WorldWideScience

Sample records for barrier probe tunneling

  1. Tunnelling without barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution in flat and curved space-time of quantum fields in theories with relative flat potential and its consequences are considered. It is shown that bubble nucleation, a quantum mechanical tunnelling process, may occur in flat space-time, having a bounce solution, even if V(phi) has no barrier. It is shown that bubble nucleation can also occur in curved space-time even though there is no bounce solution in the standard formalism for the bubble nucleation rate in curved space-time. Additionally, bubbles can nucleate during the slow rolling period on the potential in flat and curved space-time, in this case also there is no bounce solution. It is known in the new inflationary scenario that energy density perturbations caused by quantum fluctuations of the scalar field can satisfy the presently observed bounds on density perturbations. Bubble nucleation during the slow rolling period also gives rise to density perturbations. For a model potential density perturbations by bubbles are calculated at the horizon reentering. By applying the bound from the almost isotropic microwave black body radiation on these density perturbations, a constraint on the model potential is obtained. Finally, some further implications on the galaxy formation and applications in more realistic potential are discussed

  2. Enhanced tunneling through nonstationary barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomares-Baez, J. P.; Rodriguez-Lopez, J. L.; Ivlev, B.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum tunneling through a nonstationary barrier is studied analytically and by a direct numerical solution of Schroedinger equation. Both methods are in agreement and say that the main features of the phenomenon can be described in terms of classical trajectories which are solutions of Newton's equation in complex time. The probability of tunneling is governed by analytical properties of a time-dependent perturbation and the classical trajectory in the plane of complex time. Some preliminary numerical calculations of Euclidean resonance (an easy penetration through a classical nonstationary barrier due to an underbarrier interference) are presented

  3. Tunnel magnetoresistance in alumina, magnesia and composite tunnel barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schebaum, Oliver; Drewello, Volker; Auge, Alexander; Reiss, Guenter; Muenzenberg, Markus; Schuhmann, Henning; Seibt, Michael; Thomas, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Using magnetron sputtering, we have prepared Co-Fe-B/tunnel barrier/Co-Fe-B magnetic tunnel junctions with tunnel barriers consisting of alumina, magnesia, and magnesia-alumina bilayer systems. The highest tunnel magnetoresistance ratios we found were 73% for alumina and 323% for magnesia-based tunnel junctions. Additionally, tunnel junctions with a unified layer stack were prepared for the three different barriers. In these systems, the tunnel magnetoresistance ratios at optimum annealing temperatures were found to be 65% for alumina, 173% for magnesia, and 78% for the composite tunnel barriers. The similar tunnel magnetoresistance ratios of the tunnel junctions containing alumina provide evidence that coherent tunneling is suppressed by the alumina layer in the composite tunnel barrier. - Research highlights: → Transport properties of Co-Fe-B/tunnel barrier/Co-Fe-B magnetic tunnel junctions. → Tunnel barrier consists of MgO, Al-Ox, or MgO/Al-Ox bilayer systems. → Limitation of TMR-ratio in composite barrier tunnel junctions to Al-Ox values. → Limitation indicates that Al-Ox layer is causing incoherent tunneling.

  4. Tunneling rates in electron transport through double-barrier molecular junctions in a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazin, G V; Wu, S W; Ho, W

    2005-06-21

    The scanning tunneling microscope enables atomic-scale measurements of electron transport through individual molecules. Copper phthalocyanine and magnesium porphine molecules adsorbed on a thin oxide film grown on the NiAl(110) surface were probed. The single-molecule junctions contained two tunneling barriers, vacuum gap, and oxide film. Differential conductance spectroscopy shows that electron transport occurs via vibronic states of the molecules. The intensity of spectral peaks corresponding to the individual vibronic states depends on the relative electron tunneling rates through the two barriers of the junction, as found by varying the vacuum gap tunneling rate by changing the height of the scanning tunneling microscope tip above the molecule. A simple, sequential tunneling model explains the observed trends.

  5. Tunneling rates in electron transport through double-barrier molecular junctions in a scanning tunneling microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Nazin, G. V.; Wu, S. W.; Ho, W.

    2005-01-01

    The scanning tunneling microscope enables atomic-scale measurements of electron transport through individual molecules. Copper phthalocyanine and magnesium porphine molecules adsorbed on a thin oxide film grown on the NiAl(110) surface were probed. The single-molecule junctions contained two tunneling barriers, vacuum gap, and oxide film. Differential conductance spectroscopy shows that electron transport occurs via vibronic states of the molecules. The intensity of spectral peaks correspondi...

  6. Relativistic tunneling through two successive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunardi, Jose T.; Manzoni, Luiz A.

    2007-01-01

    We study the relativistic quantum mechanical problem of a Dirac particle tunneling through two successive electrostatic barriers. Our aim is to study the emergence of the so-called generalized Hartman effect, an effect observed in the context of nonrelativistic tunneling as well as in its counterparts and which is often associated with the possibility of superluminal velocities in the tunneling process. We discuss the behavior of both the phase (or group) tunneling time and the dwell time, and show that in the limit of opaque barriers the relativistic theory also allows the emergence of the generalized Hartman effect. We compare our results with the nonrelativistic ones and discuss their interpretation

  7. Tunnel junctions with multiferroic barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Martin; Bibes, Manuel; Fusil, Stéphane; Bouzehouane, Karim; Fontcuberta, Josep; Barthélémy, Agnès; Fert, Albert

    2007-04-01

    Multiferroics are singular materials that can exhibit simultaneously electric and magnetic orders. Some are ferroelectric and ferromagnetic and provide the opportunity to encode information in electric polarization and magnetization to obtain four logic states. However, such materials are rare and schemes allowing a simple electrical readout of these states have not been demonstrated in the same device. Here, we show that films of La0.1Bi0.9MnO3 (LBMO) are ferromagnetic and ferroelectric, and retain both ferroic properties down to a thickness of 2nm. We have integrated such ultrathin multiferroic films as barriers in spin-filter-type tunnel junctions that exploit the magnetic and ferroelectric degrees of freedom of LBMO. Whereas ferromagnetism permits read operations reminiscent of magnetic random access memories (MRAM), the electrical switching evokes a ferroelectric RAM write operation. Significantly, our device does not require the destructive ferroelectric readout, and therefore represents an advance over the original four-state memory concept based on multiferroics.

  8. Electron tunneling across a tunable potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, A; Anthore, A; Rocca, M L Della; Boulat, E; Lafarge, P

    2009-01-01

    We present an experiment where the elementary quantum electron tunneling process should be affected by an independent gate voltage parameter. We have realized nanotransistors where the source and drain electrodes are created by electromigration inducing a nanometer sized gap acting as a tunnel barrier. The barrier potential shape is in first approximation considered trapezoidal. The application of a voltage to the gate electrode close to the barrier region can in principle affect the barrier shape. Simulations of the source drain tunnel current as a function of the gate voltage predict modulations as large as one hundred percent. The difficulty of observing the predicted behaviour in our samples might be due to the peculiar geometry of the realized tunnel junction.

  9. Tunnelling through a Gaussian random barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezak, Viktor

    2008-01-01

    A thorough analysis of the tunnelling of electrons through a laterally inhomogeneous rectangular barrier is presented. The barrier height is defined as a statistically homogeneous Gaussian random function. In order to simplify calculations, we assume that the electron energy is low enough in comparison with the mean value of the barrier height. The randomness of the barrier height is defined vertically by a constant variance and horizontally by a finite correlation length. We present detailed calculations of the angular probability density for the tunnelled electrons (i.e. for the scattering forwards). The tunnelling manifests a remarkably diffusive character if the wavelength of the electrons is comparable with the correlation length of the barrier

  10. Magnetic tunnel junctions with monolayer hexagonal boron nitride tunnel barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquemal-Banci, M.; Galceran, R.; Bouzehouane, K.; Anane, A.; Petroff, F.; Fert, A.; Dlubak, B.; Seneor, P. [Unité Mixte de Physique, CNRS, Thales, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Palaiseau 91767 (France); Caneva, S.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Kidambi, P. R.; Robertson, J.; Hofmann, S. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB21PZ (United Kingdom); Xavier, S. [Thales Research and Technology, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, Palaiseau 91767 (France)

    2016-03-07

    We report on the integration of atomically thin 2D insulating hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) tunnel barriers into Co/h-BN/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The h-BN monolayer is directly grown by chemical vapor deposition on Fe. The Conductive Tip Atomic Force Microscopy (CT-AFM) measurements reveal the homogeneity of the tunnel behavior of our h-BN layers. As expected for tunneling, the resistance depends exponentially on the number of h-BN layers. The h-BN monolayer properties are also characterized through integration into complete MTJ devices. A Tunnel Magnetoresistance of up to 6% is observed for a MTJ based on a single atomically thin h-BN layer.

  11. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. Friedman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  12. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.; van't Erve, Olaf M. J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Whitener, Keith E.; Jonker, Berend T.

    2016-05-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  13. Tunnel magnetoresistance in asymmetric double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Useinov, N.Kh.; Petukhov, D.A.; Tagirov, L.R.

    2015-01-01

    The spin-polarized tunnel conductance and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) through a planar asymmetric double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DBMTJ) have been calculated using quasi-classical model. In DBMTJ nanostructure the magnetization of middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel with respect to the fixed magnetizations of the top and bottom ferromagnetic electrodes. The transmission coefficients of an electron to pass through the barriers have been calculated in terms of quantum mechanics. The dependencies of tunnel conductance and TMR on the applied voltage have been calculated in case of non-resonant transmission. Estimated in the framework of our model, the difference between the spin-channels conductances at low voltages was found relatively large. This gives rise to very high magnitude of TMR. - Highlights: • The spin-polarized conductance through the junction is calculated. • Dependencies of the tunnel conductance vs applied bias are shown. • Bias voltage dependence of tunnel magnetoresistance for the structure is shown

  14. Phonon tunneling through a double barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villegas, Diosdado; León-Pérez, Fernando de; Pérez-Álvarez, R.; Arriaga, J.

    2015-01-01

    The tunneling of optical and acoustic phonons at normal incidence on a double-barrier is studied in this paper. Transmission coefficients and resonance conditions are derived theoretically under the assumption that the long-wavelength approximation is valid. It is shown that the behavior of the transmission coefficients for the symmetric double barrier has a Lorentzian form close to resonant frequencies and that Breit–Wigner's formula have a general validity in one-dimensional phonon tunneling. Authors also study the so-called generalized Hartman effect in the tunneling of long-wavelength phonons and show that this effect is a numerical artifact resulting from taking the opaque limit before exploring the variation with a finite barrier width. This study could be useful for the design of acoustic devices

  15. Phonon tunneling through a double barrier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villegas, Diosdado [Departamento de Física, Universidad Central “Marta Abreu” de Las Villas, CP 54830, Santa Clara, Villa Clara (Cuba); Instituto de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 18 Sur y San Claudio, Edif. 110A, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla (Mexico); León-Pérez, Fernando de [Centro Universitario de la Defensa de Zaragoza, Ctra. de Huesca s/n, E-50090 Zaragoza (Spain); Pérez-Álvarez, R. [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209 Cuernavaca (Mexico); Arriaga, J., E-mail: arriaga@ifuap.buap.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 18 Sur y San Claudio, Edif. 110A, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    The tunneling of optical and acoustic phonons at normal incidence on a double-barrier is studied in this paper. Transmission coefficients and resonance conditions are derived theoretically under the assumption that the long-wavelength approximation is valid. It is shown that the behavior of the transmission coefficients for the symmetric double barrier has a Lorentzian form close to resonant frequencies and that Breit–Wigner's formula have a general validity in one-dimensional phonon tunneling. Authors also study the so-called generalized Hartman effect in the tunneling of long-wavelength phonons and show that this effect is a numerical artifact resulting from taking the opaque limit before exploring the variation with a finite barrier width. This study could be useful for the design of acoustic devices.

  16. Tunnel superpenetrability of potential barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhariev, B N.

    1982-01-01

    The transmission of two particles through the same barrier is considered. The limiting cases are compared when the particles are joined together in a single particle with double mass-energy and potential and when they pass the barrier independently. As an intermediate case a pair of particles bound in a quasideuteron of a finite size is considered. It is shown that long-range collective correlations of particles (of the superfluidity type and others) simplify very much for them passing through high potential barriers. This happens due to the transfer of the additional energy from the particles outside the barriers to those inside it

  17. Resonant tunneling via spin-polarized barrier states in a magnetic tunnel junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.; Lodder, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Resonant tunneling through states in the barrier of a magnetic tunnel junction has been analyzed theoretically for the case of a spin-polarized density of barrier states. It is shown that for highly spin-polarized barrier states, the magnetoresistance due to resonant tunneling is enhanced compared

  18. Large magnetocurrents in double-barrier tunneling transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Jun, K.-I.; Shin, K.-H.; Park, S.Y.; Hong, J.K.; Rhie, K.; Lee, B.C.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic tunneling transistors (MTT) with double tunneling barriers are fabricated. The structure of the transistor is AFM/FM/I/FM/I/FM/AFM, and ferromagnetic layers serve as the emitter, base and collector. This double-barrier tunneling transistor (DBTT) has an advantage of controlling the potential between the base and collector, compared to the Schottky-barrier-based base and collector of MTT. We found that the collector current density of DBTT is at least 10 3 times larger than that of conventional MTT, since tunneling through AlO x barrier provides much larger current density than that through Schottky barrier

  19. Resonant tunneling through double-barrier structures on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Wei-Yin; Zhu Rui; Deng Wen-Ji; Xiao Yun-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Quantum resonant tunneling behaviors of double-barrier structures on graphene are investigated under the tight-binding approximation. The Klein tunneling and resonant tunneling are demonstrated for the quasiparticles with energy close to the Dirac points. The Klein tunneling vanishes by increasing the height of the potential barriers to more than 300 meV. The Dirac transport properties continuously change to the Schrödinger ones. It is found that the peaks of resonant tunneling approximate to the eigen-levels of graphene nanoribbons under appropriate boundary conditions. A comparison between the zigzag- and armchair-edge barriers is given. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  20. Dependence of the Josephson coupling of unconventional superconductors on the properties of the tunneling barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledvij, M.; Klemm, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Josephson coupling between a conventional and an unconventional superconductor is investigated as a function of the properties of the tunneling barrier. A simple model is adopted for the tunneling probability and it is shown that its variation dramatically affects the I c R n product of an s-d, as opposed to an s-s junction. Based on these conclusions, experiments are proposed to probe the symmetry of the order parameter in high temperature superconductors

  1. Single-electron tunneling in double-barrier nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, V.J.; Su, B.; Cunningham, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors review experimental study of charge transport in nanometer double-barrier resonant tunneling devices. Heterostructure material is asymmetric: one barrier is substantially less transparent than the other. Resonant tunneling through size-quantized well states and single-electron charging of the well are thus largely separated in the two bias polarities. When the emitter barrier is more transparent than the collector barrier, electrons accumulate in the well; incremental electron occupation of the well is accompanied by Coulomb blockade leading to sharp steps of the tunneling current. When the emitter barrier is less transparent, the current reflects resonant tunneling of just one electron at a time through size-quantized well states; the current peaks and/or steps (depending on experimental parameters) appear in current-voltage characteristics. Magnetic field and temperature effects are also reviewed. Good agreement is achieved in comparison of many features of experimental data with simple theoretical models

  2. When does an electron exit a tunneling barrier?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov M. Yu.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We probe the dynamics of tunnel ionization via high harmonic generation. We characterize the ionization dynamics in helium atoms, and apply our approach to resolve subtle differences in ionization from different orbitals of a CO2 molecule.

  3. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with a single-crystalline LiF tunnel barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Narayananellore, Sai; Doko, Naoki; Matsuo, Norihiro; Saito, Hidekazu; Yuasa, Shinji

    2018-04-01

    We fabricated Fe/LiF/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgO(001) substrate, where LiF is an insulating tunnel barrier with the same crystal structure as MgO (rock-salt type). Crystallographical studies such as transmission electron microscopy and nanobeam electron diffraction observations revealed that the LiF tunnel barrier is single-crystalline and has a LiF(001)[100] ∥ bottom Fe(001)[110] crystal orientation, which is constructed in the same manner as MgO(001) on Fe(001). Also, the in-plane lattice mismatch between the LiF tunnel barrier and the Fe bottom electrode was estimated to be small (about 0.5%). Despite such advantages for the tunnel barrier of the MTJ, the observed tunnel magnetoresistance (MR) ratio was low (˜6% at 20 K) and showed a significant decrease with increasing temperature (˜1% at room temperature). The results imply that indirect tunneling and/or thermally excited carriers in the LiF tunnel barrier, in which the current basically is not spin-polarized, play a major role in electrical transport in the MTJ.

  4. Tunneling time through a barrier using the tempus operator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobe, Donald H.; Aguilera-Navarro, Valdir C. [North Texas Univ., Denton, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-11-01

    The time a particle spends in a classically forbidden region of a potential barrier is expressed as an expectation value of the time operator in that region. Classically, time is canonically conjugate to the energy and is equal to the time a conservative system. The tunneling time is calculated by this approach for a rectangular barrier, which gives a complex time. The imaginary part of the time is non negative, so it is interpreted as a tunneling time. The real part gives a negative value for some values of the parameters, and is therefore rejected because it violates causality. This tunneling time is compared with other tunneling times that have been suggested by also calculating them for the rectangular barrier. 58 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Tunneling time through a barrier using the tempus operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobe, Donald H.; Aguilera-Navarro, Valdir C.

    1996-11-01

    The time a particle spends in a classically forbidden region of a potential barrier is expressed as an expectation value of the time operator in that region. Classically, time is canonically conjugate to the energy and is equal to the time a conservative system. The tunneling time is calculated by this approach for a rectangular barrier, which gives a complex time. The imaginary part of the time is non negative, so it is interpreted as a tunneling time. The real part gives a negative value for some values of the parameters, and is therefore rejected because it violates causality. This tunneling time is compared with other tunneling times that have been suggested by also calculating them for the rectangular barrier. 58 refs., 7 figs

  6. Asymmetric voltage behavior of the tunnel magnetoresistance in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we study the value of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as a function of the applied voltage in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) with the left and right ferromagnetic (FM) layers being pinned and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions (equal barriers and electrodes). DMTJs are modeled as two single barrier junctions connected in series with consecutive tunneling (CST). We investigated the asymmetric voltage behavior of the TMR for the CST in the range of a general theoretical model. Significant asymmetries of the experimental curves, which arise due to different annealing regimes, are mostly explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and asymmetries of spin polarizations in magnetic layers. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications.

  7. Asymmetric voltage behavior of the tunnel magnetoresistance in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the value of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as a function of the applied voltage in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) with the left and right ferromagnetic (FM) layers being pinned and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions (equal barriers and electrodes). DMTJs are modeled as two single barrier junctions connected in series with consecutive tunneling (CST). We investigated the asymmetric voltage behavior of the TMR for the CST in the range of a general theoretical model. Significant asymmetries of the experimental curves, which arise due to different annealing regimes, are mostly explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and asymmetries of spin polarizations in magnetic layers. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications.

  8. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.

    2015-09-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate homoepitaxial tunnel barrier devices in which graphene serves as both the tunnel barrier and the high mobility transport channel. Beginning with multilayer graphene, we fluorinate or hydrogenate the top layer to decouple it from the bottom layer, so that it serves as a single monolayer tunnel barrier for both charge and spin injection into the lower graphene transport channel. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves, and a weakly temperature dependent zero bias resistance. We perform lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies (~200 ps). However, we also demonstrate the highest spin polarization efficiencies (~45%) yet measured in graphene-based spin devices [1]. [1] A.L. Friedman, et al., Homoepitaxial tunnel barriers with functionalized graphene-on-graphene for charge and spin transport, Nat. Comm. 5, 3161 (2014).

  9. Tunnelling through two successive barriers and the Hartman (superluminal) effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.; Recami, E.; Salesi, G.; Bergamo Univ., Bergamo

    2000-03-01

    The paper studies the phenomenon of one-dimensional non-resonant tunnelling through two successive potential barriers, separated by an intermediate free region R, by analyzing the relevant solutions to the Schroedinger equation. The total traversal time does not depend not only on the barrier widths (the so called Hartman effect), but also on the R width: so the effective velocity in the region R, between the two barriers, can be regarded as infinite. This agrees with the results known from the corresponding waveguide experiments, which simulated the tunnelling experiment herein considered due to the formal identity between the Schroedinger and the Helmholtz equation

  10. Effect of an Interfacial Layer on Electron Tunneling through Atomically Thin Al2O3 Tunnel Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Jamie; Sakidja, Ridwan; Goul, Ryan; Wu, Judy Z

    2017-10-25

    Electron tunneling through high-quality, atomically thin dielectric films can provide a critical enabling technology for future microelectronics, bringing enhanced quantum coherent transport, fast speed, small size, and high energy efficiency. A fundamental challenge is in controlling the interface between the dielectric and device electrodes. An interfacial layer (IL) will contain defects and introduce defects in the dielectric film grown atop, preventing electron tunneling through the formation of shorts. In this work, we present the first systematic investigation of the IL in Al 2 O 3 dielectric films of 1-6 Å's in thickness on an Al electrode. We integrated several advanced approaches: molecular dynamics to simulate IL formation, in situ high vacuum sputtering atomic layer deposition (ALD) to synthesize Al 2 O 3 on Al films, and in situ ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling spectroscopy to probe the electron tunneling through the Al 2 O 3 . The IL had a profound effect on electron tunneling. We observed a reduced tunnel barrier height and soft-type dielectric breakdown which indicate that defects are present in both the IL and in the Al 2 O 3 . The IL forms primarily due to exposure of the Al to trace O 2 and/or H 2 O during the pre-ALD heating step of fabrication. As the IL was systematically reduced, by controlling the pre-ALD sample heating, we observed an increase of the ALD Al 2 O 3 barrier height from 0.9 to 1.5 eV along with a transition from soft to hard dielectric breakdown. This work represents a key step toward the realization of high-quality, atomically thin dielectrics with electron tunneling for the next generation of microelectronics.

  11. Optical characterication of probes for photon scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    The photon scanning tunnelling microscope is a well-established member of the family of scanning near-field optical microscopes used for optical imaging at the sub-wavelength scale. The quality of the probes, typically pointed uncoated optical fibres, used is however difficult to evaluate...

  12. Instantaneous Tunneling Flight Time for Wavepacket Transmission through Asymmetric Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jakob; Pollak, Eli

    2018-04-12

    The time it takes a particle to tunnel through the asymmetric Eckart barrier potential is investigated using Gaussian wavepackets, where the barrier serves as a model for the potential along a chemical reaction coordinate. We have previously shown that the, in principle experimentally measurable, tunneling flight time, which determines the time taken by the transmitted particle to traverse the barrier, vanishes for symmetric potentials like the Eckart and square barrier [ Petersen , J. ; Pollak , E. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2017 , 9 , 4017 ]. Here we show that the same result is obtained for the asymmetric Eckart barrier potential, and therefore, the zero tunneling flight time seems to be a general result for one-dimensional time-independent potentials. The wavepacket dynamics is simulated using both an exact quantum mechanical method and a classical Wigner prescription. The excellent agreement between the two methods shows that quantum coherences are not important in pure one-dimensional tunneling and reinforces the conclusion that the tunneling flight time vanishes.

  13. Flexible MgO Barrier Magnetic Tunnel Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loong, Li Ming; Lee, Wonho; Qiu, Xuepeng; Yang, Ping; Kawai, Hiroyo; Saeys, Mark; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2016-07-01

    Flexible MgO barrier magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices are fabricated using a transfer printing process. The flexible MTJ devices yield significantly enhanced tunneling magnetoresistance of ≈300% and improved abruptness of switching, as residual strain in the MTJ structure is released during the transfer process. This approach could be useful for flexible electronic systems that require high-performance memory components. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Optimization of a tunneling barrier in magnetic tunneling junction by tilted-plasma oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, C.H.; Shim, Heejae; Kim, K.S.; Cho, B.K.

    2004-01-01

    Oxidation of an AlO x insulating barrier in a magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) was carried out by a tilted-plasma oxidation method. It was found that the tilted-plasma oxidation induced a gradual change in the extent of oxidation of an insulating layer, which consequently led to a gradual change in the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and specific junction resistance (RA) of the MTJ. We found a linear relation in the TMR versus RA curve with positive and negative slopes for less- and overoxidized junctions, respectively, and a parabolic relation for optimally oxidized junctions. The crossover in the TMR versus RA curves provides an effective and useful way to optimize (and monitor) the oxidation condition of a tunneling barrier in MTJs especially of a tunneling barrier less than 10 A thick. The tunneling junctions were also investigated after thermal annealing at various temperatures. The observations after thermal annealing were found to be consistent with transmission electrons microscopy images and a scenario of the partial formation of an additional ultrathin tunneling barrier at the top surface of the bottom magnetic layer

  15. Spin-polarized inelastic tunneling through insulating barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Tran, M; Jaffrès, H; Seneor, P; Deranlot, C; Petroff, F; George, J-M; Lépine, B; Ababou, S; Jézéquel, G

    2009-05-01

    Spin-conserving hopping transport through chains of localized states has been evidenced by taking benefit of the high degree of spin-polarization of CoFeB-MgO-CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions. In particular, our data show that relatively thick MgO barriers doped with boron favor the activation of spin-conserving inelastic channels through a chain of three localized states and leading to reduced magnetoresistance effects. We propose an extension of the Glazman-Matveev theory to the case of ferromagnetic reservoirs to account for spin-polarized inelastic tunneling through nonmagnetic localized states embedded in an insulating barrier.

  16. Nonlinear transport theory in the metal with tunnel barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubov, E. E.

    2018-02-01

    Within the framework of the scattering matrix formalism, the nonlinear Kubo theory for electron transport in the metal with a tunnel barrier has been considered. A general expression for the mean electrical current was obtained. It significantly simplifies the calculation of nonlinear contributions to the conductivity of various hybrid structures. In the model of the tunnel Hamiltonian, all linear and nonlinear contributions to a mean electrical current are evaluated. The linear approximation agrees with results of other theories. For effective barrier transmission ?, the ballistic transport is realised with a value of the Landauer conductivity equal to ?.

  17. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomons, Mark; Martins, Bruno V. C.; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe

  18. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomons, Mark [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Martins, Bruno V. C.; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A., E-mail: rwolkow@ualberta.ca [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe.

  19. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, Mark; Martins, Bruno V C; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe.

  20. Locally addressable tunnel barriers within a carbon nanotube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biercuk, M.; Mason, N.; Chow, J.

    2003-01-01

    We report the realization and characterization of independently controllable tunnel barriers within a carbon nanotube. The nanotubes are mechanically bent or kinked using an atomic force microscope, and top gates are subsequently placed near each kink. Transport measurements indicate that the kin...

  1. Apparent Barrier Height in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, L.; Brandbyge, Mads; Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt

    1996-01-01

    The apparent barrier height phi(ap), that is, the rate of change of the logarithm of the conductance with tip-sample separation in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), has been measured for Ni, Pt, and Au single crystal surfaces. The results show that phi(ap) is constant until point contact...... is reached rather than decreasing at small tunneling gap distances, as previously reported. The findings for phi(ap) can be accounted for theoretically by including the relaxations of the tip-surface junction in an STM due to the strong adhesive forces at close proximity. These relaxation effects are shown...

  2. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in double-barrier planar magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, A. N.

    2011-08-24

    We present a theoretical approach to calculate the spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DMTJ), in which the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel in relation to the fixed magnetizations of the left and right ferromagnetic electrodes. The electron transport through the DMTJ is considered as a three-dimensional problem, taking into account all transmitting electron trajectories as well as the spin-dependent momentum conservation law. The dependence of the transmission coefficient and spin-polarized currents on the applied voltage is derived as an exact solution to the quantum-mechanical problem for the spin-polarized transport. In the range of the developed physical model, the resonant tunneling, nonresonant tunneling, and enhanced spin filtering can be explained; the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in double-barrier planar magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, A. N.; Kosel, Jü rgen; Useinov, N. Kh.; Tagirov, L. R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical approach to calculate the spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DMTJ), in which the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel in relation to the fixed magnetizations of the left and right ferromagnetic electrodes. The electron transport through the DMTJ is considered as a three-dimensional problem, taking into account all transmitting electron trajectories as well as the spin-dependent momentum conservation law. The dependence of the transmission coefficient and spin-polarized currents on the applied voltage is derived as an exact solution to the quantum-mechanical problem for the spin-polarized transport. In the range of the developed physical model, the resonant tunneling, nonresonant tunneling, and enhanced spin filtering can be explained; the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  4. Electrically tunable tunneling rectification magnetoresistance in magnetic tunneling junctions with asymmetric barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Huang, Qikun; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Kun; Tian, Yufeng; Yan, Shishen; Chen, Yanxue; Liu, Guolei; Kang, Shishou; Mei, Liangmo

    2017-10-26

    The development of multifunctional spintronic devices requires simultaneous control of multiple degrees of freedom of electrons, such as charge, spin and orbit, and especially a new physical functionality can be realized by combining two or more different physical mechanisms in one specific device. Here, we report the realization of novel tunneling rectification magnetoresistance (TRMR), where the charge-related rectification and spin-dependent tunneling magnetoresistance are integrated in Co/CoO-ZnO/Co magnetic tunneling junctions with asymmetric tunneling barriers. Moreover, by simultaneously applying direct current and alternating current to the devices, the TRMR has been remarkably tuned in the range from -300% to 2200% at low temperature. This proof-of-concept investigation provides an unexplored avenue towards electrical and magnetic control of charge and spin, which may apply to other heterojunctions to give rise to more fascinating emergent functionalities for future spintronics applications.

  5. Photon-assisted Tunneling In Double-barrier Superconducting Tunnel-junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierichs, M. M. T. M.; Dieleman, P.; Wezelman, J. J.; Honingh, C. E.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    1994-01-01

    Double-barrier Nb/Al2O3/Al/Al2O3/Nb tunnel junctions are used as mixing elements in a 345 GHz waveguide mixer. Noise temperatures (double side band) down to 720 K at 3.0 K are obtained without the need to apply a magnetic field to suppress the Josephson current. It is shown that the composite

  6. Tunneling Current Probe for Noncontract Wafer-Level Photodiode Array Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Verdun, Horacio

    1999-01-01

    The Tunneling Current Probe (TCP) is an automated picometer-sensitive proximity sensor and current measurement system which measures the current through a photodiode detector array element by establishing a tunneling current...

  7. Tunneling spectroscopy on superconducting Nb3Sn with artioficial barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, U.

    1984-03-01

    Tunneling diodes on Nb 3 Sn were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The superconducting transition temperatures of the Nb 3 Sn films were in the range of 5 to 18 K. An energetically low-lying structure in the tunneling density of states has been localized by detailed studies of the second derivative of the current-voltage characteristics of the diodes. This structure was found near 5.5 meV for stoichiometric Nb 3 Sn (Tsub(c) approx.= 18 K) and at 6.7 meV for understoichiometric Nb 3 Sn (Tsub(c) approx.= 5 K). The minimum in the conductance at zero energy found in the normal state could be identified to be mainly due to inelastic phonon processes of barrier phonons and Nb 3 Sn phonons. Deformations were found in the tunneling density of states of stoichiometric Nb 3 Sn diodes which lead to contradiction when explained by proximity effects. (orig./GSCH)

  8. Niobium nitride Josephson tunnel junctions with magnesium oxide barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, A.; Aoyagi, M.; Kosaka, S.; Shinoki, F.; Hayakawa, H.

    1985-01-01

    Niobium nitride-niobium nitride Josephson tunnel junctions have been fabricated using amorphous magnesium oxide (a-MgO) films as barriers. These junctions have excellent tunneling characteristics. For example, a large gap voltage (V/sub g/ = 5.1 mV), a large product of the maximum critical current and the normal tunneling resistance (I/sub c/R/sub n/ = 3.25 mV), and a small subgap leakage current (V/sub m/ = 45 mV, measured at 3 mV) have been obtained for a NbN/a-MgO/NbN junction. The critical current of this junction remains finite up to 14.5 K

  9. Graphene quantum dots probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenstern, Markus; Freitag, Nils; Nent, Alexander; Nemes-Incze, Peter; Liebmann, Marcus [II. Institute of Physics B and JARA-FIT, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy results probing the electronic properties of graphene quantum dots are reviewed. After a short summary of the study of squared wave functions of graphene quantum dots on metal substrates, we firstly present data where the Landau level gaps caused by a perpendicular magnetic field are used to electrostatically confine electrons in monolayer graphene, which are probed by the Coulomb staircase revealing the consecutive charging of a quantum dot. It turns out that these quantum dots exhibit much more regular charging sequences than lithographically confined ones. Namely, the consistent grouping of charging peaks into quadruplets, both, in the electron and hole branch, portrays a regular orbital splitting of about 10meV. At low hole occupation numbers, the charging peaks are, partly, additionally grouped into doublets. The spatially varying energy separation of the doublets indicates a modulation of the valley splitting by the underlying BN substrate. We outline that this property might be used to eventually tune the valley splitting coherently. Afterwards, we describe graphene quantum dots with multiple contacts produced without lithographic resist, namely by local anodic oxidation. Such quantum dots target the goal to probe magnetotransport properties during the imaging of the corresponding wave functions by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Optically controlled resonant tunneling in a double-barrier diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, S. C.; Wu, S.; Sanders, S.; Griffel, G.; Yariv, A.

    1991-03-01

    The resonant tunneling effect is optically enhanced in a GaAs/GaAlAs double-barrier structure that has partial lateral current confinement. The peak current increases and the valley current decreases simultaneously when the device surface is illuminated, due to the increased conductivity of the top layer of the structure. The effect of the lateral current confinement on the current-voltage characteristic of a double-barrier resonant tunneling structure was also studied. With increased lateral current confinement, the peak and valley current decrease at a different rate such that the current peak-to-valley ratio increases up to three times. The experimental results are explained by solving the electrostatic potential distribution in the structure using a simple three-layer model.

  11. Tunnelling of plane waves through a square barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julve, J [IMAFF, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 113 bis, Madrid 28006 (Spain); UrrIes, F J de [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: julve@imaff.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: fernando.urries@uah.es

    2008-08-01

    The time evolution of plane waves in the presence of a one-dimensional square quantum barrier is considered. Comparison is made between the cases of an infinite and a cut-off (shutter) initial plane wave. The difference is relevant when the results are applied to the analysis of the tunnelling regime. This work is focused on the analytical calculation of the time-evolved solution and highlights the contribution of the resonant (Gamow) states.

  12. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    tunneling microscope (STM). Especially at low temperatures the Kondo resonance is used to probe magnetic interaction with ferromagnetic islands and between two atoms. The latter showing a crossover between Kondo screened atoms and antiferromagnetically coupled atoms close to the quantum critical point....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...

  13. Current-voltage relation for thin tunnel barriers: Parabolic barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim; Brandbyge, Mads

    2004-01-01

    We derive a simple analytic result for the current-voltage curve for tunneling of electrons through a thin uniform insulating layer modeled by a parabolic barrier. Our model, which goes beyond the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation, is applicable also in the limit of highly transparant...

  14. Output voltage calculations in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with asymmetric voltage behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Mryasov, Oleg; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the asymmetric voltage behavior (AVB) of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) for single and double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) in range of a quasi-classical free electron model. Numerical calculations of the TMR

  15. Optical and electrical characterization at the nanoscale with a transparent probe of a scanning tunnelling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sychugov, Ilya; Omi, Hiroo; Murashita, Tooru; Kobayashi, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    A new type of scanning probe microscope, combining features of the scanning tunnelling microscope, the scanning tunnelling luminescence microscope with a transparent probe and the aperture scanning near-field optical microscope, is described. Proof-of-concept experiments were performed under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at varying temperature on GaAs/AlAs heterostructures.

  16. Parametric enhancement of the tunneling transmission through a potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masatoshi; Iwata, Giiti.

    1992-01-01

    A possibility of indicated of enhancing the tunneling transmission of particle incident on a potential barrier with the aid of an auxiliary potential parametrically in resonance with incident particles. For a simple auxiliary potential, a train of two-step square wells, examples are presented in which the ratio of the transmission coefficients with and without the auxiliary potential can be very large, e.g. (2n + 1) 2L , where n is the positive integer and L the number of the period of the auxiliary potential. (author)

  17. Instanton and noninstanton tunneling in periodically perturbed barriers: semiclassical and quantum interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kin'ya; Ikeda, Kensuke S

    2012-11-01

    In multidimensional barrier tunneling, there exist two different types of tunneling mechanisms, instanton-type tunneling and noninstanton tunneling. In this paper we investigate transitions between the two tunneling mechanisms from the semiclassical and quantum viewpoints taking two simple models: a periodically perturbed Eckart barrier for the semiclassical analysis and a periodically perturbed rectangular barrier for the quantum analysis. As a result, similar transitions are observed with change of the perturbation frequency ω for both systems, and we obtain a comprehensive scenario from both semiclassical and quantum viewpoints for them. In the middle range of ω, in which the plateau spectrum is observed, noninstanton tunneling dominates the tunneling process, and the tunneling amplitude takes the maximum value. Noninstanton tunneling explained by stable-unstable manifold guided tunneling (SUMGT) from the semiclassical viewpoint is interpreted as multiphoton-assisted tunneling from the quantum viewpoint. However, in the limit ω→0, instanton-type tunneling takes the place of noninstanton tunneling, and the tunneling amplitude converges on a constant value depending on the perturbation strength. The spectrum localized around the input energy is observed, and there is a scaling law with respect to the width of the spectrum envelope, i.e., the width ∝ℏω. In the limit ω→∞, the tunneling amplitude converges on that of the unperturbed system, i.e., the instanton of the unperturbed system.

  18. Tunnel barrier and noncollinear magnetization effects on shot noise in ferromagnetic/semiconductor/ferromagnetic heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Xingtao; Liu Jianjun

    2008-01-01

    Based on the scattering approach, we investigate transport properties of electrons in a one-dimensional waveguide that contains a ferromagnetic/semiconductor/ferromagnetic heterojunction and tunnel barriers in the presence of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions. We simultaneously consider significant quantum size effects, quantum coherence, Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions and noncollinear magnetizations. It is found that the tunnel barrier plays a decisive role in the transmission coefficient and shot noise of the ballistic spin electron transport through the heterojunction. When the small tunnel barriers are considered, the transport properties of electrons are quite different from those without tunnel barriers

  19. The critical role of the barrier thickness in spin filter tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Casey W.

    2009-01-01

    Spin filter tunneling is considered in the low bias limit as functions of the temperature dependent barrier parameters. We demonstrate the generation of spin polarized tunneling currents in relation to the magnetic order parameter, and discuss how an interfacially suppressed order parameter leads to a temperature dependent tunneling current asymmetry. Analyzing the full parameter space reveals that the often overlooked barrier thickness plays a critical role in spin filter tunneling. With all else fixed, thicker barriers yield higher spin polarization, and allow a given polarization to be achieved at higher temperatures. This insight may open the door for new materials to serve as spin filter barriers.

  20. Search for Spin Filtering By Electron Tunneling Through Ferromagnetic EuS Barriers in Pbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figielski, T.; Morawski, A.; Wosinski, T.; Wrotek, S.; Makosa, A.; Lusakowska, E.; Story, T.; Sipatov, A. Yu.; Szczerbakow, A.; Grasza, K.; hide

    2002-01-01

    Perpendicular transport through single- and double-barrier heterostructures consisting of ferromagnetic EuS layers embedded into PbS matrix was investigated. Manifestations of both resonant tunneling and spin filtering through EuS barrier have been observed.

  1. Output voltage calculations in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with asymmetric voltage behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-10-22

    In this paper we study the asymmetric voltage behavior (AVB) of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) for single and double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) in range of a quasi-classical free electron model. Numerical calculations of the TMR-V curves, output voltages and I-V characteristics for negative and positive values of applied voltages were carried out using MTJs with CoFeB/MgO interfaces as an example. Asymmetry of the experimental TMR-V curves is explained by different values of the minority and majority Fermi wave vectors for the left and right sides of the tunnel barrier, which arises due to different annealing regimes. Electron tunneling in DMTJs was simulated in two ways: (i) Coherent tunneling, where the DMTJ is modeled as one tunnel system and (ii) consecutive tunneling, where the DMTJ is modeled by two single barrier junctions connected in series. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Transmittance and Tunneling Current through a Trapezoidal Barrier under Spin Polarization Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, F. A.; Nabila, E.; Mardianti, H.; Ariani, T. I.; Khairurrijal

    2018-04-01

    The transmittance and tunneling current in heterostructures under spin polarization consideration were studied by employing a zinc-blended structure for the heterostructures. An electron tunnels through a potential barrier by applying a bias voltage to the barrier, which is called the trapezoidal potential barrier. In order to study the transmittance, an Airy wave function approach was employed to find the transmittance. The obtained transmittance was then utilized to compute the tunneling current by using a Gauss quadrature method. It was shown that the transmittances were asymmetric with the incident angle of the electron. It was also shown that the tunneling currents increased as the bias voltage increased.

  3. Anisotropic sensor and memory device with a ferromagnetic tunnel barrier as the only magnetic element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lόpez-Mir, L; Frontera, C; Aramberri, H; Bouzehouane, K; Cisneros-Fernández, J; Bozzo, B; Balcells, L; Martínez, B

    2018-01-16

    Multiple spin functionalities are probed on Pt/La 2 Co 0.8 Mn 1.2 O 6 /Nb:SrTiO 3 , a device composed by a ferromagnetic insulating barrier sandwiched between non-magnetic electrodes. Uniquely, La 2 Co 0.8 Mn 1.2 O 6 thin films present strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of magnetocrystalline origin, property of major interest for spintronics. The junction has an estimated spin-filtering efficiency of 99.7% and tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) values up to 30% at low temperatures. This remarkable angular dependence of the magnetoresistance is associated with the magnetic anisotropy whose origin lies in the large spin-orbit interaction of Co 2+ which is additionally tuned by the strain of the crystal lattice. Furthermore, we found that the junction can operate as an electrically readable magnetic memory device. The findings of this work demonstrate that a single ferromagnetic insulating barrier with strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy is sufficient for realizing sensor and memory functionalities in a tunneling device based on TAMR.

  4. Multiterminal semiconductor/ferromagnet probes for spin-filter scanning tunneling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vera Marun, I.J.; Jansen, R.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the fabrication of multiterminal semiconductor/ferromagnet probes for a new technique to study magnetic nanostructures: spin-filter scanning tunneling microscopy. We describe the principle of the technique, which is based on spin-polarized tunneling and subsequent analysis of the spin

  5. Internal resistor of multi-functional tunnel barrier for selectivity and switching uniformity in resistive random access memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangheon; Woo, Jiyong; Lee, Daeseok; Cha, Euijun; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2014-01-01

    In this research, we analyzed the multi-functional role of a tunnel barrier that can be integrated in devices. This tunnel barrier, acting as an internal resistor, changes its resistance with applied bias. Therefore, the current flow in the devices can be controlled by a tunneling mechanism that modifies the tunnel barrier thickness for non-linearity and switching uniformity of devices. When a device is in a low-resistance state, the tunnel barrier controls the current behavior of the device because most of the bias is applied to the tunnel barrier owing to its higher resistance. Furthermore, the tunnel barrier induces uniform filament formation during set operation with the tunnel barrier controlling the current flow.

  6. Multiple-scanning-probe tunneling microscope with nanoscale positional recognition function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Seiji; Kuramochi, Hiromi; Laurent, Olivier; Komatsubara, Takashi; Machida, Shinichi; Aono, Masakazu; Obori, Kenichi; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2010-07-01

    Over the past decade, multiple-scanning-probe microscope systems with independently controlled probes have been developed for nanoscale electrical measurements. We developed a quadruple-scanning-probe tunneling microscope (QSPTM) that can determine and control the probe position through scanning-probe imaging. The difficulty of operating multiple probes with submicrometer precision drastically increases with the number of probes. To solve problems such as determining the relative positions of the probes and avoiding of contact between the probes, we adopted sample-scanning methods to obtain four images simultaneously and developed an original control system for QSPTM operation with a function of automatic positional recognition. These improvements make the QSPTM a more practical and useful instrument since four images can now be reliably produced, and consequently the positioning of the four probes becomes easier owing to the reduced chance of accidental contact between the probes.

  7. The time of discrete spectrum identical particles tunneling at their simultaneous passing over rectangular quantum barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martsenyuk, L.S.

    2010-01-01

    Research of influence of exchange interaction of identical particles for the time of their simultaneous tunneling through a rectangular quantum barrier is lead. The account of identity leads to necessity of symmetrisation of wave function owing to what in the formula describing interaction of two particles, arises an additional element. In result the parameters of tunneling, including time of tunneling change. Time of tunneling is calculated from the formula received in work from the size of exchange interaction of two particles simultaneously crossing a rectangular quantum barrier.

  8. Enhanced voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy in magnetic tunnel junctions with an MgO/PZT/MgO tunnel barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Diana; Li, Xiang; Wong, Kin; Zurbuchen, Mark A.; Robbennolt, Shauna; Yu, Guoqiang; Tolbert, Sarah; Kioussis, Nicholas; Khalili Amiri, Pedram; Wang, Kang L.; Chang, Jane P.

    2016-03-01

    Compared with current-controlled magnetization switching in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), electric field- or voltage-induced magnetization switching reduces the writing energy of the memory cell, which also results in increased memory density. In this work, an ultra-thin PZT film with high dielectric constant was integrated into the tunneling oxide layer to enhance the voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect. The growth of MTJ stacks with an MgO/PZT/MgO tunnel barrier was performed using a combination of sputtering and atomic layer deposition techniques. The fabricated MTJs with the MgO/PZT/MgO barrier demonstrate a VCMA coefficient, which is ˜40% higher (19.8 ± 1.3 fJ/V m) than the control sample MTJs with an MgO barrier (14.3 ± 2.7 fJ/V m). The MTJs with the MgO/PZT/MgO barrier also possess a sizeable tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of more than 50% at room temperature, comparable to the control MTJs with an MgO barrier. The TMR and enhanced VCMA effect demonstrated simultaneously in this work make the MgO/PZT/MgO barrier-based MTJs potential candidates for future voltage-controlled, ultralow-power, and high-density magnetic random access memory devices.

  9. Determination of the thickness of Al2O3 barriers in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, J.D.R.; Hase, T.P.A.; Tanner, B.K.; Hughes, N.D.; Hicken, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    The barrier thickness in magnetic spin-dependent tunnel junctions with Al 2 O 3 barriers has been measured using grazing incidence x-ray reflectivity and by fitting the tunneling current to the Simmons model. We have studied the effect of glow discharge oxidation time on the barrier structure, revealing a substantial increase in Al 2 O 3 thickness with oxidation. The greater thickness of barrier measured using grazing incidence x-ray reflectivity compared with that obtained by fitting current density-voltage to the Simmons electron tunneling model suggests that electron tunneling is localized to specific regions across the barrier, where the thickness is reduced by fluctuations due to nonconformal roughness

  10. Probing spin-polarized tunneling at high bias and temperature with a magnetic tunnel transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, B.G.; Banerjee, T.; Min, B.C.; Sanderink, Johannes G.M.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic tunnel transistor (MTT) is a three terminal hybrid device that consists of a tunnel emitter, a ferromagnetic (FM) base, and a semiconductor collector. In the MTT with a FM emitter and a single FM base, spin-polarized hot electrons are injected into the base by tunneling. After

  11. Josephson phase qubit circuit for the evaluation of advanced tunnel barrier materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, Jeffrey S; Oh, Seongshik; Pappas, David P [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Wang Haohua; Martinis, John M [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)], E-mail: klinej@nist.gov

    2009-01-15

    We have found that crystalline Josephson junctions have problems with the control of critical current density that decrease the circuit yield. We present a superconducting quantum bit circuit designed to accommodate a factor of five variation in critical current density from one fabrication run to the next. The new design enables the evaluation of advanced tunnel barrier materials for superconducting quantum bits. Using this circuit design, we compare the performance of Josephson phase qubits fabricated with MgO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} advanced crystalline tunnel barriers to AlO{sub x} amorphous tunnel barrier qubits.

