WorldWideScience

Sample records for barrier integrity allowing

  1. Assessment of blood-retinal barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinores, S A

    1995-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier consists of two components which are comprised of the retinal vascular endothelium and the retinal pigment epithelium, respectively. Its functional integrity can be recognized by tight junctions between these cells with a paucity of endocytic vesicles within them and the presence of the molecules that regulate the ionic and metabolic gradients that constitute the barrier. The barrier is compromised in several disease processes and by a variety of agents, but in most cases the location and mechanism for barrier failure is not understood. Perfusion with a variety of radiolabeled tracer molecules, vitreous fluorophotometry, or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to quantitate blood-retinal barrier leakage. Fluorescein angiography or magnetic resonance imaging can localize sites of leakage in vivo with limited resolution. Evans blue dye can be used to visualize blood-retinal barrier failure in gross pathological specimens and immuno-histochemical labeling of serum proteins such as albumin or fibrinogen can be used to localize sites of blood-retinal barrier breakdown by light microscopy. Tracers such as horseradish peroxidase, microperoxidase, or lanthanum, or the immunocytochemical demonstration of albumin can be used to reveal blood-retinal barrier breakdown at the ultrastructural level and provide insights into the mechanisms involved. This review discusses the advantages and limitations of each of these methods to aid in selection of the appropriate techniques to derive the desired information.

  2. Barriers towards integrated product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Anita Friis; Dukovska-Popovska, Iskra; Steger-Jensen, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    to traditional methods, when it is a matter of complex problem solving where product development is a disruptive and non-linear process. Even though integrated product development has been the focus of a large number of research studies, most focus on identifying success criteria and improving performance while......The basis for product development in many large industrial companies is a traditional project management method positing non-overlapping phases, independent activities, and a dedicated project team. Research findings indicate that integrated product development methods increase performance compared...

  3. Markers for blood-brain barrier integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld;

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in brain barriers and various roles their intrinsic mechanisms may play in neurological disorders. Such studies require suitable models and markers to demonstrate integrity and functional changes at the interfaces between blood, brain...... known when first introduced, but seem to have been forgotten since. Understanding these limitations is important because Evans blue is still the most commonly used marker of brain barrier integrity and those using it seem oblivious to problems arising from its in vivo application. The introduction....... There is no single marker suitable for all purposes. A combination of different sized, visualizable dextrans and radiolabeled molecules currently seems to be the most appropriate approach for qualitative and quantitative assessment of barrier integrity....

  4. Cleansing Formulations That Respect Skin Barrier Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russel M. Walters

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants in skin cleansers interact with the skin in several manners. In addition to the desired benefit of providing skin hygiene, surfactants also extract skin components during cleansing and remain in the stratum corneum (SC after rinsing. These side effects disrupt SC structure and degrade its barrier properties. Recent applications of vibrational spectroscopy and two-photon microscopy in skin research have provided molecular-level information to facilitate our understanding of the interaction between skin and surfactant. In the arena of commercial skin cleansers, technologies have been developed to produce cleansers that both cleanse and respect skin barrier. The main approach is to minimize surfactant interaction with skin through altering its solution properties. Recently, hydrophobically modified polymers (HMPs have been introduced to create skin compatible cleansing systems. At the presence of HMP, surfactants assemble into larger, more stable structures. These structures are less likely to penetrate the skin, thereby resulting in less aggressive cleansers and the integrity of the skin barrier is maintained. In this paper, we reviewed our recent findings on surfactant and SC interactions at molecular level and provided an overview of the HM technology for developing cleansers that respect skin barrier.

  5. Neutrophils Compromise Retinal Pigment Epithelial Barrier Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiehao Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that neutrophils and their secreted factors mediate breakdown of the integrity of the outer blood-retina-barrier by degrading the apical tight junctions of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. The effect of activated neutrophils or neutrophil cell lysate on apparent permeability of bovine RPE-Choroid explants was evaluated by measuring [H] mannitol flux in a modified Ussing chamber. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 in murine peritoneal neutrophils, and the effects of neutrophils on RPE tight-junction protein expression were assessed by confocal microscopy and western blot. Our results revealed that basolateral incubation of explants with neutrophils decreased occludin and ZO-1 expression at 1 and 3 hours and increased the permeability of bovine RPE-Choroid explants by >3-fold (P<.05. Similarly, basolateral incubation of explants with neutrophil lysate decreased ZO-1 expression at 1 and 3 hours (P<.05 and increased permeability of explants by 75%. Further, we found that neutrophils prominently express MMP-9 and that incubation of explants with neutrophils in the presence of anti-MMP-9 antibody inhibited the increase in permeability. These data suggest that neutrophil-derived MMP-9 may play an important role in disrupting the integrity of the outer blood-retina barrier.

  6. Phase-integral method allowing nearlying transition points

    CERN Document Server

    Fröman, Nanny

    1996-01-01

    The efficiency of the phase-integral method developed by the present au­ thors has been shown both analytically and numerically in many publica­ tions. With the inclusion of supplementary quantities, closely related to new Stokes constants and obtained with the aid of comparison equation technique, important classes of problems in which transition points may approach each other become accessible to accurate analytical treatment. The exposition in this monograph is of a mathematical nature but has important physical applications, some examples of which are found in the adjoined papers. Thus, we would like to emphasize that, although we aim at mathematical rigor, our treatment is made primarily with physical needs in mind. To introduce the reader into the background of this book, we start by de­ scribing the phase-integral approximation of arbitrary order generated from an unspecified base function. This is done in Chapter 1, which is reprinted, after minor changes, from a review article. Chapter 2 is the re...

  7. Humid-air and aqueous corrosion models for corrosion-allowance barrier material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humid-air and aqueous general and pitting corrosion models (including their uncertainties) for the carbon steel outer containment barrier were developed using the corrosion data from literature for a suite of cast irons and carbon steels which have similar corrosion behaviors to the outer barrier material. The corrosion data include the potential effects of various chemical species present in the testing environments. The atmospheric corrosion data also embed any effects of cyclic wetting and drying and salts that may form on the corroding specimen surface. The humid-air and aqueous general corrosion models are consistent in that the predicted humid-air general corrosion rates at relative humidities between 85 and 100% RH are close to the predicted aqueous general corrosion rates. Using the expected values of the model parameters, the model predicts that aqueous pitting corrosion is the most likely failure mode for the carbon steel outer barrier, and an earliest failure (or initial pit penetration) of the 100-mm thick barrier may occur as early as about 500 years if it is exposed continuously to an aqueous condition at between 60 and 70 degrees C

  8. Regional economic integration in Great East Asia: determinants and barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Korol

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article studies both general trends and peculiar characteristics of processes of economic integration in the Great East Asia, which plays the role of one of the major centers of contemporary global development. The basic determinants and barriers for implementation of regional strategies by China, Japan, ASEAN that will influence the geo-economic policy of Ukraine not only in East Asian, but also European and Eurasian areas. Attention is focused on the basic principles of realized and potential future integration models in the "ASEAN+" format with variable composition of member states that correspond to different extents to strategic objectives of both specified key actors in the region and extra-regional states that have global and transnational interests. Extrapolation of dominant trends in the nature and dynamics of transformation processes of East Asian economic regionalization allowed forming a forecast for the longterm conservation of importance of free trade agreements in the absence of preconditions to create customs unions. At the same time it was stressed out that proper assurance of national interests of international economic relations will be based on contractual instruments at the international level, without creating institutional and legal superstructure similar to the European Union or the Eurasian Economic Union as supranational law and supranational bodies.

  9. Barriers and Challenges in the Integrated Design Process Approcach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudstrup, Mary-Ann

    2006-01-01

    agreement for reducing the global heating. This paper will briefly present the method of the Integrated Design Process, IDP [1]. It describes the background and means for developing a new method for designing integrated architecture in an interdisciplinary approach between architecture and engineering. It...... also describes the barriers and the challenges that must be overcome when trying to cross the borders between the two fields of engineering and architecture to design sustainable architecture....

  10. Attitudes towards immigrants, other integration barriers, and their veracity

    OpenAIRE

    Constant, Amelie F.; KAHANEC, Martin; Zimmermann, Klaus F.

    2008-01-01

    The paper studies opinions and attitudes towards immigrants and minorities and their interactions with other barriers to minorities' economic integration. Specifically, we consider the minority experts' own perceptions about these issues, the veracities and repercussions of unfavorable attitudes of natives. Employing newly available data from the IZA Expert Opinion Survey 2007 we depict main trends in the integration situation of ethnic minorities in Europe in a comparative manner. Using a un...

  11. Barriers of inter-organisational integration in vocational rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Wihlman

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A project of vocational rehabilitation was studied in Sweden between 1999 and 2002. The project included four public organisations: the social insurance office, the local health services, the municipal social service and the office of the state employment service. The aim of this paper was to analyse perceived barriers in the development of inter-organisational integration. Theory: Theories of inter-professional and inter-organisational integration, and theories on organisational change. Methods: In total, 51 semi-structured interviews and 14 focus group discussions were performed with actors within the project between 1999 and 2002. A thematic approach was used for the analysis of the data. Results: Three different main themes of barriers emerged from the data: A Uncertainty, B Prioritising own organisation and C Lack of communication. The themes are interconnected in an intricate web and hence not mutually exclusive. Conclusions and discussion: The barriers found are all related partly to organisational change in general and partly to the specific development of organisational integration. Prioritising of own organisation led to flaws in communication, which in turn led to a high degree of uncertainty within the project. This can be seen as a circular relationship, since uncertainty might increase focus on own organisation and lack of communication. A way to overcome these barriers would be to take the needs of the clients as a point of departure in the development of joint services and to also involve them in the development of inter-organisational integration.

  12. Integrating Religion and Spirituality into Counselor Education: Barriers and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher M.; Puig, Ana; Baggs, Adrienne; Wolf, Cheryl Pence

    2015-01-01

    Despite a professionally recognized need for training in religion/spirituality, literature indicates that religious and spirituality issues continue to be inconsistently addressed in counselor education. Ten experts were asked to identify potential barriers to integrating religion and spirituality into counselor education and indicate strategies…

  13. Barriers to Asthma Management for School Nurses: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley Nadeau, Ellen; Toronto, Coleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood asthma is a growing health concern. Asthma is the most common chronic illness of childhood and a leading cause of emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and school absenteeism. School nurses play a valuable role in asthma management. The purpose of this integrative review is to examine barriers to asthma management for school nurses in…

  14. Integrated control of the wastewater system – potentials and barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Ane Loft; Grum, Morten; Muschalla, Dirk;

    2013-01-01

    Applying integrated control to a sewer system and wastewater treatment plant often leads to additional benefits for both systems when compared to controlling them independently. However, barriers such as a lack of incentive for utilities to put this type of control in place mean that in practice...

  15. Trek1 contributes to maintaining nasal epithelial barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Li, Jing; Li, Meng; Chen, Hong-Bin; Yan, Hao; Mo, Li-Hua; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial barrier integrity is critical to maintain the homeostasis in the body. The regulatory mechanism of the epithelial barrier function has not been fully understood. This study aims to elucidate the role of the TWIK-related potassium channel-1 (Trek1) in the regulation of the epithelial barrier function of the nasal mucosa. In this study, the levels of Trek1 were assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The epithelial barrier function of the rat nasal epithelia was evaluated by the Ussing chamber system. The results showed that Trek1 was detected in the human and rat nasal epithelia, which were significantly lower in patients and rats with allergic rhinitis than that in healthy controls. Exposure to the signature T helper 2 cytokine, interleukin (IL)-4, markedly suppressed the expression of Trek1 in the nasal mucosa via up regulating the expression of the histone deacetylase (HDAC)1. The IL-4-induced rat nasal epithelial barrier dysfunction could be blocked by HDAC1 inhibitor (Trichostatin A), or sodium butyrate, or administration of Clostridium Butyricum. We conclude that Trek1 is critical to maintain the nasal epithelial barrier function. PMID:25778785

  16. Verification of the integrity of barriers using gas diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ barrier materials and designs are being developed for containment of high risk contamination as an alternative to immediate removal or remediation. The intent of these designs is to prevent the movement of contaminants in either the liquid or vapor phase by long-term containment, essentially buying time until the contaminant depletes naturally or a remediation can be implemented. The integrity of the resultant soil-binder mixture is typically assessed by a number of destructive laboratory tests (leaching, compressive strength, mechanical stability with respect to wetting and freeze-thaw cycles) which as a group are used to infer the likelihood of favorable long-term performance of the barrier. The need exists for a minimally intrusive yet quantifiable methods for assessment of a barrier's integrity after emplacement, and monitoring of the barrier's performance over its lifetime. Here, the authors evaluate non-destructive measurements of inert-gas diffusion (specifically, SF6) as an indicator of waste-form integrity. The goals of this project are to show that diffusivity can be measured in core samples of soil jet-grouted with Portland cement, validate the experimental method through measurements on samples, and to calculate aqueous diffusivities from a series of diffusion measurements. This study shows that it is practical to measure SF6 diffusion rates in the laboratory on samples of grout (Portland cement and soil) typical of what might be used in a barrier. Diffusion of SF6 through grout (Portland cement and soil) is at least an order of magnitude slower than through air. The use of this tracer should be sensitive to the presence of fractures, voids, or other discontinuities in the grout/soil structure. Field-scale measurements should be practical on time-scales of a few days

  17. [Barriers to socio-professional integration of people with severe mental disorders: empirical data and theoretical points of reference.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbière, Marc; Bordeleau, Monique; Provost, Geneviève; Mercier, Céline

    2002-01-01

    The authors describe the barriers related to socio-professional integration of people with severe mental disorders according to different perspectives of various people involved. Focus groups (22) have been conducted in almost every region in Quebec involving 87 participants in vocational rehabilitation programs, 47 non participants and 51 employers. Eighty (80) vocational program administrator completed a questionaire. The barriers identified by these groups are compared with those described in other studies. It seems that the results are similar: the main obstacle is prejudice towards mental illness and people with mental disorders, no matter who is questionned. Barriers to socio-professional integration are reviewed according to the theories of feeling of self-efficiency (Bandura, 1977,1997), causal attribution (Weiner, 1986) and planned behavior (Ajzen, 1991, 1996). Analysis of barriers to socio-professional integration carried out in the light of these three theories, allows to suggest points of reference for new tools and integration strategies. PMID:18253625

  18. Spark-integrated propellant injector head with flashback barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Gregory Stuart (Inventor); Fisher, David James (Inventor); Mungas, Christopher (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    High performance propellants flow through specialized mechanical hardware that allows for effective and safe thermal decomposition and/or combustion of the propellants. By integrating a sintered metal component between a propellant feed source and the combustion chamber, an effective and reliable fuel injector head may be implemented. Additionally the fuel injector head design integrates a spark ignition mechanism that withstands extremely hot running conditions without noticeable spark mechanism degradation.

  19. The "Third"-Order Barrier for Technology-Integration Instruction: Implications for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chin-Chung; Chai, Ching Sing

    2012-01-01

    Technology integration is a major trend in contemporary education practice. When undertaking technology integration in classrooms, a first-order barrier and a second-order barrier, as proposed by Ertmer (1999), can hinder its implementation. The first-order barrier is external, such as lack of adequate access, time, training and institutional…

  20. Fluidic interconnections for microfluidic systems: A new integrated fluidic interconnection allowing plug 'n' play functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Bundgaard, Frederik; Geschke, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    A crucial challenge in packaging of microsystems is microfluidic interconnections. These have to seal the ports of the system, and have to provide the appropriate interface to other devices or the external environment. Integrated fluidic interconnections appear to be a good solution...... for interconnecting polymer microsystems in terms of cost, space and performance. Following this path we propose a new reversible, integrated fluidic interconnection composed of custom-made cylindrical rings integrated in a polymer house next to the fluidic network. This allows plug 'n' play functionality between...... external metal ferrules and the system. Theoretical calculations are made to dimension and model the integrated fluidic interconnection. Leakage tests are performed on the interconnections, in order to experimentally confirm the model, and detect its limits....

  1. Dyslipidemia and Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene L. Bowman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blood-brain barrier (BBB dysfunction may have a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Modifiable factors associated with BBB function may have therapeutic implication. This study tested the hypothesis that dyslipidemia is associated with BBB impairment in mild-to-moderate AD. Methods. Thirty-six subjects with AD were followed for 1 year. Fasting CSF and plasma were collected with clinical assessments at baseline and 12 months. BBB impairment was defined as CSF albumin index ≥9. Independent t-tests and linear regression assessed the relationship between plasma lipoproteins and BBB integrity. Results. Dyslipidemia was prevalent in 47% of the population, and in 75% of those with BBB impairment. Subjects with BBB impairment had significantly higher mean plasma triglyceride and lower HDL cholesterol (TG, P=0.007; HDL, P=0.043. Plasma triglycerides explained 22% of the variance in BBB integrity and remained significant after controlling for age, gender, ApoE-4 genotype, blood pressure, and statin use. Conclusion. Dyslipidemia is more prevalent in AD subjects with BBB impairment. Plasma triglyceride and HDL cholesterol may have a role in maintaining BBB integrity in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Barriers and facilitators to integrating care: experiences from the English Integrated Care Pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Ling

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 2008, the English Department of Health appointed 16 'Integrated Care Pilots' which used a range of approaches to provide better integrated care. We report qualitative analyses from a three year multi-method evaluation to identify barriers and facilitators to successful integration of care. Theory and methods. Data were analysed from transcripts of 213 in-depth staff interviews, and from semi-structured questionnaires (the 'Living Document' completed by staff in pilot sites at six points over a two-year period. Emerging findings were therefore built from 'bottom up' and grounded in the data. However, we were then interested in how these findings compared and contrasted with more generic analyses. Therefore after our analyses were complete we then systematically compared and contrasted the findings with the analysis of barriers and facilitators to quality improvement identified in a systematic review by Kaplan et al (2010 and the analysis of more micro-level shapers of behaviour found in Normalisation Process Theory (May et al 2007. Neither of these approaches claims to be full blown theories but both claim to provide mid-range theoretical arguments which may be used to structure existing data and which can be undercut or reinforced by new data.Results and discussion. Many barriers and facilitators to integrating care are those of any large scale organisational change. These include issues relating to leadership, organisational culture, information technology, physician involvement, and availability of resources. However, activities which appear particularly important for delivering integrated care include personal relationships between leaders in different organisations, the scale of planned activities, governance and finance arrangements, support for staff in new roles, and organisational and staff stability. We illustrate our analyses with a 'routemap' which identifies questions that providers may wish to consider when planning

  3. Barriers and facilitators to integrating care: experiences from the English Integrated Care Pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Ling

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 2008, the English Department of Health appointed 16 'Integrated Care Pilots' which used a range of approaches to provide better integrated care. We report qualitative analyses from a three year multi-method evaluation to identify barriers and facilitators to successful integration of care.  Theory and methods. Data were analysed from transcripts of 213 in-depth staff interviews, and from semi-structured questionnaires (the 'Living Document' completed by staff in pilot sites at six points over a two-year period. Emerging findings were therefore built from 'bottom up' and grounded in the data. However, we were then interested in how these findings compared and contrasted with more generic analyses. Therefore after our analyses were complete we then systematically compared and contrasted the findings with the analysis of barriers and facilitators to quality improvement identified in a systematic review by Kaplan et al (2010 and the analysis of more micro-level shapers of behaviour found in Normalisation Process Theory (May et al 2007. Neither of these approaches claims to be full blown theories but both claim to provide mid-range theoretical arguments which may be used to structure existing data and which can be undercut or reinforced by new data. Results and discussion. Many barriers and facilitators to integrating care are those of any large scale organisational change. These include issues relating to leadership, organisational culture, information technology, physician involvement, and availability of resources. However, activities which appear particularly important for delivering integrated care include personal relationships between leaders in different organisations, the scale of planned activities, governance and finance arrangements, support for staff in new roles, and organisational and staff stability. We illustrate our analyses with a 'routemap' which identifies questions that providers may wish to consider when

  4. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 regulates airway epithelial barrier integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Shintani

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Our results indicated that the Nrf2/AOX1 pathway was important for enhancing airway epithelial barrier integrity. Because the airway epithelium of asthmatics is susceptible to reduced barrier integrity, this pathway might be a new therapeutic target for asthma.

  5. Building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV). Review, potentials, barriers and myths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinstein, Patrick; Ballif, Christophe [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Neuchatel (Switzerland). Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Lab.; Perret-Aebi, Laure-Emmanuelle [CSEM, Neuchatel (Switzerland). PV-Center

    2013-07-01

    To date, none of the predictions that have been made about the emerging BIPV industry have really hit the target. The anticipated boom has so far stalled and despite developing and promoting a number of excellent systems and products, many producers around the world have been forced to quit on purely economic grounds. The authors believe that after this painful cleansing of the market, a massive counter trend will follow, enlivened and carried forward by more advanced PV technologies and ever-stricter climate policies designed to achieve energy neutrality in a cost-effective way. As a result, the need for BIPV products for use in construction will undergo first a gradual and then a massive increase. The planning of buildings with multifunctional, integrated roof and facade elements capable of fulfilling the technical and legal demands will become an essential, accepted part of the architectonic mainstream and will also contribute to an aesthetic valorisation. Until then, various barriers need to be overcome in order to facilitate and accelerate BIPV. Besides issues related to mere cost-efficiency ratio, psychological and social factors also play an evident role. The goal of energy change linked to greater use of renewables can be successfully achieved only when all aspects are taken into account and when visual appeal and energy efficiency thus no longer appear to be an oxymoron. (orig.)

  6. Molten carbonate fuel cell integral matrix tape and bubble barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A molten carbonate fuel cell matrix material is described made up of a matrix tape portion and a bubble barrier portion. The matrix tape portion comprises particles inert to molten carbonate electrolyte, ceramic particles and a polymeric binder, the matrix tape being flexible, pliable and having rubber-like compliance at room temperature. The bubble barrier is a solid material having fine porosity preferably being bonded to the matrix tape. In operation in a fuel cell, the polymer binder burns off leaving the matrix and bubble barrier providing superior sealing, stability and performance properties to the fuel cell stack

  7. Barriers to Social Integration for People with Disabilities. The Polish Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Twardowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of social integration consists in creating opportunities for the disabled to participate in normal life, providing access to all public institutions and social situations in which fully able people participate. Social integration in this meaning is a long way and numerous barriers are likely to appear. Barriers are all obstacles which make it difficult or impossible for the disabled to participate in the mainstream of social life and to perform socially apprecia...

  8. Performance of double three-dimensional rigid barriers used to create an acoustic space—A normal derivative integral equationapproach

    Science.gov (United States)

    António, J.; Tadeu, A.; Castro, I.

    2013-06-01

    This paper simulates the propagation of sound generated by point pressure sources in the vicinity of double three-dimensional (3D) barriers, placed so as to create an indoor acoustic space. The barriers are assumed to be very thin rigid elements. The problem is solved by developing and implementing a 3D Boundary Element Method formulation using a normal derivative integral equation (TBEM), thereby allowing the definition of models in which only the discretization of the barriers as single open surfaces is required. The TBEM is formulated in the frequency domain and the resulting hypersingular terms are computed analytically. After the verification of the model against two-and-a-half-dimensional (2.5D) BEM solutions, several numerical applications are described to illustrate the applicability and usefulness of the proposed approaches. Different barrier shape geometries and their relative position with respect to a lateral wall are analyzed to evaluate the performance of double 3D rigid barriers in the creation of an acoustic space.

  9. Environmentally Design; Barriers and Challenges in the Integrated Design Process Approch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudstrup, Mary-Ann

    heating. The paper will shortly present the method of the Integrated Design Process (IDP). It describes the background and means for developing a new method for designing integrated architecture in an interdisciplinary approach between architecture and engineering. It also describes the barriers and the...

  10. Technology integration in K-12 science classrooms: An analysis of barriers and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Richard P. Hechter; Laurie Anne Vermette

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the barriers to technology integration for Manitoban K-12 inservice science educators (n = 430) based on a 10-item online survey; results are analyzed according to teaching stream using the Technology, Pedagogy, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework. Quantitative descriptive statistics indicated that the leading barriers experienced by all teachers are inadequate: access; time; resources; training; budget; and support. Upon further examination, Middle Years and Senior Ye...

  11. Alteration of blood-brain barrier integrity by retroviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe V Afonso

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, which forms the interface between the blood and the cerebral parenchyma, has been shown to be disrupted during retroviral-associated neuromyelopathies. Human T Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with BBB breakdown. The BBB is composed of three cell types: endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. Although astrocytes have been shown to be infected by HTLV-1, until now, little was known about the susceptibility of BBB endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection and the impact of such an infection on BBB function. We first demonstrated that human cerebral endothelial cells express the receptors for HTLV-1 (GLUT-1, Neuropilin-1 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans, both in vitro, in a human cerebral endothelial cell line, and ex vivo, on spinal cord autopsy sections from HAM/TSP and non-infected control cases. In situ hybridization revealed HTLV-1 transcripts associated with the vasculature in HAM/TSP. We were able to confirm that the endothelial cells could be productively infected in vitro by HTLV-1 and that blocking of either HSPGs, Neuropilin 1 or Glut1 inhibits this process. The expression of the tight-junction proteins within the HTLV-1 infected endothelial cells was altered. These cells were no longer able to form a functional barrier, since BBB permeability and lymphocyte passage through the monolayer of endothelial cells were increased. This work constitutes the first report of susceptibility of human cerebral endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection, with implications for HTLV-1 passage through the BBB and subsequent deregulation of the central nervous system homeostasis. We propose that the susceptibility of cerebral endothelial cells to retroviral infection and subsequent BBB dysfunction is an important aspect of HAM/TSP pathogenesis and should be considered in the design of future therapeutics strategies.

  12. Computer Technology Integration and Student Learning: Barriers and Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace; Wachira, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Political and institutional support has enabled many institutions of learning to spend millions of dollars to acquire educational computing tools (Ficklen and Muscara, "Am Educ" 25(3):22-29, 2001) that have not been effectively integrated into the curriculum. While access to educational technology tools has remarkably improved in most schools,…

  13. A Theoretical Framework Mapping Barriers of Integrating and Adopting Educational Techonology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Buus, Lillian

    2016-01-01

    In the field of educational technology, a decades-long research question is: what barriers exist in integration and adoption of information and communication technology (ICT) in education educational technology? The intensity of integration and the rate of adoption are significantly low and the i......In the field of educational technology, a decades-long research question is: what barriers exist in integration and adoption of information and communication technology (ICT) in education educational technology? The intensity of integration and the rate of adoption are significantly low......) adoption decision. Instead of “system blame” or “individual blame”, an integration and adoption approach should consider national holistic view for careful strategic changes in policies, procedures, and practices at each decision level of the educational system and related external systems....

  14. Thinking Allowed: Content and Language Integrated Learning--A Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton-Puffer, Christiane; Smit, Ute

    2013-01-01

    While Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) has received a considerable amount of research interest lately, its increasing popularity as an approach to teaching content subjects in a foreign language requires concerted investigation that reflects and recognises its fundamentally contextualised nature. In this contribution, we sketch…

  15. Ribosomal DNA Integrating rAAV-rDNA Vectors Allow for Stable Transgene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Lisowski, Leszek; Lau, Ashley; Wang, Zhongya; Zhang, Yue(Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125, U.S.A.); Zhang, Feijie; Grompe, Markus; Kay, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Although recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are proving to be efficacious in clinical trials, the episomal character of the delivered transgene restricts their effectiveness to use in quiescent tissues, and may not provide lifelong expression. In contrast, integrating vectors enhance the risk of insertional mutagenesis. In an attempt to overcome both of these limitations, we created new rAAV-rDNA vectors, with an expression cassette flanked by ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences cap...

  16. Barriers to Physical Activity Among African American Women: An Integrative Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Rodney P; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Keller, Colleen; Dodgson, Joan E

    2015-01-01

    A key aspect for researchers to consider when developing culturally appropriate physical activity (PA) interventions for African American (AA) women are the specific barriers AA women face that limit their participation in PA. Identification and critical examination of these barriers is the first step in developing comprehensive culturally relevant approaches to promote PA and help resolve PA-related health disparities in this underserved population. We conducted a systematic integrative literature review to identify barriers to PA among AA women. Five electronic databases were searched, and forty-two studies (twenty-seven qualitative, fourteen quantitative, one mixed method) published since 1990 (range 1998-2013) in English language journals met inclusion criteria for review. Barriers were classified as intrapersonal, interpersonal, or environment/community according to their respective level of influence within our social ecological framework. Intrapersonal barriers included lack of time, knowledge, and motivation; physical appearance concerns; health concerns; monetary cost of exercise facilities; and tiredness/fatigue. Interpersonal barriers included family/caregiving responsibilities; lack of social support; and lack of a PA partner. Environmental barriers included safety concerns; lack of facilities; weather concerns; lack of sidewalks; and lack of physically active AA role models. Results provide key leverage points for researchers to consider when developing culturally relevant PA interventions for AA women.

  17. Barriers to Physical Activity Among African American Women: An Integrative Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Rodney P; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Keller, Colleen; Dodgson, Joan E

    2015-01-01

    A key aspect for researchers to consider when developing culturally appropriate physical activity (PA) interventions for African American (AA) women are the specific barriers AA women face that limit their participation in PA. Identification and critical examination of these barriers is the first step in developing comprehensive culturally relevant approaches to promote PA and help resolve PA-related health disparities in this underserved population. We conducted a systematic integrative literature review to identify barriers to PA among AA women. Five electronic databases were searched, and forty-two studies (twenty-seven qualitative, fourteen quantitative, one mixed method) published since 1990 (range 1998-2013) in English language journals met inclusion criteria for review. Barriers were classified as intrapersonal, interpersonal, or environment/community according to their respective level of influence within our social ecological framework. Intrapersonal barriers included lack of time, knowledge, and motivation; physical appearance concerns; health concerns; monetary cost of exercise facilities; and tiredness/fatigue. Interpersonal barriers included family/caregiving responsibilities; lack of social support; and lack of a PA partner. Environmental barriers included safety concerns; lack of facilities; weather concerns; lack of sidewalks; and lack of physically active AA role models. Results provide key leverage points for researchers to consider when developing culturally relevant PA interventions for AA women. PMID:25909603

  18. Examining Current Beliefs, Practices and Barriers about Technology Integration: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pi-Sui

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to examine the current beliefs, practices and barriers concerning technology integration of Kindergarten through Grade Six teachers in the midwestern United States. The three data collection methods were online surveys with 152 teachers as well as interviews and observations with 8 teachers. The findings…

  19. Barriers to the Integration and Adoption of iPads in Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Kilic, Gökce; Christoffersen, Jeanette;

    2015-01-01

    iPad, with its Apple platform and interoperability-dependent material conditions, bring complex barriers in its adoption and integration in secondary education system as a learning tool. In the schools’ context, it is an emerging educational technology for its affordances supporting collaborative...

  20. Teachers' Perceptions of the Barriers to Technology Integration and Practices with Technology under Situated Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcha, Theodore J.

    2012-01-01

    This case study examines 18 elementary school teachers' perceptions of the barriers to technology integration (access, vision, professional development, time, and beliefs) and instructional practices with technology after two years of situated professional development. Months after transitioning from mentoring to teacher-led communities of…

  1. A novel integrated renewable energy system modelling approach, allowing fast FPGA controller prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Ruiz, Alberto Parera; Cirstea, Marcian;

    2008-01-01

    for comparison. Later on, the model was successfully developed in Handel-C. The holistic functional simulation of the system is performed in the same environment as its controller hardware implementation and timing analysis. The controller design was then downloaded in hardware onto a RC100 development board...... containing a Xilinx Spartan II FPGA and was successfully experimentally tested. This approach enables the design and fast hardware implementation of efficient controllers for Distributed Energy Resource (DER) hybrid systems....... of a photovoltaic energy system and a wind power system, which would allow an optimized holistic digital control system design, followed by rapid prototyping of the controller into a single Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Initially, the system was simulated using Matlab / Simulink, to create a reference...

  2. Effects of Yishendaluo decoction on blood-brain barrier integrity in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanqing Wu; Ying Gao; Lingqun Zhu; Yonghong Gao; Dongmei Zhang; Lixia Lou; Yanfang Yan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of Yishendaluo decoction on the loss of blood-brain barrier integrity in mice exhibiting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.To this end,we used real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR to measure the levels of mRNAs specific to the T cell markers CD4 and CD8,and the monocyte marker CD11b.In addition,we used Evans blue dye extravasation in the spinal cord and brain tissues to assess blood-brain barrier permeability.The results indicated that an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability was associated with an increase in CD4,CD8 and CD11b mRNA expression in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.Yishendaluo decoction administration significantly reversed inflammatory cell accumulation in cerebral tissues of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

  3. Integration of health into urban spatial planning through impact assessment: Identifying governance and policy barriers and facilitators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the results of a review of literature examining the barriers and facilitators in integrating health in spatial planning at the local, mainly urban level, through appraisals. Our literature review covered the UK and non UK experiences of appraisals used to consider health issues in the planning process. We were able to identify four main categories of obstacles and facilitators including first the different knowledge and conceptual understanding of health by different actors/stakeholders, second the types of governance arrangements, in particular partnerships, in place and the political context, third the way institutions work, the responsibilities they have and their capacity and resources and fourth the timeliness, comprehensiveness and inclusiveness of the appraisal process. The findings allowed us to draw some lessons on the governance and policy framework regarding the integration of health impact into spatial planning, in particular considering the pros and cons of integrating health impact assessment (HIA) into other forms of impact assessment of spatial planning decisions such as environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environment assessment (SEA). In addition, the research uncovered a gap in the literature that tends to focus on the mainly voluntary HIA to assess health outcomes of planning decisions and neglect the analysis of regulatory mechanisms such as EIA and SEA. - Highlights: ► Governance and policy barriers and facilitators to the integration of health into urban planning. ► Review of literature on impact assessment methods used across the world. ► Knowledge, partnerships, management/resources and processes can impede integration. ► HIA evaluations prevail uncovering research opportunities for evaluating other techniques.

  4. Method and device for detecting impact events on a security barrier which includes a hollow rebar allowing insertion and removal of an optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pies, Ross E.

    2016-03-29

    A method and device for the detection of impact events on a security barrier. A hollow rebar is farmed within a security barrier, whereby the hollow rebar is completely surrounded by the security barrier. An optical fiber passes through the interior of the hollow rebar. An optical transmitter and an optical receiver are both optically connected to the optical fiber and connected to optical electronics. The optical electronics are configured to provide notification upon the detection of an impact event at the security barrier based on the detection of disturbances within the optical fiber.

  5. Lactobacillus protects the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier damaged by pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua eYu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens invade intestinal mucosal barrier through phagocytosis of antigen presenting cells (dendritic cell, microfold cells, or through the invasion into the intestinal epithelial directly. Some pathogens could damage the cell junction between epithelial cells and use the paracellular pathway as an entrance to invade. Moreover, some Lactobacillus could inhibit the adhesion of the pathogens and protect the integrity of the cell junction and mucosal barrier. This research focused on the potential therapeutic effect of Lactobacillus fructosus (L. fructosus C2 to attenuate ETEC K88 or S. typhimurium SL1344 induced changes to mucosal barrier. The results demonstrated that treatment of polarized Caco-2 cells with L. fructosus C2 reduced the permeation of dextran, and expression of IL-8, p-ERK and p-JNK when cells were infected with pathogenic bacteria. The findings indicated that L. fructosus C2 exerted a protective effect against the damage to the integrity of Caco-2 cells by ETEC or S. typhimurium infection.

  6. Zona occludens-2 is critical for blood-testis barrier integrity and male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianliang; Anuar, Farhana; Ali, Safiah Mohamed; Ng, Mei Yong; Phua, Dominic C Y; Hunziker, Walter

    2009-10-01

    Tight junction integral membrane proteins such as claudins and occludin are tethered to the actin cytoskeleton by adaptor proteins, notably the closely related zonula occludens (ZO) proteins ZO-1, ZO-2, and ZO-3. All three ZO proteins have recently been inactivated in mice. Although ZO-3 knockout mice lack an obvious phenotype, animals deficient in ZO-1 or ZO-2 show early embryonic lethality. Here, we rescue the embryonic lethality of ZO-2 knockout mice by injecting ZO-2(-/-) embryonic stem (ES) cells into wild-type blastocysts to generate viable ZO-2 chimera. ZO-2(-/-) ES cells contribute extensively to different tissues of the chimera, consistent with an extraembryonic requirement for ZO-2 rather than a critical role in epiblast development. Adult chimera present a set of phenotypes in different organs. In particular, male ZO-2 chimeras show reduced fertility and pathological changes in the testis. Lanthanum tracer experiments show a compromised blood-testis barrier. Expression levels of ZO-1, ZO-3, claudin-11, and occludin are not apparently affected. ZO-1 and occludin still localize to the blood-testis barrier region, but claudin-11 is less well restricted and the localization of connexin-43 is perturbed. The critical role of ZO-2 for male fertility and blood-testis barrier integrity thus provides a first example for a nonredundant role of an individual ZO protein in adult mice.

  7. N-wasp is required for structural integrity of the blood-testis barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Xiao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis, the blood-testis barrier (BTB segregates the adluminal (apical and basal compartments in the seminiferous epithelium, thereby creating a privileged adluminal environment that allows post-meiotic spermatid development to proceed without interference of the host immune system. A key feature of the BTB is its continuous remodeling within the Sertoli cells, the major somatic component of the seminiferous epithelium. This remodeling is necessary to allow the transport of germ cells towards the seminiferous tubule interior, while maintaining intact barrier properties. Here we demonstrate that the actin nucleation promoting factor Neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (N-WASP provides an essential function necessary for BTB restructuring, and for maintaining spermatogenesis. Our data suggests that the N-WASP-Arp2/3 actin polymerization machinery generates branched-actin arrays at an advanced stage of BTB remodeling. These arrays are proposed to mediate the restructuring process through endocytic recycling of BTB components. Disruption of N-WASP in Sertoli cells results in major structural abnormalities to the BTB, including mis-localization of critical junctional and cytoskeletal elements, and leads to disruption of barrier function. These impairments result in a complete arrest of spermatogenesis, underscoring the critical involvement of the somatic compartment of the seminiferous tubules in germ cell maturation.

  8. Protein Homeostasis Imposes a Barrier on Functional Integration of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimon Bershtein

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT plays a central role in bacterial evolution, yet the molecular and cellular constraints on functional integration of the foreign genes are poorly understood. Here we performed inter-species replacement of the chromosomal folA gene, encoding an essential metabolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, with orthologs from 35 other mesophilic bacteria. The orthologous inter-species replacements caused a marked drop (in the range 10-90% in bacterial growth rate despite the fact that most orthologous DHFRs are as stable as E.coli DHFR at 37°C and are more catalytically active than E. coli DHFR. Although phylogenetic distance between E. coli and orthologous DHFRs as well as their individual molecular properties correlate poorly with growth rates, the product of the intracellular DHFR abundance and catalytic activity (kcat/KM, correlates strongly with growth rates, indicating that the drop in DHFR abundance constitutes the major fitness barrier to HGT. Serial propagation of the orthologous strains for ~600 generations dramatically improved growth rates by largely alleviating the fitness barriers. Whole genome sequencing and global proteome quantification revealed that the evolved strains with the largest fitness improvements have accumulated mutations that inactivated the ATP-dependent Lon protease, causing an increase in the intracellular DHFR abundance. In one case DHFR abundance increased further due to mutations accumulated in folA promoter, but only after the lon inactivating mutations were fixed in the population. Thus, by apparently distinguishing between self and non-self proteins, protein homeostasis imposes an immediate and global barrier to the functional integration of foreign genes by decreasing the intracellular abundance of their products. Once this barrier is alleviated, more fine-tuned evolution occurs to adjust the function/expression of the transferred proteins to the constraints imposed by the

  9. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) application in metal barrier layer integrity for porous low- k materials

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Lin; Gidley, D W; Wetzel, J T; Monnig, K A; Ryan, E T; Simon, Jang; Douglas, Yu; Liang, M S; En, W G; Jones, E C; Sturm, J C; Chan, M J; Tiwari, S C; Hirose, M

    2002-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) is a useful tool to pre-screen metal barrier integrity for Si-based porous low-k dielectrics. Pore size of low-k, thickness of metal barrier Ta, positronium (Ps) leakage from PALS, trench sidewall morphology, electrical test from one level metal (1LM) pattern wafer and Cu diffusion analysis were all correlated. Macro-porous low-k (pore size >=200 AA) and large scale meso-porous low-k (>50~200 AA) encounter both Ps leakage and Cu diffusion into low-k dielectric in the 0.25 mu mL/0.3 mu mS structures when using SEMATECH in-house PVD Ta 250 AA as barrier layer. For small scale meso-porous (>20~50 AA) and micro- porous (<=20 AA) low-k, no Ps leakage and no Cu diffusion into low-k were observed even with PVD Ta 50 AA, which is proved also owing to sidewall densification to seal all sidewall pores due to plasma etch and ash. For future technology, smaller pore size of porous Si-based low-k (=<50 AA) will be preferential for dense low-k like trench sidewall to...

  10. Loss of endothelial barrier integrity in mice with conditional ablation of podocalyxin (Podxl) in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrillo, Angélica; Porras, Gracia; Ayuso, Matilde S; González-Manchón, Consuelo

    2016-08-01

    Podocalyxin (Podxl) has an essential role in the development and function of the kidney glomerular filtration barrier. It is also expressed by vascular endothelia but perinatal lethality of podxl(-/-) mice has precluded understanding of its function in adult vascular endothelial cells (ECs). In this work, we show that conditional knockout mice with deletion of Podxl restricted to the vascular endothelium grow normally but most die spontaneously around three months of age. Histological analysis showed a nonspecific inflammatory infiltrate within the vessel wall frequently associated with degenerative changes, and involving vessels of different caliber in one or more organs. Podxl-deficient lung EC cultures exhibit increased permeability to dextran and macrophage transmigration. After thrombin stimulation, ECs lacking Podxl showed delayed recovery of VE-cadherin cell contacts, persistence of F-actin stress fibers, and sustained phosphorylation of the ERM complex and activation of RhoA, suggesting a failure in endothelial barrier stabilization. The results suggest that Podxl has an essential role in the regulation of endothelial permeability by influencing the mechanisms involved in the restoration of endothelial barrier integrity after injury. PMID:27289182

  11. MRI confirms loss of blood-brain barrier integrity in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarathna, Dhammika H M L P; Munasinghe, Jeeva; Lizak, Martin J; Nayak, Debasis; McGavern, Dorian B; Roberts, David D

    2013-09-01

    Disseminated candidiasis primarily targets the kidneys and brain in mice and humans. Damage to these critical organs leads to the high mortality associated with such infections, and invasion across the blood-brain barrier can result in fungal meningoencephalitis. Candida albicans can penetrate a brain endothelial cell barrier in vitro through transcellular migration, but this mechanism has not been confirmed in vivo. MRI using the extracellular vascular contrast agent gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid demonstrated that integrity of the blood-brain barrier is lost during C. albicans invasion. Intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy was used to provide the first real-time demonstration of C. albicans colonizing the living brain, where both yeast and filamentous forms of the pathogen were found. Furthermore, we adapted a previously described method utilizing MRI to monitor inflammatory cell recruitment into infected tissues in mice. Macrophages and other phagocytes were visualized in kidney and brain by the administration of ultrasmall iron oxide particles. In addition to obtaining new insights into the passage of C. albicans across the brain microvasculature, these imaging methods provide useful tools to study further the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections, to define the roles of Candida virulence genes in kidney versus brain infection and to assess new therapeutic measures for drug development.

  12. Towards integrated care for chronic conditions: Dutch policy developments to overcome the (financial) barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Hipple-Walters, Bethany; Lemmens, Karin M M; Nieboer, Anna P; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H

    2011-07-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases are a major threat to population health and have a major economic impact on health care systems. Worldwide, integrated chronic care delivery systems have been developed to tackle this challenge. In the Netherlands, the recently introduced integrated payment system--the chain-DTC--is seen as the cornerstone of a policy stimulating the development of a well-functioning integrated chronic care system. The purpose of this paper is to describe the recent attempts in the Netherlands to stimulate the delivery of integrated chronic care, focusing specifically on the new integrated payment scheme and the barriers to introducing this scheme. We also highlight possible threats and identify necessary conditions to the success of the system. This paper is based on a combination of methods and sources including literature, government documents, personal communications and site visits to disease management programs (DMPs). The most important conditions for the success of the new payment system are: complete care protocols describing both general (e.g. smoking cessation, physical activity) and disease-specific chronic care modules, coverage of all components of a DMP by basic health care insurance, adequate information systems that facilitate communication between caregivers, explicit links between the quality and the price of a DMP, expansion of the amount of specialized care included in the chain-DTC, inclusion of a multi-morbidity factor in the risk equalization formula of insurers, and thorough economic evaluation of DMPs.

  13. Analyses of the ``allowed'' inversion barriers of H2O and NH3: Incompleteness of the Woodward-Hoffmann HOMO-LUMO symmetry ideas due to neglect of molecular orbital terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, C.; Jarvie, J.; Bartleson, J.

