particular classes of barriers were investigated: those within the organization attempting the commercialization, those that arise from attempts to link the community system with an electric utility, and those that impede the flow of investment capital into community energy systems. In summary, three general observations regarding community energy systems may be distilled from this study. First, although many barriers exist to the commercialization of the systems, few if any appear unresolvable. Perhaps most challenginng will be the problem of expanding the use of cogeneration and municipal sold waste while at the same time maintaining or improving ambient air quality. Second, the financial subsidies required to make community systems competitive are not extraordinary. Indeed, with the exception of photovoltaics they should not amount to more than about 10% of capital cost of the new systems, and mass production may eliminate the need for subsidies altogether at some point in the future. Third, the administrative and regulatory procedures required to make community energy systems viable appear to be taking shape in a positive and timely fashion.

  12. Relaxing Competition through Speculation : Committing to a Negative Supply Slope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmberg, P.; Willems, Bert

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: We demonstrate how suppliers can take strategic speculative positions in derivatives markets to soften competition in the spot market. In our game, suppliers first choose a portfolio of call options and then compete with supply functions. In equilibrium firms sell forward contracts and buy

  13. Relaxing competition through speculation : Committing to a negative supply slope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmberg, Par; Willems, Bert

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate how commodity producers can take strategic speculative positions in derivatives markets to soften competition in the spot market. In our game, producers first choose a portfolio of call options and then compete in supply functions. In equilibrium, producers sell forward contracts and

  14. Molecular markers to study competition and diversity of Rhizobium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sessitsch, A.

    1997-01-01

    The research described in this thesis was directed to the development of molecular identification and detection techniques for studying the ecology of Rhizobium, a nitrogen- fixing bacterium of agricultural importance. Competition of inoculant strains with indigenous microbes is a serious problem in

  15. Barriers to the development of fuel-cell electric vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study is structured as follows: Fuel cells (with focus on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC)); Fuel cell electric vehicles; Barriers to commercial use of fuel cell vehicles in the following areas: price; hydrogen production; hydrogen infrastructure; hydrogen storage; other barriers (safety; lifetime; use in extreme conditions; control system errors). The major barriers include too high price and problems with a stable and sustainable hydrogen source. Also, the following must be ensured for a wider use of FCEVs: reduction in the weight and volume of the drive unit; improved lifetime of the PEMFC system; usability within wide weather conditions; existence of an adequate infrastructure (a dense hydrogen service station network and their hydrogen supply); and implementation of related legislation including safety standards. (P.A.)

  16. Application of Extended Kalman Filter to Tactical Ballistic Missile Re-entry Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Subrata

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to investigate the advantages and performance of Extended Kalman Filter for the estimation of non-linear system where linearization takes place about a trajectory that was continually updated with the state estimates resulting from the measurement. Here tactile ballistic missile Re-entry problem is taken as a nonlinear system model and Extended Kalman Filter technique is used to estimate the positions and velocities at the X and Y direction at different values of ballistic coefficients. The result shows that the method gives better estimation with the increase of ballistic coefficient.

  17. Government`s response to the competitiveness problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gover, J.; Huray, P.; Carayannis, E.

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis of how the US government responded to the concern in the 1980`s that US companies were experiencing problems of competitiveness in international markets. By the mid 1980`s there was great and growing concern throughout the US that US companies were experiencing difficulties in international competition. Pressure on Congress to take action came from constituents seeking jobs and companies that would directly benefit (this usually means receive public money) from programs that Congress might initiate. The fact that most constituent calls to Congress were about job creation was lost in the on-rush of R&D performers seeking funds for their favorite R&D project. In response, Congress created the Advanced Technology Program, the Technology Transfer Initiative, and the Technology Reinvestment Project, expanded the responsibilities of ARPA/DARPA, increased funding for the Small Business Initiative, expanded the Manufacturing Extension Partnership, funded SEMATECH, and increased NSF funding for basic research at universities. Many of these programs were later criticized for being industrial welfare and several were cut-back or stopped. Retrospective analysis shows that few of these programs addressed the root cause of competitiveness difficulties. In fact, by the time most of these programs were in place, US companies were well on their way to correcting their competitiveness problems. In addition, few were relevant to companies` often expressed concerns about workforce training, regulatory costs, and access to foreign markets. Twenty percent reductions in health care costs, regulatory costs, and education costs could annually pump $500 billion into the US economy and make companies operating in the US much more competitive in international markets.

  18. Overcoming Barriers to Generalism in Medicine: The Residents' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Elizabeth; Stoken, Jacqueline M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents medical residents' opinions regarding barriers to producing more generalist physicians, such as lack of appropriate training in ambulatory generalist practice and the increased prestige given to specialists. Recommendations are offered to medical schools, residency programs, the community, and the culture of medicine to…

  19. Educational Opportunity: El Salvador's Barriers to Achieving Equality Persist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosekrans, Kristin

    This paper analyzes barriers to educational equality in El Salvador, using a multi-layered framework of educational opportunity. To improve educational opportunity and give the most marginalized sectors of society the possibility of changing their life circumstances requires policies that go beyond mere access to formal schooling. The model…

  20. Barriers to Participation of Children with Disabilities in Youth Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Thomas E.; Block, Martin E.

    2010-01-01

    Youth sports were created as opportunities for children to play, be active, and begin learning how to become better or more successful at a given sport. Unfortunately for many children with disabilities they may not get the same opportunities that are available to other children. There are a number of barriers that may inhibit children with…

  1. Attributional Biases: More Barriers to Women's Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falbo, Toni; And Others

    This paper presents three studies dealing with the use of attribution theory in the study of sex differences in achievement. These sex differences are measured in terms of task difficulty, ability, effort, and luck according to the model developed by Weiner, et al (1971). The studies attempt to expand the Weiner model to demonstrate that males and…

  2. Reported barriers to evaluation in chronic care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knai, Cécile; Nolte, Ellen; Brunn, Matthias;

    2013-01-01

    The growing movement of innovative approaches to chronic disease management in Europe has not been matched by a corresponding effort to evaluate them. This paper discusses challenges to evaluation of chronic disease management as reported by experts in six European countries....