  12. Elimination of two level fluctuators in superconducting quantum bits by an epitaxial tunnel barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seongshik; Cicak, Katarina; Kline, Jeffrey S.; Sillanpaeae, Mika A.; Osborn, Kevin D.; Whittaker, Jed D.; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Pappas, David P.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum computing based on Josephson junction technology is considered promising due to its scalable architecture. However, decoherence is a major obstacle. Here, we report evidence for improved Josephson quantum bits (qubits) using a single-crystal Al 2 O 3 tunnel barrier. We have found an ∼80% reduction in the density of the spectral splittings that indicate the existence of two-level fluctators (TLFs) in amorphous tunnel barriers. The residual ∼20% TLFs can be attributed to interfacial effects that may be further reduced by different electrode materials. These results show that decoherence sources in the tunnel barrier of Josephson qubits can be identified and eliminated

  13. Probing Field Distributions on Waveguide Structures with an Atomic Force/Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgonjen, E.G.; Borgonjen, E.G.; Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    A 'stand-alone' Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope combined with an Atomic force Microscope, using a micro-fabricated silicon-nitride probe, is applied to the imaging of field distribution in integrated optical ridge waveguides. The electric field on the waveguide is locally probed by coupling to

  14. Superluminal tunneling of a relativistic half-integer spin particle through a potential barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanni Luca

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the problem of a relativistic Dirac half-integer spin free particle tunneling through a rectangular quantum-mechanical barrier. If the energy difference between the barrier and the particle is positive, and the barrier width is large enough, there is proof that the tunneling may be superluminal. For first spinor components of particle and antiparticle states, the tunneling is always superluminal regardless the barrier width. Conversely, the second spinor components of particle and antiparticle states may be either subluminal or superluminal depending on the barrier width. These results derive from studying the tunneling time in terms of phase time. For the first spinor components of particle and antiparticle states, it is always negative while for the second spinor components of particle and antiparticle states, it is always positive, whatever the height and width of the barrier. In total, the tunneling time always remains positive for particle states while it becomes negative for antiparticle ones. Furthermore, the phase time tends to zero, increasing the potential barrier both for particle and antiparticle states. This agrees with the interpretation of quantum tunneling that the Heisenberg uncertainty principle provides. This study’s results are innovative with respect to those available in the literature. Moreover, they show that the superluminal behaviour of particles occurs in those processes with high-energy confinement.

  15. Temperature dependence of shot noise in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jiasen; Liu, Liang; Feng, J. F.; Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.; Zhang, X.-G.; Wei, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Shot noise reveals spin dependent transport properties in a magnetic tunnel junction. We report measurement of shot noise in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions, which shows a strong temperature dependence. The Fano factor used to characterize shot noise increases with decreasing temperature. A sequential tunneling model can be used to account for these results, in which a larger Fano factor results from larger spin relaxation length at lower temperatures.

  16. Theoretical analysis of a dual-probe scanning tunneling microscope setup on graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Power, Stephen R.; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2014-01-01

    Experimental advances allow for the inclusion of multiple probes to measure the transport properties of a sample surface. We develop a theory of dual-probe scanning tunneling microscopy using a Green's function formalism, and apply it to graphene. Sampling the local conduction properties at finite...... to different scattering processes. We compute the conductance maps of graphene systems with different edge geometries or height fluctuations to determine the effects of nonideal graphene samples on dual-probe measurements. © 2014 American Physical Society....

  17. Investigation of the tunnel magnetoresistance in junctions with a strontium stannate barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althammer, Matthias; Mishra, Rohan; Borisevich, Albina J.; Singh, Amit Vikam; Keshavarz, Sahar; Yurtisigi, Mehmet Kenan; Leclair, Patrick; Gupta, Arunava

    We experimentally investigate the structural, magnetic and electrical transport properties of La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 based magnetic tunnel junctions with a SrSnO3 barrier. Our results show that despite the high density of defects in the strontium stannate barrier the observed tunnel magnetoresistance is comparable to tunnel junctions with a better lattice matched SrTiO3 barrier, reaching values of up to 350 % at T = 5 K . Further analysis of the current-voltage characteristics of the junction and the bias voltage dependence of the observed tunnel magnetoresistance show a decrease of the TMR with increasing bias voltage. Our results suggest that by reducing the structural defects in the strontium stannate barrier, even larger TMR ratios might be possible in the future. We gratefully acknowledge financial support via NSF-ECCS Grant No. 1509875.

  18. Electron-spin polarization in tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic EuS barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, X.; Moodera, J.S.; Meservey, R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report here spin-polarized tunneling experiments using non-ferromagnetic electrodes and ferromagnetic EuS barriers. Because of the conduction band in EuS splits into spin-up and spin-down subbands when the temperature is below 16.7 K, the Curie temperature of EuS, the tunnel barrier for electrons with different spin directions is different, therefore giving rise to tunnel current polarization. The spin-filter effect, as it may be called, was observed earlier, directly or indirectly, by several groups: Esaki et al. made a tunneling study on junctions having EuS and EuSe barriers; Thompson et al. studied Schottky barrier tunneling between In and doped EuS; Muller et al. and Kisker et al. performed electron field emission experiments on EuS-coated tungsten tips. The field emission experiments gave a maximum polarization of (89 + 7)% for the emitted electrons. Although the previous tunneling studies did not directly show electron polarization, their results were explained by the same spin- filter effect. This work uses the spin-polarized tunneling technique to show directly that tunnel current is indeed polarized and polarization can be as high as 85%

  19. The time of simultaneous tunneling of identical particles through the rectangular quantum barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martsenyuk, L.S.; Omelchenko, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    Work is devoted to studying the influence of exchange processes on a time of simultaneous crossing by identical particles of a rectangular quantum barrier. It is shown, that such processes essentially influence on the parameters of tunneling. The size of addition to time of identical particles tunneling, arising up because of their exchange interaction in a field of a rectangular quantum barrier is first counted.

  20. Magnetic tunnel junctions with AlN and AlNxOy barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwickert, M. M.; Childress, J. R.; Fontana, R. E.; Kellock, A. J.; Rice, P. M.; Ho, M. K.; Thompson, T. J.; Gurney, B. A.

    2001-01-01

    Nonoxide tunnel barriers such as AlN are of interest for magnetic tunnel junctions to avoid the oxidation of the magnetic electrodes. We have investigated the fabrication and properties of thin AlN-based barriers for use in low resistance magnetic tunnel junctions. Electronic, magnetic and structural data of tunnel valves of the form Ta (100 Aa)/PtMn (300 Aa)/CoFe 20 (20 Aa - 25 Aa)/barrier/CoFe 20 (10 - 20 Aa)/NiFe 16 (35 - 40 Aa)/Ta (100 Aa) are presented, where the barrier consists of AlN, AlN x O y or AlN/AlO x with total thicknesses between 8 and 15 Aa. The tunnel junctions were sputter deposited and then lithographically patterned down to 2 x 2μm 2 devices. AlN was deposited by reactive sputtering from an Al target with 20% - 35% N 2 in the Ar sputter gas at room temperature, resulting in stoichiometric growth of AlN x (x=0.50±0.05), as determined by RBS. TEM analysis shows that the as-deposited AlN barrier is crystalline. For AlN barriers and AlN followed by natural O 2 oxidation, we obtain tunnel magnetoresistance >10% with specific junction resistance R j down to 60Ωμm 2 . [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  1. Large-scale fabrication of BN tunnel barriers for graphene spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Wangyang; Makk, Péter; Maurand, Romain; Bräuninger, Matthias; Schönenberger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We have fabricated graphene spin-valve devices utilizing scalable materials made from chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both the spin-transporting graphene and the tunnel barrier material are CVD-grown. The tunnel barrier is realized by Hexagonal boron nitride, used either as a monolayer or bilayer and placed over the graphene. Spin transport experiments were performed using ferromagnetic contacts deposited onto the barrier. We find that spin injection is still greatly suppressed in devices with a monolayer tunneling barrier due to resistance mismatch. This is, however, not the case for devices with bilayer barriers. For those devices, a spin relaxation time of ∼260 ps intrinsic to the CVD graphene material is deduced. This time scale is comparable to those reported for exfoliated graphene, suggesting that this CVD approach is promising for spintronic applications which require scalable materials

  2. Temperature dependence of interlayer coupling in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with GdOX barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse-Illige, T.; Xu, Y. H.; Liu, Y. H.; Huang, S.; Kato, H.; Bi, C.; Xu, M.; LeRoy, B. J.; Wang, W. G.

    2018-02-01

    Perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with GdOX tunneling barriers have shown a unique voltage controllable interlayer magnetic coupling effect. Here, we investigate the quality of the GdOX barrier and the coupling mechanism in these junctions by examining the temperature dependence of the tunneling magnetoresistance and the interlayer coupling from room temperature down to 11 K. The barrier is shown to be of good quality with the spin independent conductance only contributing a small portion, 14%, to the total room temperature conductance, similar to AlOX and MgO barriers. The interlayer coupling, however, shows an anomalously strong temperature dependence including sign changes below 80 K. This non-trivial temperature dependence is not described by previous models of interlayer coupling and may be due to the large induced magnetic moment of the Gd ions in the barrier.

  3. Tunneling probe of fluctuating superconductivity in disordered thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentelski, David; Frydman, Aviad; Shimshoni, Efrat; Dalla Torre, Emanuele G.

    2018-03-01

    Disordered thin films close to the superconductor-insulator phase transition (SIT) hold the key to understanding quantum phase transition in strongly correlated materials. The SIT is governed by superconducting quantum fluctuations, which can be revealed, for example, by tunneling measurements. These experiments detect a spectral gap, accompanied by suppressed coherence peaks, on both sides of the transition. Here we describe the insulating side in terms of a fluctuating superconducting field with finite-range correlations. We perform a controlled diagrammatic resummation and derive analytic expressions for the tunneling differential conductance. We find that short-range superconducting fluctuations suppress the coherence peaks even in the presence of long-range correlations. Our approach offers a quantitative description of existing measurements on disordered thin films and accounts for tunneling spectra with suppressed coherence peaks.

  4. Effects of barrier fluctuation on the tunneling dynamics in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the present paper is to study the effect of classical subsystem or more importantly the effect of .... of chaos-assisted tunneling has been a topic of interest for various researchers over many .... state causes the increase in tunneling rate constant.

  5. Probing superconductors. Spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaguri, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in a cuprate triggered developments of various spectroscopic tools which have been utilized to elucidate electronic states of this mysterious compound. Particularly, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning-tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy are improved considerably. It is now possible to map the superconducting gap in both momentum and real spaces using these two techniques. Here we review spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy which is able to explore momentum-space phase structure of the superconducting gap, as well as real-space structure. Applications of this technique to a cuprate and an iron-based superconductor are discussed. (author)

  6. Miniaturized compact water-cooled pitot-pressure probe for flow-field surveys in hypersonic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, George C.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the design of pitot probes for flowfield surveys in hypersonic wind tunnels is reported. The results show that a pitot-pressure probe can be miniaturized for minimum interference effects by locating the transducer in the probe support body and water-cooling it so that the pressure-settling time and transducer temperature are compatible with hypersonic tunnel operation and flow conditions. Flowfield surveys around a two-to-one elliptical cone model in a 20-inch Mach 6 wind tunnel using such a probe show that probe interference effects are essentially eliminated.

  7. Planar edge Schottky barrier-tunneling transistors using epitaxial graphene/SiC junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunc, Jan; Hu, Yike; Palmer, James; Guo, Zelei; Hankinson, John; Gamal, Salah H; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A

    2014-09-10

    A purely planar graphene/SiC field effect transistor is presented here. The horizontal current flow over one-dimensional tunneling barrier between planar graphene contact and coplanar two-dimensional SiC channel exhibits superior on/off ratio compared to conventional transistors employing vertical electron transport. Multilayer epitaxial graphene (MEG) grown on SiC(0001̅) was adopted as the transistor source and drain. The channel is formed by the accumulation layer at the interface of semi-insulating SiC and a surface silicate that forms after high vacuum high temperature annealing. Electronic bands between the graphene edge and SiC accumulation layer form a thin Schottky barrier, which is dominated by tunneling at low temperatures. A thermionic emission prevails over tunneling at high temperatures. We show that neglecting tunneling effectively causes the temperature dependence of the Schottky barrier height. The channel can support current densities up to 35 A/m.

  8. Probing ultrafast carrier tunneling dynamics in individual quantum dots and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Kai; Bechtold, Alexander; Kaldewey, Timo; Zecherle, Markus; Wildmann, Johannes S.; Bichler, Max; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J. [Walter Schottky Institut and Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748, Garching (Germany); Ruppert, Claudia; Betz, Markus [Experimentelle Physik 2, TU Dortmund, 44221, Dortmund (Germany); Krenner, Hubert J. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentalphysik 1 and Augsburg Centre for Innovative Technologies (ACIT), Universitaet Augsburg, Universitaetsstr 1, 86159, Augsburg (Germany); Villas-Boas, Jose M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2013-02-15

    Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy is employed to directly monitor the tunneling of charge carriers from single and vertically coupled quantum dots and probe intra-molecular dynamics. Immediately after resonant optical excitation, several peaks are observed in the pump-probe spectrum arising from Coulomb interactions between the photogenerated charge carriers. The influence of few-Fermion interactions in the photoexcited system and the temporal evolution of the optical response is directly probed in the time domain. In addition, the tunneling times for electrons and holes from the QD nanostructure are independently determined. In polarization resolved measurements, near perfect Pauli-spin blockade is observed in the spin-selective absorption spectrum as well as stimulated emission. While electron and hole tunneling from single quantum dots is shown to be well explained by the WKB formalism, for coupled quantum dots pronounced resonances in the electron tunneling rate are observed arising from elastic and inelastic electron tunneling between the different dots. (copyright 2012 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Scanning tunneling microscopy III theory of STM and related scanning probe methods

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1996-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy III provides a unique introduction to the theoretical foundations of scanning tunneling microscopy and related scanning probe methods. The different theoretical concepts developed in the past are outlined, and the implications of the theoretical results for the interpretation of experimental data are discussed in detail. Therefore, this book serves as a most useful guide for experimentalists as well as for theoreticians working in the filed of local probe methods. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  10. Thermopower in double planar tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic barriers and nonmagnetic electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczyński, M., E-mail: wilczyns@if.pw.edu.pl

    2017-01-01

    The Seebeck effect is investigated in double planar tunnel junctions consisting of nonmagnetic electrodes and the central layer separated by ferromagnetic barriers. Calculations are performed in the linear response theory using the free-electron model. The thermopower is analyzed as a function of the thickness of the central layer, temperature of the junctions and the relative orientation of magnetic moments of the barriers. It has been found that the thermopower can be significantly enhanced in the junction with special central layer thickness due to electron tunneling by resonant states. The thickness of the central layer for which the thermopower is enhanced depends not only on the temperature of the junction but also on the orientation of magnetic moments in the barriers. - Highlights: • Thermopower in the double planar junctions with magnetic barriers is analyzed. • Thermopower can be enhanced due to the resonant tunneling. • Thermopower depends on the magnetic configuration of the junction.

  11. Supersonic and transonic Mach probe for calibration control in the Trisonic Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Marius PANAIT

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A supersonic and high speed transonic Pitot Prandtl is described as it can be implemented in the Trisonic Wind Tunnel for calibration and verification of Mach number precision. A new calculation method for arbitrary precision Mach numbers is proposed and explained. The probe is specially designed for the Trisonic wind tunnel and would greatly simplify obtaining a precise Mach calibration in the critical high transonic and low supersonic regimes, where typically wind tunnels exhibit poor performance. The supersonic Pitot Prandtl combined probe is well known in the aerospace industry, however the proposed probe is a derivative of the standard configuration, combining a stout cone-cylinder probe with a supersonic Pitot static port which allows this configuration to validate the Mach number by three methods: conical flow method – using the pressure ports on a cone generatrix, the Schlieren-optical method of shock wave angle photogrammetry and the Rayleigh supersonic Pitot equation, while having an aerodynamic blockage similar to that of a scaled rocket model commonly used in testing. The proposed probe uses an existing cone-cylinder probe forebody and support, adding only an afterbody with a support for a static port.

  12. Electron transport and noise spectroscopy in organic magnetic tunnel junctions with PTCDA and Alq3 barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Isidoro; Cascales, Juan Pedro; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Lin, Minn-Tsong; Prezioso, Mirko; Riminucci, Alberto; Dediu, Valentin A.; Aliev, Farkhad G.

    2016-10-01

    The possible influence of internal barrier dynamics on spin, charge transport and their fluctuations in organic spintronics remains poorly understood. Here we present investigation of the electron transport and low frequency noise at temperatures down to 0.3K in magnetic tunnel junctions with an organic PTCDA barriers with thickness up to 5 nm in the tunneling regime and with 200 nm thick Alq3 barrier in the hopping regime. We observed high tunneling magneto-resistance at low temperatures (15-40%) and spin dependent super-poissonian shot noise in organic magnetic tunnel junctions (OMTJs) with PTCDA. The Fano factor exceeds 1.5-2 values which could be caused by interfacial states controlled by spin dependent bunching in the tunneling events through the molecules.1 The bias dependence of the low frequency noise in OMTJs with PTCDA barriers which includes both 1/f and random telegraph noise activated at specific biases will also be discussed. On the other hand, the organic junctions with ferromagnetic electrodes and thick Alq3 barriers present sub-poissonian shot noise which depends on the temperature, indicative of variable range hopping.

  13. Supramolecular chemistry at the liquid/solid interface probed by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feyter, S. De; Uji-i, H.; Mamdouh, W.; Miura, A.; Zhang, J.; Jonkheijm, P.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.; Meijer, E.W.; Chen, Z.; Wurthner, F.; Schuurmans, N.; Esch, J. van; Feringa, B.L.; Dulcey, A.E.; Percec, V.; Schryver, F.C. De

    2006-01-01

    The liquid/solid interface provides an ideal environment to investigate self-assembly phenomena, and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is one of the preferred methodologies to probe the structure and the properties of physisorbed monolayers on the nanoscale. Physisorbed monolayers are of

  14. Electric-field effects on electronic tunneling transport in magnetic barrier structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yong; Wang Hao; Gu Binglin; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2000-01-01

    Electronic transport properties in magnetic barrier structures under the influence of an electric field have been investigated. The results indicate that the characteristics of transmission resonance are determined not only by the structure and the incident wave vector but also strongly by the electric field. It is shown that the transmission coefficient at resonance in the low-energy range is suppressed by applying the electric field for electron tunneling through the magnetic barrier structure, arranged with identical magnetic barriers and wells. It is also shown that the transmission resonance is first enhanced up to optimal resonance, and then suppressed with further increased electric field for electron tunneling through the magnetic barrier structure, arranged with unidentical building blocks. Strong suppression of the current density is also found in the magnetic barrier structure, arranged with two different building blocks

  15. Macroscopic quantum tunneling of a Bose-Einstein condensate through double Gaussian barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kenji; Urban, Gregor; Weidemüller, Matthias; Carr, Lincoln D.

    2015-05-01

    Macroscopic quantum tunneling is one of the great manifestations of quantum physics, not only showing passage through a potential barrier but also emerging in a many-body wave function. We study a quasi-1D Bose-Einstein condensate of Lithium, confined by two Gaussian barriers, and show that in an experimentally realistic potential tens of thousands of atoms tunnel on time scales of 10 to 100 ms. Using a combination of variational and WKB approximations based on the Gross-Pitaevskii or nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we show that many unusual tunneling features appear due to the nonlinearity, including the number of trapped atoms exhibiting non-exponential decay, severe distortion of the barriers by the mean field, and even formation of a triple barrier in certain regimes. In the first 10ms, nonlinear many-body effects make the tunneling rates significantly larger than background loss rates, from 10 to 70 Hz. Thus we conclude that macroscopic quantum tunneling can be observed on experimental time scales. Funded by NSF, AFOSR, the Alexander von Humboldt foundation, and the Heidelberg Center for Quantum Dynamics.

  16. Metal-Insulator-Metal Single Electron Transistors with Tunnel Barriers Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Karbasian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Single electron transistors are nanoscale electron devices that require thin, high-quality tunnel barriers to operate and have potential applications in sensing, metrology and beyond-CMOS computing schemes. Given that atomic layer deposition is used to form CMOS gate stacks with low trap densities and excellent thickness control, it is well-suited as a technique to form a variety of tunnel barriers. This work is a review of our recent research on atomic layer deposition and post-fabrication treatments to fabricate metallic single electron transistors with a variety of metals and dielectrics.

  17. Electronic tunneling through a potential barrier on the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Benliang; Zhou, Benhu; Zhou, Guanghui

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the tunneling transport for electrons on the surface of a topological insulator (TI) through an electrostatic potential barrier. By using the Dirac equation with the continuity conditions for all segments of wave functions at the interfaces between regions inside and outside the barrier, we calculate analytically the transmission probability and conductance for the system. It is demonstrated that, the Klein paradox can also been observed in the system same as in graphene system. Interestingly, the conductance reaches the minimum value when the incident electron energy is equal to the barrier strength. Moreover, with increasing barrier width, the conductance turns up some tunneling oscillation peaks, and larger barrier strength can cause lower conductance, shorter period but larger oscillation amplitude. The oscillation amplitude decreases as the barrier width increases, which is similar as that of the system consisting of the compressive uniaxial strain applied on a TI, but somewhat different from that of graphene system where the oscillation amplitude is a constant. The findings here imply that an electrostatic barrier can greatly influence the electron tunneling transport of the system, and may provide a new way to realize directional filtering of electrons.

  18. Inducing spin-dependent tunneling to probe magnetic correlations in optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim-Georg; Andersen, Brian; Syljuåsen, Olav

    2012-01-01

    We suggest a simple experimental method for probing antiferromagnetic spin correlations of two-component Fermi gases in optical lattices. The method relies on a spin selective Raman transition to excite atoms of one spin species to their first excited vibrational mode where the tunneling is large....... The resulting difference in the tunneling dynamics of the two spin species can then be exploited, to reveal the spin correlations by measuring the number of doubly occupied lattice sites at a later time. We perform quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the spin system and solve the optical lattice dynamics...

  19. Photon-Assisted Resonant Chiral Tunneling Through a Bilayer Graphene Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips A. H.; Mina A. N.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic transport property of a bilayer graphene is investigated under the effect of an electromagnetic field. We deduce an expression for the conductance by solving the Dirac equation. This conductance depends on the barrier height for graphene and the energy of the induced photons. A resonance oscillatory behavior of the conductance is observed. These oscillations are strongly depends on the barrier height for chiral tunneling through graphene. This oscillatory behavio...

  20. Under-the-barrier dynamics in laser-induced relativistic tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaiber, Michael; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Bauke, Heiko; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Keitel, Christoph H

    2013-04-12

    The tunneling dynamics in relativistic strong-field ionization is investigated with the aim to develop an intuitive picture for the relativistic tunneling regime. We demonstrate that the tunneling picture applies also in the relativistic regime by introducing position dependent energy levels. The quantum dynamics in the classically forbidden region features two time scales, the typical time that characterizes the probability density's decay of the ionizing electron under the barrier (Keldysh time) and the time interval which the electron spends inside the barrier (Eisenbud-Wigner-Smith tunneling time). In the relativistic regime, an electron momentum shift as well as a spatial shift along the laser propagation direction arise during the under-the-barrier motion which are caused by the laser magnetic field induced Lorentz force. The momentum shift is proportional to the Keldysh time, while the wave-packet's spatial drift is proportional to the Eisenbud-Wigner-Smith time. The signature of the momentum shift is shown to be present in the ionization spectrum at the detector and, therefore, observable experimentally. In contrast, the signature of the Eisenbud-Wigner-Smith time delay disappears at far distances for pure quasistatic tunneling dynamics.

  1. Transport spectroscopy and modeling of a clean MOS point contact tunnel barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhorshidian, Amir; Bishop, Nathaniel; Dominguez, Jason; Grubbs, Robert; Wendt, Joel; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2014-03-01

    We present transport spectroscopy of non-implanted and antimony-implanted tunnel barriers formed in MOS split-gate structures at 4K. The non-implanted barrier shows no signs of resonant behavior while the Sb-implanted barrier shows resonances superimposed on the clean transport. We simulate the transmission through the clean barrier over the entire gate and bias range of the experiment using a phenomenological 1D-tunneling model that includes Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and Schottky barrier lowering to capture effects at high bias. The model is qualitatively similar to experiment when the barrier height has a quadratic dependence in contrast to a linear one, which can be a sign of 2D effects such as confinement perpendicular to the transport direction. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. This work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Influence of semiconductor barrier tunneling on the current-voltage characteristics of tunnel metal-oxide-semiconductor diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Otto M.

    1983-01-01

    of multistep tunneling recombination current and injected minority carrier diffusion current. This can explain the observed values of the diode quality factor n. The results also show that the voltage drop across the oxide Vox is increased with increased NA, with the result that the lowering of the minority...... carrier diode current Jmin is greater than in the usual theory. The conclusion drawn is that the increase in Vox and lowering of Jmin is due to multistep tunneling of majority carriers through the semiconductor barrier. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics.......Current–voltage characteristics have been examined for Al–SiO2–pSi diodes with an interfacial oxide thickness of delta[approximately-equal-to]20 Å. The diodes were fabricated on and oriented substrates with an impurity concentration in the range of NA=1014–1016 cm−3. The results show that for low...

  3. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.

    2008-08-19

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  4. Tunnel barrier design in donor nanostructures defined by hydrogen-resist lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascher, Nikola; Hennel, Szymon; Mueller, Susanne; Fuhrer, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    A four-terminal donor quantum dot (QD) is used to characterize potential barriers between degenerately doped nanoscale contacts. The QD is fabricated by hydrogen-resist lithography on Si(001) in combination with n-type doping by phosphine. The four contacts have different separations (d = 9, 12, 16 and 29 nm) to the central 6 nm × 6 nm QD island, leading to different tunnel and capacitive coupling. Cryogenic transport measurements in the Coulomb-blockade (CB) regime are used to characterize these tunnel barriers. We find that field enhancement near the apex of narrow dopant leads is an important effect that influences both barrier breakdown and the magnitude of the tunnel current in the CB transport regime. From CB-spectroscopy measurements, we extract the mutual capacitances between the QD and the four contacts, which scale inversely with the contact separation d. The capacitances are in excellent agreement with numerical values calculated from the pattern geometry in the hydrogen resist. Furthermore, we show that by engineering the source-drain tunnel barriers to be asymmetric, we obtain a much simpler excited-state spectrum of the QD, which can be directly linked to the orbital single-particle spectrum.

  5. Tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance due to antiferromagnetic CoO tunnel barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kai; Sanderink, Johannes G.M.; Bolhuis, Thijs; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; de Jong, Machiel Pieter

    2015-01-01

    A new approach in spintronics is based on spin-polarized charge transport phenomena governed by antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach for AFM metals and semiconductors. We report tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) due to the

  6. Bias voltage effect on electron tunneling across a junction with a ferroelectric–ferromagnetic two-phase composite barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jian; Ju Sheng; Li, Z.Y.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of bias voltage on electron tunneling across a junction with a ferroelectric–ferromagnetic composite barrier is investigated theoretically. Because of the inversion symmetry breaking of the spontaneous ferroelectric polarization, bias voltage dependence of the electron tunneling shows significant differences between the positive bias and the negative one. The differences of spin filtering or tunnel magnetoresistance increase with the increasing absolute value of bias voltage. Such direction preferred electron tunneling is found intimately related with the unusual asymmetry of the electrical potential profile in two-phase composite barrier and provides a unique change to realize rectifying functions in spintronics. - Highlights: ► Electron tunneling across a ferroelectric–ferromagnetic composite barrier junction. ► TMR effect is different under the same value but opposite direction bias voltage. ► This directionality of the electron tunneling enhances with increasing bias voltage.

  7. Tunneling effect on double potential barriers GaAs and PbS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prastowo, S. H. B.; Supriadi, B.; Ridlo, Z. R.; Prihandono, T.

    2018-04-01

    A simple model of transport phenomenon tunnelling effect through double barrier structure was developed. In this research we concentrate on the variation of electron energy which entering double potential barriers to transmission coefficient. The barriers using semiconductor materials GaAs (Galium Arsenide) with band-gap energy 1.424 eV, distance of lattice 0.565 nm, and PbS (Lead Sulphide) with band gap energy 0.41 eV distance of lattice is 18 nm. The Analysisof tunnelling effect on double potentials GaAs and PbS using Schrodinger’s equation, continuity, and matrix propagation to get transmission coefficient. The maximum energy of electron that we use is 1.0 eV, and observable from 0.0025 eV- 1.0 eV. The shows the highest transmission coefficient is0.9982 from electron energy 0.5123eV means electron can pass the barriers with probability 99.82%. Semiconductor from materials GaAs and PbS is one of selected material to design semiconductor device because of transmission coefficient directly proportional to bias the voltage of semiconductor device. Application of the theoretical analysis of resonant tunnelling effect on double barriers was used to design and develop new structure and combination of materials for semiconductor device (diode, transistor, and integrated circuit).

  8. ON current enhancement of nanowire Schottky barrier tunnel field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Kohei; Hashimoto, Shuichiro; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Xu; Asada, Shuhei; Xu, Taiyu; Matsukawa, Takashi; Masahara, Meishoku; Watanabe, Takanobu

    2016-04-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky barrier tunnel field effect transistors (NW-SBTFETs) are promising structures for high performance devices. In this study, we fabricated NW-SBTFETs to investigate the effect of nanowire structure on the device characteristics. The NW-SBTFETs were operated with a backgate bias, and the experimental results demonstrate that the ON current density is enhanced by narrowing the width of the nanowire. We confirmed using the Fowler-Nordheim plot that the drain current in the ON state mainly comprises the quantum tunneling component through the Schottky barrier. Comparison with a technology computer aided design (TCAD) simulation revealed that the enhancement is attributed to the electric field concentration at the corners of cross-section of the NW. The study findings suggest an effective approach to securing the ON current by Schottky barrier width modulation.

  9. Tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance due to antiferromagnetic CoO tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Sanderink, J. G. M.; Bolhuis, T.; van der Wiel, W. G.; de Jong, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach in spintronics is based on spin-polarized charge transport phenomena governed by antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach for AFM metals and semiconductors. We report tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) due to the rotation of antiferromagnetic moments of an insulating CoO layer, incorporated into a tunnel junction consisting of sapphire(substrate)/fcc-Co/CoO/AlOx/Al. The ferromagnetic Co layer is exchange coupled to the AFM CoO layer and drives rotation of the AFM moments in an external magnetic field. The results may help pave the way towards the development of spintronic devices based on AFM insulators. PMID:26486931

  10. Quantum tunneling time of a Bose-Einstein condensate traversing through a laser-induced potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Zhenglu; Fan Bixuan; Yuan Chunhua; Zhang Weiping; Cheng Jing; Zhu Shiyao

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically study the effect of atomic nonlinearity on the tunneling time in the case of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) traversing the laser-induced potential barrier. The atomic nonlinearity is controlled to appear only in the region of the barrier by employing the Feshbach resonance technique to tune interatomic interaction in the tunneling process. Numerical simulation shows that the atomic nonlinear effect dramatically changes the tunneling behavior of the BEC matter wave packet and results in the violation of the Hartman effect and the occurrence of negative tunneling time.

  11. Rotational barriers in ammonium hexachlorometallates as studied by NMR, tunneling spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birczynski, A.; Lalowicz, Z.T.; Lodziana, Zbigniew

    2004-01-01

    Ammonium hexachlorometallates, (NH4)(2)MCl6 With M = Pd, Pt, Ir, Os, Re, Se, Sn, Te and Pb, comprise a set of compounds with systematically changing properties. The compounds may be ordered according to decreasing tunnelling frequency (TF) of ammonium ions, which is related to the increasing...... structure explain observed variation of the tunnelling frequencies for NH4+. The theory provides also M-Cl distances and barriers for C-2 and C-3 rotations of ammonium ions in respective compounds, which show good agreement with experimental values. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. Radio-frequency shot-noise measurement in a magnetic tunnel junction with a MgO barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Mushtaq; Park, Junghwan; Song, Woon; Chong, Yonuk; Lee, Yeonsub; Min, Byoungchul; Shin, Kyungho; Ryu, Sangwan; Khim, Zheong

    2010-01-01

    We measured the noise power of a magnetic tunnel junction in the frequency range of 710 ∼ 1200 MHz. A low-noise cryogenic HEMT amplifier was used to measure the small noise signal at a high frequency with wide bandwidth. The MgO-barrier tunnel junction showed large tunnel magnetoresistance ratio of 215% at low temperature, which indicates electronic transport through the tunnel barrier without any significant spin-flip scattering. In the bias-dependent noise measurement, however, the zero-bias shot noise was enhanced compared to the value expected from a perfect tunnel barrier or the value observed from a good Al-AlO x -Al tunnel junction. We assume that this enhanced noise comes from inelastic tunneling processes through the barrier, which may be related to the observed zero-bias anomaly in the differential resistance of the tunnel junctions. We present a simple phenomenological model for how the inelastic scattering process can enhance the zero-bias noise in a tunnel junction.

  13. Theoretical analysis of a dual-probe scanning tunneling microscope setup on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Power, Stephen R; Petersen, Dirch H; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2014-03-07

    Experimental advances allow for the inclusion of multiple probes to measure the transport properties of a sample surface. We develop a theory of dual-probe scanning tunneling microscopy using a Green's function formalism, and apply it to graphene. Sampling the local conduction properties at finite length scales yields real space conductance maps which show anisotropy for pristine graphene systems and quantum interference effects in the presence of isolated impurities. Spectral signatures in the Fourier transforms of real space conductance maps include characteristics that can be related to different scattering processes. We compute the conductance maps of graphene systems with different edge geometries or height fluctuations to determine the effects of nonideal graphene samples on dual-probe measurements.

  14. Normal-state conductance used to probe superconducting tunnel junctions for quantum computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaparro, Carlos; Bavier, Richard; Kim, Yong-Seung; Kim, Eunyoung; Oh, Seongshik [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Kline, Jeffrey S; Pappas, David P, E-mail: carlosch@physics.rutgers.ed, E-mail: ohsean@physics.rutgers.ed [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Here we report normal-state conductance measurements of three different types of superconducting tunnel junctions that are being used or proposed for quantum computing applications: p-Al/a-AlO/p-Al, e-Re/e-AlO/p-Al, and e-V/e-MgO/p-V, where p stands for polycrystalline, e for epitaxial, and a for amorphous. All three junctions exhibited significant deviations from the parabolic behavior predicted by the WKB approximation models. In the p-Al/a-AlO/p-Al junction, we observed enhancement of tunneling conductances at voltages matching harmonics of Al-O stretching modes. On the other hand, such Al-O vibration modes were missing in the epitaxial e-Re/e-AlO/p-Al junction. This suggests that absence or existence of the Al-O stretching mode might be related to the crystallinity of the AlO tunnel barrier and the interface between the electrode and the barrier. In the e-V/e-MgO/p-V junction, which is one of the candidate systems for future superconducting qubits, we observed suppression of the density of states at zero bias. This implies that the interface is electronically disordered, presumably due to oxidation of the vanadium surface underneath the MgO barrier, even if the interface was structurally well ordered, suggesting that the e-V/e-MgO/p-V junction will not be suitable for qubit applications in its present form. This also demonstrates that the normal-state conductance measurement can be effectively used to screen out low quality samples in the search for better superconducting tunnel junctions.

  15. Photon-Assisted Resonant Chiral Tunneling Through a Bilayer Graphene Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips A. H.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The electronic transport property of a bilayer graphene is investigated under the effect of an electromagnetic field. We deduce an expression for the conductance by solving the Dirac equation. This conductance depends on the barrier height for graphene and the energy of the induced photons. A resonance oscillatory behavior of the conductance is observed. These oscillations are strongly depends on the barrier height for chiral tunneling through graphene. This oscillatory behavior might be due to the interference of different central band and sidebands of graphene states. The present investigation is very important for the application of bilayer graphene in photodetector devices, for example, far-infrared photodevices and ultrafast lasers.

  16. Fabrication of fully epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions with a Co2MnSi thin film and a MgO tunnel barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijima, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Marukame, T.; Matsuda, K.-I.; Uemura, T.; Yamamoto, M.

    2007-01-01

    Fully epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) were fabricated with a Co-based full-Heusler alloy Co 2 MnSi (CMS) thin film having the ordered L2 1 structure as a lower electrode, a MgO tunnel barrier, and a Co 50 Fe 50 upper electrode. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns observed in situ for each layer in the MTJ layer structure during fabrication clearly indicated that all layers of the CMS lower electrode, MgO tunnel barrier, and Co 50 Fe 50 upper electrode grew epitaxially. The microfabricated fully epitaxial CMS/MgO/Co 50 Fe 50 MTJs demonstrated relatively high tunnel magnetoresistance ratios of 90% at room temperature and 192% at 4.2 K

  17. Transport of electrons in the tunnel of an ion sensitive probe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komm, Michael; Adámek, Jiří; Dejarnac, Renaud; Gunn, J. P.; Pekárek, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2011), 015005-015005 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430901; GA MŠk 7G09042; GA MŠk LA08048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tokamak * plasma * katsumata probe * ExB drift * ion temperature * tunnel * electron Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.425, year: 2011 http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/53/1/015005/pdf/0741-3335_53_1_015005.pdf

  18. Probing flexible conformations in molecular junctions by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Mingsen [Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang, 550025 (China); Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, 550018 (China); Ye, Gui; Jiang, Jun, E-mail: jiangj1@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemical Physics, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Cai, Shaohong, E-mail: caish@mail.gufe.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang, 550025 (China); Guizhou Key Laboratory of Economic System Simulation, Guizhou University of Finance and Economics, Guiyang, 550004 (China); Sun, Guangyu [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, 550018 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The probe of flexible molecular conformation is crucial for the electric application of molecular systems. We have developed a theoretical procedure to analyze the couplings of molecular local vibrations with the electron transportation process, which enables us to evaluate the structural fingerprints of some vibrational modes in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Based on a model molecule of Bis-(4-mercaptophenyl)-ether with a flexible center angle, we have revealed and validated a simple mathematical relationship between IETS signals and molecular angles. Our results might open a route to quantitatively measure key geometrical parameters of molecular junctions, which helps to achieve precise control of molecular devices.

  19. Perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction with tunneling magnetoresistance ratio of 64% using MgO (100) barrier layer prepared at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmori, Hideto; Hatori, Tomoya; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2008-01-01

    MgO (100) textured films can be prepared by reactive facing targets sputtering at room temperature without postdeposition annealing process when they were deposited on (100) oriented Fe buffer layers. This method allows fabrication of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (p-MTJ) with MgO (100) tunneling barrier layer and rare-earth transition metal (RE-TM) alloy thin films as perpendicularly magnetized free and pinned layers. The 3-nm-thick MgO tunneling barrier layer in p-MTJ multilayer prepared on glass substrate revealed (100) crystalline orientation. Extraordinary Hall effect measurement clarified that the perpendicular magnetic components of 3-nm-thick Fe buffer layers on the two ends of MgO tunneling barrier layer were increased by exchange coupling with RE-TM alloy layers. The RA of 35 kΩ μm 2 and tunneling magnetoresistance ratio of 64% was observed in the multilayered p-MTJ element by current-in-plane-tunneling

  20. Nanomanipulation and nanofabrication with multi-probe scanning tunneling microscope: from individual atoms to nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wang, Zhouhang; Li, An-Ping

    2012-06-01

    The wide variety of nanoscale structures and devices demands novel tools for handling, assembly, and fabrication at nanoscopic positioning precision. The manipulation tools should allow for in situ characterization and testing of fundamental building blocks, such as nanotubes and nanowires, as they are built into functional devices. In this paper, a bottom-up technique for nanomanipulation and nanofabrication is reported by using a 4-probe scanning tunneling microscope (STM) combined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The applications of this technique are demonstrated in a variety of nanosystems, from manipulating individual atoms to bending, cutting, breaking carbon nanofibers, and constructing nanodevices for electrical characterizations. The combination of the wide field of view of SEM, the atomic position resolution of STM, and the flexibility of multiple scanning probes is expected to be a valuable tool for rapid prototyping in the nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  1. Insertion of the Biogenesis Factor Rei1 Probes the Ribosomal Tunnel during 60S Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil Johannes; Gerhardy, Stefan; Leitner, Alexander; Leibundgut, Marc; Salem, Michèle; Boehringer, Daniel; Leulliot, Nicolas; Aebersold, Ruedi; Panse, Vikram Govind; Ban, Nenad

    2016-01-14

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis depends on several hundred assembly factors to produce functional 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. The final phase of 60S subunit biogenesis is cytoplasmic maturation, which includes the proofreading of functional centers of the 60S subunit and the release of several ribosome biogenesis factors. We report the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the yeast 60S subunit in complex with the biogenesis factors Rei1, Arx1, and Alb1 at 3.4 Å resolution. In addition to the network of interactions formed by Alb1, the structure reveals a mechanism for ensuring the integrity of the ribosomal polypeptide exit tunnel. Arx1 probes the entire set of inner-ring proteins surrounding the tunnel exit, and the C terminus of Rei1 is deeply inserted into the ribosomal tunnel, where it forms specific contacts along almost its entire length. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that failure to insert the C terminus of Rei1 precludes subsequent steps of 60S maturation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Time dependent semiclassical tunneling through one dimensional barriers using only real valued trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, Michael F. [Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The time independent semiclassical treatment of barrier tunneling has been understood for a very long time. Several semiclassical approaches to time dependent tunneling through barriers have also been presented. These typically involve trajectories for which the position variable is a complex function of time. In this paper, a method is presented that uses only real valued trajectories, thus avoiding the complications that can arise when complex trajectories are employed. This is accomplished by expressing the time dependent wave packet as an integration over momentum. The action function in the exponent in this expression is expanded to second order in the momentum. The expansion is around the momentum, p{sub 0{sup *}}, at which the derivative of the real part of the action is zero. The resulting Gaussian integral is then taken. The stationary phase approximation requires that the derivative of the full action is zero at the expansion point, and this leads to a complex initial momentum and complex tunneling trajectories. The “pseudo-stationary phase” approximation employed in this work results in real values for the initial momentum and real valued trajectories. The transmission probabilities obtained are found to be in good agreement with exact quantum results.

  3. Time dependent semiclassical tunneling through one dimensional barriers using only real valued trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    The time independent semiclassical treatment of barrier tunneling has been understood for a very long time. Several semiclassical approaches to time dependent tunneling through barriers have also been presented. These typically involve trajectories for which the position variable is a complex function of time. In this paper, a method is presented that uses only real valued trajectories, thus avoiding the complications that can arise when complex trajectories are employed. This is accomplished by expressing the time dependent wave packet as an integration over momentum. The action function in the exponent in this expression is expanded to second order in the momentum. The expansion is around the momentum, p 0 * , at which the derivative of the real part of the action is zero. The resulting Gaussian integral is then taken. The stationary phase approximation requires that the derivative of the full action is zero at the expansion point, and this leads to a complex initial momentum and complex tunneling trajectories. The “pseudo-stationary phase” approximation employed in this work results in real values for the initial momentum and real valued trajectories. The transmission probabilities obtained are found to be in good agreement with exact quantum results

  4. Barrier breakdown mechanism in nano-scale perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with ultrathin MgO barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hua; Leitao, Diana C.; Hou, Zhiwei; Freitas, Paulo P.; Cardoso, Susana; Kämpfe, Thomas; Müller, Johannes; Langer, Juergen; Wrona, Jerzy

    2018-05-01

    Recently, the perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs) arouse great interest because of its unique features in the application of spin-transfer-torque magnetoresistive random access memory (STT-MRAM), such as low switching current density, good thermal stability and high access speed. In this paper, we investigated current induced switching (CIS) in ultrathin MgO barrier p-MTJs with dimension down to 50 nm. We obtained a CIS perpendicular tunnel magnetoresistance (p-TMR) of 123.9% and 7.0 Ω.μm2 resistance area product (RA) with a critical switching density of 1.4×1010 A/m2 in a 300 nm diameter junction. We observe that the extrinsic breakdown mechanism dominates, since the resistance of our p-MTJs decreases gradually with the increasing current. From the statistical analysis of differently sized p-MTJs, we observe that the breakdown voltage (Vb) of 1.4 V is 2 times the switching voltage (Vs) of 0.7 V and the breakdown process exhibits two different breakdown states, unsteady and steady state. Using Simmons' model, we find that the steady state is related with the barrier height of the MgO layer. Furthermore, our study suggests a more efficient method to evaluate the MTJ stability under high bias rather than measuring Vb. In conclusion, we developed well performant p-MTJs for the use in STT-MRAM and demonstrate the mechanism and control of breakdown in nano-scale ultrathin MgO barrier p-MTJs.

  5. A theoretical study of resonant tunneling characteristics in triangular double-barrier diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongmei; Xu Huaizhe; Zhang Yafei

    2006-01-01

    Resonant tunneling characteristics of triangular double-barrier diodes have been investigated systematically in this Letter, using Airy function approach to solve time-independent Schroedinger function in triangular double-barrier structures. Originally, the exact analytic expressions of quasi-bound levels and quasi-level lifetime in symmetrical triangular double-barrier structures have been derived within the effective-mass approximation as a function of structure parameters including well width, slope width and barrier height. Based on our derived analytic expressions, numerical results show that quasi-bound levels and quasi-level lifetime vary nearly linearly with the structure parameters except that the second quasi-level lifetime changes parabolically with slope width. Furthermore, according to our improved transmission coefficient of triangular double-barrier structures under external electric field, the current densities of triangular double-barrier diodes with different slope width at 0 K have been calculated numerically. The results show that the N-shaped negative differential resistance behaviors have been observed in current-voltage characteristics and current-voltage characteristics depend on the slope width

  6. Degradation of magnetic tunnel junctions with thin AlOx barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Mihara, Yoshinari Kamakura, Masato Morifuji and Kenji Taniguchi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The degradation of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs with AlOx barrier was experimentally investigated. Constant voltage stress (CVS measurement was carried out to monitor the time evolution of the conductance and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR of MTJs. The gradual increase of the stress-induced leakage current (SILC was observed prior to the breakdown, following a power law function of stress time with an exponent of about 0.2–0.4, which is similar to the case of the ultrathin gate oxide films in MOSFETs. The measured TMR for SILC suggests that the spin-dependent current component would be involved in the early stage of degradation, while spin-independent conduction becomes dominant before the breakdown resulting in a decrease of TMR.

  7. Vibrational Properties of h-BN and h-BN-Graphene Heterostructures Probed by Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Suyong; Park, Minkyu; Park, Jaesung; Jeong, Tae-Young; Kim, Ho-Jong; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ha, Dong Han; Hwang, Chanyong; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2015-11-13

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a powerful technique for investigating lattice dynamics of nanoscale systems including graphene and small molecules, but establishing a stable tunnel junction is considered as a major hurdle in expanding the scope of tunneling experiments. Hexagonal boron nitride is a pivotal component in two-dimensional Van der Waals heterostructures as a high-quality insulating material due to its large energy gap and chemical-mechanical stability. Here we present planar graphene/h-BN-heterostructure tunneling devices utilizing thin h-BN as a tunneling insulator. With much improved h-BN-tunneling-junction stability, we are able to probe all possible phonon modes of h-BN and graphite/graphene at Γ and K high symmetry points by inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. Additionally, we observe that low-frequency out-of-plane vibrations of h-BN and graphene lattices are significantly modified at heterostructure interfaces. Equipped with an external back gate, we can also detect high-order coupling phenomena between phonons and plasmons, demonstrating that h-BN-based tunneling device is a wonderful playground for investigating electron-phonon couplings in low-dimensional systems.

  8. Nonlinear properties of double and triple barrier resonant tunneling structures in the sub-THz range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karuzskij, A.L.; Perestoronin, A.V.; Volchkov, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    The high-frequency nonlinear properties of GaAs/AlAs resonant tunneling diode (RTD) nanostructures and perspectives of implementation of the quantum regime of amplification in such structures, which is especially efficient in the range of sub-THz and THz ranges, are investigated. It is shown that in a triple barrier RTD the symmetry between the processes of amplification and dissipation can be avoided because of the interaction of an electromagnetic wave with both of resonant states in two quantum wells, that results in the significant growth of an RTD efficiency [ru

  9. Tunneling of an energy eigenstate through a parabolic barrier viewed from Wigner phase space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heim, D.M.; Schleich, W.P.; Alsing, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the tunneling of a particle through a repulsive potential resulting from an inverted harmonic oscillator in the quantum mechanical phase space described by the Wigner function. In particular, we solve the partial differential equations in phase space determining the Wigner function...... of an energy eigenstate of the inverted oscillator. The reflection or transmission coefficients R or T are then given by the total weight of all classical phase-space trajectories corresponding to energies below, or above the top of the barrier given by the Wigner function....