    1986-06-01

    Walsh's rules correctly attribute the ``bent'' structures of H2O and NH3 to the occupation of the 1πz→3a1 HOMO not occupied in linear BeH2 and planar BH3. In Walsh's molecular orbital (MO) diagram E(3a1) decreases sharply with bending angle S. This has always been attributed incorrectly to changes in the 3a1 MO, mainly due to symmetry-allowed mixing with the LUMO, 4a*1. The forbidden bending of BeH2 and BH3 has been similarly ``explained.'' Using large-basis-set self-consistent field molecular orbital (SCF MO) ψs, we show that the integral Hellmann-Feynman theorem ΔEIHF≂ΔESCF much better than does the analogous second-order perturbation theory λE''(SE'=0 and λ=S2/2, ΔH≂SH'+λH''). ΔEIHF=++ΔNR≂Σni2Δ EIHFi+ΔNR, Δψ˜=(ψ/η)-ψ0, η=, ΔEIHFi=+, Δφ˜i=(φi/ηi)-φ0i, ηi=, ΔNA=ΔH-ΔNR. Both theories show a large negative term and small z> HOMO-UMO mixing term, which is positive in ΔEIHF. The HOMO-LUMO mixing term is small even when 3σ*g is optimized for the excited state. The ΔEIHFis and λE`is give the usual Walsh diagrams for bending of H2O and NH3, with or without MO partitioning of the nuclear repulsion change (ΔNR). However ``decoupling'' of the φ'is in ψ' makes the λE`is unreliable. The term acts to create a large allowed barrier to inversion for H2O and CH4, but a strong ΔNR nearly destroys an otherwise large barrier for NH3. acts to bend the linear H2O, planar NH3, and planar CH4, with HOMO-LUMO mixing being ``antibending.'' We show that understanding of MO correlation diagrams demands consideration of the ``static'' terms as well as the OMO-UMO mixing terms, which has not been appreciated by earlier workers so far as we are aware.

  14. MALDI-TOF-MS Platform for Integrated Proteomic and Peptidomic Profiling of Milk Samples Allows Rapid Detection of Food Adulterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Mauro; Arena, Simona; Scaloni, Andrea

    2015-07-15

    Adulteration of ovine, caprine, and buffalo milks with more common bovine material occurs for economic reasons and seasonal availability. Frauds are also associated with the use of powdered milk instead of declared, fresh material. In this context, various analytical methods have been adapted to dairy science applications with the aim to evaluate adulteration of milk samples, although time-consuming, suitable only for speciation or thermal treatment analysis, or useful for a specific fraud type. An integrated MALDI-TOF-MS platform for the combined peptidomic and proteomic profiling of milk samples is here presented, which allows rapid detection of illegal adulterations due to the addition of either nondeclared bovine material to water buffalo, goat, and ovine milks or of powdered bovine milk to the fresh counterpart. Peptide and protein markers of each animal milk were identified after direct analysis of a large number of diluted skimmed and/or enriched diluted skimmed filtrate samples. In parallel, markers of thermal treatment were characterized in different types of commercial milks. Principal components scores of ad hoc prepared species- or thermal treatment-associated adulterated milk samples were subjected to partial least-squares regression, permitting a fast accurate estimate of the fraud extents in test samples at either protein and peptide level. With respect to previous reports on MALDI-TOF-MS protein profiling methodologies for milk speciation, this study extends that approach to the analysis of the thermal treatment and introduces an independent, complementary peptide profiling measurement, which integrates protein data with additional information on peptides, validating final results and ultimately broadening the method applicability.

  15. Integration of sustainable consumption education in the Malaysian School Curriculum: Opportunities and barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Yuek-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been identified that gaps exist in education for sustainable development (ESD in the Malaysian curriculum, and specifically in Education for Sustainable Consumption (ESC. There is a general lack of cohesiveness and intent although numerous aspects of education for sustainable consumption are present in the curriculum. On the conceptual level, the understanding of the vision of sustainable consumption based on sustainable human development is often vague or lacking. The opportunity to incorporate ESC in the curriculum could be realised in the impending curriculum review of the Malaysian secondary school curriculum. In 2011 Malaysia implemented the new Malaysian Standard Curriculum for Primary Schools and is now into its fifth year running. It will complete its first run by 2016 and will transition into the new Standard Curriculum for Secondary Schools that will be implemented in 2017. This curriculum revamp provides the opportunity for ESC content to be formally incorporated in the new Standard Curriculum for Secondary Schools. A study was carried out to determine the need and viability for the integration of sustainable consumption education in the Malaysian curriculum. The output from this study could inform the impending curriculum review for the inclusion of ESC content and materials in the new curriculum in 2017. A survey was carried out to identify opportunities and barriers towards this effort. The objective of this survey was to determine the barriers and enabling factors in the integration of Education for Sustainable Consumption (ESC in learning and teaching among teachers. Preliminary findings showed that teachers are enthusiastic about integrating ESC in their learning and teaching, but lack formal training. The availability of trained teachers and administrative support system are also possible barriers to the implementation of the ESC curriculum. It is recommended that ESC content, stressing on desired behaviors towards

  16. The Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Toxin Perturbs the Barrier Function in Caco-2 Epithelial Cell Monolayers by Altering Junctional Integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Young-Keun; Vikström, Elena; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Vécsey-Semjén, Beatrix; Colque-Navarro, Patricia; Möllby, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Increased microvascular permeability is a hallmark of sepsis and septic shock. Intestinal mucosal dysfunction may allow translocation of bacteria and their products, thereby promoting sepsis and inflammation. Although Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin significantly contributes to sepsis and perturbs the endothelial barrier function, little is known about possible effects of S. aureus alpha-toxin on human epithelial barrier functions. We hypothesize that S. aureus alpha-toxin in the blood can ...

  17. Exploring the Main Barriers of Technology Integration in the English Language Teaching Classroom: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouholllah Khodabandelou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of technology in recent years has contributed to development in the societies, industries, and education. It is proven from the current trend of technology such as the emergence and rise of smart phones, tablets, laptops and wireless internet connection that the present and future world will be heralded by technology. The integration of technology into the teaching and learning process is idealistic with the existence of vast information and multimedia on the internet and innovative inventions of devices that serve as great assistance. However, the available technology has not been put to good use in the English language teaching and learning classroom for some reasons, especially in developing countries like Malaysia. Thus, this research is conducted to determine the hindrances faced by the education community in Malaysia. The current qualitative research involved seven individuals who discussed issues relating to the hindrances of technology integration in English language teaching and learning. This paper presents the results of the discussion and provides suggestions on some possible solutions to the identified obstacles faced by the education community in using technology in a more efficient and resourceful manner for the teaching and learning development.Keywords: TESL, barriers, technology, integration, higher education

  18. Permeability of ergot alkaloids across the blood-brain barrier in vitro and influence on the barrier integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Mulac, Dennis; Hüwel, Sabine; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Scope Ergot alkaloids are secondary metabolites of Claviceps spp. and they have been in the focus of research for many years. Experiments focusing on ergotamine as a former migraine drug referring to the ability to reach the brain revealed controversial results. The question to which extent ergot alkaloids are able to cross the blood-brain barrier is still not answered. Methods and results In order to answer this question we have studied the ability of ergot alkaloids to penetrate the blood-b...

  19. Barriers to, Efforts in, and Optimization of Integrated One Health Surveillance: A Review and Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchtmann, Nathaniel; Herrmann, John Arthur; Hahn, Edwin C; Beasley, Val Richard

    2015-06-01

    Insufficient data from existing surveillance systems underlie societal tolerance of acute and slow-onset health disasters that threaten, harm, and kill vast numbers of humans, animals, and plants. Here we describe barriers to integrated "One Health" surveillance, including those related to a lack of medical services, professional divisions, incompatible vocabularies, isolated data sets, and territorial borders. We draw from publications of experts who justify broader and more integrated surveillance, education, and stewardship focused on preventing and mitigating disease emergence and re-emergence. In addition, we highlight efforts from Illinois, the United States and the broader world, pointing to examples of relevant education; ways to acquire, compile, and analyze diagnostic and syndromic data; mapping of diseases of humans and animals; and rapid communication of findings and recommendations. For the future, we propose using needed outcomes for health and sustainability to set priorities for One Health programs of education, surveillance, and stewardship. Professionals and paraprofessionals should gather, interpret, and widely communicate the implications of data, not only on infectious diseases, but also on toxic agents, malnutrition, ecological damage, the grave impacts of warfare, societal drivers underlying these problems, and the effectiveness of specific countermeasures. PMID:25894955

  20. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells support blood-brain barrier integrity via TGF-β signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hae Seo

    Full Text Available Trophic coupling between cerebral endothelium and their neighboring cells is required for the development and maintenance of blood-brain barrier (BBB function. Here we report that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs secrete soluble factor TGF-β1 to support BBB integrity. Firstly, we prepared conditioned media from OPC cultures and added them to cerebral endothelial cultures. Our pharmacological experiments showed that OPC-conditioned media increased expressions of tight-junction proteins and decreased in vitro BBB permeability by activating TGB-β-receptor-MEK/ERK signaling pathway. Secondly, our immuno-electron microscopic observation revealed that in neonatal mouse brains, OPCs attach to cerebral endothelial cells via basal lamina. And finally, we developed a novel transgenic mouse line that TGF-β1 is knocked down specifically in OPCs. Neonates of these OPC-specific TGF-β1 deficient mice (OPC-specific TGF-β1 partial KO mice: PdgfraCre/Tgfb1flox/wt mice or OPC-specific TGF-β1 total KO mice: PdgfraCre/Tgfb1flox/flox mice exhibited cerebral hemorrhage and loss of BBB function. Taken together, our current study demonstrates that OPCs increase BBB tightness by upregulating tight junction proteins via TGF-β signaling. Although astrocytes and pericytes are well-known regulators of BBB maturation and maintenance, these findings indicate that OPCs also play a pivotal role in promoting BBB integrity.

  1. Short communication: Differential loss of bovine mammary epithelial barrier integrity in response to lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellnitz, Olga; Zbinden, Christina; Huang, Xiao; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2016-06-01

    In the mammary gland, the blood-milk barrier prevents an uncontrolled intermixture of blood and milk constituents and hence maintains the osmotic gradient to draw water into the mammary secretion. During mastitis, the permeability of the blood-milk barrier is increased, which is reflected by the transfer of blood constituents into milk and vice versa. In this study, we aimed to investigate changes in the barrier function of mammary epithelial cells in vitro as induced by cell wall components of different pathogens. Primary bovine mammary epithelial cells from 3 different cows were grown separately on Transwell (Corning Inc., Corning, NY) inserts. The formation of tight junctions between adjacent epithelial cells was shown by transmission electron microscopy and by immunofluorescence staining of the tight junction protein zona occludens-1. The integrity of the epithelial barrier was assayed by means of transepithelial electrical resistance, as well as by diffusion of the fluorophore Lucifer yellow across the cell layer. The release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was used as an indicator for cytotoxic effects. In response to a 24-h challenge with bacterial endotoxin, barrier integrity was reduced after 3 or 7h, respectively, in response to 0.5mg/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli or 20mg/mL lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus. No paracellular leakage was observed in response to 0.2mg/mL LPS or 2mg/mL LTA. Although LPS and LTA affected barrier permeability, most likely by opening the tight junctions, only LPS caused cell damage, reflected by increased LDH concentrations in cell culture medium. These results prove a pathogen-specific loss of blood-milk barrier integrity during mastitis, which is characterized by tight junction opening by both LPS and LTA and by additional epithelial cell destruction through LPS. PMID:27060811

  2. Integrating Computing across the Curriculum: The Impact of Internal Barriers and Training Intensity on Computer Integration in the Elementary School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, LaToya O.; Gibson, Philip; Cotten, Shelia R.; Howell-Moroney, Michael; Stringer, Kristi

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between internal barriers, professional development, and computer integration outcomes among a sample of fourth- and fifth-grade teachers in an urban, low-income school district in the Southeastern United States. Specifically, we examine the impact of teachers' computer attitudes, computer anxiety, and computer…

  3. Breakdown of Epithelial Barrier Integrity and Overdrive Activation of Alveolar Epithelial Cells in the Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Lung Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shigehisa Yanagi; Hironobu Tsubouchi; Ayako Miura; Nobuhiro Matsumoto; Masamitsu Nakazato

    2015-01-01

    Individual alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) collaboratively form a tight barrier between atmosphere and fluid-filled tissue to enable normal gas exchange. The tight junctions of AECs provide intercellular sealing and are integral to the maintenance of the AEC barrier integrity. Disruption and failure of reconstitution of AEC barrier result in catastrophic consequences, leading to alveolar flooding and subsequent devastating fibrotic scarring. Recent evidences reveal that many of the fibrotic ...

  4. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed.

  5. Integrating ground-penetrating radar and borehole data from a Wadden Sea barrier island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars; Møller, I.; Nielsen, L. H.;

    2009-01-01

    Sea level rise may have large implications for low-gradient barrier coastal systems. This problem motivated an integrated ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and sedimentological study of the Rømø Wadden Sea barrier island. Crossing W-E and N-S-oriented 100 MHz GPR reflection profiles with a total...... signals varies between 7 and 15 m in the interior of the island where the shallow subsurface is not influenced by saltwater intrusion or fine-grained salt marsh sediments. Analysis of common midpoint reflection data constrains the radar wave velocity distribution in the subsurface and facilitates depth...

  6. Three integrated photovoltaic/sound barrier power plants. Construction and operational experience; Drei integrierte PV-Schallschutz Versuchsfelder. Bau und Erprobung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordmann, T.; Froelich, A.; Clavadetscher, L.

    2002-07-01

    After an international ideas competition by TNC Switzerland and Germany in 1996, six companies where given the opportunity to construct a prototype of their newly developed integrated PV-sound barrier concepts. The main goal was to develop highly integrated concepts, allowing the reduction of PV sound barrier systems costs, as well as the demonstration of specific concepts for different noise situations. This project is strongly correlated with a German project. Three of the concepts of the competition are demonstrated along a highway near Munich, constructed in 1997. The three Swiss installations had to be constructed at different locations, reflecting three typical situations for sound barriers. The first Swiss installation was the world first Bi-facial PV-sound barrier. It was built on a highway bridge at Wallisellen-Aubrugg in 1997. The operational experience of the installation is positive. But due to the different efficiencies of the two cell sides, its specific yield lies somewhat behind a conventional PV installation. The second Swiss plant was finished in autumn 1998. The 'zig-zag' construction is situated along the railway line at Wallisellen in a densely inhabited area with some local shadowing. Its performance and its specific yield is comparatively low due to a combination of several reasons (geometry of the concept, inverter, high module temperature, local shadows). The third installation was constructed along the motor way A1 at Bruettisellen in 1999. Its vertical panels are equipped with amorphous modules. The report show, that the performance of the system is reasonable, but the mechanical construction has to be improved. A small trial field with cells directly laminated onto the steel panel, also installed at Bruettisellen, could be the key development for this concept. This final report includes the evaluation and comparison of the monitored data in the past 24 months of operation. (author)

  7. Eradicating Barriers to Mental Health Care Through Integrated Service Models: Contemporary Perspectives for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Horace; Alexander, Vinette

    2016-06-01

    There has been renewed, global interest in developing new and transformative models of facilitating access to high-quality, cost-effective, and individually-centered health care for severe mentally-ill (SMI) persons of diverse racial/ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. However, in our present-day health-service delivery systems, scholars have identified layers of barriers to widespread dispersal of well-needed mental health care both nationally and internationally. It is crucial that contemporary models directed at eradicating barriers to mental health services are interdisciplinary in context, design, scope, sequence, and best-practice standards. Contextually, nurses are well-positioned to influence the incorporation and integration of new concepts into operationally interdisciplinary, evidence-based care models with measurable outcomes. The aim of this concept paper is to use the available evidence to contextually explicate how the blended roles of psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing can be influential in eradicating barriers to care and services for SMI persons through the integrated principles of collaboration, integration and service expansion across health, socioeconomic, and community systems. A large body of literature proposes that any best-practice standards aimed at eliminating barriers to the health care needs of SMI persons require systematic, well-coordinated interdisciplinary partnerships through evidence-based, high-quality, person-centered, and outcome-driven processes. Transforming the conceptual models of collaboration, integration and service expansion could be revolutionary in how care and services are coordinated and dispersed to populations across disadvantaged communities. Building on their longstanding commitment to individual and community care approaches, and their pivotal roles in research, education, leadership, practice, and legislative processes; PMH nurses are well-positioned to be both influential and instrumental in

  8. Melatonin Preserves Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and Permeability via Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himakarnika Alluri

    Full Text Available Microvascular hyperpermeability that occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB often leads to vasogenic brain edema and elevated intracranial pressure following traumatic brain injury (TBI. At a cellular level, tight junction proteins (TJPs between neighboring endothelial cells maintain the integrity of the BBB via TJ associated proteins particularly, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1 that binds to the transmembrane TJPs and actin cytoskeleton intracellularly. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β as well as the proteolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 are key mediators of trauma-associated brain edema. Recent studies indicate that melatonin a pineal hormone directly binds to MMP-9 and also might act as its endogenous inhibitor. We hypothesized that melatonin treatment will provide protection against TBI-induced BBB hyperpermeability via MMP-9 inhibition. Rat brain microvascular endothelial cells grown as monolayers were used as an in vitro model of the BBB and a mouse model of TBI using a controlled cortical impactor was used for all in vivo studies. IL-1β (10 ng/mL; 2 hours-induced endothelial monolayer hyperpermeability was significantly attenuated by melatonin (10 μg/mL; 1 hour, GM6001 (broad spectrum MMP inhibitor; 10 μM; 1 hour, MMP-9 inhibitor-1 (MMP-9 specific inhibitor; 5 nM; 1 hour or MMP-9 siRNA transfection (48 hours in vitro. Melatonin and MMP-9 inhibitor-1 pretreatment attenuated IL-1β-induced MMP-9 activity, loss of ZO-1 junctional integrity and f-actin stress fiber formation. IL-1β treatment neither affected ZO-1 protein or mRNA expression or cell viability. Acute melatonin treatment attenuated BBB hyperpermeability in a mouse controlled cortical impact model of TBI in vivo. In conclusion, one of the protective effects of melatonin against BBB hyperpermeability occurs due to enhanced BBB integrity via MMP-9 inhibition. In addition, acute melatonin treatment provides protection against BBB

  9. New integrative computational approaches unveil the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pheno-metabolomic fermentative profile and allow strain selection for winemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Duarte, Ricardo; Umek, Lan; Mendes, Inês; Castro, Cristiana C; Fonseca, Nuno; Martins, Rosa; Silva-Ferreira, António C; Sampaio, Paula; Pais, Célia; Schuller, Dorit

    2016-11-15

    During must fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains thousands of volatile aroma compounds are formed. The objective of the present work was to adapt computational approaches to analyze pheno-metabolomic diversity of a S. cerevisiae strain collection with different origins. Phenotypic and genetic characterization together with individual must fermentations were performed, and metabolites relevant to aromatic profiles were determined. Experimental results were projected onto a common coordinates system, revealing 17 statistical-relevant multi-dimensional modules, combining sets of most-correlated features of noteworthy biological importance. The present method allowed, as a breakthrough, to combine genetic, phenotypic and metabolomic data, which has not been possible so far due to difficulties in comparing different types of data. Therefore, the proposed computational approach revealed as successful to shed light into the holistic characterization of S. cerevisiae pheno-metabolome in must fermentative conditions. This will allow the identification of combined relevant features with application in selection of good winemaking strains. PMID:27283661

  10. Integrating Barriers to Caucasian Lesbians' Career Development and Super's Life-Span, Life-Space Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Chloe J. C.

    2004-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners do not fully understand the nature and extent of actual and perceived barriers in lesbians' career development (S. L. Morrow, P. A. Gore, & B. W. Campbell, 1996). In this study, 10 lesbian women, ages 42 to 64 years, were interviewed and asked to identify barriers to career development due to sexual identity.…

  11. Mobile Devices and the Teacher Perceived Barriers Impacting Effective Integration in the K-5 Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Tina S.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, phenomenological study explored the teacher perceived barriers of using mobile devices in the K-5 classroom. Research confirms teachers face various types of variables and become reluctant to use technology within their curriculum driven lessons. This study sought to understand what teachers perceive as barriers, and how the…

  12. Hydrogen sulfide improves colonic barrier integrity in DSS-induced inflammation in Caco-2 cells and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyu; Yan, Rui; Zhou, Xiaogang; Ji, Fang; Zhang, Bing

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal barrier involves in the pathogeny of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to improve intestinal barrier integrity. Thus, this study investigated the effects of GYY4137, a slow-release H2S donor, on DSS-induced inflammation and intestinal dysfunction. In vitro model, cellular permeability was significantly increased and expression of tight junctions (ZO-1, Cauldin4, and Occludin) was downregulated in Caco-2 cells. GYY4137 treatment markedly attenuated DSS-induced inflammation and barrier dysfunction. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS)-siRNA transfection further demonstrated that endogenous H2S system involves in DSS-induced inflammation and mediates barrier function. In vivo model, DSS exposure caused colonic inflammation and injury in mice and GYY4137 injection alleviated inflammatory response and improved intestinal barrier via reducing intestinal permeability and upregulating of tight junctions. In conclusion, endogenous H2S system involves in DSS-induced inflammation and H2S addition alleviated inflammation and intestinal dysfunction in vitro and in vivo.

  13. CHILD ALLOWANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    HR Division wishes to clarify to members of the personnel that the allowance for a dependent child continues to be paid during all training courses ('stages'), apprenticeships, 'contrats de qualification', sandwich courses or other courses of similar nature. Any payment received for these training courses, including apprenticeships, is however deducted from the amount reimbursable as school fees. HR Division would also like to draw the attention of members of the personnel to the fact that any contract of employment will lead to the suppression of the child allowance and of the right to reimbursement of school fees.

  14. A Review of Barriers to and Opportunities for the Integration of Renewable Energy in the Southeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Ben W [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to prepare a summary report that examines the opportunities for and obstacles to the integration of renewable energy resources in the Southeast between now and the year 2030. The report, which is based on a review of existing literature regarding renewable resources in the Southeast, includes the following renewable energy resources: wind, solar, hydro, geothermal, biomass, and tidal. The evaluation was conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Energy Foundation and is a subjective review with limited detailed analysis. However, the report offers a best estimate of the magnitude, time frame, and cost of deployment of renewable resources in the Southeast based upon the literature reviewed and reasonable engineering and economic estimates. For the purposes of this report, the Southeast is defined as the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. In addition, some aspects of the report (wind and geothermal) also consider the extended Southeast, which includes Maryland, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. A description of the existing base of renewable electricity installations in the region is given for each technology considered. Where available, the possible barriers and other considerations regarding renewable energy resources are listed in terms of availability, investment and maintenance costs, reliability, installation requirements, policies, and energy market. As stated above, the report is a comprehensive review of renewable energy resources in the southeastern region of United States based on a literature study that included information obtained from the Southern Bio-Power wiki, sources from the Energy Foundation, sources available to ORNL, and sources found during the review. The report consists of an executive summary, this introductory chapter describing report objectives, a chapter on analysis methods and

  15. Identifying the barriers to conducting outcomes research in integrative health care clinic settings - a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Findlay-Reece Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrative health care (IHC is an interdisciplinary blending of conventional medicine and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM with the purpose of enhancing patients' health. In 2006, we designed a study to assess outcomes that are relevant to people using such care. However, we faced major challenges in conducting this study and hypothesized that this might be due to the lack of a research climate in these clinics. To investigate these challenges, we initiated a further study in 2008, to explore the reasons why IHC clinics are not conducting outcomes research and to identify strategies for conducting successful in-house outcomes research programs. The results of the latter study are reported here. Methods A total of 25 qualitative interviews were conducted with key participants from 19 IHC clinics across Canada. Basic content analysis was used to identify key themes from the transcribed interviews. Results Barriers identified by participants fell into four categories: organizational culture, organizational resources, organizational environment and logistical challenges. Cultural challenges relate to the philosophy of IHC, organizational leadership and practitioner attitudes and beliefs. Participants also identified significant issues relating to their organization's lack of resources such as funding, compensation, infrastructure and partnerships/linkages. Environmental challenges such as the nature of a clinic's patient population and logistical issues such as the actual implementation of a research program and the applicability of research data also posed challenges to the conduct of research. Embedded research leadership, integration of personal and professional values about research, alignment of research activities and clinical workflow processes are some of the factors identified by participants that support IHC clinics' ability to conduct outcomes research. Conclusions Assessing and enhancing the broader

  16. Overcoming Barriers to Family Planning through Integration: Perspectives of HIV-Positive Men in Nyanza Province, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Steinfeld

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored barriers to and facilitators of using family planning services among HIV-positive men in Nyanza Province, Kenya. From May to June 2010, in-depth interviews were conducted with 30 men receiving care at 15 HIV clinics. The key barriers to the use of family planning included concerns about side effects of contraceptives, lack of knowledge about contraceptive methods, myths and misconceptions including fear of infertility, structural barriers such as staffing shortages at HIV clinics, and a lack of male focus in family planning methods and service delivery. The integration of family planning into HIV clinics including family planning counseling and education was cited as an important strategy to improve family planning receptivity among men. Integrating family planning into HIV services is a promising strategy to facilitate male involvement in family planning. Integration needs to be rigorously evaluated in order to measure its impact on unmet need for contraception among HIV-positive women and their partners and assure that it is implemented in a manner that engages both men and women.

  17. Barriers and potential solutions for Critical Zone data integration between environmental genomics and the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, E. L.; Meyer, F.; Packman, A. I.; Mayorga, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's permeable near-surface layer from bedrock to canopy is referred to as the Critical Zone (CZ). Integration of bio- and geoscience data is critical for understanding physical, biological and chemical interactions in the CZ. Genomic and meta-genomic scientists study organisms both in laboratory settings and in the environment, in order to understand the interactions of organisms with the environment. Geoscientists are using environmental data to describe and model dynamics of physical and chemical properties. Yet, there is no agreed upon method for integrating genomic and environmental data to address interactions of living and non-living components of the CZ. There are standards for data interchange being developed in the geosciences and genomics sciences, via standards organization such as the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), as well as by research communities in biogeochemistry, hydrology, climatology, and other fields. These are in parallel to, but typically not in coordination with the standards the Genomics Standards Consortium (GSC) is developing for genomics. In addition, efforts are being made to allow for intercompatability of these CZ data with data generated by NEON, Inc. The interoperability of these types of data is limited with current software and cyberinfrastructure. A group of CZ geoscientists, environmental genomic scientists and cyberinfrastructure scientists are coming together to develop a set of common data collection and integration methods and sets of common standards. The data generated by this effort across multiple CZ sites (including the US CZ Observatories, or CZOs) around the world, along with NEON facility data, will be used to test EarthCube (an NSF initiative to develop cyberinfrastructure for the geosciences) cyberinfrastructure, with the goal of bridging this gap in standards and interoperability. Potential solutions to these issues of interoperability will be presented, and a way forward will be described.

  18. Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt: an integration of current knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    This document represents a compilation of data and interpretive studies conducted as part of the engineered barriers program of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The overall objective of these studies is to provide information on barrier system designs, emplacement and isolation techniques, and chemical reactions expected in a nuclear waste repository located in the basalts underlying the Hanford Site within the state of Washington. Backfills, waste-basalt interactions, sorption, borehole plugging, etc., are among the topics discussed.

  19. Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt: an integration of current knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document represents a compilation of data and interpretive studies conducted as part of the engineered barriers program of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The overall objective of these studies is to provide information on barrier system designs, emplacement and isolation techniques, and chemical reactions expected in a nuclear waste repository located in the basalts underlying the Hanford Site within the state of Washington. Backfills, waste-basalt interactions, sorption, borehole plugging, etc., are among the topics discussed

  20. Barriers to Integration of Traditional and Complementary Medicine in Supportive Cancer Care of Arab Patients in Northern Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Ben-Arye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, an Integrative Oncology Program (IOP, aiming to improve patients’ quality of life during chemotherapy and advanced cancer, was launched within the Clalit Health Organization's oncology service at the Lin Medical Center, Haifa, Israel. The IOP clinical activity is documented using a research-based registry protocol. In this study, we present an analysis of the registry protocol of 15 Arab patients with cancer who were referred to the IOP. Analysis of patients’ reported outcomes using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale suggests that integrative medicine care improves fatigue (=0.024, nausea (=0.043, depression (=0.012, anxiety (=0.044, appetite (=0.012, and general well-being (=0.031. Barriers to integration of traditional and complementary medicine in supportive care of Arab patients are discussed followed by six practical recommendations aimed at improving accessibility of patients to integrative supportive care, as well as compliance with treatments.

  1. Aids to Overcome Architectural Barriers: Normatives, Contributions and Concessions:Government contribution in removing physical barriers to improve integration of people with impaired mobility—ltalian case%Aids to Overcome Architectural Barriers:Normatives,Contributions and Concessions:Government contribution in removing physical barriers to improve integration of people with impaired mobility—ltalian case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elisabetta Turina; Carlo Belletti

    2011-01-01

    In previous articles we described how the Italian system of aid for people with disabilities also provides a system of incentives and subsidies for devices that are very useful,in addition to the provision of aids that are granted free of charge as required under an individual rehabilitation plan.We have also seen as aids for overcoming architectural barriers are (rightly!) in the first place among those who are essential for people with disabilities to lead an independent life and to be able to access public and private places,in particular workplaces.Without removing of architectural barriers it is impossible to achieve many of the rights decreed by the Italian law n.104 and n.68 (work integration of disabled people).Here you can find the incentives provided by Italian law and the features of the two most common systems:stairlifts and platform lifts.

  2. AN ACTIVITY THEORY APPROACH TO STUDY BARRIERS OF FACULTY REGARDING TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro Guzman, Willy

    2016-01-01

    for a reconceptualization in the study of barriers arguing that the teaching process is a complex and dynamic activity that needs to be examined from a collective perspective. Cultural-Historical Activity Theory is the theoretical framework used in the study. It concludes with the necessity of overcoming the existing......Information and communication technologies are instruments for supporting new ways of teaching and learning. Nevertheless, its impact concerning scope has not reached the expected level. This strain between benefits and impact has been inquired from the perspective of barriers of teachers to use...

  3. Barriers to and enablers for European rail freight transport for integrated door-to-door logistics service. Part 1: Barriers to multimodal rail freight transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Md Zahurul ISLAM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to examine and identify barriers to and enablers for the European rail freight transport services as a transport chain partner along the supply chains in the changing market scenario. The changing market scenario includes, among others, requiring 'door-to-door' rather than 'terminal to terminal' and integrated service, competitive ability to attract non-rail cargo type, changes in the customer requirements (e.g. reliable service and changes in the operational requirements and practices. Using a literature review method, the paper is presented in two parts. The part 1 focuses on the identification of barriers to the European rail freight service by reviewing freight logistics services for global supply chains followed by the current performance of European rail freight transport followed by a discussion on the rail freight market liberalisation in Europe. Then rail freight transport in the Unites States (U.S. is discussed. The research notes that although the background, scope and necessity for reform measures in Europe differ from those of the U.S., some lessons can be learned and the main lesson is that an appropriate reform measure can enhance rail sector competitive ability in Europe. Examining and identifying the barriers in the part 1 (with the pan-Pacific examples of rail freight transports, the part 2 of the paper focuses on recommending clear actions and steps as enablers for the rail freight industry in general and operators in particular. The research in part 1 of the paper finds that: •\tIn many European countries, the rail freight market is not fully liberalised. In such market segment, infrastructure managers do act independently for incumbents and new entrant operators that hamper the progress of building a competitive market; •\tThe rail operators have not yet achieved the service quality (e.g. customer tailored service needed for the modern supply chains; •\tThey operate

  4. Assessing barriers and facilitators of implementing an integrated HIV prevention and property rights program in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tiffany; Zwicker, Lindsey; Kwena, Zachary; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Mwaura-Muiru, Esther; Dworkin, Shari L

    2013-04-01

    Despite the recognized need for structural HIV prevention interventions, few scientific programs have integrated women's property and inheritance rights with HIV prevention and treatment. The current study focused on a community-led land and property rights intervention that was implemented in two rural areas of Western Kenya with high HIV prevalence rates (24-30%). The program was designed to respond to women's property rights violations in order to reduce HIV risk at the local level. Through in-depth interviews with twenty program leaders, we identified several facilitators to program implementation, including the leadership of home-based HIV caregivers and involvement of traditional leaders in mediating property rights disputes. We also identified the voluntary basis of the intervention and its lack of integration with the formal justice system as implementation barriers. Our findings can guide future research and design of structural HIV prevention strategies that integrate women's economic empowerment through property and inheritance rights.

  5. Barriers Teachers Face in Integrating ICT during English Lessons: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Kumutha; Yamat, Hamidah

    2014-01-01

    The government has assured all Malaysians that no one; both in rural and urban areas; would be deprived of the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) development. This calls for a need for teachers nationwide to make necessary adjustments to the teaching and learning process. This paper takes a closer look at the barriers faced by teachers…

  6. Teacher-Perceived Barriers to Integrating Instructional Technology in a Bermuda Senior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry-Young, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to identify, classify, and interpret, through the lived experiences of teachers, the subjective barriers to the use of new communications technology in the classroom. Three questions guided this study: (a) What in the teacher's experience prevented him or her in the adoption and active use…

  7. Software Based Barriers To Integration Of Renewables To The Future Distribution Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Emma; Kiliccote, Sila

    2014-06-01

    The future distribution grid has complex analysis needs, which may not be met with the existing processes and tools. In addition there is a growing number of measured and grid model data sources becoming available. For these sources to be useful they must be accurate, and interpreted correctly. Data accuracy is a key barrier to the growth of the future distribution grid. A key goal for California, and the United States, is increasing the renewable penetration on the distribution grid. To increase this penetration measured and modeled representations of generation must be accurate and validated, giving distribution planners and operators confidence in their performance. This study will review the current state of these software and modeling barriers and opportunities for the future distribution grid.

  8. Integrity of the alveolar-capillary barrier and alveolar surfactant system in smokers.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmekel, B; Bos, J.A.; A. R. Khan; Wohlfart, B; Lachmann, B.; Wollmer, P.

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier to technetium-99m labelled diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (99mTc DTPA) is known to be greatly increased in smokers, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Abnormal permeability of the alveolar epithelium as well as impaired surfactant function has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to examine transudation of urea and albumin into the alveoli and alveolar surfactant function in smokers and non-smokers and to...

  9. Barriers and challenges in integration of anthroposophic medicine in supportive breast cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Schiff, Elad; Levy, Moti; Raz, Orit Gressel; Barak, Yael; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, more and more oncology centers are challenged with complementary medicine (CM) integration within supportive breast cancer care. Quality of life (QOL) improvement and attenuation of oncology treatment side effects are the core objectives of integrative CM programs in cancer care. Yet, limited research is available on the use of specific CM modalities in an integrative setting and on cancer patients’ compliance with CM consultation. Studies are especially warranted to view ...

  10. Development of an Integrated Natural Barrier Database System for Site Evaluation of a Deep Geologic Repository in Korea - 13527

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea Radioactive-waste Management Corporation (KRMC) established in 2009 has started a new project to collect information on long-term stability of deep geological environments on the Korean Peninsula. The information has been built up in the integrated natural barrier database system available on web (www.deepgeodisposal.kr). The database system also includes socially and economically important information, such as land use, mining area, natural conservation area, population density, and industrial complex, because some of this information is used as exclusionary criteria during the site selection process for a deep geological repository for safe and secure containment and isolation of spent nuclear fuel and other long-lived radioactive waste in Korea. Although the official site selection process has not been started yet in Korea, current integrated natural barrier database system and socio-economic database is believed that the database system will be effectively utilized to narrow down the number of sites where future investigation is most promising in the site selection process for a deep geological repository and to enhance public acceptance by providing readily-available relevant scientific information on deep geological environments in Korea. (authors)

  11. Barriers to integration of behavioral and social sciences in the general medicine curriculum and recommended strategies to overcome them: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    TABATABAEI, ZAHRA; YAZDANI, SHAHRAM; SADEGHI, RAMIN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The integration of behavioral and social sciences (BSS) into the curriculum of medical students in order to equip them with the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes is an essential issue, emphasized in many researches. Our aim is to investigate the barriers to integrate BSS into the general medicine curriculum as well as the recommended strategies to overcome such barriers through a systematic review of literature. Methods PubMed, ERIC, Scopus, CINAHL, Google Scholar, and OPENGREY were searched for studies on the barriers to integration of BSS into the general medicine curriculum as well as the strategies employed to overcome them until August 28, 2015. Results Sixteen relevant studies were included and the related domains were categorized as barriers and some strategies were recommended to overcome them. In addition, the quality of the included studies was assessed. Conclusion Despite the prominent role of BSS in the effectiveness of health care, these sciences have not been included in the curriculum of medical students effectively. The identified barriers and the strategies used to overcome them should be considered for all integration programs. Future studies should focus on the process of BSS integration in the medical curricula and should evaluate the efficacy of this integration in more detail. PMID:27382578

  12. Barriers to Implementing Treatment Integrity Procedures in School Psychology Research: Survey of Treatment Outcome Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity data are essential to drawing valid conclusions in treatment outcome studies. Such data, however, are not always included in peer-reviewed research articles in school psychology or related fields. To gain a better understanding of why treatment integrity data are lacking in the school psychology research, we surveyed the…

  13. Barriers, Support, and Collaboration: A Comparison of Science and Agriculture Teachers' Perceptions regarding Integration of Science into the Agricultural Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, Brian K.; Thompson, Gregory W.

    2007-01-01

    This study is part of a larger investigation which focused on determining and comparing the perceptions of agriculture teachers and science teachers on integrating science into agricultural education programs. Science and agriculture teachers' perceptions of barriers to integrating science, the support of stakeholders, and collaboration between…

  14. Polyploidization of glia in neural development links tissue growth to blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unhavaithaya, Yingdee; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2012-01-01

    Proper development requires coordination in growth of the cell types composing an organ. Many plant and animal cells are polyploid, but how these polyploid tissues contribute to organ growth is not well understood. We found the Drosophila melanogaster subperineurial glia (SPG) to be polyploid, and ploidy is coordinated with brain mass. Inhibition of SPG polyploidy caused rupture of the septate junctions necessary for the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the increased SPG cell size resulting from polyploidization is required to maintain the SPG envelope surrounding the growing brain. Polyploidization likely is a conserved strategy to coordinate tissue growth during organogenesis, with potential vertebrate examples.

  15. Heat stress reduces intestinal barrier integrity and favors intestinal glucose transport in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Sarah C; Mani, Venkatesh; Boddicker, Rebecca L; Johnson, Jay S; Weber, Thomas E; Ross, Jason W; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H; Gabler, Nicholas K

    2013-01-01

    Excessive heat exposure reduces intestinal integrity and post-absorptive energetics that can inhibit wellbeing and be fatal. Therefore, our objectives were to examine how acute heat stress (HS) alters intestinal integrity and metabolism in growing pigs. Animals were exposed to either thermal neutral (TN, 21°C; 35-50% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (35°C; 24-43% humidity; n=8) for 24 h. Compared to TN, rectal temperatures in HS pigs increased by 1.6°C and respiration rates by 2-fold (Pintestinal integrity was compromised in the HS pigs (ileum and colon TER decreased; PIntestinal permeability was accompanied by an increase in protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (PIntestinal glucose transport and blood glucose were elevated due to HS (Pintestinal integrity and increase intestinal stress and glucose transport.

  16. Optimal fiscal barriers to international economic integration in the presence of tax havens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops a model where firms can shift profits to tax havens by means of intra-firm loans and countries can protect themselves against profit shifting by taxing cross-border interest flows. The model considers two countries with a scope for welfare improving economic integration....... The first-best tax system has two important characteristics: (i) the tax rate on interest flows to the other country is zero to ensure the optimal level of economic integration; (ii) the tax rate on interest flows to tax havens is high enough to deter profit shifting to tax havens. In second......-best environments, countries face a trade-off between economic integration and protection against tax havens, which causes protection to be suboptimally low. The key to the result is that economic integration makes it easier for multinational firms to circumvent taxes on interest payments to tax havens with conduit...

  17. Breakdown of Epithelial Barrier Integrity and Overdrive Activation of Alveolar Epithelial Cells in the Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Lung Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehisa Yanagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual alveolar epithelial cells (AECs collaboratively form a tight barrier between atmosphere and fluid-filled tissue to enable normal gas exchange. The tight junctions of AECs provide intercellular sealing and are integral to the maintenance of the AEC barrier integrity. Disruption and failure of reconstitution of AEC barrier result in catastrophic consequences, leading to alveolar flooding and subsequent devastating fibrotic scarring. Recent evidences reveal that many of the fibrotic lung diseases involve AECs both as a frequent target of injury and as a driver of ongoing pathological processes. Aberrantly activated AECs express most of the growth factors and chemokines responsible for the proliferation, migration, and activation of fibroblasts. Current evidences suggest that AECs may acquire overdrive activation in the initial step of fibrosis by several mechanisms, including abnormal recapitulation of the developmental pathway, defects of the molecules essential for epithelial integrity, and acceleration of aging-related properties. Among these initial triggering events, epithelial Pten, a multiple phosphatase that negatively regulates the PI3K/Akt pathway and is crucial for lung development, is essential for the prevention of alveolar flooding and lung fibrosis through the regulation of AEC barrier integrity after injury. Reestablishment of AEC barrier integrity also involves the deployment of specialized stem/progenitor cells.

  18. Monolithic structure of integrated coaxial microhollow dielectric barrier discharges: Characterization for environmental and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Kunihide; Nakamura, Toshihiro; Motomura, Hideki

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of microhollow dielectric barrier discharge devices in a thin monolithic planar structure with many holes were analyzed regarding the production of OH radicals, using optical emission and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy techniques. Spatial distributions of OH radical density depended on the diameter of electrode holes from 0.6 to 1.5 mm and the discharge operating gas species. Apparent emission intensity from OH radicals and the LIF signals were very high in He and Ar gases but quite low in N2. However, taking into account the LIF quenching rate in each gas, the existing densities of OH radicals in all tested gases were not greatly different from each other. The absolute density of OH radicals estimated by a comparison of the LIF intensity with our measured result on a conventional He plasma jet referring to reported densities in similar situations was on the order of 1014 cm‑3.

  19. The Study of 0.34 THz Monolithically Integrated Fourth Subharmonic Mixer Using Planar Schottky Barrier Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaodong; Li, Qian; An, Ning; Wang, Wenjie; Deng, Xiaodong; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Haitao; Zeng, Jianping; Li, Zhiqiang; Tang, Hailing; Xiong, Yong-Zhong

    2015-11-01

    A planar Schottky barrier diode with the designed Schottky contact area of approximately 3 μm2 is developed on gallium arsenide (GaAs) material. The measurements of the developed planar Schottky barrier diode indicate that the zero-biased junction capacitance Cj0 is 11.0 fF, the parasitic series resistance RS is 3.0 Ω, and the cut off frequency fT is 4.8 THz. A monolithically integrated fourth subharmonic mixer with this diode operating at the radio frequency (RF) signal frequency of 0.34 THz with the chip area of 0.6 mm2 is implemented. The intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidth is from DC to 40 GHz. The local oscillator (LO) bandwidth is 37 GHz from 60 to 97 GHz. The RF bandwidth is determined by the bandwidth of the on chip antenna, which is 28 GHz from 322 to 350 GHz. The measurements of the mixer demonstrated a conversion loss of approximately 51 dB.

  20. Opportunities and Barriers related to Supply Chain Collaboration for Delivering Integrated Single-Family Home Renovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlecnik, E.; Kondratenko, I.; Haavik, T.

    2013-01-01

    Single-family home renovations often show deficiencies in project management. There might be a market addressing house owners who would prefer integrated renovation services and clear responsibilities. Companies that would respond to these client’s needs would have a clear market potential, particul

  1. Employability Skill Development in Work-Integrated Learning: Barriers and Best Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is widely considered instrumental in equipping new graduates with the required employability skills to function effectively in the work environment. Evaluation of WIL programs in enhancing skill development remains predominantly outcomes-focused with little attention to the process of what, how and from whom students…

  2. Intestinal immune barrier integrity in rats with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis and steatohepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Lin; LIU Yu-lan; WANG Jian-hua; CONG Xu; WANG Li-hong; LIU Feng; XIE Xing-wang; ZHANG Heng-hui; WANG Jiang-hua; FEI Ran

    2012-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the major cause of chronic liver injury.Intestinal barrier plays an important role in the pathogenis of NAFLD.The aim of this article was to assess intestinal immune barrier function during the development of NAFLD.Methods Totally 60 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into 2 groups:normal diet (ND) group and high-fat diet (HFD) group.NAFLD rat model was established in the HFD rat group.Portal blood endotoxin level was assessed by limulus test.The percentage of CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and lymphocytes in Peyer's patches (PP) were analysed by flow cytometry.Intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) level was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Paired Student's t test was used for the statistic analysis.Results HFD rats presented with simple steatosis at the 4th and 8th week and progressed to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis at the 12th week.Elevated lipopolysaccharides (LPS) level in HFD rats was observed at the 8th week ((1.54±0.30) times of ND group,P <0.01).CD4/CD8 ratios in PBMC and PP of HFD rats were increased at the 4th week ((1.50±0.47) and (1.63±0.34) times of ND group,P <0.05) and decreased at the 8th week ((0.50±0.16) and (0.61±0.26)times of ND group,P <0.05).At the 12th week,CD4/CD8 ratio ((1.47±0.46) times,P <0.05) in PP increased to levels observed in the 4th week.Intestinal SIgA expression of HFD rats was remarkably up-regulated at 12th week ((2.70±1.65)times,P <0.05).Conclusion Liver-gut axis in rats with NAFLD may mediate and improve intestinal immune function by increased CD4/CD8 ratio in PP and increased production of SIgA.