  3. Iranian entrepreneur nurses’ perceived barriers to entrepreneurship: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani, Simin; Abedi, Heidarali; Elahi, Nasrin; Fallahi-Khoshknab, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: To respond efficiently to the increasing and new needs of people in health issues, it is necessary for nurses to develop their knowledge from hospital to society and to be equipped to play entrepreneur role in different levels of care. The present study was conducted to describe Iranian entrepreneur nurses’ perceived barriers to entrepreneurship, in order to identify the existing barriers. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative study in which Graneheim and Lundman's content analysis method was employed. Thirteen entrepreneur nurses were chosen purposively, and data were gathered by unstructured interviews. Results: As a result of the data analysis, five major themes were extracted: Traditional nursing structure, legal limitations, traditional attitudes of governmental managers, unprofessional behaviors of colleagues, and immoral business. Conclusions: The findings of the present study show that Iranian nurses are confronted with various problems and barriers to enter entrepreneur nursing and keep going in this area. By focusing on such barriers and applying appropriate changes, policymakers and planners in health can facilitate nurses entering into this activity. PMID:26985222

  4. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2001-05-01

    In summary, stoker-fired boilers that cofire or switch to biomass fuel may potentially have to deal with ash behavior issues such as production of different concentrations and quantities of fine particulate or aerosols and ash-fouling deposition. Stoker boiler operators that are considering switching to biomass and adding potential infrastructure to accommodate the switch may also at the same time be looking into upgrades that will allow for generating additional power for sale on the grid. This is the case for the feasibility study being done currently for a small (<1-MW) stoker facility at the North Dakota State Penitentiary, which is considering not only the incorporation of a lower-cost biomass fuel but also a refurbishing of the stoker boiler to burn slightly hotter with the ability to generate more power and sell excess energy on the grid. These types of fuel and boiler changes can greatly affect ash behavior issues.

  5. Barriers to bacterial motility on unsaturated surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of the spatial organization and spatial dynamics of microbial populations in soil at a scale close to that of the microorganisms is scarce. While passive dispersal via water ow or soil biota is probably a major dispersal route, it is reasonable to consider that active dispersal also contributes to microbial spatial dynamics. In bacteria, active dispersal is enabled by a diversity of appendages and, in the case of swarming motility, by the secretion of surface active biomolecules...

  6. Using Inquiry to Break the Language Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The more than five million English language learners (ELLs) in the United States represent over 10% of students enrolled in public schools--and this number is growing rapidly. From 1997 to 2007, growth of ELL enrollment exceeded that of overall enrollment by more than six to one. Regardless of where they teach, science educators will undoubtedly…

  7. Overcoming Barriers to Classroom Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Technology-savvy teachers are often the "go to" staff members in schools for their colleagues' technology issues. These teachers are seen as leaders within their schools with respect to technology and often do not understand their peers' difficulties when bringing technology into the classroom. Understanding both the reasons teachers may…

  8. Barriers to Communication in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Zane L.

    2013-01-01

    To a large extent education can be thought of as a communication process among the participants. This article focuses on distance education, which has both the general communication processes that in-person education venues possess, and also communication specific to the technologies that mediate the teaching and learning taking place at a…

  9. Housing Mix, School Mix: Barriers to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camina, M. M.; Iannone, P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent UK policy has emphasised both the development of socially mixed communities and the creation of balanced school intakes. In this paper, we use a case study of an area of mixed tenure in eastern England to explore policy in practice and the extent to which mechanisms of segregation impact on both the creation of socially mixed neighbourhoods…

  10. Barriers to bacterial motility on unsaturated surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    and their isogenic mutants unable to express various type of motility we aimed to quantify the physical limits of bacterial motility. Our results demonstrate how hydration controls bacterial motility under unsaturated conditions. They can form the base of improved biodegradation models that include microbial...

  11. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Jay R. Gunderson; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2002-09-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has completed a project to examine fundamental issues that could limit the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC attempted to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience problematic fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive coal-biomass blends. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause increased clinkering or slagging at the grate due to higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start much earlier for biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates, various chlorides, and phosphates. These species in combination with different flue gas temperatures, because of changes in fuel heating value, can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project was to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project were: (1) Modification of an existing pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system. (2) Verification testing of the simulator. (3) Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to

  12. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2001-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early for biomass fuels compared to the design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides, in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project is to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project are: Modification of an existing EERC pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system; Verification testing of the simulator; Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash

  13. Home Dialysis Modalities: Educational Barriers to Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, an increasing number of individuals are being diagnosed with end stage renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy. Home dialysis modalities are an available option in lieu of in-center hemodialysis therapy for these individuals, but are vastly underutilized in the U.S. for multiple reasons. Both healthcare providers and individuals requiring renal replacement therapy are frequently unaware these modalities are an available alternative to in-center hemodialysis and of the potential benefits related to home modality use. Lack of healthcare provider and patient education regarding home modalities is a primary factor related to underutilization. PMID:27501632

  14. The Continuity of Barrier Function with Respect to the Parameter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinxiang LI; Jun YAN

    2009-01-01

    The authors study the continuity of barrier function Be(x) with respect to the parameter.A sufficient condition which makes Bc(x) be continuous with respect to c is obtained,and an example of discontinuity when the condition is not satisfied is also constructed.

  15. Perceived barriers to consumption of fish among Norwegian women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondsen, Torbjørn; Scholderer, Joachim; Lund, Eiliv;

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize constraints on consumption of fish perceived by consumers in Norway. A random sample of Norwegian women aged 45-69 years answered a self-administered mail questionnaire in 1996 about eating habits, perceived barriers to fish consumption, socioeconomic status...

  16. Structural Barriers: Redesigning Schools to Create Learning Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randeree, Ebrahim

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on schools and address the structural dimensions of the organization as well as the hierarchical design of information flows between stakeholders. The paper highlights current structural barriers to creating learning organizations. Design/methodology/approach: This paper utilizes a conceptual model.…

  17. Barriers to Asthma Management for School Nurses: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley Nadeau, Ellen; Toronto, Coleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood asthma is a growing health concern. Asthma is the most common chronic illness of childhood and a leading cause of emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and school absenteeism. School nurses play a valuable role in asthma management. The purpose of this integrative review is to examine barriers to asthma management for school nurses in…

  18. How Barriers to Collaboration Prevent Progress in Demand for Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goduscheit, René Chester; Knudsen, Mette Præst

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the challenging collaboration between small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and knowledge institutions. The aim of the article is to shed light on the barriers, which hinder collaboration, and to investigate the particular role of research and technology organizations...

  19. Barriers to Dance Training for Young People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujla, Imogen J.; Redding, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Dance is a viable and enjoyable activity -- and potential career -- for young people with disabilities, yet they face several barriers to participation and training. The aim of this article, by Imogen J. Aujla of the University of Bedfordshire and Emma Redding of Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, is to review the literature on…

  20. Identifying Barriers to the Remix of Translated Open Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, Tel

    2013-01-01

    Remix is touted as one of the most important practices within the field of open educational resources (OER). But remixing is still not mainstream practice in education and the barriers and limitations to remix are not well known. In this article we discuss the design and development of a print and web-based booklet created to introduce the topic…

  1. Typical diffusion behaviour in packaging polymers - Application to functional barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dole, P.; Feigenbaum, A.E.; Cruz, C. de la; Pastorelli, S.; Paseiro, P.; Hankemeier, T.; Voulzatis, Y.; Aucejo, S.; Saillard, P.; Papaspyrides, C.