  10. Spin polarization of tunneling current in barriers with spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, T; Jalil, M B A; Tan, S G

    2008-01-01

    We present a general method for evaluating the maximum transmitted spin polarization and optimal spin axis for an arbitrary spin-orbit coupling (SOC) barrier system, in which the spins lie in the azimuthal plane and finite spin polarization is achieved by wavevector filtering of electrons. Besides momentum filtering, another prerequisite for finite spin polarization is asymmetric occupation or transmission probabilities of the eigenstates of the SOC Hamiltonian. This is achieved most efficiently by resonant tunneling through multiple SOC barriers. We apply our analysis to common SOC mechanisms in semiconductors: pure bulk Dresselhaus SOC, heterostructures with mixed Dresselhaus and Rashba SOC and strain-induced SOC. In particular, we find that the interplay between Dresselhaus and Rashba SOC effects can yield several advantageous features for spin filter and spin injector functions, such as increased robustness to wavevector spread of electrons

  11. Spin polarization of tunneling current in barriers with spin-orbit coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T; Jalil, M B A; Tan, S G

    2008-03-19

    We present a general method for evaluating the maximum transmitted spin polarization and optimal spin axis for an arbitrary spin-orbit coupling (SOC) barrier system, in which the spins lie in the azimuthal plane and finite spin polarization is achieved by wavevector filtering of electrons. Besides momentum filtering, another prerequisite for finite spin polarization is asymmetric occupation or transmission probabilities of the eigenstates of the SOC Hamiltonian. This is achieved most efficiently by resonant tunneling through multiple SOC barriers. We apply our analysis to common SOC mechanisms in semiconductors: pure bulk Dresselhaus SOC, heterostructures with mixed Dresselhaus and Rashba SOC and strain-induced SOC. In particular, we find that the interplay between Dresselhaus and Rashba SOC effects can yield several advantageous features for spin filter and spin injector functions, such as increased robustness to wavevector spread of electrons.

  12. Spin-polarized scanning-tunneling probe for helical Luttinger liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sourin; Rao, Sumathi

    2011-06-10

    We propose a three-terminal spin-polarized STM setup for probing the helical nature of the Luttinger liquid edge state that appears in the quantum spin Hall system. We show that the three-terminal tunneling conductance depends on the angle (θ) between the magnetization direction of the tip and the local orientation of the electron spin on the edge while the two terminal conductance is independent of this angle. We demonstrate that chiral injection of an electron into the helical Luttinger liquid (when θ is zero or π) is associated with fractionalization of the spin of the injected electron in addition to the fractionalization of its charge. We also point out a spin current amplification effect induced by the spin fractionalization.

  13. Spin asymmetry calculations of the TMR-V curves in single and double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-10-01

    Spin-polarization asymmetry is the key parameter in asymmetric voltage behavior (AVB) of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in magnetic tunnel junctions. In this paper, we study the value of the TMR as a function of the applied voltage Va in the single as well as double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (SMTJ & DMTJ, which are constructed from CoFeB/MgO interfaces) and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR-V a curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions. As a result, we found that AVB may help to determine the exact values of Fermi wave vectors for minority and majority conducting spin sub-bands. Moreover, significant asymmetry of the experimental TMR-Va curves, which arises due to different annealing regimes, is explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and values of the spin asymmetry. The numerical TMR-V a data are in good agreement with experimental ones. © 2011 IEEE.

  14. Probing Nitrosyl Ligation of Surface-Confined Metalloporphyrins by Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Complexes obtained by the ligation of nitric oxide (NO) to metalloporphyrins represent important model systems with biological relevance. Herein we report a molecular-level investigation of surface-confined cobalt tetraphenyl porphyrin (Co-TPP) species and their interaction with NO under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. It is demonstrated that individual NO adducts can be desorbed using the atomically sharp tip of a scanning tunneling microscope, whereby a writing process is implemented for fully saturated regular metalloporphyrin arrays. The low-energy vibrational characteristics of individual Co-TPP-nitrosyl complexes probed by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) reveal a prominent signature at an energy of ≃31 meV. Using density functional theory-based IETS simulations—the first to be performed on such an extensive interfacial nanosystem—we succeed to reproduce the low-frequency spectrum for the NO-ligated complex and explain the absence of IETS activity for bare Co-TPP. Moreover, we can conclusively assign the IETS peak of NO-Co-TPP to a unique vibration mode involving the NO complexation site, namely, the in-plane Co–N–O rocking mode. In addition, we verify that the propensity rules previously designed on small aromatic systems and molecular fragments hold true for a metal–organic entity. This work notably permits one to envisage IETS spectroscopy as a sensitive tool to chemically characterize hybrid interfaces formed by complex metal–organic units and gaseous adducts. PMID:23718257

  15. Probing odd-triplet contributions to the long-ranged proximity effect by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diesch, Simon; Machon, Peter; Belzig, Wolfgang; Scheer, Elke [Universitaet Konstanz, Konstanz (Germany); Suergers, Christoph; Beckmann, Detlef [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In conventional superconductors, electrons are bound in singlet Cooper pairs, i.e. with opposite spin. More recently, experiments on superconductor-ferromagnet-systems have shown Cooper pairs tunneling through ferromagnetic layers, indicating Cooper pairs of equal spin, thus corresponding to a long-range triplet proximity effect. Most experimental evidence for triplet superconductivity comes from observations of the thickness dependence of the Josephson current through a ferromagnetic barrier, but there is an increasing interest in obtaining direct spectroscopic evidence. This project aims at analyzing the electronic density of states of a thin diffusive normal metal layer (Ag) coupled to a superconductor (Al) across a ferromagnetic insulator (EuS) using a scanning tunneling microscope in spectroscopy mode at 280 mK. For this purpose, we fabricated EuS films of different thicknesses and acquired spectroscopic data at different magnetic fields. We observe significant broadening of the superconductive energy gap and a variety of sub-gap structures including zero-bias conductance peaks induced by the presence of the ferromagnet.

  16. Characteristics of titanium oxide memristor with coexistence of dopant drift and a tunnel barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Xiao-Bo; Xu Hui

    2014-01-01

    The recent published experimental data of titanium oxide memristor devices which are tested under the same experimental conditions exhibit the strange instability and complexity of these devices. Such undesired characteristics preclude the understanding of the device conductive processes and the memristor-based practical applications. The possibility of the coexistence of dopant drift and tunnel barrier conduction in a memristor provides preliminary explanations for the undesired characteristics. However, current research lacks detailed discussion about the coexistence case. In this paper, dopant drift and tunnel barrier-based theories are first analyzed for studying the relations between parameters and physical variables which affect characteristics of memristors, and then the influences of each parameter change on the conductive behaviors in the single and coexistence cases of the two mechanisms are simulated and discussed respectively. The simulation results provide further explanations of the complex device conduction. Theoretical methods of eliminating or reducing the coexistence of the two mechanisms are proposed, in order to increase the stability of the device conduction. This work also provides the support for optimizing the fabrications of memristor devices with excellent performance

  17. Conical Probe Calibration and Wind Tunnel Data Analysis of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Samson Siu

    2011-01-01

    For a multi-hole test probe undergoing wind tunnel tests, the resulting data needs to be analyzed for any significant trends. These trends include relating the pressure distributions, the geometric orientation, and the local velocity vector to one another. However, experimental runs always involve some sort of error. As a result, a calibration procedure is required to compensate for this error. For this case, it is the misalignment bias angles resulting from the distortion associated with the angularity of the test probe or the local velocity vector. Through a series of calibration steps presented here, the angular biases are determined and removed from the data sets. By removing the misalignment, smoother pressure distributions contribute to more accurate experimental results, which in turn could be then compared to theoretical and actual in-flight results to derive any similarities. Error analyses will also be performed to verify the accuracy of the calibration error reduction. The resulting calibrated data will be implemented into an in-flight RTF script that will output critical flight parameters during future CCIE experimental test runs. All of these tasks are associated with and in contribution to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center s F-15B Research Testbed s Small Business Innovation Research of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment.

  18. Effect of the δ-potential on spin-dependent electron tunneling in double barrier semiconductor heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, L. Bruno; Gnanasekar, K.; Karunakaran, M.

    2018-06-01

    The effect of δ-potential was studied in GaAs/Ga0.6Al0·4As double barrier heterostructure with Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction. The role of barrier height and position of the δ- potential in the well region was analysed on spin-dependent electron tunneling using transfer matrix method. The spin-separation between spin-resonances on energy scale depends on both height and position of the δ- potential, whereas the tunneling life time of electrons highly influenced by the position of the δ- potential and not on the height. These results might be helpful for the fabrication of spin-filters.

  19. Co2FeAl based magnetic tunnel junctions with BaO and MgO/BaO barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rogge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We succeed to integrate BaO as a tunneling barrier into Co2FeAl based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs. By means of Auger electron spectroscopy it could be proven that the applied annealing temperatures during BaO deposition and afterwards do not cause any diffusion of Ba neither into the lower Heusler compound lead nor into the upper Fe counter electrode. Nevertheless, a negative tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR ratio of -10% is found for Co2FeAl (24 nm / BaO (5 nm / Fe (7 nm MTJs, which can be attributed to the preparation procedure and can be explained by the formation of Co- and Fe-oxides at the interfaces between the Heusler and the crystalline BaO barrier by comparing with theory. Although an amorphous structure of the BaO barrier seems to be confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM, it cannot entirely be ruled out that this is an artifact of TEM sample preparation due to the sensitivity of BaO to moisture. By replacing the BaO tunneling barrier with an MgO/BaO double layer barrier, the electric stability could effectively be increased by a factor of five. The resulting TMR effect is found to be about +20% at room temperature, although a fully antiparallel state has not been realized.

  20. Structural details of Al/Al 2O3 junctions and their role in the formation of electron tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koberidze, M.; Puska, M. J.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2018-05-01

    We present a computational study of the adhesive and structural properties of the Al/Al 2O3 interfaces as building blocks of the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel devices, where electron transport is accomplished via tunneling mechanism through the sandwiched insulating barrier. The main goal of this paper is to understand, on the atomic scale, the role of the geometrical details in the formation of the tunnel barrier profiles. Initially, we concentrate on the adhesive properties of the interfaces. To provide reliable results, we carefully assess the accuracy of the traditional methods used to examine Al/Al 2O3 systems. These are the most widely employed exchange-correlation functionals—local-density approximation and two different generalized gradient approximations; the universal binding-energy relation for predicting equilibrium interfacial distances and adhesion energies; and the ideal work of separation as a measure of junction stability. In addition, we show that the established interpretation of the computed ideal work of separation might be misleading in predicting the optimal interface structures. Finally, we perform a detailed analysis of the atomic and interplanar relaxations in each junction, and identify their contributions to the tunnel barrier parameters. Our results imply that the structural irregularities on the surface of the Al film have a significant contribution to lowering the tunnel barrier height, while atomic relaxations at the interface and interplanar relaxations in Al2O3 may considerably change the width of the barrier and, thus, distort its uniformity. Both the effects may critically influence the performance of the MIM tunnel devices.

  1. Pair transfer processes probed at deep sub barrier energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradi, L.; Mason, P.; Fioretto, E.; Michelagnoli, C.; Stefanini, A.M.; Valiente-Dobon, J.J.; Szinler, S.; Jelavic-Malenica, D.; Soic, N.; Pollarolo, G.; Farnea, E.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Scarlassara, F.; Ur, C.A.; Gadea, A.; Haas, F.; Marginean, N.

    2011-01-01

    Multinucleon transfer cross sections in the system 40 Ca+ 96 Zr have been measured at bombarding energies ranging from the Coulomb barrier to ∼ 25% below. Target-like (lighter) recoils in inverse kinematics have been completely identified in A,Z and Q-value with the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA. The experimental slopes of the neutron transfer probabilities at large internuclear separation are consistent with the values derived from the binding energies. A phenomenological interpretation of the transfer probabilities indicates the presence of enhanced values for the even number of neutron transfers. (authors)

  2. Probing the location of displayed cytochrome b562 on amyloid by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, C. J.; Wang, N.; Yang, Z. Y.; Mowat, C. G.; Jarvis, S.; Durkan, C.; Barker, P. D.

    2013-05-01

    Amyloid fibres displaying cytochrome b562 were probed using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) in vacuo. The cytochromes are electron transfer proteins containing a haem cofactor and could, in principle, mediate electron transfer between the tip and the gold substrate. If the core fibres were insulating and electron transfer within the 3D haem network was detected, then the electron transport properties of the fibre could be controlled by genetic engineering. Three kinds of STM images were obtained. At a low bias (<1.5 V) the fibres appeared as regions of low conductivity with no evidence of cytochrome mediated electron transfer. At a high bias, stable peaks in tunnelling current were observed for all three fibre species containing haem and one species of fibre that did not contain haem. In images of this kind, some of the current peaks were collinear and spaced around 10 nm apart over ranges longer than 100 nm, but background monomers complicate interpretation. Images of the third kind were rare (1 in 150 fibres); in these, fully conducting structures with the approximate dimensions of fibres were observed, suggesting the possibility of an intermittent conduction mechanism, for which a precedent exists in DNA. To test the conductivity, some fibres were immobilized with sputtered gold, and no evidence of conduction between the grains of gold was seen. In control experiments, a variation of monomeric cytochrome b562 was not detected by STM, which was attributed to low adhesion, whereas a monomeric multi-haem protein, GSU1996, was readily imaged. We conclude that the fibre superstructure may be intermittently conducting, that the cytochromes have been seen within the fibres and that they are too far apart for detectable current flow between sites to occur. We predict that GSU1996, being 10 nm long, is more likely to mediate successful electron transfer along the fibre as well as being more readily detectable when displayed from amyloid.

  3. Effect of graphene tunnel barrier on Schottky barrier height of Heusler alloy Co2MnSi/graphene/n-Ge junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Gui-fang; Hu Jing; Lv Hui; Cui Zhijun; Hou Xiaowei; Liu Shibin; Du Yongqian

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the insertion of a graphene tunnel barrier between Heusler alloy Co 2 MnSi and the germanium (Ge) channel modulates the Schottky barrier height and the resistance–area product of the spin diode. We confirm that the Fermi level is depinned and a reduction in the electron Schottky barrier height (SBH) occurs following the insertion of the graphene layer between Co 2 MnSi and Ge. The electron SBH is modulated in the 0.34 eV–0.61 eV range. Furthermore, the transport mechanism changes from rectifying to symmetric tunneling following the insertion. This behavior provides a pathway for highly efficient spin injection from a Heusler alloy into a Ge channel with high electron and hole mobility. (paper)

  4. Effect of graphene tunnel barrier on Schottky barrier height of Heusler alloy Co2MnSi/graphene/n-Ge junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui-fang, Li; Jing, Hu; Hui, Lv; Zhijun, Cui; Xiaowei, Hou; Shibin, Liu; Yongqian, Du

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that the insertion of a graphene tunnel barrier between Heusler alloy Co2MnSi and the germanium (Ge) channel modulates the Schottky barrier height and the resistance-area product of the spin diode. We confirm that the Fermi level is depinned and a reduction in the electron Schottky barrier height (SBH) occurs following the insertion of the graphene layer between Co2MnSi and Ge. The electron SBH is modulated in the 0.34 eV-0.61 eV range. Furthermore, the transport mechanism changes from rectifying to symmetric tunneling following the insertion. This behavior provides a pathway for highly efficient spin injection from a Heusler alloy into a Ge channel with high electron and hole mobility. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61504107) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 3102014JCQ01059 and 3102015ZY043).

  5. Modulation of spin transfer torque amplitude in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, P.-Y.; Baraduc, C.; Ducruet, C.; Vila, L.; Chshiev, M.; Diény, B.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetization switching induced by spin transfer torque is used to write magnetic memories (Magnetic Random Access Memory, MRAM) but can be detrimental to the reading process. It would be quite convenient therefore to modulate the efficiency of spin transfer torque. A solution is adding an extra degree of freedom by using double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with two spin-polarizers, with controllable relative magnetic alignment. We demonstrate, for these structures, that the amplitude of in-plane spin transfer torque on the middle free layer can be efficiently tuned via the magnetic configuration of the electrodes. Using the proposed design could thus pave the way towards more reliable read/write schemes for MRAM. Moreover, our results suggest an intriguing effect associated with the out-of-plane (field-like) spin transfer torque, which has to be further investigated.

  6. Modulation of spin transfer torque amplitude in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clément, P.-Y.; Baraduc, C.; Chshiev, M.; Diény, B.; Ducruet, C.; Vila, L.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization switching induced by spin transfer torque is used to write magnetic memories (Magnetic Random Access Memory, MRAM) but can be detrimental to the reading process. It would be quite convenient therefore to modulate the efficiency of spin transfer torque. A solution is adding an extra degree of freedom by using double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with two spin-polarizers, with controllable relative magnetic alignment. We demonstrate, for these structures, that the amplitude of in-plane spin transfer torque on the middle free layer can be efficiently tuned via the magnetic configuration of the electrodes. Using the proposed design could thus pave the way towards more reliable read/write schemes for MRAM. Moreover, our results suggest an intriguing effect associated with the out-of-plane (field-like) spin transfer torque, which has to be further investigated

  7. Tunneling Characteristics Depending on Schottky Barriers and Diffusion Current in SiOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Teresa; Kim, Chy Hyung

    2016-02-01

    To obtain a diffusion current in SiOC, the aluminum doped zinc oxide films were deposited on SiOC/Si wafer by a RF magnetron sputtering. All the X-ray patterns of the SiOC films showed amorphous phases. The level of binding energy of Si atoms will lead to an additional potential modulation by long range Coulombic and covalent interactions with oxygen ions. The growth of the AZO film was affected by the characteristics of SiOC, resulting in similar trends in XPS spectra and a shift to higher AZO lattice d values than the original AZO d values in XRD analyses. The charges trapped by the defects at the interlayer between AZO and SiOC films induced the decreased mobility of carriers. In the absence of trap charges, AZO grown on SiOC film such as the sample prepared at O2 = 25 or 30 sccm, which has low charge carrier concentration and high mobility, showed high mobility in an ambipolar characteristic of oxide semiconductor due to the tunneling effect and diffusion current. The structural matching of an interface between AZO and amorphous SiOC enhanced the height of Schottky Barrier (SB), and then the mobility was increased by the tunneling effect from band to band through the high SB.

  8. The strain effect on the Dirac electrons tunneling through the time-periodic scalar and vector barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Weixian, E-mail: wxyansxu@gmail.com

    2017-01-01

    The tunneling of the massless and massive Dirac particle through the strained barriers driven by the time-periodic scalar potentials and the static vector potentials is investigated, where the interrelationships among the strain, the incidence angle, the dynamic scalar potential, the magnetic field and the transmission of the Dirac particle have been discussed. In either massless or massive case, the intersection angle between the obliquely incident Dirac particle and strain determines the extent of deviation of the tunneling profiles from the strainless case. The time-periodic scalar potentials can enhance the capability of the Dirac particle to surmount the energy gap induced by the mass, reflecting quantum nature of the photon-assisted tunneling. When the magnetic field is switched on, the transmission overall presents a remarkably different profile, and decreases with the increase of the magnetic fields due to the conservation of the transverse momentum, which reduces the number of the side-band channels for tunneling.

  9. Probing cluster structures through sub-barrier transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafferty D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleon transfer probabilities and excitation energy distributions have been measured in 16,18O, 19F + 208Pb at energies between 90% - 100% of the Coulomb barrier. A strong 2p2n enhancement is observed for all reactions, though most spectacularly in the 18O induced reaction. Results are interpreted in terms of the Semiclassical model, which seems to suggest α-cluster transfer in all studied systems. The relation to cluster-states in the projectile is discussed, with the experimental results consistent with previous structure studies. Dissipation of energy in the collisions of 18O is compared between different reaction modes, with cluster transfer associated with dissipation over a large number of internal states. Cluster transfer is shown to be a long range dissipation mechanism, which will inform the development of future models to treat these dynamic processes in reactions.

  10. Spin asymmetry calculations of the TMR-V curves in single and double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    in the single as well as double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (SMTJ & DMTJ, which are constructed from CoFeB/MgO interfaces) and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR-V a curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions

  11. Development of CdTe/Cd1-xMgxTe double barrier, single quantum well heterostructure for resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuscher, G.; Keim, M.; Fischer, F.; Waag, A.; Landwehr, G.

    1995-01-01

    We report the first observation of resonant tunneling through a CdTe/Cd 1-x Mg x Te double barrier, single quantum well heterostructure. Negative differential resistance is observable at temperatures below 230 K, exhibiting a peak to valley ratio of 3:1 at 4.2 K. (author)

  12. Ultrafast photoinduced carrier dynamics in GaNAs probed using femtosecond time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Yasuhiko; Aoyama, Masahiro; Kondo, Hiroyuki; Taninaka, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2007-01-01

    The combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) with optical excitation using ultrashort laser pulses enables us, in principle, to simultaneously obtain ultimate spatial and temporal resolutions. We have developed the shaken-pulse-pair-excited STM (SPPX-STM) and succeeded in detecting a weak time-resolved tunnelling current signal from a low-temperature-grown GaNAs sample. To clarify the underlying physics in SPPX-STM measurements, we performed optical pump-probe reflectivity measurements with a wavelength-changeable ultrashort-pulse laser. By comparing the results obtained from the two methods with an analysis based on the nonlinear relationship between the photocarrier density and tunnelling current, we obtained a comprehensive explanation that the photocarrier dynamics is reflected in the SPPX-STM signal through the surface photovoltage effect

  13. Scanning tunneling microscopy III theory of STM and related scanning probe methods

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1993-01-01

    While the first two volumes on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and its related scanning probe (SXM) methods have mainly concentrated on intro­ ducing the experimental techniques, as well as their various applications in different research fields, this third volume is exclusively devoted to the theory of STM and related SXM methods. As the experimental techniques including the reproducibility of the experimental results have advanced, more and more theorists have become attracted to focus on issues related to STM and SXM. The increasing effort in the development of theoretical concepts for STM/SXM has led to considerable improvements in understanding the contrast mechanism as well as the experimental conditions necessary to obtain reliable data. Therefore, this third volume on STM/SXM is not written by theorists for theorists, but rather for every scientist who is not satisfied by just obtaining real­ space images of surface structures by STM/SXM. After a brief introduction (Chap. 1), N. D. Lang first co...

  14. Probing the location of displayed cytochrome b562 on amyloid by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, C J; Barker, P D; Wang, N; Durkan, C; Yang, Z Y; Mowat, C G; Jarvis, S

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid fibres displaying cytochrome b 562 were probed using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) in vacuo. The cytochromes are electron transfer proteins containing a haem cofactor and could, in principle, mediate electron transfer between the tip and the gold substrate. If the core fibres were insulating and electron transfer within the 3D haem network was detected, then the electron transport properties of the fibre could be controlled by genetic engineering. Three kinds of STM images were obtained. At a low bias ( 562 was not detected by STM, which was attributed to low adhesion, whereas a monomeric multi-haem protein, GSU1996, was readily imaged. We conclude that the fibre superstructure may be intermittently conducting, that the cytochromes have been seen within the fibres and that they are too far apart for detectable current flow between sites to occur. We predict that GSU1996, being 10 nm long, is more likely to mediate successful electron transfer along the fibre as well as being more readily detectable when displayed from amyloid. (paper)

  15. Superconducting β-ZrNClx probed by scanning-tunnelling and break-junction spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekino, Toshikazu; Sugimoto, Akira; Gabovich, Alexander M.; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Yamanaka, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •STM/STS combined with break-junction tunnelling spectroscopy (BJTS) on β-ZrNCl. •STM image on the ab plane shows triangular atomic lattice spots with a period of 0.36 nm. •The gap peaks are widely distributed (Δ p–p = 9–28 meV)over the area of 100 nm 2 . •Average gap ratio 2Δ/k B T c ∼ 10 is confirmed by both STS and BJTS. -- Abstract: Superconducting layered compound β-ZrNCl x (x = 0.7) with the critical temperature T c = 13–14 K was investigated by means of scanning tunnelling microscopy/spectroscopy. The single-crystal domain facet of ∼100 μm 2 in the c-axis-oriented polycrystal was used as a probing surface. The STM image at 4.9 K shows triangular atomic lattice spots with the period of ∼0.36 nm, which agrees with the X-ray diffraction measurements. The STS measurements of the local conductance, dI/dV, exhibit broadened gap structures with a substantial distribution of the gap-edge values. Most frequently observed peak-to-peak value of ∼20 mV is remarkably similar to the superconducting gap edge of the isostructural β-HfNCl x with T c = 24 K. Temperature, T, dependence of the dI/dV shows that the gap structure disappears above T c ∼ 13 K. Fitting of the dI/dV curve by the broadened BCS density of states leads to the superconducting gap of 2Δ(4.9 K) = 11–13 meV. This is in accordance with our former break-junction data confirming the intrinsic character of the previously obtained extremely large gap to T c ratio 2Δ(0)/k B T c ≈ 10 (k B is the Boltzmann constant), thereby pointing to the unusual superconducting properties of this compound

  16. Tunnel spin polarization versus energy for clean and doped Al2O3 barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, B.G.; Banerjee, T.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2007-01-01

    The variation of the tunnel spin-polarization (TSP) with energy is determined using a magnetic tunnel transistor, allowing quantification of the energy dependent TSP separately for both ferromagnet/insulator interfaces and direct correlation with the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) measured in the

  17. Tunnel Spin Polarization Versus Energy for Clean and Doped Al2O3 Barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, B.G.; Banerjee, T.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2007-01-01

    The variation of the tunnel spin-polarization (TSP) with energy is determined using a magnetic tunnel transistor, allowing quantification of the energy dependent TSP separately for both ferromagnet/insulator interfaces and direct correlation with the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) measured in the

  18. Low-leakage superconducting tunnel junctions with a single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Cicak, K; Osborn, K D; Simmonds, R W; Pappas, D P [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); McDermott, R; Cooper, K B; Steffen, M; Martinis, J M [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    We have developed a two-step growth scheme for single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barriers. The barriers are epitaxially grown on single-crystal rhenium (Re) base electrodes that are grown epitaxially on a sapphire substrate, while polycrystalline Al is used as the top electrode. We show that by first growing an amorphous aluminium (Al) oxide layer at room temperature and crystallizing it at a high temperature in oxygen environment, a morphologically intact single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer is obtained. Tunnel junctions fabricated from these trilayers show very low subgap leakage current. This single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} junction may open a new venue for coherent quantum devices.

  19. Barrier tunneling of the loop-nodal semimetal in the hyperhoneycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ji-Huan; Zhang, Yan-Yang; Lu, Wei-Er; Xia, Yang; Li, Shu-Shen

    2018-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the barrier tunneling in the 3D model of the hyperhoneycomb lattice, which is a nodal-line semimetal with a Dirac loop at zero energy. In the presence of a rectangular potential, the scattering amplitudes for different injecting states around the nodal loop are calculated, by using analytical treatments of the effective model, as well as numerical simulations of the tight binding model. In the low energy regime, states with remarkable transmissions are only concentrated in a small range around the loop plane. When the momentum of the injecting electron is coplanar with the nodal loop, nearly perfect transmissions can occur for a large range of injecting azimuthal angles if the potential is not high. For higher potential energies, the transmission shows a resonant oscillation with the potential, but still with peaks being perfect transmissions that do not decay with the potential width. These strikingly robust transports of the loop-nodal semimetal can be approximately explained by a momentum dependent Dirac Hamiltonian.

  20. HfO2 and SiO2 as barriers in magnetic tunneling junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Gokaran; Archer, Thomas; Sanvito, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    SiO2 and HfO2 are both high-k, wide-gap semiconductors, currently used in the microelectronic industry as gate barriers. Here we investigate whether the same materials can be employed to make magnetic tunnel junctions, which in principle can be amenable for integration in conventional Si technology. By using a combination of density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's functions method for quantum transport we have studied the transport properties of Co [0001 ] /SiO2[001 ] /Co [0001 ] and Fe [001 ] /HfO2[001 ] /Fe [001 ] junctions. In both cases we found a quite large magnetoresistance, which is explained through the analysis of the real band structure of the magnets and the complex one of the insulator. We find that there is no symmetry spin filtering for the Co-based junction since the high transmission Δ2' band crosses the Fermi level, EF, for both spin directions. However, the fact that Co is a strong ferromagnet makes the orbital contribution to the two Δ2' spin subbands different, yielding magnetoresistance. In contrast for the Fe-based junction symmetry filtering is active for an energy window spanning between the Fermi level and 1 eV below EF, with Δ1 symmetry contributing to the transmission.

  1. Intrinsic current oscillations in an asymmetric triple-barrier resonant tunnelling diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wójcik, P; Spisak, B J; Wołoszyn, M; Adamowski, J

    2010-01-01

    The electronic transport characteristics of an asymmetric triple-barrier resonant tunnelling diode are calculated by the time-dependent Wigner–Poisson method. The intrinsic current oscillations are found in two separate bias voltage ranges. The first one is located below the resonant current peak, and the second lies in the negative differential resistance region. We provide the explanation of the current density oscillations in these two separate bias voltage ranges based on the analysis of the self-consistent potential profiles and changes of electron density. We have shown that two different formation mechanisms are responsible for the current density oscillations in these two bias voltage ranges. In the bias voltage range below the resonant current peak in the current–voltage characteristics, the current density oscillations are caused by the coupling between quasi-bound states in the left and right quantum wells. On the other hand, the current density oscillations in the negative differential resistance region result from the coupling between quasi-bound states in the left quantum well and the quantum well formed in the region of the left contact

  2. Spin-related tunneling through a nanostructured electric-magnetic barrier on the surface of a topological insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenhua; Li, Jun

    2012-01-27

    We investigate quantum tunneling through a single electric and/or magnetic barrier on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator. We found that (1) the propagating behavior of electrons in such system exhibits a strong dependence on the direction of the incident electron wavevector and incident energy, giving the possibility to construct a wave vector and/or energy filter; (2) the spin orientation can be tuned by changing the magnetic barrier structure as well as the incident angles and energies.PACS numbers: 72.25.Dc; 73.20.-r; 73.23.-b; 75.70.-i.

  3. Pressure tuning of anisotropy barrier in Fe8 SMMs probed using high frequency EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunavukkuarasu, Komalavalli; Beedle, Christopher; Tozer, Stanley; Hill, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are spin systems with large spin ground state where quantum phenomena such as tunneling of magnetization via a considerable anisotropy barrier manifest. One such SMM that has been extensively studied is [Fe8O2(OH)12(tacn)6]Br8.9H2O, also known as Fe8, with a giant spin ground state of S=10. The eight Fe atoms bridged by the ligands form a butterfly structure where six Fe atoms have spins up and two spins down in the simplest model. This structure in fact gives rise to geometrical spin frustration effects within the cluster. By varying the interaction between the spins, manipulation of quantum tunneling in SMMs may be achieved. Typically, the manipulation of spin interactions is realized using chemical methods. As an alternative approach, we employ high pressure to induce changes in the ligand-field environment of the Fe atoms. In this presentation, the pressure-dependent changes in the anisotropy barrier in single crystal Fe8 SMMs investigated by high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance measurements will be discussed.

  4. Development of micro-four-point probe in a scanning tunneling microscope for in situ electrical transport measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian-Feng; Liu, Zhi-Long; Gao, Chun-Lei; Qian, Dong; Liu, Canhua; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2015-05-01

    Electrons at surface may behave differently from those in bulk of a material. Multi-functional tools are essential in comprehensive studies on a crystal surface. Here, we developed an in situ microscopic four-point probe (4PP) transport measurement system on the basis of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). In particular, convenient replacement between STM tips and micro-4PPs enables systematic investigations of surface morphology, electronic structure, and electrical transport property of a same sample surface. Performances of the instrument are demonstrated with high-quality STM images, tunneling spectra, and low-noise electrical I-V characteristic curves of a single-layer FeSe film grown on a conductive SrTiO3 surface.

  5. Development of micro-four-point probe in a scanning tunneling microscope for in situ electrical transport measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Jian-Feng; Liu, Zhi-Long; Gao, Chun-Lei; Qian, Dong; Liu, Canhua, E-mail: canhualiu@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: jfjia@sjtu.edu.cn; Jia, Jin-Feng, E-mail: canhualiu@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: jfjia@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Electrons at surface may behave differently from those in bulk of a material. Multi-functional tools are essential in comprehensive studies on a crystal surface. Here, we developed an in situ microscopic four-point probe (4PP) transport measurement system on the basis of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). In particular, convenient replacement between STM tips and micro-4PPs enables systematic investigations of surface morphology, electronic structure, and electrical transport property of a same sample surface. Performances of the instrument are demonstrated with high-quality STM images, tunneling spectra, and low-noise electrical I-V characteristic curves of a single-layer FeSe film grown on a conductive SrTiO{sub 3} surface.

  6. Rupture of a high pressure gas or steam pipe in a tunnel: a preliminary investigation of the jet thrust exerted on a tunnel barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, M.R.

    1988-04-01

    On power plant, if a high pressure pipe containing high temperature gas or steam were to rupture, sensitive equipment necessary for safety shutdown of the plant could possibly be incapacitated if exposed to the subsequent high temperature environment. In many plant configurations the high pressure pipework is contained in tunnels where it is possible to construct barriers which isolate one section of the plant from another, thereby restricting the spread of the high temperature fluid/air mixture. This paper describes a preliminary experimental investigation of the magnitude of the thrust likely to be exerted on such barriers by a gas jet issuing from the failed pipe. Measurements of the thrust exerted on a flat plate by normal impingement of a highly underexpanded gas jet are in agreement with a semi-quantitative analysis assuming conservation of the axial momentum of the jet. (author)

  7. In silico simulations of tunneling barrier measurements for molecular orbital-mediated junctions: A molecular orbital theory approach to scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terryn, Raymond J.; Sriraman, Krishnan; Olson, Joel A., E-mail: jolson@fit.edu; Baum, J. Clayton, E-mail: cbaum@fit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, Florida 32901 (United States); Novak, Mark J. [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biological Sciences, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, 501 E. Saint Joseph Street, Rapid City, South Dakota 57701 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A new simulator for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented based on the linear combination of atomic orbitals molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) approximation for the effective tunneling Hamiltonian, which leads to the convolution integral when applied to the tip interaction with the sample. This approach intrinsically includes the structure of the STM tip. Through this mechanical emulation and the tip-inclusive convolution model, dI/dz images for molecular orbitals (which are closely associated with apparent barrier height, ϕ{sub ap}) are reported for the first time. For molecular adsorbates whose experimental topographic images correspond well to isolated-molecule quantum chemistry calculations, the simulator makes accurate predictions, as illustrated by various cases. Distortions in these images due to the tip are shown to be in accord with those observed experimentally and predicted by other ab initio considerations of tip structure. Simulations of the tunneling current dI/dz images are in strong agreement with experiment. The theoretical framework provides a solid foundation which may be applied to LCAO cluster models of adsorbate–substrate systems, and is extendable to emulate several aspects of functional STM operation.

  8. In silico simulations of tunneling barrier measurements for molecular orbital-mediated junctions: A molecular orbital theory approach to scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terryn, Raymond J.; Sriraman, Krishnan; Olson, Joel A.; Baum, J. Clayton; Novak, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    A new simulator for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented based on the linear combination of atomic orbitals molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) approximation for the effective tunneling Hamiltonian, which leads to the convolution integral when applied to the tip interaction with the sample. This approach intrinsically includes the structure of the STM tip. Through this mechanical emulation and the tip-inclusive convolution model, dI/dz images for molecular orbitals (which are closely associated with apparent barrier height, ϕ_a_p) are reported for the first time. For molecular adsorbates whose experimental topographic images correspond well to isolated-molecule quantum chemistry calculations, the simulator makes accurate predictions, as illustrated by various cases. Distortions in these images due to the tip are shown to be in accord with those observed experimentally and predicted by other ab initio considerations of tip structure. Simulations of the tunneling current dI/dz images are in strong agreement with experiment. The theoretical framework provides a solid foundation which may be applied to LCAO cluster models of adsorbate–substrate systems, and is extendable to emulate several aspects of functional STM operation.

  9. Reliability enhancement due to in-situ post-oxidation of sputtered MgO barrier in double MgO barrier magnetic tunnel junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikako Yoshida

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effects of in-situ post-oxidation (PO of a sputtered MgO barrier in a double-MgO-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ and found that the short error rate was significantly reduced, the magnetoresistance (MR ratio was increased approximately 18%, and the endurance lifetime was extend. In addition, we found that the distribution of breakdown number (a measure of endurance exhibits trimodal characteristics, which indicates competition between extrinsic and intrinsic failures. This improvement in reliability might be related to the suppression of Fe and Co diffusion to the MgO barrier, as revealed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS analysis.

  10. Simultaneously measured signals in scanning probe microscopy with a needle sensor: frequency shift and tunneling current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Voigtländer, Bert

    2010-03-01

    We present combined noncontact scanning force microscopy and tunneling current images of a platinum(111) surface obtained by means of a 1 MHz quartz needle sensor. The low-frequency circuit of the tunneling current was combined with a high-frequency signal of the quartz resonator enabling full electrical operation of the sensor. The frequency shift and the tunneling current were detected simultaneously, while the feedback control loop of the topography signal was fed using one of them. In both cases, the free signal that was not connected to the feedback loop reveals proportional-integral controller errorlike behavior, which is governed by the time derivative of the topography signal. A procedure is proposed for determining the mechanical oscillation amplitude by utilizing the tunneling current also including the average tip-sample work function.

  11. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  12. Low-voltage high-speed programming gate-all-around floating gate memory cell with tunnel barrier engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Afiq; Ezaila Alias, N.; Ismail, Razali

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the memory performances of gate-all-around floating gate (GAA-FG) memory cell implementing engineered tunnel barrier concept of variable oxide thickness (VARIOT) of low-k/high-k for several high-k (i.e., Si3N4, Al2O3, HfO2, and ZrO2) with low-k SiO2 using three-dimensional (3D) simulator Silvaco ATLAS. The simulation work is conducted by initially determining the optimized thickness of low-k/high-k barrier-stacked and extracting their Fowler–Nordheim (FN) coefficients. Based on the optimized parameters the device performances of GAA-FG for fast program operation and data retention are assessed using benchmark set by 6 and 8 nm SiO2 tunnel layer respectively. The programming speed has been improved and wide memory window with 30% increment from conventional SiO2 has been obtained using SiO2/Al2O3 tunnel layer due to its thin low-k dielectric thickness. Furthermore, given its high band edges only 1% of charge-loss is expected after 10 years of ‑3.6/3.6 V gate stress.

  13. Bias voltage dependence of magnetic tunnel junctions comprising amorphous ferromagnetic CoFeSiB layer with double barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, H.I.; Lee, S.Y.; Hwang, J.Y.; Rhee, J.R.; Chun, B.S.; Wang, K.L.; Kim, Y.K.; Kim, T.W.; Lee, S.S.; Hwang, D.G.

    2008-01-01

    Double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) with and without an amorphous ferromagnetic material such as CoFeSiB 10, CoFe 5/CoFeSiB 5, and CoFe 10 (nm) were prepared and compared to investigate the bias voltage dependence of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio. Typical DMTJ structures were Ta 45/Ru 9.5/IrMn 10/CoFe 7/AlO x /free layer 10/AlO x /CoFe 7/IrMn 10/Ru 60 (in nanometers). The interlayer coupling field and the normalized TMR ratios at the applied voltages of +0.4 and -0.4 V of the amorphous CoFeSiB free-layer DMTJ offer lower and higher values than that of the polycrystalline CoFe free-layer DMTJ, respectively. An amorphous ferromagnetic CoFeSiB layer improves the interface roughness of the free layer/tunnel barrier and, as a result, the interlayer coupling field and bias voltage dependence of the TMR ratio are suppressed at a given voltage. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Self-consistent calculation of tunneling current in w-GaN/AlGaN(0001) two-barrier heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinyaev, S. N.; Razzhuvalov, A. N.

    2006-01-01

    The specific features of the tunneling current in wurtzite GaN/AlGaN(0001) two-barrier structures are studied by solving the Schroedinger equation and the Poisson equation simultaneously, with regard to spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations. It is shown that the internal fields manifest themselves in the asymmetry of the tunneling current via the value of the electronic charge in the quantum well. This charge is larger when the internal and external fields in the well compensate each other, resulting in smaller shifts of potential and resonance levels in the active region with voltage, in the higher resistance of the structure, and in the linear current-voltage dependence within a wide range of voltages. When the internal and external fields are the same, the current exhibits a sharp negative-differential-conductivity structure, with the peak-to-valley ratio equal to about four. The structure is similar to one of the branches of the current-voltage characteristic of the GaAs/AlGaAs(001) two-barrier structure, suggesting that nitrides are promising materials for resonance-tunneling devices

  15. Energy gap and surface structure of superconducting diamond films probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizaki, Terukazu; Takano, Yoshihiko; Nagao, Masanori; Takenouchi, Tomohiro; Kawarada, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Norio

    2007-01-01

    We have performed scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) experiments on (1 1 1)-oriented epitaxial films of heavily boron-doped diamond at T = 0.47 K. The STM topography shows two kinds of atomic structures: a hydrogenated 1 x 1 structure, C(1 1 1)1 x 1:H, and an amorphous structure. On the C(1 1 1)1 x 1:H region, the tunneling spectra show superconducting property with the energy gap Δ = 0.83 meV. The obtained gap ratio 2Δ/k B T c = 3.57 is consistent with the weak-coupling BCS theory

  16. Probing the energy barriers and magnetization reversal processes of nanoperforated membrane based percolated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, V; Schultz, L; Schulze, C; Makarov, D; Albrecht, M; Faustini, M; Grosso, D; Lee, J; Kim, S-K; Suess, D

    2013-01-01

    Magnetization reversal processes in Co/Pt multilayers prepared on nanoperforated templates are probed by magnetization relaxation measurements. The signature of pinning controlled domain wall movement as expected for percolated media is identified. This contrasts with the nucleation-type reversal mechanism of a Co/Pt reference film prepared on a smooth substrate. A zero field energy barrier of 93k B T is determined by fluctuation field measurements and is elucidated by micromagnetic calculations using the nudged elastic band method. This value is sufficiently large to qualify the material as a promising percolated medium. (paper)

  17. Infinite dwell time and group delay in resonant electron tunneling through double complex potential barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opacak, Nikola; Milanović, Vitomir; Radovanović, Jelena

    2017-12-01

    Tunneling times in complex potentials are investigated. Analytical expressions for dwell time, self-interference time and group delay are obtained for the case of complex double delta potentials. It is shown that we can always find a set of parameters of the potential so that the tunneling times achieve very large values and even approach infinity for the case of resonance. The phenomenon of infinite tunneling times occurs for only one particular positive value of the imaginary part of the potential, if all other parameters are given.

  18. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.; Perrin, M.L.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from

  19. Probing the longitudinal momentum spread of the electron wave packet at the tunnel exit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    N. Pfeiffer, Adrian; Cirelli, Claudio; S. Landsman, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    We present an ellipticity resolved study of momentum distributions arising from strong-field ionization of Helium at constant intensity. The influence of the ion potential on the departing electron is considered within a semi-classical model consisting of an initial tunneling step and subsequent...

  20. Magneto-optical Faraday effect probed in a scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.W.J.; Wielen, van der M.C.M.M.; Abraham, D.L.; Kempen, van H.; Kesteren, van H.W.

    1994-01-01

    Semiconductor tips are used as local photodetectors in a scanning tunneling microscope. We demonstrate that this configuration is sensitive to small light intensity variations, as supported by a simple model. The principle is applied to the detection of Faraday ellipticity of a Pt/Co multilayer

  1. Electron Tunneling in Lithium Ammonia Solutions Probed by Frequency-Dependent Electron-Spin Relaxation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T.J.; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H.; Edwards, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multi-exponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1–10)×10−12 s over a temperature range 230–290K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a timescale of ca. 10−13 s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great potential

  2. Electron tunneling in lithium-ammonia solutions probed by frequency-dependent electron spin relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T J; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H; Edwards, Peter P

    2012-06-06

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multiexponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1-10) × 10(-12) s over a temperature range 230-290 K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a time scale of ∼10(-13) s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great

  3. Decrease of the tunneling time and violation of the Hartman effect for large barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Zaichenko, A.K.; Petrillo, V.

    2004-01-01

    The explicit formulation of the initial conditions of the definition of the wave-packet tunneling time is proposed. This formulation takes adequately into account the irreversibility of the wave-packet space-time spreading. Moreover, it explains the violations of the Hartman effect, leading to a strong decrease of the tunneling times up to negative values for wave packets with large momentum spreads due to strong wave-packet time spreading

  4. Quantum nature of protons in water probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Lü, Jing-Tao; Feng, Yexin; Chen, Ji; Peng, Jinbo; Lin, Zeren; Meng, Xiangzhi; Wang, Zhichang; Li, Xin-Zheng; Wang, En-Ge; Jiang, Ying; Jing-Tao Lü Team; Xin-Zheng Li Team

    The complexity of hydrogen-bonding interaction largely arises from the quantum nature of light hydrogen nuclei, which has remained elusive for decades. Here we report the direct assessment of nuclear quantum effects on the strength of a single hydrogen bond formed at a water-salt interface, using tip-enhanced inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) based on a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The IETS signals are resonantly enhanced by gating the frontier orbitals of water via a chlorine-terminated STM tip, such that the hydrogen-bonding strength can be determined with unprecedentedly high accuracy from the redshift in the O-H stretching frequency of water. Isotopic substitution experiments combined with quantum simulations reveal that the anharmonic quantum fluctuations of hydrogen nuclei weaken the weak hydrogen bonds and strengthen the relatively strong ones. However, this trend can be completely reversed when the hydrogen bond is strongly coupled to the polar atomic sites of the surface.

  5. Contact induced spin relaxation in graphene spin valves with Al2O3 and MgO tunnel barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Amamou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate spin relaxation in graphene by systematically comparing the roles of spin absorption, other contact-induced effects (e.g., fringe fields, and bulk spin relaxation for graphene spin valves with MgO barriers, Al2O3 barriers, and transparent contacts. We obtain effective spin lifetimes by fitting the Hanle spin precession data with two models that include or exclude the effect of spin absorption. Results indicate that additional contact-induced spin relaxation other than spin absorption dominates the contact effect. For tunneling contacts, we find reasonable agreement between the two models with median discrepancy of ∼20% for MgO and ∼10% for Al2O3.

  6. Simultaneous Measurements of Ion Temperature by Katsumata and Segmented Tunnel Probe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámek, Jiří; Stöckel, Jan; Brotánková, Jana; Pánek, Radomír; Kocan, M.; Gunn, J. P.; Martines, E.; Schrittwieser, R.; Ionita, C.; Popa, G.; Costin, C.; Van Oost, G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 48, 5-7 (2008), s. 395-399 ISSN 0863-1042. [International Workshop on Electrical Probes in Magnetized Plasmas/7th./. Praha, 22.07.2007-25.07.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Toroidal plasma system * tokamak * probe diagnostics * ion temperature. Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.250, year: 2008

  7. Spin-wave thermal population as temperature probe in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Goff, A., E-mail: adrien.le-goff@u-psud.fr; Devolder, T. [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France); Nikitin, V. [SAMSUNG Electronics Corporation, 601 McCarthy Blvd Milpitas, California 95035 (United States)

    2016-07-14

    We study whether a direct measurement of the absolute temperature of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) can be performed using the high frequency electrical noise that it delivers under a finite voltage bias. Our method includes quasi-static hysteresis loop measurements of the MTJ, together with the field-dependence of its spin wave noise spectra. We rely on an analytical modeling of the spectra by assuming independent fluctuations of the different sub-systems of the tunnel junction that are described as macrospin fluctuators. We illustrate our method on perpendicularly magnetized MgO-based MTJs patterned in 50 × 100 nm{sup 2} nanopillars. We apply hard axis (in-plane) fields to let the magnetic thermal fluctuations yield finite conductance fluctuations of the MTJ. Instead of the free layer fluctuations that are observed to be affected by both spin-torque and temperature, we use the magnetization fluctuations of the sole reference layers. Their much stronger anisotropy and their much heavier damping render them essentially immune to spin-torque. We illustrate our method by determining current-induced heating of the perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction at voltages similar to those used in spin-torque memory applications. The absolute temperature can be deduced with a precision of ±60 K, and we can exclude any substantial heating at the spin-torque switching voltage.