  3. Histamine activates p38 MAP kinase and alters local lamellipodia dynamics, reducing endothelial barrier integrity and eliciting central movement of actin fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adderley, Shaquria P; Lawrence, Curtis; Madonia, Eyong; Olubadewo, Joseph O; Breslin, Jerome W

    2015-07-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in endothelial barrier function has been debated for nearly four decades. Our previous investigation revealed spontaneous local lamellipodia in confluent endothelial monolayers that appear to increase overlap at intercellular junctions. We tested the hypothesis that the barrier-disrupting agent histamine would reduce local lamellipodia protrusions and investigated the potential involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation and actin stress fiber formation. Confluent monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) expressing green fluorescent protein-actin were studied using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The protrusion and withdrawal characteristics of local lamellipodia were assessed before and after addition of histamine. Changes in barrier function were determined using electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing. Histamine initially decreased barrier function, lamellipodia protrusion frequency, and lamellipodia protrusion distance. A longer time for lamellipodia withdrawal and reduced withdrawal distance and velocity accompanied barrier recovery. After barrier recovery, a significant number of cortical fibers migrated centrally, eventually resembling actin stress fibers. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 attenuated the histamine-induced decreases in barrier function and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. SB203580 also inhibited the histamine-induced decreases in withdrawal distance and velocity, and the subsequent actin fiber migration. These data suggest that histamine can reduce local lamellipodia protrusion activity through activation of p38 MAP kinase. The findings also suggest that local lamellipodia have a role in maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. Furthermore, we provide evidence that actin stress fiber formation may be a reaction to, rather than a cause of, reduced endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:25948734

  4. Integration Strategies and Barriers to Co-Operation in Cross-Border Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Povl Adler; Serin, Göran Folke

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of the article is to analyze strategies for cross-border integration in the Øresund Region. The point of departure is that the development of strategies for cross-border integration is dependent on the development on both the general level in the EU and deregulation of economy...... and business on the global level. In this respect, the article points out the importance of market forces and their influence on institutional change. Recent economic crises have put growth center stage at both the national and regional level, and have called for regional development programs on both...... the Swedish and Danish sides of the Sound. The strengths and weaknesses of the Øresund Region’s ‘traditional’ and new institutions as instruments for change are examined. The article identifies and discusses the structures, institutions, and players which are the driving forces in the field between markets...

  5. Exploring the Main Barriers of Technology Integration in the English Language Teaching Classroom: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rouholllah Khodabandelou; Junny Ei Mon That; Melinda Anne A/P S.Selvaraju; Tan Yan Ken; Zhu Kewen; Zhang Yan; Tan Yan Ning

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of technology in recent years has contributed to development in the societies, industries, and education. It is proven from the current trend of technology such as the emergence and rise of smart phones, tablets, laptops and wireless internet connection that the present and future world will be heralded by technology. The integration of technology into the teaching and learning process is idealistic with the existence of vast information and multimedia on the internet and innova...

  6. Opportunities and Barriers related to Supply Chain Collaboration for Delivering Integrated Single-Family Home Renovations

    OpenAIRE

    Mlecnik, E.; Kondratenko, I.; Haavik, T.

    2013-01-01

    Single-family home renovations often show deficiencies in project management. There might be a market addressing house owners who would prefer integrated renovation services and clear responsibilities. Companies that would respond to these client’s needs would have a clear market potential, particularly for ambitious energyefficient home renovations. Such enterprises could result from collaboration between different enterprises. This paper first examined the business activity and supply chain...

  7. Identifying the barriers to conducting outcomes research in integrative health care clinic settings - a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Findlay-Reece Barbara; Kania Ania; Mulkins Andrea; Verhoef Marja J; Mior Silvano

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Integrative health care (IHC) is an interdisciplinary blending of conventional medicine and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with the purpose of enhancing patients' health. In 2006, we designed a study to assess outcomes that are relevant to people using such care. However, we faced major challenges in conducting this study and hypothesized that this might be due to the lack of a research climate in these clinics. To investigate these challenges, we initiated a...

  8. Levels & Barriers to Supply Chain Integration: A conceptual model of Supply Chain Performance

    OpenAIRE

    RajaIrfan Sabir; Muhammad Irfan

    2014-01-01

    In modern business scenario Supply chain has become the back bone for every business organization. All supply chain partners are joined together in value delivery network of company that no one can perform better without support of other. The ultimate objective of this cohesive relationship is to deliver value to customers and gets desired state of customer satisfaction & loyalty for the organization. For this purpose it is necessary to integrate the internal and external partners of Supply c...

  9. Heat stress reduces intestinal barrier integrity and favors intestinal glucose transport in growing pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Pearce

    Full Text Available Excessive heat exposure reduces intestinal integrity and post-absorptive energetics that can inhibit wellbeing and be fatal. Therefore, our objectives were to examine how acute heat stress (HS alters intestinal integrity and metabolism in growing pigs. Animals were exposed to either thermal neutral (TN, 21°C; 35-50% humidity; n=8 or HS conditions (35°C; 24-43% humidity; n=8 for 24 h. Compared to TN, rectal temperatures in HS pigs increased by 1.6°C and respiration rates by 2-fold (P<0.05. As expected, HS decreased feed intake by 53% (P<0.05 and body weight (P<0.05 compared to TN pigs. Ileum heat shock protein 70 expression increased (P<0.05, while intestinal integrity was compromised in the HS pigs (ileum and colon TER decreased; P<0.05. Furthermore, HS increased serum endotoxin concentrations (P=0.05. Intestinal permeability was accompanied by an increase in protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (P<0.05 and casein kinase II-α (P=0.06. Protein expression of tight junction (TJ proteins in the ileum revealed claudin 3 and occludin expression to be increased overall due to HS (P<0.05, while there were no differences in claudin 1 expression. Intestinal glucose transport and blood glucose were elevated due to HS (P<0.05. This was supported by increased ileum Na(+/K(+ ATPase activity in HS pigs. SGLT-1 protein expression was unaltered; however, HS increased ileal GLUT-2 protein expression (P=0.06. Altogether, these data indicate that HS reduce intestinal integrity and increase intestinal stress and glucose transport.

  10. Lowering the Barriers to Integrative Aquatic Ecosystem Science: Semantic Provenance, Open Linked Data, and Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, T.; Hofmann, A. F.; Utz, R.; Deelman, E.; Hanson, P. C.; Szekely, P.; Villamizar, S. R.; Knoblock, C.; Guo, Q.; Crichton, D. J.; McCann, M. P.; Gil, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Environmental cyber-observatory (ECO) planning and implementation has been ongoing for more than a decade now, and several major efforts have recently come online or will soon. Some investigators in the relevant research communities will use ECO data, traditionally by developing their own client-side services to acquire data and then manually create custom tools to integrate and analyze it. However, a significant portion of the aquatic ecosystem science community will need more custom services to manage locally collected data. The latter group represents enormous intellectual capacity when one envisions thousands of ecosystems scientists supplementing ECO baseline data by sharing their own locally intensive observational efforts. This poster summarizes the outcomes of the June 2011 Workshop for Aquatic Ecosystem Sustainability (WAES) which focused on the needs of aquatic ecosystem research on inland waters and oceans. Here we advocate new approaches to support scientists to model, integrate, and analyze data based on: 1) a new breed of software tools in which semantic provenance is automatically created and used by the system, 2) the use of open standards based on RDF and Linked Data Principles to facilitate sharing of data and provenance annotations, 3) the use of workflows to represent explicitly all data preparation, integration, and processing steps in a way that is automatically repeatable. Aquatic ecosystems workflow exemplars are provided and discussed in terms of their potential broaden data sharing, analysis and synthesis thereby increasing the impact of aquatic ecosystem research.

  11. The removal of multiplicative, systematic bias allows integration of breast cancer gene expression datasets – improving meta-analysis and prediction of prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepper Stuart D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of gene expression studies in the public domain is rapidly increasing, representing a highly valuable resource. However, dataset-specific bias precludes meta-analysis at the raw transcript level, even when the RNA is from comparable sources and has been processed on the same microarray platform using similar protocols. Here, we demonstrate, using Affymetrix data, that much of this bias can be removed, allowing multiple datasets to be legitimately combined for meaningful meta-analyses. Results A series of validation datasets comparing breast cancer and normal breast cell lines (MCF7 and MCF10A were generated to examine the variability between datasets generated using different amounts of starting RNA, alternative protocols, different generations of Affymetrix GeneChip or scanning hardware. We demonstrate that systematic, multiplicative biases are introduced at the RNA, hybridization and image-capture stages of a microarray experiment. Simple batch mean-centering was found to significantly reduce the level of inter-experimental variation, allowing raw transcript levels to be compared across datasets with confidence. By accounting for dataset-specific bias, we were able to assemble the largest gene expression dataset of primary breast tumours to-date (1107, from six previously published studies. Using this meta-dataset, we demonstrate that combining greater numbers of datasets or tumours leads to a greater overlap in differentially expressed genes and more accurate prognostic predictions. However, this is highly dependent upon the composition of the datasets and patient characteristics. Conclusion Multiplicative, systematic biases are introduced at many stages of microarray experiments. When these are reconciled, raw data can be directly integrated from different gene expression datasets leading to new biological findings with increased statistical power.

  12. Actin related protein complex subunit 1b controls sperm release, barrier integrity and cell division during adult rat spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita; Dumasia, Kushaan; Deshpande, Sharvari; Gaonkar, Reshma; Balasinor, N H

    2016-08-01

    Actin remodeling is a vital process for signaling, movement and survival in all cells. In the testes, extensive actin reorganization occurs at spermatid-Sertoli cell junctions during sperm release (spermiation) and at inter Sertoli cell junctions during restructuring of the blood testis barrier (BTB). During spermiation, tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs), rich in branched actin networks, ensure recycling of spermatid-Sertoli cell junctional molecules. Similar recycling occurs during BTB restructuring around the same time as spermiation occurs. Actin related protein 2/3 complex is an essential actin nucleation and branching protein. One of its subunits, Arpc1b, was earlier found to be down-regulated in an estrogen-induced rat model of spermiation failure. Also, Arpc1b was found to be estrogen responsive through estrogen receptor beta in seminiferous tubule culture. Here, knockdown of Arpc1b by siRNA in adult rat testis led to defects in spermiation caused by failure in TBC formation. Knockdown also compromised BTB integrity and caused polarity defects of mature spermatids. Apart from these effects pertaining to Sertoli cells, Arpc1b reduction perturbed ability of germ cells to enter G2/M phase thus hindering cell division. In summary, Arpc1b, an estrogen responsive gene, is a regulator of spermiation, mature spermatid polarity, BTB integrity and cell division during adult spermatogenesis. PMID:27113856

  13. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-05-06

    Various methods and systems are provided for smart parking barriers. In one example, among others, a smart parking barrier system includes a movable parking barrier located at one end of a parking space, a barrier drive configured to control positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking space and a second position that allows access to the parking space. The parking controller can initiate movement of the movable parking barrier in response to a positive identification of an individual allowed to use the parking space. The parking controller can identify the individual through, e.g., a RFID tag, a mobile device (e.g., a remote control, smartphone, tablet, etc.), an access card, biometric information, or other appropriate identifier.

  14. Exocyst Sec10 protects epithelial barrier integrity and enhances recovery following oxidative stress, by activation of the MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwon Moo; Fogelgren, Ben; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Kim, Jinu; Chung, Daniel C; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2010-03-01

    Cell-cell contacts are essential for epithelial cell function, and disruption is associated with pathological conditions including ischemic kidney injury. We hypothesize that the exocyst, a highly-conserved eight-protein complex that targets secretory vesicles carrying membrane proteins, is involved in maintaining renal epithelial barrier integrity. Accordingly, increasing exocyst expression in renal tubule cells may protect barrier function from oxidative stress resulting from ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. When cultured on plastic, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells overexpressing Sec10, a central exocyst component, formed domes showing increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Transepithelial electric resistance (TER) of Sec10-overexpressing MDCK cells grown on Transwell filters was higher than in control MDCK cells, and the rate of TER decrease following H2O2 treatment was less in Sec10-overexpressing MDCK cells compared with control MDCK cells. After removal of H2O2, TER returned to normal more rapidly in Sec10-overexpressing compared with control MDCK cells. In collagen culture MDCK cells form cysts, and H2O2 treatment damaged Sec10-overexpressing MDCK cell cysts less than control MDCK cell cysts. The MAPK pathway has been shown to protect animals from I/R injury. Levels of active ERK, the final MAPK pathway step, were higher in Sec10-overexpressing compared with control MDCK cells. U0126 inhibited ERK activation, exacerbated the H2O2-induced decrease in TER and cyst disruption, and delayed recovery of TER following H2O2 removal. Finally, in mice with renal I/R injury, exocyst expression decreased early and returned to normal concomitant with functional recovery, suggesting that the exocyst may be involved in the recovery following I/R injury.

  15. An integrative microfluidically supported in vitro model of an endothelial barrier combined with cortical spheroids simulates effects of neuroinflammation in neocortex development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasch, Martin; Rennert, Knut; Jahn, Tobias; Gärtner, Claudia; Schönfelder, Gilbert; Huber, Otmar; Seiler, Andrea E M; Mosig, Alexander S

    2016-07-01

    The development of therapeutic substances to treat diseases of the central nervous system is hampered by the tightness and selectivity of the blood-brain barrier. Moreover, testing of potential drugs is time-consuming and cost-intensive. Here, we established a new microfluidically supported, biochip-based model of the brain endothelial barrier in combination with brain cortical spheroids suitable to detect effects of neuroinflammation upon disruption of the endothelial layer in response to inflammatory signals. Unilateral perfusion of the endothelial cell layer with a cytokine mix comprising tumor necrosis factor, IL-1β, IFNγ, and lipopolysaccharide resulted in a loss of endothelial von Willebrand factor and VE-cadherin expression accompanied with an increased leakage of the endothelial layer and diminished endothelial cell viability. In addition, cytokine treatment caused a loss of neocortex differentiation markers Tbr1, Tbr2, and Pax6 in the cortical spheroids concomitant with reduced cell viability and spheroid integrity. From these observations, we conclude that our endothelial barrier/cortex model is suitable to specifically reflect cytokine-induced effects on barrier integrity and to uncover damage and impairment of cortical tissue development and viability. With all its limitations, the model represents a novel tool to study cross-communication between the brain endothelial barrier and underlying cortical tissue that can be utilized for toxicity and drug screening studies focusing on inflammation and neocortex formation. PMID:27478526

  16. Circulation in the southern Great Barrier Reef studied through an integration of multiple remote sensing and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yadan; Luick, John L.

    2014-03-01

    New mechanisms for stratification and upwelling in the southern Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are identified, and dynamic details of Capricorn Eddy, a transient feature located off the shelf at the southern extremity of the GBR, are revealed using the newly available surface current from High Frequency (HF) radar combined with other remote sensing and mooring data. The HF radar surface currents were used for tidal harmonic analysis and current-wind correlation analysis. These analyses, combined with Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data, mooring data, and altimetry-based geostrophic currents, enabled the effects of forcing from the large-scale oceanic currents (including the East Australian Current (EAC)), wind, and tides in a topographically complex flow regime to be separately identified. Within the indentation region where the width of the shelf abruptly narrows, current is strongly coupled with the EAC. Here strong residual flows, identified on current maps and SST images, fall into three patterns: southward flow, northwestward flow, and an eddy. Multiple data sets shed light on the prerequisite for the formation of the eddy, the reasons for its geometric variation, and its evolution with time. Intrusions of the eddy onto the shelf result in stratification characterized by a significant increase of surface temperature. Upwelling driven by wind or oceanic inflow is shown to cause stratification of previously well-mixed shelf water. The upwelling appears to be associated with equatorward-traveling coastal-trapped waves. The integrative method of analysis embodied here is applicable to other coastal regions with complex circulation.

  17. Penetration through the Skin Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Benfeldt, Eva; Holmgaard, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a strong and flexible organ with barrier properties essential for maintaining homeostasis and thereby human life. Characterizing this barrier is the ability to prevent some chemicals from crossing the barrier while allowing others, including medicinal products, to pass at varying rates. During recent decades, the latter has received increased attention as a route for intentionally delivering drugs to patients. This has stimulated research in methods for sampling, measuring and predicting percutaneous penetration. Previous chapters have described how different endogenous, genetic and exogenous factors may affect barrier characteristics. The present chapter introduces the theory for barrier penetration (Fick's law), and describes and discusses different methods for measuring the kinetics of percutaneous penetration of chemicals, including in vitro methods (static and flow-through diffusion cells) as well as in vivo methods (microdialysis and microperfusion). Then follows a discussion with examples of how different characteristics of the skin (age, site and integrity) and of the penetrants (size, solubility, ionization, logPow and vehicles) affect the kinetics of percutaneous penetration. Finally, a short discussion of the advantages and challenges of each method is provided, which will hopefully allow the reader to improve decision making and treatment planning, as well as the evaluation of experimental studies of percutaneous penetration of chemicals. PMID:26844902

  18. Integrated evaluation of the performance of a more than seven year old permeable reactive barrier at a site contaminated with chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchitsch, Nanna; Nooten, Thomas Van; Bastiaens, Leen;

    2011-01-01

    role in the long-term performance. An integrated study was performed on the Vapokon permeable reactive barrier (PRB) in Denmark by groundwater and iron core sample characterization. The detailed field groundwater sampling carried out from more than 75 well screens up and downstream the barrier showed...... a very efficient removal (N99%) for the most important CAHs (PCE, TCE and 1,1,1-TCA). However, significant formation of cis-DCE within the PRB resulted in an overall insufficient efficiency for cis-DCE removal. The detailed analysis of the upstream groundwater revealed a very heterogeneous spatial...... distribution of contaminant loading into the PRB, which resulted in that only about a quarter of the barrier system is treating significant loads of CAHs. Laboratory batch experiments using contaminated groundwater from the site and iron material from the core samples revealed that the aged iron material...

  19. Horn River basin: a study of the behavior of frac barriers in a thick shale package using the integration of microseismic, geomechanics and log analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaudoin, Bill; Allison, Jeff [Devon Canada Ltd (Canada); Khalid, Salman; Faurschou, Ken [Schlumberger Canada Ltd (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The Horn River Basin is located to the north west of Calgary, Alberta. The shales in the river basin form a 200m thick package of over-pressured, organic-rich, siliceous mudrocks found at drilling depths between 2400-2700m. This paper is a study of the behavior of frac barriers in a thick shale package using integrated microseismics, geomechanics and log analysis. Within the shale package, the gross thickness of the shale interval and the observed frac barriers present a challenge to maximizing the stimulated rock volume. The aim of this study is to evaluate reservoir complexity and heterogeneity. Core and log data from vertical wells were analyzed to target optimal horizontal drilling zones for hydraulic fracture initiation and ease of drilling. The results show that the rate of change of closure stress on either side of an unidentified frac barrier is the reason for frac height growth in the shale package.

  20. Impaired small-bowel barrier integrity in the presence of lumenal pancreatic digestive enzymes leads to circulatory shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Erik B; Alsaigh, Tom; Chang, Marisol; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2012-08-01

    In bowel ischemia, impaired mucosal integrity may allow intestinal pancreatic enzyme products to become systemic and precipitate irreversible shock and death. This can be attenuated by pancreatic enzyme inhibition in the small-bowel lumen. It is unresolved, however, whether ischemically mediated mucosal disruption is the key event allowing pancreatic enzyme products systemic access and whether intestinal digestive enzyme activity in concert with increased mucosal permeability leads to shock in the absence of ischemia. To test this possibility, the small intestinal lumen of nonischemic rats was perfused for 2 h with either digestive enzymes, a mucin disruption strategy (i.e., mucolytics) designed to increase mucosal permeability, or both, and animals were observed for shock. Digestive enzymes perfused included trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, amylase, and lipase. Control (n = 6) and experimental animals perfused with pancreatic enzymes only (n = 6) or single enzymes (n = 3 for each of the five enzyme groups) maintained stable hemodynamics. After mucin disruption using a combination of enteral N-acetylcysteine, atropine, and increased flow rates, rats (n = 6) developed mild hypotension (P shock and increase systemic protease activation in the absence of ischemia, implicating bowel mucin disruption as a key event in early ischemia. Digestive enzymes and their products, if allowed to penetrate the gut wall, may trigger multiorgan failure and death.

  1. The Integrated Renovation Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galiotto, Nicolas; Heiselberg, Per; Knudstrup, Mary-Ann

    2016-01-01

    structured and holistic method of decision making toward nearly zero-energy building renovation. The methodology is evolutive, implementable on a large scale, and allows an optimal integration of nonexpert decision makers. In practice, such a scheme allowed most behavioral barriers to sustainable home...

  2. Effect of a probiotic mixture on intestinal microflora, morphology, and barrier integrity of broilers subjected to heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J; Xiao, K; Ke, Y L; Jiao, L F; Hu, C H; Diao, Q Y; Shi, B; Zou, X T

    2014-03-01

    The current study investigated the efficacy of a probiotic mixture on ameliorating heat stress-induced impairment of intestinal microflora, morphology, and barrier integrity in broilers. The probiotic mixture contained Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus subtilis, and Lactobacillus plantarum. Three hundred sixty 21-d-old Ross 308 male broilers were allocated in 4 experimental treatments, each of which was replicated 6 times with 15 broilers per replicate. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used in the study, and the main factors were composed of diet (basal diet or addition of 1.5 g/kg of probiotic mixture) and temperature (thermoneutral zone or heat stress). From d 22 to 42, birds were either raised in a thermoneutral zone (22°C) or subjected to cyclic heat stress by exposing them to 33°C for 10 h (from 0800 to 1800) and 22°C from 1800 to 0800. Compared with birds kept in the thermoneutral zone, birds subjected to heat stress had reduced ADG and ADFI; lower viable counts of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium and increased viable counts of coliforms and Clostridium in small intestinal contents; shorter jejunal villus height, deeper crypt depth, and lower ratio of villus height to crypt depth; decreased jejunal transepithelial electrical resistance and a higher level of jejunal paracellular permeability of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran 4 kDa; and downregulated protein levels of occludin and zonula occludens-1 (P diet interaction was observed in the present study, revealing that the supplemented probiotics had the same effect at both temperatures.

  3. Pentylentetrazole-induced loss of blood-brain barrier integrity involves excess nitric oxide generation by neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danjo, Sonoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Masatomo; Nakamura, Yu; Itoh, Kouichi

    2013-09-12

    Dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major pathophysiological consequences of epilepsy. The increase in the permeability caused by BBB failure is thought to contribute to the development of epileptic outcomes. We developed a method by which the BBB permeability can be demonstrated by gadolinium-enhanced T1 weighted imaging (GdET1WI). The present study examined the changes in the BBB permeability in mice with generalized convulsive seizures (GCS) induced by acute pentylentetrazole (PTZ) injection. At 15min after PTZ-induced GCS, the BBB temporarily leaks BBB-impermeable contrast agent into the parenchyma of the diencephalon, hippocampus and cerebral cortex in mice, and the loss of BBB integrity was gradually recovered by 24h. The temporary BBB failure is a critical link to the glutamatergic activities that occur following the injection of PTZ. PTZ activates the glutamatergic pathway via the NMDA receptor, then nitric oxide (NO) is generated by NMDA receptor-coupled neuronal NO synthase (nNOS). To examine the influence of nNOS-derived NO induced by PTZ on the increases of the BBB permeability, GdET1WI was performed using conventional nNOS gene-deficient mice with or without PTZ injection. The failure of the BBB induced by PTZ was completely protected by nNOS deficiency in the brain. These results suggest that nNOS-derived excess NO in the glutamatergic pathway plays a key role in the failure of the BBB during PTZ-induced GCS. The levels of NO synthetized by nNOS in the brain may represent an important target for the future development of drugs to protect the BBB. PMID:23831997

  4. Effect of ecoimmunonutrition supports on maintenance of integrity of intestinal mucosal barrier in severe acute pancreatitis in dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background One of the major causes of death in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is severe infection owing to bacterial translocation. Some clinical studies suggested that ecoimmunonutrition (EIN) as a new strategy had better treatment effect on SAP patients. But the experiment studies on the precise mechanism of the effect of EIN were less reported. In this study, we mainly investigated the effects of EIN on bacterial translocation in SAP model of dogs.Methods SAP was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct in healthy hybrid dogs. The SAP dogs were supported with either parenteral nutrition (PN) or elemental enteral nutrition (EEN) or EIN. The levels of serum amylase, serum aminotransferase and plasma endotoxin were detected before and after pancreatitis induction. On the 7th day after nutrition supports, peritoneal fluid, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, and pancreas were collected for bacterial culture with standard techniques to observe the incidence of bacterial translocation. Pathology changes of pancreas were analyzed by histopathologic grading and scoring of the severity of pancreas, and the degree of intestinal mucosal damage was assessed by measuring mucosal thickness, villus height, and crypt depth of ileum.Results Compared with PN and EEN, EIN significantly decreased the levels of serum amylase, serum aminotransferase, plasma endotoxin, and the incidence of bacterial translocation. Furthermore, compared with the others, the histology scores of inflammation in pancreas and the ileum injury (ileum mocosa thickness, villus height, and crypt depth) were significantly alleviated by EIN (P<0.05). Moreover, concerning liver function, the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and albumin were ameliorating significantly in the EIN group.Conclusion Our results suggested that EIN could maintain the integrity of intestinal mucosal barrier and reducing the incidence of bacterial translocation

  5. Human oral isolate Lactobacillus fermentum AGR1487 reduces intestinal barrier integrity by increasing the turnover of microtubules in Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel C Anderson

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus fermentum is found in fermented foods and thought to be harmless. In vivo and clinical studies indicate that some L. fermentum strains have beneficial properties, particularly for gastrointestinal health. However, L. fermentum AGR1487 decreases trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER, a measure of intestinal barrier integrity. The hypothesis was that L. fermentum AGR1487 decreases the expression of intestinal cell tight junction genes and proteins, thereby reducing barrier integrity. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Caco-2 cells (model of human intestinal epithelial cells treated with L. fermentum AGR1487 were used to obtain a global view of the effect of the bacterium on intestinal epithelial cells. Specific functional characteristics by which L. fermentum AGR1487 reduces intestinal barrier integrity were examined using confocal microscopy, cell cycle progression and adherence bioassays. The effects of TEER-enhancing L. fermentum AGR1485 were investigated for comparison. L. fermentum AGR1487 did not alter the expression of Caco-2 cell tight junction genes (compared to L. fermentum AGR1485 and tight junction proteins were not able to be detected. However, L. fermentum AGR1487 increased the expression levels of seven tubulin genes and the abundance of three microtubule-associated proteins, which have been linked to tight junction disassembly. Additionally, Caco-2 cells treated with L. fermentum AGR1487 did not have defined and uniform borders of zona occludens 2 around each cell, unlike control or AGR1485 treated cells. L. fermentum AGR1487 cells were required for the negative effect on barrier integrity (bacterial supernatant did not cause a decrease in TEER, suggesting that a physical interaction may be necessary. Increased adherence of L. fermentum AGR1487 to Caco-2 cells (compared to L. fermentum AGR1485 was likely to facilitate this cell-to-cell interaction. These findings illustrate that bacterial strains of the

  6. Safety-barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2007-01-01

    are discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed, including situations where safety barriers depend on shared common elements. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk......Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called "bow-tie" diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation with other methods such as fault trees and Bayesian networks...... analysis with operational safety management....

  7. Safety- barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2008-01-01

    Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called 'bow-tie' diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation of safety-barrier diagrams to other methods such as fault...... trees and Bayesian networks is discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk analysis with operational safety management....

  8. Hydroxyethyl starch (HES 130/0.4 impairs intestinal barrier integrity and metabolic function: findings from a mouse model of the isolated perfused small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuk Lung Wong

    Full Text Available The application of hydroxyethyl starch (HES for volume resuscitation is controversially discussed and clinical studies have suggested adverse effects of HES substitution, leading to increased patient mortality. Although, the intestine is of high clinical relevance and plays a crucial role in sepsis and inflammation, information about the effects of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity is very scarce. We therefore evaluated the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity employing an isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine.An isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine was established and intestines were vascularly perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing 3% Albumin (N=7 or 3% HES (130/0.4; N=7. Intestinal metabolic function (galactose uptake, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, edema formation (wet-to-dry weight ratio, morphology (histological and electron microscopical analysis, fluid shifts within the vascular, lymphatic and luminal compartments, as well as endothelial and epithelial barrier permeability (FITC-dextran translocation were evaluated in both groups.Compared to the Albumin group, HES perfusion did not significantly change the wet-to-dry weight ratio and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio. However, perfusing the small intestine with 3% HES resulted in a significant loss of vascular fluid (p<0.01, an increased fluid accumulation in the intestinal lumen (p<0.001, an enhanced translocation of FITC-dextran from the vascular to the luminal compartment (p<0.001 and a significantly impaired intestinal galactose uptake (p<0.001. Morphologically, these findings were associated with an aggregation of intracellular vacuoles within the intestinal epithelial cells and enlarged intercellular spaces.A vascular perfusion with 3% HES impairs the endothelial and epithelial barrier integrity as well as metabolic function of the small intestine.

  9. Cytokines and the Skin Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Malte Baron

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The skin is the largest organ of the human body and builds a barrier to protect us from the harmful environment and also from unregulated loss of water. Keratinocytes form the skin barrier by undergoing a highly complex differentiation process that involves changing their morphology and structural integrity, a process referred to as cornification. Alterations in the epidermal cornification process affect the formation of the skin barrier. Typically, this results in a disturbed barrier, which allows the entry of substances into the skin that are immunologically reactive. This contributes to and promotes inflammatory processes in the skin but also affects other organs. In many common skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, a defect in the formation of the skin barrier is observed. In these diseases the cytokine composition within the skin is different compared to normal human skin. This is the result of resident skin cells that produce cytokines, but also because additional immune cells are recruited. Many of the cytokines found in defective skin are able to influence various processes of differentiation and cornification. Here we summarize the current knowledge on cytokines and their functions in healthy skin and their contributions to inflammatory skin diseases.

  10. Chronic type 2 diabetes reduces the integrity of the blood-brain barrier by reducing tight junction proteins in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dae Young; Yim, Hee Sun; Jung, Hyo Young; Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Choi, Jung Hoon; Seong, Je Kyung; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Kim, Dae Won; Hwang, In Koo

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of type 2 diabetes-induced hyperglycemia on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and tight junction markers in the rat hippocampus. Forty-week-old diabetic (Zucker diabetic fatty, ZDF) rats and littermate control (Zucker lean control, ZLC) rats were used in this study. We evaluated the integrity of the blood-brain barrier by measuring sodium fluorescein extravasation and blood vessel ultrastructure. In addition, tight junction markers, such as zona occludens-1, occludin and claudin-5, were quantified by western blot analysis. ZDF rats showed significantly increased sodium fluorescein leakage in the hippocampus. Tight junction markers, such as occludin and claudin-5, were significantly decreased in the hippocampi of ZDF rats compared to those of ZLC rats. In addition, ZDF rats showed ultrastructural changes with phagocytic findings in the blood vessels. These results suggest that chronic untreated diabetes impairs the permeability of the hippocampal blood-brain barrier by down-regulating occludin and claudin-5, indicating that chronic untreated diabetes may cause hippocampus-dependent dysfunction. PMID:26876499

  11. Evaluation of 320x240 pixel LEC GaAs Schottky barrier X-ray imaging arrays, hybridized to CMOS readout circuit based on charge integration

    CERN Document Server

    Irsigler, R; Alverbro, J; Borglind, J; Froejdh, C; Helander, P; Manolopoulos, S; O'Shea, V; Smith, K

    1999-01-01

    320x240 pixels GaAs Schottky barrier detector arrays were fabricated, hybridized to silicon readout circuits, and subsequently evaluated. The detector chip was based on semi-insulating LEC GaAs material. The square shaped pixel detector elements were of the Schottky barrier type and had a pitch of 38 mu m. The GaAs wafers were thinned down prior to the fabrication of the ohmic back contact. After dicing, the chips were indium bump, flip-chip bonded to CMOS readout circuits based on charge integration, and finally evaluated. A bias voltage between 50 and 100 V was sufficient to operate the detector. Results on I-V characteristics, noise behaviour and response to X-ray radiation are presented. Images of various objects and slit patterns were acquired by using a standard dental imaging X-ray source. The work done was a part of the XIMAGE project financed by the European Community (Brite-Euram). (author)

  12. Experienced barriers and facilitators for integrating smoking cessation advice and support into daily dental practice. A short report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosseel, J.P.; Jacobs, J.E.; Hilberink, S.R.; Maassen, I.M.; Segaar, D.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2011-01-01

    In a controlled study, primary care dental professionals in the intervention group were encouraged to provide smoking cessation advice and support for all smoking patients with the help of a stage-based motivational protocol. The barriers and facilitators reported by the dental professionals on two

  13. Integrity of geotechnical barriers. Pt. 1. Structural pre-analysis. Report on work package 9.2. Preliminary safety analysis for the site Gorleben

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work package 9.2 of the preliminary safety analysis for the site Gorleben covers the integrity of geotechnical barriers. The report includes the issues Basis for the design of the closure system; design of the closure system; constructional design of the closure system - demonstration of the technical functionality; salt grit compaction; consideration of the functional time periods of the closures; pre-analysis of the closures; description of the modified design for the closure of the mining shaft; construction sequence/performance approach; deepened hydraulic pre-analysis of the closure system; plausibility assessment of the thermal design; evaluation of the closures system based on the pre-analysis.

  14. The effect of first and second order barriers on the ideal and actual integration of computer technology into the high school science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendren, Kevin L.

    2000-10-01

    Science teachers' decisions to integrate computer technology into their classrooms was impacted by their pedagogical beliefs and their computer attitudes. First order barriers, ones extrinsic to the teacher, and second order barriers, ones grounded in the teachers' beliefs about teaching and learning, interfered with the implementation of computer technology. This study examined the beliefs of high school educators in a large, suburban school district in the Southeast. Teachers identified their actual levels of computer use in the current school year and what their ideal levels of use would have been if they were given unlimited resources of time, technical support, computer hardware, and software. The level of computer use was measured in the areas of administration, communication, Internet, instruction, and laboratory. Research questions examined in the study were: (1) What are the pedagogical beliefs and computer attitudes of high school science teachers in the district? (2) How do first and second order barriers affect the actual use of computers? (3) How do first and second order barriers affect the teachers' perspective of the ideal use of computers? A significant interaction existed between computer use and the attitude of the science teachers toward computers, and the most notable interaction was between the teachers' computer attitudes and the use of the Internet. Teachers with constructivist beliefs were more likely to do Internet and use the computer in the laboratory. A significant difference existed between the actual use and the ideal use of computer technology in the areas of communication, Internet, instruction, and laboratory. A significant difference existed between male and female teachers in the amount of time computers were used in the laboratory, and years of teaching showed a significant interaction with constructivism and computer attitude. In their ideal visions, the science teachers expressed the greatest desire for growth in the areas of

  15. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  16. Promising perceptions, divergent practices and barriers to integrated malaria prevention in Wakiso district, Uganda: a mixed methods study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Musoke

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization recommends use of multiple approaches to control malaria. The integrated approach to malaria prevention advocates the use of several malaria prevention methods in a holistic manner. This study assessed perceptions and practices on integrated malaria prevention in Wakiso district, Uganda.A clustered cross-sectional survey was conducted among 727 households from 29 villages using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Assessment was done on awareness of various malaria prevention methods, potential for use of the methods in a holistic manner, and reasons for dislike of certain methods. Households were classified as using integrated malaria prevention if they used at least two methods. Logistic regression was used to test for factors associated with the use of integrated malaria prevention while adjusting for clustering within villages.Participants knew of the various malaria prevention methods in the integrated approach including use of insecticide treated nets (97.5%, removing mosquito breeding sites (89.1%, clearing overgrown vegetation near houses (97.9%, and closing windows and doors early in the evenings (96.4%. If trained, most participants (68.6% would use all the suggested malaria prevention methods of the integrated approach. Among those who would not use all methods, the main reasons given were there being too many (70.2% and cost (32.0%. Only 33.0% households were using the integrated approach to prevent malaria. Use of integrated malaria prevention by households was associated with reading newspapers (AOR 0.34; 95% CI 0.22 -0.53 and ownership of a motorcycle/car (AOR 1.75; 95% CI 1.03 - 2.98.Although knowledge of malaria prevention methods was high and perceptions on the integrated approach promising, practices on integrated malaria prevention was relatively low. The use of the integrated approach can be improved by promoting use of multiple malaria prevention methods through various communication

  17. Barriers and Facilitators of Healthcare for People with Mental Illness: Why Integrated Patient Centered Healthcare Is Necessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Chyrell D; H Flanagan, Elizabeth; Costa, Mark; O'Connell-Bonarrigo, Maria; Tana Le, Thanh; Guy, Kimberly; Antunes, Kimberly; Steiner, Jeanne L

    2016-06-01

    Understanding barriers and facilitators of healthcare for people with mental illness is essential for healthcare and mental healthcare organizations moving towards patient centered care. This paper presents findings of a measure on barriers and facilitators of healthcare completed by 204 patients being served at a co-located wellness center (primary healthcare clinic) located in an urban mental health center. The top 10 results show important findings for planning healthcare services that are responsive to the needs of people with mental illness. Basic structural issues as a result of poverty are extremely important (transportation, housing, payment) as well as difficulty with public healthcare that often involves long wait-times for appointments and at the doctor's office and hours that might not be convenient. Healthcare services that want to meet the needs of people with mental illness need to address these issues. What facilitates healthcare is not just removing the barriers to receiving healthcare services but instead involves more interpersonal aspects of healthcare such as liking your provider, being able to talk with your provider, feeling your provider cares about you and listens to you. Structural supports such as also being in mental health services, having systems for remembering appointments, and/or having appointment times that are convenient also facilitate seeking healthcare. Facilitating healthcare seeking also seems to involve a sense of agency-looking forward to taking charge of your health and feeling capable of following healthcare provider instructions. Healthcare systems for people with mental illness need to support these facilitators to give care-seekers the support they need. Key points are provided on how organizations and staff can work more effectively in implementing patient centered care. PMID:27104370

  18. Neuropsychiatric disease relevance of circulating anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies depends on blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, C; Stepniak, B; Schneider, A; Papiol, S; Tantra, M; Begemann, M; Sirén, A-L; Pardo, L A; Sperling, S; Mohd Jofrry, S; Gurvich, A; Jensen, N; Ostmeier, K; Lühder, F; Probst, C; Martens, H; Gillis, M; Saher, G; Assogna, F; Spalletta, G; Stöcker, W; Schulz, T F; Nave, K-A; Ehrenreich, H

    2014-10-01

    In 2007, a multifaceted syndrome, associated with anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies (NMDAR-AB) of immunoglobulin-G isotype, has been described, which variably consists of psychosis, epilepsy, cognitive decline and extrapyramidal symptoms. Prevalence and significance of NMDAR-AB in complex neuropsychiatric disease versus health, however, have remained unclear. We tested sera of 2817 subjects (1325 healthy, 1081 schizophrenic, 263 Parkinson and 148 affective-disorder subjects) for presence of NMDAR-AB, conducted a genome-wide genetic association study, comparing AB carriers versus non-carriers, and assessed their influenza AB status. For mechanistic insight and documentation of AB functionality, in vivo experiments involving mice with deficient blood-brain barrier (ApoE(-/-)) and in vitro endocytosis assays in primary cortical neurons were performed. In 10.5% of subjects, NMDAR-AB (NR1 subunit) of any immunoglobulin isotype were detected, with no difference in seroprevalence, titer or in vitro functionality between patients and healthy controls. Administration of extracted human serum to mice influenced basal and MK-801-induced activity in the open field only in ApoE(-/-) mice injected with NMDAR-AB-positive serum but not in respective controls. Seropositive schizophrenic patients with a history of neurotrauma or birth complications, indicating an at least temporarily compromised blood-brain barrier, had more neurological abnormalities than seronegative patients with comparable history. A common genetic variant (rs524991, P=6.15E-08) as well as past influenza A (P=0.024) or B (P=0.006) infection were identified as predisposing factors for NMDAR-AB seropositivity. The >10% overall seroprevalence of NMDAR-AB of both healthy individuals and patients is unexpectedly high. Clinical significance, however, apparently depends on association with past or present perturbations of blood-brain barrier function. PMID:23999527

  19. The Integrated Renovation Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galiotto, Nicolas

    is applied to two single-family homes. In practice, such a scheme allowed most informational barriers to sustainable home renovation to be overcome. The homeowners were better integrated and their preferences and immaterial values were better taken into account. They assimilated the multiple benefits...

  20. Barriers and Opportunities for Integrating Social Science into Natural Resource Management: Lessons from National Estuarine Research Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Patrick; Genskow, Ken; Shaw, Bret; Shepard, Robin

    2012-12-01

    The need for cross-disciplinary scientific inquiries that facilitate improved natural resource management outcomes through increased understanding of both the biophysical and human dimensions of management issues has been widely recognized. Despite this broad recognition, a number of obstacles and barriers still sometimes challenge the successful implementation of cross-disciplinary approaches. Improving understanding of these challenges and barriers will help address them and thereby foster appropriate and effective utilization of cross-disciplinary approaches to solve natural resource management challenges. This research uses a case study analysis of the United States National Estuarine Research Reserve System to improve understanding of the critical factors that influence practitioners' decisions related to incorporating social science into their natural resource management work. The case study research is analyzed and evaluated within a Theory of Planned Behavior framework to (1) determine and describe the factors that predict practitioners' intent to incorporate social science into their natural resource related activities and (2) recommend potential strategies for encouraging and enabling cross-disciplinary approaches to natural resource management. The results indicate that National Estuarine Research Reserve practitioners' decisions related to incorporating social science are primarily influenced by (1) confidence in their own capability to incorporate social science into their work and (2) beliefs about whether the outcomes of incorporating social science into their work would be valuable or beneficial.

  1. Barriers and opportunities for integrating social science into natural resource management: lessons from National Estuarine Research Reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Patrick; Genskow, Ken; Shaw, Bret; Shepard, Robin

    2012-12-01

    The need for cross-disciplinary scientific inquiries that facilitate improved natural resource management outcomes through increased understanding of both the biophysical and human dimensions of management issues has been widely recognized. Despite this broad recognition, a number of obstacles and barriers still sometimes challenge the successful implementation of cross-disciplinary approaches. Improving understanding of these challenges and barriers will help address them and thereby foster appropriate and effective utilization of cross-disciplinary approaches to solve natural resource management challenges. This research uses a case study analysis of the United States National Estuarine Research Reserve System to improve understanding of the critical factors that influence practitioners' decisions related to incorporating social science into their natural resource management work. The case study research is analyzed and evaluated within a Theory of Planned Behavior framework to (1) determine and describe the factors that predict practitioners' intent to incorporate social science into their natural resource related activities and (2) recommend potential strategies for encouraging and enabling cross-disciplinary approaches to natural resource management. The results indicate that National Estuarine Research Reserve practitioners' decisions related to incorporating social science are primarily influenced by (1) confidence in their own capability to incorporate social science into their work and (2) beliefs about whether the outcomes of incorporating social science into their work would be valuable or beneficial.

  2. Barriers to radiant barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, C.

    Radiant barriers are an energy saving device which decrease the heat lost through radiant heat transfer. The primary reason to install it is to save on air conditioning costs, as it prevents the loss of heat through the attic. They have been the subject of much controversy, as the claims made by many manufacturers were extreme (up to 100% heat shielding), with the consumer paying high prices for ineffective devices. The authors outline criteria for the consumer to consider when buying radiant warmers and then give installation tips for both new constructions and retrofits.

  3. Impact on Social Change: Benefits and Barriers to School Culture and the Integration of M-Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Smith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines benefits and barriers of mtechnologyin its growing use in education through a surveyconducted at a Canadian teacher education institution(n=350. Topics included are the types of mobile technologydevices and how their uses have been rejected and acceptedas a socially-situated construct for learning in schools. Issuesfor new teachers range from the dollar cost of using thedevices to the cost of time in learning about these devices.The paper concludes with a central issue of why somedevices do not remain in the social construct but areadopted for short periods of time and do not last becausebarriers prevent their sustainability. The research for thispaper was supported in part by a grant from the ImperialOil Academy for the Learning of Mathematics, Science andTechnology.