    2006-01-01

    When plastics are collected for recycling, possibly contaminated articles might be recycled into food packaging, and thus the contaminants might subsequently migrate into the food. Multilayer functional barriers may be used to delay and to reduce such migration. The contribution of the work reported

  2. Barriers to combating human trafficking in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Wilcox, Daniel Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Despite international and domestic policies and programs intended to combat human trafficking, Colombia remains one of the countries with the highest instances of human trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. Factors contributing to human trafficking in Colombia, such as internal violence and displacement, drug trafficking, a weak central government, and widespread corruption, have overpowered what energies the government marshaled agai...

  3. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay R. Gunderson; Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2002-05-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early with biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the boiler, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value, which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior.

  4. Barriers to adaptive reasoning in community ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Athol J; Ladle, Richard J

    2011-08-01

    Recent high-profile calls for a more trait-focused approach to community ecology have the potential to open up novel research areas, generate new insights and to transform community ecology into a more predictive science. However, a renewed emphasis on function and phenotype also requires a fundamental shift in approach and research philosophy within community ecology to more fully embrace evolutionary reasoning. Such a subject-wise transformation will be difficult due to at least four factors: (1) the historical development of the academic discipline of ecology and its roots as a descriptive science; (2) the dominating role of the ecosystem concept in the driving of contemporary ecological thought; (3) the practical difficulties associated with defining and identifying (phenotypic) adaptations, and; (4) scaling effects in ecology; the difficulty of teasing apart the overlapping and shifting hierarchical processes that generate the observed environment-trait correlations in nature. We argue that the ability to predict future ecological conditions through a sufficient understanding of ecological processes will not be achieved without the placement of the concept of adaptation at the centre of ecology, with influence radiating outwards through all the related (and rapidly specializing) sub-disciplines.

  5. Eat, Grow, Lead 4-H: An Innovative Approach to Deliver Campus- Based Field Experiences to Pre-Entry Extension Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Penny Pennington; Weeks, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Eat, Grow, Lead 4-H Club was created as a pilot program for college students seeking to gain experience as non-formal youth educators, specifically serving pre-entry level Extension educators through a university-based 4-H club. Seventeen student volunteers contributed an estimated 630 hours of service to the club during spring 2011. The club…

  6. Barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacker K

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Karen Hacker,1,2 Maria Anies,2 Barbara L Folb,2,3 Leah Zallman4–6 1Allegheny County Health Department, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Graduate School of Public Health, 3Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 4Institute for Community Health, Cambridge, MA, USA; 5Cambridge Health Alliance, Cambridge, MA, USA; 6Harvard School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: With the unprecedented international migration seen in recent years, policies that limit health care access have become prevalent. Barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants go beyond policy and range from financial limitations, to discrimination and fear of deportation. This paper is aimed at reviewing the literature on barriers to health care for undocumented immigrants and identifying strategies that have or could be used to address these barriers. To address study questions, we conducted a literature review of published articles from the last 10 years in PubMed using three main concepts: immigrants, undocumented, and access to health care. The search yielded 341 articles of which 66 met study criteria. With regard to barriers, we identified barriers in the policy arena focused on issues related to law and policy including limitations to access and type of health care. These varied widely across countries but ultimately impacted the type and amount of health care any undocumented immigrant could receive. Within the health system, barriers included bureaucratic obstacles including paperwork and registration systems. The alternative care available (safety net was generally limited and overwhelmed. Finally, there was evidence of widespread discriminatory practices within the health care system itself. The individual level focused on the immigrant’s fear of deportation, stigma, and lack of capital (both social and financial to obtain services. Recommendations identified in the papers reviewed included advocating for policy change to increase

  7. Lymphotoxin β Receptor Controls T Cell Progenitor Entry to the Thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Beth; James, Kieran D; Cosway, Emilie J; Parnell, Sonia M; Tumanov, Alexi V; Ware, Carl F; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2016-10-01

    The recruitment of lymphoid progenitors to the thymus is essential to sustain T cell production throughout life. Importantly, it also limits T lineage regeneration following bone marrow transplantation, and so contributes to the secondary immunodeficiency that is caused by delayed immune reconstitution. Despite this significance, the mechanisms that control thymus colonization are poorly understood. In this study, we show that in both the steady-state and after bone marrow transplant, lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) controls entry of T cell progenitors to the thymus. We show that this requirement maps to thymic stroma, further underlining the key importance of this TNFR superfamily member in regulation of thymic microenvironments. Importantly, analysis of the requirement for LTβR in relationship to known regulators of thymus seeding suggests that it acts independently of its regulation of thymus-homing chemokines. Rather, we show that LTβR differentially regulates intrathymic expression of adhesion molecules known to play a role in T cell progenitor entry to the thymus. Finally, Ab-mediated in vivo LTβR stimulation following bone marrow transplant enhances initial thymus recovery and boosts donor-derived T cell numbers, which correlates with increased adhesion molecule expression by thymic stroma. Collectively, we reveal a novel link between LTβR and thymic stromal cells in thymus colonization, and highlight its potential as an immunotherapeutic target to boost T cell reconstitution after transplantation. PMID:27549174

  8. Overcoming the Adoption Barrier to Electric Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Nicholas K.; Nickol, Craig L.; Jones, Frank P.; Yasky, Richard J.; Woodham, Kurt; Fell, Jared S.; Litherland, Brandon L.; Loyselle, Patricia L.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Samuel, Aamod G.

    2016-01-01

    Electrically-powered aircraft can enable dramatic increases in efficiency and reliability, reduced emissions, and reduced noise as compared to today's combustion-powered aircraft. This paper describes a novel flight demonstration concept that will enable the benefits of electric propulsion, while keeping the extraordinary convenience and utility of common fuels available at today's airports. A critical gap in airborne electric propulsion research is addressed by accommodating adoption at the integrated aircraft-airport systems level, using a confluence of innovative but proven concepts and technologies in power generation and electricity storage that need to reside only on the airframe. Technical discriminators of this demonstrator concept include (1) a novel, high-efficiency power system that utilizes advanced solid oxide fuel cells originally developed for ultra-long-endurance aircraft, coupled with (2) a high-efficiency, high-power electric propulsion system selected from mature products to reduce technical risk, assembled into (3) a modern, high-performance demonstration platform to provide useful and compelling data, both for the targeted early adopters and the eventual commercial market.

  9. Peru : Overcoming the Barriers to Hydropower

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2010-01-01

    Hydropower has been the major source of electricity in Peru, traditionally supplying more than 80 percent of electricity requirements, and serving as a source of independent generation for major mines and industries. With the development of natural gas in the early 1990s, and the opening of the Camisea pipeline, the Government of Peru's (GOP's) attention turned to providing incentives for ...