  8. Tunneling Mode of Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy: Probing Electrochemical Processes at Single Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tong; Wang, Dengchao; Mirkin, Michael V

    2018-06-18

    Electrochemical experiments at individual nanoparticles (NPs) can provide new insights into their structure-activity relationships. By using small nanoelectrodes as tips in a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), we recently imaged individual surface-bound 10-50 nm metal NPs. Herein, we introduce a new mode of SECM operation based on tunneling between the tip and a nanoparticle immobilized on the insulating surface. The obtained current vs. distance curves show the transition from the conventional feedback response to electron tunneling between the tip and the NP at separation distances of less than about 3 nm. In addition to high-resolution imaging of the NP topography, the tunneling mode enables measurement of the heterogeneous kinetics at a single NP without making an ohmic contact with it. The developed method should be useful for studying the effects of nanoparticle size and geometry on electrocatalytic activity in real-world applications. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Combined free-stream disturbance measurements and receptivity studies in hypersonic wind tunnels by means of a slender wedge probe and direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Alexander; Schülein, Erich; Petervari, René; Hannemann, Klaus; Ali, Syed R. C.; Cerminara, Adriano; Sandham, Neil D.

    2018-05-01

    Combined free-stream disturbance measurements and receptivity studies in hypersonic wind tunnels were conducted by means of a slender wedge probe and direct numerical simulation. The study comprises comparative tunnel noise measurements at Mach 3, 6 and 7.4 in two Ludwieg tube facilities and a shock tunnel. Surface pressure fluctuations were measured over a wide range of frequencies and test conditions including harsh test environments not accessible to measurement techniques such as pitot probes and hot-wire anemometry. Quantitative results of the tunnel noise are provided in frequency ranges relevant for hypersonic boundary layer transition. In combination with the experimental studies, direct numerical simulations of the leading-edge receptivity to fast and slow acoustic waves were performed for the slender wedge probe at conditions corresponding to the experimental free-stream conditions. The receptivity to fast acoustic waves was found to be characterized by an early amplification of the induced fast mode. For slow acoustic waves an initial decay was found close to the leading edge. At all Mach numbers, and for all considered frequencies, the leading-edge receptivity to fast acoustic waves was found to be higher than the receptivity to slow acoustic waves. Further, the effect of inclination angles of the acoustic wave with respect to the flow direction was investigated. The combined numerical and experimental approach in the present study confirmed the previous suggestion that the slow acoustic wave is the dominant acoustic mode in noisy hypersonic wind tunnels.

  10. Surface polymerization of (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) probed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy on Au(111) in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shahzada; Carstens, Timo; Berger, Rüdiger; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Endres, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The electropolymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) to poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was investigated in the air and water-stable ionic liquids 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl) trifluorophosphate [HMIm]FAP and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) amide [EMIm]TFSA. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) results show that the electropolymerization of EDOT in the ionic liquid can be probed on the nanoscale. In contrast to present understanding, it was observed that the EDOT can be oxidised in ionic liquids well below its oxidation potential and the under potential growth of polymer was visualized by in situ STM. These results serve as the first study to confirm the under potential growth of conducting polymers in ionic liquids. Furthermore, ex situ microscopy measurements were performed. Quite a high current of 670 nA was observed on the nanoscale by conductive scanning force microscopy (CSFM).

  11. Topographic and electronic contrast of the graphene moir´e on Ir(111) probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.; Hämäläinen, K.; Sainio, K.; Lahtinen, J.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.; Liljeroth, P.

    2011-01-01

    Epitaxial graphene grown on transition-metal surfaces typically exhibits a moir´e pattern due to the lattice mismatch between graphene and the underlying metal surface. We use both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the electronic and topographic contrast

  12. Probing the atomic structure of metallic nanoclusters with the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouteden, Koen; Lauwaet, Koen; Janssens, Ewald; Barcaro, Giovanni; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Van Haesendonck, Chris; Lievens, Peter

    2014-02-21

    Preformed Co clusters with an average diameter of 2.5 nm are produced in the gas phase and are deposited under controlled ultra-high vacuum conditions onto a thin insulating NaCl film on Au(111). Relying on a combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we demonstrate visualization of the three-dimensional atomic structure of the Co clusters by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) using a Cl functionalized STM tip that can be obtained on the NaCl surface. More generally, use of a functionalized STM tip may allow for systematic atomic structure determination with STM of nanoparticles that are deposited on metal surfaces.

  13. Collapse and revival oscillations as a probe for the tunneling amplitude in an ultracold Bose gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, F. Alexander; Hen, Itay; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the quantum corrections to the revival time due to finite tunneling in the collapse and revival of matter-wave interference after a quantum quench. We study hard-core bosons in a superlattice potential and the Bose-Hubbard model by means of exact numerical approaches and mean-field theory. We consider systems without and with a trapping potential present. We show that the quantum corrections to the revival time can be used to accurately determine the value of the hopping parameter in experiments with ultracold bosons in optical lattices.

  14. Dissipative tunneling through a potential barrier in the Lindblad theory of open quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isar, A.

    2000-01-01

    In the Lindblad theory for open quantum systems, and analytical expression of the tunneling probability through an inverted parabola is obtained. This probability depends on the environment coefficient and increase with the dissipation and the temperature of the thermal bath. (author)

  15. Calibration of a four-hole pyramid probe and area traverse measurements in a short-duration transonic turbine cascade tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, A. J.; Day, C. R. B.; Lock, G. D.; Oldfield, M. L. G.

    1996-08-01

    A four-hole pyramid probe has been calibrated for use in a short-duration transonic turbine cascade tunnel. The probe is used to create area traverse maps of total and static pressure, and pitch and yaw angles of the flow downstream of a transonic annular cascade. This data is unusual in that it was acquired in a short-duration (5 s of run time) annular cascade blowdown tunnel. A four-hole pyramid probe was used which has a 2.5 mm section head, and has the side faces inclined at 60° to the flow to improve transonic performance. The probe was calibrated in an ejector driven, perforated wall transonic tunnel over the Mach number range 0.5 1.2, with pitch angles from -20° to + 20° and yaw angles from-23° to +23°. A computer driven automatic traversing mechanism and data collection system was used to acquire a large probe calibration matrix (˜ 10,000 readings) of non dimensional pitch, yaw, Mach number, and total pressure calibration coefficients. A novel method was used to transform the probe calibration matrix of the raw coefficients into a probe application matrix of the physical flow variables (pitch, yaw, Mach number etc.). The probe application matrix is then used as a fast look-up table to process probe results. With negligible loss of accuracy, this method is faster by two orders of magnitude than the alternative of global interpolation on the raw probe calibration matrix. The blowdown tunnel (mean nozzle guide vane blade ring diameter 1.1 m) creates engine representative Reynolds numbers, transonic Mach numbers and high levels (≈ 13%) of inlet turbulence intensity. Contours of experimental measurements at three different engine relevant conditions and two axial positions have been obtained. An analysis of the data is presented which includes a necessary correction for the finite velocity of the probe. Such a correction is non trivial for the case of fast moving probes in compressible flow.

  16. Study of an edge transport barrier by Langmuir probes in the compact helical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, M [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Toi, K [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nagaoka, K [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Suzuki, C [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Minami, T [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Akiyama, T [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Isobe, M [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Yoshimura, Y [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nishimura, S [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Shimizu, A [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Takahashi, C [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Matsuoka, K [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Okamura, S [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The edge transport barrier (ETB) produced by the L-H transition was measured by a triple Langmuir probe (LP) at two toroidal sections of the compact helical system (CHS), of which diagnostic method has good time and spatial resolutions. The radial profiles of electron density (n{sub e}), electron temperature (T{sub e}) and space potential (V{sub s}) in the ETB region have different shapes at two different toroidal sections. These profiles are deformed inside the ETB region at one location and are formed with rather smooth variations at the other. These deformations gradually disappear in the deep H-phase (after {approx}15 ms from the transition) and the profiles inside the ETB become similar at both sections. The deformation seems linked to the presence of a non-rotating magnetic island at the rational surface of the rotational transform {iota}/2{pi} = 1.

  17. Probing Single Nanometer-scale Particles with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarty, G.S.; Love, J.C.; Kushmerick, J.G.; Charles, L.F.; Keating, C.D.; Toleno, B.J.; Lyn, M.E.; Castleman, A.W.; Natan, M.J.; Weiss, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy can be used to isolate single particles on surfaces for further study. Local optical and electronic properties coupled with topographic information collected by the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) give insight into the intrinsic properties of the species under study. Since each spectroscopic measurement is done on a single particle, each sample is 'monodisperse', regardless of the degree of heterogeneity of the original preparation. We illustrate this with three example systems - a metal cluster of known atomic structure, metal nanoparticles dispersed from colloid suspensions, and metallocarbohedrenes (Met-Cars) deposited with other reaction products. Au and Ag nanoparticles were imaged using a photon emission STM. The threshold voltage, the lowest bias voltage at which photons are produced, was determined for Au nanoparticles. Electronic spectra of small clusters of Ni atoms on MoS 2 were recorded. Preliminary images of Zr-based Met-Car-containing soot were obtained on Au and MoS 2 substrates and partial electronic spectra were recorded of these possible Met-Car particles

  18. Dynamics of a nanoscale Josephson junction probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ast, Christian R.; Jaeck, Berthold; Eltschka, Matthias; Etzkorn, Markus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Kern, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Institut de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    The Josephson effect is an intriguing phenomenon as it presents an interplay of different energy scales, such as the Josephson energy ε{sub J} (critical current), charging energy ε{sub C}, and temperature T. Using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating at a base temperature of 15 mK, we create a nanoscale superconductor-vacuum-superconductor tunnel junction in an extremely underdamped regime (Q>>10). We observe extremely small retrapping currents also owing to strongly reduced ohmic losses in the well-developed superconducting gaps. While formally operating in the zero temperature limit, i.e. the temperature T is smaller than the Josephson plasma frequency ω{sub J} (k{sub B}T<<ℎω{sub J}=√(8ε{sub J}ε{sub C})), experimentally other phenomena, such as stray photons, may perturb the Josephson junction, leading to an effectively higher temperature. The dynamics of the Josephson junction can be addressed experimentally by looking at characteristic parameters, such as the switching current and the retrapping current. We discuss the dynamics of the Josephson junction in the context of reaching the zero temperature limit.

  19. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; de la Fuente, César; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-09-03

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths.

  20. Josephson scanning tunneling microscopy -- a local and direct probe of the superconducting order parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Hikari; Dynes, Robert; Barber Jr., Richard. P.; Ono, S.; Ando, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Direct measurements of the superconducting superfluid on the surface of vacuum-cleaved Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta (BSCCO) samples are reported. These measurements are accomplished via Josephson tunneling into the sample using a novel scanning tunneling microscope (STM) equipped with a superconducting tip. The spatial resolution of the STM of lateral distances less than the superconducting coherence length allows it to reveal local inhomogeneities in the pair wavefunction of the BSCCO. Instrument performance is demonstrated first with Josephson measurements of Pb films followed by the layered superconductor NbSe2. The relevant measurement parameter, the Josephson ICRN product, is discussed within the context of both BCS superconductors and the high transition temperature superconductors. The local relationship between the ICRN product and the quasiparticle density of states (DOS) gap are presented within the context of phase diagrams for BSCCO. Excessive current densities can be produced with these measurements and have been found to alter the local DOS in the BSCCO. Systematic studies of this effect were performed to determine the practical measurement limits for these experiments. Alternative methods for preparation of the BSCCO surface are also discussed.

  1. TAMR effect in the tunneling through monocrystalline GaAs barriers; TAMR-Effekt beim Tunneln durch einkristalline GaAs-Barrieren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobenhofer, Michael

    2013-01-28

    Within the scope of this thesis the TAMR-effect in magnetic tunnel junctions with a single-crystalline GaAs-barrier was investigated. As ferromagnetic electrodes Fe-, FeCo- and FePt-layers were used. The measured TAMR-effect was investigated with respect to its behaviour towards changes in external Parameters, like the applied voltage, the temperature and the external magnetic field. The physical origin of the effect was attributed to the interaction of Rashba- and Dresselhaus-Spin-Orbit-coupling inside the tunnelling barrier and at the metal/semiconductor-interfaces.

  2. Fabrication of nano-sized magnetic tunnel junctions using lift-off process assisted by atomic force probe tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ku Youl; Min, Byoung-Chul; Ahn, Chiyui; Choi, Gyung-Min; Shin, Il-Jae; Park, Seung-Young; Rhie, Kungwon; Shin, Kyung-Ho

    2013-09-01

    We present a fabrication method for nano-scale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), employing e-beam lithography and lift-off process assisted by the probe tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). It is challenging to fabricate nano-sized MTJs on small substrates because it is difficult to use chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process. The AFM-assisted lift-off process enables us to fabricate nano-sized MTJs on small substrates (12.5 mm x 12.5 mm) without CMP process. The e-beam patterning has been done using bi-layer resist, the poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA)/ hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ). The PMMA/HSQ resist patterns are used for both the etch mask for ion milling and the self-aligned mask for top contact formation after passivation. The self-aligned mask buried inside a passivation oxide layer, is readily lifted-off by the force exerted by the probe tip. The nano-MTJs (160 nm x 90 nm) fabricated by this method show clear current-induced magnetization switching with a reasonable TMR and critical switching current density.

  3. Spin accumulation in Si channels using CoFe/MgO/Si and CoFe/AlOx/Si tunnel contacts with high quality tunnel barriers prepared by radical-oxygen annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akushichi, T.; Shuto, Y.; Sugahara, S.; Takamura, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate spin injection into Si channels using three-terminal spin-accumulation (3T-SA) devices with high-quality CoFe/MgO/n-Si and CoFe/AlO x /n-Si tunnel spin-injectors whose tunnel barriers are formed by radical oxidation of Mg and Al thin films deposited on Si(100) substrates and successive annealing under radical-oxygen exposure. When the MgO and AlO x barriers are not treated by the radical-oxygen annealing, the Hanle-effect signals obtained from the 3T-SA devices are closely fitted by a single Lorentz function representing a signal due to trap spins. On the other hand, when the tunnel barriers are annealed under radical-oxygen exposure, the Hanle-effect signals can be accurately fitted by the superposition of a Lorentz function and a non-Lorentz function representing a signal due to accumulated spins in the Si channel. These results suggest that the quality improvement of tunnel barriers treated by radical-oxygen annealing is highly effective for spin-injection into Si channels

  4. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Perrin, Mickael L; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule-electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  5. Spin filtering through ferromagnetic BiMn O3 tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, M.; Bibes, M.; Barthélémy, A.; Bouzehouane, K.; Fusil, S.; Varela, M.; Fontcuberta, J.; Fert, A.

    2005-07-01

    We report on experiments of spin filtering through ultrathin single-crystal layers of the insulating and ferromagnetic oxide BiMnO3 (BMO). The spin polarization of the electrons tunneling from a gold electrode through BMO is analyzed with a counterelectrode of the half-metallic oxide La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LSMO). At 3K we find a 50% change of the tunnel resistances according to whether the magnetizations of BMO and LSMO are parallel or opposite. This effect corresponds to a spin-filtering efficiency of up to 22%. Our results thus show the potential of complex ferromagnetic insulating oxides for spin filtering and injection.

  6. The time analysis of multiple internal reflections in tunneling description through the barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ol'khovskij, V.S.; Majdanyuk, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    The problem of scattering of a nonrelativistic particle on a nucleus is considered, the interaction potential between which has a spherically symmetrical view. As the further development of the time analysis of processes of tunneling the non-stationary method of the solution of a problem is represented, due to which begins the possibility to describe in a time dependence the propagation (tunneling) of a particle and in details to study this process in an interesting instant or concerning a concrete point of space. At calculating the time parameters the method has shown itself simple and convenient. At finding the expressions for stationary wave functions for problems with an interaction potential, which radial part has more composite view than rectangular, this method is more effective than reference stationary approaches

  7. Analysis of the resonant tunneling diode with the stepped pre-barrier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yatskiv, Roman; Voves, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 193, č. 1 (2009), s. 1-4 ISSN 1742-6588. [16th International Conference on Electron Dynamics In Semiconductors, Optoelectronics and Nanostructure. Monpellier, 24.8.2009 – 28.8.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB200670901; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN401220801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Resonant tunneling diodes * Nonequilibrium Green functions * Hysteresis Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics , Electrical Engineering

  8. Investigation of the negative differential resistance reproducibility in AlN/GaN double-barrier resonant tunnelling diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucherit, M.; Soltani, A.; Rousseau, M.; Deresmes, D.; Berthe, M.; Durand, C.; De Jaeger, J.-C. [IEMN/UMR-CNRS 8520, Universite Lille1, PRES Universite Lille Nord de France (France); Monroy, E. [Equipe mixte CEA-CNRS-UJF Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs, DRFMC/SP2M/PSC, CEA-Grenoble (France)

    2011-10-31

    AlN/GaN double-barrier resonant tunnelling diodes were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaN/sapphire template and processed into mesa diameters from 2 {mu}m to 4 {mu}m. The current-voltage characteristics were carried out in direct current operation and under-high vacuum. A sharp negative differential resistance (NDR) was detected in the forward bias at 120 K. The NDR was observed for the mesa size of 2 {mu}m at 4 V with a peak-to-valley current ratio of 3.5. The measurement conditions were chosen to make NDR reproducible more than 50 times and apparent in both scan voltage directions after electrical treatment.

  9. Comparison of Electron Transmittance and Tunneling Current through a Trapezoidal Potential Barrier with Spin Polarization Consideration by using Analytical and Numerical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabila, Ezra; Noor, Fatimah A.; Khairurrijal

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we report an analytical calculation of electron transmittance and polarized tunneling current in a single barrier heterostructure of a metal-GaSb-metal by considering the Dresselhaus spin orbit effect. Exponential function, WKB method and Airy function were used in calculating the electron transmittance and tunneling current. A Transfer Matrix Method, as a numerical method, was utilized as the benchmark to evaluate the analytical calculation. It was found that the transmittances calculated under exponential function and Airy function is the same as that calculated under TMM method at low electron energy. However, at high electron energy only the transmittance calculated under Airy function approach is the same as that calculated under TMM method. It was also shown that the transmittances both of spin-up and spin-down conditions increase as the electron energy increases for low energies. Furthermore, the tunneling current decreases with increasing the barrier width.

  10. Development of CdTe/Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te double barrier, single quantum well heterostructure for resonant tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuscher, G.; Keim, M.; Fischer, F.; Waag, A.; Landwehr, G. [Physikalishes Institut der Universitaet Wuerzburg am Hubland, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    We report the first observation of resonant tunneling through a CdTe/Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te double barrier, single quantum well heterostructure. Negative differential resistance is observable at temperatures below 230 K, exhibiting a peak to valley ratio of 3:1 at 4.2 K. (author). 16 refs, 2 figs.

  11. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy with quantitative insights into magnetic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phark, Soo-Hyon; Sander, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (spin-STM/S) have been successfully applied to magnetic characterizations of individual nanostructures. Spin-STM/S is often performed in magnetic fields of up to some Tesla, which may strongly influence the tip state. In spite of the pivotal role of the tip in spin-STM/S, the contribution of the tip to the differential conductance d I /d V signal in an external field has rarely been investigated in detail. In this review, an advanced analysis of spin-STM/S data measured on magnetic nanoislands, which relies on a quantitative magnetic characterization of tips, is discussed. Taking advantage of the uniaxial out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy of Co bilayer nanoisland on Cu(111), in-field spin-STM on this system has enabled a quantitative determination, and thereby, a categorization of the magnetic states of the tips. The resulting in-depth and conclusive analysis of magnetic characterization of the tip opens new venues for a clear-cut sub-nanometer scale spin ordering and spin-dependent electronic structure of the non-collinear magnetic state in bilayer high Fe nanoislands on Cu(111).

  12. Deep repository - engineered barrier systems. Assessment of backfill materials and methods for deposition tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, D.; Moren, L.; Sellin, P; Keto, P.

    2007-09-01

    The main objectives of this report are to: (1) present density criteria considering deposition tunnels for the investigated backfill materials, (2) evaluate what densities can be achieved with the suggested backfill methods, (3) compare the density criteria to achievable densities, (4) based on this comparison evaluate the safety margin for the combinations of backfill materials and methods and, (5) make recommendations for further investigations and development work. The backfilling methods considered in this report are compaction of backfill material in situ in the tunnel and placement of pre-compacted blocks and pellets. The materials investigated in the second phase of the SKB-Posiva backfilling programme can be divided into three main categories: (1) Bentonite clays: two high-grade Na-bentonites from Wyoming (MX-80 and SPV200), one low-grade bentonite from Kutch (India Asha 2 0), and one high- and one low-grade Ca-bentonite from Milos (Deponite CA-N and Milos backfill). The highgrade bentonites are used in different bentonite-ballast mixtures. (2) Smectite-rich mixed-layer clays: one from Dnesice-Plzensko Jih (DPJ) located in the Czech Republic and one from Northern Germany (Friedland clay). (3) Mixtures of bentonite and ballast: Mixtures consisting of high-grade bentonite (30, 40 and 50 w-%) and crushed rock with different type of grain size distribution or sand. The general conclusion from the comparison between estimated achievable densities and the density criteria is that placing pre-compacted blocks of swelling clay or 50/50 mixture and pellets in the tunnel results in the highest safety margin. (orig.)

  13. Localization effects in the tunnel barriers of phosphorus-doped silicon quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ferrus

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We have observed a negative differential conductance with singular gate and source-drain bias dependences in a phosphorus-doped silicon quantum dot. Its origin is discussed within the framework of weak localization. By measuring the current-voltage characteristics at different temperatures as well as simulating the tunneling rates dependences on energy, we demonstrate that the presence of shallow energy defects together with an enhancement of localization satisfactory explain our observations. Effects observed in magnetic fields are also discussed.

  14. Unified approach to probing Coulomb effects in tunnel ionization for any ellipticity of laser light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsman, A S; Hofmann, C; Pfeiffer, A N; Cirelli, C; Keller, U

    2013-12-27

    We present experimental data that show significant deviations from theoretical predictions for the location of the center of the electron momenta distribution at low values of ellipticity ε of laser light. We show that these deviations are caused by significant Coulomb focusing along the minor axis of polarization, something that is normally neglected in the analysis of electron dynamics, even in cases where the Coulomb correction is otherwise taken into account. By investigating ellipticity-resolved electron momenta distributions in the plane of polarization, we show that Coulomb focusing predominates at lower values of ellipticity of laser light, while Coulomb asymmetry becomes important at higher values, showing that these two complementary phenomena can be used to probe long-range Coulomb interaction at all polarizations of laser light. Our results suggest that both the breakdown of Coulomb focusing and the onset of Coulomb asymmetry are linked to the disappearance of Rydberg states with increasing ellipticity.

  15. Low frequency noise in asymmetric double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a top thin MgO layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hui-Qiang; Tang Wei-Yue; Liu Liang; Wei Jian; Li Da-Lai; Feng Jia-Feng; Han Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency noise has been investigated at room temperature for asymmetric double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DBMTJs), where the coupling between the top and middle CoFeB layers is antiferromagnetic with a 0.8-nm thin top MgO barrier of the CoFeB/MgO/CoFe/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB DBMTJ. At enough large bias, 1/f noise dominates the voltage noise power spectra in the low frequency region, and is conventionally characterized by the Hooge parameter α mag . With increasing external field, the top and bottom ferromagnetic layers are aligned by the field, and then the middle free layer rotates from antiparallel state (antiferromagnetic coupling between top and middle ferromagnetic layers) to parallel state. In this rotation process α mag and magnetoresistance-sensitivity-product show a linear dependence, consistent with the fluctuation dissipation relation. With the magnetic field applied at different angles (θ) to the easy axis of the free layer, the linear dependence persists while the intercept of the linear fit satisfies a cos(θ) dependence, similar to that for the magnetoresistance, suggesting intrinsic relation between magnetic losses and magnetoresistance. (rapid communication)

  16. Low-resistance magnetic tunnel junctions prepared by partial remote plasma oxidation of 0.9 nm Al barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ricardo; Freitas, Paulo P.; MacKenzie, Maureen; Chapman, John N.

    2005-01-01

    Current perpendicular to the plane read-head elements suitable for high-density magnetic storage require low resistance while maintaining a reasonable magnetoresistive (MR) signal (RxA 2 and MR>20% for areal densities >200 Gb/in 2 ). This letter shows that competitive low RxA junctions can be produced using underoxidized barriers starting from 0.9 nm thick Al layers. For as-deposited junctions, tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ∼20% for RxA∼2-15 Ω μm 2 is obtained, while in the RxA∼60-150 Ω μm 2 range, TMR values between 40% to 45% are achieved. A limited number of junctions exhibits considerably lower RxA values with respect to the average, while keeping a similar MR (down to 0.44 Ω μm 2 with TMR of 20% and down to 2.2 Ω μm 2 with TMR of 52%). Experimental data suggest that current confinement to small regions (barrier defects/hot spots) may explain these results

  17. Quantum tunneling through a very narrow triangular potential barrier exact and WKB solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballo, P.; Harmatha, L.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the quantum-mechanical transmission of an electron in narrow potential barrier. It has been shown that application of WKB approximation could give enormous error if the slope of potential is rapid. Edification of this work is that unreasonable application of numerical approximations without the deep knowledge of theory should give wrong result. This we should remember every second, every day. (authors)

  18. Deep repository - engineered barrier systems. Assessment of backfill materials and methods for deposition tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, David; Moren, Lena; Sellin, Patrik; Keto, Paula

    2006-09-01

    The main objectives of this report are to: 1) present density criteria considering deposition tunnels for the investigated backfill materials, 2) evaluate what densities can be achieved with the suggested backfill methods, 3) compare the density criteria to achievable densities, 4) based on this comparison evaluate the safety margin for the combinations of backfill materials and methods and, 5) make recommendations for further investigations and development work. The backfilling methods considered in this report are compaction of backfill material in situ in the tunnel and placement of pre-compacted blocks and pellets. The materials investigated in the second phase of the SKB-Posiva backfilling project can be divided into three main categories: 1. Bentonite clays: two high-grade Na-bentonites from Wyoming (MX-80 and SPV200), one low-grade bentonite from Kutch (India Asha 230), and one high and one low-grade Ca-bentonite from Milos (Deponite CA-N and Milos backfill). The high-grade bentonites are used in different bentonite-ballast mixtures. 2. Smectite-rich mixed-layer clays: one from Dnesice-Plzensko Jih (DPJ) located in the Czech Republic and one from Northern Germany (Friedland clay). Mixtures of bentonite and ballast: Mixtures consisting of high-grade bentonite (0, 40 and 50 w-%) and crushed rock with different type of grain size distribution or sand. The relationships between dry densities and hydraulic conductivity, swelling pressure and compressibility in saturated state for these materials were investigated. Most of the tests were performed with a groundwater salinity of 3.5%. This salinity is comparable to sea water and can be expected to be at the high end of salinities occurring during the assessment period. The purpose of the investigations was to determine the dry densities required to meet the function indicator criteria. These densities are referred to as the density criteria. However throughout the assessment period a loss of material and thus

  19. Deep repository - engineered barrier systems. Assessment of backfill materials and methods for deposition tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnarsson, David; Moren, Lena; Sellin, Patrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Keto, Paula [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-09-15

    The main objectives of this report are to: 1) present density criteria considering deposition tunnels for the investigated backfill materials, 2) evaluate what densities can be achieved with the suggested backfill methods, 3) compare the density criteria to achievable densities, 4) based on this comparison evaluate the safety margin for the combinations of backfill materials and methods and, 5) make recommendations for further investigations and development work. The backfilling methods considered in this report are compaction of backfill material in situ in the tunnel and placement of pre-compacted blocks and pellets. The materials investigated in the second phase of the SKB-Posiva backfilling project can be divided into three main categories: 1. Bentonite clays: two high-grade Na-bentonites from Wyoming (MX-80 and SPV200), one low-grade bentonite from Kutch (India Asha 230), and one high and one low-grade Ca-bentonite from Milos (Deponite CA-N and Milos backfill). The high-grade bentonites are used in different bentonite-ballast mixtures. 2. Smectite-rich mixed-layer clays: one from Dnesice-Plzensko Jih (DPJ) located in the Czech Republic and one from Northern Germany (Friedland clay). Mixtures of bentonite and ballast: Mixtures consisting of high-grade bentonite (0, 40 and 50 w-%) and crushed rock with different type of grain size distribution or sand. The relationships between dry densities and hydraulic conductivity, swelling pressure and compressibility in saturated state for these materials were investigated. Most of the tests were performed with a groundwater salinity of 3.5%. This salinity is comparable to sea water and can be expected to be at the high end of salinities occurring during the assessment period. The purpose of the investigations was to determine the dry densities required to meet the function indicator criteria. These densities are referred to as the density criteria. However throughout the assessment period a loss of material and thus

  20. Long-term reliable physically unclonable function based on oxide tunnel barrier breakdown on two-transistors two-magnetic-tunnel-junctions cell-based embedded spin transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Satoshi; Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Noguchi, Hiroki; Ikegami, Kazutaka; Abe, Keiko; Fujita, Shinobu

    2017-04-01

    Among the diverse applications of spintronics, security for internet-of-things (IoT) devices is one of the most important. A physically unclonable function (PUF) with a spin device (spin transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory, STT-MRAM) is presented. Oxide tunnel barrier breakdown is used to realize long-term stability for PUFs. A secure PUF has been confirmed by evaluating the Hamming distance of a 32-bit STT-MRAM-PUF fabricated using 65 nm CMOS technology.

  1. Probing DNA in nanopores via tunneling: from sequencing to ``quantum'' analogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2012-02-01

    Fast and low-cost DNA sequencing methods would revolutionize medicine: a person could have his/her full genome sequenced so that drugs could be tailored to his/her specific illnesses; doctors could know in advance patients' likelihood to develop a given ailment; cures to major diseases could be found faster [1]. However, this goal of ``personalized medicine'' is hampered today by the high cost and slow speed of DNA sequencing methods. In this talk, I will discuss the sequencing protocol we suggest which requires the measurement of the distributions of transverse currents during the translocation of single-stranded DNA into nanopores [2-5]. I will support our conclusions with a combination of molecular dynamics simulations coupled to quantum mechanical calculations of electrical current in experimentally realizable systems [2-5]. I will also discuss recent experiments that support these theoretical predictions. In addition, I will show how this relatively unexplored area of research at the interface between solids, liquids, and biomolecules at the nanometer length scale is a fertile ground to study quantum phenomena that have a classical counterpart, such as ionic quasi-particles, ionic ``quantized'' conductance [6,7] and Coulomb blockade [8]. Work supported in part by NIH. [4pt] [1] M. Zwolak, M. Di Ventra, Physical Approaches to DNA Sequencing and Detection, Rev. Mod. Phys. 80, 141 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Zwolak and M. Di Ventra, Electronic signature of DNA nucleotides via transverse transport, Nano Lett. 5, 421 (2005).[0pt] [3] J. Lagerqvist, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Fast DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport, Nano Lett. 6, 779 (2006).[0pt] [4] J. Lagerqvist, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Influence of the environment and probes on rapid DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport, Biophys. J. 93, 2384 (2007).[0pt] [5] M. Krems, M. Zwolak, Y.V. Pershin, and M. Di Ventra, Effect of noise on DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport

  2. Resonant Tunnelling in Barrier-in-Well and Well-in-Well Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang-Hong, Yao; Zhang-Yan; Wei-Wu, Li; Yong-Chun, Shu; Zhan-Guo, Wang; Jing-Jun, Xu; Guo-Zhi, Jia

    2008-01-01

    A Schrödinger equation is solved numerically for a barrier in a quantum well and a quantum well in another well structure by the transfer matrix technique. Effect of structure parameters on the transmission probabilities is investigated in detail. The results suggest that symmetry plays an important role in the coupling effect between the quantum wells. The relationship between the width of the inner well and the resonant energy levels in well-in-well structures is also studied. It is found that the ground state energy and the second resonant energy decrease with increasing width of the inner well, while the first resonant energy remains constant

  3. Quantum size effects on spin-transfer torque in a double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (semiconductor) spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daqiq, Reza; Ghobadi, Nader

    2016-01-01

    We study the quantum size effects of an MgO-based double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (DBMTJ-NM) (semiconductor (DBMTJ-SC)) spacer on the charge current and the spin-transfer torque (STT) components using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The results show oscillatory behavior due to the resonant tunneling effect depending on the structure parameters. We find that the charge current and the STT components in the DBMTJ-SC demonstrate the magnitude enhancement in comparison with the DBMTJ-NM. The bias dependence of the STT components in a DBMTJ-NM shows different behavior in comparison with spin valves and conventional MTJs. Therefore, by choosing a specific SC spacer with suitable thickness in a DBMTJ the charge current and the STT components significantly increase so that one can design a device with high STT and faster magnetization switching. - Highlights: • The quantum size effects are studied in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions. • Spin torque (ST) components oscillate for increasing of middle spacer thicknesses. • Due to the resonant tunneling in the quantum well, oscillations have appeared. • By replacement a metal spacer with a semiconductor (ZnO) ST has increased. • The ST components vs. bias show gradually decreasing unlike spin valves or MTJs.

  4. Quantum size effects on spin-transfer torque in a double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (semiconductor) spacer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daqiq, Reza; Ghobadi, Nader

    2016-07-15

    We study the quantum size effects of an MgO-based double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (DBMTJ-NM) (semiconductor (DBMTJ-SC)) spacer on the charge current and the spin-transfer torque (STT) components using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The results show oscillatory behavior due to the resonant tunneling effect depending on the structure parameters. We find that the charge current and the STT components in the DBMTJ-SC demonstrate the magnitude enhancement in comparison with the DBMTJ-NM. The bias dependence of the STT components in a DBMTJ-NM shows different behavior in comparison with spin valves and conventional MTJs. Therefore, by choosing a specific SC spacer with suitable thickness in a DBMTJ the charge current and the STT components significantly increase so that one can design a device with high STT and faster magnetization switching. - Highlights: • The quantum size effects are studied in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions. • Spin torque (ST) components oscillate for increasing of middle spacer thicknesses. • Due to the resonant tunneling in the quantum well, oscillations have appeared. • By replacement a metal spacer with a semiconductor (ZnO) ST has increased. • The ST components vs. bias show gradually decreasing unlike spin valves or MTJs.

  5. Liquid phase mass production of air-stable black phosphorus/phospholipids nanocomposite with ultralow tunneling barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiankun; Liu, Yinan; Lai, Jiawei; Qi, Shaomian; An, Chunhua; Lu, Yao; Duan, Xuexin; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Daihua; Sun, Dong; Chen, Jian-Hao; Liu, Jing

    2018-04-01

    Few-layer black phosphorus (FLBP), a recently discovered two-dimensional semiconductor, has attracted substantial attention in the scientific and technical communities due to its great potential in electronic and optoelectronic applications. However, reactivity of FLBP flakes with ambient species limits its direct applications. Among various methods to passivate FLBP in ambient environment, nanocomposites mixing FLBP flakes with stable matrix may be one of the most promising approaches for industry applications. Here, we report a simple one-step procedure to mass produce air-stable FLBP/phospholipids nanocomposite in liquid phase. The resultant nanocomposite is found to have ultralow tunneling barrier for charge carriers which can be described by an Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping mechanism. Devices made from such mass-produced FLBP/phospholipids nanocomposite show highly stable electrical conductivity and opto-electrical response in ambient conditions, indicating its promising applications in both electronic and optoelectronic applications. This method could also be generalized to the mass production of nanocomposites consisting of other air-sensitive 2D materials, such as FeSe, NbSe2, WTe2, etc.

  6. Controlled fabrication of nano-scale double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions using focused ion beam milling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, H.X.; Wang, T.X.; Zeng, Z.M.; Zhang, X.Q.; Zhao, J.; Han, X.F.

    2006-01-01

    The controlled fabrication method for nano-scale double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DBMTJs) with the layer structure of Ta(5)/Cu(10)/Ni 79 Fe 21 (5)/Ir 22 Mn 78 (12)/Co 6 Fe 2 B 2 (4)/Al(1) -oxide/Co 6 Fe 2 B 2 (6)/Al (1)-oxide/Co 6 Fe 2 B 2 (4)/Ir 22 Mn 78 (12)/Ni 79 Fe 21 (5)/Ta(5) (thickness unit: nm) was used. This method involved depositing thin multi-layer stacks by sputtering system, and depositing a Pt nano-pillar using a focused ion beam which acted both as a top contact and as an etching mask. The advantages of this process over the traditional process using e-beam and optical lithography in that it involve only few processing steps, e.g. it does not involve any lift-off steps. In order to evaluate the nanofabrication techniques, the DBMTJs with the dimensions of 200 nmx400 nm, 200 nmx200 nm nano-scale were prepared and their R-H, I-V characteristics were measured.

  7. Interfacial mixing in double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with amorphous NiFeSiB layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, B.S.; Ko, S.P.; Hwang, J.Y.; Rhee, J.R.; Kim, T.W.; Kim, Y.K.

    2007-01-01

    Double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) comprising Ta 45/Ru 9.5/IrMn 10/CoFe 7/AlO x /free layer (CoFe 4/NiFeSiB 2/CoFe 4, CoFe 10, or NiFeSiB 10)/AlO x /CoFe 7/IrMn 10/Ru 60 (nm) have been examined with an emphasis given on understanding the interfacial mixing effects. The DMTJ, consisted of NiFeSiB, shows low switching field and low bias voltage dependence because the amorphous NiFeSiB has lower M S (=800 emu/cm 3 ) and offers smoother interfaces than polycrystalline CoFe. An interesting feature observed in the CoFe/NiFeSiB/CoFe sandwich free layered DMTJ is the presence of a wavy MR transfer curve at high-resistance region. Because the polycrystalline CoFe usually grows into a columnar structure, diamagnetic CoSi, paramagnetic FeSi, and/or diamagnetic CoB might have been formed during the sputter-deposition process. By employing electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), we were able to confirm that Si and B atoms were arranged evenly in the top and bottom portions of AlO x /CoFe interfaces. This means that the interfacial mixing resulted in a distorted magnetization reversal process

  8. Measurement and statistical analysis of single-molecule current-voltage characteristics, transition voltage spectroscopy, and tunneling barrier height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaoyin; Hihath, Joshua; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Tao, Nongjian

    2011-11-30

    We report on the measurement and statistical study of thousands of current-voltage characteristics and transition voltage spectra (TVS) of single-molecule junctions with different contact geometries that are rapidly acquired using a new break junction method at room temperature. This capability allows one to obtain current-voltage, conductance voltage, and transition voltage histograms, thus adding a new dimension to the previous conductance histogram analysis at a fixed low-bias voltage for single molecules. This method confirms the low-bias conductance values of alkanedithiols and biphenyldithiol reported in literature. However, at high biases the current shows large nonlinearity and asymmetry, and TVS allows for the determination of a critically important parameter, the tunneling barrier height or energy level alignment between the molecule and the electrodes of single-molecule junctions. The energy level alignment is found to depend on the molecule and also on the contact geometry, revealing the role of contact geometry in both the contact resistance and energy level alignment of a molecular junction. Detailed statistical analysis further reveals that, despite the dependence of the energy level alignment on contact geometry, the variation in single-molecule conductance is primarily due to contact resistance rather than variations in the energy level alignment.

  9. Deep repository - Engineered barrier system. Erosion and sealing processes in tunnel backfill materials investigated in laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanden, Torbjoern; Boergesson, Lennart; Dueck, Ann; Goudarzi, Reza; Loennqvist, Margareta (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    SKB in Sweden and Posiva in Finland are developing and plan to implement similar disposal concepts for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Co-operation and joint development work between Posiva and SKB with the overall objective to develop backfill concepts and techniques for sealing and closure of the repository have been going on for several years. The investigation described in this report is intended to acquire more knowledge regarding the behavior of some of the candidate backfilling materials. Blocks made of three different materials (Friedland clay, Asha 230 or a bentonite/ballast 30/70 mixture) as well as different bentonite pellets have been examined. The backfill materials will be exposed to an environment simulating that in a tunnel, with high relative humidity and water inflow from the rock. The processes and properties investigated are: 1. Erosion properties of blocks and pellets (Friedland blocks, MX-80 pellets, Cebogel QSE pellets, Minelco and Friedland granules). 2. Displacements of blocks after emplacement in a deposition drift (Blocks of Friedland, Asha 230 and Mixture 30/70). 3. The ability of these materials to seal a leaking in-situ cast plug cement/rock but also other fractures in the rock (MX-80 pellets). 4. The self healing ability after a piping scenario (Blocks of Friedland, Asha 230 Mixture 30/70 and also MX-80 pellets). 5. Swelling and cracking of the compacted backfill blocks caused by relative humidity. The erosion properties of Friedland blocks were also investigated in Phase 2 of the joint SKBPosiva project 'Backfilling and Closure of the Deep Repository, BACLO, which included laboratory scale experiments. In this phase of the project (3) some completing tests were performed with new blocks produced for different field tests. These blocks had a lower density than intended and this has an influence on the erosion properties measured. The erosion properties of MX-80 pellets were also investigated earlier in the project but

  10. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy to probe odd-triplet contributions to the long-ranged proximity effect in Al-EuS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diesch, Simon; Machon, Peter; Belzig, Wolfgang; Scheer, Elke [Universitaet Konstanz, Konstanz (Germany); Suergers, Christoph; Beckmann, Detlef [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Experiments on superconductor-ferromagnet-systems have shown Cooper pairs tunneling through ferromagnetic layers, indicating Cooper pairs of equal spin, thus corresponding to a long-range triplet proximity effect. Most experimental evidence for triplet superconductivity comes from observations of the thickness dependence of the Josephson current through a ferromagnetic barrier, but there is an increasing interest in obtaining direct spectroscopic evidence. This project aims to analyze the DOS of thin films of the ferromagnetic insulator europium sulfide on superconducting aluminum or vice versa, using a scanning tunneling microscope in spectroscopy mode at 280 mK and in varying magnetic fields. We observe significant broadening of the superconducting energy gap and a variety of sub-gap structures induced by the presence of the ferromagnet and interpret our findings based on the diffusive theory.

  11. Fabrication of Mg-X-O (X = Fe, Co, Ni, Cr, Mn, Ti, V, and Zn) barriers for magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushiji, K.; Kitagawa, E.; Ochiai, T.; Kubota, H.; Shimomura, N.; Ito, J.; Yoda, H.; Yuasa, S.

    2018-05-01

    We fabricated magnetic tunnel junctions with a 3d-transition material(X)-doped MgO (Mg-X-O) barrier, and evaluated the effect of the doping on magnetoresistance (MR) and microstructure. Among the variations of X (X = Fe, Co, Ni, Cr, Mn, Ti, V, and Zn), X = Fe and Mn showed a high MR ratio of more than 100%, even at a low resistance-area product of 3 Ωμm2. The microstructure analysis revealed that (001) textured orientation formed for X = Fe and Mn despite substantial doping (about 10 at%). The elemental mappings indicated that Fe atoms in the Mg-Fe-O barrier were segregated at the interfaces, while Mn atoms were evenly involved in the Mg-Mn-O barrier. This suggests that MgO has high adaptability for Fe and Mn dopants in terms of high MR ratio.

  12. Physics of Gate Modulated Resonant Tunneling (RT)-FETs: Multi-barrier MOSFET for steep slope and high on-current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzalian, Aryan; Colinge, Jean-Pierre; Flandre, Denis

    2011-05-01

    A new concept of nanoscale MOSFET, the Gate Modulated Resonant Tunneling Transistor (RT-FET), is presented and modeled using 3D Non-Equilibrium Green's Function simulations enlightening the main physical mechanisms. Owing to the additional tunnel barriers and the related longitudinal confinement present in the device, the density of state is reduced in its off-state, while remaining comparable in its on-state, to that of a MOS transistor without barriers. The RT-FET thus features both a lower RT-limited off-current and a faster increase of the current with V G, i.e. an improved slope characteristic, and hence an improved Ion/ Ioff ratio. Such improvement of the slope can happen in subthreshold regime, and therefore lead to subthreshold slope below the kT/q limit. In addition, faster increase of current and improved slope occur above threshold and lead to high thermionic on-current and significant Ion/ Ioff ratio improvement, even with threshold voltage below 0.2 V and supply voltage V dd of a few hundreds of mV as critically needed for future technology nodes. Finally RT-FETs are intrinsically immune to source-drain tunneling and are therefore promising candidate for extending the roadmap below 10 nm.

  13. Barriers and Facilitators of Iranian Elderly in Use of ATM Machines: A Qualitative Research in the Way of Cultural Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azade Mokhberi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Having considering to the rate of increasing of elder people population in Iran, is preadicted that in the next thirty years the number of elderly people who need to independently work with electronic devices such as ATMs machineswill be significantly increased while there is no sufficient studies in order to modification of these devices considering physical, mental and psychology abilities of the elder people. Methods & Materials: This article is part of a qualitative study with cultural Probes Methodology to explore the needs and barriers and facilitators in the work ATMs. This study collected data through observation, interview and documentation participants respectively. This qualitative study was conducted in two stages. In the first phase interviewed with 30 elderly people in Tehran.In the second Phase according to cultural probes method we designed a package to extract the needs and problems associated with ATM. purposive sample of 10 elderly people in Tehran, 6 participants were female and 4 males. Interviews continued until data saturation, data Were coded and categorized by content analysis method. Results: Six key factors required for the design of ATM data were extracted according to the Iranian people, that pleasant, unpleasant, wants and desires, problems and obstacles, banking and mishaps. that the classification of barriers and facilitating factors these factors were extracted for the elderly. The results showed a much higher barriers to Elderly people using ATMs in facilitating conditions are present. Conclusion: According to the Iranian people using ATMs barrier is recommended to attention to ATMs in the the environment, nature and location of the installation, ATMs appear particularly relevant in the context of software that can be tailored to the elderly should be done. Finally, it is suggested that future studies in different groups of people, especially older people with disabilities and low literacy are doing.

  14. Probing defect states in polycrystalline GaN grown on Si(111) by sub-bandgap laser-excited scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, F.-M.; Schnedler, M.; Portz, V.; Huang, Y.-C.; Huang, B.-C.; Shih, M.-C.; Chang, C.-W.; Tu, L.-W.; Eisele, H.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.; Chiu, Y.-P.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the potential of sub-bandgap laser-excited cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to investigate the presence of defect states in semiconductors. The characterization method is illustrated on GaN layers grown on Si(111) substrates without intentional buffer layers. According to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, the GaN layers consist of nanoscale wurtzite and zincblende crystallites with varying crystal orientations and hence contain high defect state densities. In order to discriminate between band-to-band excitation and defect state excitations, we use sub-bandgap laser excitation. We probe a clear increase in the tunnel current at positive sample voltages during sub-bandgap laser illumination for the GaN layer with high defect density, but no effect is found for high quality GaN epitaxial layers. This demonstrates the excitation of free charge carriers at defect states. Thus, sub-bandgap laser-excited scanning tunneling spectroscopy is a powerful complimentary characterization tool for defect states.

  15. Physics of optimal resonant tunneling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Racec, P.N.; Stoica, T.; Popescu, C.; Lepsa, M.I.; Roer, van de T.G.

    1997-01-01

    The optimal resonant tunneling, or the complete tunneling transparence of a biased double-barrier resonant-tunneling (DBRT) structure, is discussed. It is shown that its physics does not rest on the departure from the constant potential within the barriers and well, due to the applied electric

  16. Band Alignment in MoS2/WS2 Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Heterostructures Probed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Heather M; Rigosi, Albert F; Rim, Kwang Taeg; Flynn, George W; Heinz, Tony F

    2016-08-10

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we examine the electronic structure of transition metal dichalcogenide heterostructures (TMDCHs) composed of monolayers of MoS2 and WS2. STS data are obtained for heterostructures of varying stacking configuration as well as the individual monolayers. Analysis of the tunneling spectra includes the influence of finite sample temperature, yield information about the quasi-particle bandgaps, and the band alignment of MoS2 and WS2. We report the band gaps of MoS2 (2.16 ± 0.04 eV) and WS2 (2.38 ± 0.06 eV) in the materials as measured on the heterostructure regions and the general type II band alignment for the heterostructure, which shows an interfacial band gap of 1.45 ± 0.06 eV.