  4. Demonstration of the blood-ocular barrier integrity by contrast-enhanced MR imaging: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In five Rhesus monkeys we assessed the potential for monitoring the blood-ocular barrier (BOB) with Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging. Unilateral opening of the BOB was achieved by infusion of mannitol into the internal carotid artery. This was followed immediately by Gd-DTPA, 0.2 mmol/kg, given intravenously. T-l weighted MR images (Picken unit, 0.5 T, SE 500/40, 5-mm thickness, 15cm FOV) obtained before and within one-half hour after injection of Gd-DTPA demonstrated marked enhancement (2-to 17-fold) of the anterior and posterior chambers of the challenged eye, representing leakage of Gd-DTPA into those chambers. Animals remained free of ocular side effects

  5. 4.0-nm-thick amorphous Nb–Ni film as a conducting diffusion barrier layer for integrating ferroelectric capacitor on Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, X.H. [Hebei Key Lab of Optic-electronic Information and Materials, College of Physics Science & Technology, Hebei University, Hebei 071002 (China); College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300401 (China); Guo, J.X.; Zhang, L.; Jia, D.M.; Qi, C.G.; Zhou, Y.; Li, X.H.; Shi, J.B.; Fu, Y.J.; Wang, Y.L.; Lou, J.Z. [Hebei Key Lab of Optic-electronic Information and Materials, College of Physics Science & Technology, Hebei University, Hebei 071002 (China); Ma, L.X. [Department of Physics, Blinn College, Bryan, TX 77805 (United States); Zhao, H.D. [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300401 (China); Liu, B.T., E-mail: btliu@hbu.cn [Hebei Key Lab of Optic-electronic Information and Materials, College of Physics Science & Technology, Hebei University, Hebei 071002 (China)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • 4-nm-thick amorphous Nb–Ni film is first used as the conducting barrier layer. • No obvious interdiffusion/reaction can be found from the LSCO/PZT/LSCO/Nb–Ni/Si. • The LSCO/PZT/LSCO capacitor, measured at 5 V, possesses very good properties. • Ultrathin amorphous Nb–Ni film is ideal to fabricate silicon-based FRAM. - Abstract: We have successfully integrated La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3}/PbZr{sub 0.4}Ti{sub 0.6}O{sub 3}/La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3} (LSCO/PZT/LSCO) capacitors on silicon substrate using a ∼4.0-nm-thick amorphous Nb–Ni film as the conducting diffusion barrier layer. Transmission electron microscopy technique confirms that the Nb–Ni film is still amorphous after fabrication of the capacitors, and the interfaces related to Nb–Ni are clean and sharp without any findable interdiffusion/reaction. The LSCO/PZT/LSCO capacitor, measured at 5 V, possesses very good properties, such as large remanent polarization of ∼22.1 μC/cm{sup 2}, small coercive voltage of ∼1.27 V, good fatigue-resistance, and small pulse width dependence, implying that ultrathin amorphous Nb–Ni film is ideal as the conducting diffusion barrier layer to fabricate high-density silicon-based ferroelectric random access memories.

  6. 1.55 µm spot-size converter integrated polarization-insensitive quantum-well semiconductor optical amplifier with tensile-strained barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong; Chen, Sihai; Yi, Xinjian; Zhu, Guangxi

    2004-07-01

    A 1.55 µm polarization-insensitive lateral tapered spot-size converter integrated semiconductor optical amplifier (SSC-SOA) with tensile-strained barriers was investigated. The optical amplifier structure used a conventional ridge guide for the active layers and a second larger ridge for the passive waveguide. Low beam divergence of 12° × 15° results in about 3.1 dB coupling losses with -1 dB positional tolerances of ±2.3 µm and ±1.6 µm in horizontal and vertical directions using an anti-reflection coated flat-ended single-mode fibre. The active layer of SSC-SOA consisted of a tensile-strained barrier multiple-quantum-well structure. The SSC-SOA exhibited a signal gain of 25.5 dB and a saturation output power of 11.2 dB m with excellent polarization insensitivity (less than 0.5 dB) at 200 mA.

  7. Barriers to and Facilitators of the Evaluation of Integrated Community-Wide Overweight Intervention Approaches: A Qualitative Case Study in Two Dutch Municipalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Koperen, Tessa M; de Kruif, Anja; van Antwerpen, Lisa; Hendriks, Anna-Marie; Seidell, Jacob C; Schuit, Albertine J; Renders, Carry M

    2016-04-01

    To prevent overweight and obesity the implementation of an integrated community-wide intervention approach (ICIA) is often advocated. Evaluation can enhance implementation of such an approach and demonstrate the extent of effectiveness. To be able to support professionals in the evaluation of ICIAs we studied barriers to and facilitators of ICIA evaluation. In this study ten professionals of two Dutch municipalities involved in the evaluation of an ICIA participated. We conducted semi-structured interviews (n = 12), observed programme meetings (n = 4) and carried out document analysis. Data were analyzed using a thematic content approach. We learned that evaluation is hampered when it is perceived as unfeasible due to limited time and budget, a lack of evaluation knowledge or a negative evaluation attitude. Other barriers are a poor understanding of the evaluation process and its added value to optimizing the programme. Sufficient communication between involved professionals on evaluation can facilitate evaluation, as does support for evaluation of ICIAs together with stakeholders at a strategic and tactical level. To stimulate the evaluation of ICIAs, we recommend supporting professionals in securing evaluation resources, providing tailored training and tools to enhance evaluation competences and stimulating strategic communication on evaluation. PMID:27043600

  8. Integrated geological-engineering model of Patrick Draw field and examples of similarities and differences among various shoreline barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Szpakiewicz, M.J.; Jackson, S.R.; Chang, M.M.; Sharma, B.; Tham, M.K.; Cheng, A.M.

    1992-04-01

    The Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program at NIPER employs an interdisciplinary approach that focuses on the high priority reservoir class of shoreline barrier deposits to: (1) determine the problems specific to this class of reservoirs by identifying the reservoir heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of fluids; and (2) develop methods to characterize effectively this class of reservoirs to predict residual oil saturation (ROS) on interwell scales and improve prediction of the flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Accurate descriptions of the spatial distribution of critical reservoir parameters (e.g., permeability, porosity, pore geometry, mineralogy, and oil saturation) are essential for designing and implementing processes to improve sweep efficiency and thereby increase oil recovery. The methodologies and models developed in this program will, in the near- to mid-term, assist producers in the implementation of effective reservoir management strategies such as location of infill wells and selection of optimum enhanced oil recovery methods to maximize oil production from their reservoirs.

  9. Integration of ICTs into the Curriculum of Cameroon Primary and Secondary Schools: A Review of Current Status, Barriers and Proposed Strategies for Effective Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngajie, Berty Nsolly; Ngo, Mback Marie Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Many sub-Saharan African countries are progressively integrating information and communication technologies (ICTs) into their education systems especially in primary and secondary schools. These efforts that are seen in both private and public schools to bring technologies into the classroom are just starting but are encountering a lot of…

  10. Increase in family allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    In July 1989 the family allowance structure in Australia was changed from a 4-rate to a 2-rate structure. The new rates were increased to $A9 a week for the 1st 3 children and $A12 for each additional child. The Family Allowance Supplment rate for children 13-15 years old was raised from $A31 to $A34.10/week. PMID:12344544

  11. Melatonin promotes blood-brain barrier integrity in methamphetamine-induced inflammation in primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumnongprakhon, Pichaya; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Tocharus, Chainarong; Tocharus, Jiraporn

    2016-09-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone and has high potent of antioxidant that is widely reported to be active against methamphetamine (METH)-induced toxicity to neuron, glial cells, and brain endothelial cells. However, the role of melatonin on the inflammatory responses which are mostly caused by blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment by METH administration has not been investigated. This study used the primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs) to determine the protective mechanism of melatonin on METH-induced inflammatory responses in the BBB via nuclear factor-ĸB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling. Herein, we demonstrated that melatonin reduced the level of the inflammatory mediators, including intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM)-1, vascular cell adhesion molecules (VCAM)-1, matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-9, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) caused by METH. These responses were related to the decrease of the expression and translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit and the activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX)-2. In addition, melatonin promoted the antioxidant processes, modulated the expression and translocation of Nrf2, and also increased the level of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, NAD (P) H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO)-1, γ-glutamylcysteine synthase (γ-GCLC), and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) through NOX2 mechanism. In addition, we found that the protective role of melatonin in METH-induced inflammatory responses in the BBB was mediated through melatonin receptors (MT1/2). We concluded that the interaction of melatonin with its receptor prevented METH-induced inflammatory responses by suppressing the NF-κB signaling and promoting the Nrf2 signaling before BBB impairment. PMID:27268413

  12. Fly proof net shed for livestock: A novel concept of physical barrier for integrated management of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Narladkar

    2014-11-01

    net shed with pitch roof (gable type fitted with hurricane type ventilator at its top serves the purpose of a physical barrier to minimize host-pest contact. Observations recorded in the experiment are sound enough to conclude and to recommend the use of net shed for livestock.

  13. Potential barriers and facilitators for implementation of an integrated care pathway for hearing-impaired persons: an exploratory survey among patients and professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verschuure Hans

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the increasing costs and anticipated shortage of Ear Nose and Throat (ENT specialists in the care for hearing-impaired persons, an integrated care pathway that includes direct hearing aid provision was developed. While this direct pathway is still under investigation, in a survey we examined expectations and potential barriers and facilitators towards this direct pathway, of patients and professionals involved in the pathway. Methods Two study populations were assessed: members of the health professions involved in the care pathway for hearing-impaired persons (general practitioners (GPs, hearing aid dispensers, ENT-specialists and clinical audiologists and persons with hearing complaints. We developed a comprehensive semi-structured questionnaire for the professionals, regarding expectations, barriers, facilitators and conditions for implementation. We developed two questionnaires for persons with hearing complaints, both regarding evaluations and preferences, and administered them after they had experienced two key elements of the direct pathway: the triage and the hearing aid fitting. Results On average GPs and hearing aid dispensers had positive expectations towards the direct pathway, while ENT-specialists and clinical audiologists had negative expectations. Professionals stated both barriers and facilitators towards the direct pathway. Most professionals either supported implementation of the direct pathway, provided that a number of conditions were satisfied, or did not support implementation, unless roughly the same conditions were satisfied. Professionals generally agreed on which conditions need to be satisfied. Persons with hearing complaints evaluated the present referral pathway and the new direct pathway equally. Many, especially older, participants stated however that they would still visit the GP and ENT-specialist, even when this would not be necessary for reimbursement of the hearing aid, and

  14. Barriers to and enablers for European rail freight transport for integrated door-to-door logistics service. Part 2: Enablers for multimodal rail freight transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Md Zahurul ISLAM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to examine and identify barriers to and enablers for the European rail freight transport services as a transport chain partner along the supply chains in the changing market scenario. The changing market scenario includes, among others, requiring 'door-to-door' rather than 'terminal to terminal' and integrated service, competitive ability to attract non-rail cargo type, changes in the customer requirements (e.g. reliable service and changes in the operational requirements and practices. Using a literature review method, the paper is presented in two parts. The part 1 focuses on the identification of barriers to the European rail freight service by reviewing freight logistics services for global supply chains followed by the current performance of European rail freight transport followed by a discussion on the rail freight market liberalisation in Europe. Then rail freight transport in the Unites States (U.S. is discussed. The research notes that although the background, scope and necessity for reform measures in Europe differ from those of the U.S., some lessons can be learned and the main lesson is that an appropriate reform measure can enhance rail sector competitive ability in Europe. The part 2 of the paper is dedicated to recommend some concrete steps and actions as enablers to remove the barriers identified in the part 1 to develop multimodal rail freight transport. The enablers for multimodal rail freight transport include: •\tEuropean rail freight transport market needs full liberalisation so that incumbent and new entrants can compete freely. •\tThe rail operators need to acquire service (e.g. customer tailored services, door to door service quality offered by road freight operators. •\tThey need to conduct a combination of ‘terminal-to-terminal’ and door-to-door operations, as and when needed; •\tThey must build partnership with freight forwarder or 3PLs to include all types of customers

  15. Vector control programs in Saint Johns County, Florida and Guayas, Ecuador: successes and barriers to integrated vector management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) and mosquito control programs (MCPs) diverge in settings and countries, and lead control specialists need to be aware of the most effective control strategies. Integrated Vector Management (IVM) strategies, once implemented in MCPs, aim to reduce cost and optimize protection of the populations against VBDs. This study presents a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis to compare IVM strategies used by MCPs in Saint Johns County, Florida and Guayas, Ecuador. This research evaluates MCPs strategies to improve vector control activities. Methods Methods included descriptive findings of the MCP operations. Information was obtained from vector control specialists, directors, and residents through field trips, surveys, and questionnaires. Evaluations of the strategies and assets of the control programs where obtained through SWOT analysis and within an IVM approach. Results Organizationally, the Floridian MCP is a tax-based District able to make decisions independently from county government officials, with the oversight of an elected board of commissioners. The Guayas program is directed by the country government and assessed by non-governmental organizations like the World health Organization. Operationally, the Floridian MCP conducts entomological surveillance and the Ecuadorian MCP focuses on epidemiological monitoring of human disease cases. Strengths of both MCPs were their community participation and educational programs. Weaknesses for both MCPs included limitations in budgets and technical capabilities. Opportunities, for both MCPs, are additional funding and partnerships with private, non-governmental, and governmental organizations. Threats experienced by both MCPs included political constraints and changes in the social and ecological environment that affect mosquito densities and control efforts. IVM pillars for policy making were used to compare the information among the programs. Differences

  16. Overcoming barriers to validation of non-animal partial replacement methods/Integrated Testing Strategies: the report of an EPAA-ECVAM workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Akkan, Zerrin; Casati, Silvia; Coecke, Sandra; Corvi, Raffaella; Dal Negro, Gianni; De Bruijn, Jack; De Silva, Odile; Gribaldo, Laura; Griesinger, Claudius; Jaworska, Joanna; Kreysa, Joachim; Maxwell, Gavin; McNamee, Pauline; Price, Anna; Prieto, Pilar; Schubert, Roland; Tosti, Luca; Worth, Andrew; Zuang, Valerie

    2009-09-01

    The use of Integrated Testing Strategies (ITS) in toxicological hazard identification and characterisation is becoming increasingly common as a method for enabling the integration of diverse types of toxicology data. At present, there are no existing procedures and guidelines for the construction and validation of ITS, so a joint EPAA WG5-ECVAM workshop was held with the following objectives: a) to investigate the role of ITS and the need for validation of ITS in the different industry sectors (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, chemicals); b) to formulate a common definition of ITS applicable across different sectors; c) to explore how and when Three Rs methods are used within ITS; and d) to propose a validation rationale for ITS and for alternative methods that are foreseen to be used within ITS. The EPAA provided a platform for comparing experiences with ITS across different industry sectors. It became clear that every ITS has to be adapted to the product type, R&D stage, and regulatory context. However, common features of ITS were also identified, and this permitted the formulation of a general definition of ITS in a regulatory context. The definition served as a basis for discussing the needs, rationale and process of formal ITS validation. One of the main conclusions was that a formal validation should not be required, unless the strategy will serve as full replacement of an in vivo study used for regulatory purposes. Finally, several challenges and bottlenecks to the ITS validation were identified, and it was agreed that a roadmap on how to address these barriers would be established by the EPAA partners. PMID:19807215

  17. Progress, barriers, solutions and recommendations for more DER integration in the European electricity supply. Summary of findings from the 6th FP EU project SOLID-DER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an overall and summarizing report of most relevant findings and conclusions regarding the topic of 'Integration of more Distributed Energy Resources (DER) in the electricity supply of Europe' addressed in the 6th Framework Programme RTD project SOLID-DER. More precisely this report reviews the current position of DER, thereby enhancing its definition in RES and DG) in the electricity supply, drivers for more DER in the future and the different technical and economic barriers to meet these policy objectives in the EU countries. But most attention is given to the different technical, economic and regulatory changes and policies for increasing the share of DER (RES and DG) in the power supply of all EU countries in the next decades. Also for that reason, at the end the report the most recent developments and issues, i.e. the increasing role of intermittent RES and DG generation and their system impacts that need to be reduced in the future to maintain the reliability levels of the power system, are discussed in this report. This discussion is mainly based on recently finished or still on-going EIE EU projects such as RESPOND, IMPROGRES etc. Finally in the report the policy measures, regulation and the pending RTD issues necessary to be solved are summarized.

  18. Hypoxic Stress Induced by Hydralazine Leads to a Loss of Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and an Increase in Efflux Transporter Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatard, Morgane; Puech, Clémentine; Roche, Frederic; Perek, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by hypoxic stress is crucial to reduce blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in some neurological diseases. Since the brain is a complex organ, it makes the interpretation of in vivo data difficult, so BBB studies are often investigated using in vitro models. However, the investigation of hypoxia in cellular pathways is complex with physical hypoxia because HIF-1α (factor induced by hypoxia) has a short half-life. We had set up an innovative and original method of induction of hypoxic stress by hydralazine that was more reproducible, which allowed us to study its impact on an in vitro BBB model. Our results showed that hydralazine, a mimetic agent of the hypoxia pathway, had the same effect as physical hypoxia, with few cytotoxicity effects on our cells. Hypoxic stress led to an increase of BBB permeability which corresponded to an opening of our BBB model. Study of tight junction proteins revealed that this hypoxic stress decreased ZO-1 but not occludin expression. In contrast, cells established a defence mechanism by increasing expression and activity of their efflux transporters (Pgp and MRP-1). This induction method of hypoxic stress by hydralazine is simple, reproducible, controllable and suitable to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved by hypoxia on the BBB. PMID:27337093

  19. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Integral Tanks... Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and Classing Steel Vessels”, 1981. Membrane Tanks...

  20. Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie; Kirby, Brendan

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

  1. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Jane Hindle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The invertebrate blood-brain barrier field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through GPCR signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate blood-brain barrier has recently been shown to require coordinated function of all layers of the compound barrier structure, analogous to signaling between the layers of the vertebrate neurovascular unit. These findings strengthen the notion that many blood-brain barrier mechanisms are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest that novel findings in invertebrate model organisms will have a significant impact on the understanding of vertebrate BBB functions. In this vein, important roles in coordinating localized and systemic signaling to dictate organism development and growth are beginning to show how the blood-brain barrier can govern whole animal physiologies. This includes novel functions of blood-brain barrier gap junctions in orchestrating synchronized neuroblast proliferation, and of blood-brain barrier secreted antagonists of insulin receptor signaling. These advancements and others are pushing the field forward in exciting new directions. In this review, we provide a synopsis of invertebrate blood-brain barrier anatomy and physiology, with a focus on insights from the past 5 years, and highlight important areas for future study.

  2. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) disrupts blood-brain barrier integrity through a mechanism involving P2X7 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Araiz, Ana; Perez-Hernandez, Mercedes; Urrutia, Andrés; Porcu, Francesca; Borcel, Erika; Gutierrez-Lopez, Maria Dolores; O'Shea, Esther; Colado, Maria Isabel

    2014-08-01

    The recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; 'ecstasy') produces a neuro-inflammatory response in rats characterized by an increase in microglial activation and IL-1β levels. The integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is important in preserving the homeostasis of the brain and has been shown to be affected by neuro-inflammatory processes. We aimed to study the effect of a single dose of MDMA on the activity of metalloproteinases (MMPs), expression of extracellular matrix proteins, BBB leakage and the role of the ionotropic purinergic receptor P2X7 (P2X7R) in the changes induced by the drug. Adult male Dark Agouti rats were treated with MDMA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and killed at several time-points in order to evaluate MMP-9 and MMP-3 activity in the hippocampus and laminin and collagen-IV expression and IgG extravasation in the dentate gyrus. Microglial activation, P2X7R expression and localization were also determined in the dentate gyrus. Separate groups were treated with MDMA and the P2X7R antagonists Brilliant Blue G (BBG; 50 mg/kg, i.p.) or A-438079 (30 mg/kg, i.p.). MDMA increased MMP-3 and MMP-9 activity, reduced laminin and collagen-IV expression and increased IgG immunoreactivity. In addition, MDMA increased microglial activation and P2X7R immunoreactivity in these cells. BBG suppressed the increase in MMP-9 and MMP-3 activity, prevented basal lamina degradation and IgG extravasation into the brain parenchyma. A-438079 also prevented the MDMA-induced reduction in laminin and collagen-IV immunoreactivity. These results indicate that MDMA alters BBB permeability through an early P2X7R-mediated event, which in turn leads to enhancement of MMP-9 and MMP-3 activity and degradation of extracellular matrix.

  3. Prototype Hanford Surface Barrier: Design basis document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program (BDP) was organized in 1985 to develop the technology needed to provide a long-term surface barrier capability for the Hanford Site and other arid sites. This document provides the basis of the prototype barrier. Engineers and scientists have momentarily frozen evolving barrier designs and incorporated the latest findings from BDP tasks. The design and construction of the prototype barrier has required that all of the various components of the barrier be brought together into an integrated system. This integration is particularly important because some of the components of the protective barreir have been developed independently of other barreir components. This document serves as the baseline by which future modifications or other barrier designs can be compared. Also, this document contains the minutes of meeting convened during the definitive design process in which critical decisions affecting the prototype barrier's design were made and the construction drawings

  4. Integration of molecular-layer-deposited aluminum alkoxide interlayers into inorganic nanolaminate barriers for encapsulation of organic electronics with improved stress resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossbach, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.hossbach@tu-dresden.de; Fischer, Dustin; Albert, Matthias; Bartha, Johann W. [Institute of Semiconductor and Microsystems Technology, Technische Universität Dresden, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Nehm, Frederik, E-mail: frederik.nehm@iapp.de; Klumbies, Hannes; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Leo, Karl [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Singh, Aarti; Richter, Claudia; Schroeder, Uwe; Mikolajick, Thomas [Nanoelectronics Materials Laboratory NaMLab gGmbH, Nöthnitzer Str. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Diffusion barrier stacks for the encapsulation of organic electronics made from inorganic nanolaminates of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} with aluminum alkoxide interlayers have been deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and molecular layer deposition (MLD). As a part of the MLD process development, the deposition of aluminum alkoxide with low a density of about 1.7 g/cm{sup 3} was verified. The ALD/MLD diffusion barrier stack is meant to be deposited either on a polymer film, creating a flexible barrier substrate, or on top of a device on glass, creating a thin-film encapsulation. In order to measure the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) through the barrier, the device is replaced by a calcium layer acting as a water sensor in an electrical calcium test. For the barrier stack applied as thin-film encapsulation on glass substrates, high resolution scanning electron microscopy investigations indicate that the inorganic nanolaminates without MLD interlayers are brittle as they crack easily upon the stress induced by the corroding calcium below. The introduction of up to three MLD interlayers of 12 nm each into the 48 nm barrier film laminate successfully mitigates stress issues and prevents the barrier from cracking. Using the three MLD interlayer configurations on glass, WVTRs of as low as 10{sup −5} g/m{sup 2}/d are measured at 38 °C and 32% relative humidity. On polymer barrier substrates, the calcium is evaporated onto the barrier stack and encapsulated with a cavity glass. In this configuration, the corroding calcium has space for expansion and gas release without affecting the underlying barrier film. In consequence, a WVTR of about 3 × 10{sup −3} g/m{sup 2}/d is measured for all samples independently of the number of MLD interlayers. In conclusion, a stabilization and preservation of the ALD barrier film against mechanical stress is achieved by the introduction of MLD interlayers into the inorganic nanolaminate.

  5. Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration......Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration...

  6. PHARMACOVIGILANCE: BARRIERS AND CHALLENGES

    OpenAIRE

    Varma, S. K.; RAPELLIWAR A; S. Sutradhar; THAWARE P; Misra, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance is a new discipline which deals with adverse drug or any drug related problems. Pharmacovigilance programme was not bed of roses but its path is laid with challenges and barriers. It is facing obstacles from deficiency from professional health personal to web-based sale of drugs, counterfeit drug to self-medication, etc. It is an integral part of the health sector and identification and reporting of adverse drug effects will have a positive impact on the public health. Impro...

  7. Thermal barrier coating materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Clarke

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Improved thermal barrier coatings (TBCs will enable future gas turbines to operate at higher gas temperatures. Considerable effort is being invested, therefore, in identifying new materials with even better performance than the current industry standard, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ. We review recent progress and suggest that an integrated strategy of experiment, intuitive arguments based on crystallography, and simulation may lead most rapidly to the development of new TBC materials.

  8. Sensing of EGTA Mediated Barrier Tissue Disruption with an Organic Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherrine Tria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barrier tissue protects the body against external factors by restricting the passage of molecules. The gastrointestinal epithelium is an example of barrier tissue with the primary purpose of allowing the passage of ions and nutrients, while restricting the passage of pathogens and toxins. It is well known that the loss of barrier function can be instigated by a decrease in extracellular calcium levels, leading to changes in protein conformation and an increase in paracellular transport. In this study, ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid (EGTA, a calcium chelator, was used to disrupt the gastrointestinal epithelial barrier. The effect of EGTA on barrier tissue was monitored by a novel label-free method based on an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT integrated with living cells and validated against conventional methods for measuring barrier tissue integrity. We demonstrate that the OECT can detect breaches in barrier tissue upon exposure to EGTA with the same sensitivity as existing methods but with increased temporal resolution. Due to the potential of low cost processing techniques and the flexibility in design associated with organic electronics, the OECT has great potential for high-throughput, disposable sensing and diagnostics.

  9. Cryogenic Barrier Demonstration Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.A.; Yarmak, E.; Long, E.L.

    2000-03-01

    A long-term frozen soil barrier was implemented at the HRE (Homogeneous Reactor Experiment) Pond facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1997. This was performed to verify the technical feasibility and costs of deploying a frozen barrier at a radiologically contaminated site. Work began in September 1996 and progressed through to December 1999. The frozen barrier has been operational since November 1997. Verification of the barrier integrity was performed independently by the EPA's SITE Program. This project showed frozen barriers offer a proven technology to retain below grade hazardous substances at relatively low costs with minimal effect on the environment.

  10. The Tangle of Student Allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Norman J.

    1980-01-01

    A discussion of the distribution of student financial aid in Australia focuses on these issues: direct vs. indirect payment to students; inequality in living allowances given to secondary and postsecondary students; and distribution of expense allowances by state government and living allowances by the Commonwealth. (MSE)

  11. Effect of a Semi-Purified Oligosaccharide-Enriched Fraction from Caprine Milk on Barrier Integrity and Mucin Production of Co-Culture Models of the Small and Large Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M. Barnett

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Caprine milk contains the highest amount of oligosaccharides among domestic animals, which are structurally similar to human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs. This suggests caprine milk oligosaccharides may offer similar protective and developmental effects to that of HMOs. However, to date, studies using oligosaccharides from caprine milk have been limited. Thus, this study aimed to examine the impact of a caprine milk oligosaccharide-enriched fraction (CMOF on barrier function of epithelial cell co-cultures of absorptive enterocytes (Caco-2 cells and mucus-secreting goblet cells (HT29-MTX cells, that more closely simulate the cell proportions found in the small (90:10 and large intestine (75:25. Treatment of epithelial co-cultures with 0.4, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/mL of CMOF was shown to have no effect on metabolic activity but did enhance cell epithelial barrier integrity as measured by trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER, in a dose-dependent manner. The CMOF at the maximum concentration tested (4.0 mg/mL enhanced TEER, mucin gene expression and mucin protein abundance of epithelial co-cultures, all of which are essential components of intestinal barrier function.

  12. Development Strategies on Barrier-free Facility Integration of City Public Transportation System%城市公共交通无障碍设施一体化实施对策研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严亚丹; 过秀成

    2011-01-01

    Barrier-free construction of a public transportation system is an embodiment of human-oriented,transit priority policies and the requirement for promoting city grade.The relationship between the public transportation system and sustainable mobility was explored.The paper proposed a definition and the service objects of public transport barrier-free construction.Then,according to the existed problems in the process of accessibility construction of the public transportation system,the development strategies and measures from the perspectives of facility,design and management on barrier-free facility integration were discussed.%公共交通无障碍设施的建设是以人为本、公交优先的具体体现,亦是城市功能和品质提升的必然要求。论文探讨了公共交通与可持续机动性的关系,并在分析公共交通无障碍建设的服务对象和内涵的基础上,针对我国城市公共交通无障碍设施的建设现状,从设施配置、工程设计、运营管理等方面提出公共交通无障碍设施一体化的实施对策。

  13. Uropathogenic E. coli Promote a Paracellular Urothelial Barrier Defect Characterized by Altered Tight Junction Integrity, Epithelial Cell Sloughing and Cytokine Release

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, M W; Breitschwerdt, E B; Nordone, S.K.; Linder, K. E.; Gookin, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    The urinary bladder is a common site of bacterial infection with a majority of cases attributed to uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Sequels of urinary tract infections (UTIs) include the loss of urothelial barrier function and subsequent clinical morbidity secondary to the permeation of urine potassium, urea and ammonia into the subepithelium. To date there has been limited research describing the mechanism by which this urothelial permeability defect develops. The present study models acute u...

  14. Zinc oxide influences mitogen-activated protein kinase and TGF-β1 signaling pathways, and enhances intestinal barrier integrity in weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ze He; Xiao, Kan; Ke, Ya Lu; Jiao, Le Fei; Hu, Cai Hong

    2015-05-01

    Weaning is the most significant event in the life of pigs and is always related with intestinal disruption. Although it is well known that zinc oxide (ZnO) exerts beneficial effects on the intestinal barrier, the mechanisms underlying these effects have not yet been fully elucidated. We examined whether ZnO protects the intestinal barrier via mitogen-activated protein kinases and TGF-β1 signaling pathways. Twelve barrows weaned at 21 d of age were randomly assigned to two treatments (0 verus 2200 mg Zn/kg from ZnO) for 1 wk. The results showed that supplementation with ZnO increased daily gain and feed intake, and decreased postweaning scour scores. ZnO improved intestinal morphology, as indicated by increased villus height and villus height:crypt depth ratio, and intestinal barrier function, indicated by increased transepithelial electrical resistance and decreased mucosal-to-serosal permeability to 4-ku FITC dextran. ZnO decreased the ratios of the phosphorylated to total JNK and p38 (p-JNK/JNK and p-p38/p38), while it increased the ratio of ERK (p-ERK/ERK). Supplementation with ZnO increased intestinal TGF-β1 expression. The results indicate that supplementation with ZnO activates ERK ½, and inhibits JNK and p38 signaling pathways, and increases intestinal TGF-β1 expression in weaned pigs. PMID:24917655

  15. Hanford Protective Barriers Program asphalt barrier studies -- FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Protective Barrier (HPB) Program is evaluating alternative barriers to provide a means of meeting stringent water infiltration requirements. One type of alternative barrier being considered is an asphalt-based layer, 1.3 to 15 cm thick, which has been shown to be very effective as a barrier for radon gas and, hence, should be equally effective as a barrier for the larger molecules of water. Fiscal Year 1988 studies focused on the selection and formulation of the most promising asphalt materials for further testing in small-tube lysimeters. Results of laboratory-scale formulation and hydraulic conductivity tests led to the selection of a rubberized asphalt material and an admixture of 24 wt% asphalt emulsion and concrete sand as the two barriers for lysimeter testing. Eight lysimeters, four each containing the two asphalt treatments, were installed in the Small Tube Lysimeter Facility on the Hanford Site. The lysimeter tests allow the performance of these barrier formulations to be evaluated under more natural environmental conditions

  16. 'Integration'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2011-01-01

    , while the countries have adopted disparate policies and ideologies, differences in the actual treatment and attitudes towards immigrants and refugees in everyday life are less clear, due to parallel integration programmes based on strong similarities in the welfare systems and in cultural notions of...

  17. Apolipoprotein E Regulates the Integrity of Tight Junctions in an Isoform-dependent Manner in an in Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Hosono, Takashi; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Bu, Guojun; Michikawa, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a major apolipoprotein in the brain. The ϵ4 allele of apoE is a major risk factor for Alzheimer disease, and apoE deficiency in mice leads to blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage. However, the effect of apoE isoforms on BBB properties are as yet unknown. Here, using an in vitro BBB model consisting of brain endothelial cells and pericytes prepared from wild-type (WT) mice, and primary astrocytes prepared from human apoE3- and apoE4-knock-in mice, we show that the barri...

  18. Investigation of amorphous RuMoC alloy films as a seedless diffusion barrier for Cu/p-SiOC:H ultralow-k dielectric integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Guohua [Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Liu, Bo [Sichuan University, Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Chengdu (China); Li, Qiran [CNRS-Universite Paris Sud UMR 8622, Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, Orsay (France)

    2015-08-15

    Ultrathin RuMoC amorphous films prepared by magnetron co-sputtering with Ru and MoC targets in a sandwiched scheme Si/p-SiOC:H/RuMoC/Cu were investigated as barrier in copper metallization. The evolution of final microstructure of RuMoC alloy films show sensitive correlation with the content of doped Mo and C elements and can be easily controlled by adjusting the sputtering power of the MoC target. There was no signal of interdiffusion between the Cu and SiOC:H layer in the sample of Cu/RuMoC/p-SiOC:H/Si, even annealing up to 500 C. Very weak signal of oxygen have been confirmed in the RuMoC barrier layer both as-deposited and after being annealed, and a good performance on preventing oxygen diffusion has been proved. Leakage current and resistivity evaluations also reveal the excellent thermal reliability of this Si/p-SiOC:H/RuMoC/Cu film stack at the temperatures up to 500 C, indicating its potential application in the advanced barrierless Cu metallization. (orig.)

  19. Integrated Documents

    OpenAIRE

    Sawitzki, Günther

    2000-01-01

    An introduction to integrated documents in statistics. Integrated documents allow a seamless integration of interactive statistics and data analysis components in 'life' documents while keeping the full computational power needed for simulation or resampling.

  20. Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K. [National Regulatory Research Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

  1. BARRIERS, FACILITATORS AND SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS ASSOCIATED WITH CONDOM USAGE AMONGST MALE HIV INTEGRATED COUNSELLING AND TESTING CENTRE ATTENDEES AT THE GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL OF THORACIC MEDICINE, AN HIV TERTIARY CARE CENTRE IN CHENNAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Mahajan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV is transmitted largely through sexual route which can be prevented by using condoms. The objectives of this study were to describe condom usage with various barriers, facilitators and to determine association between different socioeconomic characteristics among male Integrated Counselling and Testing Centre (ICTC attendees. Methods: This is a hospital based cross sectional study (n=300. Clients (18-45years attending ICTC for first time, between June-October ‘2010, were interviewed with structured questionnaire after obtaining informed consent. Description of demographic characteristics of respondents; univariate, multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed for estimation of association. Results: Among respondents, awareness of HIV and condom were 80% and 85.3% respectively; Knowledge of prevention from STI/HIV (97.7% was most common facilitator while forgetfulness after drinking alcohol (64.1% was most common barrier to use condom; Respondents who had education up to secondary or above level were more associated with condom usage (AOR 2.9,95%CI1.34-6.24, after adjusting for income compared to non educated respondents; considering less than Indian rupee (INR 3000 per month as reference category, there were association of condom usage among relatively higher income groups between INR.3000 to 5000 per month (AOR 2.6, 95%CI 1.38-5.0,adjusting education and income above INR5000 per month (AOR 2.85,95%CI1.37-5.9, adjusting education. Conclusions: Condom usage was independently associated with education and income level of respondents. Forgetfulness after drinking alcohol was main barrier; knowledge of prevention from HIV was main facilitator of condom usage. Dissemination of knowledge regarding facilitator of condom usage and implementation of Rapid Needs Assessment Tool for Condom Programming can encourage condom use.

  2. The network paradigm in criminal justice: an exploratory mixed methods study of the barriers to its integration into Europol’s analysis environment

    OpenAIRE

    Mainas, Efstathios

    2015-01-01

    This doctoral thesis examined the paradoxically difficult integration of Social Network Analysis (SNA), as a principal analytical approach, in the supranational intelligence and law enforcement environment of Europol. This real-world problem was systematically investigated with the use of an exploratory mixed methods design. Initially, a questionnaire survey, focussing on the perceptions of the whole population of Europol’s operational analysts (N=77) and achieving a high response rate of 75%...

  3. ELECTROSTATICALLY ENHANCED BARRIER FILTER COLLECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Erjavec; Michael D. Mann; Ryan Z. Knutson; Michael L. Swanson; Michael E. Collings

    2003-06-01

    This work was performed through the University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department with assistance from UND's Energy & Environmental Research Center. This research was undertaken in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Technology Center Program Solicitation No. DE-PS26-99FT40479, Support of Advanced Coal Research at U.S. Universities and Colleges. Specifically, this research was in support of the UCR Core Program and addressees Topic 1, Improved Hot-Gas Contaminant and Particulate Removal Techniques, introducing an advanced design for particulate removal. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) offers the potential for very high efficiency and clean electric generation. In IGCC, the product gas from the gasifier needs to be cleaned of particulate matter to avoid erosion and high-temperature corrosion difficulties arising with the turbine blades. Current methods involve cooling the gases to {approx}100 C to condense alkalis and remove sulfur and particulates using conventional scrubber technology. This ''cool'' gas is then directed to a turbine for electric generation. While IGCC has the potential to reach efficiencies of over 50%, the current need to cool the product gas for cleaning prior to firing it in a turbine is keeping IGCC from reaching its full potential. The objective of the current project was to develop a highly reliable particulate collector system that can meet the most stringent turbine requirements and emission standards, can operate at temperatures above 1500 F, is applicable for use with all U.S. coals, is compatible with various sorbent injection schemes for sulfur and alkali control, can be integrated into a variety of configurations for both pressurized gasification and combustion, increases allowable face velocity to reduce filter system capital cost, and is cost-competitive with existing technologies. The collector being developed is a new concept in particulate control called

  4. Sleep fragmentation and sepsis differentially impact blood-brain barrier integrity and transport of tumor necrosis factor-α in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opp, Mark R; George, Amrita; Ringgold, Kristyn M; Hansen, Kim M; Bullock, Kristin M; Banks, William A

    2015-11-01

    The factors by which aging predisposes to critical illness are varied, complex, and not well understood. Sepsis is considered a quintessential disease of old age because the incidence and mortality of severe sepsis increases in old and the oldest old individuals. Aging is associated with dramatic changes in sleep quality and quantity and sleep increasingly becomes fragmented with age. In healthy adults, sleep disruption induces inflammation. Multiple aspects of aging and of sleep dysregulation interact via neuroimmune mechanisms. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), a cytokine involved in sleep regulation and neuroimmune processes, exerts some of its effects on the CNS by crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In this study we examined the impact of sepsis, sleep fragmentation, and aging on BBB disruption and TNF transport into brain. We used the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis in young and aged mice that were either undisturbed or had their sleep disrupted. There was a dichotomous effect of sepsis and sleep disruption with age: sepsis disrupted the BBB and increased TNF transport in young mice but not in aged mice, whereas sleep fragmentation disrupted the BBB and increased TNF transport in aged mice, but not in young mice. Combining sleep fragmentation and CLP did not produce a greater effect on either of these BBB parameters than did either of these manipulations alone. These results suggest that the mechanisms by which sleep fragmentation and sepsis alter BBB functions are fundamentally different from one another and that a major change in the organism's responses to those insults occurs with aging.

  5. Integrating Multiple Measurement Techniques to Understand how the Delivery of Sediments to the Great Barrier Reef has Changed Over Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, R.; Bainbridge, Z. T.; Lewis, S.; Wilkinson, S. N.; Croke, J.; Bastin, G.; Brodie, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Based on the ratio of various trace-elements from coral cores, there is considerable evidence that the amount of sediment reaching the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia, has increased since agricultural development commenced in the 1870's. However, understanding the primary source and processes driving the increase in sediment delivery has been challenging due to the variable geology and episodic hydrology of adjacent catchments. This paper presents the results from several projects that use a range of measurement techniques all aimed at understanding the spatial and temporal changes in sediment yield from the Burdekin watershed, Australia. Cosmogenic nuclide analysis (10Be) was combined with contemporary sediment flux monitoring to help identify the high risk sub-watersheds. Particle size analysis of the sediment loads from the sub-watersheds has determined the primary source areas for the fine (clay) sediment fractions. Within the sub-watersheds, fallout radionuclides (137Cs, 7Pb and 7Be) showed that most of the fine sediment is coming from vertical channel walls (50%) or horizontal sub-surface soils (~42%). Changes to in-stream sedimentation rates, derived from OSL dating, suggest that sediment delivery to channels lags behind reductions to vegetative ground cover. Historical archives of remotely sensed ground cover data were then linked to animal stocking rates in the area. Together, these data sets help elucidate the often complex sediment delivery processes and provide a stronger link between grazing land management and sediment flux to the GBR. This study highlights the benefit of using a range of techniques and data sets to identify the major sediment sources in these highly variable systems. The implications for land management restoration, policy and investment are discussed.

  6. Interorganisational Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anne Marie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Frølich, Anne

    2016-01-01

    at a university hospital in the Capital Region of Denmark. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Our results can be grouped into five influencing areas for interorganisational integration: communication/information transfer, committed leadership, patient engagement, the role and competencies of the general practitioner......INTRODUCTION: Despite many initiatives to improve coordination of patient pathways and intersectoral cooperation, Danish health care is still fragmented, lacking intra- and interorganisational integration. This study explores barriers to and facilitators of interorganisational integration...

  7. PHARMACOVIGILANCE: BARRIERS AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VARMA S. K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacovigilance is a new discipline which deals with adverse drug or any drug related problems. Pharmacovigilance programme was not bed of roses but its path is laid with challenges and barriers. It is facing obstacles from deficiency from professional health personal to web-based sale of drugs, counterfeit drug to self-medication, etc. It is an integral part of the health sector and identification and reporting of adverse drug effects will have a positive impact on the public health. Improvement in knowledge in pharmacovigilance and communication from the top level to the grass-root level in the health sector will help in proper implementation of the programme. Patient should be educated to report any adverse effects after taking drug and stop relaying on acquiring information related to drugs in web. Proper detection, reporting and analysis would help to implement the programme for the betterment of society.

  8. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Avsenik Jernej; Bisdas Sotirios; Popovic Katarina Surlan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with patholog...

  9. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avsenik Jernej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Long distance relationships : the secret for fuel cell success? fuel cell developers and integrators form trans-oceanic partnerships to crash through cultural barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The varieties of viable fuel cell applications and widely varying regional market conditions have created global partnerships among entities with complementary attributes. Although it may appear that domestic liaisons among culturally similar players spawned from industry clusters should provide the clearest route to success in this industry, it is the intercontinental groupings which are demonstrating the most potential. This paper discussed the global fuel cell challenge and the vertical integration of multi-national partnerships. The paper also discussed the current global stationary market in perspective. Fuel cells require unique maintenance, support, and refueling including operator instruction and a new supply infrastructure. The paper addressed the fact that fuel cells represent a disruptive technology. A telecom backup status report was also presented. Other topics that were discussed included developing markets as well as specific examples of global organizations such as Canadian Ballard and Danish Dantherm Power and their fuel cell application solutions. It was concluded that after an inconsistent history, fuel cells have finally achieved viability in the real world. However, there is significant cultural resistance to their implementation in the United States. 4 figs

  11. Economic integration in the Americas

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    This pioneering study shows that economic integration in the Americas is not simply a matter of removing trade barriers. Economic Integration in the Americas addresses the pervasive effects of economic integration on the economy as a whole.

  12. Wave packet propagation across barriers by semiclassical initial value methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jakob; Kay, Kenneth G.

    2015-07-01

    Semiclassical initial value representation (IVR) formulas for the propagator have difficulty describing tunneling through barriers. A key reason is that these formulas do not automatically reduce, in the classical limit, to the version of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller (VVG) propagator required to treat barrier tunneling, which involves trajectories that have complex initial conditions and that follow paths in complex time. In this work, a simple IVR expression, that has the correct tunneling form in the classical limit, is derived for the propagator in the case of one-dimensional barrier transmission. Similarly, an IVR formula, that reduces to the Generalized Gaussian Wave Packet Dynamics (GGWPD) expression [D. Huber, E. J. Heller, and R. Littlejohn, J. Chem. Phys. 89, 2003 (1988)] in the classical limit, is derived for the transmitted wave packet. Uniform semiclassical versions of the IVR formulas are presented and simplified expressions in terms of real trajectories and WKB penetration factors are described. Numerical tests show that the uniform IVR treatment gives good results for wave packet transmission through the Eckart and Gaussian barriers in all cases examined. In contrast, even when applied with the proper complex trajectories, the VVG and GGWPD treatments are inaccurate when the mean energy of the wave packet is near the classical transmission threshold. The IVR expressions for the propagator and wave packet are cast as contour integrals in the complex space of initial conditions and these are generalized to potentially allow treatment of a larger variety of systems. A steepest descent analysis of the contour integral formula for the wave packet in the present cases confirms its relationship to the GGWPD method, verifies its semiclassical validity, and explains results of numerical calculations.