  10. Barriers to Parental Involvement for Disadvantaged Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify obstacles which prevent active participation at home and at school for economically disadvantaged families. Parental involvement has been recognized as one of the most important variables influencing student academic achievement (Henrich & Gadaire, 2008; Jeynes, 2007; Stewart, 2008). Recent history…

  11. Barriers to Discourse: Tautologies in Student Essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Richard

    Tautologies in student essays, arguments that most commonly assume the truth or self-evidence of themselves without relationship to something other than themselves, can be identified whenever an essay contains a series of nonsuccessive, noncumulative discourse units. Three kinds of tautologies in student papers are tautologies of redundancy,…

  12. Barriers to E-Commerce Adoption in Egyptian SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Nasser H. Zaied

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available E-commerce has been predicted to be a new driver of economic growth for developing countries. The SME sector plays a significant role in its contribution to the national economy in terms of the wealth created and the number of people employed. Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs in Egypt represent the greatest share of the productive units of the Egyptian economy and the current national policy directions address ways and means of developing the capacities of SMEs. Many factors could be responsible for the low usage of e-commerce among the SMEs in Egypt. In order to determine the factors that promote the adoption of e-commerce, SMEs adopters and non-adopters of e-commerce were asked to indicate the factors inhibiting the adoption of e-commerce. The results show that technical barriers are the most important barriers followed by legal and regulatory barriers, whereas lack of Internet security is the highest barrier that inhibit the implementation of e-commerce in SMEs in Egypt followed by limited use of Internet banking and web portals by SMEs. Also, findings implied that more efforts are needed to help and encourage SMEs in Egypt to speed up e-commerce adoption, particularly the more advanced applications.

  13. Barriers to creating a secure MPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brightwell, R.; Greenberg, D.S.; Matt, B.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Davida, G.I. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Computer Sciences

    1997-08-01

    This paper explores some of the many issues in developing security enhanced MPI for embedded real-time systems supporting the Department of Defense`s Multi-level Security policy (DoD MLS) are presented along with the preliminary design for such an MPI variant. In addition some of the many issues that need to be addressed in creating security enhanced versions of MPI for other domains are discussed. 19 refs.

  14. Legal Costs as Barriers to Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Turrini, Alessandro Antonio; Van Ypersele, Tanguy

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the 'home bias puzzle' in international trade may be associated with the mere presence of national borders (McCallum (1995)). In this paper we provide a theoretical framework to explain why borders may matter so much for trade. Our argument is that even between perfectly integrated and similar countries the legal system differs, so that legal costs are higher when business is done abroad. Using a matching model of trade, we show that legal costs asymmetry produce ho...

  15. Computerized logistics information systems - a key to competitiveness:

    OpenAIRE

    Čižman, Anton

    2001-01-01

    Part of an organization's ability to use logistics as a competitive weapon is based on its ability to assess and adjust actual logistics performance real time. This means the ability to monitor customer demands and inventory levels as they occur, to act in timely manner to prevent stockouts, and communicate potential problems to customers. This requires excellent, integrated logistics systems which impact all of the logistics activities. In this paper we examined how computer and information ...

  16. HEURISTIC OPTIMIZATION AND ALGORITHM TUNING APPLIED TO SORPTIVE BARRIER DESIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    While heuristic optimization is applied in environmental applications, ad-hoc algorithm configuration is typical. We use a multi-layer sorptive barrier design problem as a benchmark for an algorithm-tuning procedure, as applied to three heuristics (genetic algorithms, simulated ...

  17. Categories for Barriers to Adoption of Instructional Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Although higher education has spent millions of dollars on instructional technologies, often higher education administration complains that instructors are not adopting them. Without a full understanding of possible barriers, higher education institutes are hard-pressed to develop either appropriate goals or sound strategies for the adoption of…

  18. Using organizational influence processes to overcome IS implementation barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki; Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental tenet of the information systems (IS) discipline holds that: (a) a lack of formal power and influence over the organization targeted for change, (b) weak support from top management, and (c) organizational memories of prior failures are barriers to implementation success. Our resear...

  19. Perceived Gender and Racial/Ethnic Barriers to STEM Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Jennifer M.; Porche, Michelle V.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined urban adolescents' perceptions of gender and racial/ethnic barriers to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) success, and their meaning-making and coping regarding these experiences. The sample includes surveys from 1024 high school-aged students and interviews from 53 students. Logistic…

  20. The transition to practice of Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatto, Bobbi; Meyer, Geralyn; Delicath, Timothy A

    2016-07-01

    This study looks at Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader graduates and how their transition to practice experiences develops over time as well as factors influencing their transition. Graduates were surveyed at graduation, three, six and 12 months. Seventeen participated; eight completed all surveys. Most were from the Millennial generation. The survey consisted of two parts: school satisfaction and the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Scale. The results showed the Casey-Fink total score at 12 months was 0.75 points higher than at three months; suggesting a positive transition. The highest score occurred at six months which conversely had the lowest levels of satisfaction with both educational experience and intent to stay in their current role. Despite having 850 precepted/mentored clinical hours, 57.1% of these graduates stated they felt unprepared for the reality of nursing after 12 months. Regardless of feeling unprepared, the results suggest these students displayed a positive transition to practice. At 12 months, 88.2% were still with their first employers which contrasted the results of Casey-Fink and other studies of Millennial gradate nurses, which showed higher actual and intent to leave results. This study suggests that Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader students do indeed transition to practice more positively than traditional nursing graduates. PMID:27428700

  1. The transition to practice of Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatto, Bobbi; Meyer, Geralyn; Delicath, Timothy A

    2016-07-01

    This study looks at Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader graduates and how their transition to practice experiences develops over time as well as factors influencing their transition. Graduates were surveyed at graduation, three, six and 12 months. Seventeen participated; eight completed all surveys. Most were from the Millennial generation. The survey consisted of two parts: school satisfaction and the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Scale. The results showed the Casey-Fink total score at 12 months was 0.75 points higher than at three months; suggesting a positive transition. The highest score occurred at six months which conversely had the lowest levels of satisfaction with both educational experience and intent to stay in their current role. Despite having 850 precepted/mentored clinical hours, 57.1% of these graduates stated they felt unprepared for the reality of nursing after 12 months. Regardless of feeling unprepared, the results suggest these students displayed a positive transition to practice. At 12 months, 88.2% were still with their first employers which contrasted the results of Casey-Fink and other studies of Millennial gradate nurses, which showed higher actual and intent to leave results. This study suggests that Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader students do indeed transition to practice more positively than traditional nursing graduates.