  17. Superconducting tunnel junctions on MgB{sub 2} using MgO and CaF{sub 2} as a barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakoda, Masahito, E-mail: sakoda@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Aibara, Masato; Mede, Kazuya; Kikuchi, Motoyuki; Naito, Michio [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We have revised the manuscript according to reviewer's comments. The details are in “Response to Reviewers”. • Superconducting junctions with MgO and CaF{sub 2} barrier were fabricated in order to improve the quality of junctions. • In SIN junctions with MgO barrier, clear superconducting gap was observed. (). • In SIS junctions with CaF2 barrier, Josephson current was observed over 30 K. (). • The compatibility of each barrier material at the upper and lower interfaces was clarified. (). - Abstract: We report the fabrication of superconducting tunnel junctions, both of superconductor–insulator-normal metal (SIN) and superconductor–insulator-superconductor (SIS), on MgB{sub 2} using MgO and CaF{sub 2} as a barrier. The SIN junctions fabricated using an MgO barrier showed excellent quasi-particle characteristics, including a large superconducting gap (Δ) of 2.5–3 meV and a low zero-bias conductance. We have also fabricated SIS junctions with an MgO barrier, but the quasi-particle characteristics of the SIS junctions are not as good as those of the SIN junctions, namely a reduced superconducting gap and a high zero-bias conductance. It appears that top MgB{sub 2} electrodes do not grow well on an MgO barrier, which is also suggested from in-situ RHEED observation. The SIN junctions fabricated using a CaF{sub 2} barrier showed less sharp quasi-particle characteristics than using an MgO barrier. However, the SIS junctions using a CaF{sub 2} barrier showed a fairly large I{sub c}R{sub N} value at 4.2 K over 1 mV and also exhibited finite Josephson current up to almost the film's T{sub c} (∼30 K). The RHEED observation revealed that top MgB{sub 2} electrodes grow well on a CaF{sub 2} barrier.

  18. Instabilities in thin tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konkin, M.K.; Adler, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Tunnel junctions prepared for inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy are often plagued by instabilities in the 0-500-meV range. This paper relates the bias at which the instability occurs to the barrier thickness

  19. Tip-induced local strain on Mo S2/graphite detected by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wonhee; Hus, Saban M.; Li, Xufan; Berlijn, Tom; Nguyen, Giang D.; Xiao, Kai; Li, An-Ping

    2018-03-01

    We report the detection of tip-induced local strain applied to the monolayer Mo S2 grown on a graphite substrate by scanning tunneling microscope. Monolayer Mo S2 behaves as both mechanical and tunneling barriers that prevent the tip from contacting the graphite while maintaining the tunneling current. Inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy (IETS) is utilized to probe the phonon modes in graphite. As the tip pushes the sample, IETS reveals a continuous phonon softening in graphite, corroborated by a downward shift of the phonon energy as calculated by density-functional theory. Our results demonstrate a way to apply local mechanical strain and simultaneously detect the induced change in phonon modes by unitizing IETS with two-dimensional materials as a tunneling barrier.

  20. Absence of a spin-signature from a single Ho adatom as probed by spin-sensitive tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, M; Sonntag, A; dos Santos Dias, M; Bouhassoune, M; Lounis, S; Wiebe, J; Wiesendanger, R; Khajetoorians, A A

    2016-02-03

    Whether rare-earth materials can be used as single-atom magnetic memory is an ongoing debate in recent literature. Here we show, by inelastic and spin-resolved scanning tunnelling-based methods, that we observe a strong magnetic signal and excitation from Fe atoms adsorbed on Pt(111), but see no signatures of magnetic excitation or spin-based telegraph noise for Ho atoms. Moreover, we observe that the indirect exchange field produced by a single Ho atom is negligible, as sensed by nearby Fe atoms. We demonstrate, using ab initio methods, that this stems from a comparatively weak coupling of the Ho 4f electrons with both tunnelling electrons and substrate-derived itinerant electrons, making both magnetic coupling and detection very difficult when compared to 3d elements. We discuss these results in the context of ongoing disputes and clarify important controversies.

  1. Modeling and optimization of a double-well double-barrier GaN/AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN resonant tunneling diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Gao, Bo; Gong, Min; Shi, Ruiying

    2017-06-01

    The influence of a GaN layer as a sub-quantum well for an AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) on device performance has been investigated by means of numerical simulation. The introduction of the GaN layer as the sub-quantum well turns the dominant transport mechanism of RTD from the 3D-2D model to the 2D-2D model and increases the energy difference between tunneling energy levels. It can also lower the effective height of the emitter barrier. Consequently, the peak current and peak-to-valley current difference of RTD have been increased. The optimal GaN sub-quantum well parameters are found through analyzing the electrical performance, energy band, and transmission coefficient of RTD with different widths and depths of the GaN sub-quantum well. The most pronounced electrical parameters, a peak current density of 5800 KA/cm2, a peak-to-valley current difference of 1.466 A, and a peak-to-valley current ratio of 6.35, could be achieved by designing RTD with the active region structure of GaN/Al0.2Ga0.8 N/GaN/Al0.2Ga0.8 N (3 nm/1.5 nm/1.5 nm/1.5 nm).

  2. Influence of pairing correlations on the probability and dynamics of tunneling through the barrier in fission and fusion of complex nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarev, Yu.A.

    1986-01-01

    An analytically solvable model is used to study the potential barrier penetrability in the case when the gap parameter Δ is treated as a dynamical variable governed by the least action principle. It is found that, as compared to the standard (BCS) approach, the dynamical treatment of pairing results in a considerably weakened dependence of the fission barrier penetrability on the intensity of pairing correlations in the initial state (Δ 0 ), on the barrier height, and on the energy of the initial state. On this basis, a more adequate explanation is proposed for typical order-of-magnitude values of the empirical hidrance factors for groun-state spontaneous fission of odd nuclei. It is also shown that a large enhancement of superfluidity in tunneling - the inherent effect of the dynamical treatment of pairing - strongly facilitates deeply subbarier fusion of complex nuclei. Finally, an analysis is given for the probability of spontaneous fission from K-isomeric quasiparticle (q-p) states in even-even heavy nuclei. The relative change of the partial spontaneous fission half-life in going from the ground-state to a high-spin q-p isomeric state, T* sf /T sf , is found to be strongly dependent on whether or not there takes place the dynamically induced enhancement of superfluidity in tunneling. Measurements of T* sf /T sf provide thus a unique possibility of verifying theoretical predictions about the strong, inverse-square Δ dependence of the effective inertia associated with large-scale subbarrier rearrangements of nuclei

  3. Multi-nucleon transfer: a probe to investigate the reaction mechanism around the barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Samit K.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of multi-nucleon transfer mechanism offers valuable information on the pairing interactions that enhance the transfer of nucleon pairs across heavy ions involved in the reaction. These reactions are also a useful tool to study exotic nuclei far from the stability line, which can be explored with the new generation radioactive beam facility. In this talk, multi-nucleon transfer reaction mechanisms between heavy ions and their effect on the reaction dynamics around the coulomb barrier energies have been discussed. Experimental results will be presented with a semi classical description of multi nucleon transfer reaction calculation. One and two nucleon transfer cross sections reproduced using a quantum mechanical coupled channel calculations will also be discussed. A feasibility of investigation of multi-nucleon transfer mechanism to explore the pairing correlation at moderate spin states with radioactive beams will be discussed. (author)

  4. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-01-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations

  5. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morawski, Ireneusz [Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-3) and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Wrocław, pl. M. Borna 9, 50-204 Wrocław (Poland); Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert [Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-3) and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  6. Sample mounting and transfer for coupling an ultrahigh vacuum variable temperature beetle scanning tunneling microscope with conventional surface probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nafisi, Kourosh; Ranau, Werner; Hemminger, John C.

    2001-01-01

    We present a new ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber for surface analysis and microscopy at controlled, variable temperatures. The new instrument allows surface analysis with Auger electron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, quadrupole mass spectrometer, argon ion sputtering gun, and a variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope (VT-STM). In this system, we introduce a novel procedure for transferring a sample off a conventional UHV manipulator and onto a scanning tunneling microscope in the conventional ''beetle'' geometry, without disconnecting the heating or thermocouple wires. The microscope, a modified version of the Besocke beetle microscope, is mounted on a 2.75 in. outer diameter UHV flange and is directly attached to the base of the chamber. The sample is attached to a tripod sample holder that is held by the main manipulator. Under UHV conditions the tripod sample holder can be removed from the main manipulator and placed onto the STM. The VT-STM has the capability of acquiring images between the temperature range of 180--500 K. The performance of the chamber is demonstrated here by producing an ordered array of island vacancy defects on a Pt(111) surface and obtaining STM images of these defects

  7. Quantum tunneling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.S.; Lai, C.H.; Oh, C.H.; Kwek, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    We present a calculation of quantum tunneling time based on the transition duration of wave peak from one side of a barrier to the other. In our formulation, the tunneling time comprises a real and an imaginary part. The real part is an extension of the phase tunneling time with quantum corrections whereas the imaginary time is associated with energy derivatives of the probability amplitudes

  8. About tunnelling times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Recami, E.

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, first we critically analyse the main theoretical definitions and calculations of the sub-barrier tunnelling and reflection times. Secondly, we propose a new, physically sensible definition of such durations, on the basis of a recent general formalism (already tested for other types of quantum collisions). At last, we discuss some results regarding temporal evolution of the tunnelling processes, and in particular the ''particle'' speed during tunnelling. (author). 36 refs, 1 fig

  9. Probing Dirac fermion dynamics in topological insulator Bi2Se3 films with a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Can-Li; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2015-05-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy have been used to investigate the femtosecond dynamics of Dirac fermions in the topological insulator Bi2Se3 ultrathin films. At the two-dimensional limit, bulk electrons become quantized and the quantization can be controlled by the film thickness at a single quintuple layer level. By studying the spatial decay of standing waves (quasiparticle interference patterns) off steps, we measure directly the energy and film thickness dependence of the phase relaxation length lϕ and inelastic scattering lifetime τ of topological surface-state electrons. We find that τ exhibits a remarkable (E - EF)(-2) energy dependence and increases with film thickness. We show that the features revealed are typical for electron-electron scattering between surface and bulk states.

  10. Proposed alteration of images of molecular orbitals obtained using a scanning tunneling microscope as a probe of electron correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toroz, Dimitrios; Rontani, Massimo; Corni, Stefano

    2013-01-04

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) allows us to image single molecules decoupled from the supporting substrate. The obtained images are routinely interpreted as the square moduli of molecular orbitals, dressed by the mean-field electron-electron interaction. Here we demonstrate that the effect of electron correlation beyond the mean field qualitatively alters the uncorrelated STS images. Our evidence is based on the ab initio many-body calculation of STS images of planar molecules with metal centers. We find that many-body correlations alter significantly the image spectral weight close to the metal center of the molecules. This change is large enough to be accessed experimentally, surviving to molecule-substrate interactions.

  11. Surface structure of YBa2Cu3O7-x probed by reversed-bias scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, H.L.; Markert, J.T.; Lozanne, A.L.d.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of scanning tunneling microscopy studies on high-quality single crystals of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) which were cleaved along a basal plane in situ at 20 K prior to measurement. The initial results of a systematic study of the YBCO surface are presented. Reversed-bias images of the CuO chain layer reveal modulations 3.3±0.3|b|=1.3±0.1 nm in wavelength which change phase by 180 degree under bias polarity reversal along solid chains, and are invariant under bias polarity reversal at a point defect. Regions of sharp unit-cell-sized square corrugations with disordered islands are also observed. We interpret these new results in terms of our previous model [H. L. Edwards, J. T. Markert, and A. L. de Lozanne, Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 2967 (1992)] of the cleaved YBCO surface

  12. Reduction of conductance mismatch in Fe/Al2O3/MoS2 system by tunneling-barrier thickness control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Naoki; Muneta, Iriya; Ohashi, Takumi; Matsuura, Kentaro; Shimizu, Jun’ichi; Kakushima, Kuniyuki; Tsutsui, Kazuo; Wakabayashi, Hitoshi

    2018-04-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) among two-dimensional semiconductor films is promising for spintronic devices because it has a longer spin-relaxation time with contrasting spin splitting than silicon. However, it is difficult to fabricate integrated circuits by the widely used exfoliation method. Here, we investigate the contact characteristics in the Fe/Al2O3/sputtered-MoS2 system with various thicknesses of the Al2O3 film. Current density increases with increasing thickness up to 2.5 nm because of both thermally-assisted and direct tunneling currents. On the other hand, it decreases with increasing thickness over 2.5 nm limited by direct tunneling currents. These results suggest that the Schottky barrier width can be controlled by changing thicknesses of the Al2O3 film, as supported by calculations. The reduction of conductance mismatch with this technique can lead to highly efficient spin injection from iron into the MoS2 film.

  13. Transport properties of Josephson contacts with ferromagnetic tunnel barriers; Transporteigenschaften von Josephson-Kontakten mit ferromagnetischer Tunnelbarriere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprungmann, Dirk

    2010-01-28

    The combination of the Josephson and the proximity effect is possible by the introduction of a ferromagnetic barrier into a Josephson contact resulting in a so called π coupling. The supra current through these contacts is flowing in the reverse direction. Specific new electronic circuits such as phase shifting devices are possible, for instance for high-speed analog-digital transducers. In the frame of this thesis SIFS Josephson contacts were studied, with a barrier consisting of a thin insulating Al2Ox barrier layer and a ferromagnetic thin film. For the ferromagnetic material weak ferromagnetic Ni(0.6)Cu(0.4), the strong ferromagnetic Fe(0.25)Co(0.75) and the ternary Heusler alloys Co2MnSn and Cu2MnAl were used. Josephson contacts with π coupling were realized with the NiCu alloy, triplet superconductivity seems to appear with the Heusler systems.

  14. Computational Multiqubit Tunnelling in Programmable Quantum Annealers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    ARTICLE Received 3 Jun 2015 | Accepted 26 Nov 2015 | Published 7 Jan 2016 Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers...state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational ...qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational

  15. The Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on an oxide surface: a combined Monte-Carlo and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfrancesco, Anthony G; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V; Vasudevan, Rama K

    2015-11-13

    The controlled growth of epitaxial films of complex oxides requires an atomistic understanding of key parameters determining final film morphology, such as termination dependence on adatom diffusion, and height of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier. Here, through an in situ scanning tunneling microscopy study of mixed-terminated La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 (LCMO) films, we image adatoms and observe pile-up at island edges. Image analysis allows determination of the population of adatoms at the edge of islands and fractions on A-site and B-site terminations. A simple Monte-Carlo model, simulating the random walk of adatoms on a sinusoidal potential landscape using Boltzmann statistics is used to reproduce the experimental data, and provides an estimate of the ES barrier as ∼0.18 ± 0.04 eV at T = 1023 K, similar to those of metal adatoms on metallic surfaces. These studies highlight the utility of in situ imaging, in combination with basic Monte-Carlo methods, in elucidating the factors which control the final film growth in complex oxides.

  16. The Ehrlich–Schwoebel barrier on an oxide surface: a combined Monte-Carlo and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianfrancesco, Anthony G; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V; Vasudevan, Rama K

    2015-01-01

    The controlled growth of epitaxial films of complex oxides requires an atomistic understanding of key parameters determining final film morphology, such as termination dependence on adatom diffusion, and height of the Ehrlich–Schwoebel (ES) barrier. Here, through an in situ scanning tunneling microscopy study of mixed-terminated La_5_/_8Ca_3_/_8MnO_3 (LCMO) films, we image adatoms and observe pile-up at island edges. Image analysis allows determination of the population of adatoms at the edge of islands and fractions on A-site and B-site terminations. A simple Monte-Carlo model, simulating the random walk of adatoms on a sinusoidal potential landscape using Boltzmann statistics is used to reproduce the experimental data, and provides an estimate of the ES barrier as ∼0.18 ± 0.04 eV at T = 1023 K, similar to those of metal adatoms on metallic surfaces. These studies highlight the utility of in situ imaging, in combination with basic Monte-Carlo methods, in elucidating the factors which control the final film growth in complex oxides. (paper)

  17. The Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on an oxide surface: a combined Monte-Carlo and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Vasudevan, Rama K.

    2015-11-01

    The controlled growth of epitaxial films of complex oxides requires an atomistic understanding of key parameters determining final film morphology, such as termination dependence on adatom diffusion, and height of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier. Here, through an in situ scanning tunneling microscopy study of mixed-terminated La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 (LCMO) films, we image adatoms and observe pile-up at island edges. Image analysis allows determination of the population of adatoms at the edge of islands and fractions on A-site and B-site terminations. A simple Monte-Carlo model, simulating the random walk of adatoms on a sinusoidal potential landscape using Boltzmann statistics is used to reproduce the experimental data, and provides an estimate of the ES barrier as ˜0.18 ± 0.04 eV at T = 1023 K, similar to those of metal adatoms on metallic surfaces. These studies highlight the utility of in situ imaging, in combination with basic Monte-Carlo methods, in elucidating the factors which control the final film growth in complex oxides.

  18. Determination of Schottky barrier heights and Fermi-level unpinning at the graphene/n-type Si interfaces by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Kelvin probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yow-Jon; Zeng, Jian-Jhou

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The interface characteristics of graphene/n-type Si devices are measured. • The actual work function of graphene is examined with the Kelvin probe. • An analysis is conducted according to the Schottky–Mott limit. • The Fermi energy level at the graphene/n-type Si interfaces is unpinned. • The Schottky barrier value is dependent on the work function of graphene. - Abstract: The interface characteristics of graphene/n-type Si samples using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are investigated. XPS makes it possible to extract a reliable Schottky barrier value. For graphene/n-type Si samples with (without) sulfide treatment, the Schottky barrier height is 0.86 (0.78) eV. The Schottky barrier height was increased from 0.78 to 0.86 eV, indicating that sulfide treatment is effective in passivating the surface of Si (owing to the formation of Si–S bonds). To determine the Fermi-level pinning/unpinning at the graphene/n-type Si interfaces with sulfide treatment, an analysis is conducted according to the Schottky–Mott limit and the actual work function of graphene is examined with the Kelvin probe. It is shown that the Fermi energy level is unpinned and the Schottky barrier value is dependent on the work function of graphene. Investigation of graphene/n-type Si interfaces is important, and providing the other technique for surface potential control is possible

  19. Tunneling of Atoms, Nuclei and Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief review of few relevant topics on tunneling of composite particles and how the coupling to intrinsic and external degrees of freedom affects tunneling probabilities. I discuss the phenomena of resonant tunneling, different barriers seen by subsystems, damping of resonant tunneling by level bunching and continuum effects due to particle dissociation. (author)

  20. A comparison of disturbance levels measured in hypersonic tunnels using a hot-wire anemometer and a pitot pressure probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Wagner, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Disturbance levels were measured in the test section of a Mach 5 blowdown jet using a constant-current, hot-wire anemometer and a pressure transducer. The disturbance levels, measured by the two instruments and normalized by local mean values, agreed within about 30%, with the pitot data higher than the hot-wire data. The rms disturbance levels measured with the hot-wire anemometer and converted to pitot pressures using a quasi-steady flow analysis, were about two-thirds the levels measured with the pitot probe. The variation of the normalized rms disturbance levels with stagnation pressure indicated that transition occurred in the boundary layer on the nozzle wall and influenced the outputs of the instruments located at the exit of the nozzle when the total pressure was about 35 N/sq cm. Below this pressure the disturbance levels decreased markedly. At higher pressures the disturbances were predominantly aerodynamic noise generated by the turbulent boundary layer on the nozzle wall.

  1. Interplay between barrier width and height in electron tunneling: photoinduced electron transfer in porphyrin-based donor-bridge-acceptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Karin; Wiberg, Joanna; Ljungdahl, Thomas; Mårtensson, Jerker; Albinsson, Bo

    2006-01-12

    The rate of electron tunneling in molecular donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) systems is determined both by the tunneling barrier width and height, that is, both by the distance between the donor and acceptor as well as by the energy gap between the donor and bridge moieties. These factors are therefore important to control when designing functional electron transfer systems, such as constructs for photovoltaics, artificial photosynthesis, and molecular scale electronics. In this paper we have investigated a set of D-B-A systems in which the distance and the energy difference between the donor and bridge states (DeltaEDB) are systematically varied. Zinc(II) and gold(III) porphyrins were chosen as electron donor and acceptor because of their suitable driving force for photoinduced electron transfer (-0.9 eV in butyronitrile) and well-characterized photophysics. We have previously shown, in accordance with the superexchange mechanism for electron transfer, that the electron transfer rate is proportional to the inverse of DeltaEDB in a series of zinc/gold porphyrin D-B-A systems with bridges of constant edge to edge distance (19.6 A) and varying DeltaEDB (3900-17 600 cm(-1)). Here, we use the same donor and acceptor but the bridge is shortened or extended giving a set of oligo-p-phenyleneethynylene bridges (OPE) with four different edge to edge distances ranging from 12.7 to 33.4 A. These two sets of D-B-A systems-ZnP-RB-AuP+ and ZnP-nB-AuP+-have one bridge in common, and hence, for the first time both the distance and DeltaEDB dependence of electron transfer can be studied simultaneously in a systematic way.

  2. Distilling two-center-interference information during tunneling of aligned molecules with orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F.; Chen, Y. J.; Xin, G. G.; Liu, J.; Fu, L. B.

    2017-12-01

    When electrons tunnel through a barrier formed by the strong laser field and the two-center potential of a diatomic molecule, a double-slit-like interference can occur. However, this interference effect can not be probed directly right now, as it is strongly coupled with other dynamical processes during tunneling. Here, we show numerically and analytically that orthogonally polarized two-color (OTC) laser fields are capable of resolving the interference effect in tunneling, while leaving clear footprints of this effect in photoelectron momentum distributions. Moreover, this effect can be manipulated by changing the relative field strength of OTC fields.

  3. Gate-controlled tunneling of quantum Hall edge states in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Li, Jing; Wen, Hua

    Controlled tunneling of integer and fractional quantum Hall edge states provides a powerful tool to probe the physics of 1D systems and exotic particle statistics. Experiments in GaAs 2DEGs employ either a quantum point contact or a line junction tunnel barrier. It is generally difficult to independently control the filling factors νL and νR on the two sides of the barrier. Here we show that in bilayer graphene both νL and νR as well as their Landau level structures can be independently controlled using a dual-split-gate structure. In addition, the height of the line-junction tunnel barrier implemented in our experiments is tunable via a 5th gate. By measuring the tunneling resistance across the junction RT we examine the equilibration of the edge states in a variety of νL/νR scenarios and under different barrier heights. Edge states from both sides are fully mixed in the case of a low barrier. As the barrier height increases, we observe plateaus in RT that correspond to sequential complete backscattering of edge states. Gate-controlled manipulation of edge states offers a new angle to the exploration of quantum Hall magnetism and fractional quantum Hall effect in bilayer graphene.

  4. Ultrafast spin injection from Cd1-x Mn x Te magnetic barriers into a CdTe quantum well studied by pump-probe spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoshima, I.; Nishibayashi, K.; Souma, I.; Murayama, A.; Oka, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Spin injection from diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) barriers of Cd 1- x Mn x Te into a quantum well (QW) of CdTe is studied, by means of pump-probe absorption spectroscopy in magnetic fields. Fast decay characteristics of circularly polarized differential absorbances of spin-polarized excitons in the DMS barrier show the exciton injection time of 6 ps from the barriers into the QW. In accordance with the fast relaxation of the spin-polarized excitons from the barrier, we observe the rise of circular polarization degree for the differential absorption of the CdTe QW in magnetic fields, evidently indicating the spin injection. In addition, the circular polarization degree up to 0.3 is developed in the well immediately after pumping, originating from the fast relaxation of a heavy hole (hh) spin less than 0.2 ps, due to the giant Zeeman effect caused by the penetration of the hh wave function into the DMS barriers

  5. Tunneling with dissipation in open quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamyan, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V.; Scheid, W.

    1997-01-01

    Based on the general form of the master equation for open quantum systems the tunneling is considered. Using the path integral technique a simple closed form expression for the tunneling rate through a parabolic barrier is obtained. The tunneling in the open quantum systems strongly depends on the coupling with environment. We found the cases when the dissipation prohibits tunneling through the barrier but decreases the crossing of the barrier for the energies above the barrier. As a particular application, the case of decay from the metastable state is considered

  6. Electronic tunneling currents at optical frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, S. M.; Fan, B.; Gustafson, T. K.

    1975-01-01

    Rectification characteristics of nonsuperconducting metal-barrier-metal junctions as deduced from electronic tunneling theory have been observed experimentally for optical frequency irradiation of the junction.

  7. Characterization of the insulator barrier and the superconducting transition temperature in GdBa2Cu3O7−δ/BaTiO3 bilayers for application in tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, H.; Sirena, M.; Haberkorn, N.; Yang, Ilkyu; Kim, Jeehoon

    2015-01-01

    The optimization of the superconducting properties in a bottom electrode and the quality of an insulator barrier are the first steps in the development of superconductor/insulator/superconductor tunnel junctions. Here, we study the quality of a BaTiO 3 tunnel barrier deposited on a 16 nm thick GdBa 2 Cu 3 O 7−δ thin film by using conductive atomic force microscopy. We find that the tunnel current is systematically reduced (for equal applied voltage) by increasing the BaTiO 3 barrier thickness between 1.6 and 4 nm. The BaTiO 3 layers present an energy barrier of ≈1.2 eV and an attenuation length of 0.35–0.5 nm (depending on the applied voltage). The GdBa 2 Cu 3 O 7−δ electrode is totally covered by a BaTiO 3 thickness above 3 nm. The presence of ferroelectricity was verified by piezoresponse force microscopy for a 4 nm thick BaTiO 3 top layer. The superconducting transition temperature of the bilayers is systematically suppressed by increasing the BaTiO 3 thickness. This fact can be associated with stress at the interface and a reduction of the orthorhombicity of the GdBa 2 Cu 3 O 7−δ . The reduction in the orthorhombicity is expected by considering the interface mismatch and it can also be affected by reduced oxygen stoichiometry (poor oxygen diffusion across the BaTiO 3 barrier)

  8. Characterization of the insulator barrier and the superconducting transition temperature in GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}/BaTiO{sub 3} bilayers for application in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, H., E-mail: henrynavarro@cab.cnea.gov.ar; Sirena, M.; Haberkorn, N. [Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo and CNEA, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica. Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Yang, Ilkyu [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeehoon [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); CALDES, Institute for Basic Science, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-28

    The optimization of the superconducting properties in a bottom electrode and the quality of an insulator barrier are the first steps in the development of superconductor/insulator/superconductor tunnel junctions. Here, we study the quality of a BaTiO{sub 3} tunnel barrier deposited on a 16 nm thick GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} thin film by using conductive atomic force microscopy. We find that the tunnel current is systematically reduced (for equal applied voltage) by increasing the BaTiO{sub 3} barrier thickness between 1.6 and 4 nm. The BaTiO{sub 3} layers present an energy barrier of ≈1.2 eV and an attenuation length of 0.35–0.5 nm (depending on the applied voltage). The GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} electrode is totally covered by a BaTiO{sub 3} thickness above 3 nm. The presence of ferroelectricity was verified by piezoresponse force microscopy for a 4 nm thick BaTiO{sub 3} top layer. The superconducting transition temperature of the bilayers is systematically suppressed by increasing the BaTiO{sub 3} thickness. This fact can be associated with stress at the interface and a reduction of the orthorhombicity of the GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}. The reduction in the orthorhombicity is expected by considering the interface mismatch and it can also be affected by reduced oxygen stoichiometry (poor oxygen diffusion across the BaTiO{sub 3} barrier)

  9. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in Co/AIOx/Al tunnel junctions with fcc Co (111) electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kai; Tran, T. Lan Ahn; Brinks, Peter; Brinks, P.; Sanderink, Johannes G.M.; Bolhuis, Thijs; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; de Jong, Machiel Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) has been characterized in junctions comprised of face-centered cubic (fcc) Co (111) ferromagnetic electrodes grown epitaxially on sapphire substrates, amorphous AlOx tunnel barriers, and nonmagnetic Al counterelectrodes. Large TAMR ratios have been

  10. Transient gain property of a weak probe field in an asymmetric semiconductor coupled double quantum well structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhigang; Zheng Zhiren; Yu Junhua

    2007-01-01

    The transient gain property of a weak probe field in an asymmetric semiconductor coupled double quantum well structure is reported. The transient process of the system, which is induced by the external coherent coupling field, shows the property of no inverse gain. We find that the transient behavior of the probe field can be tuned by the change of tunneling barrier. Both the amplitude of the transient gain and the frequency of the oscillation can be affected by the lifetime broadening

  11. Thermovoltages in vacuum tunneling investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, D. H.; Rettenberger, Armin; Grand, Jean Yves; Läuger, K.; Leiderer, Paul; Dransfeld, Klaus; Möller, Rolf

    1995-01-01

    By heating the tunneling tip of a scanning tunneling microscope the thermoelectric properties of a variable vacuum barrier have been investigated. The lateral variation of the observed thermovoltage will be discussed for polycrystalline gold, stepped surfaces of silver, as well as for copper islands on silver.

  12. Results of the space shuttle vehicle ascent air data system probe calibration test using a 0.07-scale external tank forebody model (68T) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (IA-310), volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1991-01-01

    A recalibration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Ascent Air Data System probe was conducted in the Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC) transonic wind tunnel. The purpose was to improve on the accuracy of the previous calibration in order to reduce the existing uncertainties in the system. A probe tip attached to a 0.07-scale External Tank Forebody model was tested at angles of attack of -8 to +4 degrees and sideslip angles of -4 to +4 degrees. High precision instrumentation was used to acquire pressure data at discrete Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55. Pressure coefficient uncertainties were estimated at less than 0.0020. Additional information is given in tabular form.

  13. Results of the space shuttle vehicle ascent air data system probe calibration test using a 0.07-scale external tank forebody model (68T) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (IA-310), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1991-01-01

    A recalibration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Ascent Air Data System probe was conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) transonic wind tunnel. The purpose was to improve on the accuracy of the previous calibration in order to reduce the existing uncertainties in the system. A probe tip attached to a 0.07-scale External Tank Forebody model was tested at angles of attack of -8 to +4 degrees and sideslip angles of -4 to +4 degrees. High precision instrumentation was used to acquire pressure data at discrete Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55. Pressure coefficient uncertainties were estimated at less than 0.0020. Data is given in graphical and tabular form.

  14. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with epitaxial and textured ferromagnetic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua Joshua

    2008-11-11

    This invention relates to magnetic tunnel junctions and methods for making the magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetic tunnel junctions include a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers both of which are epitaxial or textured with respect to the underlying substrate upon which the magnetic tunnel junctions are grown. The magnetic tunnel junctions provide improved magnetic properties, sharper interfaces and few defects.

  15. Hydrogen-atom tunneling through a very high barrier; spontaneous thiol → thione conversion in thiourea isolated in low-temperature Ar, Ne, H2 and D2 matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostkowska, Hanna; Lapinski, Leszek; Nowak, Maciej J

    2018-05-23

    Spontaneous thiol → thione hydrogen-atom transfer has been investigated for molecules of thiourea trapped in Ar, Ne, normal-H2 (n-H2) and normal-D2 (n-D2) low-temperature matrices. The most stable thione isomer was the only form of the compound present in the matrices after their deposition. According to MP2/6-311++G(2d,p) calculations, the thiol tautomer should be higher in energy by 62.5 kJ mol-1. This less stable thiol form of the compound was photochemically generated in a thione → thiol process, occurring upon UV irradiation of the matrix. Subsequently, a very slow spontaneous conversion of the thiol tautomer into the thione form was observed for the molecules isolated in Ar, Ne, n-H2 and n-D2 matrices kept at 3.5 K and in the dark. Since the thiol → thione transformation in thiourea is a process involving the dissociation of a chemical bond, the barrier for this hydrogen-atom transfer is very high (104-181 kJ mol-1). Crossing such a high potential-energy barrier at a temperature as low as 3.5 K, is possible only by hydrogen-atom tunneling. The experimentally measured time constants of this tunneling process: 52 h (Ar), 76 h (Ne), 94 h (n-H2) and 94 h (n-D2), do not differ much from one another. Hence, the dependence of the tunneling rate on the matrix environment is not drastic. The progress of the thiol → thione conversion was also monitored for Ar matrices at different temperature: 3.5 K, 9 K and 15 K. For this temperature range, the experiments revealed no detectable temperature dependence of the rate of the tunneling process.

  16. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  17. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however......, not a sufficient condition in order to establish genuine tunneling as a result of quantum dynamics. This proposition is illustrated for a two-dimensional model potential describing dissociative sticking of N-2 on Ru(s). It is suggested that the remarkable heavy atom tunneling, found in this system, is related...

  18. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... barriers, an ability classical particles do not possess. Tunnelling is a fundamental quantum mechanical process, a process that is distinctly non-classical, so solving this tunnelling problem is not only relevant for molecular physics, but also for quantum theory in general. In this dissertation the theory...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  19. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of AdsorbateStructure and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions: Novel Design of anUltra High Pressure, High Temperature Scanning Tunneling MicroscopeSystem for Probing Catalytic Conversions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, David Chi-Wai [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-16

    The aim of the work presented therein is to take advantage of scanning tunneling microscope’s (STM) capability for operation under a variety of environments under real time and at atomic resolution to monitor adsorbate structures and mobility under high pressures, as well as to design a new generation of STM systems that allow imaging in situ at both higher pressures (35 atm) and temperatures (350 °C).

  20. Results of an investigation to determine local flow characteristics at the air data probe locations using an 0.030-scale model (45-0) of the space shuttle vehicle orbiter configuration 140A/B (modified) in the NASA Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (OA161, A, B, C), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of wind tunnel test 0A161 of a 0.030-scale model 45-0 of the configuration 140A/B (modified) space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the NASA Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel facilities. The purpose of this test was to determine local total and static pressure environments for the air data probe locations and relative effectiveness of alternate flight-test probe configurations. Testing was done in the Mach number range from 0.30 to 3.5. Angle of attack was varied from -8 to 25 degrees while sideslip varied between -8 and 8 degrees.

  1. Hydrodynamic optical soliton tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, P.; Hoefer, M. A.; El, G. A.

    2018-03-01

    A notion of hydrodynamic optical soliton tunneling is introduced in which a dark soliton is incident upon an evolving, broad potential barrier that arises from an appropriate variation of the input signal. The barriers considered include smooth rarefaction waves and highly oscillatory dispersive shock waves. Both the soliton and the barrier satisfy the same one-dimensional defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, which admits a convenient dispersive hydrodynamic interpretation. Under the scale separation assumption of nonlinear wave (Whitham) modulation theory, the highly nontrivial nonlinear interaction between the soliton and the evolving hydrodynamic barrier is described in terms of self-similar, simple wave solutions to an asymptotic reduction of the Whitham-NLS partial differential equations. One of the Riemann invariants of the reduced modulation system determines the characteristics of a soliton interacting with a mean flow that results in soliton tunneling or trapping. Another Riemann invariant yields the tunneled soliton's phase shift due to hydrodynamic interaction. Soliton interaction with hydrodynamic barriers gives rise to effects that include reversal of the soliton propagation direction and spontaneous soliton cavitation, which further suggest possible methods of dark soliton control in optical fibers.

  2. Gamma rays as probe of fission and quasi-fission dynamics in the reaction 32S + 197Au near the Coulomb barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, A.; Vardaci, E.; Kozulin, E.; Ashaduzzaman, M.; Borcea, C.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Calinescu, S.; Camera, F.; Ciemala, M.; de Canditiis, B.; Dorvaux, O.; Harca, I. M.; Itkis, I.; Kirakosyan, V. V.; Knyazheva, G.; Kozulina, N.; Kolesov, I. V.; La Rana, G.; Maj, A.; Matea, I.; Novikov, K.; Petrone, C.; Quero, D.; Rath, P.; Saveleva, E.; Schmitt, C.; Sposito, G.; Stezowski, O.; Trzaska, W. H.; Wilson, J.

    2018-05-01

    Compound nucleus fission and quasi-fission are both binary decay channels whose common properties make the experimental separation between them difficult. A way to achieve this separation could be to probe the angular momentum of the binary fragments. This can be done detecting gamma rays in coincidence with the two fragments. As a case study, the reaction 32S + 197Au near the Coulomb barrier has been performed at the Tandem ALTO facility at IPN ORSAY. ORGAM and PARIS, two different gamma detectors arrays, are coupled with the CORSET detector, a two-arm time-of-flight spectrometer. TOF-TOF data were analyzed to reconstruct the mass-energy distribution of the primary fragments coupled with gamma multiplicity and spectroscopic analysis. Preliminary results of will be shown.

  3. Tunneling works. Tunnel koji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higo, M [Hazam Gumi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-10-25

    A mountain tunneling method for rock-beds used to be applied mainly to construction works in the mountains under few restrictions by environmental problems. However, construction works near residential sreas have been increasing. There are such enviromental problems due to tunneling works as vibration, noise, lowering of ground-water level, and influences on other structures. This report mainly describes the measurement examples of vibration and noise accompanied with blasting and the effects of the measures to lessen such influences. When the tunneling works for the railroad was carried out on the natural ground mainly composed of basalt, vibration of the test blasting was measured at three stations with piezoelectric accelerometers. Then, ordinary blasting, mutistage blasting, and ABM blasting methods were used properly besed on the above results, and only a few complaints were made. In the different works, normal noise and low-frequency sound were mesured at 22 stations around the pit mouth. As countermeasures for noise, sound-proof sheets, walls, and single and double doors were installed and foundto be effective. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Probing the limits of Si:P δ-doped devices patterned by a scanning tunneling microscope in a field-emission mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, M.; Carr, S. M.; Ten Eyck, G.; Dominguez, J.; Carroll, M. S.; Bussmann, E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Subramania, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Lilly, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Pluym, T.

    2014-10-20

    Recently, a single atom transistor was deterministically fabricated using phosphorus in Si by H-desorption lithography with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). This milestone in precision, achieved by operating the STM in the conventional tunneling mode, typically utilizes slow (∼10{sup 2} nm{sup 2}/s) patterning speeds. By contrast, using the STM in a high-voltage (>10 V) field-emission mode, patterning speeds can be increased by orders of magnitude to ≳10{sup 4} nm{sup 2}/s. We show that the rapid patterning negligibly affects the functionality of relatively large micron-sized features, which act as contacting pads for these devices. For nanoscale structures, we show that the resulting electrical transport is consistent with the donor incorporation chemistry constraining the electrical dimensions to a scale of 10 nm even though the pattering spot size is 40 nm.

  5. Tunnelling of a molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, P.D.; Bulte, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical description of tunnelling is presented for a one-dimensional system with internal oscillator degrees of freedom. The 'charged diatomic molecule' is frustrated on encountering a barrier potential by its centre of charge not being coincident with its centre of mass, resulting in transitions amongst internal states. In an adiabatic limit, the tunnelling of semiclassical coherent-like oscillator states is shown to exhibit the Hartman and Bueuttiker-Landauer times t H and t BL , with the time dependence of the coherent state parameter for the tunnelled state given by α(t) = α e -iω(t+Δt) , Δt = t H - it BL . A perturbation formalism is developed, whereby the exact transfer matrix can be expanded to any desired accuracy in a suitable limit. An 'intrinsic' time, based on the oscillator transition rate during tunnelling, transmission or reflection, is introduced. In simple situations the resulting intrinsic tunnelling time is shown to vanish to lowest order. In the general case a particular (nonzero) parametrisation is inferred, and its properties discussed in comparison with the literature on tunnelling times for both wavepackets and internal clocks. Copyright (1998) CSIRO Australia

  6. Robust spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaoui, Hamed Ben Mohamed; Waintal, Xavier; Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study the current-induced spin torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions, composed of two semi-infinite antiferromagnetic layers separated by a tunnel barrier, in both clean and disordered regimes. We find that the torque

  7. concentration on spin-dependent resonant tunnelling in InAs/Ga1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cent percentage polarization can be obtained in this strained non-magnetic double-barrier ... Keywords. Spin–orbit interaction; barrier transparency; polarization efficiency; tunnelling lifetime. 1. Introduction ..... Figure 6. Tunnelling lifetime vs.

  8. Tunneling Flight Time, Chemistry, and Special Relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jakob; Pollak, Eli

    2017-09-07

    Attosecond ionization experiments have not resolved the question "What is the tunneling time?". Different definitions of tunneling time lead to different results. Second, a zero tunneling time for a material particle suggests that the nonrelativistic theory includes speeds greater than the speed of light. Chemical reactions, occurring via tunneling, should then not be considered in terms of a nonrelativistic quantum theory calling into question quantum dynamics computations on tunneling reactions. To answer these questions, we define a new experimentally measurable paradigm, the tunneling flight time, and show that it vanishes for scattering through an Eckart or a square barrier, irrespective of barrier length or height, generalizing the Hartman effect. We explain why this result does not lead to experimental measurement of speeds greater than the speed of light. We show that this tunneling is an incoherent process by comparing a classical Wigner theory with exact quantum mechanical computations.

  9. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  10. Electronic-Reconstruction-Enhanced Tunneling Conductance at Terrace Edges of Ultrathin Oxide Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingfei; Kim, Rokyeon; Kim, Yoonkoo; Kim, Choong H; Hwang, Sangwoon; Cho, Myung Rae; Shin, Yeong Jae; Das, Saikat; Kim, Jeong Rae; Kalinin, Sergei V; Kim, Miyoung; Yang, Sang Mo; Noh, Tae Won

    2017-11-01

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of electrons across ultrathin insulating oxide barriers has been studied extensively for decades due to its great potential in electronic-device applications. In the few-nanometers-thick epitaxial oxide films, atomic-scale structural imperfections, such as the ubiquitously existed one-unit-cell-high terrace edges, can dramatically affect the tunneling probability and device performance. However, the underlying physics has not been investigated adequately. Here, taking ultrathin BaTiO 3 films as a model system, an intrinsic tunneling-conductance enhancement is reported near the terrace edges. Scanning-probe-microscopy results demonstrate the existence of highly conductive regions (tens of nanometers wide) near the terrace edges. First-principles calculations suggest that the terrace-edge geometry can trigger an electronic reconstruction, which reduces the effective tunneling barrier width locally. Furthermore, such tunneling-conductance enhancement can be discovered in other transition metal oxides and controlled by surface-termination engineering. The controllable electronic reconstruction can facilitate the implementation of oxide electronic devices and discovery of exotic low-dimensional quantum phases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Superconductivity and electronic structure in single-layer FeSe on SrTiO{sub 3} probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandke, Jasmin; Dressner, Jonas; Wulfhekel, Wulf [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Yang, Fang; Gao, Chunlei [Fudan Universitaet, Shanghai (China)

    2016-07-01

    We use high-resolution scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) to study single-layer FeSe on Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} (001). Features of bosonic excitations were observed in the measured quasiparticle density of states. Furthermore, using STS, quasiparticle interference (QPI) imaging was performed in order to map the multiband electronic structure of FeSe. Compared to previous measurements, an additional feature is visible in our measured QPI maps on a single-layer FeSe/SrTiO{sub 3}. The origin of this feature will be discussed.

  12. Primary Tunnel Junction Thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekola, Jukka P.; Holmqvist, Tommy; Meschke, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    We describe the concept and experimental demonstration of primary thermometry based on a four-probe measurement of a single tunnel junction embedded within four arrays of junctions. We show that in this configuration random sample specific and environment-related errors can be avoided. This method relates temperature directly to Boltzmann constant, which will form the basis of the definition of temperature and realization of official temperature scales in the future

  13. Tunneling time, what is its meaning?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C R; Orlando, G; Vampa, G; Brabec, T

    2015-01-01

    The tunnel time ionization dynamics for bound systems in laser fields are investigated. Numerical analysis for a step function switch-on of the field allows for the tunnel time to be defined as the time it takes the ground state to develop the under-barrier wavefunction components necessary to achieve the static field ionization rate. A relation between the tunnel time and the Keldysh time is established. The definition of the tunnel time is extended to time varying fields and experimental possibilities for measuring the tunnel time are discussed

  14. Experimental Evidence for Quantum Tunneling Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Nicolas; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Fechner, Lutz; Klaiber, Michael; Laux, Martin; Mi, Yonghao; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Pfeifer, Thomas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Moshammer, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The first hundred attoseconds of the electron dynamics during strong field tunneling ionization are investigated. We quantify theoretically how the electron's classical trajectories in the continuum emerge from the tunneling process and test the results with those achieved in parallel from attoclock measurements. An especially high sensitivity on the tunneling barrier is accomplished here by comparing the momentum distributions of two atomic species of slightly deviating atomic potentials (argon and krypton) being ionized under absolutely identical conditions with near-infrared laser pulses (1300 nm). The agreement between experiment and theory provides clear evidence for a nonzero tunneling time delay and a nonvanishing longitudinal momentum of the electron at the "tunnel exit."

  15. Surface flattening processes of metal layer and their effect on transport properties of magnetic tunnel junctions with Al-N barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, S.; Nozawa, T.; Shoyama, T.; Tsunoda, M.; Takahashi, M.

    2005-01-01

    In order to form ultrathin insulating layer in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), two surface flatting processes of metal films are investigated. Oxygen-additive sputter-deposition process was applied to the bottom Cu electrode and the Al layer to be nitrided. Dry-etching process was applied for the surface treatment of lower Co-Fe layer. As a result, the surface roughness of stacked ultrathin Al layer to be nitrided is reduced from 3.2A to 1.7A, and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of the MTJs increases from 1% to 26% while maintaining resistance-area product (RxA) less than 5x10 2 Ω μm 2 in the Co-Fe/Al(6A)-N/Co-Fe MTJs. We conclude that the decrease of the surface roughness of Al layer is one of the key factors to realize high performance MTJs with low RxA and high TMR ratio

  16. Frequency driven inversion of tunnel magnetoimpedance and observation of positive tunnel magnetocapacitance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parui, Subir; Ribeiro, Mário; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Llopis, Roger; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Sun, Xiangnan; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance for modern computation of non-volatile high-frequency memories makes ac-transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) crucial for exploring this regime. Here, we demonstrate a frequency-mediated effect in which the tunnel magnetoimpedance reverses its sign in a classical Co/Al 2 O 3 /NiFe MTJ, whereas we only observe a gradual decrease in the tunnel magnetophase. Such effects are explained by the capacitive coupling of a parallel resistor and capacitor in the equivalent circuit model of the MTJ. Furthermore, we report a positive tunnel magnetocapacitance effect, suggesting the presence of a spin-capacitance at the two ferromagnet/tunnel-barrier interfaces. Our results are important for understanding spin transport phenomena at the high frequency regime in which the spin-polarized charge accumulation due to spin-dependent penetration depth at the two interfaces plays a crucial role.

  17. Frequency driven inversion of tunnel magnetoimpedance and observation of positive tunnel magnetocapacitance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parui, Subir, E-mail: s.parui@nanogune.eu, E-mail: l.hueso@nanogune.eu; Ribeiro, Mário; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Llopis, Roger [CIC nanoGUNE, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar [CIC nanoGUNE, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Sun, Xiangnan [CIC nanoGUNE, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, 100190 Beijing (China); Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E., E-mail: s.parui@nanogune.eu, E-mail: l.hueso@nanogune.eu [CIC nanoGUNE, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2016-08-01

    The relevance for modern computation of non-volatile high-frequency memories makes ac-transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) crucial for exploring this regime. Here, we demonstrate a frequency-mediated effect in which the tunnel magnetoimpedance reverses its sign in a classical Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiFe MTJ, whereas we only observe a gradual decrease in the tunnel magnetophase. Such effects are explained by the capacitive coupling of a parallel resistor and capacitor in the equivalent circuit model of the MTJ. Furthermore, we report a positive tunnel magnetocapacitance effect, suggesting the presence of a spin-capacitance at the two ferromagnet/tunnel-barrier interfaces. Our results are important for understanding spin transport phenomena at the high frequency regime in which the spin-polarized charge accumulation due to spin-dependent penetration depth at the two interfaces plays a crucial role.

  18. Probing the thermal decomposition behaviors of ultrathin HfO2 films by an in situ high temperature scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kun; Wang, Lei; An, Jin; Xu, Jianbin

    2011-05-13

    The thermal decomposition of ultrathin HfO(2) films (∼0.6-1.2 nm) on Si by ultrahigh vacuum annealing (25-800 °C) is investigated in situ in real time by scanning tunneling microscopy. Two distinct thickness-dependent decomposition behaviors are observed. When the HfO(2) thickness is ∼ 0.6 nm, no discernible morphological changes are found below ∼ 700 °C. Then an abrupt reaction occurs at 750 °C with crystalline hafnium silicide nanostructures formed instantaneously. However, when the thickness is about 1.2 nm, the decomposition proceeds gradually with the creation and growth of two-dimensional voids at 800 °C. The observed thickness-dependent behavior is closely related to the SiO desorption, which is believed to be the rate-limiting step of the decomposition process.