  13. Barriers to predicting changes in global terrestrial methane fluxes: analyses using CLM4Me, a methane biogeochemistry model integrated in CESM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Riley

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial net CH4 surface fluxes often represent the difference between much larger gross production and consumption fluxes and depend on multiple physical, biological, and chemical mechanisms that are poorly understood and represented in regional- and global-scale biogeochemical models. To characterize uncertainties, study feedbacks between CH4 fluxes and climate, and to guide future model development and experimentation, we developed and tested a new CH4 biogeochemistry model (CLM4Me integrated in the land component (Community Land Model; CLM4 of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1. CLM4Me includes representations of CH4 production, oxidation, aerenchyma transport, ebullition, aqueous and gaseous diffusion, and fractional inundation. As with most global models, CLM4 lacks important features for predicting current and future CH4 fluxes, including: vertical representation of soil organic matter, accurate subgrid scale hydrology, realistic representation of inundated system vegetation, anaerobic decomposition, thermokarst dynamics, and aqueous chemistry. We compared the seasonality and magnitude of predicted CH4 emissions to observations from 18 sites and three global atmospheric inversions. Simulated net CH4 emissions using our baseline parameter set were 270, 160, 50, and 70 Tg CH4 yr−1 globally, in the tropics, in the temperate zone, and north of 45° N, respectively; these values are within the range of previous estimates. We then used the model to characterize the sensitivity of regional and global CH4 emission estimates to uncertainties in model parameterizations. Of the parameters we tested, the temperature sensitivity of CH4 production, oxidation parameters, and aerenchyma properties had the largest impacts on net CH4 emissions, up to a factor of 4 and 10 at the regional and gridcell scales

  14. Barriers to predicting changes in global terrestrial methane fluxes: analyses using CLM4Me, a methane biogeochemistry model integrated in CESM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Riley

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial net CH4 surface fluxes often represent the difference between much larger gross production and consumption fluxes and depend on multiple physical, biological, and chemical mechanisms that are poorly understood and represented in regional- and global-scale biogeochemical models. To characterize uncertainties, study feedbacks between CH4 fluxes and climate, and to guide future model development and experimentation, we developed and tested a new CH4 biogeochemistry model (CLM4Me integrated in the land component (Community Land Model; CLM4 of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1. CLM4Me includes representations of CH4 production, oxidation, aerenchymous transport, ebullition, aqueous and gaseous diffusion, and fractional inundation. As with most global models, CLM4Me lacks important features for predicting current and future CH4 fluxes, including: vertical representation of soil organic matter, accurate subgrid scale hydrology, realistic representation of inundated system vegetation, anaerobic decomposition, thermokarst dynamics, and aqueous chemistry. We compared the seasonality and magnitude of predicted CH4 emissions to observations from 18 sites and three global atmospheric inversions. Simulated net CH4 emissions using our baseline parameter set were 270, 160, 50, and 70 Tg CH4 m−2 yr−1 globally, in the tropics, temperate zone, and north of 45° N, respectively; these values are within the range of previous estimates. We then used the model to characterize the sensitivity of regional and global CH4 emission estimates to uncertainties in model parameterizations. Of the parameters we tested, the temperature sensitivity of CH4 production, oxidation parameters, and aerenchyma properties had the largest impacts on net CH4 emissions, up to a factor of 4 and 10 at the regional and gridcell

  15. Extremal surface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C. [Department of Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-03-13

    We present a generic condition for Lorentzian manifolds to have a barrier that limits the reach of boundary-anchored extremal surfaces of arbitrary dimension. We show that any surface with nonpositive extrinsic curvature is a barrier, in the sense that extremal surfaces cannot be continuously deformed past it. Furthermore, the outermost barrier surface has nonnegative extrinsic curvature. Under certain conditions, we show that the existence of trapped surfaces implies a barrier, and conversely. In the context of AdS/CFT, these barriers imply that it is impossible to reconstruct the entire bulk using extremal surfaces. We comment on the implications for the firewall controversy.

  16. The blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeier, Birgit; Verma, Ajay; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    In autoimmune neurologic disorders, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a central role in immunopathogenesis, since this vascular interface is an entry path for cells and effector molecules of the peripheral immune system to reach the target organ, the central nervous system (CNS). The BBB's unique anatomic structure and the tightly regulated interplay of its cellular and acellular components allow for maintenance of brain homeostasis, regulation of influx and efflux, and protection from harm; these ensure an optimal environment for the neuronal network to function properly. In both health and disease, the BBB acts as mediator between the periphery and the CNS. For example, immune cell trafficking through the cerebral vasculature is essential to clear microbes or cell debris from neural tissues, while poorly regulated cellular transmigration can underlie or worsen CNS pathology. In this chapter, we focus on the specialized multicellular structure and function of the BBB/neurovascular unit and discuss how BBB breakdown can precede or be a consequence of neuroinflammation. We introduce the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and include a brief aside about evolutionary aspects of barrier formation and refinements. Lastly, since restoration of barrier function is considered key to ameliorate neurologic disease, we speculate about new therapeutic avenues to repair a damaged BBB. PMID:27112670

  17. Quantifying system safety: A comparison of the SBOAT & Safety Barrier Manager tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee; Duijm, Nijs Jan; Markert, Frank;

    2015-01-01

    of valid safety-barrier diagrams and allows the quantitative analysis of the probability of all possible end states of the barrier diagram, i.e. the outcomes if one or several of the barriers fail to perform their barrier function. We compare the foundations of these tools and describe how they can be used...

  18. Penetration through the Skin Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Benfeldt, Eva; Holmgaard, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    . During recent decades, the latter has received increased attention as a route for intentionally delivering drugs to patients. This has stimulated research in methods for sampling, measuring and predicting percutaneous penetration. Previous chapters have described how different endogenous, genetic...... and exogenous factors may affect barrier characteristics. The present chapter introduces the theory for barrier penetration (Fick's law), and describes and discusses different methods for measuring the kinetics of percutaneous penetration of chemicals, including in vitro methods (static and flow......-through diffusion cells) as well as in vivo methods (microdialysis and microperfusion). Then follows a discussion with examples of how different characteristics of the skin (age, site and integrity) and of the penetrants (size, solubility, ionization, logPow and vehicles) affect the kinetics of percutaneous...

  19. An Ideal Integrating Bolometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An ideal integrating bolometer can achieve breakthrough sensitivity in IR photon detection by removing practical barriers to extreme thermal isolation of the...

  20. Multilayer moisture barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  1. Overcoming Barriers to Classroom Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Technology-savvy teachers are often the "go to" staff members in schools for their colleagues' technology issues. These teachers are seen as leaders within their schools with respect to technology and often do not understand their peers' difficulties when bringing technology into the classroom. Understanding both the reasons teachers may…

  2. High Integrity Can Design Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaber, E.L.

    1998-08-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is chartered with facilitating the disposition of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel to allow disposal at a geologic repository. This is done through coordination with the repository program and by assisting DOE Site owners of SNF with needed information, standardized requirements, packaging approaches, etc. The High Integrity Can (HIC) will be manufactured to provide a substitute or barrier enhancement for normal fuel geometry and cladding. The can would be nested inside the DOE standardized canister which is designed to interface with the repository waste package. The HIC approach may provide the following benefits over typical canning approaches for DOE SNF. (a) It allows ready calculation and management of criticality issues for miscellaneous. (b) It segments and further isolates damaged or otherwise problem materials from normal SNF in the repository package. (c) It provides a very long term corrosion barrier. (d) It provides an extra internal pressure barrier for particulates, gaseous fission products, hydrogen, and water vapor. (e) It delays any potential release of fission products to the repository environment. (f) It maintains an additional level of fuel geometry control during design basis accidents, rock-fall, and seismic events. (g) When seal welded, it could provide the additional containment required for shipments involving plutonium content in excess of 20 Ci. (10 CFR 71.63.b) if integrated with an appropriate cask design. Long term corrosion protection is central to the HIC concept. The material selected for the HIC (Hastelloy C-22) has undergone extensive testing for repository service. The most severe theoretical interactions between iron, repository water containing chlorides and other repository construction materials have been tested. These expected chemical species have not been shown capable of corroding the selected HIC material. Therefore, the HIC should provide a significant barrier to DOE SNF dispersal

  3. High Integrity Can Design Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is chartered with facilitating the disposition of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel to allow disposal at a geologic repository. This is done through coordination with the repository program and by assisting DOE Site owners of SNF with needed information, standardized requirements, packaging approaches, etc. The High Integrity Can (HIC) will be manufactured to provide a substitute or barrier enhancement for normal fuel geometry and cladding. The can would be nested inside the DOE standardized canister which is designed to interface with the repository waste package. The HIC approach may provide the following benefits over typical canning approaches for DOE SNF. (a) It allows ready calculation and management of criticality issues for miscellaneous. (b) It segments and further isolates damaged or otherwise problem materials from normal SNF in the repository package. (c) It provides a very long term corrosion barrier. (d) It provides an extra internal pressure barrier for particulates, gaseous fission products, hydrogen, and water vapor. (e) It delays any potential release of fission products to the repository environment. (f) It maintains an additional level of fuel geometry control during design basis accidents, rock-fall, and seismic events. (g) When seal welded, it could provide the additional containment required for shipments involving plutonium content in excess of 20 Ci. (10 CFR 71.63.b) if integrated with an appropriate cask design. Long term corrosion protection is central to the HIC concept. The material selected for the HIC (Hastelloy C-22) has undergone extensive testing for repository service. The most severe theoretical interactions between iron, repository water containing chlorides and other repository construction materials have been tested. These expected chemical species have not been shown capable of corroding the selected HIC material. Therefore, the HIC should provide a significant barrier to DOE SNF dispersal

  4. Overcoming the Bradyon-Tachyon Barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Nanni, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the problem of overcoming the infinite energy barrier separating the bradyonic and tachyonic realms is investigated. Making use of the Majorana equation for particles with arbitrary spin and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, it is proved that, under certain conditions of spatial confinement, quantum fluctuations allow particles with very small mass and velocity close to the speed of light to pass in the tachyonic realm, avoiding the problem of the infinite barrier. This theoretical approach allows an avoidance of the difficulties encountered in quantum field theory when it is extended to particles with imaginary rest mass.

  5. Potential in vitro model for testing the effect of exposure to nanoparticles on the lung alveolar epithelial barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Derk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary barrier function plays a pivotal role in protection from inhaled particles. However, some nano-scaled particles, such as carbon nanotubes (CNT, have demonstrated the ability to penetrate this barrier in animal models, resulting in an unusual, rapid interstitial fibrosis. To delineate the underlying mechanism and specific bio-effect of inhaled nanoparticles in respiratory toxicity, models of lung epithelial barriers are required that allow accurate representation of in vivo systems; however, there is currently a lack of consistent methods to do so. Thus, this work demonstrates a well-characterized in vitro model of pulmonary barrier function using Calu-3 cells, and provides the experimental conditions required for achieving tight junction complexes in cell culture, with trans-epithelial electrical resistance measurement used as a biosensor for proper barrier formation and integrity. The effects of cell number and serum constituents have been examined and we found that changes in each of these parameters can greatly affect barrier formation. Our data demonstrate that use of 5.0 × 104 Calu-3 cells/well in the Transwell cell culture system, with 10% serum concentrations in culture media is optimal for assessing epithelial barrier function. In addition, we have utilized CNT exposure to analyze the dose-, time-, and nanoparticle property-dependent alterations of epithelial barrier permeability as a means to validate this model. Such high throughput in vitro cell models of the epithelium could be used to predict the interaction of other nanoparticles with lung epithelial barriers to mimic respiratory behavior in vivo, thus providing essential tools and bio-sensing techniques that can be uniformly employed.

  6. Advances in research on labyrinth membranous barriers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenfang Sun; Wuqing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Integrity of the membranous labyrinth barrier system is of critical importance, which promotes inner ear homeostasis and maintains its features. The membranous labyrinth barrier system is divided into several subsets of barriers which, although independent from each other, are interrelated. The same substance may demonstrate different permeability characteristics through different barriers and under different conditions, while different substances can have different permeability features even in the same barrier under the same condition. All parts of the mem-branous labyrinth barrier structure, including their morphology, enzymes and channel proteins, and theirs permeability characteristics under various physiological and pathological conditions are reviewed in this paper. Infections, noise exposure, ototoxicity may all increase perme-ability of the barriers and lead to disturbances in inner ear homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production & hosting by Elsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd On behalf of PLA General Hospital Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  7. Economic analysis of engineered sorbent barrier technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the incremental cost of placing an engineered sorbent barrier beneath a shallow land burial (SLB) site in a humid climate. The cost estimates are also applicable to alternative uses of sorbent barrier technology such as redundant barriers around below-grade vaults. The preliminary costs presented represent only rough order-of-magnitude estimates. Further information obtained from field studies and refined performance models would allow a more precise cost estimate to be prepared. Flow-through column tests have shown that clinoptilolite is much more effective in sorbing strontium than indicated previously. The effectiveness of the barrier for cobalt was not as good as that measured previously. The costs in this paper are based on these updated data. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  8. Tunneling without barriers with gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Kanno, Sugumi; Sasaki, Misao; Soda, Jiro

    2012-01-01

    We consider the vacuum decay of the flat Minkowski space to an anti-de Sitter space. We find a one-parameter family of potentials that allow exact, analytical instanton solutions describing tunneling without barriers in the presence of gravity. In the absence of gravity such instantons were found and discussed by Lee and Weinberg more than a quarter of a century ago. The bounce action is also analytically computed. We discuss possible implications of these new instantons to cosmology in the c...

  9. Breaking the Barriers in Chinese Female Career Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Career development is an important part of modern human resource management. Women are an important and integral part in human resources. Paying at ention to women's career development can’t be ignored both for women own career development and the economic development of society. But compared to men, the Chinese women encounter more barriers in the process of career development, the purpose of this paper is to analyze these barriers and put forward corresponding countermeasures to break the barriers.

  10. Numerical valuation of discrete double barrier options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, Mariyan; Tagliani, Aldo

    2010-03-01

    In the present paper we explore the problem for pricing discrete barrier options utilizing the Black-Scholes model for the random movement of the asset price. We postulate the problem as a path integral calculation by choosing approach that is similar to the quadrature method. Thus, the problem is reduced to the estimation of a multi-dimensional integral whose dimension corresponds to the number of the monitoring dates. We propose a fast and accurate numerical algorithm for its valuation. Our results for pricing discretely monitored one and double barrier options are in agreement with those obtained by other numerical and analytical methods in Finance and literature. A desired level of accuracy is very fast achieved for values of the underlying asset close to the strike price or the barriers. The method has a simple computer implementation and it permits observing the entire life of the option.

  11. Permanent isolation surface barrier development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exhumation and treatment of wastes may not always be the preferred alternative in the remediation of a waste site. In-place disposal alternatives, under certain circumstances, may be the most desirable alternatives to use in the protection of human health and the environment. The implementation of an in-place disposal alternative will likely require some type of protective covering that will provide long-term isolation of the wastes from the accessible environment. Even if the wastes are exhumed and treated, a long-term barrier may still be needed to adequately dispose of the treated wastes or any remaining waste residuals. Currently, no open-quotes provenclose quotes long-term barrier is available. The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program (BDP) was organized to develop the technology needed to provide a long-term surface barrier capability for the Hanford Site. The permanent isolation barrier technology also could be used at other sites. Permanent isolation barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with redundant protective features. Drawings of conceptual permanent isolation surface barriers are shown. The natural construction materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, asphalt) have been selected to optimize barrier performance and longevity. The objective of current designs is to use natural materials to develop a maintenance-free permanent isolation surface barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1,000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts; reducing the likelihood of plant, animal, and human intrusion; controlling the exhalation of noxious gases; and minimizing erosion-related problems

  12. Permanent isolation surface barrier development plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wing, N.R.

    1994-01-01

    The exhumation and treatment of wastes may not always be the preferred alternative in the remediation of a waste site. In-place disposal alternatives, under certain circumstances, may be the most desirable alternatives to use in the protection of human health and the environment. The implementation of an in-place disposal alternative will likely require some type of protective covering that will provide long-term isolation of the wastes from the accessible environment. Even if the wastes are exhumed and treated, a long-term barrier may still be needed to adequately dispose of the treated wastes or any remaining waste residuals. Currently, no {open_quotes}proven{close_quotes} long-term barrier is available. The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program (BDP) was organized to develop the technology needed to provide a long-term surface barrier capability for the Hanford Site. The permanent isolation barrier technology also could be used at other sites. Permanent isolation barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with redundant protective features. Drawings of conceptual permanent isolation surface barriers are shown. The natural construction materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, asphalt) have been selected to optimize barrier performance and longevity. The objective of current designs is to use natural materials to develop a maintenance-free permanent isolation surface barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1,000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts; reducing the likelihood of plant, animal, and human intrusion; controlling the exhalation of noxious gases; and minimizing erosion-related problems.

  13. Penetrating the Barriers to Teaching Higher Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supon, Viola

    1998-01-01

    Considers five ways to overcome barriers teachers face when they attempt to create thinking classrooms: (1) acquisition of conscious commitment; (2) legitimization of students' experiences; (3) integration of visualizing into the curriculum; (4) use of reflective analysis; and (5) diversification of perspectives. (SR)

  14. 49 CFR 266.11 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 266.11 Section 266.11... TRANSPORTATION ACT § 266.11 Allowable costs. Allowable costs include only the following costs which are properly allocable to the work performed: Planning and program operation costs which are allowed under...

  15. The blood-tendon barrier: identification and characterisation of a novel tissue barrier in tendon blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, C; Gehwolf, R; Ek, J C; Korntner, S; Bauer, H; Bauer, H C; Traweger, A; Tempfer, H

    2016-01-01

    Tissue barriers function as "gate keepers" between different compartments (usually blood and tissue) and are formed by specialised membrane-associated proteins, localising to the apicolateral plasma membrane domain of epithelial and endothelial cells. By sealing the paracellular space, the free diffusion of solutes and molecules across epithelia and endothelia is impeded. Thereby, tissue barriers contribute to the establishment and maintenance of a distinct internal and external environment, which is crucial during organ development and allows maintenance of an organ-specific homeostatic milieu. So far, various epithelial and endothelial tissue barriers have been described, including the blood-brain barrier, the blood-retina barrier, the blood-testis barrier, the blood-placenta barrier, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-brain barrier, which are vital for physiological function and any disturbance of these barriers can result in severe organ damage or even death. Here, we describe the identification of a novel barrier, located in the vascular bed of tendons, which we term the blood-tendon barrier (BTB). By using immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and tracer studies we demonstrate the presence of a functional endothelial barrier within tendons restricting the passage of large blood-borne molecules into the surrounding tendon tissue. We further provide in vitro evidence that the BTB potentially contributes to the creation of a distinct internal tissue environment impacting upon the proliferation and differentiation of tendon-resident cells, effects which might be fundamental for the onset of tendon pathologies. PMID:27227787

  16. Barriers to Implementing E-Learning: A Kuwaiti Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ghadah Essa; Magalhaes, Rodrigo

    2008-01-01

    The paper reports on a research project that encompasses two key objectives: (1) finding out about the barriers affecting or preventing e-learning from being adopted by companies as an integral part of their workforce's training and learning processes and (2) establishing a comparison between the barriers and the e-learning implementation models…

  17. Barreras y facilitadores de la coordinación asistencial en dos organizaciones sanitarias integradas en Cataluña Barriers and facilitators to health care coordination in two integrated health care organizations in Catalonia (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Vargas Lorenzo

    2007-04-01

    exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study was carried out based on case studies by means of document analysis and semi-structured individual interviews. A criterion sample of cases and, for each case, of documents and informants was selected. Study cases consisted of the Consorci Sanitari del Maresme (CSdM and the Consorci Sanitari de Terrassa/Fundació Hospital Sant Llàtzer (FHSLL. A total of 127 documents were analyzed and 29 informants were interviewed: IDS managers (n = 10, technical staff (n = 5, operational unit managers (n = 5 and health professionals (n = 9. Content analysis was conducted, with mixed generation of categories and segmentation by cases and subjects. Results: CSdM and CSdT/FHSLL are health care organizations with backward vertical integration, total services production, and real (CSdM and virtual (CSdT/FHSLL ownership. Funds are allocated by care level. The governing body is centralized in CSdM and decentralized in CSdT/FHSLL. In both organizations, the global objectives are oriented toward improving coordination and efficiency but are not in line with those of the operational units. Both organizations present a functional structure with integration of support functions and utilize mechanisms for collaboration between care levels based on work processes standardization. Conclusions: Both IDS present facilitators and barriers to health care coordination. To improve coordination, changes in external elements (payment mechanism and in internal elements (governing body role, organizational structure and coordination mechanisms are required.

  18. An insight into the performance of road barriers - redistribution of barrier-relevant crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yaotian; Tarko, Andrew P

    2016-11-01

    Unlike most of traffic safety treatments that prevent crashes, road barriers reduce the severity of crash outcomes by replacing crashes with a high risk of severe injury and fatality (such as median crossover head-on collisions or collisions with high-hazard objects) with less risky events (such as collisions with barriers). This "crash conversion" is actually more complex than one-to-one replacement and it has not been studied yet. The published work estimated the reduction of selected types of crashes (typically, median crossover collisions) or the overall effect of barriers on crash severity. The objective of this study was to study the probabilities of various types of crash events possible under various road and barrier scenarios. The estimated probabilities are conditional given that at least one vehicle left the travelled way and the resulted crash had been recorded. The results are meant to deliver a useful insight onto the conversion of crashes by barriers from more to less risky to help better understand the mechanism of crash severity reduction. Such knowledge should allow engineers more accurate estimation of barriers' benefits and help researchers evaluate barriers' performance to improve the barrier's design. Seven barrier-relevant crash events possible after a vehicle departs the road could be identified based on the existing crash data and their probabilities estimated given the presence and location of three types of barriers: median concrete barriers, median and roadside W-beam steel guardrails, and high-tension median cable barriers. A multinomial logit model with variable outcomes was estimated based on 2049 barrier-relevant crashes occurred between 2003 and 2012 on 1258 unidirectional travelled ways in Indiana. The developed model allows calculating the changes in the probabilities of the barrier-relevant crash events. The results of this study indicated that road departures lead to less frequent crossings of unprotected (no barriers) medians

  19. Complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An infrared detector having a hole barrier region adjacent to one side of an absorber region, an electron barrier region adjacent to the other side of the absorber region, and a semiconductor adjacent to the electron barrier.

  20. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a converse barrier certificate theorem for a generic dynamical system.We show that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system defined on a compact manifold. Other authors have developed a related result, by assuming that the dynamical system has no singular...... points in the considered subset of the state space. In this paper, we redefine the standard notion of safety to comply with generic dynamical systems with multiple singularities. Afterwards, we prove the converse barrier certificate theorem and illustrate the differences between ours and previous work by...

  1. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, C M

    2012-01-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf system for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf systems, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  2. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  3. Structure formation in a DC-driven "barrier" discharge:

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebert, U.; Rafatov, I.; Sijacic, D.; Schmidt, J.; Simek, M.; Pekarek, S.; Prukner, V.

    2007-01-01

    A DC-driven "barrier" discharge is a gas discharge layer and a high-Ohmic semiconductor layer sandwiched between planar electrodes to which a DC voltage is applied. The system resembles a dielectric barrier discharge, but is even simpler, as the external boundary conditions allow for a completely ho

  4. An overview on novel thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN; Feng; YU; Yue-guang; JIANG; Xian-liang; ZENG; Ke-li; REN; Xian-jing

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) offer the potential to significantly improve efficiencies of aero engines as well as stationary gas turbines for power generation. On internally cooled turbine parts, temperature gradients of the order of 100-150℃ can be achieved. TBCs, typically consisting of an yttrium stabilized zirconia top coat and a metallic bond coat deposited onto a superalloy substrate, are mainly used to extend lifetime. Further efficiency improvements require TBCs being an integral part of the component which requires reliable and predictable TBC performance. TBCs produced by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EbPVD) or plasma spray (PS) deposition are favored for high performance applications. The paper highlights critical R&D needs for advanced TBC systems with a special focus on reduced thermal conductivity and life prediction needs. To further enhance the efficiency of gas turbines, higher temperature and a longer lifetime of the coating are needed for the next generation of TBCs. This paper presents the development of new materials, new deposition technologies, and new concept for application as novel TBCs. This paper summarizes the basic properties of conventional thermal barrier coatings. Based on our own investigation, we reviewed the progress on materials and technologies of novel thermal barrier coatings. Except yttria stabilized zirconia, other materials such as lanthanum zirconate and rare earth oxides are also promising materials for thermal barrier coatings. Nanostructure thermal barrier coating is presented as a new concept. This paper also summarizes the technologies for depositing the thermal barrier coatings.

  5. Allowance Holdings and Transfers Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Allowance Holdings and Transfers Data Inventory contains measured data on holdings and transactions of allowances under the NOx Budget Trading Program (NBP), a...

  6. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  7. Barriers to Effective Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, Jack E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the following barriers which interfere with listening efficiency: content, speaker, medium, distractions, mindset, language, listening speed, and feedback. Suggests ways to combat these obstacles to accurate comprehension. (MM)

  8. Overcoming Intercultural Communication Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, Jack E.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an activity that helps students overcome the multicultural barriers that might be encountered in dealing with people from various cultures in a global economy. Outlines instructions, reporting procedures, principles to emphasize, and time required for the exercise. (HB)

  9. Information barriers and authentication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acceptance of nuclear materials into a monitoring regime is complicated if the materials are in classified shapes or have classified composition. An attribute measurement system with an information barrier can be emplo,yed to generate an unclassified display from classified measurements. This information barrier must meet two criteria: (1) classified information cannot be released to the monitoring party, and (2) the monitoring party must be convinced that the unclassified output accurately represents the classified input. Criterion 1 is critical to the host country to protect the classified information. Criterion 2 is critical to the monitoring party and is often termed the 'authentication problem.' Thus, the necessity for authentication of a measurement system with an information barrier stems directly from the description of a useful information barrier. Authentication issues must be continually addressed during the entire development lifecycle of the measurement system as opposed to being applied only after the system is built.

  10. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  11. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  12. 45 CFR 1180.56 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1180.56 Section 1180.56 Public... by a Grantee General Administrative Responsibilities § 1180.56 Allowable costs. (a) Determination of costs allowable under a grant is made in accordance with government-wide cost principles in...

  13. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  14. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802 Public... PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs...

  15. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that are proper...

  16. 45 CFR 1157.22 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1157.22 Section 1157.22 Public... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable...

  17. 50 CFR 85.41 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... applicable Federal cost principles in 43 CFR 12.60(b). Purchase of informational signs, program signs, and... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 85.41 Section 85.41... Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.41 Allowable costs. (a) Allowable grant costs are limited to those...

  18. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR 75.530 through 75.562, the following items are... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21...

  19. 50 CFR 80.15 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., see 5 CFR 1310.3.). (b) What is required to determine the allowability of costs? Source documents or... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 80.15 Section 80.15... WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.15 Allowable costs. (a) What...

  20. 44 CFR 295.21 - Allowable compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable compensation. 295... OF HOMELAND SECURITY CERRO GRANDE FIRE ASSISTANCE CERRO GRANDE FIRE ASSISTANCE Compensation Available Under the CGFAA § 295.21 Allowable compensation. (a) Allowable compensation. The CGFAA provides for...

  1. China in Talks with Brazil over Trade Barriers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ China is in talks with Brazil on lifting trade barriers that would allow the Latin Ameri-can country to sell it more processed agricul-tural goods; Brazilian government officials have told the Financial Times.

  2. Mechanisms of restriction of viral neuroinvasion at the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Jonathan J; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) consists of highly specialized cells including brain microvascular endothelial cells, astrocytes, microglia, pericytes, and neurons, which act in concert to restrict the entry of pathogens, immune cells, and soluble molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). If pathogens manage to cross the BBB and establish infection within the CNS, the BBB can open in a regulated manner to allow leukocyte transmigration into the CNS so that microbes, infected cells, and debris can be cleared. This review highlights how different inflammatory cytokines or signaling pathways disrupt or enhance BBB integrity in a way that regulates entry of neurotropic viruses into the CNS.

  3. Dynamics of Cold Atoms Crossing a One-Way Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Thorn, Jeremy J.; Schoene, Elizabeth A.; Li, Tao; Steck, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    We implemented an optical one-way potential barrier that allows ultracold $^{87}$Rb atoms to transmit through when incident on one side of the barrier but reflect from the other. This asymmetric barrier is a realization of Maxwell's demon, which can be employed to produce phase-space compression and has implications for cooling atoms and molecules not amenable to standard laser-cooling techniques. The barrier comprises two focused, Gaussian laser beams that intersect the focus of a far-off-re...

  4. Valuation of Discrete Barrier American Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Patrício Samanez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an approach and a model to valuing discrete barrier American options. The developed model consists of an adaptation of the method of Grant, Vora and Weeks (1997, in order to allow to incorporate the barriers. The Hybrid Quasi-Monte Carlo method was used in the simulations and the Bisection method in the definition of the options trigger curves. The results found in the application of the developed model were compared with the estimated by the Adaptive Mesh Model, developed by Ahn et al (1999. In addition, the sensitivity of the options price relative to changes in inputs parameters was analyzed, confirming the consistence of the model.

  5. The role of anthrolysin O in gut epithelial barrier disruption during Bacillus anthracis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Brian L; Lodolce, James P; Kolodziej, Lauren E; Boone, David L; Tang, Wei Jen

    2010-04-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax, caused by the bacterial infection of Bacillus anthracis, posts a significant bioterrorism threat by its relatively high mortality rate in humans. Different from inhalational anthrax by the route of infection, accumulating evidence indicates the bypass of vegetative bacteria across GI epithelium is required to initiate GI anthrax. Previously, we reported that purified anthrolysin O (ALO), instead of tripartite anthrax edema and lethal toxins, is capable of disrupting gut epithelial tight junctions and barrier function in cultured cells. Here, we show that ALO can disrupt intestinal tissue barrier function in an ex vivo mouse model. To explore the effects of ALO in a cell culture model of B. anthracis infection, we showed that anthrax bacteria can effectively reduce the monolayer integrity of human Caco-2 brush-border expressor (C2BBE) cells based on the reduced transepithelial resistance and the increased leakage of fluorescent dye. This disruption is likely caused by tight junction dysfunction observed by the reorganization of the tight junction protein occludin. Consequently, we observe significant passage of vegetative anthrax bacteria across C2BBE cells. This barrier disruption and bacterial crossover requires ALO since ALO-deficient B. anthracis strains fail to induce monolayer dysfunction and allow the passage of anthrax bacteria. Together these findings point to a pivotal role for ALO within the establishment of GI anthrax infection and the initial bypass of the epithelial barrier. PMID:20188700

  6. BARRIERS TO CALL PRACTICES IN AN EFL CONTEXT: A CASE STUDY OF PREPARATORY YEAR ENGLISH COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taj Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study attempts to find out the practical barriers to technology integration in an Arab EFL scenario, particularly in the context of Preparatory Year English courses. The practical barriers to CALL practices are multifaceted and vary according to contexts. In this mixed method study, 50 ESL teachers were surveyed using a 5-point Likert-scale questionnaire. The questionnaire focused on the pedagogical, technological, personal and administrative barriers to CALL integration in an EFL context. In addition, 21 teachers participated in the focus group discussion. Overall, the survey results found that the barriers influencing CALL integration in the study context were moderate. However, lack of administrative support, inadequate training, and absence of suitable materials were found as significant barriers to CALL integration. The focus group discussion reiterated the issues and suggested practical solutions for maximization of CALL practices. The study suggests a holistic administrative approach to solve the barriers to CALL integration.

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor (EGF is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health.

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  9. Saving the Barrier by Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshaar, Elke

    2016-01-01

    One third of all occupation-related diseases are diseases of the skin, and in most of these cases the skin barrier is involved. Professions such as metalworkers, hairdressers, and health care and construction workers are mainly affected. Among them, contact dermatitis is the leading skin disease. It usually presents as hand eczema caused by or leading to impaired barrier function. All this significantly impacts the function of the hands, reduces the ability to work and especially impairs the patient's quality of life. Diagnostics and therapy are of great importance; in addition, prevention programs are meanwhile an important mainstay of the overall therapeutic concept. They comprise measures of secondary (outpatient) and tertiary (inpatient) prevention. Secondary prevention measures include occupation-tailored teaching and prevention programs, and the dermatologist's examination and report. In severe cases or if therapy is not successful in the long term, or if the diagnosis is not clear, measures of tertiary prevention may come into action. They are offered as an inpatient treatment and prevention program. The aims are prevention of the job loss, but especially to reach a long-term healing up and getting back to normal occupational and leisure life in the sense of attaining full quality of life. During the last years, research in Germany has shown that the different measures of prevention in occupational dermatology are very effective. This integrated concept of an in-/outpatient disease management reveals remarkable pertinent efficacy for patients with severe occupational dermatoses in at-risk professions. PMID:26844907

  10. Method of installing subsurface barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-10-09

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  11. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, C.; Slabu, I.; Wiekhorst, F.; Bergemann, C.; von Eggeling, F.; Hochhaus, A.; Trahms, L.; Clement, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood–brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood–brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles’ shape, material, size, and coating.

  12. 42 CFR 61.9 - Payments: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payments: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances. 61.9 Section 61.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... allowances; travel allowances. Payments for stipends, dependency allowances, and the travel...

  13. Skin barrier in rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  14. 75 FR 4098 - Utility Allowance Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Utility Allowance Adjustments AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... are required to advise the Secretary of the need for and request of a new utility allowance for... whether the information will have practical utility; (2) Evaluate the accuracy of the agency's estimate...

  15. Allocation of Allowances and Associated Family Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, M. Kaye; Cheadle, Tannis

    This study gathered information on general family practices concerning allowances given to children, parental reasons for the provision of allowances, the bases for their administration, and the frequency of conflicts generated around them. The subjects were 81 parents of elementary school children in a midwest Canadian city. Subjects completed…

  16. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 602.22 Section 602.22 Public... Requirements § 602.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for:...

  17. 45 CFR 1174.22 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1174.22 Section 1174.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  18. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  19. 45 CFR 1183.22 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1183.22 Section 1183.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  20. 2 CFR 215.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR part 230, “Cost Principles for Non-Profit Organizations (OMB Circular A-122).” The allowability of... CFR part 220, “Cost Principles for Educational Institutions (OMB Circular A-21).” The allowability of costs incurred by hospitals is determined in accordance with the provisions of appendix E of 45 CFR...

  1. 5 CFR 180.104 - Allowable claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... mobile homes may be allowed only in cases of collision, theft, or vandalism. (5) Money. Claims for money... claimant's supervisor. (4) Mobile homes. Claims may be allowed for damage to or loss of mobile homes and their contents under the provisions of § 180.104(c)(2). Claims for structural damage to mobile...

  2. 45 CFR 2543.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 2543.27 Allowable costs. For each kind... Organizations.” The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education is determined...

  3. 38 CFR 49.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 49.27 Allowable...-Profit Organizations.” The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education...

  4. 20 CFR 435.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 435.27 Allowable costs. For each kind... Organizations.” (c) Allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education is determined...

  5. 28 CFR 70.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AND AGREEMENTS (INCLUDING SUBAWARDS) WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 70.27 Allowable costs. (a... Organizations.” The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education is determined...

  6. 15 CFR 14.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NON-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 14.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of... Organizations.” The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education is determined...

  7. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 30.27 Allowable...-Profit Organizations.” The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education...

  8. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  9. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowable costs will be determined in accordance...

  10. 29 CFR 1470.22 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting... grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowable costs will be determined in accordance...

  11. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with...) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowable costs will be determined in accordance with the cost...

  12. 42 CFR 405.2468 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to the limit on the all-inclusive rate for allowable costs. (3) Allowable graduate medical education.... (f) Graduate medical education. (1) Effective for that portion of cost reporting periods occurring on... receive direct graduate medical education payment for those residents. (2) Direct graduate...

  13. Nutritional keys for intestinal barrier modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania eDe Santis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal tract represents the largest interface between the external environment and the human body. Nutrient uptake mostly happens in the intestinal tract, where the epithelial surface is constantly exposed to dietary antigens. Since inflammatory response towards these antigens may be deleterious for the host, a plethora of protective mechanisms take places to avoid or attenuate local damage. For instance, the intestinal barrier is able to elicit a dynamic response that either promotes or impairs luminal antigens adhesion and crossing. Regulation of intestinal barrier is crucial to control intestinal permeability whose increase is associated to chronic inflammatory conditions. The cross talk among bacteria, immune and dietary factors is able to modulate the mucosal barrier function, as well as the intestinal permeability. Several nutritional products have recently been proposed as regulators of the epithelial barrier, even if their effects are in part contradictory. At the same time, the metabolic function of the microbiota generates new products with different effects based on the dietary content. Besides conventional treatments, novel therapies based on complementary nutrients is now growing. It has been recently used a fecal therapy approach for the clinical treatment of refractory Clostridium difficile infection instead of the classical antibiotic therapy.In the present review we will outline the epithelial response to nutritional components derived from diet intake and microbial fermentation focusing on the consequent effects on the epithelial barrier integrity.

  14. Surface stability test plan for protective barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of buried waste have been identified as integral components of a plan to isolate a number of Hanford defense waste sites. Standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance will mandate a barrier surface layer that is resistant to the eolian erosion processes of wind erosion (deflation) and windborne particle deposition (formation of sand dunes). Thus, experiments are needed to measure rates of eolian erosion processes impacting those surfaces under different surface and climatological conditions. Data from these studies will provide information for use in the evaluation of selected surface layers as a means of providing stable cover over waste sites throughout the design life span of protective barriers. The multi-year test plan described in this plan is directed at understanding processes of wind erosion and windborne particle deposition, providing measurements of erosion rates for models, and suggesting construction materials and methods for reducing the effect of long-term eolian erosion on the barrier. Specifically, this plan describes possible methods to measure rates of eolian erosion, including field and laboratory procedure. Advantages and disadvantages of laboratory (wind tunnel) tests are discussed, and continued wind tunnel tests are recommended for wind erosion studies. A comparison between field and wind tunnel erosive forces is discussed. Plans for testing surfaces are described. Guidance is also presented for studying the processes controlling sand dune and blowout formation. 24 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Reduced barrier efficiency in axillary stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, A; Lee, R S; Moore, A E; Pudney, P D A; Paterson, S E; Rawlings, A V

    2002-06-01

    The skin of the axilla is cosmetically important with millions of consumers daily applying antiperspirant/deodorant products. Despite this, we know virtually nothing about axillary skin or how antiperspirant (AP) use impacts upon it. To characterize the axillary stratum corneum and determine whether this is a unique skin type, we have looked at stratum corneum composition and function, particularly its barrier properties, and compared it with other body sites. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and corneosurfametry (CSM) revealed a reduced barrier function in the axilla. HPTLC analysis of the stratum corneum lipids demonstrated statistically elevated levels of fatty acids, ceramides, and particularly cholesterol in the axilla. Both ceramide and cholesterol did not appear to change with depth, indicating that they were predominantly of stratum corneum origin. On the other hand, at least some of the fatty acid had a sebaceous origin. We hypothesized that the reduced barrier function might be owing to the changes in the crucial ceramide : cholesterol ratio. To address this, we used a combination of attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) with cyanoacrylate sampling. These results demonstrated more ordered lipid-lamellae phase behaviour in the axilla, suggesting that the elevated cholesterol might form crystal microdomains within the lipid lamellae, allowing an increase in water flux. Since an exaggerated application of antiperspirant had no effect upon the axilla barrier properties, it is concluded that this region of skin physiologically has a reduced barrier function.

  16. Utility allowed returns and market extremes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years interest rates have fluctuated from exceptionally high levels in the early 1980s to their current levels, the lowest in two decades. Observers and analysts generally have assumed that allowed returns by regulatory commissions follow the movement of interest rates; indeed some analysts use a risk premium method to estimate the cost of common equity, assuming a constant and linear relationship between interest rates and the cost of common equity. That suggests we could expect a relatively stable relationship between interest rates and allowed returns, as well. However, a simple comparison of allowed returns and interest rates shows that this is not the case in recent years. The relationship between market interest rates and the returns allowed by commissions varies and is obviously a great deal more complicated. Empirically, there appears to be only a narrow range where market interest rates significantly affect the allowed returns on common stock set by state commissions, at least for electric and combination utilities. If rates are at historically low levels, allowed returns based largely on market rates will hasten subsequent rate filings, and commissions appear to look beyond the low rate levels. Conversely, it appears that regulators do not let historically high market rates determine allowed returns either. At either high or low interest levels, caution seems to be the policy

  17. Central role of the gut epithelial barrier in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation: lessons learned from animal models and human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorelli, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Mercado, Joseph R; Vecchi, Maurizio; Pizarro, Theresa T

    2013-01-01

    The gut mucosa is constantly challenged by a bombardment of foreign antigens and environmental microorganisms. As such, the precise regulation of the intestinal barrier allows the maintenance of mucosal immune homeostasis and prevents the onset of uncontrolled inflammation. In support of this concept, emerging evidence points to defects in components of the epithelial barrier as etiologic factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In fact, the integrity of the intestinal barrier relies on different elements, including robust innate immune responses, epithelial paracellular permeability, epithelial cell integrity, as well as the production of mucus. The purpose of this review is to systematically evaluate how alterations in the aforementioned epithelial components can lead to the disruption of intestinal immune homeostasis, and subsequent inflammation. In this regard, the wealth of data from mouse models of intestinal inflammation and human genetics are pivotal in understanding pathogenic pathways, for example, that are initiated from the specific loss of function of a single protein leading to the onset of intestinal disease. On the other hand, several recently proposed therapeutic approaches to treat human IBD are targeted at enhancing different elements of gut barrier function, further supporting a primary role of the epithelium in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation and emphasizing the importance of maintaining a healthy and effective intestinal barrier. PMID:24062746

  18. Central role of the gut epithelial barrier in pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation: Lessons learned from animal models and human genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca ePastorelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The gut mucosa is constantly challenged by a bombardment of foreign antigens and environmental microorganisms. As such, the precise regulation of the intestinal barrier allows the maintenance of mucosal immune homeostasis and prevents the onset of uncontrolled inflammation. In support of this concept, emerging evidence points to defects in components of the epithelial barrier as etiologic factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs. In fact, the integrity of the intestinal barrier relies on different elements, including robust innate immune responses, epithelial paracellular permeability, epithelial cell integrity, as well as the production of mucus. The purpose of this review is to systematically evaluate how alterations in the aforementioned epithelial components can lead to the disruption of intestinal immune homeostasis, and subsequent inflammation. In this regard, the wealth of data from mouse models of intestinal inflammation and human genetics are pivotal in understanding pathogenic pathways, for example, that are initiated from the specific loss of function of a single protein leading to the onset of intestinal disease. On the other hand, several recently proposed therapeutic approaches to treat human IBD are targeted at enhancing different elements of gut barrier function, further supporting a primary role of the epithelium in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation and emphasizing the importance of maintaining a healthy and effective intestinal barrier.

  19. Barriers in Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Ambjorn, Jan

    1994-01-01

    I discuss recent progress in our understanding of two barriers in quantum gravity: $c > 1$ in the case of 2d quantum gravity and $D > 2$ in the case of Euclidean Einstein-Hilbert gravity formulated in space-time dimensions $D >2$.

  20. Breaking Down Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Beverly T.

    1994-01-01

    Faculty at 11 higher education institutions in California, New Mexico, Texas, and northern Mexico have been experimenting with computer conferencing on the BESTNET (Bilingual English-Spanish Telecommunications Network). The growing system is credited with creating an international student-faculty community that crosses cultural barriers for…

  1. Simulation of double barrier resonant tunneling diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, Roy M.

    1996-01-01

    The double barrier resonant tunneling diode (DBRTD) is one of several devices currently being considered by the semiconductor industry as a replacement for conventional very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuit technology when the latter reaches its currently perceived scaling limits. The DBRTD was one of the first and remains one of the most promising devices to exhibit a room temperature negative differential resistance (NDR); this non-linear device characteristic has innovative circuit ap...

  2. 24 CFR 17.43 - Allowable claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... by the negligent or wrongful act of the claimant, his agent, the members of his family, or his..., superior authority. (6) Clothing and accessories. Claims may be allowed for damage to, or loss of,...

  3. 45 CFR 34.4 - Allowable claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Damage or loss of personal property, including baggage and household items, while being transported by a carrier, agent or agency of the government, or private conveyance, may be allowed only if the property...

  4. Sign Patterns That Allow the Given Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵燕灵; 孙良

    2003-01-01

    Let P be a property referring to a real matrix. For a sign pattern A, if there exists a real matrix B in the qualitative class of A such that B has property P, then we say A allows P. Three cases that A allows an M-matrix, an inverse M-matrix and a P0-matrix are considered. The complete characterizations are obtained.

  5. FINANCIAL-ACCOUNTING ASPECTS REGARDING FAMILY ALLOWANCES

    OpenAIRE

    Iuliana Cenar

    2010-01-01

    The importance of family and ensuring its social protection are indisputable in any society. It is the reason why in this paper we plan to create an overall picture of how social protection is achieved through family allowances and other social benefits, as well as the role of accounting in this process. Thus, we considered appropriate to present the institutional and legal frameworks for the social protection of the family thorough family allowances and additional social benefits related to ...

  6. Child Allowances, Educational Subsidies and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hung-Ju

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the effects on economic growth attributable to government policies of child allowances and educational subsidies. We show that multiple steady states may arise under these two policies, with club convergence occurring, and the initial condition being of relevance, if the tax rate is fairly high. Under a policy of child allowances, an increase in the tax rate is found to raise the quantity of children, but lower the quality of adults; however, under a policy of educational ...

  7. Barriers to SCM implementing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Rosli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper explores the barriers faced by Malaysian manufacturing companies in successfullyimplementing the Supply Chain Management (SCM. The study has highlighted some pertinent factorsperforming the barriers that are most frequently reported by the studied companies. Sixteen companies, fromservice and manufacturing companies were studied over a period of two years to assess their SCM practicesthrough survey and interview processes.Design/methodology/approach: This part discusses the research design and methodological issues upon whichthe research is based. The explanation includes two types of research methods, short survey and follow-upinterviews that were identified as being suitable to achieve the aims of this study, which is to identify the currentproblem of SCM practices within the Malaysian SMEs. Research design is a framework or plan for researchused as a guide in collecting and analysing data.Findings: The results showed that the barriers are depending on the types or group of companies business; suchas either it is an SME or a big company. The barriers inhibiting the practice of SCM can be summarized inthe following factors: partnership with suppliers, limited expertise, management commitment, understanding ofSCM, supported technologies and customer satisfaction. The findings are also compared with the results of asimilar study on SCM in other country.Practical implications: Some suggestions are also offered, which is believed to be a good strategy to the companiesto manage the SCM that will lead to sustainable competitive advantage and hence improve their market share.Originality/value: There are interesting barriers between the companies in Malaysia and other country in therespect of SCM implementation. These findings can be used by both Malaysian and other companies to worktogether or review the SCM strategies that will lead to sustainable competitive advantage and hence improvetheir business performance.