  2. MAPs to Success: Improving the First Year Experience of alternative entry mature age students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Christensen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Successfully supporting wider participation in higher education requires a coherent blend of administrative, social and academic support.  Access is a necessary but insufficient element of equitable participation.  This is a vital distinction given the outcomes of the Bradley Report and the expectation that higher education institutions will significantly increase the enrolment and participation of equity target groups.  Our project, MAPs to Success, was designed to achieve the best possible outcomes for underprepared mature age students who have been granted alternative entry to the University of Western Australia through the Mature age Access Pathway (MAP.  This alternative entry pathway was first offered in July 2008.  In late 2009 we secured a Learning Teaching Performance Fund Grant to provide support for the original and subsequent cohorts. This paper outlines the theoretical perspectives underpinning this project's social and academic components, and evaluates the impact this project has achieved after its first year of operation. 

  3. Approaches to Assess Competitiveness of Small and Medium Sized Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is continuing interest in Member States concerning the development and application of small and medium sized reactors (SMRs), i.e., reactors with the equivalent electric power of less than 700 MW. Currently, developed SMRs are in most cases intended for markets different than those in which large nuclear power plants operate. Such markets have essentially different investment requirements, siting flexibility, grid connections and infrastructure restrictions. Therefore, economic factors affecting the competitiveness or competition of SMRs in such markets would also be different from those observed in established markets for electricity production. For example, investment capability may be limited, which would favour capacity addition in smaller increments; grids may be small or weak, which would favour capacities exactly matching the demand; infrastructure and human resource may be insufficient, which would favour less complex operation and maintenance requirements; and non-electrical energy products, such as potable water, may be in demand, which would favour reasonably close plant location to the customer. In practice it is futile to compare a single SMR needs to a single larger capacity plant on an economy of scale basis because SMRs are suitable for those locations that might not be appropriate for larger plants. However, a series of SMRs could be considered comparable to fewer larger plants to achieve the same overall power station capacity. In this case, SMRs have a potential to be competitive by employing alternative design strategies, taking advantage of smaller reactor size, offering a less complex design and operation and maintenance, relying on deployment-in-series approaches, taking an advantage of the accelerated learning, multiple unit factors and shorter construction duration. Reflecting on developments in member states, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is finalizing the preparation of a report highlighting the economics and

  4. Centromeric barrier disruption leads to mitotic defects in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Terilyn L; Merrett, Stephanie L; Pun, Matthew J; Scott, Kristin C

    2014-04-01

    Centromeres are cis-acting chromosomal domains that direct kinetochore formation, enabling faithful chromosome segregation and preserving genome stability. The centromeres of most eukaryotic organisms are structurally complex, composed of nonoverlapping, structurally and functionally distinct chromatin subdomains, including the specialized core chromatin that underlies the kinetochore and pericentromeric heterochromatin. The genomic and epigenetic features that specify and preserve the adjacent chromatin subdomains critical to centromere identity are currently unknown. Here we demonstrate that chromatin barriers regulate this process in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Reduced fitness and mitotic chromosome segregation defects occur in strains that carry exogenous DNA inserted at centromere 1 chromatin barriers. Abnormal phenotypes are accompanied by changes in the structural integrity of both the centromeric core chromatin domain, containing the conserved CENP-A(Cnp1) protein, and the flanking pericentric heterochromatin domain. Barrier mutant cells can revert to wild-type growth and centromere structure at a high frequency after the spontaneous excision of integrated exogenous DNA. Our results reveal a previously undemonstrated role for chromatin barriers in chromosome segregation and in the prevention of genome instability. PMID:24531725

  5. 41 CFR 102-76.60 - To which facilities does the Architectural Barriers Act apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROPERTY 76-DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION Architectural Barriers Act § 102-76.60 To which facilities does the Architectural Barriers Act apply? (a) The Architectural Barriers Act applies to any facility that is intended... the Architectural Barriers Act apply? 102-76.60 Section 102-76.60 Public Contracts and...

  6. Entry Threat in Duopoly

    OpenAIRE

    Peitz, Martin

    1996-01-01

    Abstract: An oligopolistic market with vertical product differentiation is parametrized in cost parameters. This allows me to study the impact of the technology of the firms (cost parameters) on market structure, conduct, and performance. Firms which differ only by the order of the sequential move to choose a quality use sophisticated entry deterring or entry accomodating strategies. I show that infinitesimal changes in the cost parameters can generate discontinuities in market profits. In pa...

  7. Using Competitions to Engage the Public: Lessons Learnt from Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, K. S.; Baldwin, E.; Mignone, C.; Homfeld, A. M.; Scuka, D.; Schepers, A.; Braun, M.; Croci, F.; Giacomini, L.; Journo, N.; Bauer, M.; McCaughrean, M.

    2016-03-01

    The year 2014 was an historic and challenging time for the Rosetta mission. On 20 January the spacecraft awoke from a 957-day hibernation; by August, it had arrived at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko; and in November, the lander Philae was deployed to the comet's surface. These milestones were communicated by traditional outreach channels -- on websites and via press events -- as well as through the extensive use of social media. To provide an opportunity for the public to participate actively in these milestones, the European Space Agency and its partners ran three competitions. In this article we outline how these competitions provided a means for the public to engage with what was to become one of the most exciting space science missions in decades.

  8. Forest Strategy in Republic of Macedonia: Barriers to Effective Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Baumgartner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: In recent years, implementation of forest strategies and programs has been acknowledged as an important phase of the forest policy process. Forest policies such as conflict management concepts between deferent interests of stakeholders, are a dynamic route that needs to be managed carefully to achieve its goals. Creation of the forest policy document entitled “Strategy for sustainable development of forestry in Republic of Macedonia” was introduced for the first time in 2005 as cooperation between the Government and United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO. Action Plan was brought in the same year including the strategy and validity until the end of the year 2009 now is out of date for undetermined reasons, due to lack of analysis of the level of implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Materials and Methods: Through exploratory qualitative method using a case study, this paper attempts to explore different stakeholders perception of the most common barriers for implementation of the Strategy for sustainable development of forests in Republic of Macedonia and ascertain if implementation variables are identified as barriers in the implementation stage. Results: The research showed that environmental and organisational barriers such as legal restrictions, political willingness, social change, control, leadership and clear responsibility are the most common barriers impeding forest strategy implementation in Macedonia. Conclusions: The paper concluded that the three year action plan was too ambitious, given the existing human and technical capacities in the forestry sector, recommending participation of all included stakeholders in the implementation as an important fact in overcoming the current barriers and moving forward the process.

  9. Competitive energy markets. The effective route to improving the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate how market forces, operating in an increasingly competitive energy market, are a preferred route to achieving environmental and energy efficiency benefits than those which can be achieved through a managed approach adopted by many governments. It shows, through UK examples such as shifting to electricity in several industrial processes, how electricity is a catalyst for change at several levels in business, the community and the general economy

  10. Opportunities to Improve the Competitiveness of Romanian Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe, Gabriela; Ioana LUPASC

    2013-01-01

    Competitive organizations are permanently prepared to identify the cutting-edge technologies which will change the future in business by using the concept of Business Intelligence. Moore's paradigm was a visionary model to predict the future and to make the correct business decisions, inspiring business solutions in many fields. Many businesses believe that predictions based on an exponential improvement of the technology have successfully bet that the technological limitations can be overcom...