  19. Implementation of a Particle Image Velocimetry System for Wind Tunnel Flowfield Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Instrumentation Wind tunnel speed was measured by two pitot probes mounted on opposite tunnel walls upstream of the model and above the ground...board. The pitot probes were connected differentially to Scanivalve 1-psi transducers. A secondary measurement of wind tunnel speed was made with the...Manf. Model Range 1 Tunnel Vel (south pitot ) Transducer Scanivalve CR24D 1 psi 2 Tunnel Vel (north pitot ) Transducer Scanivalve CR24D 1 psi 3

  20. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs

  1. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Adsorbate Structure and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions. Novel Design of an Ultra High Pressure, High Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscope System for Probing Catalytic Conversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, David Chi-Wai

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the work presented therein is to take advantage of scanning tunneling microscope's (STM) capability for operation under a variety of environments under real time and at atomic resolution to monitor adsorbate structures and mobility under high pressures, as well as to design a new generation of STM systems that allow imaging in situ at both higher pressures (35 atm) and temperatures (350 C). The design of a high pressure, high temperature scanning tunneling microscope system, that is capable of monitoring reactions in situ at conditions from UHV and ambient temperature up to 1 atm and 250 C, is briefly presented along with vibrational and thermal analysis, as this system serves as a template to improve upon during the design of the new ultra high pressure, high temperature STM. Using this existing high pressure scanning tunneling microscope we monitored the co-adsorption of hydrogen, ethylene and carbon dioxide on platinum (111) and rhodium (111) crystal faces in the mTorr pressure range at 300 K in equilibrium with the gas phase. During the catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene to ethane in the absence of CO the metal surfaces are covered by an adsorbate layer that is very mobile on the time scale of STM imaging. We found that the addition of CO poisons the hydrogenation reaction and induces ordered structures on the single crystal surfaces. Several ordered structures were observed upon CO addition to the surfaces pre-covered with hydrogen and ethylene: a rotated (√19 x √19)R23.4 o on Pt(111), and domains of c(4 x 2)-CO+C 2 H 3 , previously unobserved (4 x 2)-CO+3C 2 H 3 , and (2 x 2)-3CO on Rh(111). A mechanism for CO poisoning of ethylene hydrogenation on the metal single crystals was proposed, in which CO blocks surface metal sites and reduces adsorbate mobility to limit adsorption and reaction rate of ethylene and hydrogen. In order to observe heterogeneous catalytic reactions that occur well above ambient pressure and temperature that more closely

  2. Single Electron Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-01-01

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  3. Improved multidimensional semiclassical tunneling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Albert F

    2013-12-12

    We show that the analytic multidimensional semiclassical tunneling formula of Miller et al. [Miller, W. H.; Hernandez, R.; Handy, N. C.; Jayatilaka, D.; Willets, A. Chem. Phys. Lett. 1990, 172, 62] is qualitatively incorrect for deep tunneling at energies well below the top of the barrier. The origin of this deficiency is that the formula uses an effective barrier weakly related to the true energetics but correctly adjusted to reproduce the harmonic description and anharmonic corrections of the reaction path at the saddle point as determined by second order vibrational perturbation theory. We present an analytic improved semiclassical formula that correctly includes energetic information and allows a qualitatively correct representation of deep tunneling. This is done by constructing a three segment composite Eckart potential that is continuous everywhere in both value and derivative. This composite potential has an analytic barrier penetration integral from which the semiclassical action can be derived and then used to define the semiclassical tunneling probability. The middle segment of the composite potential by itself is superior to the original formula of Miller et al. because it incorporates the asymmetry of the reaction barrier produced by the known reaction exoergicity. Comparison of the semiclassical and exact quantum tunneling probability for the pure Eckart potential suggests a simple threshold multiplicative factor to the improved formula to account for quantum effects very near threshold not represented by semiclassical theory. The deep tunneling limitations of the original formula are echoed in semiclassical high-energy descriptions of bound vibrational states perpendicular to the reaction path at the saddle point. However, typically ab initio energetic information is not available to correct it. The Supporting Information contains a Fortran code, test input, and test output that implements the improved semiclassical tunneling formula.

  4. Adjustable Pitot Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Robbins, W. Eugene; Horsley, Lewis A.

    1991-01-01

    Probe readily positionable in core of uniform flow in hypersonic wind tunnel. Formed of pair of mating cylindrical housings: transducer housing and pitot-tube housing. Pitot tube supported by adjustable wedge fairing attached to top of pitot-tube housing with semicircular foot. Probe adjusted both radially and circumferentially. In addition, pressure-sensing transducer cooled internally by water or other cooling fluid passing through annulus of cooling system.

  5. On the directional selectivity of tunneling experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuermann, G.; Goettingen Univ.

    1981-01-01

    Using realistic parameters in a simplified model the directional selectivity of tunneling experiments is discussed. Although perfect surfaces and barriers are assumed, quasiparticles coming from a wide solid angle may contribute essentially to the tunnel current. This must be taken into consideration in the case of gap anisotropy. (orig.)

  6. Theory of superconducting tunneling without the tunneling Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    When a tunneling barrier is nearly transparent, the standard tunneling (or transfer) Hamiltonian approximation fails. The author describes the theory which is necessary for calculating the tunneling current in these cases, and illustrate it by comparing theory and experiment on superconductor/insulator/superconductor (SIS) junctions have ultra-thin tunnel barriers. This theory accurately explains the subgap structure which appears in the dynamical resistance of such SIS junctions, including many observed details which no previous theory has reproduced. The expression for the current through an SIS junction with an ultrathin barrier is given by I(t) = Re{Sigma/sub n/ J/sub n/ (omega/sub o/)e/sup in omega/o/sup t/} where omega/sub o/ = 2eV/h is the Josephson frequency, V is the bias voltage, and the J/sub n/ are voltage dependent coefficients, one for each positive or negative integer, n, and n=0. The relative sign of the terms involving cos(n omega/sub o/t) and sin(n omega/sub o/t) agrees with experiment, in contrast to previous theories of Josephson tunneling

  7. Spin polarization at the interface and tunnel magnetoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, H.; Inoue, J.

    2001-01-01

    We propose that interfacial states of imperfectly oxidized Al ions may exist in ferromagnetic tunnel junctions with Al-O barrier and govern both the spin polarization and tunnel conductance. It is shown that the spin polarization is positive independent of materials and correlates well with the tunnel magnetoresistance

  8. Superconducting tunnel-junction refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, R.G.; Paterson, J.L.; Kaplan, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    The dc current through an S 1 -S 2 tunnel junction, with Δ 2 greater than Δ 1 , when biased with eV 1 +Δ 2 , will lower the energy in S 1 . This energy reduction will be shared by the phonons and electrons. This device is shown to be analogous to a thermoelectric refrigerator with an effective Peltier coefficient π* approx. Δ 1 /e. Tunneling calculations yield the cooling power P/sub c/, the electrical power P/sub e/ supplied by the bias supply, and the cooling efficiency eta=P/sub c//P/sub e/. The maximum cooling power is obtained for eV= +- (Δ 2 -Δ 1 ) and t 1 =T 1 /T/sub c/1 approx. 0.9. Estimates are made of the temperature difference T 2 -T 1 achievable in Al-Pb and Sn-Pb junctions with an Al 2 O 3 tunneling barrier. The performance of this device is shown to yield a maximum cooling efficiency eta approx. = Δ 1 /(Δ 2 -Δ 1 ) which can be compared with that available in an ideal Carnot refrigerator of eta=T 1 /(T 2 -T 1 ). The development of a useful tunnel-junction refrigerator requires a tunneling barrier with an effective thermal conductance per unit area several orders of magnitude less than that provided by the A1 2 O 3 barrier in the Al-Pb and Sn-Pb systems

  9. In situ scanning probe spectroscopy at nanoscale solid/liquid interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, W.; Hugelmann, M.; Hugelmann, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemistry provides unique features for the preparation of low-dimensional structures, but in situ spectroscopy with atomic/molecular resolution at such structures is at present not well established yet. This paper shows that in situ scanning probe spectroscopy at solid/liquid interfaces can be utilized to study electronic properties at nanoscale, if appropriate conditions are applied. Tunneling spectroscopy provides information about tunneling barrier heights and electronic states in the tunneling gap, as shown on Au(1 1 1) substrates, contact spectroscopy allows for transport measurements at single nanostructures, as shown at Au/n-Si(1 1 1) nanodiodes. The influence of the electrolytic environment on spectroscopic investigations is not a principal limitation, but offers additional degrees of freedom, which allow, for example, spectroscopic studies of potential dependent surface phenomena at solid/liquid interfaces

  10. Tunneling spin injection into single layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Pi, K; McCreary, K M; Li, Yan; Wong, Jared J I; Swartz, A G; Kawakami, R K

    2010-10-15

    We achieve tunneling spin injection from Co into single layer graphene (SLG) using TiO₂ seeded MgO barriers. A nonlocal magnetoresistance (ΔR(NL)) of 130  Ω is observed at room temperature, which is the largest value observed in any material. Investigating ΔR(NL) vs SLG conductivity from the transparent to the tunneling contact regimes demonstrates the contrasting behaviors predicted by the drift-diffusion theory of spin transport. Furthermore, tunnel barriers reduce the contact-induced spin relaxation and are therefore important for future investigations of spin relaxation in graphene.

  11. Resonant tunneling of electrons in quantum wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krive, I.V.; Shekhter, R.I.; Jonson, M.; Krive, I.V.

    2010-01-01

    We considered resonant electron tunneling in various nanostructures including single wall carbon nanotubes, molecular transistors and quantum wires formed in two-dimensional electron gas. The review starts with a textbook description of resonant tunneling of noninteracting electrons through a double-barrier structure. The effects of electron-electron interaction in sequential and resonant electron tunneling are studied by using Luttinger liquid model of electron transport in quantum wires. The experimental aspects of the problem (fabrication of quantum wires and transport measurements) are also considered. The influence of vibrational and electromechanical effects on resonant electron tunneling in molecular transistors is discussed.

  12. Influence of quasiparticle multi-tunneling on the energy flow through the superconducting tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samedov, V. V.; Tulinov, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector consists of two layers of superconducting material separated by thin insulating barrier. An incident particle produces in superconductor excess nonequilibrium quasiparticles. Each quasiparticle in superconductor should be considered as quantum superposition of electron-like and hole-like excitations. This duality nature of quasiparticle leads to the effect of multi-tunneling. Quasiparticle starts to tunnel back and forth through the insulating barrier. After tunneling from biased electrode quasiparticle loses its energy via phonon emission. Eventually, the energy that equals to the difference in quasiparticle energy between two electrodes is deposited in the signal electrode. Because of the process of multi-tunneling, one quasiparticle can deposit energy more than once. In this work, the theory of branching cascade processes was applied to the process of energy deposition caused by the quasiparticle multi-tunneling. The formulae for the mean value and variance of the energy transferred by one quasiparticle into heat were derived. (authors)

  13. Unified time analysis of photon and particle tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, Vladislav S.; Recami, Erasmo; Jakiel, Jacek

    2001-07-01

    A unified approach to the time analysis of tunnelling of nonrelativistic particles is presented, in which Time is regarded as a quantum-mechanical observable, canonically conjugated to Energy. The validity of the Hartman effect (independence of the Tunnelling Time of the opaque barrier width, with superluminal group velocities as a consequence) is verified for all the known expressions of the mean tunnelling time. Moreover, the analogy between particle and photon tunnelling is suitably exploited. On the basic of such an analogy, an explanation of some recent microwave and optics experimental results on tunnelling time is proposed. Attention is devoted to some aspects of the causality problem for particle and photon tunnelling. (author)

  14. Tunneling Anomalous and Spin Hall Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos-Abiague, A; Fabian, J

    2015-07-31

    We predict, theoretically, the existence of the anomalous Hall effect when a tunneling current flows through a tunnel junction in which only one of the electrodes is magnetic. The interfacial spin-orbit coupling present in the barrier region induces a spin-dependent momentum filtering in the directions perpendicular to the tunneling current, resulting in a skew tunneling even in the absence of impurities. This produces an anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents in the nonmagnetic electrode when a bias voltage is applied across the tunneling heterojunction. If the barrier is composed of a noncentrosymmetric material, the anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents become anisotropic with respect to both the magnetization and crystallographic directions, allowing us to separate this interfacial phenomenon from the bulk anomalous and spin Hall contributions. The proposed effect should be useful for proving and quantifying the interfacial spin-orbit fields in metallic and metal-semiconductor systems.

  15. Fiber coupled ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1997-01-01

    We report on a scanning tunneling microscope with a photoconductive gate in the tunneling current circuit. The tunneling tip is attached to a coplanar transmission line with an integrated photoconductive switch. The switch is illuminated through a fiber which is rigidly attached to the switch...... waveguide. The measurements show that the probe works as a transient voltage detector in contact and a capacitively coupled transient field detector in tunneling mode. We do not measure the transient voltage change in the ohmic tunneling current. In this sense, the spatial resolution for propagating...... substrate. By using a firmly attached fiber we achieve an excellent reproducibility and unconstrained positioning of the tip. We observe a transient signal with 2.9 ps pulse width in tunneling mode and 5 ps in contact mode. The instrument is applied to investigating the mode structure on a coplanar...

  16. Chaos regularization of quantum tunneling rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecora, Louis M.; Wu Dongho; Lee, Hoshik; Antonsen, Thomas; Lee, Ming-Jer; Ott, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Quantum tunneling rates through a barrier separating two-dimensional, symmetric, double-well potentials are shown to depend on the classical dynamics of the billiard trajectories in each well and, hence, on the shape of the wells. For shapes that lead to regular (integrable) classical dynamics the tunneling rates fluctuate greatly with eigenenergies of the states sometimes by over two orders of magnitude. Contrarily, shapes that lead to completely chaotic trajectories lead to tunneling rates whose fluctuations are greatly reduced, a phenomenon we call regularization of tunneling rates. We show that a random-plane-wave theory of tunneling accounts for the mean tunneling rates and the small fluctuation variances for the chaotic systems.

  17. Recognition tunneling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lindsay, S.; He, J.; Sankey, O.; Hapala, Prokop; Jelínek, Pavel; Zhang, P.; Chang, S.; Huang, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 26 (2010), 262001/1-262001/12 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : STM * tunneling current * molecular electronics * DFT calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.644, year: 2010

  18. Modular Rake of Pitot Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Timothy A.; Henry, Michael W.; Homyk, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    The figure presents selected views of a modular rake of 17 pitot probes for measuring both transient and steady-state pressures in a supersonic wind tunnel. In addition to pitot tubes visible in the figure, the probe modules contain (1) high-frequency dynamic-pressure transducers connected through wires to remote monitoring circuitry and (2) flow passages that lead to tubes that, in turn, lead to remote steady-state pressure transducers. Prior pitot-probe rakes were fabricated as unitary structures, into which the individual pitot probes were brazed. Repair or replacement of individual probes was difficult, costly, and time-consuming because (1) it was necessary to remove entire rakes in order to unbraze individual malfunctioning probes and (2) the heat of unbrazing a failed probe and of brazing a new probe in place could damage adjacent probes. In contrast, the modules in the present probe are designed to be relatively quickly and easily replaceable with no heating and, in many cases, without need for removal of the entire rake from the wind tunnel. To remove a malfunctioning probe, one first removes a screw-mounted V-cross-section cover that holds the probe and adjacent probes in place. Then one removes a screw-mounted cover plate to gain access to the steady-state pressure tubes and dynamicpressure wires. Next, one disconnects the tube and wires of the affected probe. Finally, one installs a new probe in the reverse of the aforementioned sequence. The wire connections can be made by soldering, but to facilitate removal and installation, they can be made via miniature plugs and sockets. The connections between the probe flow passages and the tubes leading to the remote pressure sensors can be made by use of any of a variety of readily available flexible tubes that can be easily pulled off and slid back on for removal and installation, respectively.

  19. Superconducting tunneling with the tunneling Hamiltonian. II. Subgap harmonic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    The theory of superconducting tunneling without the tunneling Hamiltonian is extended to treat superconductor/insulator/superconductor junctions in which the transmission coefficient of the insulating barrier approaches unity. The solution for the current in such junctions is obtained by solving the problem of a particle hopping in a one-dimensional lattice of sites, with forward and reverse transfer integrals that depend on the site. The results are applied to the problem of subgap harmonic structure in superconducting tunneling. The time-dependent current at finite voltage through a junction exhibiting subgap structure is found to have terms that oscillate at all integer multiples of the Josephson frequency, n(2eV/h). The amplitudes of these new, and as yet unmeasured, ac current contributions as a function of voltage are predicted

  20. Scanning tunneling microscopic images and scanning tunneling spectra for coupled rectangular quantum corrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuoka, Shigenori; Tamura, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Assuming that an electron confined by double δ-function barriers lies in a quasi-stationary state, we derived eigenstates and eigenenergies of the electron. Such an electron has a complex eigenenergy, and the imaginary part naturally leads to the lifetime of the electron associated with tunneling through barriers. We applied this point of view to the electron confined in a rectangular quantum corral (QC) on a noble metal surface, and obtained scanning tunneling microscopic images and a scanning tunneling spectrum consistent with experimental ones. We investigated the electron states confined in coupled QCs and obtained the coupled states constructed with bonding and anti-bonding states. Using those energy levels and wavefunctions we specified scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images and scanning tunneling spectra (STS) for the doubly and triply coupled QCs. In addition we pointed out the feature of resonant electron states associated with the same QCs at both ends of the triply coupled QCs.

  1. A15 Nb-Sn tunnel junction fabrication and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudman, D.A.; Hellman, F.; Hammond, R.H.; Beasley, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated the deposition conditions necessary to produce optimized films of A15 Nb-Sn (19--26 at. % Sn) by electron-beam codeposition. Reliable high-quality superconducting tunnel junctions can be made on this material by using an oxidized-amorphous silicon overlayer as the tunneling barrier and lead as the counter-electrode. These junctions have been used both as a tool for materials diagnosis and as a probe of the superconducting properties (critical temperature and gap) of the films. Careful control of the substrate temperature during the growth of the films has proved critical to obtain homogeneous samples. When the substrate temperature is properly stabilized, stoichiometric Nb 3 Sn is found to be relatively insensitive to the deposition temperature and conditions. In contrast, the properties of the off-stoichiometry (Sn-poor) material depend strongly on the deposition temperature. For this Sn-poor material the ratio 2Δ/kT/sub c/ at a given composition increases with increasing deposition temperature. This change appears to be due to an increase in the gap at the surface of the material (as measured by tunneling) relative to the critical temperature of the bulk. All the tunnel junctions exhibit some persistent nonidealities in their current-voltage characteristics that are qualitatively insensitive to composition or deposition conditions. In particular, the junctions show excess conduction below the sum of the energy gaps (with onset at the counter-electrode gap) and a broadened current rise at the sum gap. The detailed origins of these problems are not yet understood

  2. Tunnel - history of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    This book introduces history of tunnel in ancient times, the middle ages and modern times, survey of tunnel and classification of bedrock like environment survey of position, survey of the ground, design of tunnel on basic thing of the design, and design of tunnel of bedrock, analysis of stability of tunnel and application of the data, construction of tunnel like lattice girder and steel fiber reinforced shot crete, and maintenance control and repair of tunnel.

  3. The effect of asymmetry on resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Calderon, G.

    1986-07-01

    Resonant tunneling experiments on multibarrier coupled heterostructures probe the quasistationary nature of the states of the corresponding one dimensional potential. This work considers the effect of asymmetric one dimensional multibarrier potentials on resonant tunneling. It is shown, by using the properties of the propagator of the system, that this effect may lead to novel resonance phenomena and affects the lifetime of the quasistationary states of the system. The above considerations are illustrated by a simple analytical solvable model. (author)

  4. Anomalous Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin Transfer Torque in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Embedded Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Useinov, Arthur; Ye, Lin-Xiu; Useinov, Niazbeck; Wu, Te-Ho; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2015-01-01

    The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with embedded nanoparticles (NPs) was calculated in range of the quantum-ballistic model. The simulation was performed for electron tunneling through the insulating layer with embedded magnetic and non-magnetic NPs within the approach of the double barrier subsystem connected in parallel to the single barrier one. This model can be applied for both MTJs with in-plane magnetization and perpendicular one. We also calculated the in-plane component of the spin transfer torque (STT) versus the applied voltage in MTJs with magnetic NPs and determined that its value can be much larger than in single barrier system (SBS) for the same tunneling thickness. The reported simulation reproduces experimental data of the TMR suppression and peak-like TMR anomalies at low voltages available in leterature. PMID:26681336

  5. Tunneling time in space fractional quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad

    2018-02-01

    We calculate the time taken by a wave packet to travel through a classically forbidden region of space in space fractional quantum mechanics. We obtain the close form expression of tunneling time from a rectangular barrier by stationary phase method. We show that tunneling time depends upon the width b of the barrier for b → ∞ and therefore Hartman effect doesn't exist in space fractional quantum mechanics. Interestingly we found that the tunneling time monotonically reduces with increasing b. The tunneling time is smaller in space fractional quantum mechanics as compared to the case of standard quantum mechanics. We recover the Hartman effect of standard quantum mechanics as a special case of space fractional quantum mechanics.

  6. Unified time analysis of photon and particle tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Recami, Erasmo; Jakiel, Jacek

    2004-01-01

    A unified time analysis of photon and nonrelativistic particle tunnellings is presented, in which time is regarded as a quantum observable, canonically conjugated to energy. Within this approach, one can introduce self-consistent definitions of the tunnelling times, on the basis of conventional quantum mechanics (or one-dimensional quantum electrodynamics) only. The validity of the Hartman effect [which states the tunnelling duration to be independent of the (opaque) barrier width, with superluminal group velocities of the tunnelling packet as a consequence] is verified for all the known expressions of the mean tunnelling time. However, some noticeable generalizations of (and deviations from) the Hartman effect are, as well, briefly investigated. Moreover, the analogy between particle and photon tunnelling is suitably exploited; on the basis of such an analogy, an explanation of some recent interesting microwave and optical experimental results on tunnelling times is proposed. Attention is devoted, at last, to some aspects of the causality problem for particle and photon tunnelling

  7. STM-SQUID probe microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Tadayuki; Tachiki, Minoru; Itozaki, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a STM-SQUID probe microscope. A high T C SQUID probe microscope was combined with a scanning tunneling microscope for investigation of samples at room temperature in air. A high permeability probe needle was used as a magnetic flux guide to improve the spatial resolution. The probe with tip radius of less than 100 nm was prepared by microelectropolishing. The probe was also used as a scanning tunneling microscope tip. Topography of the sample surface could be measured by the scanning tunneling microscope with high spatial resolution prior to observation by SQUID microscopy. The SQUID probe microscope image could be observed while keeping the distance from the sample surface to the probe tip constant. We observed a topographic image and a magnetic image of Ni fine pattern and also a magnetically recorded hard disk. Furthermore we have investigated a sample vibration method of the static magnetic field emanating from a sample with the aim of achieving a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio

  8. Investigating superconductivity by tunneling spectroscopy using oxide heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillis-Tsirakis, Evangelos

    2017-06-19

    been investigated by magnetic-field-dependent tunneling spectroscopy. Planar tunnel junctions of Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} and In have been fabricated and analyzed. Tunneling spectroscopy measurements were conducted between the In-film and the bulk SrTiO{sub 3} crystal, through the Schottky barrier that emerges at the interface of the two and acts as the tunneling barrier. Measurements performed within broad energy ranges (of the order of 100 meV) have resolved the two highest longitudinal optical phonon modes (LO3 and LO4) in agreement with literature. This indicates that tunneling through these junctions is a simple but reliable technique to investigate the spectral DOS at the Fermi energy. The usage of tunneling spectroscopy in planar junctions as a tool for probing the DOS has been proven crucial and combining with transport measurements is a powerful method to unravel novel physical phenomena in superconductors. As an immediate follow-up of this thesis I suggest the thorough investigation of the superconducting properties in doped SrTiO{sub 3} in the entire phase diagram, as well as the investigation of LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces where LaAlO{sub 3} is either amorphous or grown on SrTiO{sub 3} [110] and [111]. Although technologically extremely challenging, fabrication of junctions where electrons tunnel into the LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} 2DES from the side (as in the dc-SQUID configuration described in Ref. [13] for YBCO) may offer an alternative viewpoint on the fascinating properties of this delicate system.

  9. Investigating superconductivity by tunneling spectroscopy using oxide heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillis-Tsirakis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    spectroscopy. Planar tunnel junctions of Nb-doped SrTiO 3 and In have been fabricated and analyzed. Tunneling spectroscopy measurements were conducted between the In-film and the bulk SrTiO 3 crystal, through the Schottky barrier that emerges at the interface of the two and acts as the tunneling barrier. Measurements performed within broad energy ranges (of the order of 100 meV) have resolved the two highest longitudinal optical phonon modes (LO3 and LO4) in agreement with literature. This indicates that tunneling through these junctions is a simple but reliable technique to investigate the spectral DOS at the Fermi energy. The usage of tunneling spectroscopy in planar junctions as a tool for probing the DOS has been proven crucial and combining with transport measurements is a powerful method to unravel novel physical phenomena in superconductors. As an immediate follow-up of this thesis I suggest the thorough investigation of the superconducting properties in doped SrTiO 3 in the entire phase diagram, as well as the investigation of LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 interfaces where LaAlO 3 is either amorphous or grown on SrTiO 3 [110] and [111]. Although technologically extremely challenging, fabrication of junctions where electrons tunnel into the LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 2DES from the side (as in the dc-SQUID configuration described in Ref. [13] for YBCO) may offer an alternative viewpoint on the fascinating properties of this delicate system.

  10. 13C ENDOR Spectroscopy of Lipoxygenase-Substrate Complexes Reveals the Structural Basis for C-H Activation by Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horitani, Masaki; Offenbacher, Adam R; Carr, Cody A Marcus; Yu, Tao; Hoeke, Veronika; Cutsail, George E; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Klinman, Judith P; Hoffman, Brian M

    2017-02-08

    In enzymatic C-H activation by hydrogen tunneling, reduced barrier width is important for efficient hydrogen wave function overlap during catalysis. For native enzymes displaying nonadiabatic tunneling, the dominant reactive hydrogen donor-acceptor distance (DAD) is typically ca. 2.7 Å, considerably shorter than normal van der Waals distances. Without a ground state substrate-bound structure for the prototypical nonadiabatic tunneling system, soybean lipoxygenase (SLO), it has remained unclear whether the requisite close tunneling distance occurs through an unusual ground state active site arrangement or by thermally sampling conformational substates. Herein, we introduce Mn 2+ as a spin-probe surrogate for the SLO Fe ion; X-ray diffraction shows Mn-SLO is structurally faithful to the native enzyme. 13 C ENDOR then reveals the locations of 13 C10 and reactive 13 C11 of linoleic acid relative to the metal; 1 H ENDOR and molecular dynamics simulations of the fully solvated SLO model using ENDOR-derived restraints give additional metrical information. The resulting three-dimensional representation of the SLO active site ground state contains a reactive (a) conformer with hydrogen DAD of ∼3.1 Å, approximately van der Waals contact, plus an inactive (b) conformer with even longer DAD, establishing that stochastic conformational sampling is required to achieve reactive tunneling geometries. Tunneling-impaired SLO variants show increased DADs and variations in substrate positioning and rigidity, confirming previous kinetic and theoretical predictions of such behavior. Overall, this investigation highlights the (i) predictive power of nonadiabatic quantum treatments of proton-coupled electron transfer in SLO and (ii) sensitivity of ENDOR probes to test, detect, and corroborate kinetically predicted trends in active site reactivity and to reveal unexpected features of active site architecture.

  11. Probing electronic interactions using electron tunneling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pratap

    Sample preparation. Chamber. Sample manipulators. Vibration Isolation. Table. Cryostat. Load lock. STM Head. Magnet. Sample holder. Tip. Tip holder. Piezo electric tube. Coarse positioner. Macor. Cu housing for sample holder. PCB. Cu shielding can. Steel studs. Our Toy: The TIFR milli-Kelvin STM. Lowest temperature:.

  12. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of Pb thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Michael

    2010-12-13

    The present thesis deals with the electronic structure, work function and single-atom contact conductance of Pb thin films, investigated with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope. The electronic structure of Pb(111) thin films on Ag(111) surfaces is investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Quantum size effects, in particular, quantum well states (QWSs), play a crucial role in the electronic and physical properties of these films. Quantitative analysis of the spectra yields the QWS energies as a function of film thickness, the Pb bulk-band dispersion in {gamma}-L direction, scattering phase shifts at the Pb/Ag interface and vacuum barrier as well as the lifetime broadening at anti {gamma}. The work function {phi} is an important property of surfaces, which influences catalytic reactivity and charge injection at interfaces. It controls the availability of charge carriers in front of a surface. Modifying {phi} has been achieved by deposition of metals and molecules. For investigating {phi} at the atomic scale, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has become a widely used technique. STM measures an apparent barrier height {phi}{sub a}, which is commonly related to the sample work function {phi}{sub s} by: {phi}{sub a}=({phi}{sub s}+{phi}{sub t}- vertical stroke eV vertical stroke)/2, with {phi}{sub t} the work function of the tunneling tip, V the applied tunneling bias voltage, and -e the electron charge. Hence, the effect of the finite voltage in STM on {phi}{sub a} is assumed to be linear and the comparison of {phi}{sub a} measured at different surface sites is assumed to yield quantitative information about work function differences. Here, the dependence of {phi}{sub a} on the Pb film thickness and applied bias voltage V is investigated. {phi}{sub a} is found to vary significantly with V. This bias dependence leads to drastic changes and even inversion of contrast in spatial maps of {phi}{sub a}, which are related to the QWSs in the Pb

  13. Resonant tunneling measurements of size-induced strain relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Can Deniz

    Lattice mismatch strain available in such semiconductor heterostructures as Si/SiGe or GaAs/AlGaAs can be employed to alter the electronic and optoelectronic properties of semiconductor structures and devices. When deep submicron structures are fabricated from strained material, strained layers relax by sidewall expansion giving rise to size- and geometry-dependent strain gradients throughout the structure. This thesis describes a novel experimental technique to probe the size-induced strain relaxation by studying the tunneling current characteristics of strained p-type Si/SiGe resonant tunneling diodes. Our current-voltage measurements on submicron strained p-Si/SiGe double- and triple-barrier resonant tunneling structures as a function of device diameter, D, provide experimental access to both the average strain relaxation (which leads to relative shifts in the tunneling current peak positions) and strain gradients (which give rise to a fine structure in the current peaks due to inhomogeneous strain-induced lateral quantization). We find that strain relaxation is significant, with a large fraction of the strain energy relaxed on average in D ≤ 0.25 m m devices. Further, the in-plane potentials that arise from inhomogeneous strain gradients are large. In the D ˜ 0.2 m m devices, the corresponding lateral potentials are approximately parabolic exceeding ˜ 25 meV near the perimeter. These potentials create discrete hole states in double-barrier structures (single well), and coupled hole states in triple-barrier structures (two wells). Our results are in excellent agreement with finite-element strain calculations in which the strained layers are permitted to relax to a state of minimum energy by sidewall expansion. Size-induced strain relaxation will undoubtedly become a serious technological issue once strained devices are scaled down to the deep submicron regime. Interestingly, our calculations predict and our measurements are consistent with the appearance of

  14. The temperature in Hawking radiation as tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baocheng; Cai Qingyu; Zhan Mingsheng

    2009-01-01

    The quasi-classical method of deriving Hawking radiation under the consideration of canonical invariance is investigated. We find that the horizon should be regarded as a two-way barrier and the ingoing amplitude should be calculated according to the negative energy particles tunneling into the black hole because of the whole space-time interchange and thus the standard Hawking temperature is recovered. We also discuss the advantage of the Painleve coordinates in Hawking radiation as tunneling

  15. Tunneling time, exit time and exit momentum in strong field tunnel ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teeny, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. It is still an open question when does the electron tunnel ionize and how long is the duration of tunneling. In this work we solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in one and two dimensions and use ab initio quantum calculations in order to answer these questions. Additionally, we determine the exit momentum of the tunnel ionized electron from first principles. We find out results that are different from the assumptions of the commonly employed two-step model, which assumes that the electron ionizes at the instant of electric field maximum with a zero momentum. After determining the quantum final momentum distribution of tunnel ionized electrons we show that the two-step model fails to predict the correct final momentum. Accordingly we suggest how to correct the two-step model. Furthermore, we determine the instant at which tunnel ionization starts, which turns out to be different from the instant usually assumed. From determining the instant at which it is most probable for the electron to enter the tunneling barrier and the instant at which it exits we determine the most probable time spent under the barrier. Moreover, we apply a quantum clock approach in order to determine the duration of tunnel ionization. From the quantum clock we determine an average tunneling time which is different in magnitude and origin with respect to the most probable tunneling time. By defining a probability distribution of tunneling times using virtual detectors we relate both methods and explain the apparent discrepancy. The results found have in general an effect on the interpretation of experiments that measure the spectra of tunnel ionized electrons, and specifically on the calibration of the so called attoclock experiments, because models with imprecise assumptions are usually employed in order to interpret experimental results.

  16. Tunneling time, exit time and exit momentum in strong field tunnel ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeny, Nicolas

    2016-10-18

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. It is still an open question when does the electron tunnel ionize and how long is the duration of tunneling. In this work we solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in one and two dimensions and use ab initio quantum calculations in order to answer these questions. Additionally, we determine the exit momentum of the tunnel ionized electron from first principles. We find out results that are different from the assumptions of the commonly employed two-step model, which assumes that the electron ionizes at the instant of electric field maximum with a zero momentum. After determining the quantum final momentum distribution of tunnel ionized electrons we show that the two-step model fails to predict the correct final momentum. Accordingly we suggest how to correct the two-step model. Furthermore, we determine the instant at which tunnel ionization starts, which turns out to be different from the instant usually assumed. From determining the instant at which it is most probable for the electron to enter the tunneling barrier and the instant at which it exits we determine the most probable time spent under the barrier. Moreover, we apply a quantum clock approach in order to determine the duration of tunnel ionization. From the quantum clock we determine an average tunneling time which is different in magnitude and origin with respect to the most probable tunneling time. By defining a probability distribution of tunneling times using virtual detectors we relate both methods and explain the apparent discrepancy. The results found have in general an effect on the interpretation of experiments that measure the spectra of tunnel ionized electrons, and specifically on the calibration of the so called attoclock experiments, because models with imprecise assumptions are usually employed in order to interpret experimental results.

  17. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila; Wilt, Dave; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Tin, Padetha; Lau, Janice; Castro, Stephanie; Jenkins, Philip; Scheiman, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy (STORM) is a method, now undergoing development, for measuring optoelectronic properties of materials and devices on the nanoscale by means of a combination of (1) traditional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with (2) tunable laser spectroscopy. In STORM, an STM tip probing a semiconductor is illuminated with modulated light at a wavelength in the visible-to-near-infrared range and the resulting photoenhancement of the tunneling current is measured as a function of the illuminating wavelength. The photoenhancement of tunneling current occurs when the laser photon energy is sufficient to excite charge carriers into the conduction band of the semiconductor. Figure 1 schematically depicts a proposed STORM apparatus. The light for illuminating the semiconductor specimen at the STM would be generated by a ring laser that would be tunable across the wavelength range of interest. The laser beam would be chopped by an achromatic liquid-crystal modulator. A polarization-maintaining optical fiber would couple the light to the tip/sample junction of a commercial STM. An STM can be operated in one of two modes: constant height or constant current. A STORM apparatus would be operated in the constant-current mode, in which the height of the tip relative to the specimen would be varied in order to keep the tunneling current constant. In this mode, a feedback control circuit adjusts the voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator in the STM that adjusts the height of the STM tip to keep the tunneling current constant. The exponential relationship between the tunneling current and tip-to-sample distance makes it relatively easy to implement this mode of operation. The choice of method by which the photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current would be measured depends on choice of the frequency at which the input illumination would be modulated (chopped). If the frequency of modulation were low enough (typically tunneling current

  18. Chiral tunneling in a twisted graphene bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen-Yu; Chu, Zhao-Dong; He, Lin

    2013-08-09

    The perfect transmission in a graphene monolayer and the perfect reflection in a Bernal graphene bilayer for electrons incident in the normal direction of a potential barrier are viewed as two incarnations of the Klein paradox. Here we show a new and unique incarnation of the Klein paradox. Owing to the different chiralities of the quasiparticles involved, the chiral fermions in a twisted graphene bilayer show an adjustable probability of chiral tunneling for normal incidence: they can be changed from perfect tunneling to partial or perfect reflection, or vice versa, by controlling either the height of the barrier or the incident energy. As well as addressing basic physics about how the chiral fermions with different chiralities tunnel through a barrier, our results provide a facile route to tune the electronic properties of the twisted graphene bilayer.

  19. Dependences of the Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin Transfer Torque on the Sizes and Concentration of Nanoparticles in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, A. M.; Useinov, A. N.; Useinov, N. Kh.

    2018-01-01

    Dependences of the tunnel magnetoresistance and in-plane component of the spin transfer torque on the applied voltage in a magnetic tunnel junction have been calculated in the approximation of ballistic transport of conduction electrons through an insulating layer with embedded magnetic or nonmagnetic nanoparticles. A single-barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nanoparticle embedded in an insulator forms a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction. It has been shown that the in-plane component of the spin transfer torque in the double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction can be higher than that in the single-barrier one at the same thickness of the insulating layer. The calculations show that nanoparticles embedded in the tunnel junction increase the probability of tunneling of electrons, create resonance conditions, and ensure the quantization of the conductance in contrast to the tunnel junction without nanoparticles. The calculated dependences of the tunnel magnetoresistance correspond to experimental data demonstrating peak anomalies and suppression of the maximum magnetoresistances at low voltages.

  20. Intrinsic Tunneling in Phase Separated Manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Bhalla, G.; Selcuk, S.; Dhakal, T.; Biswas, A.; Hebard, A. F.

    2009-02-01

    We present evidence of direct electron tunneling across intrinsic insulating regions in submicrometer wide bridges of the phase-separated ferromagnet (La,Pr,Ca)MnO3. Upon cooling below the Curie temperature, a predominantly ferromagnetic supercooled state persists where tunneling across the intrinsic tunnel barriers (ITBs) results in metastable, temperature-independent, high-resistance plateaus over a large range of temperatures. Upon application of a magnetic field, our data reveal that the ITBs are extinguished resulting in sharp, colossal, low-field resistance drops. Our results compare well to theoretical predictions of magnetic domain walls coinciding with the intrinsic insulating phase.

  1. Atomically Thin Al2O3 Films for Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Jamie; Gong, Youpin; Gong, Ming; Su, Feifan; Xu, Huikai; Sakidja, Ridwan; Elliot, Alan; Lu, Rongtao; Zhao, Shiping; Han, Siyuan; Wu, Judy Z.

    2017-06-01

    Metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions are common throughout the microelectronics industry. The industry standard AlOx tunnel barrier, formed through oxygen diffusion into an Al wetting layer, is plagued by internal defects and pinholes which prevent the realization of atomically thin barriers demanded for enhanced quantum coherence. In this work, we employ in situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy along with molecular-dynamics simulations to understand and control the growth of atomically thin Al2O3 tunnel barriers using atomic-layer deposition. We find that a carefully tuned initial H2O pulse hydroxylated the Al surface and enabled the creation of an atomically thin Al2O3 tunnel barrier with a high-quality M -I interface and a significantly enhanced barrier height compared to thermal AlOx . These properties, corroborated by fabricated Josephson junctions, show that atomic-layer deposition Al2O3 is a dense, leak-free tunnel barrier with a low defect density which can be a key component for the next generation of metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions.

  2. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  3. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  4. Transient measurements with an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    We use a photoconductively gated ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope to resolve laser-induced transients on transmission lines and photoconductors. The photoconductive switch on the tunneling probe is illuminated through a rigidly attached fiber. The use of the fiber enables us to scan across...... the transmission line while the change in delay time between pump beam (on the sample) and probe beam (on the probe) provides the temporal information. The investigated photoconductor sample is a low-temperature-grown GaAs layer placed on a sapphire substrate with a thin, semitransparent gold layer. In tunneling...... mode the probe is sensitive to laser-induced field changes in the semiconductor layer. Laser-induced transient signals of 2.2 ps widths are detected. As for the transmission lines, the signals can be explained by a capacitive coupling across the tunneling gap....

  5. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  6. To Climb or Not to Climb: The Probing of Self-Imposed Barriers that Delay or Deny Career Aspirations to be an Administrator in a Public School System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Janet M.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout history, women have faced numerous career barriers. Although significant progress has made it possible to break through the "glass ceiling," there remains a disproportionate percentage of women at the higher educational administrative positions, specifically the superintendent and high school principal roles. This study will…

  7. Direct observation of atoms on surfaces by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldeschwieler, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope is a non-destructive means of achieving atomic level resolution of crystal surfaces in real space to elucidate surface structures, electronic properties and chemical composition. Scanning tunnelling microscope is a powerful, real space surface structure probe complementary to other techniques such as x-ray diffraction. 21 refs., 8 figs

  8. Ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy with atomic resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelic, Vedran; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Nguyen, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy (THz-STM) can probe single atoms on a silicon surface with simultaneous sub-nanometer and sub-picosecond spatio-temporal resolution. THz-STM is established as a new technique for exploring high-field non-equilibrium tunneling...

  9. A review on all-perovskite multiferroic tunnel junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuewei Yin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the basic concept was proposed only about 10 years ago, multiferroic tunnel junctions (MFTJs with a ferroelectric barrier sandwiched between two ferromagnetic electrodes have already drawn considerable interests, driven mainly by its potential applications in multi-level memories and electric field controlled spintronics. The purpose of this article is to review the recent progress of all-perovskite MFTJs. Starting from the key functional properties of the tunneling magnetoresistance, tunneling electroresistance, and tunneling electromagnetoresistance effects, we discuss the main origins of the tunneling electroresistance effect, recent progress in achieving multilevel resistance states in a single device, and the electrical control of spin polarization and transport through the ferroelectric polarization reversal of the tunneling barrier.

  10. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β.

  11. Direct observation of the leakage current in epitaxial diamond Schottky barrier devices by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy and Raman imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Jose; Boutchich, M.; Kleider, J. P.; Teraji, T.; Koide, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the high leakage current measured in several vertical-type diamond Schottky devices is conjointly investigated by conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) and confocal micro-Raman/Photoluminescence (PL) imaging analysis. Local areas characterized by a strong decrease of the local resistance (5-6 orders of magnitude drop) with respect to their close surrounding have been identified in several different regions of the sample surface. The same local areas, also referenced ...

  12. Tunneling technologies for the collider ring tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frobenius, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Texas site chosen for the Superconducting Super Collider has been studied, and it has been determined that proven, conventional technology and accepted engineering practice are suitable for constructing the collider tunnels. The Texas National Research Laboratory Commission report recommended that two types of tunneling machines be used for construction of the tunnels: a conventional hard rock tunnel boring machine (TBM) for the Austin chalk and a double shielded, rotary TBM for the Taylor marl. Since the tunneling machines usually set the pace for the project, efficient planning, operation, and coordination of the tunneling system components will be critical to the schedule and cost of the project. During design, tunneling rate prediction should be refined by focusing on the development of an effective tunneling system and evaluating its capacity to meet or exceed the required schedules. 8 refs., 13 figs

  13. Resonance tunneling electron-vibrational spectroscopy of polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalidchik, F I; Kovalevskii, S A; Balashov, E M

    2017-05-21

    The tunneling spectra of the ordered monolayer films of decamolybdodicobaltate (DMDC) compounds deposited from aqueous solutions on HOPG were measured by scanning tunnel microscopy in air. The DMDC spectra, as well as the tunneling spectra of other polyoxometalates (POMs), exhibit well-defined negative differential resistances (NDRs). The mechanism of formation of these spectral features was established from the collection of revealed NDR dependences on the external varying parameters and found to be common to all systems exhibiting Wannier-Stark localization. A model of biresonance tunneling was developed to provide an explanation for the totality of experimental data, both the literature and original, on the tunneling POM probing. A variant of the tunneling electron-vibrational POM spectroscopy was proposed allowing the determination of the three basic energy parameters-energy gaps between the occupied and unoccupied states, frequencies of the vibrational transitions accompanying biresonance electron-tunneling processes, and electron-vibrational interaction constants on the monomolecular level.

  14. Transmission through a potential barrier in Luttinger liquids with a topological spin gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainaris, Nikolaos; Carr, Sam T.; Mirlin, Alexander D.

    2018-03-01

    We study theoretically the transport of the one-dimensional single-channel interacting electron gas through a strong potential barrier in the parameter regime where the spin sector of the low-energy theory is gapped by interaction (Luther-Emery liquid). There are two distinct phases of this nature, of which one is of particular interest as it exhibits nontrivial interaction-induced topological properties. Focusing on this phase and using bosonization and an expansion in the tunneling strength we calculate the conductance through the barrier as a function of the temperature as well as the local density of states (LDOS) at the barrier. Our main result concerns the mechanism of bound-state-mediated tunneling. The characteristic feature of the topological phase is the emergence of protected zero-energy bound states with fractional spin located at the impurity position. By flipping this fractional spin, single electrons can tunnel across the impurity even though the bulk spectrum for spin excitations is gapped. This results in a finite LDOS below the bulk gap and in a nonmonotonic behavior of the conductance. The system represents an important physical example of an interacting symmetry-protected topological phase, which combines features of a topological spin insulator and a topological charge metal, in which the topology can be probed by measuring transport properties.

  15. Tunneling time and Hartman effect in a ferromagnetic graphene superlattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Sattari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Using transfer-matrix and stationary phase methods, we study the tunneling time (group delay time in a ferromagnetic monolayer graphene superlattice. The system we peruse consists of a sequence of rectangular barriers and wells, which can be realized by putting a series of electronic gates on the top of ferromagnetic graphene. The magnetization in the two ferromagnetic layers is aligned parallel. We find out that the tunneling time for normal incident is independent of spin state of electron as well as the barrier height and electron Fermi energy while for the oblique incident angles the tunneling time depends on the spin state of electron and has an oscillatory behavior. Also the effect of barrier width on tunneling time is also investigated and shown that, for normal incident, the Hartman effect disappears in a ferromagnetic graphene superlattice but it appears for oblique incident angles when the x component of the electron wave vector in the barrier is imaginary.

  16. Evolution of tunnelling causality and the 'Hartman-Fletcher effect'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Zaichenko, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    A new concept of the macroscopic tunneling time is added to our previous definition of the microscopic tunnelling time. The formally accusal jump of a time advance near the forward barrier wall is interpreted as a result of the superposition and interference of incoming and reflected waves. The reality 'H.-F. effect' is confirmed

  17. Magnetic tunnel junction device having an intermediate layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic tunnel junction device has a multi-layer structure including a pair of electrode layers of a ferromagnetic material and a tunnel barrier layer of an insulating material between the electrode layers. In order to realize a low resistance, the multi-layer structure also includes an

  18. Hot Wire Anemometer Turbulence Measurements in the wind Tunnel of LM Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas

    downstream of the nozzle contraction. We used two different hot wire probes: a dual sensor miniature wire probe (Dantec 55P61) and a triple sensor fiber film probe (Dantec 55R91). The turbulence intensity measured with the dual sensor probe in the empty tunnel section was significantly lower than the one...

  19. Resonant tunneling of spin-wave packets via quantized states in potential wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ulf-Hendrik; Gatzen, Marius; Demidov, Vladislav E; Demokritov, Sergej O

    2007-09-21

    We have studied the tunneling of spin-wave pulses through a system of two closely situated potential barriers. The barriers represent two areas of inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field, where the existence of spin waves is forbidden. We show that for certain values of the spin-wave frequency corresponding to the quantized spin-wave states existing in the well formed between the barriers, the tunneling has a resonant character. As a result, transmission of spin-wave packets through the double-barrier structure is much more efficient than the sequent tunneling through two single barriers.