  8. Future prices and market for SO2 allowances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expected price of SO2 emission allowances is an important issue in energy and integrated resource planning activities. For example, the expected price of SO2 allowances in needed in order to evaluate alternative strategies for meeting SO2 provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. In addition, the expected SO2 allowance price is important to state public utility regulators who must provide guidance on rate-making issues regarding utility compliance plans which involve allowance trading and direct investment of SO2 control technologies. Last but not the least, the expected SO2 allowance price is an important determinant of the future market for natural gas and low sulfur coal. The paper develops estimates of SO2 allowance prices over time by constructing national supply and demand curves for SO2 reductions. Both the supply and demand for SO2 reductions are based on an analysis of the sulfur content of fuels burned in 1990 by utilities throughout the United States; and on assumptions about plant retirements, the rate of new capacity growth, the types of new and replacement plants constructed, the costs of SO2 reduction measures and legislation by midwest states to maintain the use of high sulfur coal to protect local jobs. The paper shows that SO2 allowance prices will peak around the year 2000 at about $500 per ton, and will eventually fall to zero by about the year 2020. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the price of SO2 allowances is relatively insensitive to assumptions regarding the availability of natural gas or energy demand growth. However, SO2 allowance prices tend to be quite sensitive to assumptions regarding regulations which may force early retirement of existing power plants and possible legislation which may reduce CO2 emissions

  9. IMS IN SMES - REASONS, ADVANTAGES AND BARRIERS ON IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Rajković

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Appearance of a number of management systems with various and sometimes divergent demands, demands for revise of optimal strategy on implementation of these standards in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs and the attempt on their integration into integrated management system are suggested even more. Firstly question on choice and reasons for implementation of standards is raised. Management and employees expect benefits on the implementation and they pass and minimize the implementation barriers. Basic concept on integrated management system (IMS into SMEs and analyse on reasons, advantages and barriers at IMS implementation are presented in this paper.

  10. 42 CFR 61.8 - Benefits: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benefits: Stipends; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation. 61.8 Section 61.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...; dependency allowances; travel allowances; vacation. Individuals awarded regular fellowships shall be...

  11. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

  12. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier

  13. Minutes of Fish Barrier Workshop

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Minutes of Fish Barrier Workshop held 27 May 2009 at DOC Waikato Area Office. Lists attendees and highlights topics to be covered in Fish Barrier Workshop.

  14. Mucosal barrier, bacteria and inflammatory bowel disease: possibilities for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merga, Yvette; Campbell, Barry J; Rhodes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal barrier has three major components, the mucus layer, the epithelial glycocalyx and the surface epithelium itself, whose integrity largely depends on tight junction function. In health, there is relatively little direct interaction between the luminal microbiota and the epithelium - the continuous mucus layer in the colon keeps the surface epithelium out of contact with bacteria and the ileo-caecal valve ensures that the distal small intestine is relatively microbe free. Most interaction takes place at the Peyer's patches in the distal ileum and their smaller colonic equivalents, the lymphoid follicles. Peyer's patches are overlain by a 'dome' epithelium, 5% of whose cells are specialised M (microfold) epithelial cells, which act as the major portal of entry for bacteria. There are no goblet cells in the dome epithelium and M cells have a very sparse glycocalyx allowing easy microbial interaction. It is intriguing that the typical age range for the onset of Crohn's disease (CD) is similar to the age at which the number of Peyer's patches is greatest. Peyer's patches are commonly the sites of the initial lesions in CD and the 'anti-pancreatic' antibody associated with CD has been shown to have as its epitope the glycoprotein 2 that is the receptor for type-1 bacterial fimbrial protein (fimH) on M cells. There are many reasons to believe that the mucosal barrier is critically important in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These include (i) associations between both CD and ulcerative colitis (UC) with genes that are relevant to the mucosal barrier; (ii) increased intestinal permeability in unaffected relatives of CD patients; (iii) increased immune reactivity against bacterial antigens, and (iv) animal models in which altered mucosal barrier, e.g. denudation of the mucus layer associated with oral dextran sulphate in rodents, induces colitis. Whilst some IBD patients may have genetic factors leading to weakening of the mucosal barrier

  15. Barriers and post-closure monitoring (AL121125)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project focuses on the rapid implementation of near-surface barriers, biotreatment, and post-closure monitoring technology. It uses water-permeable and biologic barriers that chemically capture and/or degrade contaminants without significantly altering the natural water flow regime. Barrier approaches are being tested for two different applications. The first is the use of barriers for confinement of chemical contaminants for in-trench treatments with leach systems or an in-place bioreactor. The second is an enhancement of the current practice of emplacing grout or clay slurry walls into direct horizontal surface and subsurface water flows around a contaminated area by integrating permeable reactive barriers and petroleum reservoir gel/foam/polymer technology

  16. Quantum theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Barbara; Cunha, Marcelo Terra; Cabello, Adán

    2015-12-01

    Contextuality is a fundamental feature of quantum theory and a necessary resource for quantum computation and communication. It is therefore important to investigate how large contextuality can be in quantum theory. Linear contextuality witnesses can be expressed as a sum S of n probabilities, and the independence number α and the Tsirelson-like number ϑ of the corresponding exclusivity graph are, respectively, the maximum of S for noncontextual theories and for the theory under consideration. A theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality if it has scenarios in which ϑ /α approaches n . Here we show that quantum theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality despite what is suggested by the examination of the quantum violations of Bell and noncontextuality inequalities considered in the past. Our proof is not constructive and does not single out explicit scenarios. Nevertheless, we identify scenarios in which quantum theory allows for almost-absolute-maximal contextuality.

  17. Sonic Crystal Noise Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Yung

    2012-01-01

    An alternative road traffic noise barrier using an array of periodically arranged vertical cylinders known as a Sonic Crystal (SC) is investigated. As a result of multiple (Bragg) scattering, SCs exhibit a selective sound attenuation in frequency bands called band gaps or stop bands related to the spacing and size of the cylinders. Theoretical studies using Plane Wave Expansion (PWE), Multiple Scattering Theory (MST) and Finite Element Method (FEM) have enabled study of the performance of SC ...

  18. Barrier infrared detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A superlattice-based infrared absorber and the matching electron-blocking and hole-blocking unipolar barriers, absorbers and barriers with graded band gaps, high-performance infrared detectors, and methods of manufacturing such devices are provided herein. The infrared absorber material is made from a superlattice (periodic structure) where each period consists of two or more layers of InAs, InSb, InSbAs, or InGaAs. The layer widths and alloy compositions are chosen to yield the desired energy band gap, absorption strength, and strain balance for the particular application. Furthermore, the periodicity of the superlattice can be "chirped" (varied) to create a material with a graded or varying energy band gap. The superlattice based barrier infrared detectors described and demonstrated herein have spectral ranges covering the entire 3-5 micron atmospheric transmission window, excellent dark current characteristics operating at least 150K, high yield, and have the potential for high-operability, high-uniformity focal plane arrays.

  19. 19 CFR 191.101 - Drawback allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Preparations (Including Perfumery) Manufactured From Domestic Tax-Paid Alcohol § 191.101 Drawback allowance. (a... perfumery) manufactured or produced in the United States in part from the domestic tax-paid alcohol. (b... tax on flavoring extracts or medicinal or toilet preparations (including perfumery) manufactured...

  20. 77 FR 46987 - Utility Allowances Submetering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... published in the Federal Register amendments to Sec. 1.42-10 (73 FR 43863). If gross rent includes a utility... containing final regulations under section 42 (59 FR 10067). Among these regulations was Sec. 1.42- 10, which... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BI91 Utility Allowances Submetering AGENCY:...

  1. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and... accordance with the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) at 48 CFR part 31. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section...

  2. 22 CFR 145.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CIVIL RIGHTS GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 145...-Profit Organizations.” The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education...

  3. 22 CFR 518.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 518.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of... by institutions of higher education is determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular...

  4. 45 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR AWARDS AND SUBAWARDS TO INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 74.27... Organizations” and paragraph (b) of this section. The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of...

  5. 34 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial...— Private nonprofit organization other than (1) An institution of higher education; (2) a hospital; or (3... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 74.27 Section 74.27 Education...

  6. 36 CFR 1210.27 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... RULES UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 1210.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles...

  7. Allowance trading: Market operations and regulatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W.; McDermott, K.A.

    1992-12-31

    The use of the SO{sub 2} allowance system as defined by Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments offers utilities greater compliance flexibility than EPA technology standards, State Implementation Plan (SEP) performance standards, or EPA bubble/offset strategies. Traditional methods at best offered the utility the ability to trade emissions between different units at a particular plant. The SO{sub 2} emissions trading system advocated under Title IV will allow a utility to trade emissions across its utility system, and/or trade emissions between utilities to take advantage of interfirm control cost differences. The use of transferable emission allowances offers utilities greater flexibility in the choice of how to control emissions: the choices include fuel switching, flue gas scrubbing, environmental dispatch, repowering, and even the choice not to control emissions [as long as the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements are met]. The added flexibility allows utilities to choose the least cost manner of compliance with Title IV requirements. It is hoped (intended) that pollution control cost-minimization by individual utilities will in turn reduce the cost of controlling SO{sub 2} for the electric utility industry in aggregate. In addition, through the use of NO{sub x} emission averaging, the utility would average NO{sub x} emissions from different point sources in order to comply with the prescribed emission standard.

  8. Allowance trading: Market operations and regulatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W.; McDermott, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of the SO[sub 2] allowance system as defined by Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments offers utilities greater compliance flexibility than EPA technology standards, State Implementation Plan (SEP) performance standards, or EPA bubble/offset strategies. Traditional methods at best offered the utility the ability to trade emissions between different units at a particular plant. The SO[sub 2] emissions trading system advocated under Title IV will allow a utility to trade emissions across its utility system, and/or trade emissions between utilities to take advantage of interfirm control cost differences. The use of transferable emission allowances offers utilities greater flexibility in the choice of how to control emissions: the choices include fuel switching, flue gas scrubbing, environmental dispatch, repowering, and even the choice not to control emissions [as long as the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements are met]. The added flexibility allows utilities to choose the least cost manner of compliance with Title IV requirements. It is hoped (intended) that pollution control cost-minimization by individual utilities will in turn reduce the cost of controlling SO[sub 2] for the electric utility industry in aggregate. In addition, through the use of NO[sub x] emission averaging, the utility would average NO[sub x] emissions from different point sources in order to comply with the prescribed emission standard.

  9. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... mile at the prevailing mileage rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part... prevailing per diem allowance rate authorized under the Federal travel regulations (see 41 CFR part 101-7... limited to reasons related to the family member's health, schooling or economic circumstances....

  10. Making It Personal: Per Capita Carbon Allowances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fawcett, Tina; Hvelplund, Frede; Meyer, Niels I

    2009-01-01

    The Chapter highligts the importance of introducing new, efficient schemes for mitigation of global warming. One such scheme is Personal Carbon Allowances (PCA), whereby individuals are allotted a tradable ration of CO2 emission per year.This chapter reviews the fundamentals of PCA and analyzes its...

  11. 33 CFR 136.205 - Compensation allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.205...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.205...

  12. 33 CFR 136.241 - Compensation allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.241...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.241...

  13. 33 CFR 136.235 - Compensation allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.235...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.235...

  14. 33 CFR 136.229 - Compensation allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.229...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.229...

  15. 33 CFR 136.211 - Compensation allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.211...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.211...

  16. 33 CFR 136.217 - Compensation allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.217...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.217...

  17. 33 CFR 136.223 - Compensation allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.223...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.223...

  18. Manpower Training Allowances: Financial Assistance or Investment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, Georges

    1975-01-01

    The author compares the differing approaches of Germany, Sweden, France, and Australia for providing financial support to adults enrolled in vocational training programs, focusing on training allowances for recurrent education. He concludes that without some governmental maintenance program, it is unlikely that adults can utilize even tuition-free…

  19. 32 CFR 33.22 - Allowable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with cost principles acceptable to the Federal agency. ... allowable costs) to the grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of...

  20. ANALYSIS OF FLEXIBLE BARRIERS USED AS SAFETY PROTECTION IN WOODWORKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pavlovic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Machine tools use physical barriers, made by flexible thermoplastic materials, to protect the environment and the operators against the projections of wood chips and parts of cutting tools. These barriers constitute a partial closure and allow the passage of the workpiece, being simultaneously able to contain sharp fragments projected at high speed. The present research was conducted with the aim to evaluate the real effectiveness of these barriers, to investigate their dynamic behaviour by numerical simulations. Results showed that these barriers, if properly considered, could retain heavier masses and higher speeds. The research also allowed, in fact, to investigate the influence of several factors in design, selection and use, as material, shape, position, assemblages and many others, highlighting weaknesses and identifying possible measures to increase its effectiveness.

  1. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports

  2. Barriers for recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Schipperijn, Jasper;

    2014-01-01

    differences in children's perceptions of barriers to recess physical activity. Based on the socio-ecological model four types of environmental barriers were distinguished: natural, social, physical and organizational environment. METHODS: Data were collected through 17 focus groups (at 17 different schools......BACKGROUND: Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender...... and girls identified the same barriers, there were both inter- and intra-gender differences in the perception of these barriers. Weather was a barrier for all children, apart from the most active boys. Conflicts were perceived as a barrier particularly by those boys who played ballgames. Girls said...

  3. Allowable Differential Settlement of Oil Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Faeli

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The allowable settlement of pipelines has been mentioned rarely in design references and codes. The present paper studies the effects of differential settlement of pipeline bed on resulted forces and deformations and then determines the allowable differential settlement of pipelines in two conditions as follows: (i heterogeneous soil bed and (ii adjacent to steel tanks. To accomplish the studies, numerical simulation of pipeline is used. The pipeline bed is idealized by Winkler springs and four-element standard viscoelastic Burger model. Also, the use of geosynthetic reinforcement is studied in heterogeneous soil beds and the effect of geosynthetics on decreasing the settlement is investigated. The pipeline-tank joints in two cases of fixed and flexible joints are investigated and the results for two kinds of joints are compared.

  4. Realization of allowable qeneralized quantum gates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The most general duality gates were introduced by Long,Liu and Wang and named allowable generalized quantum gates (AGQGs,for short).By definition,an allowable generalized quantum gate has the form of U=YfkjsckUK,where Uk’s are unitary operators on a Hilbert space H and the coefficients ck’s are complex numbers with |Yfijo ck\\ ∧ 1 an d 1ck| <1 for all k=0,1,...,d-1.In this paper,we prove that an AGQG U=YfkZo ck∧k is realizable,i.e.there are two d by d unitary matrices W and V such that ck=W0kVk0 (0

  5. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2004-11-23

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

  6. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports

  7. Dual role of vinculin in barrier-disruptive and barrier-enhancing endothelial cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birukova, Anna A; Shah, Alok S; Tian, Yufeng; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) barrier disruption induced by edemagenic agonists such as thrombin is a result of increased actomyosin contraction and enforcement of focal adhesions (FA) anchoring contracting stress fibers, which leads to cell retraction and force-induced disruption of cell junctions. In turn, EC barrier enhancement by oxidized phospholipids (OxPAPC) and other agonists is a result of increased tethering forces due to enforcement of the peripheral actin rim and enhancement of cell-cell adherens junction (AJ) complexes promoting EC barrier integrity. This study tested participation of the mechanosensitive adaptor, vinculin, which couples FA and AJ to actin cytoskeleton, in control of the EC permeability response to barrier disruptive (thrombin) and barrier enhancing (OxPAPC) stimulation. OxPAPC and thrombin induced different patterns of FA remodeling. Knockdown of vinculin attenuated both, OxPAPC-induced decrease and thrombin-induced increase in EC permeability. Thrombin stimulated the vinculin association with FA protein talin and suppressed the interaction with AJ protein, VE-cadherin. In contrast, OxPAPC stimulated the vinculin association with VE-cadherin. Thrombin and OxPAPC induced different levels of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and caused different patterns of intracellular phospho-MLC distribution. Thrombin-induced talin-vinculin and OxPAPC-induced VE-cadherin-vinculin association were abolished by myosin inhibitor blebbistatin. Expression of the vinculin mutant unable to interact with actin attenuated EC permeability changes and MLC phosphorylation caused by both, thrombin and OxPAPC. These data suggest that the specific vinculin interaction with FA or AJ in different contexts of agonist stimulation is defined by development of regional actyomyosin-based tension and participates in both, the barrier-disruptive and barrier-enhancing endothelial responses. PMID:26923917

  8. Recommended dietary allowances harmonization in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Corazon Vc; Cabrera, Ma Isabel Z

    2008-01-01

    Issues and opportunities for RDA harmonization within the SEA region were first raised during the First Regional Forum and Workshop "RDAs: Scientific Basis and Future Directions", held in Singapore in March 1997. A regional review on RDAs in SEA showed general similarities for the different RDAs, although in some cases a country listed an exceptionally high or low RDA for a particular nutrient for a specific group. It also revealed differences in physiologic groupings and reference body weights, nutrients included and units of expression. Realizing these differences in RDA components between countries which makes technical composition different, a consensus on the need for regional collaboration and harmonization of RDAs was reached by participants from Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. A follow-up workshop was organized to work towards agreement throughout the region on common approaches, concepts and terminologies; application and uses, format and a research agenda. Round table discussions were held to arrive at specific recommendations for achieving harmonization. While divergence in opinions were expected, some clear-cut agreements were settled. Globalization envisions to achieve economic growth and development, with the effects expected to ripple through health, nutrition and welfare improvements. The harmonization of RDAs in SEA seeks to reach this vision by strengthening R and D capabilities (both logistic and manpower) within the region and within the countries in the region, as well as harmonizing the efforts of governments and industry within the region to reduce potential trade barriers such as those relating to food and nutrition quality assurance standards. PMID:18460439

  9. Glomerular endothelial surface layer acts as a barrier against albumin filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Martijn J C; van den Berg, Bernard M; Avramut, M Cristina; Faas, Frank G A; van der Vlag, Johan; Rops, Angelique L W M M; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Koster, Bram J; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Vink, Hans; Rabelink, Ton J

    2013-05-01

    Glomerular endothelium is highly fenestrated, and its contribution to glomerular barrier function is the subject of debate. In recent years, a polysaccharide-rich endothelial surface layer (ESL) has been postulated to act as a filtration barrier for large molecules, such as albumin. To test this hypothesis, we disturbed the ESL in C57Bl/6 mice using long-term hyaluronidase infusion for 4 weeks and monitored albumin passage using immunolabeling and correlative light-electron microscopy that allows for complete and integral assessment of glomerular albumin passage. ESL ultrastructure was visualized by transmission electron microscopy using cupromeronic blue and by localization of ESL binding lectins using confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that glomerular fenestrae are filled with dense negatively charged polysaccharide structures that are largely removed in the presence of circulating hyaluronidase, leaving the polysaccharide surfaces of other glomerular cells intact. Both retention of native ferritin [corrected] in the glomerular basement membrane and systemic blood pressure were unaltered. Enzyme treatment, however, induced albumin passage across the endothelium in 90% of glomeruli, whereas this could not be observed in controls. Yet, there was no net albuminuria due to binding and uptake of filtered albumin by the podocytes and parietal epithelium. ESL structure and function completely recovered within 4 weeks on cessation of hyaluronidase infusion. Thus, the polyanionic ESL component, hyaluronan, is a key component of the glomerular endothelial protein permeability barrier.

  10. [Barrier methods of contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, A; Edelman, D A

    1982-01-01

    Vaginal methods of contraception were the earliest types used and some references to them date back to antiquity. Most of the vaginal contraceptive agents identified by the ancient Greeks, Indians, Japanese, and Chinese have been found in modern laboratory tests to have spermicidal properties, but it is doubtful that the methods were fully reliable or were used by many people. During the 19th century the condom, vaginal spermicides, and diaphragm became available. The development of nonoxynol-9 and other nonirritating but effective spermicidal agents improved vaginal contraceptives greatly by the 1950s, but starting in the 1960s newer methods began to replace the vaginal methods. Interest in barrier methods has been reawakened somewhat by concern about the health effects of hormonal methods. At present all barrier methods leave something to be desired. Failure rates of 3-30% for barrier methods in general have been estimated, but the higher rates are believed due to incorrect or inconsistent use. Theoretical failure rates of condoms and diaphragms have been estimated at 3/100 women-years, but in actual use failure rates may reach 15 for condoms and 13 for diaphragms used with spermicides. Use-effectiveness rates are greatly influenced by motivation. For a variety of reasons, the acceptability of barrier methods is low, especially in developing countries. New developments in spermicidal agents include sperm inhibitors, which impede the fertilizing capacity of sperm rather than attempting a spermicidal effect; a number of such agents have been studied and have proven more effective in animal tests than conventional spermicides. Neosampoon, a new spermicidal foam, has attracted an increasing number of users, especially in developing countries. A new condom, made of thin polymers and containing a standard dose of nonoxynol-9, has been designed to dissolve in the vaginal fluid. Further studies are needed of its acceptability, efficacy, and side effects before it becomes

  11. Technical barrier challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李思佳

    2014-01-01

    according to a famouse report,the foreign Technical Barriers to Trade(TBT)have some effects on the exports of the People’s Republic of China.Major findings are as follows:(1)TBT makes it more difficult for China to export;(2)TBT increases the costs of Chinese export commodities;(3)TBT causes friction and confilicts in the international trade;(4)SOME developed countries have moved their phase-outs to China and other developing countries,which have become victims of TBT.

  12. Technical barrier challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李思佳

    2014-01-01

    according to a famouse report,the foreign Technical Barriers to Trade(TBT) have some effects on the exports of the People's Republic of China.Major findings are as follows:(1)TBT makes it more difficult for China to export;(2)TBT increases the costs of Chinese export commodities;(3)TBT causes friction and confilicts in the international trade;(4)SOME developed countries have moved their phase-outs to China and other developing countries,which have become victims of TBT.

  13. Tearing Down Disciplinary Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Juan G.

    1988-05-01

    Profesor Hannes Alfvén's life-long battle against scientific narrow-mindedness and parochial approaches to the solution of scientific problems is well known and deeply appreciated by this author. In this article the new interdisciplinary trends in science are critically examined and the psychological impacts of crumbling disciplinary barriers on the participating scientists are analyzed. Several examples of interdisciplinary research programs are discussed and some thoughts on the structural reform of scientific organizations, agencies, and universities needed to face these trends are given.

  14. Department of Energy environmental management complex-wide integration using systems engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbourn, P.

    1997-10-01

    A systems engineering approach was successfully used to recommend changes to environmental management activities across the DOE Complex. A team of technical experts and systems engineers developed alternatives that could save tax payers billions of dollars if the barriers are removed to allow complete implementation. The alternatives are technically-based and defensible, and are being worked through the stakeholder review process. The integration process and implementing project structure are both discussed.

  15. Barriers to entry : abolishing the barriers to understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Keppler, Jan Horst

    2009-01-01

    BARRIERS TO ENTRY: ABOLISHING THE BARRIERS TO UNDERSTANDING by Jan-Horst Keppler Professor of economics Université Paris – Dauphine, LEDa, and Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne, PHARE Port.: (+33 6) 77 81 37 46; Email: . Abstract The concept of a barrier to entry has been discussed least since Bain (1956) with important contributions by Spence (1977), Dixit (1980) or Milgrom and Roberts (1982). The more recent discussion is synth...

  16. Synthetic Eelgrass Oil Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, T. G.

    2013-05-01

    Although surviving in situ micro-organisms eventually consume spilled oil, extensive inundation of shore biota by oil requires cleanup to enable ecological recovery within normal time scales. Although effective in calm seas and quiet waters, oil is advected over and under conventional curtain oil booms by wave actions and currents when seas are running. Most sorbent booms are not reusable, and are usually disposed of in landfills, creating excessive waste. A new concept is proposed for a floating oil barrier, to be positioned off vulnerable coasts, to interdict, contain, and sequester spilled oil, which can then be recovered and the barrier reused. While conventional oil boom designs rely principally on the immiscibility of oil in water and its relative buoyancy, the new concept barrier avoids the pitfalls of the former by taking advantage of the synergistic benefits of numerous fluid and material properties, including: density, buoyancy, elasticity, polarity, and surface area to volume ratio. Modeled after Zostera marina, commonly called eelgrass, the new barrier, referred to as synthetic eelgrass (SE), behaves analogously. Eelgrass has very long narrow, ribbon-like, leaves which support periphyton, a complex matrix of algae and heterotrophic microbes, which position themselves there to extract nutrients from the seawater flowing past them. In an analogous fashion, oil on, or in, seawater, which comes in contact with SE, is adsorbed on the surface and sequestered there. Secured to the bottom, in shoal waters, SE rises to the surface, and, if the tide is low enough, floats on the sea surface down wind, or down current to snare floating oil. The leaves of SE, called filaments, consist of intrinsically buoyant strips of ethylene methyl acrylate, aka EMA. EMA, made of long chain, saturated, hydrocarbon molecules with nearly homogeneous electron charge distributions, is a non-polar material which is oleophilic and hydrophobic. Oil must be in close proximity to the

  17. Skin Barrier Function and Its Importance at the Start of the Atopic March

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Mary Beth; Peele, Kathy; Wilson, Nevin W.

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis can be due to a variety of causes from nonatopic triggers to food allergy. Control of egress of water and protection from ingress of irritants and allergens are key components of cutaneous barrier function. Current research suggests that a degraded barrier function of the skin allows the immune system inappropriate access to environmental allergens. Epidermal aeroallergen exposure may allow sensitization to allergen possibly initiating the atopic march. Further research into connections between epidermal barrier function and possible allergen sensitization will be important to undertake. Future clinical trials focused on skin barrier protection may be of value as a possible intervention in prevention of the initiation of the atopic march. PMID:22619686

  18. 75 FR 14442 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances-Relocation Income Tax Allowance (RITA) Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Amendment 2008-04 in the Federal Register (73 FR 35952) specifying that GSA would no longer publish the RITA... ADMINISTRATION Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances-- Relocation Income Tax Allowance (RITA...: Mr. Ed Davis, Office of Governmentwide Policy (M), Office of Travel, Transportation, and...

  19. 78 FR 26637 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowance-Relocation Income Tax (RIT) Allowable Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... June 25, 2008 (73 FR 35952), specifying that GSA would no longer publish the RIT Allowance tables in... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowance--Relocation Income Tax (RIT)...

  20. 76 FR 16629 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances-Relocation Income Tax Allowance (RITA) Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... http://www.gsa.gov/relocationpolicy . Dated: March 21, 2011. Janet Dobbs, Director, Office of Travel... ADMINISTRATION Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances-- Relocation Income Tax Allowance (RITA... effective March 24, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Ed Davis, Office of Governmentwide Policy...

  1. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  2. Underground explosion barriers - a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, B.; O`Beirne, T. [ACIRL Ltd., Booval, Qld. (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    The paper focuses on explosibility conditions in underground coal mines, the behaviour of explosions from initiating gas ignition to violent dust explosions and the effectiveness and limits of operation of current designs of passive explosion barriers in suppressing the flame front. The paper also discusses performance evaluations made in full scale explosion galleries and the use of alternatives to passive barriers, including the installation of active barriers under some circumstances.

  3. Emission allowances and utility compliance choices: Market development and regulatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies

    1992-05-01

    This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state PUCs, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusion; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to date by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements. (VC)

  4. Emission allowances and utility compliance choices: Market development and regulatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies)

    1992-01-01

    This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state PUCs, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusion; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to date by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements. (VC)

  5. Gestão integrada e participativa da pesca artesanal: potencialidades e obstáculos no litoral do estado de Santa Catarina Integrated and participative management in small-scale fisheries: opportunities and barriers in Santa Catarina coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Nunes Maia Rebouças

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A profunda crise estrutural que afeta o setor da pesca artesanal pode ser vista como uma das inúmeras contradições do estilo de desenvolvimento adotado em nosso País. Esta crise tende a se agravar no bojo da globalização assimétrica, desafiando um sistema rígido, centralizado e tecnocrático de gestão de recursos naturais de uso comum. O artigo focaliza as oportunidades e bloqueios à re-criação deste sistema, com base nos avanços da pesquisa ecológico-humana e nos princípios do ecodesenvolvimento.The deep structural crisis that affects the small-scale fisheries sector can be seen as one among several shortcomings of the Brazilian development style. This crisis is becoming more and more acute, in the context of an asymmetrical globalization process. It challenges the performance of rigid, centralized and technocratic systems of common-property resource management. This article focuses on the opportunities and barriers for the re-creation of these systems, taking into account the advances in human-ecological research and eco-development principles.

  6. Exposure, Uptake, and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Lanone, Sophie

    The nanotechnologies market is booming, e.g., in the food industry (powder additives, etc.) and in medical applications (drug delivery, prosthetics, diagnostic imaging, etc.), but also in other industrial sectors, such as sports, construction, cosmetics, and so on. In this context, with an exponential increase in the number of current and future applications, it is particularly important to evaluate the problem of unintentional (i.e., non-medical) exposure to manufactured nanoparticles (so excluding nanoparticles found naturally in the environment). In this chapter, we begin by discussing the various parameters that must be taken into account in any serious assessment of exposure to man-made nanoparticles. We then list the potential routes by which nanoparticles might enter into the organism, and outline the mechanisms whereby they could get past the different biological barriers. Finally, we describe the biodistribution of nanoparticles in the organism and the way they are eliminated.

  7. Countermeasures and barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Johannes [Oersted - DTU, Automation, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2005-10-01

    In 1973 Haddon proposed ten strategies for reducing and avoiding damages based on a model of potential harmful energy transfer (Haddon, 1973). The strategies apply to a large variety of unwanted phenomena. Haddon's pioneering work on countermeasures has had a major influence on later thinking about safety. Considering its impact it is remarkable that the literature offers almost no discussions related to the theoretical foundations of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. The present report addresses a number of theoretical issues related to Haddon's countermeasure strategies, which are: 1) A reformulation and formalization of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. 2) An identification and description of some of the problems associated with the term 'barrier'. 3) Suggestions for a more precise terminology based on the causal structure of countermeasures. 4) Extending the scope of countermeasures to include sign-based countermeasures. (au)

  8. Countermeasures and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1973 Haddon proposed ten strategies for reducing and avoiding damages based on a model of potential harmful energy transfer (Haddon, 1973). The strategies apply to a large variety of unwanted phenomena. Haddon's pioneering work on countermeasures has had a major influence on later thinking about safety. Considering its impact it is remarkable that the literature offers almost no discussions related to the theoretical foundations of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. The present report addresses a number of theoretical issues related to Haddon's countermeasure strategies, which are: 1) A reformulation and formalization of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. 2) An identification and description of some of the problems associated with the term 'barrier'. 3) Suggestions for a more precise terminology based on the causal structure of countermeasures. 4) Extending the scope of countermeasures to include sign-based countermeasures. (au)

  9. Racial Trade Barriers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jacob Halvas

    Aryanization is associated with Nazi Germany's policies to exclude Jews in the Germany from the economy in the pre-war years, but I will show it was a global policy from 1937. The utopian goal of international Aryanization was the total removal of Jews who traded with Germany anywhere in the world....... This paper analyzes the racial policies pursued in the foreign trade and argues that we need to recognize Aryanization as a world-wide policy in order to fully understand its character and possible consequences. I focus on the pre-war period and analyze the case of Denmark from three different perspectives......: perpetrators, victims and bystanders. The analysis will show that race, economy and foreign trade were combined in an attempt to raise racial trade barriers. This forced the question of German racial policies on the Danish government, Danish-Jewish businesses, and German companies involved in foreign trade...

  10. Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    The Hanford Permanent Isolation Barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with backup protective features. The objective of current designs is to develop a maintenance-free permanent barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts. Asphalt is being used as an impermeable water diversion layer to provide a redundant layer within the overall barrier design. Data on asphalt barrier properties in a buried environment are not available for the required 100-year time frame. The purpose of this test plan is to outline the activities planned to obtain data with which to estimate performance of the asphalt layers.

  11. Safety-barrier diagrams as a safety management tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2009-01-01

    Networks is discussed. Important advantages of safety-barrier diagrams as compared to other graphical risk-analysis methods are, firstly, the relative simplicity that supports communication with non-expert stakeholders and, secondly, the focus on deliberately inserted safety systems that supports......Safety-barrier diagrams and “bow-tie” diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis and safety management. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The latter's relation to other methods such as fault trees and Bayesian...... the management and maintenance of these systems. Safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk analysis with operational safety management....

  12. Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Permanent Isolation Barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with backup protective features. The objective of current designs is to develop a maintenance-free permanent barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts. Asphalt is being used as an impermeable water diversion layer to provide a redundant layer within the overall barrier design. Data on asphalt barrier properties in a buried environment are not available for the required 100-year time frame. The purpose of this test plan is to outline the activities planned to obtain data with which to estimate performance of the asphalt layers

  13. Recovery post treatment: plans, barriers and motivators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing focus on achieving a sustained recovery from substance use brings with it a need to better understand the factors (recovery capital that contribute to recovery following treatment. This work examined the factors those in recovery perceive to be barriers to (lack of capital or facilitators of (presence of capital sustained recovery post treatment. Methods A purposive sample of 45 participants was recruited from 11 drug treatment services in northern England. Semi-structured qualitative interviews lasting between 30 and 90 minutes were conducted one to three months after participants completed treatment. Interviews examined key themes identified through previous literature but focused on allowing participants to explore their unique recovery journey. Interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically using a combination of deductive and inductive approaches. Results Participants generally reported high levels of confidence in maintaining their recovery with most planning to remain abstinent. There were indications of high levels of recovery capital. Aftercare engagement was high, often through self referral, with non substance use related activity felt to be particularly positive. Supported housing was critical and concerns were raised about the ability to afford to live independently with financial stability and welfare availability a key concern in general. Employment, often in the substance use treatment field, was a desire. However, it was a long term goal, with substantial risks associated with pursuing this too early. Positive social support was almost exclusively from within the recovery community although the re-building of relationships with family (children in particular was a key motivator post treatment. Conclusions Addressing internal factors and underlying issues i.e. ‘human capital’, provided confidence for continued recovery whilst motivators focused on external factors such as family and

  14. Cluster approach allows budgeting, planning with DRGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, P L

    1984-01-01

    Measuring costs and revenues on a diagnosis related group (DRG) basis allows health care managers to define product lines, identify market shares, and examine the effects of case mix and physician behavior on profitability. It also enables public agencies to predict bed needs and evaluate certificate-of-need applications. The large number of DRGs, however, and other managerial considerations may discourage the use of DRG-based budgeting and planning. To save time and enhance data usefulness, financial officers may consolidate the DRGs into fewer groups. Revenue, for example, can be estimated by grouping the DRGs into 23 major diagnostic categories or by clustering them according to cost weight or into one group. Comparisons of payment rates and costs will identify the DRGs that lose money and will determine whether departmental costs are excessive. Strategic planning units formed from the 468 DRGs will help health care managers analyze and project performance. Product lines for this purpose may be clustered according to major diagnostic category, physician specialty, or clinical department. Since a potentially enormous amount of DRG-based clinical and financial information could be generated, hospitals should create data committees to ensure that managers receive only the information they need. PMID:10310693

  15. Review of electromagnetic induction for mapping barrier island framework geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weymer, Bradley A.; Everett, Mark E.; de Smet, Timothy S.; Houser, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The geologic framework controls on modern barrier island transgression and the relationship of these controls to subsurface structure, hydrology and island geomorphology are not well understood. Recent evidence suggests that alongshore variations in pre-Holocene geology of barrier islands modify nearshore hydrodynamic processes and sediment transport, ultimately affecting how barrier islands will respond to relative sea-level rise. Explorations of Holocene barrier island geology are usually based on cores to supplement bathymetric, onshore/offshore seismic and/or ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys. The advantages and limitations of these methods with respect to barrier island investigations are briefly described in this review. Alternative near-surface geophysical methods including electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors are increasingly being used for coastal research because they are non-invasive, provide continuous subsurface information across a variety of sub-environments, and are capable of characterizing large areas in a short time. Although these EMI sensors have shown promise in coastal applications, a number of issues primarily related to subsurface hydrology need to be addressed to fully assess the limitations of this technique. This paper reviews the theory, methodology and applications of EMI in support of geologic framework studies with particular reference to barrier islands. Resolution of these issues will allow EMI sensors to complement and offer significant advantages over traditional methods in support of an improved understanding of large-scale barrier island evolution.

  16. Hanford prototype-barrier status report: FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, A.L.; Gee, G.W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Link, S.O. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    An above-grade surface barrier consisting of a vegetated soil-cover, surrounded by gravel and rock side slopes, is being tested for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It is part of a treatability study at the 200-BP-1 Operable Unit in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. The surface barrier, constructed in 1994, covers 2.5 ha (6.9 acre) of land surface and is situated over an inactive liquid-waste disposal crib. A set of under drains, built into the barrier using curbed asphalt, allows precise measurement of drainage from the soil cover and the side slopes. The treatability test includes measurements of water balance, wind and water erosion, subsidence, plant growth, and plant and animal intrusion. The test compares the performance of the barrier under ambient and simulated climate change (elevated precipitation) conditions. This report documents findings from the third year of testing.

  17. Hanford prototype-barrier status report: FY 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An above-grade surface barrier consisting of a vegetated soil-cover, surrounded by gravel and rock side slopes, is being tested for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It is part of a treatability study at the 200-BP-1 Operable Unit in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. The surface barrier, constructed in 1994, covers 2.5 ha (6.9 acre) of land surface and is situated over an inactive liquid-waste disposal crib. A set of under drains, built into the barrier using curbed asphalt, allows precise measurement of drainage from the soil cover and the side slopes. The treatability test includes measurements of water balance, wind and water erosion, subsidence, plant growth, and plant and animal intrusion. The test compares the performance of the barrier under ambient and simulated climate change (elevated precipitation) conditions. This report documents findings from the third year of testing

  18. Microfluidic Flame Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Gregory S. (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); Mungas, Christopher (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Propellants flow through specialized mechanical hardware that is designed for effective and safe ignition and sustained combustion of the propellants. By integrating a micro-fluidic porous media element between a propellant feed source and the combustion chamber, an effective and reliable propellant injector head may be implemented that is capable of withstanding transient combustion and detonation waves that commonly occur during an ignition event. The micro-fluidic porous media element is of specified porosity or porosity gradient selected to be appropriate for a given propellant. Additionally the propellant injector head design integrates a spark ignition mechanism that withstands extremely hot running conditions without noticeable spark mechanism degradation.

  19. A coculture model mimicking the intestinal mucosa reveals a regulatory role for myofibroblasts in immune-mediated barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, L E M; Schreurs, C C H M; Kroes, H; Spillenaar Bilgen, E J; Van Deventer, S J H; Van Tol, E A F

    2002-10-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease involves a mucosal inflammatory response affecting the barrier function of the gut. Myofibroblasts directly underlining the intestinal epithelium may have a regulatory role in immune-mediated barrier disruption. A coculture system of T84 epithelial and CCD-18Co myofibroblasts was established in order to mimic the in situ spatial interactions between these cell types and to evaluate their role in barrier: integrity. Lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) were introduced in co- and monocultures. Effects of immune cells on barrier integrity was determined by measuring resistance and permeability for macromolecules. Introduction of LPMC in both culture systems caused a time-dependent decrease in barrier integrity. This was found to be less pronounced in cocultures indicating a regulatory role for mesenchymal cells. The effects were also found to depend on the route of LPMC stimulation. Additional analyses suggested that the regulatory role of myofibroblasts in barrier integrity involves production of growth factors. PMID:12395905

  20. Assessing allowable take of migratory birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, M.C.; Sauer, J.R.; Avery, M.L.; Blackwell, B.F.; Koneff, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Legal removal of migratory birds from the wild occurs for several reasons, including subsistence, sport harvest, damage control, and the pet trade. We argue that harvest theory provides the basis for assessing the impact of authorized take, advance a simplified rendering of harvest theory known as potential biological removal as a useful starting point for assessing take, and demonstrate this approach with a case study of depredation control of black vultures (Coragyps atratus) in Virginia, USA. Based on data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey and other sources, we estimated that the black vulture population in Virginia was 91,190 (95% credible interval = 44,520?212,100) in 2006. Using a simple population model and available estimates of life-history parameters, we estimated the intrinsic rate of growth (rmax) to be in the range 7?14%, with 10.6% a plausible point estimate. For a take program to seek an equilibrium population size on the conservative side of the yield curve, the rate of take needs to be less than that which achieves a maximum sustained yield (0.5 x rmax). Based on the point estimate for rmax and using the lower 60% credible interval for population size to account for uncertainty, these conditions would be met if the take of black vultures in Virginia in 2006 was <3,533 birds. Based on regular monitoring data, allowable harvest should be adjusted annually to reflect changes in population size. To initiate discussion about how this assessment framework could be related to the laws and regulations that govern authorization of such take, we suggest that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act requires only that take of native migratory birds be sustainable in the long-term, that is, sustained harvest rate should be

  1. Barriers to Women in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    The Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales, Rosemary Butler AM, has put the issue of barriers to women in public life at the top of the political agenda in Wales. She has held sessions with women across Wales to find out what those barriers are and how they can be tackled. On International Women's Day in February, she invited…

  2. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  3. The Expanded Capabilities Of The Cementitious Barriers Partnership Software Toolbox Version 2.0 - 14331

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Heather; Flach, Greg; Smith, Frank; Langton, Christine; Brown, Kevin; Kosson, David; Samson, Eric; Mallick, Pramod

    2014-01-10

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Project is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Tank Waste Management. The CBP program has developed a set of integrated tools (based on state-of-the-art models and leaching test methods) that help improve understanding and predictions of the long-term structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. The CBP Software Toolbox – “Version 1.0” was released early in FY2013 and was used to support DOE-EM performance assessments in evaluating various degradation mechanisms that included sulfate attack, carbonation and constituent leaching. The sulfate attack analysis predicted the extent and damage that sulfate ingress will have on concrete vaults over extended time (i.e., > 1000 years) and the carbonation analysis provided concrete degradation predictions from rebar corrosion. The new release “Version 2.0” includes upgraded carbonation software and a new software module to evaluate degradation due to chloride attack. Also included in the newer version are a dual regime module allowing evaluation of contaminant release in two regimes – both fractured and un-fractured. The integrated software package has also been upgraded with new plotting capabilities and many other features that increase the “user-friendliness” of the package. Experimental work has been generated to provide data to calibrate the models to improve the credibility of the analysis and reduce the uncertainty. Tools selected for and developed under this program have been used to evaluate and predict the behavior of cementitious barriers used in near-surface engineered waste disposal systems for periods of performance up to or longer than 100 years for operating facilities and longer than 1000 years for waste disposal. The CBP Software Toolbox is and will continue to produce tangible benefits to the working DOE

  4. Differential Targeting of the E-Cadherin/β-Catenin Complex by Gram-Positive Probiotic Lactobacilli Improves Epithelial Barrier Function

    OpenAIRE

    Hummel, Stephanie; Veltman, Katharina; Cichon, Christoph; Sonnenborn, Ulrich; Schmidt, M. Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal ecosystem is balanced by dynamic interactions between resident and incoming microbes, the gastrointestinal barrier, and the mucosal immune system. However, in the context of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), where the integrity of the gastrointestinal barrier is compromised, resident microbes contribute to the development and perpetuation of inflammation and disease. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to exert beneficial effects, e.g., enhancing epithelial barrier integrity. H...

  5. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-26

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  6. Mobilitet, Barrierer & Muligheder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mimi Judidoleslami

    2011-01-01

    som en vej ud af irakiske Kurdistan, men ikke tilbage til Danmark. Drengene fra familier med bedre økonomiske ressourcer giver udtryk for, ønske om at rejse til andre lande. På grund af begrænsede sproglige kompetencer oplever hovedparten af de unge (både i Danmark og i irakiske Kurdistan) barrierer i...... forhold til at indgå i et kurdisk fællesskab. I forhold til de repatrierede unge er det netop manglende sproglig kompetence, der har skabt mange problemer for dem i bl.a. skolesammenhænge. Familier med bedre økonomiske ressourcer har forsøgt at råde bod på dette gennem ansættelse af privat sproglærere...... af hjem og belonging som viser sig i form af en transnational orientering. Og i denne transnationale orientering får Danmark en central placering. Det samme kan man med en vis forsigtighed sige om køn dvs. at pigerne retter sig mere mod Danmark. Men det at Danmark i pigernes transnationale...

  7. Development of engineered barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kim, Seung Soo; Kang, Mu Ja

    1999-03-01

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  8. Development of engineered barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and 316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  9. Language Differences as a Barrier to Quality and Safety in Health Care: The Joint Commission Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Schyve, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Effective communication with patients is critical to the safety and quality of care. Barriers to this communication include differences in language, cultural differences, and low health literacy. Evidence-based practices that reduce these barriers must be integrated into, rather than just added to, health care work processes.

  10. Barriers That Hinder the Successful Transition of Minority Youth into the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentling, Rose Mary; Waight, Consuelo Luisa

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with 21 school-to-work partnership directors identified school, workplace, societal, and individual barriers encountered by minority youth. Significant barriers included poverty, school personnel's resistance to change, lack of cultural understanding, lack of integrated and relevant curriculum, and school-business communication. (SK)

  11. Barrier island management; lessons from the past and directions for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oost, A.P.; Hoekstra, P.; Wiersma, A.; Flemming, B.; Lammerts, E.J.; Pejrup, M.; Hofstede, J.; Valk, B. de; Kiden, P.; Bartholdy, E.J.; Berg, M.W. van den; Vos, P.C.; Vries, S. de; Wang, Z.B.