  11. Returning injured athletes to competition: a role and ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, F A; Weiss, M R

    1992-03-01

    This study investigated the extent to which decisions by coaches and athletic trainers concerning the return of injured athletes to competition were influenced by the player's status and the game situation. Samples were drawn from Oregon high school and Canadian university basketball teams. Coaches and athletic trainers completed a questionnaire in which they decided whether an injured player should be returned to competition. The scenarios included winning, losing, or close games and involved a starter, first substitute, or bench player. Chi-square analyses revealed that coaches made decisions based on both a player's status and the game situation. In contrast, athletic trainers' decisions were not significantly influenced by these variables. Since the role of the coach seemingly makes it difficult to make health related decisions concerning injured players, athletic trainers should be responsible for such decisions. PMID:1322767

  12. Reliability risks during the transition to competitive electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electricity Consumers Resource Council (ELCON) is a U.S. association representing industrial consumers of electricity, and is a long-standing advocate of competition in the electric power industry. However, because a reliable grid is necessary to support competitive wholesale markets, ELCON believes that the transmission system is an essential facility that must remain regulated. The initiatives discussed in this white paper represent significant steps that the National Electric Reliability Council (NERC) and the industry have taken to improve reliability in a competitive and restructured electric industry. Strategic manoeuvres of incumbent utilities to maintain market share were evaluated, as well as discrimination against potential competitors. It was suggested that, occasionally, indecisive federal policies have been taken advantage of by utilities. The unintended consequences of state restructuring policies that allow utilities to over-earn their revenue requirements were reviewed. NERC reliability standards will remain unenforceable until a new Electricity Reliability Organization has been certified. Flawed market designs and inadequate market power mitigation, as well as the financial distress of merchant generators, pose considerable risks. It was suggested that these risks could trigger transmission loading relief incidents, local outages or widespread outages. In the absence of mandatory reliability standards with penalties, and complementary market rules for mitigating generation and transmission market power, economic incentives will encourage other forms of opportunistic behavior that may be the root cause of other outages. Public concern regarding these risks to grid reliability may result in lost public support for competitive electricity markets. Proposed solutions include the certification of a new Electric Reliability Organization to establish and enforce mandatory reliability standards, and granting the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

  13. The Competitiveness of Croatian Export to EU Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Buturac, Goran; Gržinić, Jasmina

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the competitiveness of Croatian export to EU market. At the very beginning of the paper, by analyzing the results of regression model the basic differences among the value of Croatian exports in EU countries are to be explained. The differences in the size of Croatian export among EU countries could be well explained by the geographical distance between Croatia and individual EU countries, as well as, by the GDP of the EU countries. Croatia has positive trade balance with ...

  14. China's Competitive Performance: A Threat to East Asian Manufactured Exports?

    OpenAIRE

    Lall, Sanjaya; Albaladejo, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    We examine China's competitive threat to East Asian neighbors in the 1990s, benchmarking performance by technology and market. Market share losses are mainly in low-technology products; Japan is the most vulnerable market. China and its neighbors are raising high-technology exports in tandem: international production systems here are leading to complementarity rather than confrontation. In direct trade with its neighbors, China is acting as an engine of export growth, with imports outpacing e...

  15. Barriers to renewable energy penetration. A framework for analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Painuly, Jyoti P.

    2001-01-01

    Renewable energy has the potential to play an important role in providing energy with sustainability to the vast populations in developing countries who as yet have no access to clean energy. Although economically viable fur several applications, renewable energy has not been able to realise its ...... potential due to several barriers to its penetration. A framework has been developed in this paper to identify the barriers to renewable energy penetration acid to suggest measures to overcome them. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.......Renewable energy has the potential to play an important role in providing energy with sustainability to the vast populations in developing countries who as yet have no access to clean energy. Although economically viable fur several applications, renewable energy has not been able to realise its...

  16. Thresholds to access the market for small-scale energy consumers; Toetredingsdrempels kleinverbruikersmarkt energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baarsma, B.; Bremer, S.; De Nooij, M.; Poort, J.

    2007-10-15

    Entry of and options for expansion are import aspects for a well-functioning free market. The Netherlands Competition Authority (NMa)/The Office of Energy Regulation (DTe/Energiekamer) received signals that there are barriers for entering or further growth on the small consumer market. The regulator has asked SEO Economic Research to examine which entry barriers are significant and require further monitoring. For this purpose, more than 20 interviews were held with market parties and stakeholders. [mk]. [Dutch] Toetreding en de mogelijkheid om te groeien zijn belangrijk voor goede marktwerking. NMa/DTe heeft signalen ontvangen dat er barrieres zijn om toe te treden dan wel om door te groeien op de kleinverbruikersmarkt energie. De toezichthouder heeft SEO gevraagd te onderzoeken welke toetredingsdrempels van belang zijn en om nadere toezichtactiviteit vragen. In het kader hiervan zijn meer dan 20 gesprekken met marktpartijen en stakeholders gehouden.

  17. Development of competitive immunoassays to hydroxyl containing fungicide metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Kevin C; Jarvis, Shila; Maddison, Ben C

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the isolation of monoclonal antibodies and the development of competitive immunoassays to pesticide metabolites of the fungicides imazalil, carbendazim and thiabendazole. The metabolite specific hydroxyl residues were used as the reactive group with which to link the metabolite to the carrier proteins Keyhole Limpet Haemocyanin (KLH) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). In each case immune responses in mice were raised and monoclonal antibodies were produced. Antibodies were developed into competitive ELISAs to the appropriate metabolite. The antibody raised to a metabolite of imazalil was optimised into a competitive ELISA format which had an assay IC50 of 7.5 μg/L and a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.1 μg/L. A single antibody isolated against the metabolite of carbendazim had assay IC50s of 3.2 and 2.7 μg/L for the metabolites of carbendazim and thiabendazole respectively with an LOD of 0.38 μg/L for both. These sensitive immunoassays may have application in the monitoring of human exposure to these fungicide residues either by occupational or non-occupational routes.

  18. Standing out in the crowd: the rise of exclusivity-based strategies to compete in the contemporary marketplace for music and fashion

    OpenAIRE

    Brian J Hracs; Doreen Jakob; Atle Hauge

    2013-01-01

    Geographers have studied the complex relationships between cultural production, consumption, and space for some time, but the marketplace for cultural products is being reconfigured by digital technologies and broader societal trends. For producers of fashion and music the contemporary marketplace is a double-edged sword featuring lower entry barriers and fierce competition from an unprecedented number of producers and ubiquitous substitutes. Global firms and local entrepreneurs struggle to s...