  20. Tunneling of heat: Beyond linear response regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Kamil; Saroka, David

    2018-02-01

    We examine nanoscale processes of heat (energy) transfer as carried by electrons tunneling via potential barriers and molecular interconnects between two heat reservoirs (thermal baths). For that purpose, we use Landauer-type formulas to calculate thermal conductance and quadratic correction to heat flux flowing via quantum systems. As an input, we implement analytical expressions for transmission functions related to simple potential barriers and atomic bridges. Our results are discussed with respect to energy of tunneling electrons, temperature, the presence of resonant states, and specific parameters characterizing potential barriers as well as heat carriers. The simplicity of semi-analytical models developed by us allows to fit experimental data and extract crucial information about the values of model parameters. Further investigations are expected for more realistic transmission functions, while time-dependent aspects of nanoscale heat transfer may be addressed by using the concept of wave packets scattered on potential barriers and point-like defects within regular (periodic) nanostructures.

  1. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  2. Spin-dependent tunnelling in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Mryasov, Oleg N; LeClair, Patrick R

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of electron tunnelling has been known since the advent of quantum mechanics, but continues to enrich our understanding of many fields of physics, as well as creating sub-fields on its own. Spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) has recently aroused enormous interest and has developed in a vigorous field of research. The large tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) observed in MTJs garnered much attention due to possible applications in non-volatile random-access memories and next-generation magnetic field sensors. This led to a number of fundamental questions regarding the phenomenon of SDT. In this review article we present an overview of this field of research. We discuss various factors that control the spin polarization and magnetoresistance in MTJs. Starting from early experiments on SDT and their interpretation, we consider thereafter recent experiments and models which highlight the role of the electronic structure of the ferromagnets, the insulating layer, and the ferromagnet/insulator interfaces. We also discuss the role of disorder in the barrier and in the ferromagnetic electrodes and their influence on TMR. (topical review)

  3. Dielectric Sensors Based on Electromagnetic Energy Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Omar; Kashanianfard, Mani; Ramahi, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We show that metallic wires embedded in narrow waveguide bends and channels demonstrate resonance behavior at specific frequencies. The electromagnetic energy at these resonances tunnels through the narrow waveguide channels with almost no propagation losses. Under the tunneling behavior, high-intensity electromagnetic fields are produced in the vicinity of the metallic wires. These intense field resonances can be exploited to build highly sensitive dielectric sensors. The sensor operation is explained with the help of full-wave simulations. A practical setup consisting of a 3D waveguide bend is presented to experimentally observe the tunneling phenomenon. The tunneling frequency is predicted by determining the input impedance minima through a variational formula based on the Green function of a probe-excited parallel plate waveguide. PMID:25835188

  4. Dielectric Sensors Based on Electromagnetic Energy Tunneling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Siddiqui

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that metallic wires embedded in narrow waveguide bends and channels demonstrate resonance behavior at specific frequencies. The electromagnetic energy at these resonances tunnels through the narrow waveguide channels with almost no propagation losses. Under the tunneling behavior, high-intensity electromagnetic fields are produced in the vicinity of the metallic wires. These intense field resonances can be exploited to build highly sensitive dielectric sensors. The sensor operation is explained with the help of full-wave simulations. A practical setup consisting of a 3D waveguide bend is presented to experimentally observe the tunneling phenomenon. The tunneling frequency is predicted by determining the input impedance minima through a variational formula based on the Green function of a probe-excited parallel plate waveguide.

  5. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q ∼ 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement

  6. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson-Smith, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provide information on recombination processes and material properties. The design and construction of a scanning tunnelling luminescence microscope is described in detail. Operating under ambient conditions, the microscope has several novel features, including a new type of miniature inertial slider-based approach motor, large solid-angle light collection optical arrangement and a tip-height regulation system which requires the minimum of operator input. (author)

  7. Direct observation of the leakage current in epitaxial diamond Schottky barrier devices by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy and Raman imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, J.; Boutchich, M.; Kleider, J. P.; Teraji, T.; Koide, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The origin of the high leakage current measured in several vertical-type diamond Schottky devices is conjointly investigated by conducting probe atomic force microscopy and confocal micro-Raman/photoluminescence imaging analysis. Local areas characterized by a strong decrease of the local resistance (5-6 orders of magnitude drop) with respect to their close surrounding have been identified in several different regions of the sample surface. The same local areas, also referenced as electrical hot-spots, reveal a slightly constrained diamond lattice and three dominant Raman bands in the low-wavenumber region (590, 914 and 1040 cm-1). These latter bands are usually assigned to the vibrational modes involving boron impurities and its possible complexes that can electrically act as traps for charge carriers. Local current-voltage measurements performed at the hot-spots point out a trap-filled-limited current as the main conduction mechanism favouring the leakage current in the Schottky devices.

  8. Tunnel magnetoresistance in double spin filter junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffarzadeh, Alireza

    2003-01-01

    We consider a new type of magnetic tunnel junction, which consists of two ferromagnetic tunnel barriers acting as spin filters (SFs), separated by a nonmagnetic metal (NM) layer. Using the transfer matrix method and the free-electron approximation, the dependence of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) on the thickness of the central NM layer, bias voltage and temperature in the double SF junction are studied theoretically. It is shown that the TMR and electron-spin polarization in this structure can reach very large values under suitable conditions. The highest value of the TMR can reach 99%. By an appropriate choice of the thickness of the central NM layer, the degree of spin polarization in this structure will be higher than that of the single SF junctions. These results may be useful in designing future spin-polarized tunnelling devices

  9. Closed-loop conductance scanning tunneling spectroscopy: demonstrating the equivalence to the open-loop alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellenthal, Chris; Sotthewes, Kai; Siekman, Martin H; Kooij, E Stefan; Zandvliet, Harold J W

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the validity of using closed-loop z(V) conductance scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements for the determination of the effective tunneling barrier by comparing them to more conventional open-loop I(z) measurements. Through the development of a numerical model, the individual contributions to the effective tunneling barrier present in these experiments, such as the work function and the presence of an image charge, are determined quantitatively. This opens up the possibility of determining tunneling barriers of both vacuum and molecular systems in an alternative and more detailed manner.

  10. Carrier tunneling in high magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christianen, P.C.M.; Bruggink, I.E.M.; Maan, J.C.; Vleuten, van der W.C.

    1995-01-01

    Proceedings of the XXIV International School of Semiconducting Coinpounds, Jaszowiec 1995. A magnetic field induced coupling is observed between the Landau levels with different quantum number of two GaAs quantum wells separated by a thin (Ga,Al)As tunnel barrier using

  11. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments investigated the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very-small-capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson-phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters. The experiments on small-capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the large-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wave function has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias

  12. Spin transport in spin filtering magnetic tunneling junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Lee, Eok Kyun

    2007-11-01

    Taking into account spin-orbit coupling and s-d interaction, we investigate spin transport properties of the magnetic tunneling junctions with spin filtering barrier using Landauer-Büttiker formalism implemented with the recursive algorithm to calculate the real-space Green function. We predict completely different bias dependence of negative tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) between the systems composed of nonmagnetic electrode (NM)/ferromagnetic barrier (FB)/ferromagnet (FM) and NM/FB/FM/NM spin filtering tunnel junctions (SFTJs). Analyses of the results provide us possible ways of designing the systems which modulate the TMR in the negative magnetoresistance regime.

  13. Setting up tunneling conditions by means of Bohmian mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, A S; Miret-Artes, S, E-mail: asanz@iff.csic.es, E-mail: s.miret@iff.csic.es [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental-CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-12-02

    Usually tunneling is established after imposing some matching conditions on the (time-independent) wavefunction and its first derivative at the boundaries of a barrier. Here an alternative scheme is proposed to determine tunneling and estimate transmission probabilities in time-dependent problems, which takes advantage of the trajectory picture provided by Bohmian mechanics. From this theory, a general functional expression for the transmission probability in terms of the system initial state can be reached. This expression is used here to analyze tunneling properties and estimate transmissions in the case of initial Gaussian wave packets colliding with ramp-like barriers. (paper)

  14. Tunneling in a self-consistent dynamic image potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudberg, B.G.R.; Jonson, M.

    1991-01-01

    We have calculated the self-consistent effective potential for an electron tunneling through a square barrier while interacting with surface plasmons. This potential reduces to the classical image potential in the static limit. In the opposite limit, when the ''velocity'' of the tunneling electron is large, it reduces to the unperturbed square-barrier potential. For a wide variety of parameters the dynamic effects on the transmission coefficient T=|t 2 | can, for instance, be related to the Buettiker-Landauer traversal time for tunneling, given by τ BL =ℎ|d lnt/dV|

  15. Tunneling of a coupled system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avishai, Y.

    1985-01-01

    We consider tunneling through a potential barrier V(x) in the presence of a coupling term W(x,y). Let H(y) be the internal Hamiltonian associated with the coordinate y and let E 0 (x) be the ground state energy of the operator H(x;y) = H(y) + W(x,y) in which x is a parameter. Our result for the tunneling probability (in the WKB approximation) is P = exp(2i ∫ k 0 (x)dx) where, at energy E, k 0 (x) = [E-E 0 (x)-V(x)]sup(1/2)/(h/2π) is the local wave number in the presence of coupling. (orig.)

  16. Tunneling and resonant conductance in one-dimensional molecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozhushner, M.A.; Posvyanskii, V.S.; Oleynik, I.I.

    2005-01-01

    We present a theory of tunneling and resonant transitions in one-dimensional molecular systems which is based on Green's function theory of electron sub-barrier scattering off the structural units (or functional groups) of a molecular chain. We show that the many-electron effects are of paramount importance in electron transport and they are effectively treated using a formalism of sub-barrier scattering operators. The method which calculates the total scattering amplitude of the bridge molecule not only predicts the enhancement of the amplitude of tunneling transitions in course of tunneling electron transfer through onedimensional molecular structures but also allows us to interpret conductance mechanisms by calculating the bound energy spectrum of the tunneling electron, the energies being obtained as poles of the total scattering amplitude of the bridge molecule. We found that the resonant tunneling via bound states of the tunneling electron is the major mechanism of electron conductivity in relatively long organic molecules. The sub-barrier scattering technique naturally includes a description of tunneling in applied electric fields which allows us to calculate I-V curves at finite bias. The developed theory is applied to explain experimental findings such as bridge effect due to tunneling through organic molecules, and threshold versus Ohmic behavior of the conductance due to resonant electron transfer

  17. Discussion on event horizon and quantum ergosphere of evaporating black holes in a tunnelling framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingyi; Zhao Zheng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, with the Parikh-Wilczek tunnelling framework the positions of the event horizon of the Vaidya black hole and the Vaidya-Bonner black hole are calculated, respectively. We find that the event horizon and the apparent horizon of these two black holes correspond, respectively, to the two turning points of the Hawking radiation tunnelling barrier. That is, the quantum ergosphere coincides with the tunnelling barrier. Our calculation also implies that the Hawking radiation comes from the apparent horizon.

  18. The dynamical conductance of graphene tunnelling structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huan; Chan, K S; Lin Zijing

    2011-01-01

    The dynamical conductances of graphene tunnelling structures were numerically calculated using the scattering matrix method with the interaction effect included in a phenomenological approach. The overall single-barrier dynamical conductance is capacitative. Transmission resonances in the single-barrier structure lead to dips in the capacitative imaginary part of the response. This is different from the ac responses of typical semiconductor nanostructures, where transmission resonances usually lead to inductive peaks. The features of the dips depend on the Fermi energy. When the Fermi energy is below half of the barrier height, the dips are sharper. When the Fermi energy is higher than half of the barrier height, the dips are broader. Inductive behaviours can be observed in a double-barrier structure due to the resonances formed by reflection between the two barriers.

  19. The dynamical conductance of graphene tunnelling structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Chan, K S; Lin, Zijing

    2011-12-16

    The dynamical conductances of graphene tunnelling structures were numerically calculated using the scattering matrix method with the interaction effect included in a phenomenological approach. The overall single-barrier dynamical conductance is capacitative. Transmission resonances in the single-barrier structure lead to dips in the capacitative imaginary part of the response. This is different from the ac responses of typical semiconductor nanostructures, where transmission resonances usually lead to inductive peaks. The features of the dips depend on the Fermi energy. When the Fermi energy is below half of the barrier height, the dips are sharper. When the Fermi energy is higher than half of the barrier height, the dips are broader. Inductive behaviours can be observed in a double-barrier structure due to the resonances formed by reflection between the two barriers.

  20. Voltage and temperature dependence of the grain boundary tunneling magnetoresistance in manganites

    OpenAIRE

    Hoefener, C.; Philipp, J. B.; Klein, J.; Alff, L.; Marx, A.; Buechner, B.; Gross, R.

    2000-01-01

    We have performed a systematic analysis of the voltage and temperature dependence of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of grain boundaries (GB) in the manganites. We find a strong decrease of the TMR with increasing voltage and temperature. The decrease of the TMR with increasing voltage scales with an increase of the inelastic tunneling current due to multi-step inelastic tunneling via localized defect states in the tunneling barrier. This behavior can be described within a three-current...

  1. Direct observation of the leakage current in epitaxial diamond Schottky barrier devices by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy and Raman imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J; Boutchich, M; Kleider, J P; Teraji, T; Koide, Y

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the high leakage current measured in several vertical-type diamond Schottky devices is conjointly investigated by conducting probe atomic force microscopy and confocal micro-Raman/photoluminescence imaging analysis. Local areas characterized by a strong decrease of the local resistance (5–6 orders of magnitude drop) with respect to their close surrounding have been identified in several different regions of the sample surface. The same local areas, also referenced as electrical hot-spots, reveal a slightly constrained diamond lattice and three dominant Raman bands in the low-wavenumber region (590, 914 and 1040 cm −1 ). These latter bands are usually assigned to the vibrational modes involving boron impurities and its possible complexes that can electrically act as traps for charge carriers. Local current–voltage measurements performed at the hot-spots point out a trap-filled-limited current as the main conduction mechanism favouring the leakage current in the Schottky devices. (paper)

  2. Max Auwaerter Price lecture: building and probing atomic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternes, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The control of the geometric, electronic, and magnetic properties of atomic-scale nanostructures is a prerequisite for the understanding and fabrication of new materials and devices. Two routes lead towards this goal: Atomic manipulation of single atoms and molecules by scanning probe microscopy, or patterning using self-assembly. Atomic manipulation has been performed since almost 20 years, but it has been difficult to answer the simple question: how much force does it take to manipulate atoms and molecules on surfaces? To address this question, we used a combined atomic force and scanning tunneling microscope to simultaneously measure the force and the current between an adsorbate and a tip during atomic manipulation. We found that the force it takes to move an atom depends crucially on the binding between adsorbate and surface. Our results indicate that for moving metal atoms on metal surfaces, the lateral force component plays the dominant role. Measuring the forces during manipulation yielded the full potential energy landscape of the tip-sample interaction. Surprisingly, the potential energy barriers are comparable to diffusion barriers, which are obtained in the absence of a probe tip. Furthermore, we used the scanning tunneling microscope to assemble magnetic structures on a thin insulator. We found, that the spin of the atom is influenced by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the supporting surface which lifts the spin degeneracy of the ground state and enables the identification of individual atoms. The ground state of atoms with half-integer spin remains always degenerated at zero field due to Kramers theorem. We found that if these states differ by an orbital momentum of m = ±1 the localized spin is screened by the surrounding conducting electrons of the non-magnetic host and form a many-electron spin-singlet at sufficiently low temperature. (author)

  3. New directions in scanning-tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrell, T.L.; Warmack, R.J.; Reddick, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    The tunneling of electrons in scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM) has permitted imaging of the electronic distribution about individual atoms on surfaces. The need for use of conducting surfaces in STM limits its applicability, and new forms of scanning microscopy have emerged as a result of interest in poorly conducting samples. Atomic force microscopy has demonstrated that the force between a surface and a probe tip can be used to image selected materials. Now being developed are magnetic probe STM's and photon tunneling microscopes in which the probe is a sharpened optical fiber. Also of great interest presently is the measurement of differential conductance of surfaces using electron STM's. This method supplies spectral information and contrast enhancement in images. At present there remains much theoretical work to be carried out in order to better characterize related data on inelastic electron tunneling, and valuable insight may be gained from data being gathered on the local work function of materials. As matters stand today, the key problems lie in determining tip and contamination effects, preparation of samples, and understanding conductivity mechanisms in very thin materials on conducting substrates. Resolution of these problems and introduction of new forms of scanning microscopy may permit novel and important applications in biology as well as surface science

  4. Effect of nanodimensional polyethylenimine layer on surface potential barriers of hybrid structures based on silicon single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyar, Ivan V.; Gorin, Dmitry A.; Stetsyura, Svetlana V.

    2013-01-01

    In this report we present the analysis of I-V curves for MIS-structures like silicon substrate / nanodimensional polyelectrolyte layer / metal probe (contact) which is promising for biosensors, microfluidic chips, different devices of molecular electronics, such as OLEDs, solar cells, where polyelectrolyte layers can be used to modify semiconductor surface. The research is directed to investigate the contact phenomena which influence the resulting signal of devices mentioned above. The comparison of I-V characteristics of such structures measured by scanning tunnel microscopy (contactless technique) and using contact areas deposited by thermal evaporation onto the organic layer (the contact one) was carried out. The photoassisted I-V measurements and complex analysis based on Simmons and Schottky models allow one to extract the potential barriers and to observe the changes of charge transport in MIS-structures under illumination and after polyelectrolyte adsorption. The direct correlation between the thickness of the deposited polyelectrolyte layer and both equilibrium tunnel barrier and Schottky barrier height was observed for hybrid structures with polyethylenimine. The possibility of control over the I-V curves of hybrid structure and the height of the potential barriers (for different charge transports) by illumination was confirmed. Based on experimental data and complex analysis the band diagrams were plotted which illustrate the changes of potential barriers for MIS-structures due to the polyelectrolyte adsorption and under the illumination.

  5. Understanding Quantum Tunneling through Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Sergei V; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N; Jiang, Zhang; Boixo, Sergio; Neven, Hartmut; Troyer, Matthias

    2016-10-28

    The tunneling between the two ground states of an Ising ferromagnet is a typical example of many-body tunneling processes between two local minima, as they occur during quantum annealing. Performing quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations we find that the QMC tunneling rate displays the same scaling with system size, as the rate of incoherent tunneling. The scaling in both cases is O(Δ^{2}), where Δ is the tunneling splitting (or equivalently the minimum spectral gap). An important consequence is that QMC simulations can be used to predict the performance of a quantum annealer for tunneling through a barrier. Furthermore, by using open instead of periodic boundary conditions in imaginary time, equivalent to a projector QMC algorithm, we obtain a quadratic speedup for QMC simulations, and achieve linear scaling in Δ. We provide a physical understanding of these results and their range of applicability based on an instanton picture.

  6. Addressing student models of energy loss in quantum tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmann, Michael C; Morgan, Jeffrey T; Bao Lei

    2005-01-01

    We report on a multi-year, multi-institution study to investigate students' reasoning about energy in the context of quantum tunnelling. We use ungraded surveys, graded examination questions, individual clinical interviews and multiple-choice exams to build a picture of the types of responses that students typically give. We find that two descriptions of tunnelling through a square barrier are particularly common. Students often state that tunnelling particles lose energy while tunnelling. When sketching wavefunctions, students also show a shift in the axis of oscillation, as if the height of the axis of oscillation indicated the energy of the particle. We find inconsistencies between students' conceptual, mathematical and graphical models of quantum tunnelling. As part of a curriculum in quantum physics, we have developed instructional materials designed to help students develop a more robust and less inconsistent picture of tunnelling, and present data suggesting that we have succeeded in doing so

  7. Generality of the Hartman and Fletcher effect for the mean tunneling time in nonrelativistic particle and photon tunnelling without absorption and dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakiel, J.; Olkhovsky, V.S.

    1998-01-01

    It is known that, under certain conditions, the tunnelling time becomes independent of barrier width (the Hartman and Fletcher effect). Here, the generality of this effect is shown for mean tunnelling times in all known nonrelativistic approaches, in the cases of rectangular potential barriers without absorption and dissipation. On the base of this effect and the reshaping phenomenon, taking the analogy between nonrelativistic-particle and photon tunnelling into, account, one can self-consistently explain the observed superluminal effective (group) velocities in various photon tunnelling experiments without violation of the Einstein causality

  8. Distribution of tunnelling times for quantum electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudge, Samuel L.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    In electron transport, the tunnelling time is the time taken for an electron to tunnel out of a system after it has tunnelled in. We define the tunnelling time distribution for quantum processes in a dissipative environment and develop a practical approach for calculating it, where the environment is described by the general Markovian master equation. We illustrate the theory by using the rate equation to compute the tunnelling time distribution for electron transport through a molecular junction. The tunnelling time distribution is exponential, which indicates that Markovian quantum tunnelling is a Poissonian statistical process. The tunnelling time distribution is used not only to study the quantum statistics of tunnelling along the average electric current but also to analyse extreme quantum events where an electron jumps against the applied voltage bias. The average tunnelling time shows distinctly different temperature dependence for p- and n-type molecular junctions and therefore provides a sensitive tool to probe the alignment of molecular orbitals relative to the electrode Fermi energy.

  9. New Knowledge of tunneling from photonic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimtz, G.

    1997-01-01

    Photonic experiments have shown, that the propagation of evanescent (tunneling) modes can proceed at speeds faster than the velocity of light in vacuum (superluminal). The superluminal velocities include signal and energy propagation. The analogy between the classical Helmholtz equation and the quantum mechanical Schroedinger equation was quantitatively proved in classical photonic experiments. The Hartman effect, i.e. the prediction that the tunneling time is independent of the barrier length was for the first time evidenced in a photonic analogous tunneling experiment by Enders and Nimtz. It is also shown, that the resonant state life time is not determined by the barrier traversal time. For electronic tunneling devices it follows, that the quantum mechanical phase time calculations indeed deliver the relevant intrinsic tunneling time and consequently allow to predict the dynamical specification of a device. The present theoretical descriptions of the propagation of evanescent modes is not fully compatible with the experimental situation. Superluminal signal and energy transport has been measured, and this has to be properly analyzed. May the advanced field solutions help to obtain a satisfactory theoretical description of the recent experimental results of the propagation of evanescent modes? (author)

  10. Tunneling magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic planar hetero-nanojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Deminov, R. G.; Useinov, Niazbeck Kh H; Tagirov, Lenar R.

    2010-01-01

    as a tunneling barrier between the metallic electrodes, is comparable with the mean-free path of electrons. The dependence of the TMR on the bias voltage, physical parameters of the dielectric barrier, and spin polarization of the electrodes is studied

  11. Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is a continuous flow wind-tunnel facility capable of speeds up to Mach 1.2 at stagnation pressures up to one atmosphere. The TDT...

  12. Quantum theory of tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Razavy, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    In this revised and expanded edition, in addition to a comprehensible introduction to the theoretical foundations of quantum tunneling based on different methods of formulating and solving tunneling problems, different semiclassical approximations for multidimensional systems are presented. Particular attention is given to the tunneling of composite systems, with examples taken from molecular tunneling and also from nuclear reactions. The interesting and puzzling features of tunneling times are given extensive coverage, and the possibility of measurement of these times with quantum clocks are critically examined. In addition by considering the analogy between evanescent waves in waveguides and in quantum tunneling, the times related to electromagnetic wave propagation have been used to explain certain aspects of quantum tunneling times. These topics are treated in both non-relativistic as well as relativistic regimes. Finally, a large number of examples of tunneling in atomic, molecular, condensed matter and ...

  13. Road and Railroad Tunnels

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Tunnels in the United States According to the HSIP Tiger Team Report, a tunnel is defined as a linear underground passageway open at both ends. This dataset is based...

  14. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  15. Effects of the finite duration of quantum tunneling in laser-assisted scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagmann, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Previous measurements of tunnel conductance in heterostructures and experiments with Josephson junctions suggest quantum tunneling has a definite duration. The authors use semiclassical methods to determine the effects of this delay on the tunneling current in a laser-assisted STM. A planar-planar STM model is used with the exact multiple image potential, and the energy distribution for a free-electron metal. It is necessary to average over the phase at barrier entry, and iteration with back propagated solutions is required to obtain the transmission coefficients for evenly spaced phases and specified energies at barrier entry. The simulations suggest that the dependence of the tunneling current on the wavelength of illumination can serve as a basis for determining the duration of barrier traversal. A power flux density of 10 11 W/m 2 would be required at several wavelengths from 1 to 10 μm. It is possible that thermal effects could be separated from the modeled phenomena by determining the time dependence of the tunneling current with a pulsed laser

  16. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance driven by magnetic phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X Z; Feng, J F; Wang, Z C; Zhang, J; Zhong, X Y; Song, C; Jin, L; Zhang, B; Li, F; Jiang, M; Tan, Y Z; Zhou, X J; Shi, G Y; Zhou, X F; Han, X D; Mao, S C; Chen, Y H; Han, X F; Pan, F

    2017-09-06

    The independent control of two magnetic electrodes and spin-coherent transport in magnetic tunnel junctions are strictly required for tunneling magnetoresistance, while junctions with only one ferromagnetic electrode exhibit tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance dependent on the anisotropic density of states with no room temperature performance so far. Here, we report an alternative approach to obtaining tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in α'-FeRh-based junctions driven by the magnetic phase transition of α'-FeRh and resultantly large variation of the density of states in the vicinity of MgO tunneling barrier, referred to as phase transition tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance. The junctions with only one α'-FeRh magnetic electrode show a magnetoresistance ratio up to 20% at room temperature. Both the polarity and magnitude of the phase transition tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance can be modulated by interfacial engineering at the α'-FeRh/MgO interface. Besides the fundamental significance, our finding might add a different dimension to magnetic random access memory and antiferromagnet spintronics.Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance is promising for next generation memory devices but limited by the low efficiency and functioning temperature. Here the authors achieved 20% tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature in magnetic tunnel junctions with one α'-FeRh magnetic electrode.

  17. Time scales of tunneling decay of a localized state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Yue; Muga, J. G.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Buettiker, M.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by recent time-domain experiments on ultrafast atom ionization, we analyze the transients and time scales that characterize, aside from the relatively long lifetime, the decay of a localized state by tunneling. While the tunneling starts immediately, some time is required for the outgoing flux to develop. This short-term behavior depends strongly on the initial state. For the initial state, tightly localized so that the initial transients are dominated by over-the-barrier motion, the time scale for flux propagation through the barrier is close to the Buettiker-Landauer traversal time. Then a quasistationary, slow-decay process follows, which sets ideal conditions for observing diffraction in time at longer times and distances. To define operationally a tunneling time at the barrier edge, we extrapolate backward the propagation of the wave packet that escaped from the potential. This extrapolated time is considerably longer than the time scale of the flux and density buildup at the barrier edge.

  18. Quantum tunneling of magnetization in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamp, P.C.E.; Barbara, B.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic solids should, under certain circumstances, show macroscopic quantum behavior, in which coherence exists between completely distinct magnetization states, each involving a very large number of spins (∼10 12 spins). This article reviews the recent work in this field, concentrating particularly on macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) of magnetization. The two main phenomena discussed are the tunneling of magnetization in single-domain particles or grains (in which some 10 3 - 10 4 spins rotate together through an energy barrier), and the tunneling of domain walls in films or in bulk magnets; where walls containing ∼10 10 spins may tunnel off a pinning potential, or from one pinning center to another. Some attention is also given to the quantum nucleation of magnetization reversal in a bulk magnet, and to the quantum motion of other magnetic solitons (such as vortices). After a thorough analysis of the basic grain and wall tunneling phenomena, the authors continue on to a discussion of the various dissipative or decoherence mechanisms, which destroy the phase correlations involved in tunneling. The coupling of grain magnetization to phonons, photons, and electrons is shown to have little consequence for weakly-conducting or insulating grains. Domain walls couple to these and also to magnons and impurities or defects; the 3rd order coupling to magnons can have serious effects, but if one uses pure insulators at low temperatures, these can also be ignored

  19. Results of an air data probe investigation utilizing a 0.10 scale orbiter forebody (model 57-0) in the Ames Research Center 14-foot wind tunnel (OA220)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, V.; Thornton, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of a 0.10 scale orbiter forebody test with left and right mounted air data probes (ADP) as well as a flight test probe (nose boom). Left and right ADP data were obtained at Mach numbers of .3, .4, .5, .6, .7, .8, .85, .9, .95, .98, 1.05 and 1.1 through a Reynolds number range of 1.3 to 4.4 million. Nose boom data were obtained at Mach numbers of .3, .4, .5, .6, .7, .9 and .98.

  20. One-by-one single-molecule detection of mutated nucleobases by monitoring tunneling current using a DNA tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Phuc Tan; Nishino, Tomoaki; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Tsutomu

    2015-01-31

    A DNA molecule was utilized as a probe tip to achieve single-molecule genetic diagnoses. Hybridization of the probe and target DNAs resulted in electron tunneling along the emergent double-stranded DNA. Simple stationary monitoring of the tunneling current leads to single-molecule DNA detection and discovery of base mismatches and methylation.

  1. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  2. Proton tunneling in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-01-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  3. Dynamics of tunneling ionization using Bohmian mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douguet, Nicolas; Bartschat, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    Recent attoclock experiments and theoretical studies regarding the strong-field ionization of atoms by few-cycle infrared pulses revealed features that have attracted much attention. Here we investigate tunneling ionization and the dynamics of the electron probability using Bohmian mechanics. We consider a one-dimensional problem to illustrate the underlying mechanisms of the ionization process. It is revealed that in the major part of the below-the-barrier ionization regime, in an intense and short infrared pulse, the electron does not tunnel through the entire barrier, but rather starts already from the classically forbidden region. Moreover, we highlight the correspondence between the probability of locating the electron at a particular initial position and its asymptotic momentum. Bohmian mechanics also provides a natural definition of mean tunneling time and exit position, taking account of the time dependence of the barrier. Finally, we find that the electron can exit the barrier with significant kinetic energy, thereby corroborating the results of a recent study [N. Camus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 023201 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.023201].

  4. Tunneling time in fluctuating symmetric double wells: Suppression and enhancement of tunneling by spatial symmetry-preserving perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Spatial symmetry-preserving sinusoidal fluctuations of symmetric double-well parameters cause enhancement of tunneling at ω ∼ ω 0 while rectified sinusoidal fluctuations suppress it at ω∼(ω 0 )/2 . Research highlights: → Spatial symmetry-preserving sinusoidal and rectified sinusoidal fluctuations of symmetrical double-well parameters have contrasting effects on tunneling. → Sinusoidal fluctuations at frequency ω ∼ ω 0 causes resonance enhancement of tunneling, ω 0 being the 0 + ↔ 1 + transition frequency. → Under rectified sinusoidal fluctuations at a frequency ω∼1/2 ω 0 suppression or coherent destruction of tunneling is observed due to barrier localization. → The observations are explained by energy-gain analysis and analysis of the time-dependent overlap amplitudes. - Abstract: We investigate how tunneling-time gets affected by spatial symmetry preserving fluctuations in the parameters determining the width, barrier height and well-depth of a symmetric double-well potential. Sinusoidal and rectified sinusoidal fluctuations of the well-parameters are shown to have contrasting effects. Significant enhancement of tunneling is noticed when the well-parameters fluctuate sinusoidally with frequency ω ∼ ω 0 while under rectified sinusoidal perturbation, quenching of tunneling takes place at a fluctuation frequency ω∼1/2 ω 0 ,ω 0 , being the frequency of the lowest transition allowed by the fluctuation induced spatial perturbation of even parity. Time-dependent Hellmann-Feynman theorem is invoked to analyze the energy changes induced by fluctuations. It turns out that the enhancement of tunneling in the sinusoidally fluctuating double well at frequency ω ∼ ω 0 is caused by transition to 1 ± levels under the barrier while in the rectified sinusoidal field at ω∼1/2 ω 0 , a two-photon like process suppresses the tunneling by inducing barrier localization.

  5. Silicon spintronics with ferromagnetic tunnel devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, R; Sharma, S; Dash, S P; Min, B C

    2012-01-01

    In silicon spintronics, the unique qualities of ferromagnetic materials are combined with those of silicon, aiming at creating an alternative, energy-efficient information technology in which digital data are represented by the orientation of the electron spin. Here we review the cornerstones of silicon spintronics, namely the creation, detection and manipulation of spin polarization in silicon. Ferromagnetic tunnel contacts are the key elements and provide a robust and viable approach to induce and probe spins in silicon, at room temperature. We describe the basic physics of spin tunneling into silicon, the spin-transport devices, the materials aspects and engineering of the magnetic tunnel contacts, and discuss important quantities such as the magnitude of the spin accumulation and the spin lifetime in the silicon. We highlight key experimental achievements and recent progress in the development of a spin-based information technology. (topical review)

  6. Tunneling between edge states in a quantum spin Hall system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ström, Anders; Johannesson, Henrik

    2009-03-06

    We analyze a quantum spin Hall device with a point contact connecting two of its edges. The contact supports a net spin tunneling current that can be probed experimentally via a two-terminal resistance measurement. We find that the low-bias tunneling current and the differential conductance exhibit scaling with voltage and temperature that depend nonlinearly on the strength of the electron-electron interaction.

  7. Fluoride barriers in Nb/Pb Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, H.; Tanabe, K.; Michikami, O.; Igarashi, M.; Beasley, M. R.

    1985-03-01

    Josephson tunnel junctions are fabricated using a new class of artificial barriers, metal fluorides (Al fluoride and Zr fluoride). These fluoride barriers are deposited on the surface of a Nb base electrode, which are previously cleaned using a CF4 cleaning process, and covered by a Pb counterelectrode. The junctions with both Al fluoride and Zr fluoride barriers exhibit good tunneling characteristics and have low specific capacitance. In the case of Zr fluoride, it is observed that reasonable resistances are obtained even at thickness greater than 100 A. This phenomenon might be explained by tunneling via localized states in Zr fluoride.

  8. Nb-based superconducting tunnel junctions for X-ray spectroscopy: TaOx and AlOx tunnelbarriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruijn, M.P.; Kiewiet, F.; Luiten, O.J.; Michels, F.A.; De Korte, P.A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Results are presented of an optimization study of TaO x -tunnel barriers in superconducting tunnel junctions for X-ray spectroscopy. The properties did not satisfy the critical demands. A comparison is made with first results on AlO x -barriers made with the same processing setup. AFM and TEM were used in studies of interface roughness. (orig.)

  9. The possibility to determine a constant of spin-orbit interaction by scanning tunneling microscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotkevich, N.V.; Kolesnichenko, Yu.A.; Vovk, N.P.

    2016-01-01

    The electron tunneling from the quasi-two-dimensional (surface) states with the spin-orbit interaction into bulk-mode states is studied in the framework of a model of an infinitely thin inhomogeneous tunnel magnetic barrier. The influence of the scattering of quasi-two-dimensional electrons by a single magnetic defect on the tunnel current is analyzed. Analytic formulas for the conductance of a tunnel point-contact as a function of its distance from the defect are obtained. It is shown that the analysis of the local magnetization density around the defect by means of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy allows finding the constant of spin orbit interaction.

  10. Tunneling times and the Hartman effect revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olkhovsky, Vladislav S. [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. for Nuclear Research]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Recami, Erasmo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Aplicada]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milano (Italy); Raciti, Fabio [Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Zaichenko, Aleksandr K. [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1995-05-01

    In a recent review paper we proposed, within conventional quantum mechanics, new definitions for the sub-barrier tunnelling and reflection times. Aims of the present paper are: presenting and analysing the results of various numerical calculations (based on our equations) on the penetration and return times < {tau}Pen >, <{tau}Ret >, during tunneling inside a rectangular potential barrier, for various penetration depths x{sub f}; putting forth and discussing suitable definitions, besides of the mean values, also of the variances (or dispersions) D {sup {tau}}T D {sup {tau}}R for the time durations of transmission and reflection process; mentioning that our definition < {sup {tau}}T > for the average transmission time results to constitute an improvement of the ordinary dwell-time {tau}{sup Dw} formula; commenting upon some recent criticism by C.R. Leavens, on the basis of our new numerical results. We stress that our numerical evaluations confirm that our approach implied and implies, the existence of the Hartman effect: an effect that in these days (due to the theoretical connections between tunneling and evanescent wave propagation) is receiving - at Cologne, Berkeley, Florence and Vienna- indirect, but quite interesting, experimental verifications. At last, we briefly analyze some other definitions of tunnelling times. (author). 24 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Tunneling times and the Hartman effect revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, Vladislav S.; Recami, Erasmo; Raciti, Fabio

    1995-05-01

    In a recent review paper we proposed, within conventional quantum mechanics, new definitions for the sub-barrier tunnelling and reflection times. Aims of the present paper are: presenting and analysing the results of various numerical calculations (based on our equations) on the penetration and return times , , during tunneling inside a rectangular potential barrier, for various penetration depths x f ; putting forth and discussing suitable definitions, besides of the mean values, also of the variances (or dispersions) D τ T D τ R for the time durations of transmission and reflection process; mentioning that our definition τ T > for the average transmission time results to constitute an improvement of the ordinary dwell-time τ Dw formula; commenting upon some recent criticism by C.R. Leavens, on the basis of our new numerical results. We stress that our numerical evaluations confirm that our approach implied and implies, the existence of the Hartman effect: an effect that in these days (due to the theoretical connections between tunneling and evanescent wave propagation) is receiving - at Cologne, Berkeley, Florence and Vienna- indirect, but quite interesting, experimental verifications. At last, we briefly analyze some other definitions of tunnelling times. (author). 24 refs., 5 figs

  12. Tunneling spectroscopy in NbN based Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicault, R.; Villegier, J.C.

    1984-08-01

    Tunneling spectroscopy in high quality NbN-oxide-Pb(In) diodes offers a direct observation of various NbN and Pb phonon frequences as other vibrating modes existing near the tunnel barrier. The large number of peaks attribuated to dips in the transverses and longitudinal acoustic branches of NbN dispersion curves are found to confirm the previous theory developing the contribution of these modes to the strong coupling and high Tc behavior of NbN

  13. New Tunneling Features in Polar III-Nitride Resonant Tunneling Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimy Encomendero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available For the past two decades, repeatable resonant tunneling transport of electrons in III-nitride double barrier heterostructures has remained elusive at room temperature. In this work we theoretically and experimentally study III-nitride double-barrier resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs, the quantum transport characteristics of which exhibit new features that are unexplainable using existing semiconductor theory. The repeatable and robust resonant transport in our devices enables us to track the origin of these features to the broken inversion symmetry in the uniaxial crystal structure, which generates built-in spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields. Resonant tunneling transport enabled by the ground state as well as by the first excited state is demonstrated for the first time over a wide temperature window in planar III-nitride RTDs. An analytical transport model for polar resonant tunneling heterostructures is introduced for the first time, showing a good quantitative agreement with experimental data. From this model we realize that tunneling transport is an extremely sensitive measure of the built-in polarization fields. Since such electric fields play a crucial role in the design of electronic and photonic devices, but are difficult to measure, our work provides a completely new method to accurately determine their magnitude for the entire class of polar heterostructures.

  14. Charge Transport in 2D DNA Tunnel Junction Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Minho

    2017-11-06

    Recently, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied for electronics due to its intrinsic benefits such as its natural plenitude, biodegradability, biofunctionality, and low-cost. However, its applications are limited to passive components because of inherent insulating properties. In this report, a metal-insulator-metal tunnel diode with Au/DNA/NiOx junctions is presented. Through the self-aligning process of DNA molecules, a 2D DNA nanosheet is synthesized and used as a tunneling barrier, and semitransparent conducting oxide (NiOx ) is applied as a top electrode for resolving metal penetration issues. This molecular device successfully operates as a nonresonant tunneling diode, and temperature-variable current-voltage analysis proves that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is a dominant conduction mechanism at the junctions. DNA-based tunneling devices appear to be promising prototypes for nanoelectronics using biomolecules.

  15. Robust spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaoui, Hamed Ben Mohamed

    2017-04-18

    We theoretically study the current-induced spin torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions, composed of two semi-infinite antiferromagnetic layers separated by a tunnel barrier, in both clean and disordered regimes. We find that the torque enabling electrical manipulation of the Néel antiferromagnetic order parameter is out of plane, ∼n×p, while the torque competing with the antiferromagnetic exchange is in plane, ∼n×(p×n). Here, p and n are the Néel order parameter direction of the reference and free layers, respectively. Their bias dependence shows behavior similar to that in ferromagnetic tunnel junctions, the in-plane torque being mostly linear in bias, while the out-of-plane torque is quadratic. Most importantly, we find that the spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic tunnel junctions is much more robust against disorder than that in antiferromagnetic metallic spin valves due to the tunneling nature of spin transport.

  16. Charge Transport in 2D DNA Tunnel Junction Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Minho; Min, Sung-Wook; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Lee, Yong Uk; Oh, Min Suk; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Park, Sung Ha; Im, Seongil

    2017-01-01

    Recently, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied for electronics due to its intrinsic benefits such as its natural plenitude, biodegradability, biofunctionality, and low-cost. However, its applications are limited to passive components because of inherent insulating properties. In this report, a metal-insulator-metal tunnel diode with Au/DNA/NiOx junctions is presented. Through the self-aligning process of DNA molecules, a 2D DNA nanosheet is synthesized and used as a tunneling barrier, and semitransparent conducting oxide (NiOx ) is applied as a top electrode for resolving metal penetration issues. This molecular device successfully operates as a nonresonant tunneling diode, and temperature-variable current-voltage analysis proves that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is a dominant conduction mechanism at the junctions. DNA-based tunneling devices appear to be promising prototypes for nanoelectronics using biomolecules.

  17. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  18. Josephson tunneling and nanosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Ovchinnikov, Yurii; Kresin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Josephson tunneling between nanoclusters is analyzed. The discrete nature of the electronic energy spectra, including their shell ordering, is explicitly taken into account. The treatment considers the two distinct cases of resonant and non-resonant tunneling. It is demonstrated that the current density greatly exceeds the value discussed in the conventional theory. Nanoparticles are shown to be promising building blocks for nanomaterials-based tunneling networks.

  19. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier

  20. Chiral Tunnelling in Twisted Graphene Bilayer

    OpenAIRE

    He, Wen-Yu; Chu, Zhao-Dong; He, Lin

    2013-01-01

    The perfect transmission in graphene monolayer and the perfect reflection in Bernal graphene bilayer for electrons incident in the normal direction of a potential barrier are viewed as two incarnations of the Klein paradox. Here we show a new and unique incarnation of the Klein paradox. Owing to the different chiralities of the quasiparticles involved, the chiral fermions in twisted graphene bilayer shows adjustable probability of chiral tunnelling for normal incidence: they can be changed fr...

  1. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Wilder, D.G.

    1991-02-01

    This progress report presents the interpretation of data obtained (up to November 1, 1988) from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test site. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for the field tests for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities, at a potential high-level radioactive waste repository site in Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the tests is to provide the basis for determining whether tests planned for Yucca Mountain have the potential to be successful. Thirteen chapters discuss the following: mapping the electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate of the rock mass; changes in moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe; characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the heater borehole; electrical resistance heater installed in a 30-cm borehole; relative humidity measurements; the operation, design, construction, calibration, and installation of a microwave circuit that might provide partial pressure information at temperatures in excess of 200 degree C (392 degree F); pressure and temperature measurements in the G-Tunnel; the moisture collection system, which attempts to collect steam that migrates into the heater borehole; The borehole television and borescope surveys that were performed to map the location, orientation, and aperture of the fractures intersecting the boreholes; preliminary scoping calculations of the hydrothermal conditions expected for this prototype test; the Data Acquisition System; and the results of the PEBSFT, preliminary interpretations of these results, and plans for the remainder of the test. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base

  2. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Buscheck, T.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Wang, H.; Watwood, D.

    1991-08-01

    This final report represents a summary of data and interpretations obtained from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The PEBSFT was conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for future field tests that will be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the test was to provide a basis for determining whether tests planned for the ESF have the potential to be successful. Chapter 1 on high frequency electromagnetic tomography discusses the rock mass electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate changes that were measured to characterize the water distribution in the near field of a simulated waste container. The data are used to obtain quantitative estimates of how the moisture content in the rock mass changes during heating and to infer properties of the spatial variability of water distribution, leading to conclusions about the role of fractures in the system. Chapter 2 discusses the changes in rock moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe. Chapter 3 permeability tests discusses the characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the borehole. The air permeability testing apparatus, the testing procedures, and the data analysis are presented. Chapter 4 describes the moisture collection system installed in the heater borehole to trap and measure the moisture volumes. Chapter 5 describes relative humidity measurements made with the thermocouple psychrometer and capacitance sensors. Chapter 6 discusses gas pressure measurements in the G-Tunnel, addressing the calibration and installation of piezoresistive-gaged transducers. Chapter 7 describes the calibration and installation of thermocouples for temperature measurements. Chapter 8 discusses the results of the PEBSFT

  3. Communication: Tunnelling splitting in the phosphine molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergey N.

    2016-09-01

    Splitting due to tunnelling via the potential energy barrier has played a significant role in the study of molecular spectra since the early days of spectroscopy. The observation of the ammonia doublet led to attempts to find a phosphine analogous, but these have so far failed due to its considerably higher barrier. Full dimensional, variational nuclear motion calculations are used to predict splittings as a function of excitation energy. Simulated spectra suggest that such splittings should be observable in the near infrared via overtones of the ν2 bending mode starting with 4ν2.

  4. Communication: Tunnelling splitting in the phosphine molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergey N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-07

    Splitting due to tunnelling via the potential energy barrier has played a significant role in the study of molecular spectra since the early days of spectroscopy. The observation of the ammonia doublet led to attempts to find a phosphine analogous, but these have so far failed due to its considerably higher barrier. Full dimensional, variational nuclear motion calculations are used to predict splittings as a function of excitation energy. Simulated spectra suggest that such splittings should be observable in the near infrared via overtones of the ν{sub 2} bending mode starting with 4ν{sub 2}.

  5. Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel advances the study of fundamental flow physics relevant to micro air vehicle (MAV) flight and assesses vehicle performance...

  6. Magnetic tunnel junction thermocouple for thermoelectric power harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhnert, T.; Paz, E.; Ferreira, R.; Freitas, P. P.

    2018-05-01

    The thermoelectric power generated in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is determined as a function of the tunnel barrier thickness for a matched electric circuit. This study suggests that lower resistance area product and higher tunnel magnetoresistance will maximize the thermoelectric power output of the MTJ structures. Further, the thermoelectric behavior of a series of two MTJs, a MTJ thermocouple, is investigated as a function of its magnetic configurations. In an alternating magnetic configurations the thermovoltages cancel each other, while the magnetic contribution remains. A large array of MTJ thermocouples could amplify the magnetic thermovoltage signal significantly.

  7. Ferroelectric tunnel junctions with multi-quantum well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhijun; Zhang, Tianjin, E-mail: zhangtj@hubu.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Liang, Kun; Qi, Yajun; Wang, Duofa; Wang, Jinzhao; Jiang, Juan [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2014-06-02

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) with multi-quantum well structures are proposed and the tunneling electroresistance (TER) effect is investigated theoretically. Compared with conventional FTJs with monolayer ferroelectric barriers, FTJs with single-well structures provide TER ratio improvements of one order of magnitude, while FTJs with optimized multi-well structures can enhance this improvement by another order of magnitude. It is believed that the increased resonant tunneling strength combined with appropriate asymmetry in these FTJs contributes to the improvement. These studies may help to fabricate FTJs with large TER ratio experimentally and put them into practice.

  8. The theory of coherent resonance tunneling of interacting electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elesin, V. F.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical solutions of the Schrödinger equation for a two-barrier structure (resonance-tunnel diode) with open boundary conditions are found within the model of coherent tunneling of interacting electrons. Simple expressions for resonance current are derived which enable one to analyze the current-voltage characteristics, the conditions of emergence of hysteresis, and singularities of the latter depending on the parameters of resonance-tunnel diode. It is demonstrated that the hysteresis is realized if the current exceeds some critical value proportional to the square of resonance level width.

  9. Enzyme dynamics and hydrogen tunnelling in a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, Amnon; Cannio, Raffaele; Bartolucci, Simonetta; Klinman, Judith P.; Klinman, Judith P.