    2012-01-01

    The article focuses on the morphological development of the Wadden Sea barrier island system, with emphasis on West and East Frisian islands on several temporal and spatial scales. In addition, it integrates the insights for management purposes. Barrier island management is addressed with respect to

  12. Barrier island management: Lessons from the past and directions for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oost, A.P.; Hoekstra, P.; Wiersma, A.; Flemming, B.; Lammerts, E.J.; Pejrup, M.; Hofstede, J.; Valk, B. van der; Kiden, P.; Bartholdy, J.; Berg, M.W. van der; Vos, P.C.; Vries, S. de; Wang, Z.B.

    2012-01-01

    The article focuses on the morphological development of the Wadden Sea barrier island system, with emphasis on West and East Frisian islands on several temporal and spatial scales. In addition, it integrates the insights for management purposes. Barrier island management is addressed with respect to

  13. Nanoscale drug delivery systems and the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyautdin R

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Renad Alyautdin,1 Igor Khalin,2 Mohd Ismail Nafeeza,1 Muhammad Huzaimi Haron,1 Dmitry Kuznetsov31Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM, Sungai Buloh, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, National Defence University of Malaysia (NDUM, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Department of Medicinal Nanobiotechnologies, N. I. Pirogoff Russian State Medical University, Moscow, RussiaAbstract: The protective properties of the blood–brain barrier (BBB are conferred by the intricate architecture of its endothelium coupled with multiple specific transport systems expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs in the brain's vasculature. When the stringent control of the BBB is disrupted, such as following EC damage, substances that are safe for peripheral tissues but toxic to neurons have easier access to the central nervous system (CNS. As a consequence, CNS disorders, including degenerative diseases, can occur independently of an individual's age. Although the BBB is crucial in regulating the biochemical environment that is essential for maintaining neuronal integrity, it limits drug delivery to the CNS. This makes it difficult to deliver beneficial drugs across the BBB while preventing the passage of potential neurotoxins. Available options include transport of drugs across the ECs through traversing occludins and claudins in the tight junctions or by attaching drugs to one of the existing transport systems. Either way, access must specifically allow only the passage of a particular drug. In general, the BBB allows small molecules to enter the CNS; however, most drugs with the potential to treat neurological disorders other than infections have large structures. Several mechanisms, such as modifications of the built-in pumping-out system of drugs and utilization of nanocarriers and liposomes, are among the drug-delivery systems that have been tested; however, each has its limitations and constraints. This review

  14. Barriers to drug delivery in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraman, Shravan Kumar; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in the field of drug delivery. The advent of engineered nanoparticles has allowed us to circumvent the initial limitations to drug delivery such as pharmacokinetics and solubility. However, in spite of significant advances to tumor targeting, an effective treatment strategy for malignant tumors still remains elusive. Tumors possess distinct physiological features which allow them to resist traditional treatment approaches. This combined with the complexity of the biological system presents significant hurdles to the site-specific delivery of therapeutic drugs. One of the key features of engineered nanoparticles is that these can be tailored to execute specific functions. With this review, we hope to provide the reader with a clear understanding and knowledge of biological barriers and the methods to exploit these characteristics to design multifunctional nanocarriers, effect useful dosing regimens and subsequently improve therapeutic outcomes in the clinic. PMID:25068098

  15. 76 FR 32340 - Federal Travel Regulation; Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances (Taxes); Relocation Allowances...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... number of Federal agencies have made the WTA optional to the employee. Nothing in tax law or existing... state and local tax law. At the same time, this rule carries forward from the current 302-17 the... including Social Security tax, if applicable, and Medicare tax. Current law does not allow Federal...

  16. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  17. Development of microfluidic cell culture devices towards an in vitro human intestinal barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin

    to enable real-time detection of cell responses, adjustment of cellular stimulation etc. leading to establishment of conditional experiments. In this project, microfluidic systems engineering was leveraged to develop an eight chamber multi-layer microchip for intestinal barrier studies. Sandwiched between...... the layers was a modified Teflon porous membrane for cell culture. The novelty lies in modifying the surface of the porous Teflon support membrane using thiol-ene ‘click’ chemistry, thus allowing the modified Teflon membrane to be bonded between the chip layers to form an enclosed microchip. Successful...... application of the multi-layer microchip was demonstrated by integrating the microchip to an existing cell culture fluidic system to culture the human intestinal epithelial cells, Caco-2, for long term studies. Under the continuous low flow conditions, the cells differentiated into columnar cells displaying...

  18. Focused ultrasound-mediated drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Alison; Shah, Kairavi; Hough, Olivia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-05-01

    Despite recent advances in blood-brain barrier (BBB) research, it remains a significant hurdle for the pharmaceutical treatment of brain diseases. Focused ultrasound (FUS) is one method to transiently increase permeability of the BBB to promote drug delivery to specific brain regions. An introduction to the BBB and a brief overview of the methods, which can be used to circumvent the BBB to promote drug delivery, is provided. In particular, we discuss the advantages and limitations of FUS technology and the efficacy of FUS-mediated drug delivery in models of disease. MRI for targeting and evaluating FUS treatments, combined with administration of microbubbles, allows for transient, reproducible BBB opening. The integration of a real-time acoustic feedback controller has improved treatment safety. Successful clinical translation of FUS has the potential to transform the treatment of brain disease worldwide without requiring the development of new pharmaceutical agents.

  19. Optimization of a planar all-polymer transistor for characterization of barrier tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramuz, Marc; Margita, Kaleigh; Hama, Adel; Leleux, Pierre; Rivnay, Jonathan; Bazin, Ingrid; Owens, Róisín M

    2015-04-27

    The organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) is a unique device that shows great promise for sensing in biomedical applications such as monitoring of the integrity of epithelial tissue. It is a label-free sensor that is amenable to low-cost production by roll-to-roll or other printing technologies. Herein, the optimization of a planar OECT for the characterization of barrier tissue is presented. Evaluation of surface coating, gate biocompatibility and performance, and optimization of the geometry of the transistor are highlighted. The conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate), which is used as the active material in the transistor, has the added advantage of allowing significant light transmission compared to traditional electrode materials and thus permits high-quality optical microscopy. The combination of optical and electronic monitoring of cells shown herein provides the opportunity to couple two very complementary techniques to yield a low-cost method for in vitro cell sensing. PMID:25752503

  20. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferranda Puig

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549 exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml or vehicle (control. Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  1. Informatization barriers of logistics process management in production company

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna WALASEK

    2015-01-01

    This article is an attempt to characterize informatization barriers of logistics processes management in a production company which provides automotive parts. Threats of successful implementation of Enterprise Resource Planning Systems include: community barriers; organizational barriers; communication barriers; formal barriers; legal barriers; not prepared implementation team barrier; substantive barrier. Proper identification of barriers and solving them are the right way to implement Enter...

  2. Construction of Flexible Subterranean Hydraulic Barriers in Soil and Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the management of radioactive waste sites, there is sometimes a need to divert infiltration water; or contain or divert contaminated groundwater. This paper discusses several experimental techniques based on super permeating molten wax. Many of the methods are suited to form both vertical or horizontal barriers in-situ in the ground. The first method is based on thermally controlled permeation grouting between drilled holes that produces a very thick barrier in soil, rock, or even fractured rock up to 600 meters deep. The second method is a variation on jet grouting for producing a thin low cost barrier in soil. Also discussed is a technique for forming an infiltration barrier within the surface soil over an underground tank farm and a method for encapsulating a buried waste without excavation. These new methods can produce durable subterranean barriers of high integrity. These barriers are made with a special malleable wax that soaks into the soil or rock matrix. The wax is far more impermeable than clay or cement and can flex and stretch in response to soil movements. The wax contains no water and is not prone to damage from soil moisture changes. (authors)

  3. Protective barrier program: Test plan for plant community dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are jointly developing protective barriers for the long term isolation of low-level radioactive defense waste for the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Arid Sites. Protective barriers have been identified as an integral part of the overall final disposal strategy for low-level defense waste at the Arid Sites (DOE 1987). At present, the conceptual design of the Arid Site protective barrier is a multilayer structure that will minimize waster infiltration into and through the underlying waste, and will prevent intrusion into the waste by plant roots, animals, and humans. This multilayer system consists of a fine soil layer overlying a coarse sand and/or gravel geo-filter overlying a layer of large cobbles or basalt riprap. Plants contribute several crucial functions to the overall performance of the protective barrier.Through transpiration, plants are capable of removing considerably more moisture from a given volume of soil than the physical process of evaporation alone. This becomes especially important after periods of excessive precipitation when the possibility of saturation of the textural break and leeching to the buried waste is increased. Plants also function in significantly reducing the amount of wind and water erosion that would be expected to occur on the barrier surface. In addition to these physical functions, plants also influence other biotic effects on barrier performance

  4. Polymers for subterranean containment barriers for underground storage tanks (USTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) set up the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration Program (USTID) to demonstrate technologies for the retrieval and treatment of tank waste, and closure of underground storage tanks (USTs). There are more than 250 underground storage tanks throughout the DOE complex. These tanks contain a wide variety of wastes including high level, low level, transuranic, mixed and hazardous wastes. Many of the tanks have performed beyond the designed lifetime resulting in leakage and contamination of the local geologic media and groundwater. To mitigate this problem it has been proposed that an interim subterranean containment barrier be placed around the tanks. This would minimize or prevent future contamination of soil and groundwater in the event that further tank leakages occur before or during remediation. Use of interim subterranean barriers can also provide sufficient time to evaluate and select appropriate remediation alternatives. The DOE Hanford site was chosen as the demonstration site for containment barrier technologies. A panel of experts for the USTID was convened in February, 1992, to identify technologies for placement of subterranean barriers. The selection was based on the ability of candidate grouts to withstand high radiation doses, high temperatures and aggressive tank waste leachates. The group identified and ranked nine grouting technologies that have potential to place vertical barriers and five for horizontal barriers around the tank. The panel also endorsed placement technologies that require minimal excavation of soil surrounding the tanks

  5. Nanoscale drug delivery systems and the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyautdin, Renad; Khalin, Igor; Nafeeza, Mohd Ismail; Haron, Muhammad Huzaimi; Kuznetsov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The protective properties of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are conferred by the intricate architecture of its endothelium coupled with multiple specific transport systems expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) in the brain's vasculature. When the stringent control of the BBB is disrupted, such as following EC damage, substances that are safe for peripheral tissues but toxic to neurons have easier access to the central nervous system (CNS). As a consequence, CNS disorders, including degenerative diseases, can occur independently of an individual's age. Although the BBB is crucial in regulating the biochemical environment that is essential for maintaining neuronal integrity, it limits drug delivery to the CNS. This makes it difficult to deliver beneficial drugs across the BBB while preventing the passage of potential neurotoxins. Available options include transport of drugs across the ECs through traversing occludins and claudins in the tight junctions or by attaching drugs to one of the existing transport systems. Either way, access must specifically allow only the passage of a particular drug. In general, the BBB allows small molecules to enter the CNS; however, most drugs with the potential to treat neurological disorders other than infections have large structures. Several mechanisms, such as modifications of the built-in pumping-out system of drugs and utilization of nanocarriers and liposomes, are among the drug-delivery systems that have been tested; however, each has its limitations and constraints. This review comprehensively discusses the functional morphology of the BBB and the challenges that must be overcome by drug-delivery systems and elaborates on the potential targets, mechanisms, and formulations to improve drug delivery to the CNS.

  6. Aircraft engine-mounted camera system for long wavelength infrared imaging of in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, James; Cosgrove, Joseph; Scire, James; Haldeman, Charles; Agoos, Ian

    2014-12-01

    This paper announces the implementation of a long wavelength infrared camera to obtain high-speed thermal images of an aircraft engine's in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades. Long wavelength thermal images were captured of first-stage blades. The achieved temporal and spatial resolutions allowed for the identification of cooling-hole locations. The software and synchronization components of the system allowed for the selection of any blade on the turbine wheel, with tuning capability to image from leading edge to trailing edge. Its first application delivered calibrated thermal images as a function of turbine rotational speed at both steady state conditions and during engine transients. In advance of presenting these data for the purpose of understanding engine operation, this paper focuses on the components of the system, verification of high-speed synchronized operation, and the integration of the system with the commercial jet engine test bed.

  7. Do barriers to pediatric pain management as perceived by nurses change over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Michelle L; Salamon, Katherine S; Thompson, Jamie J; Hainsworth, Keri R

    2014-03-01

    For decades, nurses (RNs) have identified barriers to providing the optimal pain management that children deserve; yet no studies were found in the literature that assessed these barriers over time or across multiple pediatric hospitals. The purpose of this study was to reassess barriers that pediatric RNs perceive, and how they describe optimal pain management, 3 years after our initial assessment, collect quantitative data regarding barriers identified through comments during our initial assessment, and describe any changes over time. The Modified Barriers to Optimal Pain Management survey was used to measure barriers in both studies. RNs were invited via e-mail to complete an electronic survey. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to compare results over time. Four hundred forty-two RNs responded, representing a 38% response rate. RNs continue to describe optimal pain management most often in terms of patient comfort and level of functioning. While small changes were seen for several of the barriers, the most significant barriers continued to involve delays in the availability of medications, insufficient physician medication orders, and insufficient orders and time allowed to pre-medicate patients before procedures. To our knowledge, this is the first study to reassess RNs' perceptions of barriers to pediatric pain management over time. While little change was seen in RNs' descriptions of optimal pain management or in RNs' perceptions of barriers, no single item was rated as more than a moderate barrier to pain management. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of improvement strategies.

  8. The gut barrier: new acquisitions and therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaldaferri, Franco; Pizzoferrato, Marco; Gerardi, Viviana; Lopetuso, Loris; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    The intestinal barrier serves 2 critical functions for the survival of the individual: first, it allows nutrient absorption and second, it defends the body from dangerous macromolecule penetration. It is a complex multilayer system, consisting of an external "anatomic" barrier and an inner "functional" immunological barrier. The interaction of these 2 barriers enables equilibrated permeability to be maintained. Many factors can alter this balance: gut microflora modifications, mucus layer alterations, and epithelial damage can increase intestinal permeability, allowing the translocation of luminal content to the inner layer of intestinal wall. Several techniques are now available that enable us to study gut permeability: "in vitro" models (Caco-2 and HT29-MTX cells) and "in vivo" not invasive tests (sugar tests and radioisotope scanning tests) are used to estimate permeability and to suggest molecular pathophysiological mechanisms of intestinal permeability in health and diseases. Many medicinal products used in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases have also found to play an active role in modulate intestinal permeability: corticosteroids, 5-aminosalicylic acid, anti-tumor necrosis factor, probiotics, and mucosal protectors, like gelatin tannate. This review will particularly address the role of the gut barrier in maintaining intestinal permeability (microbiota, mucus, and epithelial cells), the techniques used for estimating intestinal permeability and the therapeutic approaches able to modify it. PMID:22955350

  9. Immigrant children’s social integration and analysis of the barrier factors%流动儿童的社会整合及障碍因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程慧菁

    2010-01-01

    With the influx of the rural immigrants into cities, there exist a new group -the immigrant children stay between the city and countryside. The study was based on these five factors-parents’ occupation, family’s internal factors , educational resources, peer group and mass media, to analyze the factors of social integration and improve the understanding of this group’s status.%随着大量农村人口涌入城市,孕育出新的一个群体--游离于城市和农村之间的流动儿童,本文通过对流动儿童父母职业、家庭内部因素、教育资源、同辈群体以及大众传媒五个层面的剖析,分析流动儿童社会整合的存在性障碍,从而推进社会对个群体社会整合现状的认识。

  10. Coastal Structures and Barriers 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset is a compilation of the UCSC Sand Retention Structures, MC Barriers, and USACE Coastal Structures. UCSC Sand Retention Structures originate from a...

  11. In vivo measurements of skin barrier: comparison of different methods and advantages of laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, A.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2010-12-01

    A major function of the skin is to provide a protective barrier at the interface between external environment and the organism. For skin barrier measurement, a multiplicity of methods is available. As standard methods, the determination of the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as well as the measurement of the stratum corneum hydration, are widely accepted, although they offer some obvious disadvantages such as increased interference liability. Recently, new optical and spectroscopic methods have been introduced to investigate skin barrier properties in vivo. Especially, laser scanning microscopy has been shown to represent an excellent tool to study skin barrier integrity in many areas of relevance such as cosmetology, occupation, diseased skin, and wound healing.

  12. Negative Resistance in a Two-Dimensional System with Entropic Barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-Peng; BAO Jing-Dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ A phenomenon of negative resistance is found in two-dimensional bistable and periodic potentials via Langevin simulation, where output quantities for noise and signal driven system, such as the power-spectrum density modulus and the signal power amplification, can become minima at finite temperatures. In such a system, the curvature of the potential along non-transport degree of freedom at the barrier is larger than that at the local minima. The temperature-dependent effective barrier, i.e. entropic barrier, is introduced via integration over the non-transport variables. The system shows the negative resistance because of the competence between the signal and the entropic barrier.

  13. Barriers in diabetes self management

    OpenAIRE

    Rising, Carl Johan; Lauwersen, Asbjørn Flyger; Stoustrup, Sune Wiingaard

    2013-01-01

    This project seeks to expand on the question: What barriers may occur in diabetes patients' self-care, and how can doctors and patients communicate across professionalism? This project deals with the barrier that may arise between the transfer of highly professional knowledge and patient. The project seeks to create an understanding on how diabetes patients, which is the target audience, understands and experience their illness, and thereby mapping key elements for further focus, to better th...

  14. "Crossing the Sahara without Water": Experiencing Class Inequality through the Back to Education Allowance Welfare to Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Martin

    2008-01-01

    This article critically appraises the success of the Back To Education Allowance (BTEA) in removing barriers to participation in 3rd level education for welfare recipients in Ireland. The paper is based on empirical data from focus group and in-depth qualitative interviews with 3rd level students on the BTEA. This study argues that it is…

  15. Integrating Adults' Characteristics and the Requirements for Their Effective Learning in an e-Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korres, Maria Pavlis; Karalis, Thanassis; Leftheriotou, Piera; Barriocanal, Elena García

    Learning technology, through e-learning, allows adults to adapt learning to their own time, place and pace. On the other hand, the adults' specific characteristics as learners and the requirements for their effective learning must be integrated in the design and the development of any learning environment addressed to them. Adults in an online environment have also to deal with new barriers related to access to the courses, the sense of isolation and the sense of immediacy with educator and other learners. This paper is dealing with the way through which an online environment can overcome these barriers and can integrate adults' characteristics and requirements for effective learning. The use of the appropriate communication tools by designers, developers and educators seem to provide the answers as these tools promote immediacy and interaction, both considered very important factors in online educational environments and affect the nature and the quality of communication and learning.

  16. The Functional Requirements and Design Basis for Information Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, James L.

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Information Barrier Working Group workshop held at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, February 2-4, 1999. This workshop was convened to establish the functional requirements associated with warhead radiation signature information barriers, to identify the major design elements of any such system or approach, and to identify a design basis for each of these major elements. Such information forms the general design basis to be used in designing, fabricating, and evaluating the complete integrated systems developed for specific purposes.

  17. Strategies for monitoring of priority pollutant emission barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettersson, Maria; De Keyser, Webbey; Birch, Heidi;

    2010-01-01

    the model‟s parameters (Optimal Experiment Design for Parameter Estimation (OED/PE)). Furthermore, the knowledge contained in the IUWS models can be used to optimize the planning of sampling campaigns aiming at assessing the efficiency of emission control strategies. To do this, the emission barriers......The objective of Task 7.5 was to develop tools for model-based planning of sampling campaigns in the design of monitoring strategies for priority pollutant emission barriers. Using integrated urban wastewater system (IUWS) models, measurement campaigns can be designed to improve the calibration of...

  18. Global interrupt and barrier networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E; Heidelberger, Philip; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.

    2008-10-28

    A system and method for generating global asynchronous signals in a computing structure. Particularly, a global interrupt and barrier network is implemented that implements logic for generating global interrupt and barrier signals for controlling global asynchronous operations performed by processing elements at selected processing nodes of a computing structure in accordance with a processing algorithm; and includes the physical interconnecting of the processing nodes for communicating the global interrupt and barrier signals to the elements via low-latency paths. The global asynchronous signals respectively initiate interrupt and barrier operations at the processing nodes at times selected for optimizing performance of the processing algorithms. In one embodiment, the global interrupt and barrier network is implemented in a scalable, massively parallel supercomputing device structure comprising a plurality of processing nodes interconnected by multiple independent networks, with each node including one or more processing elements for performing computation or communication activity as required when performing parallel algorithm operations. One multiple independent network includes a global tree network for enabling high-speed global tree communications among global tree network nodes or sub-trees thereof. The global interrupt and barrier network may operate in parallel with the global tree network for providing global asynchronous sideband signals.

  19. Economic alternatives for containment barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, P.J.; Jasperse, B.H.; Fisher, M.J. [Geo-Con, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Fixation, barriers, and containment of existing landfills and other disposal areas are often performed by insitu auger type soil mixing and jet grouting. Cement or other chemical reagents are mixed with soil to form both vertical and horizontal barriers. Immobilization of contaminants can be economically achieved by mixing soil and the contaminants with reagents that solidify or stabilize the contaminated area. Developed in Japan, and relatively new to the United States, the first large scale application was for a vertical barrier at the Jackson Lake Dam project in 1986. This technology has grown in both the civil and environmental field since. The paper describes current United States practice for Deep Soil Mixing (over 12 meters in depth), and Shallow Soil Mixing for vertical barriers and stabilization/solidification, and Jet Grouting for horizontal and vertical barriers. Creating very low permeability barriers at depth with minimal surface return often makes these techniques economical when compared to slurry trenches. The paper will discuss equipment, materials, soil and strength parameters, and quality control.

  20. Implementation of renewable technologies - Opportunities and barriers. Zimbabwe country study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Renewable Energy Technologies (RETS) have over the years become an integral part of the energy supply chain in most developed countries. Recent projections show that 13.5% of the world's primary energy supply comes from renewable and this figure has an aggregated annual growth rate of 16%. Wind has the highest annual growth rate of 22% while the least annual growth rate of 2% is for hydropower. The main push for renewable like wind in the OECD countries are environmental concerns and the business aspect in power generation. The situation is however completely different in Africa, where the thrust for RETs is developmental based. Although the continent has abundant renewable energy resources like solar, biomass, wind and hydro potential, they have remained largely unexploited. Several efforts have been made to help African countries like Zimbabwe to exploit such resources. The main objectives of this country study included review of Zimbabwe's development of past RETs, establish barriers related lessons learnt from such projects and currently running RETs projects, identify barriers experienced by other projects and then select a few barrier removal projects and then develop them with the help of all stake holders in the country. The methodology of this study involved a review of past RETs projects to establish barriers faced and barriers related lessons learnt. An examination of the policy instruments related to RETs was done to establish how they promote the dissemination of the technologies as well as their adequacy. A survey of all possible RETs projects in the country was carried out and in this survey the end-users were visited and interviewed by the research team. An initial workshop, which was attended by all stake holders, was held in November 1999. An Advisory committee on RETs in Zimbabwe was then set up comprising of various stake holders from government, the private sector, research institutions, interviewed end-users and the NGO community

  1. Near barrier scattering of 8He from heavy targets

    OpenAIRE

    Marquínez Durán, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is the study of the elastic scattering of 8He from 208Pb at energies around the Coulomb barrier. This work is an extension of the investigations performed by the collaboration, in which the Grupo de Estructura de la Materia of the University of Huelva takes part, on 6He reactions at near-barrier energies. The direct comparison of the experimental data from the 6He+208Pb and 8He+208Pb experiments will allow for studying the subtle differences in the dynamics of hal...

  2. Evaluación de barreras vegetales en el manejo integrado de la mancha anular del papayo (PRSV-P en Michoacán, México Evaluation of plant barriers in an integrated management of papayo ringspot in Michoacan, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Rivas-Valencia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El efecto de barreras vegetales como componente de un programa de manejo integrado (MI, se validó y adaptó en 1999 en Michoacán, México, para controlar la Mancha Anular del Papayo, enfermedad causada por el Papaya ringspot potyvirus type-P (PRSV-P. Se estableció un experimento en parcelas divididas con dos factores experimentales: barreras vegetales (Hibiscus sabdariffa, y componentes de MI: MI sin aspersión de citrolina (1.5% (MI-A, MI sin eliminación de plantas con síntomas iniciales de virosis antes de floración (MI-D y MI. Las barreras vegetales sembradas 20 días antes del trasplante del papayo y el desplante retrasaron en 19 días el inicio del progreso de epidemias en el MI lo que resultó en una mayor producción (14.2% que el resto de tratamientos, aunque fue superado por MI-A en vigor (4% en diámetro de tallo. La citrolina fue fitotóxica, disminuyó el vigor de plantas (5.3% y no limitó significativamente el desarrollo de la enfermedad ya que la intensidad de las epidemias (X0 = 47días, Yf = 84% y ABCPE = 3220% días fue similar al testigo. El uso de barreras vegetales por si sola aparentemente no es suficiente para la reducción de la incidencia y dispersión de la enfermedad. Los áfidos más abundantes, con reconocida capacidad transmisora del PRSV-P, fueron Aphis gossypii, A. nerii, A. spiraecola y Macrosiphum euphorbiae, los cuales representaron aproximadamente el 13% del total de áfidos capturados.The effect of plant barriers as a component of an integrated management program (IM was validated and adapted in 1999, in Michoacan, Mexico, to control papaya ringspot, caused by papaya ringspot potyvirus type-P (PRSV-P. A split-plot design was established with two experimental factors: plant barriers and components of IM: IM without oil sprinkling (IM-O, IM without plant rouging (IM-R, and complete IM. Plant barriers (Hibiscus sabdariffa, sowed 20 days before papaya transplanting, and plant rouging delayed the epidemics

  3. Damage of vascular endothelial barrier induced by explosive blast and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Wang; Jing Chen

    2016-01-01

    In recent years,injuries induced by explosive blast have got more and more attention owing to weapon development and frequent terrorist activities.Tear.bleeding and edema of tissues and organs are the main manifestations of blast shock wave damage.Vascular endothelial barrier is the main defense of tissues and organs' integrity.This article aims to discuss possible mechanisms of endothelial barrier damage induced by explosive blast and main manifestations of blood brain barrier,blood-air barrier,and intestinal vascular barrier impairments.In addition,the main regulatory factors of vascular permeability are also summarized so as to provide theoretical basis for prevention and cure of vascular endothelial barrier damage resulting from explosive blast.

  4. Allocation of CO2 emission allowances. Distribution of emission allowances in a European emissions trading scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmsen, H.; Van der Kolk, J. [KPMG Sustainability, Amstelveen (Netherlands); Kerssemeeckers, M.; De Beer, J. [Ecofys, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2002-10-01

    The European Commission has submitted a draft directive on Emissions Trading on 23 October 2001. In this system, each Member State has to submit an allocation plan that describes the allowances that will be distributed, and how these will be distributed among the operators of each participating installation. In this study the possible allocation options and their consequences are investigated; the potential bottlenecks are assessed, which would occur if the Netherlands developed a national allocation plan; the criteria for national allocation plans are assessed (Annex III draft directive); and some possibilities for solutions are presented.

  5. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs documents. The updates

  6. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2005-08-29

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs

  7. Diabetes and diet: Managing dietary barriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friele, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports on the barriers diabetic patients experience with their diet, and the ways they cope with these barriers. A dietary barrier is a hinderance to a person's well-being, induced by being advised a diet. First inventories were made of possible dietary barriers and ways of coping with

  8. [Blood-nerve barrier: structure and function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) is a dynamic interface between the endoneurial microenvironment and surrounding extracellular space or blood contents, and is localized the innermost layer of multilayered ensheathing perineurium and endoneurial microvessels. Since the BNB is a key structure controlling the internal milieu of the peripheral nerve parenchyma, adequate understanding of the BNB is crucial for developing treatment strategies for human peripheral nervous system disorders, including Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and diabetic and various metabolic/toxic neuropathies. However, fewer studies have been conducted on the BNB, if we compare against the number of studies on the blood-brain barrier. This is because of the lack of adequate human cell lines originating from the BNB. In our laboratory, human immortal cell lines from the BNB, namely, the endothelial cell line and pericyte cell line, have recently been established and vigorous investigations of their biological and physiological properties are now underway. Pericytes constituting the BNB were found to possess robust ability of controlling BNB integrity via secretion of various cytokines and growth factors including bFGF, VEGF, GDNF, BDNF, and angiopoietin-1. Unknown soluble factors secreted by pericytes also contribute to the upregulation of claudin-5 in endothelial cells in the BNB and thus, strengthen the barrier function of the BNB. In diabetic neuropathy, pericytes were shown to regulate the vascular basement membrane, while AGEs were shown to induce basement membrane hypertrophy and disrupt the BNB by increasing the autocrine secretion of VEGF and TGF-beta from pericytes. In this review article, we discuss the macroscopic and microscopic anatomy of the human BNB as well as the molecular mechanisms of mononuclear cell infiltration across the BNB. PMID:21613659

  9. Method of in situ retrieval of contaminants or other substances using a barrier system and leaching solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Walsh, Stephanie; Richardson, John G.; Dick, John R.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-12-26

    Processes and methods relating to treating contaminants and collecting desired substances from a zone of interest using subterranean collection and containment barriers. Tubular casings having interlock structures are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The subterranean barrier includes an effluent collection system. Treatment solutions provided to the zone of interest pass therethrough and are collected by the barrier and treated or recovered, allowing on-site remediation. Barrier components may be used to in the treatment by collecting or removing contaminants or other materials from the zone of interest.

  10. Progress in forming bottom barriers under waste sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, E.E. [Carter Technologies, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The paper describes an new method for the construction, verification, and maintenance of underground vaults to isolate and contain radioactive burial sites without excavation or drilling in contaminated areas. The paper begins with a discussion of previous full-scale field tests of horizontal barrier tools which utilized high pressure jetting technology. This is followed by a discussion of the TECT process, which cuts with an abrasive cable instead of high pressure jets. The new method is potentially applicable to more soil types than previous methods and can form very thick barriers. Both processes are performed from the perimeter of a site and require no penetration or disturbance of the active waste area. The paper also describes long-term verification methods to monitor barrier integrity passively.

  11. Investigating the extent to which mobile phones reduce Knowledge Transfer barriers in Student Project Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Kyobe

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Group learning plays a key role in the transfer of knowledge. In institutions of learning, it enhances students’ understanding, critical thinking, integration of knowledge and knowledge sharing. However, the transfer of knowledge in group projects is often impeded by factors such as time and budget constraints, individual and social barriers, and a lack of motivation.Institutions of learning are increasingly adopting information and communication technologies (e.g. mobile technologies to provide solutions to the challenges facing them. Whilst the integration of the mobile context and technologies in learning environment has been encouraged over the years, and indeed many students today can use mobile phones, the effectiveness of these technologies in reducing impediments to knowledge transfer in group learning has not been investigated.This study investigated the extent to which mobile phones reduce the barriers to knowledge transfer in project groups. The impediments examined include the nature of knowledge, social barriers, lack of time and lack of motivation. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to collect and analyse the data. The sample consisted of 85 students engaged in group projects in the departments of Information Systems, Civil Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Engineering.The results show that mobile phones reduce all four knowledge transfer barriers investigated in the project groups. We found no significant difference in the nature of knowledge shared by teams with weak and strong ties. This suggests that teams with weak social ties who normally experience difficulty sharing complex (tacit knowledge can easily do so with the aid of mobile facilities. In addition, frequent users of mobile phones were motivated to share explicit knowledge with their peers whilst those who often work with tacit knowledge could convert it to explicit form and share it with others. Mobile features like short messaging

  12. The Use of Feature Parameters to Asses Barrier Properties of ALD coatings for Flexible PV Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Liam; Robbins, David; Fleming, Leigh; Elrawemi, Mohamed

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports on the recent work carried out as part of the EU funded NanoMend project. The project seeks to develop integrated process inspection, cleaning, repair and control systems for nano-scale thin films on large area substrates. In the present study flexible photovoltaic films have been the substrate of interest. Flexible PV films are the subject of significant development at present and the latest films have efficiencies at or beyond the level of Si based rigid PV modules. These flexible devices are fabricated on polymer film by the repeated deposition, and patterning, of thin layer materials using roll-to-roll processes, where the whole film is approximately 3um thick prior to encapsulation. Whilst flexible films offer significant advantages in terms of mass and the possibility of building integration (BIPV) they are at present susceptible to long term environmental degradation as a result of water vapor transmission through the barrier layers to the CIGS (Copper Indium Gallium Selenide CuInxGa(1-x)Se2) PV cells thus causing electrical shorts and efficiency drops. Environmental protection of the GIGS cell is provided by a thin (40nm) barrier coating of Al2O3. The highly conformal aluminium oxide barrier layer is produced by atomic layer deposition (ALD) where, the ultra-thin Al2O3 layer is deposited onto polymer thin films before these films encapsulate the PV cell. The surface of the starting polymer film must be of very high quality in order to avoid creating defects in the device layers. Since these defects reduce manufacturing yield, in order to prevent them, a further thin polymer coating (planarization layer) is generally applied to the polymer film prior to deposition. The presence of surface irregularities on the uncoated film can create defects within the nanometre-scale, aluminium oxide, barrier layer and these are measured and characterised. This paper begins by reporting the results of early stage measurements conducted to characterise

  13. Cylindrical air flow reversal barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woznica, C.; Rodziewicz, M.

    1988-06-01

    Describes an innovative design introduced in the ZMP mine in Zory for quick reversal of ventilation air flow. Geologic mining conditions at the 705 m deep horizon, where the barrier was built, are described. According to the design used until now, a reversal system consisted of safety barriers, ventilation air locks, a ventilation bridge and stopping needed in case of a fire when air flow direction must be reversed. Nine air locks and an expensive concrete ventilation bridge were needed and the air locks had to be operated at 8 points of the region to effect reversal. The new design consists of a 2-storey cylindrical barrier which also fulfills the function of a ventilation bridge. It can be manually or remotely operated by a mechanical or pneumatic system. Tests showed that the new barrier permits immediate air flow reversal while retaining 60% of the original air, which is important in the case of fire and methane hazards. It permits improved seam panelling and splitting of pillars and brings an economy of about 40 million zlotys in construction cost. Design and operation of the barrier is illustrated and ventilation air circulation is explained. 7 figs.

  14. Failure mechanisms of thermal barrier systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are widely used in turbines for propulsion and power generation. The benefit results from their ability to sustain high thermal gradients in the presence of adequate backside cooling. Lowering the temperature of the metal substrate prolongs the life of the component: whether from environmental attack, creep rupture, or fatigue. Thermal barrier systems exhibit multiple failure mechanisms, depends on the deposition methods of the TBCs, chemical composition of the bond coats, and their working environments. Some of the most prevalent are studied in this thesis. There are two types of thermal barrier systems based on the chemical composition of the bond coats: Pt-aluminide and NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Ratcheting happens the most in the systems with Pt-aluminide bond coats; while edge delamination is considered a possible failure mechanism for the systems with NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Ratcheting is motivated by displacement instability in the thermally grown oxide (TGO). Interactions between cracks induced in TBCs upon thermal cycling have been calculated. Cracks that converge from neighboring imperfections exhibit a minimum energy release rate prior to coalescence. Equating this minimum to the toughness of the TBC provides a criterion for coalescence and failure. Imposing this criterion allows the change in crack length upon cycling and the number of cycles to failure to be ascertained. This simulation capability is used to explore various influences on durability. Samples with NiCoCrAlY bond coat are studied after subjected to thermal cycling in a burner rig. In each case, a dominant delamination has been identified, that extends primarily along the interface between the TGO and the bond coat. Calculations of the delamination energy release rate, upon comparison with the interface toughness, reveals a critical TGO thickness, (h tgo)c ≈ 3mum, comparable to that found experimentally.

  15. A method for determining allowable residual contamination levels of radionuclide mixtures in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important consideration in the disposal of radioactive wastes, and consequently in the preparation of plans for remedial actions at contaminated sites, is the amount of radioactive contamination that may be allowed to remain at any particular waste site. The allowable residual contamination level (ARCL) is dependent on the radiation dose limit imposed, the physical and environmental characteristics of the waste site, and the time at which exposure to the wastes is assumed to occur. The steps in generating an ARCL are generally as follows: (1) develop plausible, credible site-specific exposure scenario; (2) calculate maximum annual radiation doses to an individual for each radionuclide based on the existing physical characteristics of the waste site and the site-specific exposure scenario; (3) calculate the ARCL for the dose limit desired, including all radionuclides present, uncorrected for site cleanup or barrier considerations; and (4) apply any corrections for proposed cleanup activity or addition of barriers to waste migration or uptake to obtain the ARCL applicable to the proposed action. Use of this method allows appropriate application of resources to achieve uniform compliance with a single regulatory standard, i.e., a radiation dose rate limit. Application and modification of the ARCL method requires appropriate models of the environmental transport and fate of radionuclides. Example calculations are given for several specific waste forms and waste site types in order to demonstrate the technique and generate comparisons with other approaches

  16. Room Temperature Magnetic Barrier Layers in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Wong, F. J.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-03-09

    We investigate the spin transport and interfacial magnetism of magnetic tunnel junctions with highly spin polarized LSMO and Fe3O4 electrodes and a ferrimagnetic NiFe2O4 (NFO) barrier layer. The spin dependent transport can be understood in terms of magnon-assisted spin dependent tunneling where the magnons are excited in the barrier layer itself. The NFO/Fe3O4 interface displays strong magnetic coupling, while the LSMO/NFO interface exhibits clear decoupling as determined by a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This decoupling allows for distinct parallel and antiparallel electrode states in this all-magnetic trilayer. The spin transport of these devices, dominated by the NFO barrier layer magnetism, leads to a symmetric bias dependence of the junction magnetoresistance at all temperatures.

  17. Using cultured endothelial cells to study endothelial barrier dysfunction: Challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Jurjan; Weijers, Ester M; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; Malik, Asrar B; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-08-01

    Despite considerable progress in the understanding of endothelial barrier regulation and the identification of approaches that have the potential to improve endothelial barrier function, no drug- or stem cell-based therapy is presently available to reverse the widespread vascular leak that is observed in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. The translational gap suggests a need to develop experimental approaches and tools that better mimic the complex environment of the microcirculation in which the vascular leak develops. Recent studies have identified several elements of this microenvironment. Among these are composition and stiffness of the extracellular matrix, fluid shear stress, interaction of endothelial cells (ECs) with pericytes, oxygen tension, and the combination of toxic and mechanic injurious stimuli. Development of novel cell culture techniques that integrate these elements would allow in-depth analysis of EC biology that closely approaches the (patho)physiological conditions in situ. In parallel, techniques to isolate organ-specific ECs, to define EC heterogeneity in its full complexity, and to culture patient-derived ECs from inducible pluripotent stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells are likely to advance the understanding of ARDS and lead to development of therapeutics. This review 1) summarizes the advantages and pitfalls of EC cultures to study vascular leak in ARDS, 2) provides an overview of elements of the microvascular environment that can directly affect endothelial barrier function, and 3) discusses alternative methods to bridge the gap between basic research and clinical application with the intent of improving the translational value of present EC culture approaches. PMID:27343194

  18. Structure information from fusion barriers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S V S Sastry; S Santra

    2000-06-01

    It is shown that the analysis of fusion barrier distributions is not always an unambiguous test or a ‘fingerprint’ of the structure information of the colliding nuclei. Examples are presented with same fusion barrier distributions for nuclei having different structures. The fusion excitation functions for 16O+208Pb, using the coupled reaction channel (CRC) method and correct structure information, have been analysed. The barrier distributions derived from these excitation functions including many of the significant channels are featureless, although these channels have considerable effects on the fusion excitation function. However, a simultaneous analysis of the fusion, elastic and quasi-elastic channels would fix the structure and the reaction unambiguously

  19. Translating barriers into potential improvements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altintzoglou, Themistoklis; Hansen, Karina Birch; Valsdottir, Thora;

    2010-01-01

    and Iceland. The results were then linked to the Stage-Gate model for consumer-based new product development (NPD). Findings: The participants thought of seafood as either healthy or convenient, although there The participants thought of seafood as either healthy or convenient, although there were concerns....... An increase in seafood availability coupled with lower prices would encourage these consumers to add seafood to their diet. Research limitations/implications: Purchase-point-marketing and habitual behaviour were Purchase-point-marketing and habitual behaviour were found to implicitly skew planned behaviour......Purpose: The aim of this study is to explore potential barriers to seafood consumption by The aim of this study is to explore potential barriers to seafood consumption by young adults and the parents of young children. Knowledge of these barriers will be used to assist the development of new...

  20. PROMOTION, SWITCHING BARRIERS, AND LOYALTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu-Shin Tung

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the causal relationships among promotion effects, switching barriers, and loyalty in the department stores. The relationship between switching barriers and loyalty reveals partially the same results as the switching barriers theory of Jones et al. (2000. The reasons arise from “too often” and “too similar” sales promotion programs of competitive department stores in Taiwan, leading the promotion effects to not contribute to the attractiveness of competitors. The promotion effects have a positive and significant influence on loyalty, which is consistent with the prior literature. Promotion effects are also the most important weight to loyalty in our tested model but it reveals a seeming loyalty, because the loyalty depends on the reward of promotion. The negative relationship between promotion effects and attractiveness of alternative supports the promotion effects, which can lower the attractiveness of competitors, but these similar promotion plans are not attributed to interpersonal relationships.

  1. Rare disease research: Breaking the privacy barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Mascalzoni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the few patients affected, rare disease research has to count on international registries to exist in order to produce significant research outputs. Data sharing of registries is therefore a unique resource to allow rare disease research to flourish and any lost data will jeopardize the quality of an already extremely difficult research. The rules usually applied to research such as the right to withdraw or the need for specific consent for every use of data can be detrimental in order to get effective results. Privacy rights regulated through traditional informed consent mechanisms have been regarded as a major barrier in order to effectively share data worldwide. Some authors argue that this barrier hampers results that could be beneficial to the patients so that another right will be overstated: the right to quality healthcare. We argue in this paper that privacy has been often interpreted just one-sided as the right to secrecy but it can entail another meaning: the right to manage one's own private sphere. Managing it pertains, not only to the right to deny access, but also to the right to grant access. At the same time research on patient participation and transparency shows that new forms of IT-based informed consent can provide a good balance between the right of individuals to be in control of their data and the opportunity for science to pursue international research.

  2. Rare disease research: Breaking the privacy barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascalzoni, Deborah; Paradiso, Angelo; Hansson, Matts

    2014-06-01

    Due to the few patients affected, rare disease research has to count on international registries to exist in order to produce significant research outputs. Data sharing of registries is therefore a unique resource to allow rare disease research to flourish and any lost data will jeopardize the quality of an already extremely difficult research. The rules usually applied to research such as the right to withdraw or the need for specific consent for every use of data can be detrimental in order to get effective results. Privacy rights regulated through traditional informed consent mechanisms have been regarded as a major barrier in order to effectively share data worldwide. Some authors argue that this barrier hampers results that could be beneficial to the patients so that another right will be overstated: the right to quality healthcare. We argue in this paper that privacy has been often interpreted just one-sided as the right to secrecy but it can entail another meaning: the right to manage one's own private sphere. Managing it pertains, not only to the right to deny access, but also to the right to grant access. At the same time research on patient participation and transparency shows that new forms of IT-based informed consent can provide a good balance between the right of individuals to be in control of their data and the opportunity for science to pursue international research. PMID:27275410

  3. Self healing mechanism in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochubey, V.; Sloof, W.G. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    During service damage in terms of small cracks develops in thermal barrier coatings (TBC), composed of partially yttria stabilized zirconia (PYSZ), and applied to gas turbine components made of Ni-base superalloys coated with an aluminide diffusion or MCrAlY overlay coating. Growth and coalescence of these microcracks results in cracks that run parallel to the interface with the substrate leading to failure by delamination of the TBC. A mechanism is proposed to heal the micro-cracks in a TBC by introducing MoSi{sub 2} particles. Upon high temperature expose in air, in the range of 1200 C, MoSi{sub 2} forms amorphous SiO{sub 2} that can fill micro-cracks, thereby restoring the integrity of the TBC. (orig.)

  4. Provider barriers to telemental health: obstacles overcome, obstacles remaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth; Turvey, Carolyn; Augusterfer, Eugene F

    2013-06-01

    Many providers are hesitant to use telemental health technologies. When providers are queried, various barriers are presented, such as the clinician's skepticism about the effectiveness of telemental health (TMH), viewing telehealth technologies as inconvenient, or reporting difficulties with medical reimbursement. Provider support for TMH is critical to its diffusion because clinicians often serve as the initial gatekeepers to telehealth implementation and program success. In this article, we address provider concerns in three broad domains: (1) personal barriers, (2) clinical workflow and technology barriers, and (3) licensure, credentialing, and reimbursement barriers. We found evidence that, although many barriers have been discussed in the literature for years, advancements in TMH have rapidly reduced obstacles for its use. Improvements include extensive opportunities for training, a growing evidence base supporting positive TMH outcomes, and transformations in technologies that improve provider convenience and transmission quality. Recommendations for further change are discussed within each domain. In particular, it is important to grow and disseminate data underscoring the promise and effectiveness of TMH, integrate videoconferencing capabilities into electronic medical record platforms, expand TMH reimbursement, and modify licensure standards.