  19. Using XBRL Technology to Extract Competitive Information from Financial Statements

    OpenAIRE

    Dominik Ditter; Klaus Henselmann; Elisabeth Scherr

    2011-01-01

    The eXtensible Business Reporting Language, or XBRL, is a reporting format for the automatic and electronic exchange of business and financial data. In XBRL every single reported fact is marked with a unique tag, enabling a full computer-based readout of financial data. It has the potential to improve the collection and analysis of financial data for Competitive Intelligence (e.g., the profiling of publicly available financial statements). The article describes how easily information from XBR...

  20. Trading and risk management during the transition to competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This power point presentation outlined the risks facing companies active in competitive energy markets. It reviewed and explained various types of risks including physical, market, credit, liquidity, volumetric and operational risks. The management of price risks includes trading and risk management strategies aimed at exploiting the alternatives associated with highly volatile power and fuel markets. The presentation also reviewed financial energy management in terms of the fuel markets and wholesale markets. Approaches to trading were also presented. tabs., figs

  1. The Effect of Free Primary Education Policy on Late School Entry in Urban Primary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngware, Moses W.; Oketch, Moses; Ezeh, Alex C.; Mutisya, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Late school entry is driven by several factors, one of the key ones being the cost barrier to schooling. Policies such as free primary education (FPE) that advocate for universal coverage are therefore partly aimed at removing the cost barrier. The Kenyan Government, like many in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), introduced FPE in 2003 with the aim of…

  2. Developing entry-to-practice nursing informatics competencies for registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Lynn M; Crosby, Kristine; Frisch, Noreen; Borycki, Elizabeth; Donelle, Lorie; Hannah, Kathryn; Harris, Alexandra; Jetté, Sylvie; Shaben, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICT) have brought about significant changes to the processes of health care delivery and changed how nurses perform in clinical, administrative, academic, and research settings. Because the potential benefits of ICT are significant, it is critical that new nurses have the knowledge and skills in informatics to provide safe and effective care. Despite the prevalence of technology in our day to day lives, and the potential significant benefits to patients, new nurses may not be prepared to work in this evolving reality. An important step in addressing this need for ICT preparation is to ensure that new graduates are entering the work force ready for technology-enabled care environments. In this paper, we describe the process and outcomes of developing informatics entry-to-practice competencies for adoption by Canadian Schools of Nursing. PMID:24943567

  3. Development Challenges of Game-Changing Entry System Technologies From Concept to Mission Infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin; Ellerby, Don; Feldman, Jay; Gage, Peter; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Realization within the US and NASA that future exploration both Human and Robotic will require innovative new technologies led to the creation of the Space Technology Mission Directorate and investment in game changing technologies with high pay-off. Some of these investments will see success and others, due to many of the constraints, will not attain their goal. The co-authors of this proposed presentation have been involved from concept to mission infusion aspects of entry technologies that are game changing. The four example technologies used to describe the challenges experienced along the pathways to success are at different levels of maturity. They are Conformal, 3-D MAT, HEEET and ADEPT. The four examples in many ways capture broad aspects of the challenges of maturation and illustrate what led some to be exceptionally successful and how others had to be altered in order remain viable game changing technologies.

  4. Identifying motivations and barriers to minimising household food waste

    OpenAIRE

    Graham-Rowe, Ella; Jessop, Donna C; Sparks, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The amount of food discarded by UK households is substantial and, to a large extent, avoidable. Furthermore, such food waste has serious environmental consequences. If household food waste reduction initiatives are to be successful they will need to be informed by people's motivations and barriers to minimising household food waste. This paper reports a qualitative study of the thoughts, feelings and experiences of 15 UK household food purchasers, based on semi-structured interviews. Two core...

  5. Negative pressure wound therapy: suggested solutions to barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Ousey, Karen; Milne, Jeanette

    2010-01-01

    Effective communication to ensure maintenance of a seamless quality service for patients being transferred to the community from the acute sector with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is essential. This paper reports the findings of a focus group convened to explore the decision making process; controversy or conflict surrounding the decisionmaking process; perceived barriers to seamless discharge and potential benefits of developing a UK standardized NPWT discharge do...

  6. Barriers to Effective Learning of High School Students in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Eda Gürlen; Tuğba Cihan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to present the development and validation process of a scale to explore the learning barriers of high school students in Turkey. For this purpose, a scale was developed and administered to 316 high school students studying in the different counties of Ankara in the spring term of 2014-2015 academic year. Gathering the data, an exploratory factor analysis was run through SPSS Package program to see the structure of the interrelationships among the variables under six tests. Fur...

  7. Qualidade como função de tecnologia industrial básica e a inserção competitiva do Brasil no comércio internacional Quality as a function of basic industrial technology and the competitive entry of Brazil in international trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Dias Ferraz de Souza

    1998-12-01

    though they could be extended to encompass new demands. This move has its origins in the process of the internationalization of the economy and of global trade, supported by the WTO - (World Trade Organization with its Technical Barriers on Trade Agreement. Extremely vigorous management systems have a strong metrological and standardization basis in all the models discussed in this article. In addition, such a basis has become non-trivial due to the replacement of metrological standards by fundamental chemical and physical constants. The standardization activity is also strongly affected by time reduction between the invention of the product and its entry in the market, which contributes to the obsolescence of the technical standards. In order to reconcile the different management approaches (Quality, Environment, Occupational Health and Industrial Safety, Technology, Marketing, Design, Knowledge, etc. organizations must make an effort to find a Total Management model that represents their business strategies and boosts their competitive advantage.

  8. Build to order and entry/exit strategies under exchange rate uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Tsai

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Under uncertainty of exchange rate, we extend the build to order production model of Lin et al. (2002 by considering the export-oriented manufacturer to make decisions to switch production location freely between domestic and foreign ones. The export-oriented manufacturer is risk neutral and has rational expectations. When we transfer the production location from domestic (foreign to foreign (domestic, and the production location transferring cost and the drift of real exchange rate are both equal to zero, then the optimal entry and exit threshold value of Cobb-Douglas production function are equal, no matter whether we use real options or net present value method. Thus export-oriented manufacturer can make decisions at the optimal transfer threshold value for transferable locations wherever the production locations are. It provides the export-oriented manufacturer with another way of thinking.

  9. The Psychology Driving&Barriers to Skunk Work Project

    OpenAIRE

    Bellefleur, Dean

    2002-01-01

    The Psychology Driving and Barriers to Skunk Work Projects (referred to throughout this thesis as the paper) represents a study predominantly on Tetra Pak from a selective perspective, the innovators. Innovators both past&present whose initiatives contribute to the well being of Tetra Pak as well as one from Ericsson were consulted. As with individuals, organizations possess definable characters that are influenced by the various stages of their life cycle. Theories of corporate life cycl...