    1999-06-01

    Biological catalysts (enzymes) speed up reactions by many orders of magnitude using fundamental physical processes to increase chemical reactivity. Hydrogen tunnelling has increasingly been found to contribute to enzyme reactions at room temperature. Tunnelling is the phenomenon by which a particle transfers through a reaction barrier as a result of its wave-like property. In reactions involving small molecules, the relative importance of tunnelling increases as the temperature is reduced. We have now investigated whether hydrogen tunnelling occurs at elevated temperatures in a biological system that functions physiologically under such conditions. Using a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), we find that hydrogen tunnelling makes a significant contribution at 65°C this is analogous to previous findings with mesophilic ADH at 25°C ( ref. 5). Contrary to predictions for tunnelling through a rigid barrier, the tunnelling with the thermophilic ADH decreases at and below room temperature. These findings provide experimental evidence for a role of thermally excited enzyme fluctuations in modulating enzyme-catalysed bond cleavage.

  10. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johannes Bernardus Charles; Khatib, M.G.; Koelmans, W.W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data

  11. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  12. Small numbers from tunneling between brane throats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2003-01-01

    In generic string compactifications with branes, the regions of space in the vicinity of brane horizons, or brane throats, support effective potential barriers, raised by the back-ground gravitational fields. A familiar example is the AdS brane throats in the Randall-Sundrum model. The barriers obstruct the interaction of observers inside different throats, whose communication is effectively described by tunneling through the barriers. Consequently the interactions between different throats are exponentially weak. This provides for a new mechanism for explaining small numbers in Nature. We review the applications to the hierarchy problem where supersymmetry breaking scale is reduced by tunneling, long-lived cold dark matter particles which decay into hot CFT, and consider the implications for holography. We finally discuss the important interplay between the tunneling suppression and our recent conjecture that black holes stuck on a brane in AdS D+1 should be interpreted as duals of quantum-corrected D-dimensional black holes, rather than classical ones, of a CFT coupled to gravity. (author)

  13. Optimized electrode configuration for current-in-plane characterization of magnetic tunnel junction stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Kjær, Daniel; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard

    2017-01-01

    The current-in-plane tunneling technique (CIPT) has been a crucial tool in the development of magnetic tunnel junction stacks suitable for magnetic random access memories (MRAM) for more than a decade. The MRAM development has now reached the maturity to make the transition from the R&D phase...... of electrodes on a multi-electrode probe to reach up to 36% improvement on the repeatability for the resistance area product and the tunneling magnetoresistance measurement, without any hardware modification....

  14. Doped Josephson tunneling junction for use in a sensitive IR detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.C.; Saffren, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    A superconductive tunneling device having a modified tunnel barrier capable of supporting Josephson tunneling current is provided. The tunnel barrier located between a pair of electrodes includes a molecular species which is capable of coupling incident radiation of a spectrum characteristic of the molecular species into the tunnel barrier. The coupled radiation modulates the known Josephson characteristics of the superconducting device. As a result of the present invention, a superconductive tunneling device can be tuned or made sensitive to a particular radiation associated with the dopant molecular species. The present invention is particularly useful in providing an improved infrared detector. The tunnel barrier region can be, for example, an oxide of an electrode or frozen gas. The molecular species can be intermixed with the barrier region such as the frozen gas or deposited as one or more layers of molecules on the barrier region. The deposited molecules of the molecular species are unbonded and capable of responding to a radiation characteristic of the molecules. Semi-conductor material can be utilized as the molecular species to provide an increased selective bandwidth response. Finally, appropriate detector equipment can be utilized to measure the modulation of any of the Josephson characteristics such as critical current, voltage steps, Lambe-Jaklevic peaks and plasma frequency. (auth)

  15. Four-point probe measurements using current probes with voltage feedback to measure electric potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüpke, Felix; Cuma, David; Korte, Stefan; Cherepanov, Vasily; Voigtländer, Bert

    2018-02-01

    We present a four-point probe resistance measurement technique which uses four equivalent current measuring units, resulting in minimal hardware requirements and corresponding sources of noise. Local sample potentials are measured by a software feedback loop which adjusts the corresponding tip voltage such that no current flows to the sample. The resulting tip voltage is then equivalent to the sample potential at the tip position. We implement this measurement method into a multi-tip scanning tunneling microscope setup such that potentials can also be measured in tunneling contact, allowing in principle truly non-invasive four-probe measurements. The resulting measurement capabilities are demonstrated for \

  16. Structural and electrical characterization of ultra-thin SrTiO3 tunnel barriers grown over YBa2Cu3O7 electrodes for the development of high Tc Josephson junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, L Avilés; Sirena, M; Guzmán, L A Agüero; Sutter, J González; Vargas, S Pons; Steren, L B; Bernard, R; Trastoy, J; Villegas, J E; Briático, J; Bergeal, N; Lesueur, J; Faini, G

    2012-12-14

    The transport properties of ultra-thin SrTiO(3) (STO) layers grown over YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) electrodes were studied by conductive atomic force microscopy at the nano-scale. A very good control of the barrier thickness was achieved during the deposition process. A phenomenological approach was used to obtain critical parameters regarding the structural and electrical properties of the system. The STO layers present an energy barrier of 0.9 eV and an attenuation length of 0.23 nm, indicating very good insulating properties for the development of high-quality Josephson junctions.

  17. Structural and electrical characterization of ultra-thin SrTiO3 tunnel barriers grown over YBa2Cu3O7 electrodes for the development of high Tc Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avilés Félix, L; Sirena, M; Agüero Guzmán, L A; González Sutter, J; Pons Vargas, S; Steren, L B; Bernard, R; Trastoy, J; Villegas, J E; Briático, J; Bergeal, N; Lesueur, J; Faini, G

    2012-01-01

    The transport properties of ultra-thin SrTiO 3 (STO) layers grown over YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 electrodes were studied by conductive atomic force microscopy at the nano-scale. A very good control of the barrier thickness was achieved during the deposition process. A phenomenological approach was used to obtain critical parameters regarding the structural and electrical properties of the system. The STO layers present an energy barrier of 0.9 eV and an attenuation length of 0.23 nm, indicating very good insulating properties for the development of high-quality Josephson junctions. (paper)

  18. Construction of a four tip scanning tunneling microscope/scanning electron microscope combination and conductivity measurements of silicide nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubkov, Evgeniy

    2013-01-01

    In this work the combination of a four-tip scanning tunneling microscope with a scanning electron microscope is presented. By means of this apparatus it is possible to perform the conductivity measurements on the in-situ prepared nanostructures in ultra-high vacuum. With the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), it becomes possible to position the tunneling tips of the four-tip scanning tunneling microscope (STM), so that an arrangement for a four-point probe measurement on nanostructures can be obtained. The STM head was built according to the novel coaxial Beetle concept. This concept allows on the one hand, a very compact arrangement of the components of the STM and on the other hand, the new-built STM head has a good mechanical stability, in order to achieve atomic resolution with all four STM units. The atomic resolution of the STM units was confirmed by scanning a Si(111)-7 x 7 surface. The thermal drift during the STM operation, as well as the resonant frequencies of the mechanical structure of the STM head, were determined. The scanning electron microscope allows the precise and safe navigation of the tunneling tips on the sample surface. Multi tip spectroscopy with up to four STM units can be performed synchronously. To demonstrate the capabilities of the new-built apparatus the conductivity measurements were carried out on metallic yttrium silicide nanowires. The nanowires were prepared by the in-situ deposition of yttrium on a heated Si(110) sample surface. Current-voltage curves were recorded on the nanowires and on the wetting layer in-between. The curves indicate an existence of the Schottky barrier between the yttrium silicide nanowires and the silicon bulk. By means of the two-tip measurements with a gate, the insulating property of the Schottky barrier has been confirmed. Using this Schottky barrier, it is possible to limit the current to the nanowire and to prevent it from flowing through the silicon bulk. A four-tip resistance measurement

  19. Giant electrode effect on tunnelling electroresistance in ferroelectric tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Rohit; Petraru, Adrian; Meuffels, Paul; Vavra, Ondrej; Ziegler, Martin; Kim, Seong Keun; Jeong, Doo Seok; Pertsev, Nikolay A; Kohlstedt, Hermann

    2014-11-17

    Among recently discovered ferroelectricity-related phenomena, the tunnelling electroresistance (TER) effect in ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) has been attracting rapidly increasing attention owing to the emerging possibilities of non-volatile memory, logic and neuromorphic computing applications of these quantum nanostructures. Despite recent advances in experimental and theoretical studies of FTJs, many questions concerning their electrical behaviour still remain open. In particular, the role of ferroelectric/electrode interfaces and the separation of the ferroelectric-driven TER effect from electrochemical ('redox'-based) resistance-switching effects have to be clarified. Here we report the results of a comprehensive study of epitaxial junctions comprising BaTiO(3) barrier, La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3) bottom electrode and Au or Cu top electrodes. Our results demonstrate a giant electrode effect on the TER of these asymmetric FTJs. The revealed phenomena are attributed to the microscopic interfacial effect of ferroelectric origin, which is supported by the observation of redox-based resistance switching at much higher voltages.

  20. More about tunnelling times and superluminal tunnelling (Hartmann effect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Recami, E.; Raciti, F.; Zaichenko, A.

    1995-05-01

    Aims of the present paper are: i) presenting and analysing the results of various numerical calculations on the penetration and return times Pen >, Ret >, during tunnelling inside a rectangular potential barrier, for various penetration depths x f ; ii) putting forth and discussing suitable definitions, besides of the mean values, also of the variances (or dispersions) D τT and D τR for the time durations of transmission and reflection processes; iii)mentioning, moreover, that our definition T > for the average transmission time results to constitute an improvement of the ordinary dwell- time formula; iv) commenting, at last, on the basis of the new numerical results, upon some recent criticism by C.R. Leavens. The paper stresses that numerical evaluations confirm that the approach implied, and implies, the existence of the Hartmann effect: an effect that in these days (due to the theoretical connections between tunnelling and evanescent-wave propagation) is receiving - at Cologne, Berkeley, Florence and Vienna - indirect, but quite interesting, experimental verification

  1. Scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnig, G.; Rohrer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Based on vacuum tunneling, a novel type of microscope, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed. It has an unprecedented resolution in real space on an atomic scale. The authors review the important technical features, illustrate the power of the STM for surface topographies and discuss its potential in other areas of science and technology. (Auth.)

  2. Electron tunneling in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamaraev, K.I.; Khajrutdinov, R.F.; Zhdanov, V.P.; Molin, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical investigations are outlined systematically on electron tunnelling in chemical reactions. Mechanism of electron transport to great distances is shown to be characteristic to chemical compounds of a wide range. The function of tunnel reactions is discussed for various fields of chemistry, including radiation chemistry, electrochemistry, chemistry of solids, chemistry of surface and catalysis

  3. Improved controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Wu, Yuehua; Jacobsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    fuel cells and electrolyzer cells. Here, we report on advanced improvements of our original controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope, CAHT-SPM. The new microscope can employ a broad range of the scanning probe techniques including tapping mode, scanning tunneling microscopy......, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, and Kelvin probe force microscopy. The temperature of the sample can be as high as 850 °C. Both reducing and oxidizing gases such as oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen can be added in the sample chamber and the oxygen partial pressure (pO2...

  4. Measurement of the absolute tunneling current density in field emission from tungsten(110)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, C.D.; Plummer, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    The phenomenon of quantum-mechanical tunneling of an electron through a barrier in the potential energy has been well established in a variety of experiments. The quantity which is usually measured in these experiments is the rate of change of tunneling current and not the absolute current density. This paper reports on a direct measurement of the tunneling current density, which is found to be in good agreement with free-electron theory for W

  5. The two Josephson junction flux qubit with large tunneling amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shnurkov, V.I.; Soroka, A.A.; Mel'nik, S.I.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we discuss solid-state nanoelectronic realizations of Josephson flux qubits with large tunneling amplitude between the two macroscopic states. The latter can be controlled via the height and form of the potential barrier, which is determined by quantum-state engineering of the flux qubit circuit. The simplest circuit of the flux qubit is a superconducting loop interrupted by a Josephson nanoscale tunnel junction. The tunneling amplitude between two macroscopically different states can be increased substantially by engineering of the qubit circuit if the tunnel junction is replaced by a ScS contact. However, only Josephson tunnel junctions are particularly suitable for large-scale integration circuits and quantum detectors with present-day technology. To overcome this difficulty we consider here a flux qubit with high energy-level separation between the 'ground' and 'excited' states, consisting of a superconducting loop with two low-capacitance Josephson tunnel junctions in series. We demonstrate that for real parameters of resonant superposition between the two macroscopic states the tunneling amplitude can reach values greater than 1 K. Analytical results for the tunneling amplitude obtained within the semiclassical approximation by the instanton technique show good correlation with a numerical solution

  6. Quantum tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Fan Wen Bin

    2003-01-01

    In quantum tunneling a particle with energy E can pass through a high potential barrier V(>E) due to the wave character of the particle. Bose-Einstein condensates can display very strong tunneling depending on the structure of the trap, which may be a double-well or optical lattices. The employed for the first time to our knowledge the periodic instanton method to investigate tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices. The results show that there are two kinds of tunneling in this system, Landau-Zener tunneling between extended states of the system and Wannier-Stark tunneling between localized states of the system, and that the latter is 1000 times faster than the former. The also obtain the total decay rate for a wide range of temperature, including classical thermal activation, thermally assisted tunneling and quantum tunneling. The results agree with experimental data in references. Finally, the propose an experimental protocol to observe this new phenomenon in future experiments

  7. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  8. Quasi-relativistic effects in barrier-penetration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anchishkin, D.V.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of a particle tunneling through the potential barrier is solved within quasi-relativistic Schroedinger equation. It is shown that the subbarrier relativistic effects give a significant addition to penetration coefficient when some relations between parameters of the barrier and mass of a tunneling particle are satisfied. For instance an account of these effects for penetration of low energy π + -mesons through Coulomb barrier of the 298 U nuclei would give the increasing of penetration coefficient to 30 percent as compared to the nonrelativistic one. Also we give the criteria under which the contribution of the ''under barrier relativism'' to penetration coefficient becomes essential. 3 refs.; 6 figs. (author)

  9. Optical probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, J.; Decaudin, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The probe includes optical means of refractive index n, refracting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n1>n and reflecting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n2 [fr

  10. Properties on niobium-based Josephson tunneling elements in junction microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, G.; Richter, J.; Weber, P.

    1982-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and electrical characteristics of niobium oxide-barrier tunnel junctions with counterelectrodes of lead/lead alloy. Primary attention is directed to the experimental conditions necessary to obtain high-quality tunnel barriers as well as studies on characterizing the atomic structure of the barrier region. In order to study the tunnel barrier homogeneity in the tunneling region the magnetic field dependence of the critical Josephson current is investigated. The I--V characteristics and dependence of the critical Josephson current on temperature are analyzed quantitatively by using a proximity effect model. Finally, we discuss experimental results on the improvement of junction quality by including traces of carbon in the rf argon plasma during the sputter cleaning of niobium base electrodes

  11. 'Al' concentration on spin-dependent resonant tunnelling in InAs/Ga

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The separation between spin-up and spin-down components, barrier transparency, polarization efficiency and tunnelling lifetime were calculated using the transfer matrix approach. The separation between spin-up and spin-down resonances and tunnelling lifetime were reportedfor the first time in the case of InAs/Ga 1 − y ...

  12. Tunable spin-tunnel contacts to silicon using low-work-function ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byoung-Chul; Motohashi, Kazunari; Lodder, Cock; Jansen, Ron

    2006-10-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions have become ubiquitous components appearing in magnetic random-access memory, read heads of magnetic disk drives and semiconductor-based spin devices. Inserting a tunnel barrier has been key to achieving spin injection from ferromagnetic (FM) metals into GaAs, but spin injection into Si has remained elusive. We show that Schottky barrier formation leads to a huge conductivity mismatch of the FM tunnel contact and Si, which cannot be solved by the well-known method of adjusting the tunnel barrier thickness. We present a radically different approach for spin-tunnelling resistance control using low-work-function ferromagnets, inserted at the FM/tunnel barrier interface. We demonstrate that in this way the resistance-area (RA) product of FM/Al2O3/Si contacts can be tuned over eight orders of magnitude, while simultaneously maintaining a reasonable tunnel spin polarization. This raises prospects for Si-based spintronics and presents a new category of ferromagnetic materials for spin-tunnel contacts in low-RA-product applications.

  13. Time evolution of tunneling in a thermal medium: Environment-driven excited tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Sh.; Yoshimura, M.

    2004-01-01

    Time evolution of tunneling phenomena proceeding in a thermal medium is studied using a standard model of environmental interaction. A semiclassical probability formula for the particle motion in a metastable state of a one-dimensional system put in a thermal medium is combined with the formula of the quantum penetration factor through a potential barrier to derive the tunneling rate in the medium. The effect of environment, its influence on time evolution in particular, is clarified in our real-time formalism. A nonlinear resonance effect is shown to enhance the tunneling rate at finite times of order 2/η, with η the friction coefficient unless η is too small. In the linear approximation this effect has relevance to the parametric resonance. This effect enhances the possibility of early termination of the cosmological phase transition much prior to the typical Hubble time

  14. Strain-enhanced tunneling magnetoresistance in MgO magnetic tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loong, Li Ming; Qiu, Xuepeng; Neo, Zhi Peng; Deorani, Praveen; Wu, Yang; Bhatia, Charanjit S; Saeys, Mark; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2014-09-30

    While the effects of lattice mismatch-induced strain, mechanical strain, as well as the intrinsic strain of thin films are sometimes detrimental, resulting in mechanical deformation and failure, strain can also be usefully harnessed for applications such as data storage, transistors, solar cells, and strain gauges, among other things. Here, we demonstrate that quantum transport across magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) can be significantly affected by the introduction of controllable mechanical strain, achieving an enhancement factor of ~2 in the experimental tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio. We further correlate this strain-enhanced TMR with coherent spin tunneling through the MgO barrier. Moreover, the strain-enhanced TMR is analyzed using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) quantum transport calculations. Our results help elucidate the TMR mechanism at the atomic level and can provide a new way to enhance, as well as tune, the quantum properties in nanoscale materials and devices.

  15. Tunneling time, the Hartman effect, and superluminality: A proposed resolution of an old paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winful, Herbert G.

    2006-01-01

    The issue of tunneling time is replete with controversy and paradoxes. The controversy stems from the fact that many tunneling time definitions seem to predict superluminal tunneling velocities. One prediction, termed the Hartman effect, states that the tunneling time becomes independent of barrier length for thick enough barriers, ultimately resulting in unbounded tunneling velocities. Experiments done with 'single photons', classical light waves, and microwaves all show this apparent superluminality. The origin of these paradoxical effects has been a mystery for decades. In this article, we review the history of tunneling times starting with the early work of MacColl, Hartman, and Wigner. We discuss some of the tunneling time definitions, with particular emphasis on the phase time (also known as the group delay or Wigner time) and the dwell time. The key experiments are reviewed. We then discuss our recent work, which suggests that the group delay in tunneling is not a transit time as has been assumed for decades. It is, in reality, a lifetime and hence should not be used to assign a speed of barrier traversal. We show how this new understanding along with the concept of energy storage and release resolves all the outstanding tunneling time paradoxes

  16. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Transmission coefficient, resonant tunneling lifetime and traversal time in multibarrier semiconductor heterostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Jyotirmayee [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, 769008 (India)]. E-mail: jnanda_b9@rediffmail.com; Mahapatra, P.K. [Department of Physics and Technophysics, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore, 721102 (India)]. E-mail: pkmahapatra@vidyasagar.ac.in; Roy, C.L. [Department of Physics and Meterology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302 (India)

    2006-09-01

    A computational model based on non-relativistic approach is proposed for the determination of transmission coefficient, resonant tunneling energies, group velocity, resonant tunneling lifetime and traversal time in multibarrier systems (GaAs/Al {sub y} Ga{sub 1-} {sub y} As) for the entire energy range {epsilon}V {sub 0}, V {sub 0}, being the potential barrier height. The resonant energy states were found to group into allowed tunneling bands separated by forbidden gaps. The tunneling lifetime and the traversal time are found to have minimum values at the middle of each allowed band. Further, It is observed that the electrons with energies in the higher tunneling band could tunnel out faster than those with energies in the lower band. Moreover, an additional resonant peak in resonant energy spectrum indicated the presence of a surface state where resonant tunneling occurs.

  18. Polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Akyol, Fatih; Park, Pil Sung; Esposto, Michele; Rajan, Siddharth

    2010-01-01

    We report on the design and demonstration of polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel junction diodes with high current density and low tunneling turn-on voltage. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin calculations were used to model and design tunnel junctions with narrow band gap InGaN-based barrier layers. N-polar p-GaN/In 0.33 Ga 0.67 N/n-GaN heterostructure tunnel diodes were grown using molecular beam epitaxy. Efficient interband tunneling was achieved close to zero bias with a high current density of 118 A/cm 2 at a reverse bias of 1 V, reaching a maximum current density up to 9.2 kA/cm 2 . These results represent the highest current density reported in III-nitride tunnel junctions and demonstrate the potential of III-nitride tunnel devices for a broad range of optoelectronic and electronic applications.

  19. Influence of chemical composition of CoFeB on tunneling magnetoresistance and microstructure in polycrystalline CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunekawa, Koji; Choi, Young-Suk; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Djayaprawira, David D.; Takeuchi, Takashi; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2006-01-01

    We report, for the first time, the correlation between tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and the microstructure of polycrystalline CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions with various Co/Fe ratios in the (CoFe) 81 B 19 reference and free layers. It is found that the Co/Fe ratio in the (CoFe) 81 B 19 reference layer strongly affects the (001) out-of-plane texture of the MgO tunnel barrier, resulting in the variation in TMR ratio. Further microstructure characterization of the magnetic tunnel junction with a higher TMR ratio and a stronger (001) out-of-plane texture in the MgO tunnel barrier reveals a grain-to-grain lattice match between the crystallized bcc CoFeB reference layer and MgO with a 45deg rotational epitaxial relationship, that is, CoFeB(001)[110]//MgO(001)[100]. (author)

  20. Photon scanning tunneling microscope in combination with a force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Tack, R.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1994-01-01

    The simultaneous operation of a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an atomic force microscope is presented. The use of standard atomic force silicon nitride cantilevers as near-field optical probes offers the possibility to combine the two methods. Vertical forces and torsion are detected

  1. Tunneling current between graphene layers

    OpenAIRE

    Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Siahlo, Andrei I.; Vyrko, Sergey A.; Popov, Andrey M.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2013-01-01

    The physical model that allows to calculate the values of the tunneling current be-tween graphene layers is proposed. The tunneling current according to the pro-posed model is proportional to the area of tunneling transition. The calculated value of tunneling conductivity is in qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  2. Vacuum phonon tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altfeder, Igor; Voevodin, Andrey A; Roy, Ajit K

    2010-10-15

    Field-induced phonon tunneling, a previously unknown mechanism of interfacial thermal transport, has been revealed by ultrahigh vacuum inelastic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Using thermally broadened Fermi-Dirac distribution in the STM tip as in situ atomic-scale thermometer we found that thermal vibrations of the last tip atom are effectively transmitted to sample surface despite few angstroms wide vacuum gap. We show that phonon tunneling is driven by interfacial electric field and thermally vibrating image charges, and its rate is enhanced by surface electron-phonon interaction.

  3. Chiral tunneling in gated inversion symmetric Weyl semimetal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chunxu; Yang, Yanling; Chang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Based on the chirality-resolved transfer-matrix method, we evaluate the chiral transport tunneling through Weyl semimetal multi-barrier structures created by periodic gates. It is shown that, in sharp contrast to the cases of three dimensional normal semimetals, the tunneling coefficient as a function of incident angle shows a strong anisotropic behavior. Importantly, the tunneling coefficients display an interesting periodic oscillation as a function of the crystallographic angle of the structures. With the increasement of the barriers, the tunneling current shows a Fabry-Perot type interferences. For superlattice structures, the fancy miniband effect has been revealed. Our results show that the angular dependence of the first bandgap can be reduced into a Lorentz formula. The disorder suppresses the oscillation of the tunneling conductance, but would not affect its average amplitude. This is in sharp contrast to that in multi-barrier conventional semiconductor structures. Moreover, numerical results for the dependence of the angularly averaged conductance on the incident energy and the structure parameters are presented and contrasted with those in two dimensional relativistic materials. Our work suggests that the gated Weyl semimetal opens a possible new route to access to new type nanoelectronic device. PMID:26888491

  4. Tunneling times in bianisotropic, dispersive and absorptive metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radosavljević, Sanja; Radovanović, Jelena; Milanović, Vitomir

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling times in complex bianisotropic materials have been examined in detail, with absorption and dispersion taken into account. Tunneling is characterized by the dwell and the phase tunneling time. In this paper, we have developed a theoretical model and derived the appropriate expressions for each of these quantities, as well as a relationship between them and the corresponding expression for the energy density. The model has been verified through numerical calculations based on experimental data. We have distinguished cases in which the phases of transmitted and incident wave match each other, and showed that for small angles of incidence, the time that the wave spends inside the barrier can be approximated as a linear function of the barrier width. The Hartman effect has been detected, although for very thick layers of metamaterial. - Highlights: • We analyze the tunneling times in bianisotropic, dispersive and absorptive metamaterials. • Conditions of zero phase tunneling time are identified for a range of frequencies of interest. • The Hartman effect has been detected for very thick barriers of metamaterial.

  5. Tunneling times in bianisotropic, dispersive and absorptive metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radosavljević, Sanja [School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Photonics Research Group, Ghent University – imec, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Radovanović, Jelena, E-mail: radovanovic@etf.bg.ac.rs [School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Milanović, Vitomir [School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2016-12-09

    Tunneling times in complex bianisotropic materials have been examined in detail, with absorption and dispersion taken into account. Tunneling is characterized by the dwell and the phase tunneling time. In this paper, we have developed a theoretical model and derived the appropriate expressions for each of these quantities, as well as a relationship between them and the corresponding expression for the energy density. The model has been verified through numerical calculations based on experimental data. We have distinguished cases in which the phases of transmitted and incident wave match each other, and showed that for small angles of incidence, the time that the wave spends inside the barrier can be approximated as a linear function of the barrier width. The Hartman effect has been detected, although for very thick layers of metamaterial. - Highlights: • We analyze the tunneling times in bianisotropic, dispersive and absorptive metamaterials. • Conditions of zero phase tunneling time are identified for a range of frequencies of interest. • The Hartman effect has been detected for very thick barriers of metamaterial.

  6. Tunnelling anomalous and planar Hall effects (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos-Abiague, Alex; Scharf, Benedikt; Han, Jong E.; Hankiewicz, Ewelina M.; Zutic, Igor

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically show how the interplay between spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and magnetism can result in a finite tunneling Hall conductance, transverse to the applied bias. For two-dimensional tunnel junctions with a ferromagnetic lead and magnetization perpendicular to the current flow, the detected anomalous Hall voltage can be used to extract information not only about the spin polarization but also about the strength of the interfacial SOC. In contrast, a tunneling current across a ferromagnetic barrier on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) can induce a planar Hall response even when the magnetization is oriented along the current flow[1]. The tunneling nature of the states contributing to the planar Hall conductance can be switched from the ordinary to the Klein regimes by the electrostatic control of the barrier strength. This allows for an enhancement of the transverse response and a giant Hall angle, with the tunneling planar Hall conductance exceeding the longitudinal component. Despite the simplicity of a single ferromagnetic region, the TI/ferromagnet system exhibits a variety of functionalities. In addition to a spin-valve operation for magnetic sensing and storing information, positive, negative, and negative differential conductances can be tuned by properly adjusting the barrier potential and/or varying the magnetization direction. Such different resistive behaviors in the same system are attractive for potential applications in reconfigurable spintronic devices. [1] B. Scharf, A. Matos-Abiague, J. E. Han, E. M. Hankiewicz, and I. Zutic, arXiv:1601.01009 (2016).

  7. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  8. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Resonant tunneling across a ferroelectric domain wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Tao, L. L.; Velev, J. P.; Tsymbal, E. Y.

    2018-04-01

    Motivated by recent experimental observations, we explore electron transport properties of a ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ) with an embedded head-to-head ferroelectric domain wall, using first-principles density-functional theory calculations. We consider a FTJ with L a0.5S r0.5Mn O3 electrodes separated by a BaTi O3 barrier layer and show that an in-plane charged domain wall in the ferroelectric BaTi O3 can be induced by polar interfaces. The resulting V -shaped electrostatic potential profile across the BaTi O3 layer creates a quantum well and leads to the formation of a two-dimensional electron gas, which stabilizes the domain wall. The confined electronic states in the barrier are responsible for resonant tunneling as is evident from our quantum-transport calculations. We find that the resonant tunneling is an orbital selective process, which leads to sharp spikes in the momentum- and energy-resolved transmission spectra. Our results indicate that domain walls embedded in FTJs can be used to control the electron transport.

  10. Unusual photoelectric behaviors of Mo-doped TiO2 multilayer thin films prepared by RF magnetron co-sputtering: effect of barrier tunneling on internal charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, B. X.; Luo, S. Y.; Mao, X. G.; Shen, J.; Zhou, Q. F.

    2013-01-01

    Mo-doped TiO2 multilayer thin films were prepared by RF magnetron co-sputtering. Microstructures, crystallite parameters and the absorption band were investigated with atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Internal carrier transport characteristics and the photoelectric property of different layer-assemble modes were examined on an electrochemical workstation under visible light. The result indicates that the double-layer structure with an undoped surface layer demonstrated a red-shifted absorption edge and a much stronger photocurrent compared to the uniformly doped sample, signifying that the electric field implanted at the interface between particles in different layers accelerated internal charge transfer effectively. However, a heavily doped layer implanted at the bottom of the three-layer film merely brought about negative effects on the photoelectric property, mainly because of the Schottky junction existing above the substrate. Nevertheless, this obstacle was successfully eliminated by raising the Mo concentration to 1020 cm-3, where the thickness of the depletion layer fell into the order of angstroms and the tunneling coefficient manifested a dramatic increase. Under this circumstance, the Schottky junction disappeared and the strongest photocurrent was observed in the three-layer film.

  11. Valley polarization due to trigonal warping on tunneling electrons in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira Jr, J M; Peeters, F M; Costa Filho, R N; Farias, G A

    2009-01-01

    The effect of trigonal warping on the transmission of electrons tunneling through potential barriers in graphene is investigated. We present calculations of the transmission coefficient for single and double barriers as a function of energy, incidence angle and barrier heights. The results show remarkable valley-dependent directional effects for barriers oriented parallel to the armchair or parallel to the zigzag direction. These results indicate that electrostatic gates can be used as valley filters in graphene-based devices.

  12. First-principles theory of inelastic currents in a scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Thirstrup, C.

    1998-01-01

    A first-principles theory of inelastic tunneling between a model probe tip and an atom adsorbed on a surface is presented, extending the elastic tunneling theory of Tersoff and Hamann. The inelastic current is proportional to the change in the local density of states at the center of the tip due...... to the addition of the adsorbate. We use the theory to investigate the vibrational heating of an adsorbate below a scanning tunneling microscopy tip. We calculate the desorption rate of PI from Si(100)-H(2 X 1) as a function of the sample bias and tunnel current, and find excellent a,agreement with recent...

  13. The overshoot problem in inflation after tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Koushik; Vaudrevange, Pascal M.; Westphal, Alexander

    2011-09-15

    We show the absence of the usual parametrically large overshoot problem of small-field inflation if initiated by a Coleman-De Luccia (CDL) tunneling transition from an earlier vacuum in the limit of small inflationary scale compared to the tunneling scale. For low-power monomial exit potentials V({phi}){proportional_to} {phi}{sup n}; n<4, we derive an expression for the amount of overshoot. This is bounded from above by the width of the steep barrier traversed after emerging from tunneling and before reaching a slow-roll region of the potential. For n{>=}4 we show that overshooting is entirely absent. We extend this result through binomials to a general potential written as a series expansion, and to the case of arbitrary finite initial speed of the inflaton. This places the phase space of initial conditions for small-field and large-field inflation on the same footing in a landscape of string theory vacua populated via CDL tunneling. (orig.)

  14. Tunneling magnetoresistance and electroresistance in Fe/PbTiO3/Fe multiferroic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Jian-Qing

    2016-01-01

    We perform first-principles electronic structure and spin-dependent transport calculations for a Fe/PbTiO 3 /Fe multiferroic tunnel junction with asymmetric TiO 2 - and PbO-terminated interfaces. We demonstrate that the interfacial electronic reconstruction driven by the in situ screening of ferroelectric polarization, in conjunction with the intricate complex band structure of barrier, play a decisive role in controlling the spin-dependent tunneling. Reversal of ferroelectric polarization results in a transition from insulating to half-metal-like conducting state for the interfacial Pb 6p z orbitals, which acts as an atomic-scale spin-valve by releasing the tunneling current in antiparallel magnetization configuration as the ferroelectric polarization pointing to the PbO-terminated interface. This effect produces large change in tunneling conductance. Our results open an attractive avenue in designing multiferroic tunnel junctions with excellent performance by exploiting the interfacial electronic reconstruction originated from the in situ screening of ferroelectric polarization.

  15. Tunneling magnetoresistance and electroresistance in Fe/PbTiO{sub 3}/Fe multiferroic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Jian-Qing, E-mail: djqkust@sina.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2016-08-21

    We perform first-principles electronic structure and spin-dependent transport calculations for a Fe/PbTiO{sub 3}/Fe multiferroic tunnel junction with asymmetric TiO{sub 2}- and PbO-terminated interfaces. We demonstrate that the interfacial electronic reconstruction driven by the in situ screening of ferroelectric polarization, in conjunction with the intricate complex band structure of barrier, play a decisive role in controlling the spin-dependent tunneling. Reversal of ferroelectric polarization results in a transition from insulating to half-metal-like conducting state for the interfacial Pb 6p{sub z} orbitals, which acts as an atomic-scale spin-valve by releasing the tunneling current in antiparallel magnetization configuration as the ferroelectric polarization pointing to the PbO-terminated interface. This effect produces large change in tunneling conductance. Our results open an attractive avenue in designing multiferroic tunnel junctions with excellent performance by exploiting the interfacial electronic reconstruction originated from the in situ screening of ferroelectric polarization.

  16. Atomic physics with the scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleber, M.; Bracher, C.; Riza, M.

    1999-01-01

    Backscattering of atomic beams above a given surface yields information similar to the one obtained from scanning the same surface with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM): In both cases the experimentally accessible quantity is the local density of states (LDOS) n(r,E) of the surface. For the case of backscattering, the LDOS at the turning point of the atom is an important ingredient of the potential between atom and surface. In experiments performed with an STM, the LDOS at the apex of an atomically sharp tip can be determined directly. Probing surfaces locally by an STM allows for the study of basic phenomena in atomic physics, with tunneling of electrons in three dimensions being a central issue

  17. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  18. INCAS TRISONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin MUNTEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The 1.2 m x 1.2 m Trisonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel is the largest of the experimental facilities at the National Institute for Aerospace Research - I.N.C.A.S. "Elie Carafoli", Bucharest, Romania. The tunnel has been designed by the Canadian company DSMA (now AIOLOS and since its commissioning in 1978 has performed high speed aerodynamic tests for more than 120 projects of aircraft, missiles and other objects among which the twin jet fighter IAR-93, the jet trainer IAR-99, the MIG-21 Lancer, the Polish jet fighter YRYDA and others. In the last years the wind tunnel has been used mostly for experimental research in European projects such as UFAST. The high flow quality parameters and the wide range of testing capabilities ensure the competitivity of the tunnel at an international level.

  19. The ISI Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    DP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr dark -star TCP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr dak’star ICMP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr quark MDP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr quark ...drax-net-yp 128.9.32.2 1 route add quark -net-yp 128.9.32.3 1 route add vlsi-net-yp 128.9.32.4 1 route add darkstar-net-yp 128.9.32.3 1 route add rocky...TCP /etc/tunnel-visa p zephyr quark ICMP /etc/tunnel-visa p zephyr drax tTI)P /etc/tunnel-visa p zephyr drax TCP /etc/tunnel_visa p zephyr drax ICMP

  20. Wind Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This ARDEC facility consists of subsonic, transonic, and supersonic wind tunnels to acquire aerodynamic data. Full-scale and sub-scale models of munitions are fitted...

  1. Water Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility in Pittsburgh, PA, re-creates the conditions found 3,000 meters beneath the ocean’s surface, allowing scientists to study...

  2. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Tunneling from super- to normal-deformed minima in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo, T. L.

    1998-01-01

    An excited minimum, or false vacuum, gives rise to a highly elongated superdeformed (SD) nucleus. A brief review of superdeformation is given, with emphasis on the tunneling from the false to the true vacuum, which occurs in the feeding and decay of SD bands. During the feeding process the tunneling is between hot states, while in the decay it is from a cold to a hot state. The γ spectra connecting SD and normal-deformed (ND) states provide information on several physics issues: the decay mechanism; the spin/parity quantum numbers, energies and microscopic structures of SD bands; the origin of identical SD bands; the quenching of pairing with excitation energy; and the chaoticity of excited ND states at 2.5-5 MeV. Other examples of tunneling in nuclei, which are briefly described, include the possible role of tunneling in ΔI = 4 bifurcation in SD bands, sub-barrier fusion and proton emitters

  4. Tunneling from super- to normal-deformed minima in nuclei.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoo, T. L.

    1998-01-08

    An excited minimum, or false vacuum, gives rise to a highly elongated superdeformed (SD) nucleus. A brief review of superdeformation is given, with emphasis on the tunneling from the false to the true vacuum, which occurs in the feeding and decay of SD bands. During the feeding process the tunneling is between hot states, while in the decay it is from a cold to a hot state. The {gamma} spectra connecting SD and normal-deformed (ND) states provide information on several physics issues: the decay mechanism; the spin/parity quantum numbers, energies and microscopic structures of SD bands; the origin of identical SD bands; the quenching of pairing with excitation energy; and the chaoticity of excited ND states at 2.5-5 MeV. Other examples of tunneling in nuclei, which are briefly described, include the possible role of tunneling in {Delta}I = 4 bifurcation in SD bands, sub-barrier fusion and proton emitters.

  5. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  6. Spin-polarized tunneling through a ferromagnetic insulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.; Kok, M.; Beukers, J.N.; Brinkman, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The polarization of the tunnel conductance of spin-selective ferromagnetic insulators is modeled, providing a generalized concept of polarization including both the effects of electrode and barrier polarization. The polarization model is extended to take additional non-spin-polarizing insulating

  7. Experimental Evidence for Wigner’s Tunneling Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, N.; Yakaboylu, E.; Fechner, L.; Klaiber, M.; Laux, M.; Mi, Y.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Pfeifer, T.; Keitel, C. H.; Moshammer, R.

    2018-04-01

    Tunneling of a particle through a barrier is one of the counter-intuitive properties of quantum mechanical motion. Thanks to advances in the generation of strong laser fields, new opportunities to dynamically investigate this process have been developed. In the so-called attoclock measurements the electron’s properties after tunneling are mapped on its emission direction. We investigate the tunneling dynamics and achieve a high sensitivity thanks to two refinements of the attoclock principle. Using near-IR wavelength we place firmly the ionization process in the tunneling regime. Furthermore, we compare the electron momentum distributions of two atomic species of slightly different atomic potentials (argon and krypton) being ionized under absolutely identical conditions. Experimentally, using a reaction microscope, we succeed in measuring the 3D electron momentum distributions for both targets simultaneously. Theoretically, the time resolved description of tunneling in strong-field ionization is studied using the leading quantum-mechanical Wigner treatment. A detailed analysis of the most probable photoelectron emission for Ar and Kr allows testing the theoretical models and a sensitive check of the electron initial conditions at the tunnel exit. The agreement between experiment and theory provides a clear evidence for a non-zero tunneling time delay and a non-vanishing longitudinal momentum at this point.

  8. Tunneling Planar Hall Effect in Topological Insulators: Spin Valves and Amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Benedikt; Matos-Abiague, Alex; Han, Jong E; Hankiewicz, Ewelina M; Žutić, Igor

    2016-10-14

    We investigate tunneling across a single ferromagnetic barrier on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator. In the presence of a magnetization component along the bias direction, a tunneling planar Hall conductance (TPHC), transverse to the applied bias, develops. Electrostatic control of the barrier enables a giant Hall angle, with the TPHC exceeding the longitudinal tunneling conductance. By changing the in-plane magnetization direction, it is possible to change the sign of both the longitudinal and transverse differential conductance without opening a gap in the topological surface state. The transport in a topological-insulator-ferromagnet junction can, thus, be drastically altered from a simple spin valve to an amplifier.

  9. Spin-dependent quasiparticle tunneling in junction superconductor-isolator-ferromagnetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlapak, Yu.V.; Shaternik, V.E.; Rudenko, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of Andreev reflection of quasiparticles in transparent tunnel junctions of superconductor-isolator-ferromagnetic on electric-current transport is studied within the framework of the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) model. It's obtained that current and signal-to-noise ratio can be increased for the memory cell by using in it the double-barrier tunnel junction ferromagnetic-isolator-superconductor-isolator-ferromagnetic instead off the usual tunnel junction ferromagnetic-isolator-ferromagnetic. The evolution of non-linear (tunnel-type) current-voltage characteristics with increasing of the junction transparency is described. (orig.)

  10. Delay time and tunneling transient phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Calderon, Gaston; Villavicencio, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    Analytic solutions to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for cutoff wave initial conditions are used to investigate the time evolution of the transmitted probability density for tunneling. For a broad range of values of the potential barrier opacity α, we find that the probability density exhibits two evolving structures. One refers to the propagation of a forerunner related to a time domain resonance [Phys. Rev. A 64, 0121907 (2001)], while the other consists of a semiclassical propagating wave front. We find a regime where the forerunners are absent, corresponding to positive time delays, and show that this regime is characterized by opacities α c . The critical opacity α c is derived from the analytical expression for the delay time, which reflects a link between transient effects in tunneling and the delay time

  11. Small Numbers From Tunneling Between Brane Throats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachru, Shamit

    2001-07-25

    Generic classes of string compactifications include ''brane throats'' emanating from the compact dimensions and separated by effective potential barriers raised by the background gravitational fields. The interaction of observers inside different throats occurs via tunneling and is consequently weak. This provides a new mechanism for generating small numbers in Nature. We apply it to the hierarchy problem, where supersymmetry breaking near the unification scale causes TeV sparticle masses inside the standard model throat. We also design naturally long-lived cold dark matter which decays within a Hubble time to the approximate conformal matter of a long throat. This may soften structure formation at galactic scales and raises the possibility that much of the dark matter of the universe is conformal matter. Finally, the tunneling rate shows that the coupling between throats, mediated by bulk modes, is stronger than a naive application of holography suggests.

  12. Probe specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  13. Optically controlled electroresistance and electrically controlled photovoltage in ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Jin Hu, Wei; Wang, Zhihong; Yu, Weili; Wu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) have recently attracted considerable interest as a promising candidate for applications in the next-generation non-volatile memory technology. In this work, using an ultrathin (3 nm) ferroelectric Sm0.1Bi0.9FeO3 layer as the tunnelling barrier and a semiconducting Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal as the bottom electrode, we achieve a tunnelling electroresistance as large as 105. Furthermore, the FTJ memory states could be modulated by light illumination, which is accompanied by a hysteretic photovoltaic effect. These complimentary effects are attributed to the bias- and light-induced modulation of the tunnel barrier, both in height and width, at the semiconductor/ferroelectric interface. Overall, the highly tunable tunnelling electroresistance and the correlated photovoltaic functionalities provide a new route for producing and non-destructively sensing multiple non-volatile electronic states in such FTJs.

  14. Optically controlled electroresistance and electrically controlled photovoltage in ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Jin Hu, Wei

    2016-02-29

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) have recently attracted considerable interest as a promising candidate for applications in the next-generation non-volatile memory technology. In this work, using an ultrathin (3 nm) ferroelectric Sm0.1Bi0.9FeO3 layer as the tunnelling barrier and a semiconducting Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal as the bottom electrode, we achieve a tunnelling electroresistance as large as 105. Furthermore, the FTJ memory states could be modulated by light illumination, which is accompanied by a hysteretic photovoltaic effect. These complimentary effects are attributed to the bias- and light-induced modulation of the tunnel barrier, both in height and width, at the semiconductor/ferroelectric interface. Overall, the highly tunable tunnelling electroresistance and the correlated photovoltaic functionalities provide a new route for producing and non-destructively sensing multiple non-volatile electronic states in such FTJs.

  15. Probe-based recording technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naberhuis, Steve

    2002-01-01

    The invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) prompted researchers to contemplate whether such technology could be used as the basis for the storage and retrieval of information. With magnetic data storage technology facing limits in storage density due to the thermal instability of magnetic bits, the super-paramagnetic limit, the heir-apparent for information storage at higher densities appeared to be variants of the STM or similar probe-based storage techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). Among these other techniques that could provide replacement technology for magnetic storage, near-field optical scanning optical microscopy (NSOM or SNOM) has also been investigated. Another alternative probe-based storage technology called atomic resolution storage (ARS) is also currently under development. An overview of these various technologies is herein presented, with an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages inherent in each particularly with respect to reduced device dimensions. The role of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) is emphasized

  16. Valley and spin resonant tunneling current in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic/ferromagnetic silicene junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Hajati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the transport properties in a ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic/ferromagnetic (FNF silicene junction in which an electrostatic gate potential, U, is attached to the nonmagnetic region. We show that the electrostatic gate potential U is a useful probe to control the band structure, quasi-bound states in the nonmagnetic barrier as well as the transport properties of the FNF silicene junction. In particular, by introducing the electrostatic gate potential, both the spin and valley conductances of the junction show an oscillatory behavior. The amplitude and frequency of such oscillations can be controlled by U. As an important result, we found that by increasing U, the second characteristic of the Klein tunneling is satisfied as a result of the quasiparticles chirality which can penetrate through a potential barrier. Moreover, it is found that for special values of U, the junction shows a gap in the spin and valley-resolve conductance and the amplitude of this gap is only controlled by the on-site potential difference, Δz. Our findings of high controllability of the spin and valley transport in such a FNF silicene junction may improve the performance of nano-electronics and spintronics devices.

  17. Interferometry of Klein tunnelling electrons in graphene quantum rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, D. J. P.; Chaves, Andrey; Pereira, J. M.; Farias, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study a current switch that exploits the phase acquired by a charge carrier as it tunnels through a potential barrier in graphene. The system acts as an interferometer based on an armchair graphene quantum ring, where the phase difference between interfering electronic wave functions for each path can be controlled by tuning either the height or the width of a potential barrier in the ring arms. By varying the parameters of the potential barriers, the interference can become completely destructive. We demonstrate how this interference effect can be used for developing a simple graphene-based logic gate with a high on/off ratio.

  18. Salecker-Wigner-Peres clock and average tunneling times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunardi, Jose T.; Manzoni, Luiz A.; Nystrom, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    The quantum clock of Salecker-Wigner-Peres is used, by performing a post-selection of the final state, to obtain average transmission and reflection times associated to the scattering of localized wave packets by static potentials in one dimension. The behavior of these average times is studied for a Gaussian wave packet, centered around a tunneling wave number, incident on a rectangular barrier and, in particular, on a double delta barrier potential. The regime of opaque barriers is investigated and the results show that the average transmission time does not saturate, showing no evidence of the Hartman effect (or its generalized version).

  19. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in a double magnetic tunnel junction

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Useinov, Niazbeck Kh H; Tagirov, Lenar R.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    We present quasi-classical approach to calculate a spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJ) FML/I/FMW/I/FMR, where the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer FMW can

  20. Theory of chaos regularization of tunneling in chaotic quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Jer; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ott, Edward; Pecora, Louis M

    2012-11-01

    Recent numerical experiments of Pecora et al. [Phys. Rev. E 83, 065201 (2011)] have investigated tunneling between two-dimensional symmetric double wells separated by a tunneling barrier. The wells were bounded by hard walls and by the potential barrier which was created by a step increase from the zero potential within a well to a uniform barrier potential within the barrier region, which is a situation potentially realizable in the context of quantum dots. Numerical results for the splitting of energy levels between symmetric and antisymmetric eigenstates were calculated. It was found that the splittings vary erratically from state to state, and the statistics of these variations were studied for different well shapes with the fluctuation levels being much less in chaotic wells than in comparable nonchaotic wells. Here we develop a quantitative theory for the statistics of the energy level splittings for chaotic wells. Our theory is based on the random plane wave hypothesis of Berry. While the fluctuation statistics are very different for chaotic and nonchaotic well dynamics, we show that the mean splittings of differently shaped wells, including integrable and chaotic wells, are the same if their well areas and barrier parameters are the same. We also consider the case of tunneling from a single well into a region with outgoing quantum waves.