  5. Microtubule dynamics control HGF-induced lung endothelial barrier enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xinyong; Tian, Yufeng; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Sarich, Nicolene; Birukova, Anna A

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules (MT) play a vital role in many cellular functions, but their role in peripheral actin cytoskeletal dynamics which is essential for control of endothelial barrier and monolayer integrity is less understood. We have previously described the enhancement of lung endothelial cell (EC) barrier by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) which was associated with Rac1-mediated remodeling of actin cytoskeleton. This study investigated involvement of MT-dependent mechanisms in the HGF-induced enhancement of EC barrier. HGF-induced Rac1 activation was accompanied by phosphorylation of stathmin, a regulator of MT dynamics. HGF also stimulated MT peripheral growth monitored by time lapse imaging and tracking analysis of EB-1-decorated MT growing tips, and increased the pool of acetylated tubulin. These effects were abolished by EC pretreatment with HGF receptor inhibitor, downregulation of Rac1 pathway, or by expression of a stathmin-S63A phosphorylation deficient mutant. Expression of stathmin-S63A abolished the HGF protective effects against thrombin-induced activation of RhoA cascade, permeability increase, and EC barrier dysfunction. These results demonstrate a novel MT-dependent mechanism of HGF-induced EC barrier regulation via Rac1/PAK1/stathmin-dependent control of MT dynamics. PMID:25198505

  6. Microtubule dynamics control HGF-induced lung endothelial barrier enhancement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyong Tian

    Full Text Available Microtubules (MT play a vital role in many cellular functions, but their role in peripheral actin cytoskeletal dynamics which is essential for control of endothelial barrier and monolayer integrity is less understood. We have previously described the enhancement of lung endothelial cell (EC barrier by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF which was associated with Rac1-mediated remodeling of actin cytoskeleton. This study investigated involvement of MT-dependent mechanisms in the HGF-induced enhancement of EC barrier. HGF-induced Rac1 activation was accompanied by phosphorylation of stathmin, a regulator of MT dynamics. HGF also stimulated MT peripheral growth monitored by time lapse imaging and tracking analysis of EB-1-decorated MT growing tips, and increased the pool of acetylated tubulin. These effects were abolished by EC pretreatment with HGF receptor inhibitor, downregulation of Rac1 pathway, or by expression of a stathmin-S63A phosphorylation deficient mutant. Expression of stathmin-S63A abolished the HGF protective effects against thrombin-induced activation of RhoA cascade, permeability increase, and EC barrier dysfunction. These results demonstrate a novel MT-dependent mechanism of HGF-induced EC barrier regulation via Rac1/PAK1/stathmin-dependent control of MT dynamics.

  7. Barriers to diabetes management: patient and provider factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soohyun; Chesla, Catherine; Stotts, Nancy A; Kroon, Lisa; Janson, Susan L

    2011-07-01

    Despite significant advances in diagnosis and treatment, the persistence of inadequate metabolic control continues. Poor glycemic control may be reflected by both the failure of diabetes self-management by patients as well as inadequate intervention strategies by clinicians. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize existing knowledge regarding various barriers of diabetes management from the perspectives of both patients and clinicians. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, and PsycINFO identified 1454 articles in English published between 1990 and 2009, addressing type 2 diabetes, patient's barriers, clinician's barriers, and self-management. Patients' adherence, attitude, beliefs, and knowledge about diabetes may affect diabetes self-management. Culture and language capabilities influence the patient's health beliefs, attitudes, health literacy, thereby affecting diabetes self-management. Other influential factors include the patient's financial resources, co-morbidities, and social support. Clinician's attitude, beliefs and knowledge about diabetes also influence diabetes management. Clinicians may further influence the patient's perception through effective communication skills and by having a well-integrated health care system. Identifying barriers to diabetes management is necessary to improve the quality of diabetes care, including the improvement of metabolic control, and diabetes self-management. Further research that considers these barriers is necessary for developing interventions for individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  8. The Solution to Green Barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Yan

    2009-01-01

    @@ The recovery process of world economy is rough and full of twists and turns.Especially the trade protectionism,having reemerged under the mask of"green barrier",is making a great impact on the slowly recovering world economy and trade.Then,what are the characteristics of trade barriers in the post-crisis era?Where is the outlet of Chinese manufacturing industry?With these questions,ourreporter interviewed Professor Zhou Shijian,Standing Director to China Association of International Trade and Senior Researcher to SINO-US Relationship Research Centre of Tsinghua University.

  9. Centromeric barrier disruption leads to mitotic defects in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Terilyn L; Merrett, Stephanie L; Pun, Matthew J; Scott, Kristin C

    2014-04-01

    Centromeres are cis-acting chromosomal domains that direct kinetochore formation, enabling faithful chromosome segregation and preserving genome stability. The centromeres of most eukaryotic organisms are structurally complex, composed of nonoverlapping, structurally and functionally distinct chromatin subdomains, including the specialized core chromatin that underlies the kinetochore and pericentromeric heterochromatin. The genomic and epigenetic features that specify and preserve the adjacent chromatin subdomains critical to centromere identity are currently unknown. Here we demonstrate that chromatin barriers regulate this process in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Reduced fitness and mitotic chromosome segregation defects occur in strains that carry exogenous DNA inserted at centromere 1 chromatin barriers. Abnormal phenotypes are accompanied by changes in the structural integrity of both the centromeric core chromatin domain, containing the conserved CENP-A(Cnp1) protein, and the flanking pericentric heterochromatin domain. Barrier mutant cells can revert to wild-type growth and centromere structure at a high frequency after the spontaneous excision of integrated exogenous DNA. Our results reveal a previously undemonstrated role for chromatin barriers in chromosome segregation and in the prevention of genome instability. PMID:24531725

  10. Reduction of Train-induced Vibrations by using Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Leonardi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the ground-borne vibration caused by high speed trains has received considerable attention in recent years, due to the effects of vibration on buildings, in terms of physical damage and on population, in terms of discomfort. The problem has become more significant with the increase of speed and weight of trains, which results in heavier loads on the tracks. Therefore, there is the necessity to find a method, which allows investigating the propagation of vibration waves in the soil. This study aims to study the train-induced ground vibration and the mitigation effects of barriers using a Finite Element Method (FEM model. Two different types of barriers were evaluated considering their stiffness and a benchmark model without mitigation measures was also analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of the considered barriers. The results of the proposed elaborations have been finalized to the assessment of the incidence of the barrier on the vibration state induced from the passage of a high speed trains and the following conclusions can be made: concrete seems to provide a significative reduction of the vibration. The proposed method can be successfully applied to a preliminary analysis of the influence of different types of barriers on the dynamic properties of vibration waves in the soil.

  11. On coupled THMC modelling of engineered barriers incorporating microstructural changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, M.; Olivella, S.; Gens, A. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Guimaraes, L.D.N. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); Fernandez, A.M. [CIEMAT, Dept. of Environmental Impact of Energy, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Compacted swelling clays are often envisaged as the main component of engineered barriers for radioactive waste disposal. These barriers are subjected to thermal loading due to the heat emitted by the waste and to hydration from water coming from the adjacent rock. As a consequence of these thermohydraulic phenomena, mechanical and chemical changes arise that, in turn, may affect all other aspects of behaviour. A correct understanding and prediction of these barriers require, therefore, the performance of fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical and chemical (THMC) numerical analyses. A common feature of the formulations commonly used in coupled analyses is the assumption of the clay barrier as a single porosity material. However, the pore structure of expansive clays presents more than one type of voids. In the last few years, a number of tests have been performed revealing a strong influence of the pore structure on the behaviour of expansive clays. Therefore, a proper THMC modelling of a clay-based engineered barrier should incorporate the following components: a fully coupled THMC formulation that incorporates the main phenomena occurring during heating and hydration of the clay; a double structure model that takes into account the evolving microstructure of the swelling clay; chemo-mechanical model that allows for the effect of chemical variables on the mechanical behaviour of the clay. The contribution describes each of these components and their incorporation into a computer code, CODE BRIGHT. (authors)

  12. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed

  13. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed.

  14. 7 CFR 3560.202 - Establishing rents and utility allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishing rents and utility allowances. 3560.202... Establishing rents and utility allowances. (a) General. Rents and utility allowances for rental units in Agency... Agency. (b) Agency approval. All rents and utility allowances set by borrowers are subject to...

  15. 19 CFR 148.103 - Family grouping of allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... allowance shall not include an allowance for a family member not entitled to it in his own right, nor shall a group allowance be applied to any property of that member. (b) Members of a family residing in one... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family grouping of allowances. 148.103 Section...

  16. Managing troubled data: Coastal data partnerships smooth data integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, S.S.; Hale, Miglarese A.; Bradley, M.P.; Belton, T.J.; Cooper, L.D.; Frame, M.T.; Friel, C.A.; Harwell, L.M.; King, R.E.; Michener, W.K.; Nicolson, D.T.; Peterjohn, B.G.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the ecology, condition, and changes of coastal areas requires data from many sources. Broad-scale and long-term ecological questions, such as global climate change, biodiversity, and cumulative impacts of human activities, must be addressed with databases that integrate data from several different research and monitoring programs. Various barriers, including widely differing data formats, codes, directories, systems, and metadata used by individual programs, make such integration troublesome. Coastal data partnerships, by helping overcome technical, social, and organizational barriers, can lead to a better understanding of environmental issues, and may enable better management decisions. Characteristics of successful data partnerships include a common need for shared data, strong collaborative leadership, committed partners willing to invest in the partnership, and clear agreements on data standards and data policy. Emerging data and metadata standards that become widely accepted are crucial. New information technology is making it easier to exchange and integrate data. Data partnerships allow us to create broader databases than would be possible for any one organization to create by itself.

  17. Managing troubled data: coastal data partnerships smooth data integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Stephen S; Miglarese, Anne Hale; Bradley, M Patricia; Belton, Thomas J; Cooper, Larry D; Frame, Michael T; Friel, Christopher A; Harwell, Linda M; King, Robert E; Michener, William K; Nicolson, David T; Peterjohn, Bruce G

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the ecology, condition, and changes of coastal areas requires data from many sources. Broad-scale and long-term ecological questions, such as global climate change, biodiversity, and cumulative impacts of human activities, must be addressed with databases that integrate data from several different research and monitoring programs. Various barriers, including widely differing data formats, codes, directories, systems, and metadata used by individual programs, make such integration troublesome. Coastal data partnerships, by helping overcome technical, social, and organizational barriers, can lead to a better understanding of environmental issues, and may enable better management decisions. Characteristics of successful data partnerships include a common need for shared data, strong collaborative leadership, committed partners willing to invest in the partnership, and clear agreements on data standards and data policy. Emerging data and metadata standards that become widely accepted are crucial. New information technology is making it easier to exchange and integrate data. Data partnerships allow us to create broader databases than would be possible for any one organization to create by itself.

  18. Coal sulfur-premium models for SO2 allowance valuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clean Air Capital Markets, an investment bank structuring SO2 Allowance transactions, has designed two allowance value models. The first forecasts an equilibrium allowance value based on coal supply and demand. The second estimates the sulfur premium of all reported coal deliveries to utilities. Both models demonstrate that the fundamental allowance value is approximately double current spot market prices for small volumes of off-system allowances

  19. Architectural Barriers Removal: Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Human Development (DHEW), Washington, DC. Office for Handicapped Individuals.

    The guide presents information on resources for eliminating architectural barriers for handicapped persons. Entries are grouped according to information resources, funding sources, and publications available from the federal government. Seven organizations are described in terms of agency goals, publications, and materials. Federal programs…

  20. Injectable barriers for waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the authors report laboratory work and numerical simulation done in support of development and demonstration of injectable barriers formed from either of two fluids: colloidal silica or polysiloxane. Two principal problems addressed here are control of gel time and control of plume emplacement in the vadose zone. Gel time must be controlled so that the viscosity of the barrier fluid remains low long enough to inject the barrier, but increases soon enough to gel the barrier in place. During injection, the viscosity must be low enough to avoid high injection pressures which could uplift or fracture the formation. To test the grout gel time in the soil, the injection pressure was monitored as grouts were injected into sandpacks. When grout is injected into the vadose zone, it slumps under the influence of gravity, and redistributes due to capillary forces as it gels. The authors have developed a new module for the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 to model grout injection into the vadose zone, taking into account the increase of liquid viscosity as a function of gel concentration and time. They have also developed a model to calculate soil properties after complete solidification of the grout. The numerical model has been used to design and analyze laboratory experiments and field pilot tests. The authors present the results of computer simulations of grout injection, redistribution, and solidification

  1. Injectable barriers for waste isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Apps, J.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Muller, S.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-03-01

    In this paper the authors report laboratory work and numerical simulation done in support of development and demonstration of injectable barriers formed from either of two fluids: colloidal silica or polysiloxane. Two principal problems addressed here are control of gel time and control of plume emplacement in the vadose zone. Gel time must be controlled so that the viscosity of the barrier fluid remains low long enough to inject the barrier, but increases soon enough to gel the barrier in place. During injection, the viscosity must be low enough to avoid high injection pressures which could uplift or fracture the formation. To test the grout gel time in the soil, the injection pressure was monitored as grouts were injected into sandpacks. When grout is injected into the vadose zone, it slumps under the influence of gravity, and redistributes due to capillary forces as it gels. The authors have developed a new module for the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 to model grout injection into the vadose zone, taking into account the increase of liquid viscosity as a function of gel concentration and time. They have also developed a model to calculate soil properties after complete solidification of the grout. The numerical model has been used to design and analyze laboratory experiments and field pilot tests. The authors present the results of computer simulations of grout injection, redistribution, and solidification.

  2. Overcoming Barriers: Women in Superintendency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Claire M.

    2009-01-01

    Women currently represent the largest number of teachers in the United States but remain underrepresented in the superintendent position. This suggests that the superintendency has been influenced by patriarchy. If women are to break through the barriers that prevent them from attaining a superintendency, we will need to understand the social…

  3. Communities Address Barriers to Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Anne

    1996-01-01

    Rural areas lag behind urban areas in access to information technologies. Public institutions play a critical role in extending the benefits of information technologies to those who would not otherwise have access. The most successful rural telecommunications plans address barriers to use, such as unawareness of the benefits, technophobia, the…

  4. Crossing the barrier: treatment of brain tumors using nanochain particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Ghaghada, Ketan B

    2016-09-01

    Despite advancements in surgery and radiotherapy, the aggressive forms of brain tumors, such as gliomas, are still uniformly lethal with current therapies offering only palliation complicated by significant toxicities. Gliomas are characteristically diffuse with infiltrating edges, resistant to drugs and nearly inaccessible to systemic therapies due to the brain-tumor barrier. Currently, aggressive efforts are underway to further understand brain-tumor's microenvironment and identify brain tumor cell-specific regulators amenable to pharmacologic interventions. While new potent agents are continuously becoming available, efficient drug delivery to brain tumors remains a limiting factor. To tackle the drug delivery issues, a multicomponent chain-like nanoparticle has been developed. These nanochains are comprised of iron oxide nanospheres and a drug-loaded liposome chemically linked into a 100-nm linear, chain-like assembly with high precision. The nanochain possesses a unique ability to scavenge the tumor endothelium. By utilizing effective vascular targeting, the nanochains achieve rapid deposition on the vascular bed of glioma sites establishing well-distributed drug reservoirs on the endothelium of brain tumors. After reaching the target sites, an on-command, external low-power radiofrequency field can remotely trigger rapid drug release, due to mechanical disruption of the liposome, facilitating widespread and effective drug delivery into regions harboring brain tumor cells. Integration of the nanochain delivery system with the appropriate combination of complementary drugs has the potential to unfold the field and allow significant expansion of therapies for the disease where success is currently very limited. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:678-695. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1387 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  5. Crossing the barrier: treatment of brain tumors using nanochain particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Ghaghada, Ketan B

    2016-09-01

    Despite advancements in surgery and radiotherapy, the aggressive forms of brain tumors, such as gliomas, are still uniformly lethal with current therapies offering only palliation complicated by significant toxicities. Gliomas are characteristically diffuse with infiltrating edges, resistant to drugs and nearly inaccessible to systemic therapies due to the brain-tumor barrier. Currently, aggressive efforts are underway to further understand brain-tumor's microenvironment and identify brain tumor cell-specific regulators amenable to pharmacologic interventions. While new potent agents are continuously becoming available, efficient drug delivery to brain tumors remains a limiting factor. To tackle the drug delivery issues, a multicomponent chain-like nanoparticle has been developed. These nanochains are comprised of iron oxide nanospheres and a drug-loaded liposome chemically linked into a 100-nm linear, chain-like assembly with high precision. The nanochain possesses a unique ability to scavenge the tumor endothelium. By utilizing effective vascular targeting, the nanochains achieve rapid deposition on the vascular bed of glioma sites establishing well-distributed drug reservoirs on the endothelium of brain tumors. After reaching the target sites, an on-command, external low-power radiofrequency field can remotely trigger rapid drug release, due to mechanical disruption of the liposome, facilitating widespread and effective drug delivery into regions harboring brain tumor cells. Integration of the nanochain delivery system with the appropriate combination of complementary drugs has the potential to unfold the field and allow significant expansion of therapies for the disease where success is currently very limited. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:678-695. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1387 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26749497

  6. Lower-Temperature Invert Design For Diffusion Barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this analysis is to advance the state of the subsurface facilities design to primarily support the ''Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report'' (DOE 2001) and to also support the preparation and revision of System Description Document's Section 2 system descriptions (CRWMS M and O 2001, pp. 9 and 11). The results may also eventually support the License Application (CRWMS M and O 2001, p. 3). The Performance Assessment Department will be the primary user of the information generated and will be used in abstraction modeling for the lower-temperature scenario (CRWMS M and O 200 1, p. 27). This analysis will evaluate the invert relative to the lower- and higher-temperature conditions in accordance with the primary tasks below. Invert design is a major factor in allowing water entering the drift to pass freely and enter the drift floor without surface ponding and in limiting diffusive transport into the host rock. Specific cost effective designs will be conceptualized under the new lower-temperature conditions in this analysis. Interfacing activities and all aspects of Integrated Safety Management and Nuclear Culture principles are included in this work scope by adhering to the respective principles during this design activity and by incorporating safety into the design analysis (CRWMS M and O 2001, p. 8). Primary tasks of this analysis include identifying available design information from existing sources on the invert as a diffusive barrier, developing concepts that reduce the amount steel, and developing other design features that accommodate both lower- and higher-temperature operating modes (CRWMS M and O 2001, p.16)

  7. Road Safety Barriers, the Need and Influence on Road Traffic Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butāns, Ž.; Gross, K. A.; Gridnevs, A.; Karzubova, E.

    2015-11-01

    Constantly increasing intensity of road traffic and the allowed speed limits seem to impose stronger requirements on road infrastructure and use of road safety systems. One of the ways to improve road safety is the use of road restraint systems. Road safety barriers allow not only reducing the number of road traffic accidents, but also lowering the severity of accidents. The paper provides information on the technical requirements of road safety barriers. Various types of road safety barriers and their selection criteria for different types of road sections are discussed. The article views an example of a road traffic accident, which is also modelled by PC-Crash computer program. The given example reflects a road accident mechanism in case of a car-to-barrier collision, and provides information about the typical damage to the car and the barrier. The paper describes an impact of the road safety barrier type and its presence on the road traffic accident mechanism. Implementation and maintenance costs of different barrier types are viewed. The article presents a discussion on the necessity to use road safety barriers, as well as their optimal choice.

  8. Hole spins in quantum dot molecules: novel tuning by GaBiAs barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Jackson; Bryant, Garnett; Doty, Matthew

    Hole spins in semiconductor quantum dots (QD) are promising qubits. Tunneling in vertical quantum dot molecules (QDM) provides additional freedom to use fields to manipulate hole g-factors and induce spin mixing. Interdot barriers made from GaBiAs should provide novel opportunities to further engineer these hole spin properties, because heavy- and light-holes in GaBiAs are modified by the Bi concentration without affecting conduction electrons or split off bands. For low Bi concentrations, GaBiAs provides a lower barrier for hole tunneling, allowing hole tunneling more comparable to electron tunneling and enhancing opportunities for g-factor modification. We use atomistic tight-binding theory for InAs QDMs with GaBiAs in the interdot barrier to assess the utility of this barrier material. We model the alloy barrier regions both with the virtual crystal approximation and with random realizations of atomic configurations for the alloy region in the barrier. Results are presented for electron and hole energies in QDMs with GaBiAs barriers as a function of applied electric and magnetic fields. These results allow us to quantify g-factor modification and hole-spin mixing in asymmetric structures to show how different GaBiAs barrier configurations modify hole spin physics in QDMs.

  9. Breaking wheat yield barriers requires integrated efforts in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most yield progress obtained through the so called “green revolution”, particularly in the irrigated areas of Asia, has reached a limit, and major resistance genes are quickly overcome by the appearance of new strains of disease causing organisms. New plant stresses due to a changing environment are...

  10. The Invisible Barrier to Integrating Computer Technology in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflalo, Ester

    2014-01-01

    The article explores contradictions in teachers' perceptions regarding the place of computer technologies in education. The research population included 47 teachers who have incorporated computers in the classroom for several years. The teachers expressed positive attitudes regarding the decisive importance of computer technologies in furthering…

  11. Breaking wheat yield barriers requires integrated efforts in developing countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saeed Rauf; Maria Zaharieva; Marilyn L Warburton; ZHANG Ping-zhi; Abdullah M AL-Sadi; Farghama Khalil; Marcin Kozak; Sultan A Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Most yield progress obtained through the so cal ed“Green Revolution”, particularly in the irrigated areas of Asia, has reached a limit, and major resistance genes are quickly overcome by the appearance of new strains of disease causing organisms. New plant stresses due to a changing environment are dififcult to breed for as quickly as the changes occur. There is con-sequently a continual need for new research programs and breeding strategies aimed at improving yield potential, abiotic stress tolerance and resistance to new, major pests and diseases. Recent advances in plant breeding encompass novel methods of expanding genetic variability and selecting for recombinants, including the development of synthetic hexaploid, hybrid and transgenic wheats. In addition, the use of molecular approaches such as quantitative trait locus (QTL) and asso-ciation mapping may increase the possibility of directly selecting positive chromosomal regions linked with natural variation for grain yield and stress resistance. The present article reviews the potential contribution of these new approaches and tools to the improvement of wheat yield in farmer’s ifelds, with a special emphasis on the Asian countries, which are major wheat producers, and contain the highest concentration of resource-poor wheat farmers.

  12. Effect of electric barrier on passage and physical condition of juvenile and adult rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layhee, Megan J.; Sepulveda, Adam; Shaw, Amy; Smuckall, Matthew; Kapperman, Kevin; Reyes, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Electric barriers can inhibit passage and injure fish. Few data exist on electric barrier parameters that minimize these impacts and on how body size affects susceptibility, especially to nontarget fish species. The goal of this study was to determine electric barrier voltage and pulse-width settings that inhibit passage of larger bodied rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (215–410 mm fork length) while allowing passage of smaller bodied juvenile rainbow trout (52–126 mm) in a static laboratory setting. We exposed rainbow trout to 30-Hz pulsed-direct current voltage gradients (0.00–0.45 V cm−1) and pulse widths (0.0–0.7 ms) and recorded their movement, injury incidence, and mortality. No settings tested allowed all juveniles to pass while impeding all adult passage. Juvenile and adult rainbow trout avoided the barrier at higher pulse widths, and fewer rainbow trout passed the barrier at 0.7-ms pulse width compared to 0.1 ms and when the barrier was turned off. We found no effect of voltage gradient on fish passage. No mortality occurred, and we observed external bruising in 5 (7%) juvenile rainbow trout and 15 (21%) adult rainbow trout. This study may aid managers in selecting barrier settings that allow for increased juvenile passage.

  13. A unified approach to problems of scattering of surface water waves by vertical barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabarti, A; Banerjea, S; Mandal, BN; Sahoo, T

    1997-01-01

    A unified analysis involving the solution of multiple integral equations via a simple singular integral equation with a Cauchy type kernel is presented to handle problems of surface water wave scattering by vertical barriers. Some well known results are produced in a simple and systematic manner.

  14. Thinking Allowed: Integrating Process and Genre into the Second Language Writing Classroom: Research into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racelis, Juval V.; Matsuda, Paul Kei

    2013-01-01

    The field of second language (L2) writing has moved beyond the false dichotomies between process- and genre-based pedagogies perpetuated in the 1980s and 1990s, but there has still been little research on how the two are actually reconciled in the classroom. Consequently, L2 writing instructors are left with an incomplete picture, unsure how to…

  15. AN INTEGRATED MAP OF HUMAN-CHROMOSOME-13 ALLOWING REGIONAL LOCALIZATION OF GENETIC-MARKERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOOY, RF; WIJNGAARD, A; VERLIND, E; SCHEFFER, H; BUYS, CHCM

    1995-01-01

    37 CA repeats, 5 STSs, 9 ESTs, and 4 genes were mapped to 19 different intervals of chromosome 13 determined by the cytogenetic breakpoints of 19 different cell lines with interstitial deletions or translocations involving various parts of chromosome 13. A framework genetic linkage map was construct

  16. AlzPharm: integration of neurodegeneration data using RDF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Perry

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroscientists often need to access a wide range of data sets distributed over the Internet. These data sets, however, are typically neither integrated nor interoperable, resulting in a barrier to answering complex neuroscience research questions. Domain ontologies can enable the querying heterogeneous data sets, but they are not sufficient for neuroscience since the data of interest commonly span multiple research domains. To this end, e-Neuroscience seeks to provide an integrated platform for neuroscientists to discover new knowledge through seamless integration of the very diverse types of neuroscience data. Here we present a Semantic Web approach to building this e-Neuroscience framework by using the Resource Description Framework (RDF and its vocabulary description language, RDF Schema (RDFS, as a standard data model to facilitate both representation and integration of the data. Results We have constructed a pilot ontology for BrainPharm (a subset of SenseLab using RDFS and then converted a subset of the BrainPharm data into RDF according to the ontological structure. We have also integrated the converted BrainPharm data with existing RDF hypothesis and publication data from a pilot version of SWAN (Semantic Web Applications in Neuromedicine. Our implementation uses the RDF Data Model in Oracle Database 10g release 2 for data integration, query, and inference, while our Web interface allows users to query the data and retrieve the results in a convenient fashion. Conclusion Accessing and integrating biomedical data which cuts across multiple disciplines will be increasingly indispensable and beneficial to neuroscience researchers. The Semantic Web approach we undertook has demonstrated a promising way to semantically integrate data sets created independently. It also shows how advanced queries and inferences can be performed over the integrated data, which are hard to achieve using traditional data integration

  17. Barriers to Physical Activity Among Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Miranda A; Brittain, Danielle R; Dinger, Mary K; Ford, Melissa L; Cain, Meagan; Sharp, Teresa A

    2016-09-01

    Gay men may not be physically active at recommended levels to achieve health benefits. Thus, a need exists to identify general (i.e., common across populations) and population-specific barriers that hinder or stop gay men from participating in physical activity (PA). Salient barriers may be identified through the extent each barrier limits PA (i.e., barrier limitation) and the level of one's confidence to overcome barriers and engage in PA (i.e., self-regulatory efficacy). The purposes of this study were to (1) provide a description of general and population-specific barriers to PA among sufficiently and insufficiently active gay men, (2) identify barrier limitation and self-regulatory efficacy for the reported barriers, and (3) examine the associations between meeting the current PA recommendation, barrier limitation, and self-regulatory efficacy. Participants were 108 self-identified gay males aged 21 to 64 years who completed a web-based survey. A total of 35 general barriers and no population-specific barriers were identified by the sufficiently and insufficiently active groups. The sufficiently active group reported higher self-regulatory efficacy and lower barrier limitation for nearly all reported barriers. A binary logistic regression used to examine the associations between PA, barrier limitation, and self-regulatory efficacy was statistically significant, χ(2)(2, N = 108) = 19.26, p < .0001, R(2) = .16. Only barrier limitation significantly contributed to the model. Future research should continue to examine barriers to PA among gay men to determine whether an intervention needs to be designed specifically for gay men or whether a one-size-fits-all intervention would be effective in helping all men overcome common barriers to engaging in PA. PMID:25643585

  18. Modelling of textile reinforced composite barriers against electromagnetic radiations

    OpenAIRE

    López Caro, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The advent of conductive textiles has allowed the design of much more lightweight and cheaper electromagnetic barriers than used to be with wire mesh and compact materials. Although nowadays it is possible to calculate the Shielding Effectiveness (SE) for wire mesh and compact shields, in case of conductive textiles the scenario becomes more complex. The aim of this work is to find a mathematical model dependent on frequency to determine the Shielding Effectiveness (SE) of several composit...

  19. Renewable Energy Adoption in Germany - Drivers, Barriers and Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Rode, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with renewable energy adoption in Germany. We exploit a unique dataset which includes the location, date of installation and size of all photovoltaic systems, wind power plants and biomass plants for generating electricity installed in Germany through 2011. Importantly, a strong federal subsidy scheme has fostered the adoption of the three technologies since 2000. Panel data analyses on different levels of geographical aggregation allow us to identify drivers, barriers and i...

  20. Next generation of non-mammalian blood-brain barrier models to study parasitic infections of the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Edwards-Smallbone, James; Flynn, Robin; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Transmigration of neuropathogens across the blood-brain barrier is a key step in the development of central nervous system infections, making it a prime target for drug development. The ability of neuropathogens to traverse the blood-brain barrier continues to inspire researchers to understand the specific strategies and molecular mechanisms that allow them to enter the brain. The availability of models of the blood-brain barrier that closely mimic the situation in vivo offers unprecedented o...

  1. The complex influences of back-barrier deposition, substrate slope and underlying stratigraphy in barrier island response to sea-level rise: Insights from the Virginia Barrier Islands, Mid-Atlantic Bight, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Owen T.; Moore, Laura J.; Murray, A. Brad

    2015-10-01

    To understand the relative importance of back barrier environment, substrate slope and underlying stratigraphy in determining barrier island response to RSLR (relative sea-level rise), we use a morphological-behavior model (GEOMBEST) to conduct a series of sensitivity experiments, based on late-Holocene hindcast simulations of an island in the U.S. mid-Atlantic Bight (Metompkin Island, VA) having both salt marsh and lagoonal back-barrier environments, and we draw comparisons between these results and future simulations (2000-2100 AD) of island response to RSLR. Sensitivity analyses indicate that, as a whole, the island is highly sensitive to factors that reduce overall sand availability (i.e., high sand-loss rates and substrates containing little sand). Results also indicate that for all predicted future RSLR scenarios tested, islands having high substrate sand proportions (if allowed to migrate freely) will likely remain subaerial for centuries because of sufficient substrate sand supply and elevation to assist in keeping islands above sea level. Simulation results also lead to basic insights regarding the interactions among substrate slope, back-barrier deposition and island migration rates. In contrast to previous studies, which suggest that changes in substrate slope directly affect the island migration trajectory, we find that-in the presence of back-barrier deposition-the connection between substrate slope and island behavior is modulated (i.e., variability in migration rates is dampened) by changes in back-barrier width. These interactions-which tend to produce changes in shoreface sand content-lead to a negative feedback when the back-barrier deposit contains less sand than the underlying layer, resulting in a stable back-barrier width. Alternatively, a positive feedback arises when the back-barrier deposit contains more sand than the underlying layer, resulting in either back-barrier disappearance or perpetual widening.

  2. Patient advocacy: barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikravesh Mansoure

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the two recent decades, advocacy has been a topic of much debate in the nursing profession. Although advocacy has embraced a crucial role for nurses, its extent is often limited in practice. While a variety of studies have been generated all over the world, barriers and facilitators in the patient advocacy have not been completely identified. This article presents the findings of a study exploring the barriers and facilitators influencing the role of advocacy among Iranian nurses. Method This study was conducted by grounded theory method. Participants were 24 Iranian registered nurses working in a large university hospital in Tehran, Iran. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and simultaneously Constant comparative analysis was used according to the Strauss and Corbin method. Results Through data analysis, several main themes emerged to describe the factors that hindered or facilitated patient advocacy. Nurses in this study identified powerlessness, lack of support, law, code of ethics and motivation, limited communication, physicians leading, risk of advocacy, royalty to peers, and insufficient time to interact with patients and families as barriers to advocacy. As for factors that facilitated nurses to act as a patient advocate, it was found that the nature of nurse-patient relationship, recognizing patients' needs, nurses' responsibility, physician as a colleague, and nurses' knowledge and skills could be influential in adopting the advocacy role. Conclusion Participants believed that in this context taking an advocacy role is difficult for nurses due to the barriers mentioned. Therefore, they make decisions and act as a patient's advocate in any situation concerning patient needs and status of barriers and facilitators. In most cases, they can not act at an optimal level; instead they accept only what they can do, which we called 'limited advocacy' in

  3. Ultrasonic wave transducer for high temperature barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This transducer is made by a metallic body pivoting on a support fixed to the barrier and an internal vitroceramic waveguide in contact on the barrier and on the other end on a piezoelectric ceramic element

  4. Overcoming Barriers to Shared Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... team to break it down. Barriers to shared decision making and solutions to overcome them include: Barrier: Fear, anger, stress or other emotions Solution: Strong emotions can interfere with your ability ...

  5. The Effects of information barrier requirements on the trilateral initiative attribute measurement system (AVNG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the detection techniques used for measuring classified materials are very similar to those used in unclassified measurements, the surrounding packaging is generally very different. If iZ classified item is to be measured, an information barrier is required to protect any classified data acquired. This information barrier must protect the classified information while giving the inspector confidence that the unclassified outputs accurately reflect the classified inputs, Both information barrier and authentication considerations must be considered during all phases of system design and fabrication. One example of such a measurement system is the attribute measurement system (termed the AVNG) designed for the: Trilateral Initiative. We will discuss the integration of information barrier components into this system as well as the effects of an information barrier (including authentication) concerns on the implementation of the detector systems.

  6. Magnetic Nanoparticles Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier: When Physics Rises to a Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antònia Busquets

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier is a physical and physiological barrier that protects the brain from toxic substances within the bloodstream and helps maintain brain homeostasis. It also represents the main obstacle in the treatment of many diseases of the central nervous system. Among the different approaches employed to overcome this barrier, the use of nanoparticles as a tool to enhance delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain is particularly promising. There is special interest in the use of magnetic nanoparticles, as their physical characteristics endow them with additional potentially useful properties. Following systemic administration, a magnetic field applied externally can mediate the capacity of magnetic nanoparticles to permeate the blood-brain barrier. Meanwhile, thermal energy released by magnetic nanoparticles under the influence of radiofrequency radiation can modulate blood-brain barrier integrity, increasing its permeability. In this review, we present the strategies that use magnetic nanoparticles, specifically iron oxide nanoparticles, to enhance drug delivery to the brain.

  7. 24 CFR 891.785 - Adjustment of utility allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjustment of utility allowances... Handicapped Families and Individuals-Section 162 Assistance § 891.785 Adjustment of utility allowances. In... adjustment of utility allowances provided in § 891.440 apply....

  8. 24 CFR 891.440 - Adjustment of utility allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjustment of utility allowances... Project Management § 891.440 Adjustment of utility allowances. This section shall apply to projects funded... submit an analysis of any utility allowances applicable. Such data as changes in utility rates and...

  9. 24 CFR 886.326 - Adjustment of utility allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjustment of utility allowances... utility allowances. When the owner requests HUD approval of an adjustment in Contract Rents under § 886.312, an analysis of the project's Utility Allowances must be included. Such data as changes in...

  10. 24 CFR 880.610 - Adjustment of utility allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjustment of utility allowances... Management § 880.610 Adjustment of utility allowances. In connection with annual and special adjustments of contract rents, the owner must submit an analysis of the project's Utility Allowances. Such data as...

  11. 24 CFR 886.126 - Adjustment of utility allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjustment of utility allowances... utility allowances. When the owner requests HUD approval of adjustment in Contract Rents under § 886.112, an analysis of the project's Utility Allowances must be included. Such data as changes in...

  12. 24 CFR 884.220 - Adjustment of utility allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjustment of utility allowances... Adjustment of utility allowances. In connection with annual and special adjustments of contract rents, the owner must submit an analysis of the project's Utility Allowances. Such data as changes in utility...

  13. 40 CFR 72.95 - Allowance deduction formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowance deduction formula. 72.95... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Compliance Certification § 72.95 Allowance deduction formula. The following formula shall be used to determine the total number of allowances to be deducted for the calendar...

  14. 45 CFR 1801.43 - Allowance for books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowance for books. 1801.43 Section 1801.43... HARRY S. TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM Payments to Finalists and Scholars § 1801.43 Allowance for books. The cost allowance for a Scholar's books is $1000 per year, or such higher amount published on...

  15. 40 CFR 97.42 - NOX allowance allocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX allowance allocations. 97.42... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Allocations § 97.42 NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The heat input (in mmBtu) used for calculating...

  16. 40 CFR 96.42 - NOX allowance allocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX allowance allocations. 96.42... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Allocations § 96.42 NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The heat input (in mmBtu) used...

  17. 40 CFR 74.49 - Calculation for deducting allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculation for deducting allowances. 74.49 Section 74.49 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR....49 Calculation for deducting allowances. (a) Allowance deduction formula. The following formula...

  18. 5 CFR 180.105 - Claims not allowed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Claims not allowed. 180.105 Section 180.105 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYEES' PERSONAL PROPERTY CLAIMS § 180.105 Claims not allowed. (a) A claim is not allowable if: (1) The damage...

  19. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  20. 40 CFR 96.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature and... accordance with this subpart. (b) Nature and function of general accounts. Consistent with § 96.51(b), the... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System...

  1. 7 CFR 52.810 - Allowances for quality factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowances for quality factors. 52.810 Section 52.810... for Quality Factors § 52.810 Allowances for quality factors. Table I—Allowances for Quality Factors Factor Sample unit size Maximum number permissible for the respective grade A B C Color: Vary markedly...

  2. 7 CFR 52.782 - Allowances for quality factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowances for quality factors. 52.782 Section 52.782... for Quality Factors § 52.782 Allowances for quality factors. Table IV—Allowances for Quality Factors Factor Sample unit size Maximum number permissible for the respective grade A A B B C C Pits 20 ozs...

  3. 42 CFR 61.37 - Stipends, allowances, and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... fellowship or series of service fellowships. (b) Travel and transportation allowances. Under conditions prescribed by the Secretary, an individual appointed as a service fellow may be authorized personal travel allowances or transportation and per diem, travel allowances or transportation for his or her...

  4. 78 FR 67465 - Loan Guaranty: Maximum Allowable Attorney Fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... AFFAIRS Loan Guaranty: Maximum Allowable Attorney Fees AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION... (VA) Home Loan Guaranty program concerning the maximum attorney fees allowable in calculating the... maximum attorney fees will be allowed for all loan terminations completed on or after December 12,...

  5. 41 CFR 101-27.503 - Allowable credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Allowable credit. 101-27...-Return of GSA Stock Items § 101-27.503 Allowable credit. Allowable credit for activities returning... condition of the material received. (a) Credit will be granted at the rate of 80 percent of the current...

  6. 32 CFR 842.35 - Depreciation and maximum allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Depreciation and maximum allowances. 842.35... LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Personnel Claims (31 U.S.C. 3701, 3721) § 842.35 Depreciation and maximum allowances. The military services have jointly established the “Allowance List-Depreciation Guide”...

  7. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  8. 46 CFR 54.25-5 - Corrosion allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-5 Corrosion allowance. The corrosion allowance must be as required in 46 CFR 54.01-35. ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion allowance. 54.25-5 Section 54.25-5...

  9. Factorization of Behavioral Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ximeng; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2015-01-01

    We develop a bisimulation-based nonintereference property that describes the allowed dependencies between communication behaviors of different integrity levels. The property is able to capture all possible combinations of integrity levels for the “presence” and “content” of actual communications....

  10. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTOR) pathway modulates blood-testis barrier (BTB) function through F-actin organization and gap junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-09-01

    mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) is one of the most important signaling molecules in mammalian cells which regulates an array of cellular events, ranging from cell metabolism to cell proliferation. Based on the association of mTOR with the core component proteins, such as Raptor or Rictor, mTOR can become the mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) or mTORC2, respectively. Studies have shown that during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis, mTORC1 promotes remodeling and restructuring of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) in vitro and in vivo, making the Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier "leaky"; whereas mTORC2 promotes BTB integrity, making the Sertoli cell TJ-barrier "tighter". These contrasting effects, coupled with the spatiotemporal expression of the core signaling proteins at the BTB that confer the respective functions of mTORC1 vs. mTORC2 thus provide a unique mechanism to modulate BTB dynamics, allowing or disallowing the transport of biomolecules and also preleptotene spermatocytes across the immunological barrier. More importantly, studies have shown that these changes to BTB dynamics conferred by mTORC1 and mTORC2 are mediated by changes in the organization of the actin microfilament networks at the BTB, and involve gap junction (GJ) intercellular communication. Since GJ has recently been shown to be crucial to reboot spermatogenesis and meiosis following toxicant-induced aspermatogenesis, these findings thus provide new insightful information regarding the integration of mTOR and GJ to regulate spermatogenesis. PMID:26957088

  11. Climate change mitigation options in the rural land use sector: Stakeholders’ perspectives on barriers, enablers and the role of policy in North East Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Farmers are mainly willing to expand the uptake of mitigation practices they already implement. • Main barriers and enablers to uptake are physical–environmental constraints and personal values. • Farmers consider that agriculture is a “special case” because their function is to produce food. • Lack of incentives is not the main barrier to the uptake of mitigation practices. • Policies should allow differentiation, and mitigation measures should be integrated with other mechanisms. - Abstract: The rural land use sector could potentially mitigate a large amount of GHG emissions. Implementation requires the engagement of farmers and other land managers. Understanding the barriers and enablers for the uptake of these practices is essential both to inform policy-makers and to achieve effective policy outreach. In Scotland, the rural land use sector is subject to a greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction target of 21% by 2020 relative to 1990 levels. This study contributes to the body of research on stakeholders’ perspectives about suitability of climate change mitigation practices at the regional level. Mixed-methods were used to collect the data, namely participatory workshops with scientists and relevant stakeholders, a farmer questionnaire, and focus groups with farmers. Findings show that farmers were mainly willing to expand the uptake of mitigation practices they were already implementing because they consider these are the most cost-effective. Barriers to the implementation of mitigation practices are mainly related to physical–environmental constraints, lack of information and education and personal interests and values. Similarly, enablers are also related to physical–environmental factors and personal interests and values. Economic incentives, voluntary approaches and provision of information have been identified by workshop participants as the most favourable approaches needed to promote the uptake of technically feasible

  12. Schottky Barrier with Liquid Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, B. P.; Patel, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    Schottky barrier with liquid metal may provide an attractive and new opportunity to look into various aspect of the evolution of Schottky interfaces in a relatively beneficial manner [1]. Here gallium-silicon diode has been fabricated and investigated especially around the melting point of gallium. Analysis of data no barrier height exhibits an anomalous change in the sense that there is a sharp deterioration in the rectifying nature near this temperature. It is believed to be related changes the phase transition driven physical process e.g. breaking of bonds both between gallium atoms and between gallium atoms and silicon interface; change from long range to short range order in gallium. Strain relaxations at the interface etc.

  13. Security barriers with automated reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, James O; Baird, Adam D; Tullis, Barclay J; Nolte, Roger Allen

    2015-04-07

    An intrusion delaying barrier includes primary and secondary physical structures and can be instrumented with multiple sensors incorporated into an electronic monitoring and alarm system. Such an instrumented intrusion delaying barrier may be used as a perimeter intrusion defense and assessment system (PIDAS). Problems with not providing effective delay to breaches by intentional intruders and/or terrorists who would otherwise evade detection are solved by attaching the secondary structures to the primary structure, and attaching at least some of the sensors to the secondary structures. By having multiple sensors of various types physically interconnected serves to enable sensors on different parts of the overall structure to respond to common disturbances and thereby provide effective corroboration that a disturbance is not merely a nuisance or false alarm. Use of a machine learning network such as a neural network exploits such corroboration.

  14. Regional Integration of Renewable Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this report is to show how Energetic Planning and Territorial Policy should be working together for a better integration of Renewable Energies into Region. This Integration should to contemplate social, economic and environmental aspects of the territory. The report has been classified into 7 items: planning, energetic scenarios, technology transfer for Renewable Energies dissemination, barriers for this dissemination, environmental aspects, European Union Policy and Decision Support Systems (and specially GIS). (Author) 54 refs

  15. Perceptions regarding strategic and structural entry barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutz, Clemens H. M.; Kemp, Ron G. M.; Dijkstra, S. Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the underlying dimensions of strategic and structural entry barriers. We find that, in the perception of firms, both types of barriers are important and that the effectiveness of strategic barriers depends on attributes of the market structure. Based on

  16. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  17. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography…

  18. Storm Surge Barrier: Overview and Design Considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooyaart, L.F.; Jonkman, S.N.; De Vries, P.A.L.; Van der Toorn, A.; Van Ledden, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study an overview of existing and planned storm surge barriers in the world is provided. A systematic analysis relates functional requirements (e.g. navigation and tidal exchange) to the main barrier characteristics (e.g. gate type, dimensions). Furthermore, as the costs of barriers are an i

  19. Market barriers to welfare product innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnekamp, M.H.A.; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    New products that are based on higher animal welfare standards encounter several barriers on the road to market acceptance. The authors focus on the Dutch poultry sector and distinguish between retailer and consumer barriers. Retailer barriers include the powerful position of retailers, the price co

  20. Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.