  10. Barriers to Adoption of Mobile banking: Evidence from Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Faisal Iddris

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the perceived barriers to adoption of mobile banking among consumers, and to assess whether the usage of M-Banking is constraint on the basis of different demographic characteristics such as age, income level, mobile phone usage “experience” and marital status. Data were collected using convenient sampling via self-administered questionnaire in a large university in the Ashanti region of Ghana. A total of usable 189 responses were collected from ...

  11. Towards the mitigation of cultural barriers to communication and cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Ida

    2007-01-01

    This thesis combines theories from cross-cultural psychology with literature on group faultlines to understand cultural barriers to communication and cooperation experienced in multinational emergency management teams. The aim is to investigate whether the faultline concept is a viable theoretical vocabulary for addressing cultural differences in communication and cooperation (in the domain of emergency management). Culture is defined as a relatively organized system of shared meanings which ...

  12. The biological significance of brain barrier mechanisms: help or hindrance in drug delivery to the central nervous system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Norman R; Habgood, Mark D; Møllgård, Kjeld; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M

    2016-01-01

    provide an important component of the barrier functions by either preventing entry of or expelling numerous molecules including toxins, drugs, and other xenobiotics. In this review, we summarize these influx and efflux mechanisms in normal developing and adult brain, as well as indicating their likely involvement in a wide range of neuropathologies. There have been extensive attempts to overcome the barrier mechanisms that prevent the entry of many drugs of therapeutic potential into the brain. We outline those that have been tried and discuss why they may so far have been largely unsuccessful. Currently, a promising approach appears to be focal, reversible disruption of the blood-brain barrier using focused ultrasound, but more work is required to evaluate the method before it can be tried in patients. Overall, our view is that much more fundamental knowledge of barrier mechanisms and development of new experimental methods will be required before drug targeting to the brain is likely to be a successful endeavor. In addition, such studies, if applied to brain pathologies such as stroke, trauma, or multiple sclerosis, will aid in defining the contribution of brain barrier pathology to these conditions, either causative or secondary. PMID:26998242

  13. Identifying perceived barriers to videoconferencing by rehabilitation medicine providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, Roslyn; Bradford, Natalie K; Caffery, Liam J; Smith, Anthony C

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify barriers to the utilisation of videoconferencing within a multidisciplinary rehabilitation medicine healthcare team, as the first step towards creating a telerehabilitation service. A survey was developed on videoconference use and barriers to use, and distributed to healthcare providers including rehabilitation medicine societies and allied health societies through an anonymous link to SurveyMonkey(®). There were 254 respondents, practicing primarily in Australia (n = 245), in various healthcare roles. One-hundred and fifty-nine (66%) of respondents used videoconferencing regularly, primarily for their own education. Respondents not currently utilising videoconferencing (n = 82, 34%) ranked the reasons for this and provided free-text responses to explain why this modality was not being utilised in practice. Respondents were reluctant to use videoconferencing because of perceived increase in time needed for video consultations compared to face-to-face consultations, concerns with lack of privacy and confidentiality, and a lack of clinical practice guidelines for video consultation. We believe many barriers to videoconferencing by healthcare providers can be managed with appropriate education and targeted training. Future research studies, which focus on standards and clinical practice guidelines for videoconferencing by healthcare providers, may result in increased utilisation of this modality for healthcare delivery in rehabilitation medicine. PMID:26556061

  14. Geoengineering Responses to Climate Change Selected Entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Vaughan, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Failure by the international community to make substantive progress in reducing CO2 emissions, coupled with recent evidence of accelerating climate change, has brought increasing urgency to the search for additional remediation approaches.  This book presents a selection of state-of-the-art geoengineering methods for deliberately reducing the effects of anthropogenic climate change, either by actively removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere or by decreasing the amount of sunlight absorbed at the Earth’s surface.  These methods contrast with more conventional mitigation approaches which focus on reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide. Geoengineering technologies could become a key tool to be used in conjunction with emissions reduction to limit the magnitude of climate change.  Featuring authoritative, peer-reviewed entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology, this book presents a wide range of climate change remediation technologies. Examines th...

  15. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  16. Social barriers to the adoption of smart homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to explore social barriers to the adoption of smart homes through the analysis of expert views and public attitudes. Smart home services aim to improve the comfort, convenience and safety of householders, as well as allowing them to use energy more efficiently and cope with increasing costs. Despite the existence of smart homes and smart home technologies for some time, their prevalence is not widespread, and thus their potential largely untapped. Using a combination of in-depth deliberative public workshops, expert interviews and a review of the existing literature, this paper explores social barriers to smart home diffusion, including how these vary by expertise, life-stage and location. The research highlights the importance of barriers such as control, security, and cost, providing insights for policymakers as well as smart-home designers and developers as to how these might be addressed. - Highlights: • Smart homes and related technologies can provide a variety of benefits. • Technologies need to be reliable and fit into householders’ lifestyles. • Public concerns relate to cost, control and privacy. • Trust in energy companies and government is important

  17. Understanding the barriers to real estate investment in developing economies

    OpenAIRE

    BAUM, ANDREW; Murray, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Baum (2008a) related the number of real estate funds investing in developing economies to simple economic and demographic variables, and showed that, while the popularity of markets was explained by population and GDP per capita, some countries receive more or less investment than the model predicted. Why is this? In this paper we undertake a literature review to identify the barriers which inhibit international real estate investment. We test our initial findings by questioning property in...

  18. Sociological barriers to developing sustainable discretionary air travel behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, SA; Higham, JES,; Reis, A.

    2013-01-01

    Encouraging positive public behaviour change has been touted as a pathway for mitigating the climate impacts of air travel. There is, however, growing evidence that two gaps, one between attitudes and behaviour, and the other between practices of “home” and “away”, pose significant barriers to changing discretionary air travel behaviour. This article uses both modern sociological theory on tourism as liminoid space, and postmodern theory that views identities as contextual, to provide a deepe...

  19. Physiological barriers to the oral delivery of curcumin

    OpenAIRE

    Škalko-Basnet, Nataša; Berginc, Katja; Trontelj, Jurij; Kristl, Albin

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a principal component from Curcuma longa, with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities was proposed as a potential candidate for the preventation and/or treatment of cancer and chronic diseases. However, curcumin could not achieve its expected therapeutic outcome in clinical trialsdue to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. The actual intestinal physiological barriers limiting curcumin absorption after oral administration have not been fully investigated. To identify th...

  20. Barriers and Facilitators to Community Mobility for Assistive Technology Users

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha Layton

    2012-01-01

    Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired lif...